WorldWideScience

Sample records for film atom chip

  1. Atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a stimulating and multifaceted picture of a rapidly developing field. The first part reviews fundamentals of atom chip research in tutorial style, while subsequent parts focus on the topics of atom-surface interaction, coherence on atom chips, and possible future directions of atom chip research. The articles are written by leading researchers in the field in their characteristic and individual styles.

  2. Microtrap arrays on magnetic film atom chips for quantum information science.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, Y.F.V.; Tauschinsky, A.; van Druten, N.J.; Spreeuw, R.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    We present two different strategies for developing a quantum information science platform, based on our experimental results with magnetic microtrap arrays on a magnetic-film atom chip. The first strategy aims for mesoscopic ensemble qubits in a lattice of ~5 μm period, so that qubits can be individ

  3. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, V Y F; Pijn, D R M; Schlatter, H; Torralbo-Campo, L; La Rooij, A L; Mulder, G B; Naber, J; Soudijn, M L; Tauschinsky, A; Abarbanel, C; Hadad, B; Golan, E; Folman, R; Spreeuw, R J C

    2014-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold (87)Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  4. Magnetic-film atom chip with 10 μm period lattices of microtraps for quantum information science with Rydberg atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, V. Y. F. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, PO Box 94485, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Complex Photonic Systems (COPS), MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Pijn, D. R. M.; Schlatter, H.; Torralbo-Campo, L.; La Rooij, A. L.; Mulder, G. B.; Naber, J.; Soudijn, M. L.; Tauschinsky, A.; Spreeuw, R. J. C., E-mail: r.j.c.spreeuw@uva.nl [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, PO Box 94485, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Abarbanel, C.; Hadad, B.; Golan, E. [Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel); Folman, R. [Department of Physics and Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    We describe the fabrication and construction of a setup for creating lattices of magnetic microtraps for ultracold atoms on an atom chip. The lattice is defined by lithographic patterning of a permanent magnetic film. Patterned magnetic-film atom chips enable a large variety of trapping geometries over a wide range of length scales. We demonstrate an atom chip with a lattice constant of 10 μm, suitable for experiments in quantum information science employing the interaction between atoms in highly excited Rydberg energy levels. The active trapping region contains lattice regions with square and hexagonal symmetry, with the two regions joined at an interface. A structure of macroscopic wires, cutout of a silver foil, was mounted under the atom chip in order to load ultracold {sup 87}Rb atoms into the microtraps. We demonstrate loading of atoms into the square and hexagonal lattice sections simultaneously and show resolved imaging of individual lattice sites. Magnetic-film lattices on atom chips provide a versatile platform for experiments with ultracold atoms, in particular for quantum information science and quantum simulation.

  5. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  6. Detecting Neutral Atoms on an Atom Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Wilzbach, M.; Haase, A.; Schwarz, M; Heine, D.; Wicker, K.; Liu, X; Brenner, K. -H.; Groth, S.; Fernholz, Th.; Hessmo, B.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Detecting single atoms (qubits) is a key requirement for implementing quantum information processing on an atom chip. The detector should ideally be integrated on the chip. Here we present and compare different methods capable of detecting neutral atoms on an atom chip. After a short introduction to fluorescence and absorption detection we discuss cavity enhanced detection of single atoms. In particular we concentrate on optical fiber based detectors such as fiber cavities and tapered fiber d...

  7. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  8. Optical lattice on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, D.; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2009-01-01

    Optical dipole traps and atom chips are two very powerful tools for the quantum manipulation of neutral atoms. We demonstrate that both methods can be combined by creating an optical lattice potential on an atom chip. A red-detuned laser beam is retroreflected using the atom chip surface as a high......-quality mirror, generating a vertical array of purely optical oblate traps. We transfer thermal atoms from the chip into the lattice and observe cooling into the two-dimensional regime. Using a chip-generated Bose-Einstein condensate, we demonstrate coherent Bloch oscillations in the lattice....

  9. Chiral atomically thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm-1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  10. Advanced atom chips with two metal layers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, James E.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Benito, Francisco M.; Biedermann, Grant

    2010-12-01

    A design concept, device layout, and monolithic microfabrication processing sequence have been developed for a dual-metal layer atom chip for next-generation positional control of ultracold ensembles of trapped atoms. Atom chips are intriguing systems for precision metrology and quantum information that use ultracold atoms on microfabricated chips. Using magnetic fields generated by current carrying wires, atoms are confined via the Zeeman effect and controllably positioned near optical resonators. Current state-of-the-art atom chips are single-layer or hybrid-integrated multilayer devices with limited flexibility and repeatability. An attractive feature of multi-level metallization is the ability to construct more complicated conductor patterns and thereby realize the complex magnetic potentials necessary for the more precise spatial and temporal control of atoms that is required. Here, we have designed a true, monolithically integrated, planarized, multi-metal-layer atom chip for demonstrating crossed-wire conductor patterns that trap and controllably transport atoms across the chip surface to targets of interest.

  11. Ex Vacuo Atom Chip Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC)

    CERN Document Server

    Squires, Matthew B; Kasch, Brian; Stickney, James A; Erickson, Christopher J; Crow, Jonathan A R; Carlson, Evan J; Burke, John H

    2016-01-01

    Ex vacuo atom chips, used in conjunction with a custom thin walled vacuum chamber, have enabled the rapid replacement of atom chips for magnetically trapped cold atom experiments. Atoms were trapped in $>2$ kHz magnetic traps created using high power atom chips. The thin walled vacuum chamber allowed the atoms to be trapped $\\lesssim1$ mm from the atom chip conductors which were located outside of the vacuum system. Placing the atom chip outside of the vacuum simplified the electrical connections and improved thermal management. Using a multi-lead Z-wire chip design, a Bose-Einstein condensate was produced with an external atom chip. Vacuum and optical conditions were maintained while replacing the Z-wire chip with a newly designed cross-wire chip. The atom chips were exchanged and an initial magnetic trap was achieved in less than three hours.

  12. Absorption imaging of ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David A.; Aigner, Simon; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Imaging ultracold atomic gases close to surfaces is an important tool for the detailed analysis of experiments carried out using atom chips. We describe the critical factors that need be considered, especially when the imaging beam is purposely reflected from the surface. In particular we present...... methods to measure the atom-surface distance, which is a prerequisite for magnetic field imaging and studies of atom surface-interactions....

  13. AC Zeeman potentials for atom chip-based ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancher, Charles; Pyle, Andrew; Ziltz, Austin; Aubin, Seth

    2015-05-01

    We present experimental and theoretical progress on using the AC Zeeman force produced by microwave magnetic near-fields from an atom chip to manipulate and eventually trap ultracold atoms. These AC Zeeman potentials are inherently spin-dependent and can be used to apply qualitatively different potentials to different spin states simultaneously. Furthermore, AC Zeeman traps are compatible with the large DC magnetic fields necessary for accessing Feshbach resonances. Applications include spin-dependent trapped atom interferometry and experiments in 1D many-body physics. Initial experiments and results are geared towards observing the bipolar detuning-dependent nature of the AC Zeeman force at 6.8 GHz with ultracold 87Rb atoms trapped in the vicinity of an atom chip. Experimental work is also underway towards working with potassium isotopes at frequencies of 1 GHz and below. Theoretical work is focused on atom chip designs for AC Zeeman traps produced by magnetic near-fields, while also incorporating the effect of the related electric near-fields. Electromagnetic simulations of atom chip circuits are used for mapping microwave propagation in on-chip transmission line structures, accounting for the skin effect, and guiding impedance matching.

  14. Atom Chip for Transporting and Merging Magnetically Trapped Atom Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Hänsel, W; Hommelhoff, P; Hänsch, T W

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated magnetic ``atom chip'' which transports cold trapped atoms near a surface with very high positioning accuracy. Time-dependent currents in a lithographic conductor pattern create a moving chain of magnetic potential wells; atoms are transported in these wells while remaining confined in all three dimensions. We achieve fluxes up to 10^6 /s with a negligible heating rate. An extension of this ``atomic conveyor belt'' allows the merging of magnetically trapped atom clouds by unification of two Ioffe-Pritchard potentials. Under suitable conditions, the clouds merge without loss of phase space density. We demonstrate this unification process experimentally.

  15. Tunable axial potentials for atom chip waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Stickney, James A; Imhof, Eric; Kroese, Bethany R; Crow, Jonathon A R; Olson, Spencer E; Squires, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for generating algebraically precise magnetic potentials along the axis of a cold atom waveguide near the surface of an atom chip. With a single chip design consisting of several wire pairs, various axial potentials can be created, including double wells, triple wells, and pure harmonic traps with suppression of higher order terms. We characterize the error along a harmonic trap between the expected algebraic form and magnetic field simulations and find excel- lent agreement, particularly at small displacements from the trap center. Finally, we demonstrate experimental control over the bottom fields of an asymmetric double well potential.

  16. Potential roughness near lithographically fabricated atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Andersson, L. M.; Wildermuth, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Potential roughness has been reported to severely impair experiments in magnetic microtraps. We show that these obstacles can be overcome as we measure disorder potentials that are reduced by two orders of magnitude near lithographically patterned high-quality gold layers on semiconductor atom chip...

  17. Atom chip based generation of entanglement for quantum metrology

    CERN Document Server

    Riedel, Max F; Li, Yun; Hänsch, Theodor W; Sinatra, Alice; Treutlein, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Atom chips provide a versatile `quantum laboratory on a microchip' for experiments with ultracold atomic gases. They have been used in experiments on diverse topics such as low-dimensional quantum gases, cavity quantum electrodynamics, atom-surface interactions, and chip-based atomic clocks and interferometers. A severe limitation of atom chips, however, is that techniques to control atomic interactions and to generate entanglement have not been experimentally available so far. Such techniques enable chip-based studies of entangled many-body systems and are a key prerequisite for atom chip applications in quantum simulations, quantum information processing, and quantum metrology. Here we report experiments where we generate multi-particle entanglement on an atom chip by controlling elastic collisional interactions with a state-dependent potential. We employ this technique to generate spin-squeezed states of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate and show that they are useful for quantum metrology. The obser...

  18. Generalized Liquid Film Atomization Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HeraldoS.Couto; DemetrioBastos-Netto

    2000-01-01

    The increase of the fuel burning area required by most practical combustion processes in order to guarantee the minimum energy density rate release for their start up and operation is normally achieved by the proper choice among several existing types of atomizers.For instance.impinging and multi-impinging jets atomizers are used in rocket combustion chambers.while splash-plate atomizers find their use when wall film cooling is required.Pressure swirl atomizers,either of simplex or duplex kind,along with Y-jet or SPider Jet atomizers are used in industrial applications and in turbine combustion chambers.Notice.however,that all the types of atomizing devices listed above have one point in common:they are of pre-filming kind.i.e.,befor the droplet spray is generated,a liquid film is formed.This liquid film is broken into unstable ligaments which contract under the action of surface tension forming the droplets.Once the film thickness is estimated.the droplets'SMD(Sauter Mean Diameter)can be calculated.yielding a crucial prameter for the combustion chamber design.However,although this mechanism of droplet fromation has been under study for several decades.most of the available results.are based upon experimental data.valid for a special type of atomizer under the given sepcific conditions only.This work offers a generalized theory for theoretically estimating the SMD of sprays generated by liquid pre-filming atomizers in gereral.

  19. films using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervinskii, Semen; Matikainen, Antti; Dergachev, Alexey; Lipovskii, Andrey A.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2014-08-01

    We fabricated self-assembled silver nanoisland films using a recently developed technique based on out-diffusion of silver from an ion-exchanged glass substrate in reducing atmosphere. We demonstrate that the position of the surface plasmon resonance of the films depends on the conditions of the film growth. The resonance can be gradually shifted up to 100 nm towards longer wavelengths by using atomic layer deposition of titania, from 3 to 100 nm in thickness, upon the film. Examination of the nanoisland films in surface-enhanced Raman spectrometry showed that, in spite of a drop of the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal after the titania spacer deposition, the Raman signal can be observed with spacers up to 7 nm in thickness. Denser nanoisland films show slower decay of the SERS signal with the increase in spacer thickness.

  20. Dynamic splitting and merging of an atom cloud on an atom chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Min; Yan Bo; Cheng Feng; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Chip-based atom interferometers bring together the advantages of atom chips and Bose-Einstein condensates. Their central prerequisite is that a condensate can be coherently split into two halves with a determined relative phase. This paper demonstrates the dynamical splitting and merging of an atom cloud with two U-wires on an atom chip. Symmetrical and asymmetrical splittings are realized by applying a bias field with different directions and magnitudes. The trajectories of the splitting are consistent with theoretical calculations. The atom chip is a good candidate for constructing an atom interferometer.

  1. On-chip optical detection of laser cooled atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto-Su, P; Tscherneck, M; Holmes, M; Bigelow, N

    2004-10-18

    We have used an optical fiber based system to implement optical detection of atoms trapped on a reflective "atom-chip". A fiber pair forms an emitter-detector setup that is bonded to the atom-chip surface to optically detect and probe laser cooled atoms trapped in a surface magneto-optical trap. We demonstrate the utility of this scheme by measuring the linewidth of the Cs D2 line at different laser intensities.

  2. On-chip optical trapping for atomic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maximillian A.; Salim, Evan; Farkas, Daniel; Duggan, Janet; Ivory, Megan; Anderson, Dana

    2014-09-01

    To simplify applications that rely on optical trapping of cold and ultracold atoms, ColdQuanta is developing techniques to incorporate miniature optical components onto in-vacuum atom chips. The result is a hybrid atom chip that combines an in-vacuum micro-optical bench for optical control with an atom chip for magnetic control. Placing optical components on a chip inside of the vacuum system produces a compact system that can be targeted to specific experiments, in this case the generation of optical lattices. Applications that can benefit from this technology include timekeeping, inertial sensing, gravimetry, quantum information, and emulation of quantum many-body systems. ColdQuanta's GlasSi atom chip technology incorporates glass windows in the plane of a silicon atom chip. In conjunction with the in-vacuum micro-optical bench, optical lattices can be generated within a few hundred microns of an atom chip window through which single atomic lattice sites can be imaged with sub-micron spatial resolution. The result is a quantum gas microscope that allows optical lattices to be studied at the level of single lattice sites. Similar to what ColdQuanta has achieved with magneto-optical traps (MOTs) in its miniMOT system and with Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs) in its RuBECi(R) system, ColdQuanta seeks to apply the on-chip optical bench technology to studies of optical lattices in a commercially available, turnkey system. These techniques are currently being considered for lattice experiments in NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) slated for flight on the International Space Station.

  3. Coherent matter wave optics on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2006-01-01

    Coherent manipulation of matter waves in microscopic trapping potentials facilitates both fundamental and technological applications. Here we focus on experiments with a microscopic integrated interferometer that demonstrate coherent operation on an atom chip.......Coherent manipulation of matter waves in microscopic trapping potentials facilitates both fundamental and technological applications. Here we focus on experiments with a microscopic integrated interferometer that demonstrate coherent operation on an atom chip....

  4. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.

  5. One-dimensional Bose gas on an atom chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    We describe experiments investigating the (coherence) properties of a finite-temperature one-dimensional (1D) Bose gas with repulsive interactions. The confining magnetic field is generated with a micro-electronic circuit. This microtrap for atoms or `atom chip' is particularly suited to generate a

  6. Fully permanent magnet atom chip for Bose-Einstein condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Fernholz; R. Gerritsma; S. Whitlock; I. Barb; R.J.C. Spreeuw

    2008-01-01

    We describe a proof-of-principle experiment on a fully permanent magnet atom chip. We study ultracold atoms and produce a Bose-Einstein condensate. The magnetic trap is loaded efficiently by adiabatic transport of a magnetic trap via the application of uniform external fields. Radio frequency spectr

  7. Electric field sensing near the surface microstructure of an atom chip using cold Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, J D; Martin, J D D

    2012-01-01

    The electric fields near the heterogeneous metal/dielectric surface of an atom chip were measured using cold atoms. The atomic sensitivity to electric fields was enhanced by exciting the atoms to Rydberg states that are 10^8 times more polarizable than the ground state. We attribute the measured fields to charging of the insulators between the atom chip wires. Surprisingly, it is observed that these fields may be dramatically lowered with appropriate voltage biasing, suggesting configurations for the future development of hybrid quantum systems.

  8. The Design, Fabrication and Characterization of a Transparent Atom Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Huang, Chia-Shiuan; Chen, Hung-Pin; Huang, Chi-Sheng; Lin, Yu-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the design and fabrication of transparent atom chips for atomic physics experiments. A fabrication process was developed to define the wire patterns on a transparent glass substrate to create the desired magnetic field for atom trapping experiments. An area on the chip was reserved for the optical access, so that the laser light can penetrate directly through the glass substrate for the laser cooling process. Furthermore, since the thermal conductivity of the glass substrate is poorer than other common materials for atom chip substrate, for example silicon, silicon carbide, aluminum nitride. Thus, heat dissipation copper blocks are designed on the front and back of the glass substrate to improve the electrical current conduction. The testing results showed that a maximum burnout current of 2 A was measured from the wire pattern (with a width of 100 μm and a height of 20 μm) without any heat dissipation design and it can increase to 2.5 A with a heat dissipation design on the front side of the atom chips. Therefore, heat dissipation copper blocks were designed and fabricated on the back of the glass substrate just under the wire patterns which increases the maximum burnout current to 4.5 A. Moreover, a maximum burnout current of 6 A was achieved when the entire backside glass substrate was recessed and a thicker copper block was electroplated, which meets most requirements of atomic physics experiments. PMID:24922456

  9. The Design, Fabrication and Characterization of a Transparent Atom Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Chiao Chuang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the design and fabrication of transparent atom chips for atomic physics experiments. A fabrication process was developed to define the wire patterns on a transparent glass substrate to create the desired magnetic field for atom trapping experiments. An area on the chip was reserved for the optical access, so that the laser light can penetrate directly through the glass substrate for the laser cooling process. Furthermore, since the thermal conductivity of the glass substrate is poorer than other common materials for atom chip substrate, for example silicon, silicon carbide, aluminum nitride. Thus, heat dissipation copper blocks are designed on the front and back of the glass substrate to improve the electrical current conduction. The testing results showed that a maximum burnout current of 2 A was measured from the wire pattern (with a width of 100 μm and a height of 20 μm without any heat dissipation design and it can increase to 2.5 A with a heat dissipation design on the front side of the atom chips. Therefore, heat dissipation copper blocks were designed and fabricated on the back of the glass substrate just under the wire patterns which increases the maximum burnout current to 4.5 A. Moreover, a maximum burnout current of 6 A was achieved when the entire backside glass substrate was recessed and a thicker copper block was electroplated, which meets most requirements of atomic physics experiments.

  10. A double well interferometer on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumm, Thorsten; Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.

    2006-01-01

    Radio-Frequency coupling between magnetically trapped atomic states allows to create versatile adiabatic dressed state potentials for neutral atom manipulation. Most notably, a single magnetic trap can be split into a double well by controlling amplitude and frequency of an oscillating magnetic...... field. We use this to build an integrated matter wave interferometer on an atom chip. Transverse splitting of quasi one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates over a wide range from 3 to 80 μm is demonstrated, accessing the tunnelling regime as well as completely isolated sites. By recombining the two...... the splitting process. RF induced potentials are especially suited for integrated micro manipulation of neutral atoms on atom chips: designing appropriate wire patterns enables control over the created potentials to the (nanometer) precision of the fabrication process. Additionally, hight local RF amplitudes...

  11. Adsorbate Electric Fields on a Cryogenic Atom Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, K S; Hufnagel, C; Dumke, R

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the behaviour of electric fields originating from adsorbates deposited on a cryogenic atom chip as it is cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Using Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency we measure the field strength versus distance from a 1 mm square of YBCO patterned onto a YSZ chip substrate. We find a localized and stable dipole field at room temperature and attribute it to a saturated layer of chemically adsorbed rubidium atoms on the YBCO. As the chip is cooled towards 83 K we observe a change in sign of the electric field as well as a transition from a localized to a delocalized dipole density. We relate these changes to the onset of physisorption on the chip surface when the van der Waals attraction overcomes the thermal desorption mechanisms. Our findings suggest that, through careful selection of substrate materials, it may be possible to reduce the electric fields caused by atomic adsorption on chips, opening up experiments to controlled Rydberg-surface co...

  12. Magneto-optical Trapping through a Transparent Silicon Carbide Atom Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Huet, Landry; Morvan, Erwan; Sarazin, Nicolas; Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Reichel, Jakob; Guerlin, Christine; Schwartz, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of trapping about one hundred million rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap with several of the beams passing through a transparent atom chip mounted on a vacuum cell wall. The chip is made of a gold microcircuit deposited on a silicon carbide substrate, with favorable thermal conductivity. We show how a retro-reflected configuration can efficiently address the chip birefringence issues, allowing atom trapping at arbitrary distances from the chip. We also demonstrate detection through the chip, granting a large numerical aperture. This configuration is compared to other atom chip devices, and some possible applications are discussed.

  13. Controllable Magnetic Focusing of Cold Atoms on a Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; YUN Min; YIN Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a new lens scheme to focus cold atoms by using a controllable inhomogeneous magnetic field from a square current-carrying wire fabricated on a chip. The spatial distributions of the magnetic field are calculated, and the results show that the generated magnetic field is a two-dimensional (2D) quadrupole one and can be used to focus cold atoms or a cold atomic beam. The dynamic processes of cold atoms passing through our square wire layout and its focusing properties are studied by using Monte Carlo simulations. Our study shows that the atomic clouds can be focused effectively by our magnetic lens scheme, and the focal lengthof the atomic lens and its radius of focused spot can be continuously changed by adjusting the current in the wires.

  14. A Multi-Path Interferometer on an Atom Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovic, Jovana; Lombardi, Pietro; Cataliotti, Francesco S

    2011-01-01

    Cold-atom interferometry is a powerful tool for high-precision measurements of the quantum properties of atoms, many-body interactions and gravity. Further enhancement of sensitivity and reduction of complexity of these devices are crucial conditions for success of their applications. Here we introduce a multi-path interferometric scheme that offers advances in both these aspects. It uses coherent coupling between Bose-Einstein condensates in different Zeeman states to generate an interferometric signal with sharp fringes. We realise such an interferometer as a compact easy-to-use atom-chip device and thus provide an alternative method for measurement of the light-atom and surface-atom interactions.

  15. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  16. Perovskite thin films via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brandon R; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Adachi, Michael M; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Wong, Chris T O; McDowell, Jeffrey J; Xu, Jixian; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Ning, Zhijun; Houtepen, Arjan J; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm(-1) .

  17. Nanoscale magnetic atom chips for quantum simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Rooij, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis consists of five chapters that describe the different things that I have done in the past few years which all concern my effort to create lattices of ultracold gaseous atoms at length-scales of approximately 100 nano-meters (a millionth of a decimeter, or 200 times smaller than the diame

  18. Atom chip apparatus for experiments with ultracold rubidium and potassium gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivory, M. K.; Ziltz, A. R.; Fancher, C. T.; Pyle, A. J.; Sensharma, A.; Chase, B.; Field, J. P.; Garcia, A.; Aubin, S., E-mail: saaubi@wm.edu [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Jervis, D. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    We present a dual chamber atom chip apparatus for generating ultracold {sup 87}Rb and {sup 39}K atomic gases. The apparatus produces quasi-pure Bose-Einstein condensates of 10{sup 4} {sup 87}Rb atoms in an atom chip trap that features a dimple and good optical access. We have also demonstrated production of ultracold {sup 39}K and subsequent loading into the chip trap. We describe the details of the dual chamber vacuum system, the cooling lasers, the magnetic trap, the multicoil magnetic transport system, the atom chip, and two optical dipole traps. Due in part to the use of light-induced atom desorption, the laser cooling chamber features a sufficiently good vacuum to also support optical dipole trap-based experiments. The apparatus is well suited for studies of atom-surface forces, quantum pumping and transport experiments, atom interferometry, novel chip-based traps, and studies of one-dimensional many-body systems.

  19. Atom chip apparatus for experiments with ultracold rubidium and potassium gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, M K; Ziltz, A R; Fancher, C T; Pyle, A J; Sensharma, A; Chase, B; Field, J P; Garcia, A; Jervis, D; Aubin, S

    2014-04-01

    We present a dual chamber atom chip apparatus for generating ultracold (87)Rb and (39)K atomic gases. The apparatus produces quasi-pure Bose-Einstein condensates of 10(4) (87)Rb atoms in an atom chip trap that features a dimple and good optical access. We have also demonstrated production of ultracold (39)K and subsequent loading into the chip trap. We describe the details of the dual chamber vacuum system, the cooling lasers, the magnetic trap, the multicoil magnetic transport system, the atom chip, and two optical dipole traps. Due in part to the use of light-induced atom desorption, the laser cooling chamber features a sufficiently good vacuum to also support optical dipole trap-based experiments. The apparatus is well suited for studies of atom-surface forces, quantum pumping and transport experiments, atom interferometry, novel chip-based traps, and studies of one-dimensional many-body systems.

  20. Ultracold Rubidium and Potassium System for Atom Chip-based Microwave and RF Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziltz, Austin R.

    In this dissertation we study the development of microwave and RF near-field potentials for use with atom chip trapped atomic gases. These potentials are inherently spin-dependent, able to target individual spin states simultaneously. In contrast with traditional atom chip potentials, these RF traps can be operated at arbitrary bias magnetic field strengths and thus be combined with magnetic Feshbach resonances. Furthermore, these potentials can strongly suppress the potential roughness that plagues traditional atom chip potentials. We present a dual chamber atom chip apparatus for generating ultracold 87Rb and 39K atomic gases. The apparatus produces quasi-pure Bose-Einstein condensates of 104 87Rb atoms in an atom chip trap that features a dimple and good optical access. We have also demonstrated production of ultracold 39K and subsequent loading into the chip trap. We describe the details of the dual chamber vacuum system, the cooling lasers, the magnetic trap, the multi coil magnetic transport system, and the atom chip. The apparatus is well suited for studies of atom-surface forces, quantum pumping and transport experiments, atom interferometry, novel chip-based traps, and studies of one-dimensional many-body systems.

  1. Efficient Direct Evaporative Cooling in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, Daniel M; Du, Shengwang; Anderson, Dana

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate direct evaporative cooling of $^{87}$Rb atoms confined in a dimple trap produced by an atom chip. By changing the two chip currents and two external bias fields, we show theoretically that the trap depth can be lowered in a controlled way with no change in the trap frequencies or the value of the field at the trap center. Experimentally, we maximized the decrease in trap depth by allowing some loosening of the trap. In total, we reduced the trap depth by a factor of 20. The geometric mean of the trap frequencies was reduced by less than a factor of 6. The measured phase space density in the final two stages increased by more than two orders of magnitude, and we estimate an increase of four orders of magnitude over the entire sequence. A subsequent rf evaporative sweep of only a few megahertz produced Bose-Einstein condensates. We also produce condensates in which raising the trap bottom pushes hotter atoms into an rf "knife" operating at a fixed frequency of 5\\,MHz.

  2. Dry-film polymer waveguide for silicon photonics chip packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiang-Han; Nakagawa, Shigeru

    2014-09-22

    Polymer waveguide made by dry film process is demonstrated for silicon photonics chip packaging. With 8 μm × 11.5 μm core waveguide, little penalty is observed up to 25 Gbps before or after the light propagate through a 10-km long single-mode fiber (SMF). Coupling loss to SMF is 0.24 dB and 1.31 dB at the polymer waveguide input and output ends, respectively. Alignment tolerance for 0.5 dB loss increase is +/- 1.0 μm along both vertical and horizontal directions for the coupling from the polymer waveguide to SMF. The dry-film polymer waveguide demonstrates promising performance for silicon photonics chip packaging used in next generation optical multi-chip module.

  3. Cold atoms in microscopic traps from wires to chips

    CERN Document Server

    Cassettari, D

    2000-01-01

    Ioffe-Pritchard trap. In the latter we have achieved the trapping parameters required in the experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates with much reduced power consumption. In a second time we have replaced the free standing wires with an atom chip, which we have used to compress the atomic cloud in potentials with trap frequencies above 100 kHz and ground state sizes below 100 nm. Such potentials are especially interesting for quantum information proposals of performing quantum gate operations with controlled collisions between trapped atoms. Finally, by combining two wire guides we have experimentally realized an innovative kind of beam splitter for guided atoms. We have investigated the splitting potential generated by a Y-shaped wire which has one input, i.e. the central arm of the Y, and two outputs corresponding to the left and right arms of the Y. By tuning the current ratio in the two outputs we have observed atoms switching from left to right as well as symmetric splitting. This and other similar des...

  4. Matter-wave beam splitter on an atom chip for a portable atom-interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S J; Gang, S T; Kim, J B

    2016-01-01

    We construct a matter-wave beam splitter using 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate on an atom chip. Through the use of radio-frequency-induced double-well potentials, we were able to split a BEC into two clouds separated by distances ranging from 2.8 {\\mu}m to 57 {\\mu}m. Interference between these two freely expanding BECs has been observed. By varying the rf-field amplitude, frequency, or polarization, we investigate behaviors of the beam-splitter. From the perspective of practical use, our BEC manipulation system is suitable for application to interferometry since it is compact and the repetition rate is high due to the anodic bonded atom chip on the vacuum cell. The portable system occupies a volume of 0.5 m3 and operates at a repetition rate as high as ~0.2 Hz.

  5. Matter-wave beam splitter on an atom chip for a portable atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. J.; Yu, H.; Gang, S. T.; Kim, J. B.

    2017-05-01

    We constructed a matter-wave beam splitter on an atom chip using a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. Using radio-frequency-induced double-well potentials, we were able to coherently split a BEC into two clouds separated by distances ranging from 2.8 to 57 μm. Interference between these two freely expanding BECs was observed, confirming the coherence of the matter-wave beam splitter. We are able to control the distance and the angle between the split BECs by varying the rf-field's amplitude, frequency, or polarization. From the perspective of practical use, our BEC manipulation system is suitable for application to interferometry. It is compact, and by anodic bonding the atom chip to the vacuum cell, the repetition rate is kept high. The portable system occupies a volume of 0.5 m3 and operates at a repetition rate as high as 0.2 Hz using a commercial vacuum product.

  6. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Rushton, Jo; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This "switching-MOT" relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap's beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for $^{85}$Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  7. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Jo; Roy, Ritayan; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-11-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This ‘switching-MOT’ relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap’s beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for 85Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  8. Coherent Stern-Gerlach momentum splitting on an atom chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machluf, Shimon; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2013-09-01

    In the Stern-Gerlach effect, a magnetic field gradient splits particles into spatially separated paths according to their spin projection. The idea of exploiting this effect for creating coherent momentum superpositions for matter-wave interferometry appeared shortly after its discovery, almost a century ago, but was judged to be far beyond practical reach. Here we demonstrate a viable version of this idea. Our scheme uses pulsed magnetic field gradients, generated by currents in an atom chip wire, and radio-frequency Rabi transitions between Zeeman sublevels. We transform an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate into a superposition of spatially separated propagating wavepackets and observe spatial interference fringes with a measurable phase repeatability. The method is versatile in its range of momentum transfer and the different available splitting geometries. These features make our method a good candidate for supporting a variety of future applications and fundamental studies.

  9. Crystalline thin films: The electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) view

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical atomic layer deposition technique is selected as one of the methods to prepare thin films for various applications, including electrocatalytic materials and compound....

  10. Guiding Neutral Atoms with Two Current-Carrying Wires and a Vertical Bias Field on the Atom Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Min; YAN Bo; LI Xiao-Lin; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2008-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate the guiding of neutral atoms with two parallel microfabricated current-carrying wires on the atom chip and a verticai magnetic bias field.The atoms are guided along a magnetic field minimum parallel to the current-carrying wires and confined in the other two directions.We describe in detail how the precooled atoms are efficiently loaded into the two-wire guide.

  11. Atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} for implantable brain-chip interfacing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianci, E., E-mail: elena.cianci@mdm.imm.cnr.it [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Lattanzio, S. [Istituto di Fisiologia, Dipartimento di Anatomia Umana e Fisiologia, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Seguini, G. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Vassanelli, S. [Istituto di Fisiologia, Dipartimento di Anatomia Umana e Fisiologia, Universita di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we investigated atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited on implantable neuro-chips based on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor (EOS) junctions, implementing both efficient capacitive neuron-silicon coupling and biocompatibility for long-term implantable functionality. The ALD process was performed at 295 Degree-Sign C using titanium tetraisopropoxide and ozone as precursors on needle-shaped silicon substrates. Engineering of the capacitance of the EOS junctions introducing a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer between TiO{sub 2} and silicon resulted in a further increase of the specific capacitance. Biocompatibility for long-term implantable neuroprosthetic systems was checked upon in-vitro treatment.

  12. Atom Michelson interferometer on a chip using a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Ju; Anderson, Dana Z; Bright, Victor M; Cornell, Eric A; Diot, Quentin; Kishimoto, Tetsuo; Prentiss, Mara; Saravanan, R A; Segal, Stephen R; Wu, Saijun

    2005-03-11

    An atom Michelson interferometer is implemented on an "atom chip." The chip uses lithographically patterned conductors and external magnetic fields to produce and guide a Bose-Einstein condensate. Splitting, reflecting, and recombining of condensate atoms are achieved by a standing-wave light field having a wave vector aligned along the atom waveguide. A differential phase shift between the two arms of the interferometer is introduced by either a magnetic-field gradient or with an initial condensate velocity. Interference contrast is still observable at 20% with an atom propagation time of 10 ms.

  13. Thin film magnetostrictive sensor with on-chip readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong

    We report the first successful integration of magnetostrictive Metglas2605S2 (Fesb{78}Sisb9Bsb{13}) thin film sensor system on silicon with high resolution capacitive readout. A deposition process for Metglas thin film has been developed to allow easy control of thin film composition. An amorphous microstructure has been achieved over a wide temperature range, and in-situ magnetic domain alignment can be accomplished at room temperature as the film is deposited. The thin film has been characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis for composition, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) spectrum for microstructure, magnetization measurement for domain alignment and capacitive measurement for magnetostriction. The thin film is suitable for any magnetostrictive sensor applications, in particular, for IC compatible microsensors and microactuators. We have demonstrated the subsequent process integration with IC fabrication technology. Here, the Metglas thin film has been successfully incorporated to micromechanical structures using surface micromachining with appropriate choice of sacrificial layer and low stress mechanical layers. In addition, we present the development of a high resolution capacitive readout circuit co-integrated with the sensor. The readout circuit is based on a floating gate MOSFET configuration, requiring just a single transistor and operated at DC or low frequencies. Using the prototype developed in-house, we have successfully demonstrated a resolution capability of 10sp{-17} F, this translates to a few A in terms of cantilever beam deflection of the sensor. The floating gate readout technique is readily applicable to any capacitive sensors with a need for on-chip readout. It is also an ideal in-situ test structure for on IC chip process characterization and parameter extraction.

  14. Two-dimensional array of microtraps with atomic shift register on a chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whitlock, S.; Gerritsma, R.; Fernholz, T.; Spreeuw, R.J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Arrays of trapped atoms are the ideal starting points for developing registers comprising large numbers of physical qubits for storing and processing quantum information. One very promising approach involves neutral atom traps produced on microfabricated devices known as atom chips, as almost

  15. Optically Transparent Thin-Film Electrode Chip for Spectroelectrochemical Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Shirmir D.; Lines, Amanda M.; Lynch, John A.; Bello, Job M.; Heineman, William R.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2017-07-03

    The electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical applications of an optically transparent thin film electrode chip are investigated. The working electrode is composed of indium tin oxide (ITO); the counter and quasi-reference electrodes are composed of platinum. The stability of the platinum quasi-reference electrode is modified by coating it with a planar, solid state Ag/AgCl layer. The Ag/AgCl reference is characterized with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Open circuit potential measurements indicate that the potential of the planar Ag/AgCl electrode varies a maximum of 20 mV over four days. Cyclic voltammetry measurements show that the electrode chip is comparable to a standard electrochemical cell. Randles-Sevcik analysis of 10 mM K3[Fe(CN)6] in 0.1 M KCl using the electrode chip shows a diffusion coefficient of 1.59 × 10-6 cm2/s, in comparison to the standard electrochemical cell value of 2.38 × 10-6 cm2/s. By using the electrode chip in an optically transparent thin layer electrode (OTTLE), the spectroelectrochemical modulation of [Ru(bpy)3]2+ florescence was demonstrated, achieving a detection limit of 36 nM.

  16. Processing Chip for Thin Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator Mass Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at portable application, a new integrated process chip for thin film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR mass sensor is proposed and verified with 0.18 um CMOS processing in this paper. The longitudinal mode FBAR with back-etched structure is fabricated, which has resonant frequency 1.878 GHz and factor 1200. The FBAR oscillator, based on the current-reuse structure, is designed with Modified Butterworth Van Dyke (MBVD model. The result shows that the FBAR oscillator operates at 1.878 GHz with a phase noise of −107 dBc/Hz and −135 dBc/Hz at 10 KHz and 100 KHz frequency offset, respectively. The whole process chip size with pads is 1300 μm × 950 μm. The FBAR and process chip are bonded together to sense tiny mass. The measurement results show that this chip precision is 1 KHz with the FBAR frequency gap from 25 kHz to 25 MHz.

  17. Resonator-Aided Single-Atom Detection on a Microfabricated Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Teper, Igor; Lin, Yu-Ju; Vuletic, Vladan

    2006-01-01

    We use an optical cavity to detect single atoms magnetically trapped on an atom chip. We implement the detection using both fluorescence into the cavity and reduction in cavity transmission due to the presence of atoms. In fluorescence, we register 2.0(2) photon counts per atom, which allows us to detect single atoms with 75% efficiency in 250 microseconds. In absorption, we measure transmission attenuation of 3.3(3)% per atom, which allows us to count small numbers of atoms with a resolution...

  18. Miniature Bose-Einstein condensate system design based on a transparent atom chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Jingfang; Xu, Xinping; Jiang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Haichao; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new miniature Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) system based on a transparent atom chip with a compact external coil structure. A standard six-beam macroscopic magneto-optical trap (MOT) is able to be created near the chip surface due to the chip’s transparency. A novel wire pattern consisting of a double-z wire and a z-shaped wire is designed on the transparent atom chip. With a vertical bias magnetic field, the double-z wire can create the quadrupole magnetic field of an intermediate chip MOT, which is suitable for transporting atoms from the macroscopic MOT to the chip z-wire trap efficiently. The compact external coil structure is designed with a rectangular frameless geometry consisting of only four coil pairs and its volume is less than 0.3 liters. The maximum system power consumption during the BEC generation procedure is about 45 W. The miniature system is evaluated, and about 3 × 106 atoms can be loaded into the chip z-wire trap. The miniature chip BEC system has the advantages of small volume and low power consumption, and it has great potential for practical applications of BEC.

  19. Integrated MEMS mass sensor and atom source for a ``Fab on a Chip''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; Bishop, David

    2014-03-01

    ``Fab on a Chip'' is a new concept suggesting that the semiconductor fabrication facility can be integrated into a single silicon chip for nano-manufacturing. Such a chip contains various MEMS devices which can work together, operating in a similar way as a conventional fab does, to fabricate nano-structures. Here we present two crucial ``Fab on a chip'' components: the MEMS mass sensor and atomic evaporation source. The mass sensor is essentially a parallel plate capacitor with one suspended plate. When incident atoms deposit on the suspended plate, the mass change of the plate can be measured by detecting the resonant frequency shift. Using the mass sensor, a mass resolution of 3 fg is achieved. The MEMS evaporation source consists of a polysilicon plate suspended by two electrical leads with constrictions. By resistively heating the plate, this device works as a tunable atom flux source. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one can build a multi-element atom evaporator. The mass sensor and atom source are integrated so that the mass sensor is used to monitor and characterize the atomic flux. A material source and a sensor to monitor the fabrication are two integral components for our ``Fab on a Chip.''

  20. Atomic Structure Control of Silica Thin Films on Pt(111)

    KAUST Repository

    Crampton, Andrew S

    2015-05-27

    Metal oxide thin films grown on metal single crystals are commonly used to model heterogeneous catalyst supports. The structure and properties of thin silicon dioxide films grown on metal single crystals have only recently been thoroughly characterized and their spectral properties well established. We report the successful growth of a three- dimensional, vitreous silicon dioxide thin film on the Pt(111) surface and reproduce the closed bilayer structure previously reported. The confirmation of the three dimensional nature of the film is unequivocally shown by the infrared absorption band at 1252 cm−1. Temperature programmed desorption was used to show that this three-dimensional thin film covers the Pt(111) surface to such an extent that its application as a catalyst support for clusters/nanoparticles is possible. The growth of a three-dimensional film was seen to be directly correlated with the amount of oxygen present on the surface after the silicon evaporation process. This excess of oxygen is tentatively attributed to atomic oxygen being generated in the evaporator. The identification of atomic oxygen as a necessary building block for the formation of a three-dimensional thin film opens up new possibilities for thin film growth on metal supports, whereby simply changing the type of oxygen enables thin films with different atomic structures to be synthesized. This is a novel approach to tune the synthesis parameters of thin films to grow a specific structure and expands the options for modeling common amorphous silica supports under ultra high vacuum conditions.

  1. Triggering the atomic layers control of hexagonal boron nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yangxi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhang, Changrui, E-mail: crzhang12@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Li, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Jiang, Da; Ding, Guqiao; Wang, Haomin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Xie, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmxie@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Thickness of h-BN films can be controlled from double atomic layers to over ten atomic layers by adjusting the CVD parameters, quite different from the reported thickness control of up to tens of nanometers. (The interlayer distance of h-BN is 0.333 nm.) • Growth mechanisms of h-BN are discussed, especially for bilayer h-BN films. • Both epitaxial growth and diffusion-segregation process are involved in the synthesis of bilayer h-BN films. - Abstract: In this work, we report the successful synthesis of large scale hexagonal boron nitride films with controllable atomic layers. The films are grown on thin nickel foils via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition with borazine as the precursor. The atomic layers of h-BN films can be controlled in a narrow range by adjusting growth time and the cooling rates. Transmission electron microscope results shows the h-BN films exhibit high uniformity and good crystalline. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows the B/N elemental ratio is about 1.01. The h-BN films exhibit a pronounced deep ultraviolet absorption at 203.0 nm with a large optical band gap of 6.02 ± 0.03 eV. The results suggest potential applications of h-BN films in deep ultraviolet and dielectric materials. Growth mechanisms of h-BN films with thickness control are discussed, especially when the synthesized h-BN films after a higher cooling rate show an in-plane rotation angle between bilayers. Both epitaxial growth and diffusion-segregation process are involved in the synthesis of bilayer h-BN films.

  2. Design and fabrication of diffractive atom chips for laser cooling and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Cotter, J P; Griffin, P F; Rabey, I M; Docherty, K; Riis, E; Arnold, A S; Hinds, E A

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been shown that optical reflection gratings fabricated directly into an atom chip provide a simple and effective way to trap and cool substantial clouds of atoms [1,2]. In this article we describe how the gratings are designed and micro-fabricated and we characterise their optical properties, which determine their effectiveness as a cold atom source. We use simple scalar diffraction theory to understand how the morphology of the gratings determines the power in the diffracted beams.

  3. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  4. Chip-Scale Magnetic Source of Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    30 3.7 The transistor motherboard and the 100 pin breakout board. . . . . . . . . . . . 31 3.8 The full structure of the slowing chip...a separate motherboard of 60 N-channel IRLB3813PbF International Rectifier MOSFET transistors. These transistors will be turned on and off by...60 wires from the slowing chip were soldered to a motherboard of 60 transistors, lined up in two rows of 30 on a 0.1 inch grid perforated prototyping

  5. Introduction to liquid wall film atomization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the article is an introduction to the theoretical study of atomization of droplets from the surface of a thin liquid film. The overview of basic principles of atomization prediction is complemented by the comparison of the calculations performed according to the selected approaches.

  6. Fifteen Years of Cold Matter on the Atom Chip: Promise, Realizations, and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Mark; Zhou, Shuyu; Groswasser, David; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Here we review the field of atom chips in the context of Bose-Einstein Condensates (BEC) as well as cold matter in general. Twenty years after the first realization of the BEC and fifteen years after the realization of the atom chip, the latter has been found to enable extraordinary feats: from producing BECs at a rate of several per second, through the realization of matter-wave interferometry, and all the way to novel probing of surfaces and new forces. In addition, technological applications are also being intensively pursued. This review will describe these developments and more, including new ideas which have not yet been realized.

  7. Fifteen years of cold matter on the atom chip: promise, realizations, and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Mark; Amit, Omer; Zhou, Shuyu; Groswasser, David; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2016-10-01

    Here we review the field of atom chips in the context of Bose-Einstein Condensates (BEC) as well as cold matter in general. Twenty years after the first realization of the BEC and 15 years after the realization of the atom chip, the latter has been found to enable extraordinary feats: from producing BECs at a rate of several per second, through the realization of matter-wave interferometry, and all the way to novel probing of surfaces and new forces. In addition, technological applications are also being intensively pursued. This review will describe these developments and more, including new ideas which have not yet been realized.

  8. Hexapole-compensated magneto-optical trap on a mesoscopic atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jöllenbeck, S.; Mahnke, J.; Randoll, R.

    2011-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps on atom chips are usually restricted to small atomic samples due to a limited capture volume caused primarily by distorted field configurations. Here we present a magneto-optical trap based on a millimeter-sized wire structure which generates a magnetic field with minimized...... distortions. Together with the loading from a high-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, we achieve a loading rate of 8.4×1010 atoms/s and maximum number of 8.7×109 captured atoms. The wire structure is placed outside of the vacuum to enable a further adaptation to new scientific objectives. Since all...

  9. Towards single-atom detection on a chip

    OpenAIRE

    Horak, Peter; Klappauf, Bruce G.; Haase, Albrecht; Folman, Ron; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Domokos, Peter; Hinds, E. A.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the optical detection of single atoms held in a microscopic atom trap close to a surface. Laser light is guided by optical fibers or optical micro-structures via the atom to a photo-detector. Our results suggest that with present-day technology, micro-cavities can be built around the atom with sufficiently high finesse to permit unambiguous detection of a single atom in the trap with 10 $\\mu$s of integration. We compare resonant and non-resonant detection schemes and we discuss...

  10. Micromechanical Characterization of Polysilicon Films through On-Chip Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Mirzazadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available When the dimensions of polycrystalline structures become comparable to the average grain size, some reliability issues can be reported for the moving parts of inertial microelectromechanical systems (MEMS. Not only the overall behavior of the device turns out to be affected by a large scattering, but also the sensitivity to imperfections gets enhanced. In this work, through on-chip tests, we experimentally investigate the behavior of thin polysilicon samples using standard electrostatic actuation/sensing. The discrepancy between the target and actual responses of each sample has then been exploited to identify: (i the overall stiffness of the film and, according to standard continuum elasticity, a morphology-based value of its Young’s modulus; (ii the relevant over-etch induced by the fabrication process. To properly account for the aforementioned stochastic features at the micro-scale, the identification procedure has been based on particle filtering. A simple analytical reduced-order model of the moving structure has been also developed to account for the nonlinearities in the electrical field, up to pull-in. Results are reported for a set of ten film samples of constant slenderness, and the effects of different actuation mechanisms on the identified micromechanical features are thoroughly discussed.

  11. Micromechanical Characterization of Polysilicon Films through On-Chip Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzazadeh, Ramin; Eftekhar Azam, Saeed; Mariani, Stefano

    2016-07-28

    When the dimensions of polycrystalline structures become comparable to the average grain size, some reliability issues can be reported for the moving parts of inertial microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Not only the overall behavior of the device turns out to be affected by a large scattering, but also the sensitivity to imperfections gets enhanced. In this work, through on-chip tests, we experimentally investigate the behavior of thin polysilicon samples using standard electrostatic actuation/sensing. The discrepancy between the target and actual responses of each sample has then been exploited to identify: (i) the overall stiffness of the film and, according to standard continuum elasticity, a morphology-based value of its Young's modulus; (ii) the relevant over-etch induced by the fabrication process. To properly account for the aforementioned stochastic features at the micro-scale, the identification procedure has been based on particle filtering. A simple analytical reduced-order model of the moving structure has been also developed to account for the nonlinearities in the electrical field, up to pull-in. Results are reported for a set of ten film samples of constant slenderness, and the effects of different actuation mechanisms on the identified micromechanical features are thoroughly discussed.

  12. Heating rate and spin flip lifetime due to near field noise in layered superconducting atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Fermani, Rachele; Zhang, Bo; Lim, Michael J; Dumke, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the heating rate and spin flip lifetimes due to near field noise for atoms trapped close to layered superconducting structures. In particular, we compare the case of a gold layer deposited above a superconductor with the case of a bare superconductor. We study a niobium-based and a YBCO-based chip. For both niobium and YBCO chips at a temperature of 4.2 K, we find that the deposition of the gold layer can have a significant impact on the heating rate and spin flip lifetime, as a result of the increase of the near field noise. At a chip temperature of 77 K, this effect is less pronounced for the YBCO chip.

  13. A surface-patterned chip as a strong source of ultracold atoms for quantum technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nshii, C. C.; Vangeleyn, M.; Cotter, J. P.; Griffin, P. F.; Hinds, E. A.; Ironside, C. N.; See, P.; Sinclair, A. G.; Riis, E.; Arnold, A. S.

    2013-05-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are central to modern precision measurements. They are also increasingly important as an enabling technology for experimental cavity quantum electrodynamics, quantum information processing and matter-wave interferometry. Although significant progress has been made in miniaturizing atomic metrological devices, these are limited in accuracy by their use of hot atomic ensembles and buffer gases. Advances have also been made in producing portable apparatus that benefits from the advantages of atoms in the microkelvin regime. However, simplifying atomic cooling and loading using microfabrication technology has proved difficult. In this Letter we address this problem, realizing an atom chip that enables the integration of laser cooling and trapping into a compact apparatus. Our source delivers ten thousand times more atoms than previous magneto-optical traps with microfabricated optics and, for the first time, can reach sub-Doppler temperatures. Moreover, the same chip design offers a simple way to form stable optical lattices. These features, combined with simplicity of fabrication and ease of operation, make these new traps a key advance in the development of cold-atom technology for high-accuracy, portable measurement devices.

  14. Thin Metallic Films from Solvated Metal Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-14

    research has developed over the past two decades that deals with the generation of atoms of metals (by metal evaporation, and the interaction of these...Departamento de Quimica , Universidad de Concepcion, Cassilla 3-:, c oncepcion, Chile. -I{ - ~ *~.’JS*~M 4 .~4\\ 821 19 the gold particles were negatively...flocculation were observed, as shown in table a Generally about 0.1 g In was Suspended in 100-200 nl solvent. Several approacies to characterization of

  15. Spatial atomic layer deposition of zinc oxide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.W.G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc oxide thin films have been deposited at high growth rates (up to ~1 nm/s) by spatial atomic layer deposition technique at atmospheric pressure. Water has been used as oxidant for diethylzinc (DEZ) at deposition temperatures between 75 and 250 °C. The electrical, structural (crystallinity and mo

  16. A Bose-Einstein condensate coupled to a nanomechanical resonator on an atom chip

    CERN Document Server

    Treutlein, P; Hunger, D; Hänsch, T W; Reichel, J; Camerer, Stephan; H\\"ansch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David; Reichel, Jakob; Treutlein, Philipp

    2007-01-01

    We study the coupling of the spin of Bose-Einstein condensed atoms to the mechanical oscillations of a nanoscale cantilever with a magnetic tip. This is an experimentally viable hybrid quantum system which allows one to explore the interface of quantum optics and condensed matter physics. We propose an experiment where easily detectable atomic spin-flips are induced by the cantilever motion. This can be used to probe thermal oscillations of the cantilever with the atoms. At low cantilever temperatures, as realized in recent experiments, back-action of the atoms onto the cantilever is significant and the system represents a mechanical analog of cavity quantum electrodynamics. With high but realistic cantilever quality factors, the strong coupling regime can be reached, either with single atoms or collectively with BECs. We discuss an implementation on an atom chip.

  17. High-Flux Ultracold-Atom Chip Interferometers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ColdQuanta's ultimate objective is to produce a compact, turnkey, ultracold-atom system specifically designed for performing interferometry with Bose-Einstein...

  18. High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Evan A; Pfeiffer, Jonathan B; Anderson, Dana Z

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

  19. Nanoporous SiO2 thin films made by atomic layer deposition and atomic etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaryan, Lilit; Kley, E.-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas; Szeghalmi, Adriana

    2016-06-01

    A new route to prepare nanoporous SiO2 films by mixing atomic-layer-deposited alumina and silica in an Å-scale is presented. The selective removal of Al2O3 from the composites using wet chemical etching with phosphoric acid resulted in nanoporous thin SiO2 layers. A diffusion-controlled dissolution mechanism is identified whereby an interesting reorganization of the residual SiO2 is observed. The atomic scale oxide mixing is decisive in attaining and tailoring the film porosity. The porosity and the refractive index of nanoporous silica films were tailored from 9% to 69% and from 1.40 to 1.13, respectively. The nanoporous silica was successfully employed as antireflection coatings and as diffusion membranes to encapsulate nanostructures.

  20. Near atomically smooth alkali antimonide photocathode thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jun; Nasiatka, James; Schubert, Susanne; Smedley, John; Padmore, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Nano-roughness limits the emittance of electron beams that can be generated by high efficiency photocathodes, such as the thermally reacted alkali antimonide thin films. However there is an urgent need for photocathodes that can produce an order of magnitude or more lower emittance than present day systems in order to increase the transverse coherence width of the electron beam. In this paper we demonstrate a method for producing alkali antimonide cathodes with near atomic smoothness with high reproducibility.

  1. Determination of hydration film thickness using atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Changsheng; SONG Shaoxian; GU Qingbao

    2005-01-01

    Dispersion of a solid particle in water may lead to the formation of hydration film on the particle surface, which can strongly increase the repulsive force between the particles and thus strongly affect the stability of dispersions. The hydration film thickness, which varies with the variation of property of suspension particles, is one of the most important parameters of hydration film, and is also one of the most difficult parameters that can be measured accurately. In this paper, a method, based on force-distance curve of atomic force microscopy, for determining the hydration film thickness of particles is developed. The method utilizes the difference of cantilever deflection before, between and after penetrating the hydration films between tip and sample, which reflect the difference of slope on the force-distance curve. 3 samples, mica, glass and stainless steel, were used for hydration thickness determination, and the results show that the hydration film thickness between silicon tip and mica, glass and stainless steel are 30.0(2.0, 29.0(1.0 and 32.5(2.5 nm, respectively.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of nanolaminate oxide films on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, M.; Weisheit, M.; Kolanek, K.; Michling, M.; Engelmann, H. J.; Schmeisser, D.

    2011-11-01

    Among the methods for depositing thin films, atomic layer deposition is unique for its capability of growing conformal thin films of compounds with a control of composition and thickness at the atomic level. The conformal growth of thin films can be of particular interest for covering nanostructures since it assures the homogeneous growth of the ALD film in all directions, independent of the position of the sample with respect to the incoming precursor flow. Here we describe the technique for growing the HfO2/Al2O3 bilayer on Si substrate and our in situ approach for its investigation by means of synchrotron radiation photoemission. In particular, we study the interface interactions between the two oxides for various thickness compositions ranging from 0.4 to 2.7 nm. We find that the ALD of HfO2 on Si induces the increase of the interfacial SiO2 layer, and a change in the band bending of Si. On the contrary, the ALD of Al2O3 on HfO2 shows negligible interaction between layers as the binding energies of Hf4f, Si2p, and O1s core level peaks and the valence band maximum of HfO2 do not change and the interfacial SiO2 does not increase.

  3. Electronically excited rubidium atom in a helium cluster or film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leino, Markku; Viel, Alexandra; Zillich, Robert E.

    2008-11-01

    We present theoretical studies of helium droplets and films doped with one electronically excited rubidium atom Rb∗ (P2). Diffusion and path integral Monte Carlo approaches are used to investigate the energetics and the structure of clusters containing up to 14 helium atoms. The surface of large clusters is approximated by a helium film. The nonpair additive potential energy surface is modeled using a diatomic in molecule scheme. Calculations show that the stable structure of Rb∗Hen consists of a seven helium atom ring centered at the rubidium, surrounded by a tirelike second solvation shell. A very different structure is obtained when performing a "vertical Monte Carlo transition." In this approach, a path integral Monte Carlo equilibration starts from the stable configuration of a rubidium atom in the electronic ground state adsorbed to the helium surface after switching to the electronically excited surface. In this case, Rb∗Hen relaxes to a weakly bound metastable state in which Rb∗ sits in a shallow dimple. The interpretation of the results is consistent with the recent experimental observations [G. Auböck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 035301 (2008)].

  4. Design and Fabrication of a Chip-based Continuous-wave Atom Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Power, E P; Vanderelzen, B; Herrera-Fierro, P; Murphy, R; Yalisove, S M; Raithel, G

    2012-01-01

    We present a design for a continuous-wave (CW) atom laser on a chip and describe the process used to fabricate the device. Our design aims to integrate quadrupole magnetic guiding of ground state Rb atoms with continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling to create a continuous Bose-Einstein condensate; out-coupled atoms from the condensate should realize a CW atom laser. We choose a geometry with three wires embedded in a spiral pattern in a silicon subtrate. The guide features an integrated solenoid to mitigate spin-flip losses and provide a tailored longitudinal magnetic field. Our design also includes multiple options for atom interferometry: accomodations are in place for laser-generated atom Fabry-Perot and Mach-Zehnder interferometers, and a pair of atomic beam X-splitters is incorporated for an all-magnetic atom Mach-Zehnder setup. We demonstrate the techniques necessary to fabricate our device using existing micro- and nano-scale fabrication equipment, and discuss future options for modified desi...

  5. Atomic layer deposition ultrathin film origami using focused ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supekar, O. D.; Brown, J. J.; Eigenfeld, N. T.; Gertsch, J. C.; Bright, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) micromachining is a powerful tool for maskless lithography and in recent years FIB has been explored as a tool for strain engineering. Ion beam induced deformation can be utilized as a means for folding freestanding thin films into complex 3D structures. FIB of high energy gallium (Ga+) ions induces stress by generation of dislocations and ion implantation within material layers, which create creases or folds upon mechanical relaxation enabled by motion of the material layers. One limitation on such processing is the ability to fabricate flat freestanding thin film structures. This capability is limited by the residual stresses formed during processing and fabrication of the films, which can result in initial curvature and deformation of films upon release from a sacrificial fabrication layer. This paper demonstrates folding in freestanding ultrathin films (1:1000) by ion-induced stress relaxation. The ultrathin flat structures are fabricated using atomic layer deposition on sacrificial polyimide. We have demonstrated vertical folding with 30 keV Ga+ ions in structures with lateral dimensions varying from 10 to 50 μm.

  6. A surface-patterned chip as a strong source of ultra-cold atoms for quantum technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Nshii, C C; Cotter, J P; Griffin, P F; Hinds, E A; Ironside, C N; See, P; Sinclair, A G; Riis, E; Arnold, A S

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooled atoms are central to modern precision measurements. They are also increasingly important as an enabling technology for experimental cavity quantum electrodynamics, quantum information processing and matter wave interferometry. Although significant progress has been made in miniaturising atomic metrological devices, these are limited in accuracy by their use of hot atomic ensembles and buffer gases. Advances have also been made in producing portable apparatus that benefit from the advantages of atoms in the microKelvin regime. However, simplifying atomic cooling and loading using microfabrication technology has proved difficult. In this letter we address this problem, realising an atom chip that enables the integration of laser cooling and trapping into a compact apparatus. Our source delivers ten thousand times more atoms than previous magneto-optical traps with microfabricated optics and, for the first time, can reach sub-Doppler temperatures. Moreover, the same chip design offers a simple way t...

  7. Quench-condensing superconducting thin films using the Fab on a Chip approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Del Corro, Pablo; Stark, Thomas; Lally, Richard; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Bishop, David

    Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) being manufactured in a macroscopic fab inspires the idea of getting the process further down to fabricate even smaller structures, namely nano-structures, using MEMS. The Fab on a Chip concept was proposed based on such ideas. By implementing the final-step, additive fabrication approach, manufacturing, characterization and experiments of nano-structures are integrated in-situ. Due to the miniature size of MEMS, the thickness precision is significantly improved while the power consumption is significantly depressed, making the quench-condensation of very thin films well controlled and easily achievable. Among various types of nano-structures, quench-condensed superconducting thin films are of great interest for physicists. Here we present such experiments done on superconducting thin films quench-condensed using the Fab on a Chip. We show that we are able to fabricate very thin films with its thickness precisely controlled, and the base temperature kept under ~3K during the process. The resistivity data demonstrates the high purity and uniformity of the film, as well as the annealing effect when cycling to higher temperatures. Based on the tremendous results obtained from the superconducting thin films, more complex nano-circuits can be fabricated and investigated using the Fab on a Chip, enabling a new approach for novel condensed matter physics experiments. This research is funded by the NSF through their CMMI division. This research is funded by the NSF through their CMMI division.

  8. Thin-film chip-to-substrate interconnect and methods for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckerman, David B.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated circuit chips are electrically connected to a silica wafer interconnection substrate. Thin film wiring is fabricated down bevelled edges of the chips. A subtractive wire fabrication method uses a series of masks and etching steps to form wires in a metal layer. An additive method direct laser writes or deposits very thin metal lines which can then be plated up to form wires. A quasi-additive or subtractive/additive method forms a pattern of trenches to expose a metal surface which can nucleate subsequent electrolytic deposition of wires. Low inductance interconnections on a 25 micron pitch (1600 wires on a 1 cm square chip) can be produced. The thin film hybrid interconnect eliminates solder joints or welds, and minimizes the levels of metallization. Advantages include good electrical properties, very high wiring density, excellent backside contact, compactness, and high thermal and mechanical reliability.

  9. Matter-wave interferometry in a double well on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumm, Thorsten; Hofferberth, S.; Andersson, L. M.

    2005-01-01

    Matter-wave interference experiments enable us to study matter at its most basic, quantum level and form the basis of high-precision sensors for applications such as inertial and gravitational field sensing. Success in both of these pursuits requires the development of atom-optical elements...... that can manipulate matter waves at the same time as preserving their coherence and phase. Here, we present an integrated interferometer based on a simple, coherent matter-wave beam splitter constructed on an atom chip. Through the use of radio-frequency-induced adiabatic double-well potentials, we...... demonstrate the splitting of Bose-Einstein condensates into two clouds separated by distances ranging from 3 to 80 μm, enabling access to both tunnelling and isolated regimes. Moreover, by analysing the interference patterns formed by combining two clouds of ultracold atoms originating from a single...

  10. Thin film Ag superlens towards lab-on-a-chip integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    A thin metal film near-field superlens, as originally suggested by Pendry and realized by Fang et al. and Melville et al., is investigated with emphasis on materials suitable for integration on a lab-on-a-chip platform. A chemically resistant cyclo-olefin copolymer (COC), mr-I-T85 from microresist...

  11. Atom-chip-based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, Sven; Schubert, Christian; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2017-04-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity with a quantum gravimeter based on an atom chip. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal [1]. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates [2], as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties that will allow to overcome the current limitations in the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technology offers the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We present a lab-based prototype that uses the atom chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serves as inertial reference inside the vacuum [3]. With this setup, it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal. All steps are pursued on a baseline of 1 cm right below the atom chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will target for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz [4]. The device will be characterized in cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor and finally employed in a campaign to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1227 DQ-mat, the

  12. Atomic force microscopy study of biaxially oriented polypropylene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, H.-Y.; Walzak, M. J.; McIntyre, N. S.

    2004-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) uses a very sharp pointed mechanical probe to collect real-space morphological information of solid surfaces. AFM was used in this study to image the surface morphology of a biaxially oriented polypropylene film. The polymer film is characterized by a nanometer-scale, fiberlike network structure, which reflects the drawing process used during the fabrication of the film. AFM was used to study polymer-surface treatment to improve wettability by exposing the polymer to ozone with or without ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Surface-morphology changes observed by AFM are the result of the surface oxidation induced by the treatment. Due to the topographic features of the polymer film, the fiberlike structure has been used to check the performance of the AFM tip. An AFM image is a mixture of the surface morphology and the shape of the AFM tip. Therefore, it is important to check the performance of a tip to ensure that the AFM image collected reflects the true surface features of the sample, rather than contamination on the AFM tip.

  13. Spotting 2D atomic layers on aluminum nitride thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Hareesh; Bharadwaj B, Krishna; Vaidyuala, Kranthi Kumar; Suran, Swathi; Bhat, Navakanta; Varma, Manoj; Srinivasan Raghavan

    2015-10-23

    Substrates for 2D materials are important for tailoring their fundamental properties and realizing device applications. Aluminum nitride (AIN) films on silicon are promising large-area substrates for such devices in view of their high surface phonon energies and reasonably large dielectric constants. In this paper epitaxial layers of AlN on 2″ Si wafers have been investigated as a necessary first step to realize devices from exfoliated or transferred atomic layers. Significant thickness dependent contrast enhancements are both predicted and observed for monolayers of graphene and MoS2 on AlN films as compared to the conventional SiO2 films on silicon, with calculated contrast values approaching 100% for graphene on AlN as compared to 8% for SiO2 at normal incidences. Quantitative estimates of experimentally measured contrast using reflectance spectroscopy show very good agreement with calculated values. Transistors of monolayer graphene on AlN films are demonstrated, indicating the feasibility of complete device fabrication on the identified layers.

  14. Atomic layer deposition of copper sulfide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Nathanaelle, E-mail: n.schneider@chimie-paristech.fr; Lincot, Daniel; Donsanti, Frédérique

    2016-02-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) of copper sulfide (Cu{sub x}S) thin films from Cu(acac){sub 2} (acac = acetylacetonate = 2,4-pentanedionate) and H{sub 2}S as Cu and S precursors is reported. Typical self-saturated reactions (“ALD window”) are obtained in the temperature range T{sub dep} = 130–200 °C for an average growth per cycle (GR) = 0.25 Å/cycle. The morphology, crystallographic structure, chemical composition, electrical properties and optical band gap of thin films were investigated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction under Grazing Incidence conditions (GI-XRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), Hall effect measurements, and UV–vis spectroscopy. The obtained copper sulfide films are heavily p-doped (charge carrier concentration ~ 10{sup 21} –10{sup 22} cm{sup −3}) with optical band gaps in the range of 2.2–2.5 eV for direct and 1.6–1.8 eV for indirect band gaps. Depending on the number of ALD cycles, multiphase compounds (made of digenite Cu{sub 1.8}S, chalcocite Cu{sub 2}S, djurleite Cu{sub 31}S{sub 16} and covellite CuS) or single-phase digenite Cu{sub 1.8}S films are obtained via a growth mechanism that involves in-situ copper reduction and loss of sulfur by evaporation. - Highlights: • Cu{sub x}S films were synthesized by atomic layer deposition from Cu(acac){sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. • Self-saturated reactions at T{sub dep} = 130–200 °C for growth = 0.25 Å/cycle • Multi- or single- phase films are obtained depending on the number of cycles. • Growth mechanism involves copper reduction and loss of sulfur by evaporation.

  15. Thin Film Chip Resistors with High Resistance and Low Temperature Coefficient of Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀宇; 张之圣; 白天; 刘仲娥

    2010-01-01

    High resistance thin film chip resistors(0603 type) were studied,and the specifications are as follows:1 k? with tolerance about ±0.1% after laser trimming and temperature coefficient of resistance(TCR) less than ±15×10-6/℃.Cr-Si-Ta-Al films were prepared with Ar flow rate and sputtering power fixed at 20 standard-state cubic centimeter per minute(sccm) and 100 W,respectively.The experiment shows that the electrical properties of Cr-SiTa-Al deposition films can meet the specification requirements of 0603 ty...

  16. High performance thin-film flip-chip InGaN-GaN light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchekin, O. B.; Epler, J. E.; Trottier, T. A.; Margalith, T.; Steigerwald, D. A.; Holcomb, M. O.; Martin, P. S.; Krames, M. R.

    2006-08-01

    Data are presented on the operation of thin-film flip-chip InGaN /GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The combination of thin-film LED concept with flip-chip technology is shown to provide surface brightness and flux output advantages over conventional flip-chip and vertical-injection thin-film LEDs. Performance characteristics of blue, white, and green thin-film flip-chip 1×1mm2 LEDs are described. Blue (˜441nm) thin-film flip-chip LEDs are demonstrated with radiance of 191mW/mm2sr at 1A drive, more than two times brighter than conventional flip-chip LEDs. An encapsulated thin-film flip-chip blue LED lamp is shown to have external quantum efficiency of 38% at forward current of 350mA. A white lamp based on a YAG:Ce phosphor coated device exhibits luminous efficacy of 60lm/W at 350mA with peak efficiency of 96lm/W at 20mA and luminance of 38Mcd/m2 at 1A drive current. Green (˜517nm) devices exhibit luminance of 37Mcd/m2 at 1A.

  17. Liquids on-chip: direct storage and release employing micro-perforated vapor barrier films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czurratis, Daniel; Beyl, Yvonne; Grimm, Alexander; Brettschneider, Thomas; Zinober, Sven; Lärmer, Franz; Zengerle, Roland

    2015-07-07

    Liquids on-chip describes a reagent storage concept for disposable pressure driven Lab-on-Chip (LoC) devices, which enables liquid storage in reservoirs without additional packaging. On-chip storage of liquids can be considered as one of the major challenges for the commercial break through of polymer-based LoC devices. Especially the ability for long-term storage and reagent release on demand are the most important aspects for a fully developed technology. On-chip storage not only replaces manual pipetting, it creates numerous advantages: fully automated processing, ease of use, reduction of contamination and transportation risks. Previous concepts for on-chip storage are based on liquid packaging solutions (e.g. stick packs, blisters, glass ampoules), which implicate manufacturing complexity and additional pick and place processes. That is why we prefer on-chip storage of liquids directly in reservoirs. The liquids are collected in reservoirs, which are made of high barrier polymers or coated by selected barrier layers. Therefore, commonly used polymers for LoC applications as cyclic olefin polymer (COP) and polycarbonate (PC) were investigated in the context of novel polymer composites. To ensure long-term stability the reservoirs are sealed with a commercially available barrier film by hot embossing. The barrier film is structured by pulsed laser ablation, which installs rated break points without affecting the barrier properties. A flexible membrane is actuated through pneumatic pressure for reagent release on demand. The membrane deflection breaks the barrier film and leads to efficient cleaning of the reservoirs in order to provide the liquids for further processing.

  18. Micropatterned culture of HepG2 spheroids using microwell chip with honeycomb-patterned polymer film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hidekazu; Gotou, Shun; Ito, Koju; Kohashi, Souichi; Goto, Yuki; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Sakai, Yusuke; Yabu, Hiroshi; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Nakazawa, Kohji

    2014-10-01

    Microwell chip culture is a promising technique for the generation of homogenous spheroids. We investigated the relationship between the structure of the bottom surface of microwell chip and the properties of HepG2 spheroid. We developed a microwell chip, the bottom surface of which consisted of a honeycomb-patterned polymer film (honeycomb film) that had a regular porous structure (HF chip). The chip comprised 270 circular microwells; each microwell was 600 μm in diameter and 600 μm in depth. At the center of the honeycomb film, an area, 200 μm in diameter, was modified with collagen to facilitate cell adhesion. With the exception of the collagen-coated area, the entire microwell was modified with polyethylene glycol to eliminate cell adhesion. HepG2 cells formed uniform spheroids when cultured in the microwells of HF chip. Furthermore, the cells passed through the porous structure of honeycomb film and formed spheroids at its opposite side. The spheroid growth of HepG2 cells cultured in HF chip was greater than that when the cells were culture in a microwell chip, the bottom surface of which was made of poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA chip). The albumin secretion activity of HepG2 spheroids in HF chip was equal to that in PMMA chip. These results indicate that the microwell bottom with a porous structure enhances the cell growth and maintains well the spheroid function. Thus, HF chip is a promising platform for spheroid cell culture.

  19. Heteronanojunctions with atomic size control using a lab-on-chip electrochemical approach with integrated microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunca Popa, P; Dalmas, G; Faramarzi, V; Dayen, J F; Majjad, H; Kemp, N T; Doudin, B

    2011-05-27

    A versatile tool for electrochemical fabrication of heteronanojunctions with nanocontacts made of a few atoms and nanogaps of molecular spacing is presented. By integrating microfluidic circuitry in a lab-on-chip approach, we keep control of the electrochemical environment in the vicinity of the nanojunction and add new versatility for exchanging and controlling the junction's medium. Nanocontacts made of various materials by successive local controlled depositions are demonstrated, with electrical properties revealing sizes reaching a few atoms only. Investigations on benchmark molecular electronics material, trapped between electrodes, reveal the possibility to create nanogaps of size matching those of molecules. We illustrate the interest of a microfluidic approach by showing that exposure of a fabricated molecular junction to controlled high solvent flows can be used as a reliability criterion for the presence of molecular entities in a gap.

  20. The fabrication of a double-layer atom chip with through silicon vias for an ultra-high-vacuum cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Lin, Yun-Siang; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Huang, Chi-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    This study presents a double-layer atom chip that provides users with increased diversity in the design of the wire patterns and flexibility in the design of the magnetic field. It is more convenient for use in atomic physics experiments. A negative photoresist, SU-8, was used as the insulating layer between the upper and bottom copper wires. The electrical measurement results show that the upper and bottom wires with a width of 100 µm can sustain a 6 A current without burnout. Another focus of this study is the double-layer atom chips integrated with the through silicon via (TSV) technique, and anodically bonded to a Pyrex glass cell, which makes it a desired vacuum chamber for atomic physics experiments. Thus, the bonded glass cell not only significantly reduces the overall size of the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) chamber but also conducts the high current from the backside to the front side of the atom chip via the TSV under UHV (9.5 × 10-10 Torr). The TSVs with a diameter of 70 µm were etched through by the inductively coupled plasma ion etching and filled by the bottom-up copper electroplating method. During the anodic bonding process, the electroplated copper wires and TSVs on atom chips also need to pass the examination of the required bonding temperature of 250 °C, under an applied voltage of 1000 V. Finally, the UHV test of the double-layer atom chips with TSVs at room temperature can be reached at 9.5 × 10-10 Torr, thus satisfying the requirements of atomic physics experiments under an UHV environment.

  1. The development of an atom chip with through silicon vias for an ultra-high-vacuum cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Li, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Yun-Siang; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Huang, Chi-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the development, fabrication and examination of an atom chip through silicon vias (TSV), which is anodically bonded with a Pyrex glass cell to form an ultra-high-vacuum system for the application of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) experiments. The silicon via is etched by the inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etch and filled by copper plating technology. The metal wires on both sides of the atom chips are patterned by the lithography process. Three different sizes of TSV are made and tested by continuously applying a maximum current of 17 A under the vacuum (70 Torr) and in air. In addition, after the thermal cycling of an anodic bonding process (requested at 350 °C) and a high electric field of 1000 V m-1, the TSV on atom chips can still hold the ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The conductive and vacuum yields of the TSV improved from 50% to 100% and from 75% to 81.25%, respectively after the modification of the fabrication process. Finally, the UHV test of TSV on atom chips at room temperature can be reached at 8 × 10-10 Torr, thus satisfying the requirements of atomic physics experiments under the UHV environment.

  2. Effects of nitrogen atoms of benzotriazole and its derivatives on the properties of electrodeposited Cu films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hoe Chul; Kim, Myung Jun; Lim, Taeho; Park, Kyung Ju; Kim, Kwang Hwan; Choe, Seunghoe [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Institute of Chemical Process, Seoul National University, Gwanak 1, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo-Kil, E-mail: sookilkim@cau.ac.kr [School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Jeong, E-mail: jjkimm@snu.ac.kr [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Institute of Chemical Process, Seoul National University, Gwanak 1, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    Additives having azole groups with different numbers of nitrogen atoms, such as indole, benzimidazole, indazole, benzotriazole (BTA), and 1H-benzotriazole-methanol (BTA-MeOH) were adopted to improve the mechanical hardness of electrodeposited Cu films. The effects of these additives on the film properties were elucidated in relation to their number of nitrogen atoms. Electrochemical current–potential behaviors showed that the additives containing three nitrogen atoms (BTA and BTA-MeOH) more effectively inhibited Cu electrodeposition. The inhibition strongly affected the film properties, resulting in reduced grain size and surface roughness, and increased resistivity and hardness. Cu films deposited with BTA or BTA-MeOH also exhibited 35% reduced grain size and 1.5-time higher hardness than Cu films deposited in electrolyte containing other BTA-derivatives having fewer nitrogen atoms. This notable grain refining effect of BTA and BTA-MeOH can be evaluated with respect to the strong interaction of their nitrogen atoms with the substrate and the copper ions, as well. - Highlights: • Additives of similar structure containing 1, 2, and 3 nitrogen atoms were used. • Additives with 3 nitrogen atoms more strongly inhibited Cu deposition than others. • Additives containing 3 nitrogen atoms efficiently affected film properties. • Additives having 3 nitrogen atoms remarkably improved film hardness.

  3. Opto-mechanical measurement of micro-trap on atom chip via nonlinear cavity enhanced Raman scattering spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    High-gain resonant nonlinear Raman scattering on trapped cold atoms within a high-fineness ring optical cavity is simply explained under a nonlinear opto-mechanical mechanism, and a proposal using it to detect frequency of micro-trap on atom chip is presented. The enhancement of scattering spectrum is due to coherent Raman conversion between two different cavity modes mediated by collective vibrations of atoms through nonlinear opto-mechanical couplings. The physical conditions of this technique are roughly estimated on Rubidium atoms, and a simple quantum analysis as well as a multi-body semiclassical simulation on this nonlinear Raman process is conducted.

  4. Fabricating quench condensed lead thin film circuits using MEMS Fab on a Chip technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, Matthias; Han, Han; Del Corro, Pablo; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Bishop, David

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a MEMS Fab on a Chip consisting of micro-sources, mass sensors, heaters/thermometers, shutters and a dynamic stencil. The fab only occupies a volume of a few cubic millimeters and consumes milliwatts of power, and hence can be operated in a cryostat. Thin film patterns of arbitrary shapes using multiple materials can be manufactured, while strongly suppressing thermal annealing effects. We demonstrate deposition of quench condensed lead films with fractions of a monolayer thickness control. Furthermore, using low deposition rates it is estimated that the surface temperature of the target heats by only 1.7 K. We study the effects of growing quench condensed films with different evaporation rates to demonstrate thermal annealing effects which occur during deposition. We measure the minimum conduction thickness (insulator to metal transition) as well as the superconducting transition temperature as a function of film thickness in order to shed light on growth of amorphous films and the transition to nanocluster formations. The Fab on a Chip will allow us to build nanocircuits made of ultra-thin materials. Annealing and doping is controlled and measurements occur in situ, without exposing the fabricated circuits to thermal fluctuations or foreign contaminants. This enables new types of experiments based on quantum circuits which cannot be fabricated using standard lithography techniques.

  5. Surface reactions of molecular and atomic oxygen with carbon phosphide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham, Justin; Torres, Jessica; Wolfe, Glenn; d'Agostino, Alfred; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2005-11-01

    The surface reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon phosphide films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Carbon phosphide films were produced by ion implantation of trimethylphosphine into polyethylene. Atmospheric oxidation of carbon phosphide films was dominated by phosphorus oxidation and generated a carbon-containing phosphate surface film. This oxidized surface layer acted as an effective diffusion barrier, limiting the depth of phosphorus oxidation within the carbon phosphide film to phosphorus atoms as well as the degree of phosphorus oxidation. For more prolonged AO exposures, a highly oxidized phosphate surface layer formed that appeared to be inert toward further AO-mediated erosion. By utilizing phosphorus-containing hydrocarbon thin films, the phosphorus oxides produced during exposure to AO were found to desorb at temperatures >500 K under vacuum conditions. Results from this study suggest that carbon phosphide films can be used as AO-resistant surface coatings on polymers.

  6. Role of atomic transverse migration in growth of diamond-like carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Tian-Bao; Hu Yuan-Zhong; Wang Hui

    2007-01-01

    The growth of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of impact angle on film structure is carefully studied, which shows that the transverse migration of the incident atoms is the main channel of film relaxation. A transverse-migration-induced film relaxation model is presented to elucidate the process of film relaxation which advances the original model of subplantation. The process of DLC film growth on a rough surface is also investigated, as well as the evolution of microstructure and surface morphology of the film. A preferential-to-homogeneous growth mode and a smoothing of the film are observed, which are due to the transverse migration of the incident atoms.

  7. On-chip stress relaxation testing method for freestanding thin film materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulombier, M; Guisbiers, G; Colla, M-S; Vayrette, R; Raskin, J-P; Pardoen, T

    2012-10-01

    A stress relaxation method for freestanding thin films is developed based on an on-chip internal stress actuated microtensile testing set-up. The on-chip test structures are produced using microfabrication techniques involving cleaning, deposition, lithography, and release. After release from the substrate, the test specimens are subjected to uniaxial tension. The applied load decays with the deformation taking place during relaxation. This technique is adapted to strain rates lower than 10(-6)∕s and permits the determination of the strain rate sensitivity of very thin films. The main advantage of the technique is that the relaxation tests are simultaneously performed on thousands of specimens, pre-deformed up to different strain levels, for very long periods of time without monopolizing any external mechanical loading equipment. Proof of concept results are provided for 205-nm-thick sputtered AlSi(0.01) films and for 350-nm-thick evaporated Pd films showing unexpectedly high relaxation at room temperature.

  8. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio

    2015-06-01

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner's fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α3β3 subcomplex of F1-ATPase in dynamic action at ˜7 frames/s.

  9. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Shingo [Department of Physics, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio [Department of Physics, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology of the Japan Science and Technology Agency, 7 Goban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner’s fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α{sub 3}β{sub 3} subcomplex of F{sub 1}-ATPase in dynamic action at ∼7 frames/s.

  10. Application of plasma-polymerized films for isoelectric focusing of proteins in a capillary electrophoresis chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shuo-Wen; Loughran, Michael; Hiratsuka, Atsunori; Yano, Kazuyoshi; Karube, Isao

    2003-03-01

    The first use of plasma polymerization technique to modify the surface of a glass chip for capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) of different proteins is reported. The electrophoresis separation channel was machined in Tempax glass chips with length 70 mm, 300 microm width and 100 microm depth. Acetonitrile and hexamethyldisiloxane monomers were used for plasma polymerization. In each case 100 nm plasma polymer films were coated onto the chip surface to reduce protein wall adsorption and minimize the electroosmotic flow. Applied voltages of 1000 V, 2000 V and 3000 V were used to separate mixtures of cytochrome c (pI 9.6), hemoglobin (pI 7.0) and phycocyanin (pI 4.65). Reproducible isoelectric focusing of each pI marker protein was observed in different coated capillaries at increasing concentration 2.22-5 microg microL(-1). Modification of the glass capillary with hydrophobic HMDS plasma polymerized films enabled rapid cIEF within 3 min. The separation efficiency of cytochrome c and phycocyanin in both acrylamide and HMDS coated capillaries corresponded to a plate number of 19600 which compares favourably with capillary electrophoresis of neurotransmitters with amperometric detection.

  11. On-chip and freestanding elastic carbon films for micro-supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P; Lethien, C; Pinaud, S; Brousse, K; Laloo, R; Turq, V; Respaud, M; Demortière, A; Daffos, B; Taberna, P L; Chaudret, B; Gogotsi, Y; Simon, P

    2016-02-12

    Integration of electrochemical capacitors with silicon-based electronics is a major challenge, limiting energy storage on a chip. We describe a wafer-scale process for manufacturing strongly adhering carbide-derived carbon films and interdigitated micro-supercapacitors with embedded titanium carbide current collectors, fully compatible with current microfabrication and silicon-based device technology. Capacitance of those films reaches 410 farads per cubic centimeter/200 millifarads per square centimeter in aqueous electrolyte and 170 farads per cubic centimeter/85 millifarads per square centimeter in organic electrolyte. We also demonstrate preparation of self-supported, mechanically stable, micrometer-thick porous carbon films with a Young's modulus of 14.5 gigapascals, with the possibility of further transfer onto flexible substrates. These materials are interesting for applications in structural energy storage, tribology, and gas separation.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition Films as Diffusion Barriers for Silver Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Amy; Breitung, Eric; Drayman-Weisser, Terry; Gates, Glenn; Rubloff, Gary W.; Phaneuf, Ray J.

    2012-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was investigated as a means to create transparent oxide diffusion barrier coatings to reduce the rate of tarnishing for silver objects in museum collections. Accelerated aging by heating various thicknesses (5 to 100nm) of ALD alumina (Al2O3) thin films on sterling and fine silver was used to determine the effectiveness of alumina as a barrier to silver oxidation. The effect of aging temperature on the thickness of the tarnish layer (Ag2S) created at the interface of the ALD coating and the bulk silver substrate was determined by reflectance spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectric Spectroscopy (XPS). Reflectance spectroscopy was an effective rapid screening tool to determine tarnishing rates and the coating's visual impact. X-Ray Photoelectric Spectroscopy (XPS), and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) analysis showed a phase transformation in the Ag2S tarnish layer at 177 C and saturation in the thickness of the silver sulfide layer, indicating possible self-passivation of the tarnish layer.

  13. Nanoscale observation of organic thin film by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Shota; Uruma, Takeshi; Satoh, Nobuo; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Soga, Tetsuo

    2017-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) fabricated using organic semiconductors and hybrid solar cells (HSCs) based on organic semiconductors/quantum dots (QDs) have been attracting significant attention owing to their potential use in low-cost solar energy-harvesting applications and flexible, light-weight, colorful, large-area devices. In this study, we observed and evaluated the surface of a photoelectric conversion layer (active layer) of the OPVs and HSCs based on phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles. The experiment was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with a frequency modulation detector (FM detector) and a contact potential difference (CPD) detection circuit. We experimentally confirmed the changes in film thickness and surface potential, as affected by the ZnO nanoparticle concentration. From the experimental results, we confirmed that ZnO nanoparticles possibly affect the structures of PCBM and P3HT. Also, we prepared an energy band diagram on the basis of the observation results, and analyzed the energy distribution inside the active layer.

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy Studies on The Surface Morphologies of Chemical Bath Deposited Cus Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Soonmin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, copper sulphide thin films were deposited onto microscope glass slide by chemical bath deposition technique. The tartaric acid was served as complexing agent to chelate with Cu2+ to obtain complex solution. The influence of pH value on the surface morphologies of the films has been particularly investigated using the atomic force microscopy technique. The atomic force microscopy results indicate that the CuS films deposited at pH 1 were uniform, compact and pinhole free. However, the incomplete surface coverage observed for the films prepared at high pH (pH 2 and 2.5 values.

  15. Thin film metal sensors in fusion bonded glass chips for high-pressure microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Martin; Ek, Johan; Hedman, Ludvig; Johansson, Fredrik; Sehlstedt, Viktor; Stocklassa, Jesper; Snögren, Pär; Pettersson, Victor; Larsson, Jonas; Vizuete, Olivier; Hjort, Klas; Klintberg, Lena

    2017-01-01

    High-pressure microfluidics offers fast analyses of thermodynamic parameters for compressed process solvents. However, microfluidic platforms handling highly compressible supercritical CO2 are difficult to control, and on-chip sensing would offer added control of the devices. Therefore, there is a need to integrate sensors into highly pressure tolerant glass chips. In this paper, thin film Pt sensors were embedded in shallow etched trenches in a glass wafer that was bonded with another glass wafer having microfluidic channels. The devices having sensors integrated into the flow channels sustained pressures up to 220 bar, typical for the operation of supercritical CO2. No leakage from the devices could be found. Integrated temperature sensors were capable of measuring local decompression cooling effects and integrated calorimetric sensors measured flow velocities over the range 0.5-13.8 mm s-1. By this, a better control of high-pressure microfluidic platforms has been achieved.

  16. Atomic-scale epitaxial aluminum film on GaAs substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ting Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Atomic-scale metal films exhibit intriguing size-dependent film stability, electrical conductivity, superconductivity, and chemical reactivity. With advancing methods for preparing ultra-thin and atomically smooth metal films, clear evidences of the quantum size effect have been experimentally collected in the past two decades. However, with the problems of small-area fabrication, film oxidation in air, and highly-sensitive interfaces between the metal, substrate, and capping layer, the uses of the quantized metallic films for further ex-situ investigations and applications have been seriously limited. To this end, we develop a large-area fabrication method for continuous atomic-scale aluminum film. The self-limited oxidation of aluminum protects and quantizes the metallic film and enables ex-situ characterizations and device processing in air. Structure analysis and electrical measurements on the prepared films imply the quantum size effect in the atomic-scale aluminum film. Our work opens the way for further physics studies and device applications using the quantized electronic states in metals.

  17. High atomic diffusivity during pulsed laser irradiation of TiON quasi-amorphous films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodorescu, V.S., E-mail: teoval@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Maraloiu, A.V.; Negrea, R.F.; Ghica, D. [National Institute of Materials Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Scarisoreanu, N.D.; Dinescu, M. [National Institute of Lasers, Plasma and Radiation, 409 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Gartner, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, I.G. Murgulescu, Romanian Academy, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Blanchin, M.-G. [ILM – Université Claude Bernard Lyon1, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • The evidence of the structure of the TiON quasi-amorphous structure by HRTEM. • The evidence of the laser induced phase transition in this film structure. • Fast atomic diffusion in the amorphous film during the laser pulse action. - Abstract: Quasi-amorphous titanium oxynitride (TiON) films were obtained by annealing sol–gel anatase TiO{sub 2} films in NH{sub 3} atmosphere at 600 °C. These films were irradiated with 50 laser pulses using the fourth harmonic (266 nm) radiation of the Nd-YAG laser, with an average fluence of 20 mJ/cm{sup 2}. HRTEM observations of the pulsed laser irradiated films evidenced the rutile TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites formation. The rutile structure was not present either in the TiON films before the laser irradiation, or in the initial sol–gel anatase TiO{sub 2} films. During the laser irradiation, the film structure remains in the solid state phase, as it results from the temperature estimation and microscopic observations. For the rutile nanocrystals formation, the atomic diffusion length of the oxygen and titanium atoms should be in the nanometric range during the laser pulse action, which implies a diffusivity close to the values observed in the liquid phase. We consider that the rutile phase formation is a proof of the fast atomic diffusion in the solid amorphous matrix, during the laser irradiation.

  18. Surface morphology of ultrathin graphene oxide films obtained by the SAW atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachova, Olga V.; Balashov, Sergey M.; Costa, Carlos A. R.; Pavani Filho, A.

    2015-08-01

    Lately, graphene oxide (GO) thin films have attracted much attention: they can be used as humidity-sensitive coatings in the surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors; being functionalized, they can be used in optoelectronic or biodevices, etc. In this research we study surface morphology of small-area thin GO films obtained on Si and quartz substrates by deposition of very small amounts of H2O-GO aerosols produced by the SAW atomizer. An important feature of this method is the ability to work with submicrovolumes of liquids during deposition that provides relatively good control over the film thickness and quality, in particular, minimization of the coffee ring effect. The obtained films were examined using AFM and electron microscopy. Image analysis showed that the films consist of GO sheets of different geometry and sizes and may form discrete or continuous coatings at the surface of the substrates with the minimum thickness of 1.0-1.8 nm which corresponds to one or two monolayers of GO. The thickness and quality of the deposited films depend on the parameters of the SAW atomization (number of atomized droplets, a volume of the initial droplet, etc.) and on sample surface preparation (activation in oxygen plasma). We discuss the structure of the obtained films, uniformity and the surface coverage as a function of parameters of the film deposition process and sample preparation. Qualitative analysis of adhesion of GO films is made by rinsing the samples in DI water and subsequent evaluation of morphology of the remained films.

  19. Theoretic analysis of liquid film movement and its disintegration near the orifice of atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meng; Zhuang, Fengchen

    1993-04-01

    The movement of a conic liquid film in a restricted space is studied in this paper. The film is produced by a centrifugal nozzle and impinged on by a high-speed gas stream. Based on the theory of aerodynamics, some theoretical formulas for liquid film movement are established, a criterion of breaking up the moving liquid film is proposed and a formula for calculating the size of droplet formed by disintegration of the liquid film is presented. The calculation results can be used as a reference for atomizer design.

  20. Sulfonated polyetherketone (SPEK-C) films investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Htwe Htwe Yin; YIN Ze-Jie; TANG Shi-Biao; HUANG Huan; ZHU Da-Ming

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of sulfonated polyetherketone (SPEK-C) films was investigated by using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that free volume radius and intensity depend on the variation of sulfonation degree and solvent evaporation time of the films. Pore size and distribution determined from PALS and AFM measurements showed reasonable agreement.

  1. Effect of hydration film on scanning images of atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A standard calibration grating was used for image scanning to investigate the effect of hydration films on imaging resolution by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The results showed that the hydration films greatly affect the imaging resolution for the tapping mode, but no evident effect on the contact mode. The possible reasons for the effect of hydration films on scanning images of AFM are also brought forward here.

  2. Ultrathin atomic vapor film transmission spectroscopy: analysis of Dicke narrowing structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Li; Yanpeng Zhang; Chenli Gan

    2005-01-01

    Transmission sub-Doppler spectroscopy with confined atomic vapor film between two dielectric walls is theoretically studied. Because of atoms flying from wall to wall, where they get de-excited, the atomfield interaction time is anisotropic so that the contribution of slow atoms is enhanced, a sub-Doppler transmission spectroscopy (Dicke narrowing effect) can be obtained when the thickness of the film is much small or comparable with the wavelength even at small angle oblique incidence. It is feasible to get a sub-Doppler structure in a new region (L <λ/4) in experiments.

  3. A thin film approach for SiC-derived graphene as an on-chip electrode for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohsin; Khawaja, Mohamad; Notarianni, Marco; Wang, Bei; Goding, Dayle; Gupta, Bharati; Boeckl, John J.; Takshi, Arash; Motta, Nunzio; Saddow, Stephen E.; Iacopi, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    We designed a nickel-assisted process to obtain graphene with sheet resistance as low as 80 Ω square-1 from silicon carbide films on Si wafers with highly enhanced surface area. The silicon carbide film acts as both a template and source of graphitic carbon, while, simultaneously, the nickel induces porosity on the surface of the film by forming silicides during the annealing process which are subsequently removed. As stand-alone electrodes in supercapacitors, these transfer-free graphene-on-chip samples show a typical double-layer supercapacitive behaviour with gravimetric capacitance of up to 65 F g-1. This work is the first attempt to produce graphene with high surface area from silicon carbide thin films for energy storage at the wafer-level and may open numerous opportunities for on-chip integrated energy storage applications.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of copper and copper silver films using an electrochemical process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J.S., E-mail: jsfang@nfu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Liu, Y.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Chin, T.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the formation and properties of Cu and Cu(Ag) films on a Ru/Si substrate using electrochemical atomic layer deposition. The process was performed layer-by-layer using underpotential deposition (UPD) and surface-limited redox reactions. The first Cu atomic layer was deposited on the Ru/Si substrate via UPD. Using UPD, atomic layered of Pb, which acts as a sacrificial layer, was applied on the Cu layer. Then, a Cu{sup 2+} solution was flushed into the cell at an open-circuit potential, and the Pb layer was exchanged for Cu via redox replacements. The above sequences were repeated 500 times to form a Cu film. The Cu(Ag) alloy films were formed using Cu–UPD and Ag–UPD in predetermined sequences. The lowest electrical resistivity achieved was 3.6 and 2.2 μΩ cm for the Cu film and Cu(Ag) film, respectively, after annealing at 400 °C. Due to the self-limiting reactions, the process has the ability to deposit atomic layers to meet the requirement of Cu interconnects. - Highlights: • Layer-by-layer growth of Cu and Cu(Ag) films are prepared using electrochemical atomic layer deposition. • Cu coverage is from 0.33 to 0.51 ML for each deposition cycle in different NaCl concentrations. • The process can be applied in Cu interconnections.

  5. Thin Film of Perovskite Oxide with Atomic Scale p-n Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Bin; HUANG Ke-ke; HOU Chang-min; YUAN Hong-ming; PANG Guang-sheng; FENG Shou-hua

    2012-01-01

    Thin films of perovskite manganese oxide La0.66Ca0.29K0.05MnO3(LCKMO) on Au/ITO(ITO=indium tin oxide) substrates were prepared by off-axis radio frequency magnetron sputtering and characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD),high-resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM),and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) at room temperature.The thin films with thickness ranged from 100 nm to 300 nm basically show cubic structures with a=0.3886 nm,the same as that of the raw material used,but the structures are highly modulated.C-AFM results revealed that the atomic scale p-n junction feature of the thin films was the same as that of the single crystals.The preparation of the thin films thus further confirms the possibility of their application extending from micrometer-sized single crystals to macroscopic thin film.

  6. Fabrication of atomically smooth SrRuO3 thin films by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    High-quality SrRuO3 (SRO) thin films and SrTiO3/SRO bilayer were grown epitaxially on SrTiO3 (STO)(001) substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy. The results of in situ observation of reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex situ X-ray diffraction θ -2θ scan indicate that the SRO thin films have good crystallinity. The measurements of atomic force microscopy and scan tunneling microscopy reveal that the surface of the SRO thin film is atomically smooth. The resistivity of the SRO thin film is 300 μΩ·cm at room temperature. Furthermore, the transmission electron microscopy study shows that the interfaces of STO/SRO and SRO/STO are very clear and no interfacial reaction layer was observed. The experimental results show that the SRO thin film is an excellent electrode material for devices based on perovskite oxide materials.

  7. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbard, J A; Softley, T P

    2016-06-21

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the atom. We show that "handshake" electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given film thickness.

  8. Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, Richard Alexander

    a final value of Qm = 5.8(1.1) x 105, representing more than an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional limits of SiO2 for a pendulum geometry. Our technique may enable new opportunities for mechanical sensing and facilitate observations of quantum behavior in this class of mechanical systems. We then give a detailed overview of the techniques used to produce high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with applications in a wide range of quantum optics experiments. The ability to fabricate such nanodevices with high precision opens the door to a vast array of experiments which integrate macroscopic optical setups with lithographically engineered nanodevices. Coupled with atom-trapping experiments in the Kimble Lab, we use these techniques to realize a new waveguide chip designed to address ultra-cold atoms along lithographically patterned nanobeams which have large atom-photon coupling and near 4pi Steradian optical access for cooling and trapping atoms. We describe a fully integrated and scalable design where cold atoms are spatially overlapped with the nanostring cavities in order to observe a resonant optical depth of d0 ≈ 0.15. The nanodevice illuminates new possibilities for integrating atoms into photonic circuits and engineering quantum states of atoms and light on a microscopic scale. We then describe our work with superconducting microwave resonators coupled to a phononic cavity towards the goal of building an integrated device for quantum-limited microwave-to-optical wavelength conversion. We give an overview of our characterizations of several types of substrates for fabricating a low-loss high-frequency electromechanical system. We describe our electromechanical system fabricated on a SiN membrane which consists of a 12 GHz superconducting LC resonator coupled capacitively to the high frequency localized modes of a phononic nanobeam. Using our suspended membrane geometry we isolate our system from substrates with significant loss tangents

  9. Fast-response, sensitivitive and low-powered chemosensors by fusing nanostructured porous thin film and IDEs-microheater chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhengfei; Xu, Lei; Duan, Guotao; Li, Tie; Zhang, Hongwen; Li, Yue; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yuelin; Cai, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    The chemiresistive thin film gas sensors with fast response, high sensitivity, low power consumption and mass-produced potency, have been expected for practical application. It requires both sensitive materials, especially exquisite nanomaterials, and efficient substrate chip for heating and electrical addressing. However, it is challenging to achieve repeatable microstructures across the films and low power consumption of substrate chip. Here we presented a new sensor structure via the fusion of metal-oxide nanoporous films and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based sensing chip. An interdigital-electrodes (IDEs) and microheater integrated MEMS structure is designed and employed as substrate chip to in-situ fabricate colloidal monolayer template-induced metal-oxide (egg. SnO2) nanoporous sensing films. This fused sensor demonstrates mW-level low power, ultrafast response (~1 s), and parts-per-billion lever detection for ethanol gas. Due to the controllable template strategy and mass-production potential, such micro/nano fused high-performance gas sensors will be next-generation key miniaturized/integrated devices for advanced practical applications.

  10. A Simple and Reliable Assay for Detecting Specific Nucleotide Sequences in Plants Using Optical Thin-film Biosensor Chips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Bai; X. Zhong; L. Ma; W. Zheng; L. Fan; N. Wei; X.W. Deng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Here we report the adaptation and optimization of an efficient, accurate and inexpensive assay that employs custom-designed silicon-based optical thin-film biosensor chips to detect unique transgenes in genetically modified (GM) crops and SNP markers in model plant genomes.

  11. Growth and atomic structure of tellurium thin films grown on Bi2Te3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Yuma; Sugiyama, Yuya; Ideta, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Kiyohisa; Hirahara, Toru

    2017-03-01

    We have grown tellurium (Te) thin films on Bi2Te3 and investigated the atomic structure. From low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements, we found that the Te films are [10 1 bar0]-oriented with six domains. A detailed analysis of the reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pattern revealed that the films are strained with the in-plane lattice constant compressed by ∼1.5% compared to the bulk value due to the epitaxy between Te and Bi2Te3. These films will be interesting systems to investigate the predicted topological phases that occur in strained Te.

  12. Growth by atomic layer epitaxy and characterization of thin films of ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopalko, K.; Lusakowska, E.; Paszkowicz, W.; Domagala, J.Z.; Szczerbakow, A.; Swiatek, K.; Dybko, K. [Institute of Physics, Polish Acad. of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Wojcik, A.; Godlewski, M. [Institute of Physics, Polish Acad. of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Dep. of Mathem. and Natural Sci. College of Science, Cardinal S. Wyszynski Univ., Warsaw (Poland); Godlewski, M.M. [Dept. of Physiology, Biochem., Pharmacology and Toxicology, Fac. of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw Agriculture University, Warsaw (Poland)

    2005-02-01

    ABSTRACT Atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) was applied to grow thin films of monocrystalline and polycrystalline ZnO. Monocrystalline films were obtained only for GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates, whereas use of sapphire, silicon or soda lime glass resulted in either 3D growth mode or in polycrystalline films showing preferential orientation along the c axis. Successful Mn doping of ZnO films is reported, when using organic Mn precursors. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Molecular Positional Order in Langmuir-Blodgett Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, L.; Ronsin, O.; Chatenay, D.

    1993-02-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett films of barium arachidate have been studied on both macroscopic and microscopic scales by atomic force microscopy. As prepared, the films exhibit a disordered hexagonal structure; molecularly resolved images in direct space establish a connection between the extent of the positional order and the presence of defects such as dislocations. Upon heating, the films reorganize into a more condensed state with a centered rectangular crystallographic arrangement; in this new state the films exhibit long-range positional order and unusual structural features, such as a height modulation of the arachidic acid molecules.

  14. Molecular positional order in Langmuir-Blodgett films by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdieu, L.; Ronsin, O.; Chatenay, D. (Inst. Curie, Paris (France))

    1993-02-05

    Langmuir-Blodgett films of barium arachidate have been studied on both macroscopic and microscopic scales by atomic force microscopy. As prepared, the films exhibit a disordered hexagonal structure; molecularly resolved images in direct space establish a connection between the extent of the positional order and the presence of defects such as dislocations. Upon heating, the films reorganize into a more condensed state with a centered rectangular crystallographic arrangement; in this new state the films exhibit long-range positional order and unusual structural features, such as a height modulation of the arachidic acid molecules. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Investigating the crystal growth behavior of biodegradable polymer blend thin films using in situ atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malwela, T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the crystal growth behavior of biodegradable polylactide (PLA)/poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] (PBSA) blend thin films using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Currently, polymer thin films have received increased research...

  16. Silicon solar cell performance deposited by diamond like carbon thin film ;Atomic oxygen effects;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Abbas Ail; Eshaghi, Akbar; Karami, Esmaeil

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a diamond-like carbon thin film was deposited on p-type polycrystalline silicon solar cell via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method by using methane and hydrogen gases. The effect of atomic oxygen on the functioning of silicon coated DLC thin film and silicon was investigated. Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the DLC thin film. Photocurrent-voltage characteristics of the silicon solar cell were carried out using a solar simulator. The results showed that atomic oxygen exposure induced the including oxidation, structural changes, cross-linking reactions and bond breaking of the DLC film; thus reducing the optical properties. The photocurrent-voltage characteristics showed that although the properties of the fabricated thin film were decreased after being exposed to destructive rays, when compared with solar cell without any coating, it could protect it in atomic oxygen condition enhancing solar cell efficiency up to 12%. Thus, it can be said that diamond-like carbon thin layer protect the solar cell against atomic oxygen exposure.

  17. Intercalation of two-dimensional graphite films on metals by atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gall, N R; Tontegode, A Ya; Usufov, M M

    1999-01-01

    An analysis is made of some general laws governing a new physical effect, i.e., the spontaneous penetration of particles (atoms, C/sub 60/ molecules) adsorbed on a two-dimensional graphite film on a metal (Ir, Re, Pt, Mo, ...) to beneath the graphite film (intercalation). It is shown that atoms having low ionization potentials (Cs, K, Na) intercalate a two-dimensional graphite film on iridium at T=300-400 K with an efficiency Aleph approximately=0.5, accumulating beneath the film to a concentration of up to a monolayer. Atoms having high ionization potentials (Si, Pt, Ni, C, Mo, etc.) intercalate a two- dimensional graphite film on iridium at T approximately=1000 K with an efficiency Aleph approximately=1, forming beneath the film a thick intercalate layer which is strongly bonded chemically to the metal substrate but is probably weakly bonded to the graphite monolayer by van der Waals forces. The presence of a graphite "lid" impeding the escape of atoms from the intercalated state up to record high temperatu...

  18. Direct observation of atomic-level nucleation and growth processes from an ultrathin metallic glass films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, K. Q.; Cao, C. R.; Sun, Y. T.; Li, J.; Bai, H. Y.; Zheng, D. N., E-mail: l.gu@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: whw@iphy.ac.cn; Wang, W. H., E-mail: l.gu@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: whw@iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Gu, L., E-mail: l.gu@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: whw@iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-01-07

    Till date, there have been no direct atomic-level experimental observations of the earliest stages of the nucleation and growth processes of nanocrystals formed by thermally induced crystallization in ultrathin metallic glasses (MGs). Here, we present a study of the crystallization process in atomically thin and highly stable MG films using double spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-TEM). Taking advantage of the stability of MG films with a slow crystallization process and the atomic-level high resolution of Cs-TEM, we observe the formation of the nucleus precursor of nanocrystals formed by atom aggregation followed by concomitant coalescence and stepwise evolution of the shape of the nanocrystals with a monodispersed and separated bimodal size distribution. Molecular dynamics simulation of the atomic motion in the glass film on a rigid amorphous substrate confirms the stepwise evolution processes of atom aggregation, cluster formation, cluster movement on the substrate, and cluster coalescence into larger crystalline particles. Our results might provide a better fundamental understanding of the nucleation and growth processes of nanocrystals in thin MG films.

  19. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Gibbard, Jemma A

    2016-01-01

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the Rydberg atom. We show that `handshake' electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films, have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given...

  20. Investigation of organic films by atomic force microscopy: Structural, nanotribological and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yabing

    2011-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has found its applications in a wide range of research fields. In this review, we show by examples that atomic force microscopy is a powerful technique to investigate structural, mechanical and electrical properties of organic films. We start with an introduction of AFM instrumentation highlighting AFM developments that are of direct relevance to organic films. Next, we review AFM studies on organic films according to their preparation methods: self-assembly, the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, solution preparation, and thermal evaporation. In the discussion on self-assembled monolayers, we focus on aspects such as structural evolution, load-induced molecular tilting, annealing, and incorporation of conjugated groups. For solution prepared organic films, we stress annealing-induced structural evolution as well as the effects of phase separation/segregation. We also briefly summarize the progress of AFM investigation on Langmuir-Blodgett films and thermally evaporated organic films. We conclude the review by providing some thoughts for future exploration. In particular, atomic force microscopy combined with ultra-flat coplanar nano-electrodes provides a promising platform to isolate single or a small number of molecular features (e.g. vacancies, defects, grain boundaries) in organic films as well as to identify the role of these features at the nanometer scale.

  1. Periodic oxidation for fabricating titanium oxynitride thin films via atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwashita, Shinya, E-mail: shinya.iwashita@tel.com; Aoyama, Shintaro; Nasu, Masayuki; Shimomura, Kouji; Noro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Toshio; Akasaka, Yasushi [SPE Core Technology Development Department, Tokyo Electron Yamanashi Ltd., 50 Mitsuzawa, Hosaka-cho, 407-0192 Nirasaki (Japan); Miyashita, Kohei [Leading Edge Process Development Center, Tokyo Electron Ltd., 650 Mitsuzawa, Hosaka-cho, 407-0192 Nirasaki (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    This paper demonstrates thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) combined with periodic oxidation for synthesizing titanium oxynitride (TiON) thin films. The process used a typical ALD reactor for the synthesis of titanium nitride (TiN) films wherein oxygen was supplied periodically between the ALD-TiN cycles. The great advantage of the process proposed here was that it allowed the TiN films to be oxidized efficiently. Also, a uniform depth profile of the oxygen concentration in the films could be obtained by tuning the oxidation conditions, allowing the process to produce a wide variety of TiON films. The resistivity measurement is a convenient method to confirm the reproducibility of metal film fabrication but may not be applicable for TiON films depending upon the oxidation condition because the films can easily turn into insulators when subjected to periodic oxidation. Therefore, an alternative reproducibility confirmation method was required. In this study, spectroscopic ellipsometry was applied to monitor the variation of TiON films and was able to detect changes in film structures such as conductor–insulator transitions in the TiON films.

  2. Vanadium dioxide film protected with an atomic-layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao; Cao, Yunzhen, E-mail: yzhcao@mail.sic.ac.cn; Yang, Chao; Yan, Lu; Li, Ying [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 588 Heshuo Road, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A VO{sub 2} film exposed to ambient air is prone to oxidation, which will degrade its thermochromic properties. In this work, the authors deposited an ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film with atomic layer deposition (ALD) to protect the underlying VO{sub 2} film from degradation, and then studied the morphology and crystalline structure of the films. To assess the protectiveness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capping layer, the authors performed a heating test and a damp heating test. An ultrathin 5-nm-thick ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film was sufficient to protect the underlying VO{sub 2} film heated at 350 °C. However, in a humid environment at prolonged durations, a thicker ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film (15 nm) was required to protect the VO{sub 2}. The authors also deposited and studied a TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} bilayer, which significantly improved the protectiveness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film in a humid environment.

  3. Determination of the actuator sensitivity of electromechanical polypropylene films by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Jouko; Paajanen, Mika; Lekkala, Jukka

    2000-10-01

    The actuator functionality of electromechanical polypropylene films was studied using atomic force microscopy. The film carries a permanent electric charge and includes microbubbles as a result of two-dimensional stretching of the film. The thickness change of various film structures covered with electrodes was measured as a function of external voltage. The dependence was found to be nonlinear, the thickness change in the range 0.001%-0.1% of the total film thickness and affected by the internal charge density of the film. Applying a capacitor model including an air gap within the polymer layer enabled the determination of the Young's modulus, the interfacial charge density and the actuator sensitivity of the studied structures.

  4. High sensitive formaldehyde graphene gas sensor modified by atomic layer deposition zinc oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Haichuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Keke; Xie, Haifen, E-mail: hfxie@ecust.edu.cn [Department of Physics, School of Science, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhao, Xiaojing; Liu, Feng [Department of Physics, Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2014-07-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films with various thicknesses were fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition on Chemical Vapor Deposition grown graphene films and their response to formaldehyde has been investigated. It was found that 0.5 nm ZnO films modified graphene sensors showed high response to formaldehyde with the resistance change up to 52% at the concentration of 9 parts-per-million (ppm) at room temperature. Meanwhile, the detection limit could reach 180 parts-per-billion (ppb) and fast response of 36 s was also obtained. The high sensitivity could be attributed to the combining effect from the highly reactive, top mounted ZnO thin films, and high conductive graphene base network. The dependence of ZnO films surface morphology and its sensitivity on the ZnO films thickness was also investigated.

  5. A Thin Liquid Film and Its Effects in an Atomic Force Microscopy Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jing; ZHENG Zhi-Jun; YU Ji-Lin; BAI Yi-Long

    2009-01-01

    Recently,it has been observed that a liquid film spreading on a sample surface will significantly distort atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements.In order to elaborate on the effect,we establish an equation governing the deformation of liquid film under its interaction with the AFM tip and substrate.A key issue is the critical liquid bump height yoc,at which the liquid film jumps to contact the AFM tip.It is found that there are three distinct regimes in the variation of yoc with film thickness H,depending on Hamaker constants of tip,sample and liquid.Noticeably,there is a characteristic thickness H* physically defining what a thin fihn is;namely,once the film thickness H is the same order as H*,the effect of film thickness should be taken into account.The value of H* is dependent on Hamaker constants and liquid surface tension as well as tip radius.

  6. Fabrication and laser patterning of polystyrene optical oxygen sensor films for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grist, S M; Oyunerdene, N; Flueckiger, J; Kim, J; Wong, P C; Chrostowski, L; Cheung, K C

    2014-11-21

    We present a novel and simple method for patterning oxygen-sensitive polystyrene thin films and demonstrate its potential for integration with microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. Optical oxygen sensing films composed of polystyrene with an embedded luminescent oxygen-sensitive dye present a convenient option for the measurement of oxygen levels in microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices; however, patterning and integrating the films with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices has proven difficult due to a residue after dry etch patterning that inhibits subsequent PDMS bonding. Our new method uses mask-less laser ablation by a commercial laser ablation system to define the outline of the structures and subsequent bulk film removal by aqueous lift-off. Because the bulk film is peeled or lifted off of the substrate rather than etched, the process is compatible with standard PDMS plasma bonding. We used ToF-SIMS analysis to investigate how laser ablation facilitates this fabrication process as well as why dry etching polystyrene inhibits PDMS plasma bonding. The results of this analysis showed evidence of chemical species formed during the laser ablation and dry etching processes that can produce these effects. Our new method's mask-less nature, simplicity, speed, and compatibility with PDMS bonding make it ideally suited for single-use lab-on-a-chip applications. To demonstrate the method's compatibility with PDMS microfluidics, we also present a demonstration of the sensors' integration into a microfluidic oxygen gradient generator device.

  7. Atom probe tomography study of GaMnN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Robert; Kane, Matthew [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, 110 W Boyd St Rm 150, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Diercks, David [Center for Advanced Research and Technology, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Determining the nanoscale atomic distribution of transition metals is essential for understanding the magnetic behavior of III-nitride semiconductors. Atom probe tomography is a characterization technique that can provide direct physical detection of the location of atoms and thus is ideal for investigating nanoscale atomic ordering in these materials. This work presents a study of GaMnN thin films grown bymetalorganic chemical vapor deposition that are characterized utilizing the state of the art local electrode atom probe (LEAP trademark) to determine the atomic ordering of Mn in an effort to help understand the nanoclustering behaviour which leads to observed room-temperature ferromagnetic behaviour in GaMnN. The distribution of Mn on the atomic scale was found to be random in nature in the bulk of the thin film where the analysis was performed with no evidence for the predisposition of Mn to form dimers, trimers or clusters. Other sources of clustering must lead to the room-temperature ferromagnetic behaviour that has been observed in these samples, such as surface segregation of Mn during the growth process. This work proves consistent with prior magnetic analysis in that most atoms in the crystal are isolated Mn atoms which result in a paramagnetic signal. This work is a first step towards the ultimate goal of understanding the structure-property-growth condition relationships for the tailoring of specific MOCVD processes in nitride semiconductors. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Micro-supercapacitors from carbide derived carbon (CDC) films on silicon chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peihua; Heon, Min; Pech, David; Brunet, Magali; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Gogotsi, Yury; Lofland, Samuel; Hettinger, Jeffrey D.; Simon, Patrice

    2013-03-01

    Interdigitated on-chip micro-supercapacitors based on Carbide Derived Carbon (CDC) films were fabricated and tested. A titanium carbide (TiC) film was patterned and treated with chlorine to obtain a TiC derived carbon (TiC-CDC) film, followed by the deposition of two types of current collectors (Ti/Au and Al) using standard micro-fabrication processes. CDC based micro-supercapacitors were electrochemically characterized by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy using a 1 M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate, NEt4BF4, in propylene carbonate (PC) electrolyte. A capacitance of 0.78 mF for the device and 1.5 mF cm-2 as the specific capacitance for the footprint of the device was measured for a 2 V potential range at 100 mV s-1. A specific energy of 3.0 mJ cm-2 and a specific power of 84 mW cm-2 were calculated for the devices. These devices provide a pathway for fabricating pure carbon-based micro-supercapacitors by micro-fabrication, and can be used for powering micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and electronic devices.

  9. Effects of hydrogen atoms on surface conductivity of diamond film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengbin Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of surface chemisorbed hydrogen atoms and hydrogen atoms in the subsurface region of diamond on surface conductivity, models of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on diamond with (100 orientation and various concentrations of hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond were built. By using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, the equilibrium geometries and densities of states of the models were studied. The results showed that the surface chemisorbed hydrogen alone could not induce high surface conductivity. In addition, isolated hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond prefer to exist at the bond centre site of the C-C bond. However, such a structure would induce deep localized states, which could not improve the surface conductivity. When the hydrogen concentration increases, the C-H-C-H structure and C-3Hbc-C structure in the subsurface region are more stable than other configurations. The former is not beneficial to the increase of the surface conductivity. However, the latter would induce strong surface states near the Fermi level, which would give rise to high surface conductivity. Thus, a high concentration of subsurface hydrogen atoms in diamond would make significant contributions to surface conductivity.

  10. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of copper(II) oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iivonen, Tomi, E-mail: tomi.iivonen@helsinki.fi; Hämäläinen, Jani; Mattinen, Miika; Popov, Georgi; Leskelä, Markku [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Marchand, Benoît; Mizohata, Kenichiro [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Kim, Jiyeon; Fischer, Roland A. [Chair of Inorganic Chemistry II, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitätsstrasse 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Copper(II) oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using bis-(dimethylamino-2-propoxide)copper [Cu(dmap){sub 2}] and ozone in a temperature window of 80–140 °C. A thorough characterization of the films was performed using x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, UV‐Vis spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis techniques. The process was found to produce polycrystalline copper(II) oxide films with a growth rate of 0.2–0.3 Å per cycle. Impurity content in the films was relatively small for a low temperature ALD process.

  11. Nanofiber Anisotropic Conductive Films (ACF) for Ultra-Fine-Pitch Chip-on-Glass (COG) Interconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Suk, Kyung-Lim; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Nanofiber anisotropic conductive films (ACF) were invented, by adapting nanofiber technology to ACF materials, to overcome the limitations of ultra-fine-pitch interconnection packaging, i.e. shorts and open circuits as a result of the narrow space between bumps and electrodes. For nanofiber ACF, poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) polymers were used as nanofiber polymer materials. For PVDF and PBS nanofiber ACF, conductive particles of diameter 3.5 μm were incorporated into nanofibers by electrospinning. In ultra-fine-pitch chip-on-glass assembly, insulation was significantly improved by using nanofiber ACF, because nanofibers inside the ACF suppressed the mobility of conductive particles, preventing them from flowing out during the bonding process. Capture of conductive particles was increased from 31% (conventional ACF) to 65%, and stable electrical properties and reliability were achieved by use of nanofiber ACF.

  12. Using Thin Film Targets for Muonic Atoms and Muon Catalyzed Fusion Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Bailey, J M; Beer, G A; Beveridge, J L; Faifman, M P; Huber, T M; Kammel, P; Kim, S K; Knowles, P E; Kunselman, A R; Markushin, V E; Marshall, G M; Martoff, C J; Mason, G R; Mulhauser, F; Olin, A; Petitjean, C; Porcelli, T A; Zmeskal, J

    2000-01-01

    Studies of muonic atoms and muon catalyzed fusion have been conventionally done in a bulk target of gas, liquid or solid hydrogen isotopes. The use of thin film targets developed at TRIUMF have notable advantages in tackling some of the most important questions in the field, which could be further exploited at future high intensity muon sources. We review the technique of the thin film method with emphasis on recent results and a future proposal.

  13. Optical and magnetic properties of a transparent garnet film for atomic physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Saito

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the optical and magnetic properties of a transparent magnetic garnet with a particular focus on its applications to atomic physics experiments. The garnet film used in this study was a magnetically soft material that was originally designed for a Faraday rotator at optical communication wavelengths in the near infrared region. The film had a thickness of 2.1 μm and a small optical loss at a wavelength of λ=780 nm resonant with Rb atoms. The Faraday effect was also small and, thus, barely affected the polarization of light at λ=780 nm. In contrast, large Faraday rotation angles at shorter wavelengths enabled us to visualize magnetic domains, which were perpendicularly magnetized in alternate directions with a period of 3.6 μm. We confirmed the generation of an evanescent wave on the garnet film, which can be used for the optical observation and manipulation of atoms on the surface of the film. Finally, we demonstrated a magnetic mirror for laser-cooled Rb atoms using the garnet film.

  14. Optical and magnetic properties of a transparent garnet film for atomic physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Mari; Tajima, Ryoichi; Kiyosawa, Ryota; Nagata, Yugo; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Takayuki; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the optical and magnetic properties of a transparent magnetic garnet with a particular focus on its applications to atomic physics experiments. The garnet film used in this study was a magnetically soft material that was originally designed for a Faraday rotator at optical communication wavelengths in the near infrared region. The film had a thickness of 2.1 μm and a small optical loss at a wavelength of λ =780 nm resonant with Rb atoms. The Faraday effect was also small and, thus, barely affected the polarization of light at λ =780 nm. In contrast, large Faraday rotation angles at shorter wavelengths enabled us to visualize magnetic domains, which were perpendicularly magnetized in alternate directions with a period of 3.6 μm. We confirmed the generation of an evanescent wave on the garnet film, which can be used for the optical observation and manipulation of atoms on the surface of the film. Finally, we demonstrated a magnetic mirror for laser-cooled Rb atoms using the garnet film.

  15. Preparation and atomic force microscopy of CTAB stabilized polythiophene nanoparticles thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graak, Pinki; Devi, Ranjna; Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Vishal; Kumar, Sacheen

    2016-05-01

    Polythiophene nanoparticles were synthesized by iron catalyzed oxidative polymerization method. Polythiophene formation was detected by UV-Visible spectroscopy with λmax 375nm. Thin films of CTAB stabilized polythiophene nanoparticles was deposited on n-type silicon wafer by spin coating technique at 3000rpm in three cycles. Thickness of the thin films was computed as 300-350nm by ellipsometry. Atomic force micrscopyrevealws the particle size of polymeric nanoparticles in the range of 30nm to 100nm. Roughness of thinfilm was also analyzed from the atomic force microscopy data by Picoimage software. The observed RMS value lies in the range of 6 nm to 12 nm.

  16. Atomically Thin Al2O3 Films for Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Jamie; Gong, Youpin; Gong, Ming; Su, Feifan; Xu, Huikai; Sakidja, Ridwan; Elliot, Alan; Lu, Rongtao; Zhao, Shiping; Han, Siyuan; Wu, Judy Z.

    2017-06-01

    Metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions are common throughout the microelectronics industry. The industry standard AlOx tunnel barrier, formed through oxygen diffusion into an Al wetting layer, is plagued by internal defects and pinholes which prevent the realization of atomically thin barriers demanded for enhanced quantum coherence. In this work, we employ in situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy along with molecular-dynamics simulations to understand and control the growth of atomically thin Al2O3 tunnel barriers using atomic-layer deposition. We find that a carefully tuned initial H2O pulse hydroxylated the Al surface and enabled the creation of an atomically thin Al2O3 tunnel barrier with a high-quality M -I interface and a significantly enhanced barrier height compared to thermal AlOx . These properties, corroborated by fabricated Josephson junctions, show that atomic-layer deposition Al2O3 is a dense, leak-free tunnel barrier with a low defect density which can be a key component for the next generation of metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions.

  17. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteucci, Marco; Heiskanen, Arto; Zor, Kinga

    2016-01-01

    We compare ultrasonic welding (UW) and thermal bonding (TB) for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM) microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones ...

  18. Direct observation of phase transition of GeSbTe thin films by Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Fei [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu Ling, E-mail: xuling@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang Rui; Geng Lei; Tong Liang; Xu Jun [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Su Weining; Yu Yao [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ma Zhongyuan; Chen Kunji [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized marks on GST thin film were fabricated using Conductive-AFM (Atomic Force Microscope). The AFM morphology images show that the marks are ablated at the center and a raised ring surrounding it. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure of GeSbTe thin films was characterized by XRD and AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing and applying electrical field can induce crystallization on thin film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conductive-AFM was used to modify the surface of GeSbTe thin film. - Abstract: GeSbTe (GST) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using electron beam evaporation system and then annealed in nitrogen atmosphere at different temperatures, ranging from 20 Degree-Sign C to 300 Degree-Sign C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force microscope (AFM) measurements were used to characterize the as-deposited and post-annealed thin films. Annealing treatment was found to induce changes on microstructure, surface roughness and grain size, indicating that with the increase of annealing temperature, the amorphous GST films first changed to face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase and then the stable hexagonal (hex) phase. Meanwhile, conductive-AFM (C-AFM) was used to produce crystallized GST dots on thin films. I-V spectroscopy results show that GST films can switch from amorphous state to crystalline state at threshold voltage. After switching, I-V curve exhibits ohmic characteristic, which is usually observed in crystallized GST films. By applying repeated I-V spectroscopies on the thin films, crystallized nuclei were observed. As the times of I-V spectroscopies increases, the area of written dots increases, and the center of the mark begin to ablate. The AFM images show that the shape of marks is an ablated center with a raised ring surrounding it.

  19. "Atomic Force Masking" Induced Formation of Effective Hot Spots along Grain Boundaries of Metal Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chae, Soo Sang; Jang, Seunghun; Choi, Won Jin; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-O; Lee, Tae Il

    2016-11-30

    We present an interesting phenomenon, "atomic force masking", which is the deposition of a few-nanometer-thick gold film on ultrathin low-molecular-weight (LMW) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) engineered on a polycrystalline gold thin film, and demonstrated the formation of hot spot based on SERS. The essential principle of this atomic force masking phenomenon is that an LMW PDMS layer on a single crystalline grain of gold thin film would repel gold atoms approaching this region during a second cycle of evaporation, whereas new nucleation and growth of gold atoms would occur on LMW PDMS deposited on grain boundary regions. The nanostructure formed by the atomic force masking, denoted here as "hot spots on grain boundaries" (HOGs), which is consistent with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, and the mechanism of atomic force masking were investigated by carrying out systematic experiments, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were made to carefully explain the related fundamental physics. Also, to highlight the manufacturing advantages of the proposed method, we demonstrated the simple synthesis of a flexible HOG SERS, and we used this substrate in a swabbing test to detect a common pesticide placed on the surface of an apple.

  20. Chemical resistance of thin film materials based on metal oxides grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammelselg, Väino, E-mail: vaino.sammelselg@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, Ravila 14a, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Netšipailo, Ivan; Aidla, Aleks; Tarre, Aivar; Aarik, Lauri; Asari, Jelena; Ritslaid, Peeter; Aarik, Jaan [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia)

    2013-09-02

    Etching rate of technologically important metal oxide thin films in hot sulphuric acid was investigated. The films of Al-, Ti-, Cr-, and Ta-oxides studied were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method on silicon substrates from different precursors in large ranges of growth temperatures (80–900 °C) in order to reveal process parameters that allow deposition of coatings with higher chemical resistance. The results obtained demonstrate that application of processes that yield films with lower concentration of residual impurities as well as crystallization of films in thermal ALD processes leads to significant decrease of etching rate. Crystalline films of materials studied showed etching rates down to values of < 5 pm/s. - Highlights: • Etching of atomic layer deposited thin metal oxide films in hot H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was studied. • Smallest etching rates of < 5 pm/s for TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were reached. • Highest etching rate of 2.8 nm/s for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was occurred. • Remarkable differences in etching of non- and crystalline films were observed.

  1. Oxidant-Dependent Thermoelectric Properties of Undoped ZnO Films by Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyunho

    2017-02-27

    Extraordinary oxidant-dependent changes in the thermoelectric properties of undoped ZnO thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been observed. Specifically, deionized water and ozone oxidants are used in the growth of ZnO by ALD using diethylzinc as a zinc precursor. No substitutional atoms have been added to the ZnO films. By using ozone as an oxidant instead of water, a thermoelectric power factor (σS) of 5.76 × 10 W m K is obtained at 705 K for undoped ZnO films. In contrast, the maximum power factor for the water-based ZnO film is only 2.89 × 10 W m K at 746 K. Materials analysis results indicate that the oxygen vacancy levels in the water- and ozone-grown ZnO films are essentially the same, but the difference comes from Zn-related defects present in the ZnO films. The data suggest that the strong oxidant effect on thermoelectric performance can be explained by a mechanism involving point defect-induced differences in carrier concentration between these two oxides and a self-compensation effect in water-based ZnO due to the competitive formations of both oxygen and zinc vacancies. This strong oxidant effect on the thermoelectric properties of undoped ZnO films provides a pathway to improve the thermoelectric performance of this important material.

  2. Chemical Stability of Titania and Alumina Thin Films Formed by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Gabriela C; Bao, Bo; Strandwitz, Nicholas C

    2015-07-15

    Thin films formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are being examined for a variety of chemical protection and diffusion barrier applications, yet their stability in various fluid environments is not well characterized. The chemical stability of titania and alumina thin films in air, 18 MΩ water, 1 M KCl, 1 M HNO3, 1 M H2SO4, 1 M HCl, 1 M KOH, and mercury was studied. Films were deposited at 150 °C using trimethylaluminum-H2O and tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium-H2O chemistries for alumina and titania, respectively. A subset of samples were heated to 450 and 900 °C in inert atmosphere. Films were examined using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Notably, alumina samples were found to be unstable in pure water, acid, and basic environments in the as-synthesized state and after 450 °C thermal treatment. In pure water, a dissolution-precipitation mechanism is hypothesized to cause surface roughening. The stability of alumina films was greatly enhanced after annealing at 900 °C in acidic and basic solutions. Titania films were found to be stable in acid after annealing at or above 450 °C. All films showed a composition-independent increase in measured thickness when immersed in mercury. These results provide stability-processing relationships that are important for controlled etching and protective barrier layers.

  3. Transparent ferrimagnetic semiconducting CuCr2O4 thin films by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, T. S.; Yadav, C. S.; Karppinen, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the magnetic and optical properties of CuCr2O4 thin films fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from Cu(thd)2, Cr(acac)3, and ozone; we deposit 200 nm thick films and anneal them at 700 °C in oxygen atmosphere to crystallize the spinel phase. A ferrimagnetic transition at 140 K and a direct bandgap of 1.36 eV are determined for the films from magnetic and UV-vis spectrophotometric measurements. Electrical transport measurements confirm the p-type semiconducting behavior of the films. As the ALD technique allows the deposition of conformal pin-hole-free coatings on complex 3D surfaces, our CuCr2O4 films are interesting material candidates for various frontier applications.

  4. Microwave annealing effects on ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Shirui; Dong Yabin; Yu Mingyan; Guo Xiaolong; Xu Xinwei; Jing Yupeng; Xia Yang

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide thin films deposited on glass substrate at 150 ℃ by atomic layer deposition were annealed by the microwave method at temperatures below 500 ℃.The microwave annealing effects on the structural and luminescent properties of ZnO films have been investigated by X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence.The results show that the MWA process can increase the crystal quality of ZnO thin films with a lower annealing temperature than RTA and relatively decrease the green luminescence of ZnO films.The observed changes have demonstrated that MWA is a viable technique for improving the crystalline quality of ZnO thin film on glass.

  5. Nanocharacterization and nanofabrication of a Nafion thin film in liquids by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Kazuo; Wang, Tong; Hara, Masahiko; Kuroda, Reiko; Uchida, On; Nagai, Masayuki

    2006-03-28

    We demonstrated the nanocharacterization and nanofabrication of a Nafion thin film using atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM images showed that the Nafion molecules form nanoclusters in water, in 5% methanol, and in acetic acid. Young's modulus E of a Nafion film was estimated by sequential force curve measurements in water and in 5% methanol on one sample surface. Ewater/E5% methanol was 1.75 +/- 0.40, so the film was much softer in 5% methanol than in water. Even when solvent was replaced from 5% methanol to water, Young's modulus was not recovered soon. We showed the first example of the mechanical properties of a Nafion film on the nanoscale. Furthermore, we succeeded in fabricating 3D nanostructures on a Nafion surface by AFM nanolithography in liquids. Our results showed the new potential of the AFM nanolithography of a polymer film by softening the molecules in liquids.

  6. Transparent ferrimagnetic semiconducting CuCr2O4 thin films by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Tripathi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the magnetic and optical properties of CuCr2O4 thin films fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD from Cu(thd2, Cr(acac3, and ozone; we deposit 200 nm thick films and anneal them at 700 °C in oxygen atmosphere to crystallize the spinel phase. A ferrimagnetic transition at 140 K and a direct bandgap of 1.36 eV are determined for the films from magnetic and UV-vis spectrophotometric measurements. Electrical transport measurements confirm the p-type semiconducting behavior of the films. As the ALD technique allows the deposition of conformal pin-hole-free coatings on complex 3D surfaces, our CuCr2O4 films are interesting material candidates for various frontier applications.

  7. Electrochemical behavior of high performance on-chip porous carbon films for micro-supercapacitors applications in organic electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousse, K.; Huang, P.; Pinaud, S.; Respaud, M.; Daffos, B.; Chaudret, B.; Lethien, C.; Taberna, P. L.; Simon, P.

    2016-10-01

    Carbide derived carbons (CDCs) are promising materials for preparing integrated micro-supercapacitors, as on-chip CDC films are prepared via a process fully compatible with current silicon-based device technology. These films show good adherence on the substrate and high capacitance thanks to their unique nanoporous structure which can be fine-tuned by adjusting the synthesis parameters during chlorination of the metallic carbide precursor. The carbon porosity is mostly related to the synthesis temperature whereas the thickness of the films depends on the chlorination duration. Increasing the pore size allows the adsorption of large solvated ions from organic electrolytes and leads to higher energy densities. Here, we investigated the electrochemical behavior and performance of on-chip TiC-CDC in ionic liquid solvent mixtures of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIBF4) diluted in either acetonitrile or propylene carbonate via cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Thin CDC films exhibited typical capacitive signature and achieved 169 F cm-3 in both electrolytes; 65% of the capacitance was still delivered at 1 V s-1. While increasing the thickness of the films, EMI+ transport limitation was observed in more viscous PC-based electrolyte. Nevertheless, the energy density reached 90 μW h cm-2 in 2M EMIBF4/ACN, confirming the interest of these CDC films for micro-supercapacitors applications.

  8. Structural and chemical analysis of annealed plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition aluminum nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broas, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.broas@aalto.fi; Vuorinen, Vesa [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sippola, Perttu; Pyymaki Perros, Alexander; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University. P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-07-15

    Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition was utilized to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) films on Si from trimethylaluminum and N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} plasma at 200 °C. Thermal treatments were then applied on the films which caused changes in their chemical composition and nanostructure. These changes were observed to manifest in the refractive indices and densities of the films. The AlN films were identified to contain light element impurities, namely, H, C, and excess N due to nonideal precursor reactions. Oxygen contamination was also identified in the films. Many of the embedded impurities became volatile in the elevated annealing temperatures. Most notably, high amounts of H were observed to desorb from the AlN films. Furthermore, dinitrogen triple bonds were identified with infrared spectroscopy in the films. The triple bonds broke after annealing at 1000 °C for 1 h which likely caused enhanced hydrolysis of the films. The nanostructure of the films was identified to be amorphous in the as-deposited state and to become nanocrystalline after 1 h of annealing at 1000 °C.

  9. Structural and optical properties of electrohydrodynamically atomized TiO{sub 2} nanostructured thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyung-Hyun; Duraisamy, Navaneethan; Muhammad, Nauman Malik [Jeju National University, School of Mechatronics Engineering, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Inyoung; Jo, Jeongdai [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM), Printed Electronics Research Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyunseok [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Cheonan, Chungcheongnam-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    In this paper, we report an alternate technique for the deposition of nanostructured TiO{sub 2} thin films using the electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) technique using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer. The required parameters for achieving uniform TiO{sub 2} films using EHDA are also discussed in detail. X-ray diffraction results confirm that the TiO{sub 2} films were oriented in the anatase phase. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed the uniform deposition of the TiO{sub 2}. The purity of the films is characterized by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), confirming the presence of Ti-O bonding in the films without any organic residue. The optical properties of the TiO{sub 2} films were measured by UV-visible spectroscopy, which shows that the transparency of the films is nearly 85% in the visible region. The current-voltage (I-V) curve of the TiO{sub 2} thin films shows a nearly linear behavior with 45 m{omega} cm of electrical resistivity. These results suggest that TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited via the EHDA method possess promising applications in optoelectronic devices. (orig.)

  10. Structural and electrical properties of ultrathin niobium nitride films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzen, S.; Ziegler, M.; Astafiev, O. V.; Schmelz, M.; Hübner, U.; Diegel, M.; Il'ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2017-03-01

    We studied and optimised the properties of ultrathin superconducting niobium nitride films fabricated with a plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process. By adjusting process parameters, the chemical embedding of undesired oxygen into the films was minimised and a film structure consisting of mainly polycrystalline niobium nitride with a small fraction of amorphous niobium oxide and niobium oxo-nitrides were formed. For this composition a critical temperature of 13.8 K and critical current densities of 7 × 106 A cm-2 at 4.2 K were measured on 40 nm thick films. A fundamental correlation between these superconducting properties and the crystal lattice size of the cubic δ-niobium-nitride grains were found. Moreover, the film thickness variation between 40 and 2 nm exhibits a pronounced change of the electrical conductivity at room temperature and reveals a superconductor-insulator-transition in the vicinity of 3 nm film thickness at low temperatures. The thicker films with resistances up to 5 kΩ per square in the normal state turn to the superconducting one at low temperatures. The perfect thickness control and film homogeneity of the PEALD growth make such films extremely promising candidates for developing novel devices on the coherent quantum phase slip effect.

  11. The Phase Transformations and Magnetoresistive Properties of Diluted Film Solid Solutions Based on Fe and Ge Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Vlasenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the structure, phase composition and magnetoresistive properties of single- and three-layer films based on Fe and Ge were studied. It is established that in such films eutectic is formed based on diluted solid solutions of Ge atoms in -Fe layers and of Fe atoms in -Ge layers at the total concentration of Ge atoms from 3 to 20 at.% in the temperature range of 300-870 K. It is shown that magnetoresistive properties of the films with eutectic composition are not significantly different from the properties of -Fe films.

  12. On the environmental stability of ZnO thin films by spatial atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Theelen, M.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.

    2013-01-01

    Undoped and indium-doped ZnO films have been deposited by atmospheric spatial atomic-layer-deposition (spatial-ALD). The stability of their electrical, optical, and structural properties has been investigated by a damp-heat test in an environment with 85% relative humidity at 85 °C. The resistivity

  13. Ultrathin film of nickel on the Cu (100) surface: Atomic structure and phonons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisova, Svetlana D., E-mail: svbor@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: rusina@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: rusina-g@mail.ru; Rusina, Galina G., E-mail: svbor@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: rusina@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: rusina-g@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    We investigated the structural and vibrational properties of the Cu (100) surface covered with ultrathin (1-5 ML) Ni films using interaction potential from the embedded atom method. The surface relaxation, dispersion relation and polarization of vibrational modes are discussed. Our calculated structural parameters are in good agreement with experimental results. The obtained vibrational frequencies compare well with the available experimental data.

  14. Electrical transport properties of oligothiophene based molecular films studied by current sensing Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, Bas L.M.; Martin, Florent; Qi, Yabing; Qi, Y.; Mauldin, Clayton; Vukmirovic, Nenad; Ren, JunFeng; Wormeester, Herbert; Katan, Allard J.; Altoe, Virginia; Aloni, Shaul; Frechet, Jean M.J.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Salmeron, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Using conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CAFM) we have investigated the electrical conduction properties of monolayer films of a pentathiophene derivative on a SiO2/Si-p+ substrate. By a combination of current–voltage spectroscopy and current imaging we show that lateral charge transport

  15. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  16. Solution processed Al doped ZnO film fabrication through electrohydrodynamic atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Nauman Malik [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, PO-Box, 1114, Islamabad (Pakistan); Duraisamy, Navaneethan [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Dang, Hyun-Woo [School of Electronic Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jeongdai [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung-Hyun, E-mail: amm@jejunu.ac.kr [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    In this study, highly transparent, 250 nm thick films of Aluminum doped Zinc-oxide (ZnO:Al) are achieved on glass substrates at ambient conditions through a solution processing technique called electrohydrodynamic atomization. A 10 wt.% monodispersed solution containing 6% ZnO:Al nanoparticles (ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in ethanol has been synthesized first and then used in the deposition process as the working solution. Pure and uniform transparent films with an average transmittance of 93% have been deposited with crystal structure exhibiting both zincite and gahnite phases. Surface composition purity has been confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique and the clear indication of Zn-2p and Al-2p peaks confirms surface integrity. Fourier Transform Infrared analysis further confirms the presence of aluminum in the samples. The electrical properties are studied by recording and analyzing the current-voltage (I-V) measurements and the resistivity has been estimated from the slope of the IV-curve which is approximately 25 m{Omega}.cm. The layer roughness has been characterized using atomic force microscopy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminum doped Zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) films are made via electrohydrodynamic atomization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO:Al nano-particle ink is used to form thin films in single step at room conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scanning electron and atomic force microscopes confirm fine layer characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray photoelectron and Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscope confirm film purity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transparent and conductive films have been fabricated with wurtzite structure.

  17. Atomic force microscopy study, kinetic roughening and multifractal analysis of electrodeposited silver films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasehnejad, M.; Gholipour Shahraki, M.; Nabiyouni, G.

    2016-12-01

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study surface morphology and kinetic roughening of Ag films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique is used to verify the films crystalline structure. The influence of film thickness on the kinetic roughening was investigated using AFM data and roughness calculation. It is revealed that the surface roughness increases with increasing the film thickness. The data also consist with a complex behavior which is called as anomalous scaling. Scaling laws analysis for Ag films presents two distinct dynamics including large local and scale roughness and indicates a power law dependency on the thickness of film. AFM images have been characterized by the multifractal analysis. This analysis shows that the self-similar and multifractal characteristics as well as anomalous scaling exist in the Ag film morphologies. Description of the quantitative growth and surface morphology was done by the multifractal spectra, f (α) - α . It is found that the multifractal spectrum shape is left hook-like (that is difference of height interval of the multifractal spectrum, Δf = f (αmin) - f (αmax) > 0). The results indicate that the surfaces having greater roughness give rise the wider multifractal spectrum width (Δα) and the greater Δf, thus, the nonuniformity of the height probabilities becomes larger. It indicates that the multifractality of the films becomes more pronounced at the higher thickness.

  18. Precision Photothermal Annealing of Nanoporous Gold Thin Films for the Microfabrication of a Single-chip Material Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, C. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shen, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rubenchik, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Demos, S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Matthews, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-30

    Single-chip material libraries of thin films of nanostructured materials are a promising approach for high throughput studies of structure-property relationship in the fields of physics and biology. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a nanostructured material of specific interest in both these fields. One attractive property of np-Au is its self-similar coarsening behavior by thermally induced surface diffusion. However, traditional heat application techniques for the modification of np-Au are bulk processes that cannot be used to generate a library of different pore sizes on a single chip. Laser micromachining offers an attractive solution to this problem by providing a means to apply energy with high spatial and temporal resolution. In the present study we use finite element multiphysics simulations to predict the effects of laser mode (continuous-wave vs. pulsed) and supporting substrate thermal conductivity on the local np-Au film temperatures during photothermal annealing and subsequently investigate the mechanisms by which the np-Au network is coarsening. Our simulations predict that continuous-wave mode laser irradiation on a silicon supporting substrate supports the widest range of morphologies that can be created through the photothermal annealing of thin film np-Au. Using this result we successfully fabricate a single-chip material library consisting of 81 np-Au samples of 9 different morphologies for use in increased throughput material interaction studies.

  19. Analysis of deuterium in V-Fe5at.% film by atom probe tomography (APT)

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2011-09-01

    V-Fe5at.% 2 and 10-nm thick single layered films were prepared by ion beam sputtering on W substrate. They were loaded with D from gas phase at 0.2 Pa and at 1 Pa, respectively. Both lateral and depth D distribution of these films was investigated in detail by atom probe tomography. The results of analysis are in good agreement between the average deuterium concentration and the value, expected from electromotive force measurement on a similar flat film. An enrichment of deuterium at the V/W interface was observed for both films. The origin of this D-accumulation was discussed in respect to electron transfer, mechanical stress and misfit dislocations. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K. K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (Dit) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  1. Surface Electromechanical Coupling on DLC Film with Conductive Atomic Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱守星; 丁建宁; 范真; 李长生; 蔡兰; 杨继昌

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) film composed of microscopically insulation but microscopically a mixture of conducting (sp2) and insulating (spa) phases was discussed on the local modification with a conductive atomic force microscope (C-AFM). Especially, a topographic change was observed when a direct current (DC) bias-voltage was applied to the DLC film. Experimental results show that a nanoscale pit on DLC surface was formed when applying a positive 25 V on DLC film. According to the interacting force between CoCr-coated microelectronic scanning probe (MESP) tip and DLC surface, as well as the Sondheimer oscillation theory, the "scalewing effect" of the pit was explained. Electromechanical coupling on DLC film suggested that the depth of pits increased with an increase of load applied to surface when the cantilever-deflected signal was less than a certain threshold voltage.

  2. Nanometer-scale lithography of ultrathin films with atomic force microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J C; Shin, Y W; Park, S W

    1998-01-01

    Ultrathin resist films have been prepared by both Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly (SA) techniques. Nanometer-scale patterning of these thin films has been performed by using the atomic force microscope (AFM) as the exposing tool. The poly (methylphenylmethacrylate) (PMPMA) LB films were prepared and fabricated by AFM lithography. When the exposure was carried out at the bias voltage of -25V, the protruding lines appeared in the exposed regions. The preoptimized LB films at various conditions exhibited 120 nm line resolution. An organosilane monolayer composed of octadecyldimethylsilyl groups was prepared on a Si substrate. It was then patterned through the localized degradation of the monolayer due to anodic reaction induced by an AFM tip. When the bias voltage was -30 V, the protruding lines appeared in the exposed regions.

  3. UV protective zinc oxide coating for biaxially oriented polypropylene packaging film by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahtinen, Kimmo, E-mail: kimmo.lahtinen@lut.fi [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Kääriäinen, Tommi, E-mail: tommi.kaariainen@colorado.edu [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Johansson, Petri, E-mail: petri.johansson@tut.fi [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, P.O.Box 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Kotkamo, Sami, E-mail: sami.kotkamo@tut.fi [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, P.O.Box 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Maydannik, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.maydannik@lut.fi [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Seppänen, Tarja, E-mail: tarja.seppanen@lut.fi [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Kuusipalo, Jurkka, E-mail: jurkka.kuusipalo@tut.fi [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, P.O.Box 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Cameron, David C., E-mail: david.cameron@miktech.fi [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli (Finland)

    2014-11-03

    Biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) packaging film was coated with zinc oxide (ZnO) coatings by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to protect the film from UV degradation. The coatings were made at a process temperature of 100 °C using diethylzinc and water as zinc and oxygen precursors, respectively. The UV protective properties of the coatings were tested by using UV–VIS and infrared spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a mechanical strength tester, which characterised the tensile and elastic properties of the film. The results obtained with 36 and 67 nm ZnO coatings showed that the ZnO UV protective layer is able to provide a significant decrease in photodegradation of the BOPP film under UV exposure. While the uncoated BOPP film suffered a complete degradation after a 4-week UV exposure, the 67 nm ZnO coated BOPP film was able to preserve half of its original tensile strength and 1/3 of its elongation at break after a 6-week exposure period. The infrared analysis and DSC measurements further proved the UV protection of the ZnO coatings. The results show that a nanometre scale ZnO coating deposited by ALD is a promising option when a transparent UV protection layer is sought for polymer substrates. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposited zinc oxide coatings were used as UV protection layers. • Biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) film was well protected against UV light. • Formation of UV degradation products in BOPP was significantly reduced. • Mechanical properties of the UV exposed BOPP film were significantly improved.

  4. Tuning the work function of ultrathin oxide films on metals by adsorption of alkali atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Umberto; Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2008-04-28

    We report a theoretical investigation of the adsorption of alkali metal atoms deposited on ultrathin oxide films. The properties of Li, Na, and K atoms adsorbed on SiO(2)/Mo(112) and of K on MgO / Ag(100) and TiO(2)/Pt(111) have been analyzed with particular attention to the induced changes in the work function of the system, Phi. On the nonreducible SiO(2) and MgO oxide films there is a net transfer of the outer ns electron of the alkali atom to the metal substrate conduction band; the resulting surface dipole substantially lowers Phi. The change in Phi depends (a) on the adsorption site (above the oxide film or at the interface) and (b) on the alkali metal coverage. Deposition of K on reducible TiO(2) oxide films results in adsorbed K(+) ions and in the formation of Ti(3+) ions. No charge transfer to the metal substrate is observed but also in this case the surface dipole resulting from the K-TiO(2) charge transfer has the effect to considerably reduce the work function of the system.

  5. Analysis of flow development in centrifugal atomization: Part I. Film thickness of a fully spreading melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. Y.

    2004-09-01

    Centrifugal atomization of metal melts is a cost-effective process for powder production and spray deposition. The properties of the as-produced powder and deposit are determined primarily by the characteristics of the atomized droplets, which in turn are largely dependent on the flow development of the melt on the atomizer. This paper develops a model for analysing the flow development of a fully spreading melt on and off the atomizing cup. The model can be used to calculate the velocity and film thickness of the melt as a function of melt volume flow rate, cup rotation speed, cup radius and cup slope angle, as well as to predict the trajectory of the spray off the cup. The model implies that the disintegration of a fully spreading melt takes place in the region just off the cup edge and the film thickness at the cup edge is a critical factor determining the sizes of the resultant droplets. The film thickness at the cup edge is shown to decrease with decreasing volume flow rate, with increasing cup rotation speed, with increasing cup radius and with decreasing cup slope angle.

  6. Control of nanoscale atomic arrangement in multicomponent thin films by temporally modulated vapour fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarakinos, Kostas

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis of multicomponent thin films using vapor fluxes with a modulated deposition pattern is a potential route for accessing a wide gamut of atomic arrangements and morphologies for property tuning. In the current study, we present a research concept that allows for understanding the combined effect of flux modulation, kinetics and thermodynamics on the growth of multinary thin films. This concept entails the combined use of thin film synthesis by means of multiatomic vapor fluxes modulated with sub-monolayer resolution, deterministic growth simulations and nanoscale microstructure probes. Using this research concept we study structure formation within the archetype immiscible Ag-Cu binary system showing that atomic arrangement and morphology at different length scales is governed by diffusion of near-surface Ag atoms to encapsulate 3D Cu islands growing on 2D Ag layers. Moreover, we explore the relevance of the mechanism outlined above for morphology evolution and structure formation within the miscible Ag-Au binary system. The knowledge generated and the methodology presented herein provides the scientific foundation for tailoring atomic arrangement and physical properties in a wide range of miscible and immiscible multinary systems.

  7. Towards ALD thin film stabilized single-atom Pd1 catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piernavieja-Hermida, Mar; Lu, Zheng; White, Anderson; Low, Ke-Bin; Wu, Tianpin; Elam, Jeffrey W; Wu, Zili; Lei, Yu

    2016-08-18

    Supported precious metal single-atom catalysts have shown interesting activity and selectivity in recent studies. However, agglomeration of these highly mobile mononuclear surface species can eliminate their unique catalytic properties. Here we study a strategy for synthesizing thin film stabilized single-atom Pd1 catalysts using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The thermal stability of the Pd1 catalysts is significantly enhanced by creating a nanocavity thin film structure. In situ infrared spectroscopy and Pd K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed that the Pd1 was anchored on the surface through chlorine sites. The thin film stabilized Pd1 catalysts were thermally stable under both oxidation and reduction conditions. The catalytic performance in the methanol decomposition reaction is found to depend on the thickness of protecting layers. While Pd1 catalysts showed promising activity at low temperature in a methanol decomposition reaction, 14 cycle TiO2 protected Pd1 was less active at high temperature. Pd L3 edge XAS indicated that the low reactivity compared with Pd nanoparticles is due to the strong adsorption of carbon monoxide even at 250 °C. These results clearly show that the ALD nanocavities provide a basis for future design of single-atom catalysts that are highly efficient and stable.

  8. Chemically modified STM tips for atomic-resolution imaging of ultrathin NaCI films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Li[1; Koen Schouteden[1; Violeta lancu[1; Ewald Janssens[1; Peter Lievens[1; Chris Van Haesendonck[1; Jorge I. Cerda[2

    2015-01-01

    Cl-functionalized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips are fabricated by modifying a tungsten STM tip in situ on islands of ultrathin NaCI(100) films on Au(111) surfaces. The functionalized tips are used to achieve clear atomic- resolution imaging of NaCI(100) islands. In comparison with bare metal tips, the chemically modified tips yield drastically enhanced spatial resolution as well as contrast reversal in STM topographs, implying that Na atoms, rather than C1 atoms, are imaged as protrusions. STM simulations based on a Green's function formalism reveal that the experimentally observed contrast reversal in the STM topographs is due to the highly localized character of the Cl-pz states at the tip apex. An additional remarkable characteristic of the modified tips is that in dI/dV maps, a Na atom appears as a ring with a diameter that depends crucially on the tip-sample distance.

  9. atomic layer deposition of amorphous niobium carbide-based thin film superconductors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prolier, T.; Klug, J. A.; Elam, J. W.; Claus, H.; Becker, N. G.; Pellin, M. J. (Materials Science Division)

    2011-01-01

    Niobium carbide thin films were synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using trimethylaluminum (TMA), NbF{sub 5}, and NbCl{sub 5} precursors. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements performed at 200 and 290 C revealed controlled, linear deposition with a high growth rate of 5.7 and 4.5 {angstrom}/cycle, respectively. The chemical composition, growth rate, structure, and electronic properties of the films were studied over the deposition temperature range 125-350 C. Varying amounts of impurities, including amorphous carbon (a-C), AlF{sub 3}, NbF{sub x}, and NbCl{sub x}, were found in all samples. A strong growth temperature dependence of film composition, growth rate, and room temperature DC resistivity was observed. Increasing film density, decreasing total impurity concentration, and decreasing resistivity were observed as a function of increasing deposition temperature for films grown with either NbF{sub 5} or NbCl{sub 5}. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry measurements down to 1.2 K revealed a superconducting transition at T{sub c} = 1.8 K in a 75 nm thick film grown at 350 C with TMA and NbF{sub 5}. The superconducting critical temperature could be increased up to 3.8 K with additional use of NH{sub 3} during ALD film growth.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of amorphous niobium carbide-based thin film superconductors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klug, J. A.; Prolier, T.; Elam, J. W.; Becker, N. G.; Pellin, M. J. (Energy Systems); ( HEP); ( MSD); (Illinois Inst. Tech.)

    2011-01-01

    Niobium carbide thin films were synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using trimethylaluminum (TMA), NbF{sub 5}, and NbCl{sub 5} precursors. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements performed at 200 and 290 C revealed controlled, linear deposition with a high growth rate of 5.7 and 4.5 {angstrom}/cycle, respectively. The chemical composition, growth rate, structure, and electronic properties of the films were studied over the deposition temperature range 125-350 C. Varying amounts of impurities, including amorphous carbon (a-C), AlF{sub 3}, NbF{sub x}, and NbCl{sub x}, were found in all samples. A strong growth temperature dependence of film composition, growth rate, and room temperature DC resistivity was observed. Increasing film density, decreasing total impurity concentration, and decreasing resistivity were observed as a function of increasing deposition temperature for films grown with either NbF{sub 5} or NbCl{sub 5}. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry measurements down to 1.2 K revealed a superconducting transition at T{sub c} = 1.8 K in a 75 nm thick film grown at 350 C with TMA and NbF{sub 5}. The superconducting critical temperature could be increased up to 3.8 K with additional use of NH{sub 3} during ALD film growth.

  11. Direct observation of phase transition of GeSbTe thin films by Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Rui; Geng, Lei; Tong, Liang; Xu, Jun; Su, Weining; Yu, Yao; Ma, Zhongyuan; Chen, Kunji

    2012-10-01

    GeSbTe (GST) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using electron beam evaporation system and then annealed in nitrogen atmosphere at different temperatures, ranging from 20 °C to 300 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force microscope (AFM) measurements were used to characterize the as-deposited and post-annealed thin films. Annealing treatment was found to induce changes on microstructure, surface roughness and grain size, indicating that with the increase of annealing temperature, the amorphous GST films first changed to face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase and then the stable hexagonal (hex) phase. Meanwhile, conductive-AFM (C-AFM) was used to produce crystallized GST dots on thin films. I-V spectroscopy results show that GST films can switch from amorphous state to crystalline state at threshold voltage. After switching, I-V curve exhibits ohmic characteristic, which is usually observed in crystallized GST films. By applying repeated I-V spectroscopies on the thin films, crystallized nuclei were observed. As the times of I-V spectroscopies increases, the area of written dots increases, and the center of the mark begin to ablate. The AFM images show that the shape of marks is an ablated center with a raised ring surrounding it.

  12. Observation of an atomic exchange bias effect in DyCo4 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Lott, Dieter; Radu, Florin; Choueikani, Fadi; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    The fundamental important and technologically widely employed exchange bias effect occurs in general in bilayers of magnetic thin films consisting of antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic layers where the hard magnetization behavior of an antiferromagnetic thin film causes a shift in the magnetization curve of a soft ferromagnetic film. The minimization of the single magnetic grain size to increase the storage density and the subsequent demand for magnetic materials with very high magnetic anisotropy requires a system with high HEB. Here we report an extremely high HEB of 4 Tesla observed in a single amorphous DyCo4 film close to room temperature. The origin of the exchange bias can be associated with the variation of the magnetic behavior from the surface towards the bulk part of the film revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism techniques utilizing the bulk sensitive transmission and the surface sensitive total electron yield modes. The competition between the atomic exchange coupling in the single film and the Zeeman interaction lead to an intrinsic exchanged coupled system and the so far highest exchange bias effect HEB = 4 Tesla reported in a single film, which is accommodated by a partial domain wall formation.

  13. The Atoms for Peace USIS Films: Spreading the Gospel of the "Blessing" of Atomic Energy in the Early Cold War Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Tsuchiya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In 1955, the U.S. Information Service (USIS Tokyo produced a thirty-minute documentary film Blessing of Atomic Energy in commemoration of the tenth anniversary of the Atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The film introduced how the Japanese government, researchers, and companies were using radioisotopes offered by the U.S. Argonne National Laboratory for the “peaceful” purposes in agriculture, medicine, hygiene, industry, and disaster prevention. The film also showed the mechanism of atomic power generation, and explained that it was already put into practice in the U.S. and Europe. The images of Japanese people enjoying the “blessing” of the “peaceful” use of atomic energy, ten years after the traumatic experience of A-bombs, were not only shown all over Japan, but also translated into different languages and shown in many countries, including the UK, Finland, Indonesia, Sudan, and Venezuela. The film was part of some fifty educational and documentary films produced for President Eisenhower’s “Atoms for Peace” campaign – a global information dissemination programs on the U.S. leadership in the civilian use of nuclear energy. This paper will explore the roles USIS films played in disseminating information on the “peaceful” use of nuclear energy in the early Cold War era.

  14. Dynamics of interstitial atoms and vacancies during the crystallization of amorphous Si and Ge films by flash lamp annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Naoto; Yoshioka, Naoki; Heya, Akira

    2017-08-01

    We examined the dynamics of interstitial atoms and vacancies in amorphous Si (a-Si) and a-Ge films crystallized by flash lamp annealing in consideration of the self-diffusion coefficients of Si and Ge. We found that the interstitial atoms play an important role in the liquid-phase crystallization (LPC) of a-Si films, whereas the vacancies are more important for the solid-phase crystallization (SPC) of a-Si films along with the LPC and SPC of a-Ge films. For Si, the crystal defect density of the film crystallized by LPC was higher than that of the film crystallized by SPC; the opposite result was achieved for Ge. This phenomenon is considered to be attributed to the existence of interstitial atoms introduced in Si. The thermodynamic calculated results related to the relationship between the point defect and SPC or LPC supported the crystallization mechanism.

  15. Structural and electrical properties of atomic layer deposited Al-doped ZnO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do-Joong; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kwon, Jang-Yeon; Choi, Hyoji [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo-Hyun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Bum [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-08

    Structural and electrical properties of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are investigated to study the extrinsic doping mechanism of a transparent conducting oxide. ALD-AZO films exhibit a unique layer-by-layer structure consisting of a ZnO matrix and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant layers, as determined by transmission electron microscopy analysis. In these layered AZO films, a single Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant layer deposited during one ALD cycle could provide {approx}4.5 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} free electrons to the ZnO. The effective field model for doping is suggested to explain the decrease in the carrier concentration of ALD-AZO films when the interval between the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers is reduced to less than {approx}2.6 nm (>3.4 at% Al). By correlating the electrical and structural properties, an extrinsic doping mechanism of ALD-AZO films is proposed in which the incorporated Al atoms take oxygen from the ZnO matrix and form doubly charged donors, such as oxygen vacancies or zinc interstitials. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Epitaxial thin film growth of LiH using a liquid-Li atomic template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: oguchi@nanosys.mech.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Micro System Integration Center (muSIC), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-ichi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ohsawa, Takeo; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro [Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kuwano, Hiroki [Department of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2014-11-24

    We report on the synthesis of lithium hydride (LiH) epitaxial thin films through the hydrogenation of a Li melt, forming abrupt LiH/MgO interface. Experimental and first-principles molecular dynamics studies reveal a comprehensive microscopic picture of the crystallization processes, which sheds light on the fundamental atomistic growth processes that have remained unknown in the vapor-liquid-solid method. We found that the periodic structure that formed, because of the liquid-Li atoms at the film/MgO-substrate interface, serves as an atomic template for the epitaxial growth of LiH crystals. In contrast, films grown on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates indicated polycrystalline films with a LiAlO{sub 2} secondary phase. These results and the proposed growth process provide insights into the preparation of other alkaline metal hydride thin films on oxides. Further, our investigations open the way to explore fundamental physics and chemistry of metal hydrides including possible phenomena that emerge at the heterointerfaces of metal hydrides.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Tynell, Tommi; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit; Okazaki, Ryuji; Terasaki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition has been used to fabricate thin films of aluminum-doped ZnO by depositing interspersed layers of ZnO and Al 2O3 on borosilicate glass substrates. The growth characteristics of the films have been investigated through x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflection, and x-ray fluorescence measurements, and the efficacy of the Al doping has been evaluated through optical reflectivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements. The Al doping is found to affect the carrier density of ZnO up...

  18. Thin Film Differential Photosensor for Reduction of Temperature Effects in Lab-on-Chip Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cesare, Giampiero; Carpentiero, Matteo; Nascetti, Augusto; Caputo, Domenico

    2016-02-20

    This paper presents a thin film structure suitable for low-level radiation measurements in lab-on-chip systems that are subject to thermal treatments of the analyte and/or to large temperature variations. The device is the series connection of two amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon carbide heterojunctions designed to perform differential current measurements. The two diodes experience the same temperature, while only one is exposed to the incident radiation. Under these conditions, temperature and light are the common and differential mode signals, respectively. A proper electrical connection reads the differential current of the two diodes (ideally the photocurrent) as the output signal. The experimental characterization shows the benefits of the differential structure in minimizing the temperature effects with respect to a single diode operation. In particular, when the temperature varies from 23 to 50 °C, the proposed device shows a common mode rejection ratio up to 24 dB and reduces of a factor of three the error in detecting very low-intensity light signals.

  19. Thin Film Differential Photosensor for Reduction of Temperature Effects in Lab-on-Chip Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cesare, Giampiero; Carpentiero, Matteo; Nascetti, Augusto; Caputo, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a thin film structure suitable for low-level radiation measurements in lab-on-chip systems that are subject to thermal treatments of the analyte and/or to large temperature variations. The device is the series connection of two amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon carbide heterojunctions designed to perform differential current measurements. The two diodes experience the same temperature, while only one is exposed to the incident radiation. Under these conditions, temperature and light are the common and differential mode signals, respectively. A proper electrical connection reads the differential current of the two diodes (ideally the photocurrent) as the output signal. The experimental characterization shows the benefits of the differential structure in minimizing the temperature effects with respect to a single diode operation. In particular, when the temperature varies from 23 to 50 °C, the proposed device shows a common mode rejection ratio up to 24 dB and reduces of a factor of three the error in detecting very low-intensity light signals. PMID:26907292

  20. Electromagnetic interference shielding behaviors of Zn-based conducting oxide films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-June; Kang, Kyung-Mun; Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho, E-mail: hhpark@yonsei.ac.kr

    2015-05-29

    The structural, electrical, and optical properties of undoped ZnO, F-doped ZnO (ZnO:F), and Al-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) thin films with two different thicknesses deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated to evaluate the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE). A diluted fluoride hydroxide was used as a single reactant source for F doping in a ZnO matrix, and the F doping concentration was about 1 at.% in the ZnO:F films. The fabrication of the ZnO:Al films was followed by the typical ALD method, and the Al doping concentration of about 2 at.% was adjusted by the dopant deposition intervals of the ZnO:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} precursor pulse cycle ratios, which were fixed at 19:1. The film thickness variations were controlled with 600 and 1600 total ALD cycles of approximately 100 nm and 300 nm, respectively. The carrier concentration of the films is monotonically increased in order of the undoped ZnO, ZnO:F, and ZnO:Al films. The EMI-SE values of the undoped ZnO, ZnO:F, and ZnO:Al films at 1 GHz were 0.9 dB, 2.6 dB, and 6.0 dB for ~ 100 nm, and were 2.1 dB, 9.7 dB, and 13.1 dB for ~ 300 nm, respectively. In our work, the EMI-SE value was increased by the enhancement of both the carrier concentration and film thickness due to reflection via the free carrier scattering effect. - Highlights: • Fluorine or aluminum doped ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition • Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) of ZnO thin films • Carrier concentration and film thickness enhanced the EMI-SE. • The enhancement of EMI-SE was due to reflection via free carrier scattering effect.

  1. Ag films grown by remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition on different substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusan, Akinwumi A., E-mail: akinwumi.amusan@ovgu.de; Kalkofen, Bodo; Burte, Edmund P. [Institute of Micro and Sensor Systems, Otto-von-Guericke University, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany); Gargouri, Hassan; Wandel, Klaus; Pinnow, Cay [SENTECH Instruments GmbH, Schwarzschildstraße 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lisker, Marco [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Silver (Ag) layers were deposited by remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PALD) using Ag(fod)(PEt{sub 3}) (fod = 2,2-dimethyl-6,6,7,7,8,8,8-heptafluorooctane-3,5-dionato) as precursor and hydrogen plasma on silicon substrate covered with thin films of SiO{sub 2}, TiN, Ti/TiN, Co, Ni, and W at different deposition temperatures from 70  to 200 °C. The deposited silver films were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, four point probe measurement, ellipsometric measurement, x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). XPS revealed pure Ag with carbon and oxygen contamination close to the detection limit after 30 s argon sputtering for depositions made at 120 and 200 °C substrate temperatures. However, an oxygen contamination was detected in the Ag film deposited at 70 °C after 12 s argon sputtering. A resistivity of 5.7 × 10{sup −6} Ω cm was obtained for approximately 97 nm Ag film on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The thickness was determined from the SEM cross section on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate and also compared with XRF measurements. Polycrystalline cubic Ag reflections were identified from XRD for PALD Ag films deposited at 120 and 200 °C. Compared to W surface, where poor adhesion of the films was found, Co, Ni, TiN, Ti/TiN and SiO{sub 2} surfaces had better adhesion for silver films as revealed by SEM, TEM, and AFM images.

  2. Atom probe study of sodium distribution in polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadel, E. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux (GPM), UMR 6634 CNRS, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne de Rouvray (France); Barreau, N., E-mail: nicolas.barreau@univ-nantes.fr [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR 6502 CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere BP 32229, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Kessler, J. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR 6502 CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere BP 32229, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Pareige, P. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux (GPM), UMR 6634 CNRS, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne de Rouvray (France)

    2010-04-15

    This article reports the first investigations of CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) polycrystalline thin films by means of atom probe tomography. Attention is focused on the distribution of Na atoms within the films. Both Na-containing and Na-free CIGSe thin films have been investigated. When Na is available during the CIGSe coevaporation, it is observed to be mainly segregated at the grain boundaries of the films; however, it is also detected within the grains of CIGSe at very low concentration.

  3. Characterization of cobalt oxide thin films prepared by a facile spray pyrolysis technique using perfume atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louardi, A.; Rmili, A.; Ouachtari, F.; Bouaoud, A. [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Elidrissi, B., E-mail: e.bachir@mailcity.com [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Erguig, H. [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films show a micro porous structure. > Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films are formed with spherical grains less than 50 nm in diameter. > The porous structure of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} films is expected to have promising application in electrochromism. - Abstract: Cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films were prepared by a facile spray pyrolysis technique using perfume atomizer from aqueous solution of hydrated cobalt chloride salt (CoCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O) as source of cobalt. The films were deposited onto the amorphous glass substrates kept at different temperatures (300-500 deg. C). The influences of molar concentration of the starting solution and substrate temperature on the structural, morphological and optical properties of (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) thin films were studied. It was found from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis that the films prepared with molar concentration greater than 0.025 M/L were polycrystalline spinel type cubic structure. The preferred orientation of the crystallites of these films changes gradually from (6 2 2) to (1 1 1) when the substrate temperature increases. By Raman spectroscopy, five Raman active modes characteristic of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel type cubic structure were found and identified at 194, 484, 522, 620 and 691 cm{sup -1}. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed micro porous structure with very fine grains less than 50 nm in diameter. These films exhibited also a transmittance value of about 70% in the visible and infra red range.

  4. Crystallinity of inorganic films grown by atomic layer deposition: Overview and general trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miikkulainen, Ville; Leskelä, Markku; Ritala, Mikko; Puurunen, Riikka L.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is gaining attention as a thin film deposition method, uniquely suitable for depositing uniform and conformal films on complex three-dimensional topographies. The deposition of a film of a given material by ALD relies on the successive, separated, and self-terminating gas-solid reactions of typically two gaseous reactants. Hundreds of ALD chemistries have been found for depositing a variety of materials during the past decades, mostly for inorganic materials but lately also for organic and inorganic-organic hybrid compounds. One factor that often dictates the properties of ALD films in actual applications is the crystallinity of the grown film: Is the material amorphous or, if it is crystalline, which phase(s) is (are) present. In this thematic review, we first describe the basics of ALD, summarize the two-reactant ALD processes to grow inorganic materials developed to-date, updating the information of an earlier review on ALD [R. L. Puurunen, J. Appl. Phys. 97, 121301 (2005)], and give an overview of the status of processing ternary compounds by ALD. We then proceed to analyze the published experimental data for information on the crystallinity and phase of inorganic materials deposited by ALD from different reactants at different temperatures. The data are collected for films in their as-deposited state and tabulated for easy reference. Case studies are presented to illustrate the effect of different process parameters on crystallinity for representative materials: aluminium oxide, zirconium oxide, zinc oxide, titanium nitride, zinc zulfide, and ruthenium. Finally, we discuss the general trends in the development of film crystallinity as function of ALD process parameters. The authors hope that this review will help newcomers to ALD to familiarize themselves with the complex world of crystalline ALD films and, at the same time, serve for the expert as a handbook-type reference source on ALD processes and film crystallinity.

  5. Surface nanoscale imaging of collagen thin films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stylianou, Andreas, E-mail: styliand@mail.ntua.gr; Yova, Dido

    2013-07-01

    Collagen, the most abundant protein in mammals, due to its unique properties is widely used as biomaterial, scaffold and culture substrate for cell and tissue regeneration studies. Since the majority of biological reactions occur on surfaces and structures at the nanoscale level it is of great importance to image the nanostructural surface of collagen based materials. The aim of this paper was to characterize, with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), collagen thin films formed on different substrates (glass, mica, polystyrene latex particle surfaces) and correlate their morphology with the used substrates, formation methodologies (spin coating, hydrodynamic flow) and original collagen solution. The results demonstrated that, by altering a number of parameters, it was possible to control the formation of collagen nanostructured films consisting of naturally occurring fibrils. The spin coating procedure enabled the formation of films with random oriented fibrils, while substrates influenced the fibril packing and surface roughness. The hydrodynamic flow was used for guiding fibril major orientation, while adsorption time, rinsing with buffer and solution concentration influenced the fibril orientation. The clarification of the contribution that different parameters had on thin film formation will enable the design and control of collagen nanobiomaterials with pre-determined characteristics. Highlights: • Nanocharacterization of collagen thin films with AFM • Correlation of collagen thin film morphology with the characteristics of different substrates • Correlation of collagen thin film morphology with the formation methodologies • Formation of collagen nanostructure films consisting of natural occurring fibrils was achieved • Controlled surface characteristics and orientation of collagen fibrils on thin films were achieved.

  6. Note: A silicon-on-insulator microelectromechanical systems probe scanner for on-chip atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Anthony G.; Maroufi, Mohammad; Moheimani, S. O. Reza, E-mail: Reza.Moheimani@newcastle.edu.au [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    A new microelectromechanical systems-based 2-degree-of-freedom (DoF) scanner with an integrated cantilever for on-chip atomic force microscopy (AFM) is presented. The silicon cantilever features a layer of piezoelectric material to facilitate its use for tapping mode AFM and enable simultaneous deflection sensing. Electrostatic actuators and electrothermal sensors are used to accurately position the cantilever within the x-y plane. Experimental testing shows that the cantilever is able to be scanned over a 10 μm × 10 μm window and that the cantilever achieves a peak-to-peak deflection greater than 400 nm when excited at its resonance frequency of approximately 62 kHz.

  7. Note: A silicon-on-insulator microelectromechanical systems probe scanner for on-chip atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Anthony G; Maroufi, Mohammad; Moheimani, S O Reza

    2015-04-01

    A new microelectromechanical systems-based 2-degree-of-freedom (DoF) scanner with an integrated cantilever for on-chip atomic force microscopy (AFM) is presented. The silicon cantilever features a layer of piezoelectric material to facilitate its use for tapping mode AFM and enable simultaneous deflection sensing. Electrostatic actuators and electrothermal sensors are used to accurately position the cantilever within the x-y plane. Experimental testing shows that the cantilever is able to be scanned over a 10 μm × 10 μm window and that the cantilever achieves a peak-to-peak deflection greater than 400 nm when excited at its resonance frequency of approximately 62 kHz.

  8. Note: Guaranteed collocated multimode control of an atomic force microscope cantilever using on-chip piezoelectric actuation and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Michael G.; Yong, Yuen K.

    2017-08-01

    The quality (Q) factor is an important parameter of the resonance of the microcantilever as it determines both imaging bandwidth and force sensitivity. The ability to control the Q factor of multiple modes is believed to be of great benefit for atomic force microscopy techniques involving multiple eigenmodes. In this paper, we propose a novel cantilever design employing multiple piezoelectric transducers which are used for separated actuation and sensing, leading to guaranteed collocation of the first eight eigenmodes up to 3 MHz. The design minimizes the feedthrough usually observed with these systems by incorporating a guard trace on the cantilever chip. As a result, a multimode Q controller is demonstrated to be able to modify the quality factor of the first two eigenmodes over up to four orders of magnitude without sacrificing robust stability.

  9. Discrete component bonding and thick film materials study. [of capacitor chips bonded with solders and conductive epoxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The bonding reliability of discrete capacitor chips bonded with solders and conductive epoxies was examined along with the thick film resistor materials consisting of iron oxide phosphate and vanadium oxide phosphates. It was concluded from the bonding reliability studies that none of the wide range of types of solders examined is capable of resisting failure during thermal cycling while the conductive epoxy gives substantially lower failure rates. The thick film resistor studies proved the feasibility of iron oxide phosphate resistor systems although some environmental sensitivity problems remain. One of these resistor compositions has inadvertently proven to be a candidate for thermistor applications because of the excellent control achieved upon the temperature coefficient of resistance. One new and potentially damaging phenomenon observed was the degradation of thick film conductors during the course of thermal cycling.

  10. Atomic-scale analysis of plastic deformation in thin-film forms of electronic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolluri, Kedarnath

    Nanometer-scale-thick films of metals and semiconductor heterostructures are used increasingly in modern technologies, from microelectronics to various areas of nanofabrication. Processing of such ultrathin-film materials generates structural defects, including voids and cracks, and may induce structural transformations. Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of these small-volume structures is very different from that of bulk materials. Improvement of the reliability, functionality, and performance of nano-scale devices requires a fundamental understanding of the atomistic mechanisms that govern the thin-film response to mechanical loading in order to establish links between the films' structural evolution and their mechanical behavior. Toward this end, a significant part of this study is focused on the analysis of atomic-scale mechanisms of plastic deformation in freestanding, ultrathin films of face-centered cubic (fcc) copper (Cu) that are subjected to biaxial tensile strain. The analysis is based on large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations. Elementary mechanisms of dislocation nucleation are studied and several problems involving the structural evolution of the thin films due to the glide of and interactions between dislocations are addressed. These problems include void nucleation, martensitic transformation, and the role of stacking faults in facilitating dislocation depletion in ultrathin films and other small-volume structures of fcc metals. Void nucleation is analyzed as a mechanism of strain relaxation in Cu thin films. The glide of multiple dislocations causes shearing of atomic planes and leads to formation of surface pits, while vacancies are generated due to the glide motion of jogged dislocations. Coalescence of vacancy clusters with surface pits leads to formation of voids. In addition, the phase transformation of fcc Cu films to hexagonal-close packed (hcp) ones is studied. The resulting martensite phase nucleates at the film's free surface and

  11. Fabrication and surface passivation of porous 6H-SiC by atomic layer deposited films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    photoluminescence was observed and the etching process was optimized in terms of etching time and thickness. Enormous enhancement as well as redshift and broadening of photoluminescence spectra were observed after the passivation by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 and TiO2 films. No obvious luminescence was observed...... above the 6H-SiC crystal band gap, which suggests that the strong photoluminescence is ascribed to surface state produced during the anodic etching....

  12. Chemical reaction of atomic oxygen with evaporated films of copper, part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Williams, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Evaporated copper films were exposed to an atomic oxygen flux of 1.4 x 10(exp 17) atoms/sq cm per sec at temperatures in the range 285 to 375 F (140 to 191 C) for time intervals between 2 and 50 minutes. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) was used to determine the thickness of the oxide layers formed and the ratio of the number of copper to oxygen atoms in the layers. Oxide film thicknesses ranged from 50 to 3000 A (0.005 to 0.3 microns, or equivalently, 5 x 10(exp -9) to 3 x 10(exp -7); it was determined that the primary oxide phase was Cu2O. The growth law was found to be parabolic (L(t) varies as t(exp 1/2)), in which the oxide thickness L(t) increases as the square root of the exposure time t. The analysis of the data is consistent with either of the two parabolic growth laws. (The thin-film parabolic growth law is based on the assumption that the process is diffusion controlled, with the space charge within the growing oxide layer being negligible. The thick-film parabolic growth law is also based on a diffusion controlled process, but space-charge neutrality prevails locally within very thick oxides.) In the absence of a voltage measurement across the growing oxide, a distinction between the two mechanisms cannot be made, nor can growth by the diffusion of neutral atomic oxygen be entirely ruled out. The activation energy for the reaction is on the order of 1.1 eV (1.76 x 10(exp -19) joule, or equivalently, 25.3 kcal/mole).

  13. Nanoplough-constrictions on thin YBCO films made with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkaseh, A A O; Büttner, U; Meincken, M; Hardie, G L; Srinivasu, V V; Perold, W J

    2007-09-01

    Utilizing atomic force microscope (AFM) with a diamond tip, we were able to successfully plough nano-constrictions on epitaxially grown YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films deposited on MgO substrates. The thickness, width, and length of the obtained constrictions were in the range of a few 100 nm. Furthermore, we managed to produce a new S-type constriction, of which the dimensions are easier to control than for conventional constrictions.

  14. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  15. Low temperature temporal and spatial atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaee, Morteza, E-mail: m.aghaee@tue.nl; Maydannik, Philipp S. [ASTRaL Group, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Johansson, Petri; Kuusipalo, Jurkka [Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Creatore, Mariadriana [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Homola, Tomáš; Cameron, David C. [R& D Center for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    Titanium dioxide films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using titanium tetraisopropoxide as a titanium precursor and water, ozone, or oxygen plasma as coreactants. Low temperatures (80–120 °C) were used to grow moisture barrier TiO{sub 2} films on polyethylene naphthalate. The maximum growth per cycle for water, ozone, and oxygen plasma processes were 0.33, 0.12, and 0.56 Å/cycle, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry was used to evaluate the chemical composition of the layers and the origin of the carbon contamination was studied by deconvoluting carbon C1s peaks. In plasma-assisted ALD, the film properties were dependent on the energy dose supplied by the plasma. TiO{sub 2} films were also successfully deposited by using a spatial ALD (SALD) system based on the results from the temporal ALD. Similar properties were measured compared to the temporal ALD deposited TiO{sub 2}, but the deposition time could be reduced using SALD. The TiO{sub 2} films deposited by plasma-assisted ALD showed better moisture barrier properties than the layers deposited by thermal processes. Water vapor transmission rate values lower than 5 × 10{sup −4} g day{sup −1} m{sup −2} (38 °C and 90% RH) was measured for 20 nm of TiO{sub 2} film deposited by plasma-assisted ALD.

  16. Deposition and Characterization of Molybdenum Thin Film Using Direct Current Magnetron and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhtade Mustafa Aqil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, pure molybdenum (Mo thin film has been deposited on blank Si substrate by DC magnetron sputtering technique. The deposition condition for all samples has not been changed except for the deposition time in order to study the influence of time on the thickness and surface morphology of molybdenum thin film. The surface profiler has been used to measure the surface thickness. Atomic force microscopy technique was employed to investigate the roughness and grain structure of Mo thin film. The thickness and grain of molybdenum thin film layer has been found to increase with respect to time, while the surface roughness decreases. The average roughness, root mean square roughness, surface skewness, and surface kurtosis parameters are used to analyze the surface morphology of Mo thin film. Smooth surface has been observed. From grain analysis, a uniform grain distribution along the surface has been found. The obtained results allowed us to decide the optimal time to deposit molybdenum thin film layer of 20–100 nm thickness and subsequently patterned as electrodes (source/drain in carbon nanotube-channel transistor.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of MgO films on yttria-stabilized zirconia microtubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Part, Marko, E-mail: markopa@ut.ee [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics, Department of Materials Science, Riia 142, EE-51014 Tartu (Estonia); Tamm, Aile; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Mändar, Hugo; Tätte, Tanel [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics, Department of Materials Science, Riia 142, EE-51014 Tartu (Estonia); Kukli, Kaupo [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics, Department of Materials Science, Riia 142, EE-51014 Tartu (Estonia); University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014, Univ. Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-02-28

    Deposition of MgO thin film on nanocrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia microtubes was investigated. The microtubes were prepared by self-formation from threads drawn directly from zirconium butoxide [Zr(OBu){sub 4}] precursor and heat treated at 800 °C. The tubes possessed 100% tetragonal phase, their typical outer diameter was 50 μm, inner diameter 30 μm and length 1 cm. MgO films were deposited from β-diketonate-type precursor 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-heptanedionato-3,5-magnesium(II) at 220 °C by atomic layer deposition. Thickness of MgO film on microtubes was 15.8 nm and growth rate 0.105 Å/cycle. - Highlights: • MgO films were deposited on the surface of yttria-stabilized zirconia microtubes. • The studies are carried out on the basis of surface modification of microtubes. • Films were deposited from β-diketonate-type precursor Mg(thd){sub 2}. • The growth temperature of MgO film was 220 °C.

  18. Morphology and current-voltage characteristics of nanostructured pentacene thin films probed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, S; Le, Q T; Watkins, N J; Yan, L; Gao, Y

    2001-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the growth modes (on SiO2, MoS2, and Au substrates) and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of organic semiconductor pentacene. Pentacene films grow on SiO2 substrate in a layer-by-layer manner with full coverage at an average thickness of 20 A and have the highest degree of molecular ordering with large dendritic grains among the pentacene films deposited on the three different substrates. Films grown on MoS2 substrate reveal two different growth modes, snowflake-like growth and granular growth, both of which seem to compete with each other. On the other hand, films deposited on Au substrate show granular structure for thinner coverages (no crystal structure) and dendritic growth for higher coverages (crystal structure). I-V measurements were performed with a platinum tip on a pentacene film deposited on a Au substrate. The I-V curves on pentacene film reveal symmetric tunneling type character. The field dependence of the current indicates that the main transport mechanism at high field intensities is hopping (Poole-Frenkel effect). From these measurements, we have estimated a field lowering coefficient of 9.77 x 10(-6) V-1/2 m1/2 and an ideality factor of 18 for pentacene.

  19. A preconcentrator chip employing μ-SPME array coated with in-situ-synthesized carbon adsorbent film for VOCs analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming-Yee; Cheng, Wei-Rui; Liu, Mao-Huang; Tian, Wei-Cheng; Lu, Chia-Jung

    2012-11-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and evaluation of a μ-preconcentrator chip that utilizes an array of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) needles coated with in-situ-grown carbon adsorbent film. The structure of the SPME needle (diameter=100 μm, height=250 μm) array inside the sampling chamber was fabricated using a deep reactive-ion etching (DRIE) process to enhance the attachable surface area for adsorbent film. Heaters and temperature sensors were fabricated onto the back of a μ-preconcentrator chip using lithography patterning and a metal lift-off process. The devices were sealed by anodic bonding and diced prior to the application of the adsorbent film. An adsorbent precursor, cellulose was dissolved in water and dynamically coated onto the SPME needle array. The coated cellulose film was converted into a porous carbon film via pyrolysis at 600 °C in a N(2) atmosphere. The surface area of the carbon adsorbent film was 308 m(2)/g, which is higher than that of a commercial adsorbent Carbopack X. A preconcentration factor as high as 13,637-fold was demonstrated using toluene. Eleven volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of different volatilities and functional groups were sampled and analyzed by GC-FID, and the desorption peak widths at half height were all less than 2.6 s after elution from a 15m capillary GC column. There was no sign of performance degradation after continuous operation for 50 cycles in air. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanopatterning of adsorbed 3-aminepropyltriethyoxysilane film by an atomic force microscopy tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Sun, Y.; Li, Z.

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrated a simple route to pattern nanostructures on the 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) film adsorbed on mica using nanolithography technology. Various nanopatterns (linear, foursquare and triangular) could be achieved by controlling and designing the scanning direction of AFM tip. Also, it was found that the adsorbed APTES film could be induced to rearrange into a bilayer structure. The parameters for the formation of nanostructures were investigated by contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that the height of the nanopatterns built on the adsorbed film increased with the decrease of the depth of a tip pushed in. The driving force for the formation of nanopatterns is the combination of the capillarity and inducement action of a tip to APTES molecules. The results presented in this work will improve our understanding to the formation process of short-chain alkoxysilane molecular bilayer and multilayer on mica in a position-selective way.

  1. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of MoS{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurca, Titel; Wang, Binghao; Tan, Jeffrey M.; Lohr, Tracy L.; Marks, Tobin J. [Department of Chemistry and the Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Moody, Michael J.; Henning, Alex; Emery, Jonathan D.; Lauhon, Lincoln J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and the Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2017-04-24

    Wet chemical screening reveals the very high reactivity of Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} with H{sub 2}S for the low-temperature synthesis of MoS{sub 2}. This observation motivated an investigation of Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} as a volatile precursor for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MoS{sub 2} thin films. Herein we report that Mo(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} enables MoS{sub 2} film growth at record low temperatures - as low as 60 C. The as-deposited films are amorphous but can be readily crystallized by annealing. Importantly, the low ALD growth temperature is compatible with photolithographic and lift-off patterning for the straightforward fabrication of diverse device structures. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynell, Tommi; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit; Okazaki, Ryuji; Terasaki, Ichiro [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition has been used to fabricate thin films of aluminum-doped ZnO by depositing interspersed layers of ZnO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on borosilicate glass substrates. The growth characteristics of the films have been investigated through x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflection, and x-ray fluorescence measurements, and the efficacy of the Al doping has been evaluated through optical reflectivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements. The Al doping is found to affect the carrier density of ZnO up to a nominal Al dopant content of 5 at. %. At nominal Al doping levels of 10 at. % and higher, the structure of the films is found to be strongly affected by the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase and no further carrier doping of ZnO is observed.

  3. The formation of anomalous Hall effect depending on W atoms in ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Musa Mutlu, E-mail: musamutlucan@gmail.com [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Nanotechnology Research and Application Center, Sabancı University, Tuzla, 34956 İstanbul (Turkey); CNR-SPIN, Universitá di Napoli “Federico II”, Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Shah, S. Ismat [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Fırat, Tezer [Department of Physics Engineering, Hacettepe University, Beytepe 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-06-01

    This article investigates the effects of intrinsic point defects and extrinsic W atoms on magneto electrical properties in the ZnO lattice. The analyses were accomplished for ∼0.5% W including ZnO thin films, grown using a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system. The polarized spin current dependent magnetic formation was investigated by longitudinal and transverse magneto electrical measurements in a temperature range of 5 K to 300 K. The positive magneto resistivity (PMR) ratios reached 28.8%, 12.7%, and 17.6% at 5 K for thin films, having different post-deposition annealing conditions as a consequence of ionic W dependent defects in the lattice. Furthermore, an anomalous Hall effect, originating from polarized spin currents, was understood from the split in Hall resistance versus magnetic field (R{sub xy}(H)) curves for the thin film with high amount of Zn{sup 2+} and W{sup 6+} ionic defects.

  4. Synthesis of atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride films on nickel foils by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhaie, S.; Wofford, J. M.; Schumann, T.; Jahn, U.; Ramsteiner, M.; Hanke, M.; Lopes, J. M. J., E-mail: lopes@pdi-berlin.de; Riechert, H. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-25

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered two-dimensional material with properties that make it promising as a dielectric in various applications. We report the growth of h-BN films on Ni foils from elemental B and N using molecular beam epitaxy. The presence of crystalline h-BN over the entire substrate is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy is used to examine the morphology and continuity of the synthesized films. A scanning electron microscopy study of films obtained using shorter depositions offers insight into the nucleation and growth behavior of h-BN on the Ni substrate. The morphology of h-BN was found to evolve from dendritic, star-shaped islands to larger, smooth triangular ones with increasing growth temperature.

  5. Epitaxial strain induced atomic ordering in stoichiometric LaCoO3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Kwon, Ji-Hwan; Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Sawatzky, George A.; Hinkov, Vladimir; Kim, Miyoung; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-03-01

    Heteroepitaxial strain imposed in complex transition metal oxide thin films is recognized as an effective tool for identifying and controlling emergent physical phenomena. Stoichiometric LaCoO3 is particularly interesting, since the thin film form of the material exhibits a robust macroscopic ferromagnetic ordering, while the bulk form of the material is a zero spin, nonmagnetic insulator. In this work, we show that the ferromagnetic ordering observed in LaCoO3 thin films is related to a lattice modulation in the atomic scale, originating from the epitaxial strain. The possibility of oxygen vacancies have been carefully ruled out using various macroscopic and microscopic spectroscopic techniques, and an unconventional strain relaxation behavior identified by strip-like lattice modulation pattern was responsible for the non-zero spin ground state of Co3+ ions. We further note that the unconventional strain relaxation did not involve any uncontrolled misfit dislocations.

  6. Spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition of InxGayZnzO for thin film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illiberi, A; Cobb, B; Sharma, A; Grehl, T; Brongersma, H; Roozeboom, F; Gelinck, G; Poodt, P

    2015-02-18

    We have investigated the nucleation and growth of InGaZnO thin films by spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition. Diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl indium (TMIn), triethyl gallium (TEGa), and water were used as Zn, In, Ga and oxygen precursors, respectively. The vaporized metal precursors have been coinjected in the reactor. The metal composition of InGaZnO has been controlled by varying the TMIn or TEGa flow to the reactor, for a given DEZ flow and exposure time. The morphology of the films changes from polycrystalline, for ZnO and In-doped ZnO, to amorphous for In-rich IZO and InGaZnO. The use of these films as the active channel in TFTs has been demonstrated and the influence of In and Ga cations on the electrical characteristics of the TFTs has been studied.

  7. Properties of N-rich Silicon Nitride Film Deposited by Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Pei-Ci; Lu, Chi-Pin; Shieh, Jung-Yu; Yang, Ling-Wu; Yang, Tahone; Chen, Kuang-Chao; Lu, Chih-Yuan

    2017-07-01

    An N-rich silicon nitride film, with a lower refractive index (RI) than the stoichiometric silicon nitride (RI = 2.01), was deposited by alternating the exposure of dichlorosilane (DCS, SiH2Cl2) and that of ammonia (NH3) in a plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process. In this process, the plasma ammonia was easily decomposed to reactive radicals by RF power activating so that the N-rich silicon nitride was easily formed by excited ammonia radicals. The growth kinetics of N-rich silicon nitride were examined at various deposition temperatures ranging from 400 °C to 630 °C; the activation energy (Ea) decreased as the deposition temperature decreased below 550 °C. N-rich silicon nitride film with a wide range of values of refractive index (RI) (RI = 1.86-2.00) was obtained by regulating the deposition temperature. At the optimal deposition temperature, the effects of RF power, NH3 flow rate and NH3 flow time were on the characteristics of the N-rich silicon nitride film were evaluated. The results thus reveal that the properties of the N-rich silicon nitride film that was formed by under plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) are dominated by deposition temperature. In charge trap flash (CTF) study, an N-rich silicon nitride film was applied to MAONOS device as a charge-trapping layer. The films exhibit excellent electron trapping ability and favor a fresh cell data retention performance as the deposition temperature decreased.

  8. Nitrogen doping in atomic layer deposition grown titanium dioxide films by using ammonium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeaeriaeinen, M.-L., E-mail: marja-leena.kaariainen@lut.fi; Cameron, D.C.

    2012-12-30

    Titanium dioxide films have been created by atomic layer deposition using titanium chloride as the metal source and a solution of ammonium hydroxide in water as oxidant. Ammonium hydroxide has been used as a source of nitrogen for doping and three thickness series have been deposited at 350 Degree-Sign C. A 15 nm anatase dominated film was found to possess the highest photocatalytic activity in all film series. Furthermore almost three times better photocatalytic activity was discovered in the doped series compared to undoped films. The doped films also had lower resistivity. The results from X-ray photoemission spectroscopy showed evidence for interstitial nitrogen in the titanium dioxide structure. Besides, there was a minor red shift observable in the thickest samples. In addition the film conductivity was discovered to increase with the feeding pressure of ammonium hydroxide in the oxidant precursor. This may indicate that nitrogen doping has caused the decrease in the resistivity and therefore has an impact as an enhanced photocatalytic activity. The hot probe test showed that all the anatase or anatase dominant films were p-type and all the rutile dominant films were n-type. The best photocatalytic activity was shown by anatase-dominant films containing a small amount of rutile. It may be that p-n-junctions are formed between p-type anatase and n-type rutile which cause carrier separation and slow down the recombination rate. The combination of nitrogen doping and p-n junction formation results in superior photocatalytic performance. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found all N-doped and undoped anatase dominating films p-type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found all N-doped and undoped rutile dominating films n-type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose that p-n junctions are formed in anatase-rutile mixture films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that low level N-doping has increased TiO{sub 2} conductivity. Black

  9. Atomic mechanism of polarization-controlled surface reconstruction in ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Liu, Heng-Jui; Huang, Yen-Lin; Chu, Ying-Hao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Feng, Bin; Jiang, Ying; Shibata, Naoya; Wang, En-Ge; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-04-01

    At the ferroelectric surface, the broken translational symmetry induced bound charge should significantly alter the local atomic configurations. Experimentally revealing the atomic structure of ferroelectric surface, however, is very challenging due to the strong spatial variety between nano-sized domains, and strong interactions between the polarization and other structural parameters. Here, we study surface structures of Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 thin film by using the annular bright-field imaging. We find that six atomic layers with suppressed polarization and a charged 180° domain wall are at negatively poled surfaces, no reconstruction exists at positively poled surfaces, and seven atomic layers with suppressed polarization and a charged 90° domain wall exist at nominally neutral surfaces in ferroelastic domains. Our results provide critical insights into engineering ferroelectric thin films, fine grain ceramics and surface chemistry devices. The state-of-the-art methodology demonstrated here can greatly advance our understanding of surface science for oxides.

  10. Design of Rotary Atomizer Using Characteristics of Thin Film Flow on Solid Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Boo Seong; Kim, Bo Hung [Univ. of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    A disc-type rotary atomizer affords advantages such as superior paint transfer efficiency, uniformity of paint pattern and particle size, and less consumption of compressed air compared to a spray-gun-type atomizer. Furthermore, it can be applied to all types of painting materials, and it is suitable for large-scale processes such as car painting. The painting quality, which is closely related to the atomizer performance, is determined by the uniformity and droplet size in accordance with the design of the bell disc surface. This study establishes the basics of how to design a surface by modeling the operating bell disc's RPM, diameter, surface angle, and film thickness considering dye characteristics such as the viscosity, density, and surface affinity.

  11. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films as Platforms for Atomic Layer Deposition of Cobalt Ions To Enable Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Chung-Wei; Mondloch, Joseph E; Wang, Timothy C; Bury, Wojciech; Hoffeditz, William; Klahr, Benjamin M; Klet, Rachel C; Pellin, Michael J; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-12-30

    Thin films of the metal-organic framework (MOF) NU-1000 were grown on conducting glass substrates. The films uniformly cover the conducting glass substrates and are composed of free-standing sub-micrometer rods. Subsequently, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized to deposit Co(2+) ions throughout the entire MOF film via self-limiting surface-mediated reaction chemistry. The Co ions bind at aqua and hydroxo sites lining the channels of NU-1000, resulting in three-dimensional arrays of separated Co ions in the MOF thin film. The Co-modified MOF thin films demonstrate promising electrocatalytic activity for water oxidation.

  12. Electrical transport and Al doping efficiency in nanoscale ZnO films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.; Hermkens, P.M.; Loo, B.W.H. van de; Knoops, H.C.M.; Potts, S.E.; Verheijen, M.A.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the structural, electrical, and optical properties as well as chemical bonding state of Al-doped ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition have been investigated to obtain insight into the doping and electrical transport mechanisms in the films. The range in doping levels from 0%

  13. Nano-oxide thin films deposited via atomic layer deposition on microchannel plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Heng, Yuekun

    2015-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) as a key part is a kind of electron multiplied device applied in many scientific fields. Oxide thin films such as zinc oxide doped with aluminum oxide (ZnO:Al2O3) as conductive layer and pure aluminum oxide (Al2O3) as secondary electron emission (SEE) layer were prepared in the pores of MCP via atomic layer deposition (ALD) which is a method that can precisely control thin film thickness on a substrate with a high aspect ratio structure. In this paper, nano-oxide thin films ZnO:Al2O3 and Al2O3 were prepared onto varied kinds of substrates by ALD technique, and the morphology, element distribution, structure, and surface chemical states of samples were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Finally, electrical properties of an MCP device as a function of nano-oxide thin film thickness were firstly studied, and the electrical measurement results showed that the average gain of MCP was greater than 2,000 at DC 800 V with nano-oxide thin film thickness approximately 122 nm. During electrical measurement, current jitter was observed, and possible reasons were preliminarily proposed to explain the observed experimental phenomenon.

  14. Self-limiting atomic layer deposition of conformal nanostructured silver films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golrokhi, Zahra; Chalker, Sophia; Sutcliffe, Christopher J.; Potter, Richard J.

    2016-02-01

    The controlled deposition of ultra-thin conformal silver nanoparticle films is of interest for applications including anti-microbial surfaces, plasmonics, catalysts and sensors. While numerous techniques can produce silver nanoparticles, few are able to produce highly conformal coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces, together with sub-nanometre control and scalability. Here we develop a self-limiting atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for the deposition of conformal metallic silver nanoparticle films. The films have been deposited using direct liquid injection ALD with ((hexafluoroacetylacetonato)silver(I)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)) and propan-1-ol. An ALD temperature window between 123 and 128 °C is identified and within this range self-limiting growth is confirmed with a mass deposition rate of ∼17.5 ng/cm2/cycle. The effects of temperature, precursor dose, co-reactant dose and cycle number on the deposition rate and on the properties of the films have been systematically investigated. Under self-limiting conditions, films are metallic silver with a nano-textured surface topography and nanoparticle size is dependent on the number of ALD cycles. The ALD reaction mechanisms have been elucidated using in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, showing chemisorption of the silver precursor, followed by heterogeneous catalytic dehydrogenation of the alcohol to form metallic silver and an aldehyde.

  15. Chiral Nematic Structure of Cellulose Nanocrystal Suspensions and Films; Polarized Light and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek G. Gray

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulosic liquid crystalline solutions and suspensions form chiral nematic phases that show a rich variety of optical textures in the liquid crystalline state. These ordered structures may be preserved in solid films prepared by evaporation of solvent or suspending medium. Film formation from aqueous suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC was investigated by polarized light microscopy, optical profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM. An attempt is made to interpret qualitatively the observed textures in terms of the orientation of the cellulose nanocrystals in the suspensions and films, and the changes in orientation caused by the evaporative process. Mass transfer within the evaporating droplet resulted in the formation of raised rings whose magnitude depended on the degree of pinning of the receding contact line. AFM of dry films at short length scales showed a radial orientation of the CNC at the free surface of the film, along with a radial height variation with a period of approximately P/2, ascribed to the anisotropic shrinkage of the chiral nematic structure.

  16. Photoluminescence of atomic layer deposited ZrO{sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiisk, Valter, E-mail: valter.kiisk@ut.ee; Tamm, Aile; Utt, Kathriin; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Mändar, Hugo; Puust, Laurits; Aarik, Jaan; Sildos, Ilmo

    2015-05-29

    Atomic layer deposition based on alternate cycling of ZrCl{sub 4}, Dy(thd){sub 3} and H{sub 2}O as precursors was applied for preparation of nanocrystalline ZrO{sub 2}:Dy thin films. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of Dy{sup 3+} in the ZrO{sub 2} films were studied at several laser excitations. Substantial activation of Dy{sup 3+} PL required thermal treatment at 900 °C. As a result of annealing, thinner (~ 80 nm) films with higher Dy content retained relatively high amount of tetragonal phase and remained crack-free. In thicker (~ 140 nm) films, considerable amount of monoclinic phase was formed and a peculiar microscale cracking pattern was developed along with phase segregation. It is demonstrated that the crystal structure of ZrO{sub 2} significantly influences the Dy{sup 3+} emission spectrum and, at least for ZrO{sub 2}-type matrices, Dy{sup 3+} is an excellent luminescent microprobe in comparison with micro-Raman scattering. A Förster-like PL decay profile allowed a conclusion that the self-quenching due to cross-relaxation between Dy{sup 3+} ions had a marked impact on emission intensity. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of luminescent Dy-doped ZrO{sub 2} thin films was demonstrated. • Dy{sup 3+} luminescence was significantly activated only after high-temperature annealing. • Correlation between luminescent and structural properties was obtained. • Dy{sup 3+} luminescent probe showed superior performance compared to Raman-scattering. • Presence of several quenching processes was deduced from luminescence behavior.

  17. Influence of titanium-substrate roughness on Ca–P–O thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananda Sagari, A.R., E-mail: arsagari@gmail.com [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Malm, Jari [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Laitinen, Mikko [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Rahkila, Paavo [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Hongqiang, Ma [Department of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 35 (L), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Putkonen, Matti [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Beneq Oy, P.O. Box 262, FI-01511 Vantaa (Finland); Karppinen, Maarit [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Whitlow, Harry J.; Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2013-03-01

    Amorphous Ca–P–O films were deposited on titanium substrates using atomic layer deposition, while maintaining a uniform Ca/P pulsing ratio of 6/1 with varying number of atomic layer deposition cycles starting from 10 up to 208. Prior to film deposition the titanium substrates were mechanically abraded using SiC abrasive paper of 600, 1200, 2000 grit size and polished with 3 μm diamond paste to obtain surface roughness R{sub rms} values of 0.31 μm, 0.26 μm, 0.16 μm, and 0.10 μm, respectively. The composition and film thickness of as-deposited amorphous films were studied using Time-Of-Flight Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The results showed that uniform films could be deposited on rough metal surfaces with a clear dependence of substrate roughness on the Ca/P atomic ratio of thin films. The in vitro cell-culture studies using MC3T3 mouse osteoblast showed a greater coverage of cells on the surface polished with diamond paste in comparison to rougher surfaces after 24 h culture. No statistically significant difference was observed between Ca–P–O coated and un-coated Ti surfaces for the measured roughness value. The deposited 50 nm thick films did not dissolve during the cell culture experiment. - Highlights: ► Atomic layer deposition of Ca–P–O films on abraded Ti substrate ► Surface analysis using Time-Of-Flight Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis ► Dependence of substrate roughness on the Ca/P atomic ratio of thin films ► An increase in Ca/P atomic ratio with decreasing roughness ► Mouse osteoblast showed greater coverage of cells in polished surface.

  18. Electrostatic trapping and in situ detection of Rydberg atoms above chip-based transmission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancuba, P.; Hogan, S. D.

    2016-04-01

    Beams of helium atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number n = 48 and electric dipole moments of 4600 D have been decelerated from a mean initial longitudinal speed of 2000 m s-1 to zero velocity in the laboratory-fixed frame-of-reference in the continuously moving electric traps of a transmission-line decelerator. In this process accelerations up to -1.3× {10}7 m s-2 were applied, and changes in kinetic energy of {{Δ }}{E}{kin}=1.3× {10}-20 J ({{Δ }}{E}{kin}/e=83 meV) per atom were achieved. Guided and decelerated atoms, and those confined in stationary electrostatic traps, were detected in situ by pulsed electric field ionisation. The results of numerical calculations of particle trajectories within the decelerator have been used to characterise the observed deceleration efficiencies, and aid in the interpretation of the experimental data.

  19. Electrostatic trapping and in situ detection of Rydberg atoms above chip-based transmission lines

    CERN Document Server

    Lancuba, P

    2016-01-01

    Beams of helium atoms in Rydberg-Stark states with principal quantum number $n=48$ and electric dipole moments of 4600~D have been decelerated from a mean initial longitudinal speed of 2000~m/s to zero velocity in the laboratory-fixed frame-of-reference in the continuously moving electric traps of a transmission-line decelerator. In this process accelerations up to $-1.3\\times10^{7}$~m/s$^2$ were applied, and changes in kinetic energy of $\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}=1.3\\times10^{-20}$~J ($\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}/e = 83$~meV) per atom were achieved. Guided and decelerated atoms, and those confined in stationary electrostatic traps, were detected in situ by pulsed electric field ionisation. The results of numerical calculations of particle trajectories within the decelerator have been used to characterise the observed deceleration efficiencies, and aid in the interpretation of the experimental data.

  20. Inverted tetrahedron-pyramidal micropatterned polymer films for boosting light output power in flip-chip light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Jung Woo; Lee, Soo Hyun; Guan, Xiang-Yu; Yu, Jae Su

    2015-04-20

    We report the improved light output power in gallium nitride-based green flip-chip light-emitting diodes (FCLEDs) employed with inverted tetrahedron-pyramidal micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (ITPM PDMS) films as an encapsulation and protection layer. The micropatterns are transferred into the surface of PDMS films from the sapphire substrate master molds with two-dimensional periodic hexagonal TPM arrays by a soft imprint lithography method. The ITPM PDMS film laminated on the sapphire dramatically enhances the diffuse transmittance (T(D)) in a wavelength (λ) range of 400-650 nm, exhibiting the larger T(D) value of ~53% at λ = 525 nm, (cf., T(D) ~1% for planar sapphire). By introducing the ITPM PDMS film on the outer surface of sapphire in FCLEDs, the light output power is enhanced, indicating the increment percentage of ~11.1% at 500 mA of injection current compared to the reference FCLED without the ITPM PDMS film, together with better electroluminescence intensity and far-field radiation pattern.

  1. New chemistry for the growth of first-row transition metal films by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klesko, Joseph Peter

    redox non-innocent nature of a series of recently-reported 1,4-di-tert-butyl-1,3-diazabutadienyl complexes. Other metal complexes using the same ligand system are subsequently evaluated for use as ALD precursors. Finally, a novel approach is described for the stoichiometric control of first-row transition metal manganese and cobalt borate films, whereby the film composition is governed by the elements present in a single precursor. Computational techniques such as density functional theory (DFT) using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) are used to determine the electronic structure and predict the relative reducing power of organic coreagents. Potential ALD precursors are analyzed by 1H and 13C NMR, IR, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TGA/DTA), melting point and solid state decomposition measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, preparative sublimation studies, and solution-screening reactions. Deposition parameters are optimized for successful ALD processes. The composition and surface morphology of the resultant films are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (TOF-ERDA), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), and four-point probe resistivity measurements.

  2. Effects of combined irradiation of 500 keV protons and atomic oxygen on polyimide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, Lev; Chernik, Vladimir; Zhilyakov, Lev; Voronina, Ekaterina; Chirskaia, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Polyimide films are widely used on the spacecraft surface as thermal control coating, films in different constuctions, etc. However, the space ionizing radiation of different types can alter the mechanical, optical and electrical properties of polyimide films. For example, it is well known that 20-100 keV proton irradiation causes breaking of chemical bonds and destruction of the surface layer in polyimide, deterioration of its optical properties, etc. In low-Earth orbits serious danger for polymeric materials is atomic oxygen of the upper atmosphere of the Earth, which is the main component in the range of heights of 200-800 km. Due to the orbital spacecraft velocity, the collision energy of oxygen atoms with the surface ( 5 eV) enhances their reactivity and opens additional pathways of their reaction with near-surface layers of materials. Hyperthermal oxygen atom flow causes erosion of the polyimide surface by breaking chemical bonds and forming of volatiles products (primarily, CO and CO _{2}), which leads to mass losses and degradation of material properties. Combined effect of protons and oxygen plasma is expected to give rise to synergistic effects enhancing the destruction of polyimide surface layers. This paper describes experimental investigation of polyimide films sequential irradiation with protons and oxygen plasma. The samples were irradiated by 500 keV protons at fluences of 10 ^{14}-10 ^{16} cm ^{-2} produced with SINP cascade generator KG-500 and 5-20 eV neutral oxygen atoms at fluence of 10 ^{20} cm ^{-2} generated by SINP magnetoplasmodynamics accelerator. The proton bombardment causes the decrease in optical transmission coefficient of samples, but their transmittance recovers partially after the exposure to oxygen plasma. The results of the comparative analysis of polyimide optical transmission spectra, Raman and XPS spectra obtained at different stages of the irradiation of samples, data on mass loss of samples due to erosion of the surface are

  3. Enhanced Barrier Performance of Engineered Paper by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirvakili, Mehr Negar; Van Bui, Hao; van Ommen, J Ruud; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G; Englezos, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Surface modification of cellulosic paper is demonstrated by employing plasma assisted atomic layer deposition. Al2O3 thin films are deposited on paper substrates, prepared with different fiber sizes, to improve their barrier properties. Thus, a hydrophobic paper is created with low gas permeability by combining the control of fiber size (and structure) with atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 films. Papers are prepared using Kraft softwood pulp and thermomechanical pulp. The cellulosic wood fibers are refined to obtain fibers with smaller length and diameter. Films of Al2O3, 10, 25, and 45 nm in thickness, are deposited on the paper surface. The work demonstrates that coating of papers prepared with long fibers efficiently reduces wettability with slight enhancement in gas permeability, whereas on shorter fibers, it results in significantly lower gas permeability. Wettability studies on Al2O3 deposited paper substrates have shown water wicking and absorption over time only in papers prepared with highly refined fibers. It is also shown that there is a certain fiber size at which the gas permeability assumes its minimum value, and further decrease in fiber size will reverse the effect on gas permeability.

  4. Measuring atomic oxygen densities and electron properties in an Inductively Coupled Plasma for thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, David; Gibson, Andrew; Booth, Jean-Paul; Wagenaars, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Plasma Enhanced Pulsed Laser Deposition (PE-PLD) is an advanced way of depositing thin films of oxide materials by using a laser to ablate a target, and passing the resulting plasma plume through a background Inductively-Coupled Plasma (ICP), instead of a background gas as is done in traditional PLD. The main advantage of PE-PLD is the control of film stoichiometry via the direct control of the reactive oxygen species in the ICP instead of relying on a neutral gas background. The aim is to deposit zinc oxide films from a zinc metal target and an oxygen ICP. In this work, we characterise the range of compositions of the reactive oxygen species achievable in ICPs; in particular the atomic oxygen density. The density of atomic oxygen has been determined within two ICPs of two different geometries over a range of plasma powers and pressures with the use of Energy Resolved Actinometry (ERA). ERA is a robust diagnostic technique with determines both the dissociation degree and average electron energy by comparing the excitation ratios of two oxygen and one argon transition. Alongside this the electron densities have been determined with the use of a hairpin probe. This work received financial support from the EPSRC, and York-Paris CIRC.

  5. Kinetic study on hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition of nickel thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Guangjie, E-mail: ygjhzh@dpe.mm.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Hideharu; Momose, Takeshi; Shimogaki, Yukihiro [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    High-purity Ni films were deposited using hot-wire-assisted atomic layer deposition (HW-ALD) at deposition temperatures of 175, 250, and 350 °C. Negligible amount of nitrogen or carbon contamination was detected, even though the authors used NH{sub 2} radical as the reducing agent and nickelocene as the precursor. NH{sub 2} radicals were generated by the thermal decomposition of NH{sub 3} with the assist of HW and used to reduce the adsorbed metal growth precursors. To understand and improve the deposition process, the kinetics of HW-ALD were analyzed using a Langmuir-type model. Unlike remote-plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, HW-ALD does not lead to plasma-induced damage. This is a significant advantage, because the authors can supply sufficient NH{sub 2} radicals to deposit high-purity metallic films by adjusting the distance between the hot wire and the substrate. NH{sub 2} radicals have a short lifetime, and it was important to use a short distance between the radical generation site and substrate. Furthermore, the impurity content of the nickel films was independent of the deposition temperature, which is evidence of the temperature-independent nature of the NH{sub 2} radical flux and the reactivity of the NH{sub 2} radicals.

  6. Electrical characterization of grain boundaries of CZTS thin films using conductive atomic force microscopy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhunthan, N.; Singh, Om Pal [Compound Semiconductor Solar Cell, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, New Delhi 110012 (India); Toutam, Vijaykumar, E-mail: toutamvk@nplindia.org [Quantum Phenomena and Applications Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, V.N., E-mail: singhvn@nplindia.org [Compound Semiconductor Solar Cell, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Experimental setup for conducting AFM (C-AFM). - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin film was grown by reactive co-sputtering. • The electronic properties were probed using conducting atomic force microscope, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. • C-AFM current flow mainly through grain boundaries rather than grain interiors. • SKPM indicated higher potential along the GBs compared to grain interiors. • The SCM explains that charge separation takes place at the interface of grain and grain boundary. - Abstract: Electrical characterization of grain boundaries (GB) of Cu-deficient CZTS (Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide) thin films was done using atomic force microscopic (AFM) techniques like Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM), Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). Absorbance spectroscopy was done for optical band gap calculations and Raman, XRD and EDS for structural and compositional characterization. Hall measurements were done for estimation of carrier mobility. CAFM and KPFM measurements showed that the currents flow mainly through grain boundaries (GB) rather than grain interiors. SCM results showed that charge separation mainly occurs at the interface of grain and grain boundaries and not all along the grain boundaries.

  7. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  8. Atomic scale analysis of phase formation and diffusion kinetics in Ag/Al multilayer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulfadl, Hisham; Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf; Mücklich, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Thin films generally exhibit unusual kinetics leading to chemical reactions far from equilibrium conditions. Binary metallic multilayer thin films with miscible elements show some similar behaviors with respect to interdiffusion and phase formation mechanisms. Interfacial density, lattice defects, internal stresses, layer morphologies and deposition conditions strongly control the mass transport between the individual layers. In the present work, Ag/Al multilayer thin films are used as a simple model system, in which the effects of the sputtering power and the bilayer period thickness on the interdiffusion and film reactions are investigated. Multilayers deposited by DC magnetron sputtering undergo calorimetric and microstructural analyses. In particular, atom probe tomography is extensively used to provide quantitative information on concentration gradients, grain boundary segregations, and reaction mechanisms. The magnitude of interdiffusion was found to be inversely proportional to the period thickness for the films deposited under the same conditions, and was reduced using low sputtering power. Both the local segregation at grain boundaries as well as pronounced non-equilibrium supersaturation effects play crucial roles during the early stages of the film reactions. For multilayers with small periods of 10 nm supersaturation of the Al layers with Ag precedes the polymorphic nucleation and growth of the hcp γ-Ag2Al phase. In larger periods the γ phase formation is triggered at junctions between grain boundaries and layers interfaces, where the pathway to heterogeneous nucleation is local supersaturation. Other Ag-rich phases also form as intermediate phases due to asymmetric diffusion rates of parent phases in the γ phase during annealing.

  9. Properties of HfAlO film deposited by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Duo [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China); Cheng, Xinhong, E-mail: xh_cheng@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China); Jia, Tingting; Zheng, Li; Xu, Dawei; Wang, Zhongjian; Xia, Chao; Yu, Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changning Road 865, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) method can reduce film growing temperature, and allow in situ plasma treatment. In this work, HfAlO and HfO{sub 2} films were deposited with PEALD at 160 °C. Microstructure analysis showed that both films were amorphous after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment, and HfAlO sample showed better interfacial structure than HfO{sub 2}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra indicated that main component of the interfacial layer of HfAlO sample was Hf–Si–O and Al–Si–O bonds, the valence band offset value between the HfAlO film and Si substrate was calculated to be 2.5 eV. The dominant leakage current mechanism of the samples was Schottky emission at a low electric field (<1.4 MV/cm), and Poole–Frenkel emission mechanism at a higher electric field (>1.4 MV/cm). The equivalent oxide thicknesses (EOT) of the HfAlO samples were 1.0 nm and 1.3 nm, respectively. The density of interface states between dielectric and substrate were calculated to be 1.2 × 10{sup 12} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −2} and 1.3 × 10{sup 12} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −2}, respectively. In comparison with HfO{sub 2} film, HfAlO film has good interfacial structure and electrical performance.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 on surface modified nanoporous low-k films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrau, Elisabeth; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Dendooven, Jolien; Ludwig, Karl F; Verdonck, Patrick; Meersschaut, Johan; Baklanov, Mikhail R; Detavernier, Christophe

    2013-10-01

    This paper explores the effects of different plasma treatments on low dielectric constant (low-k) materials and the consequences for the growth behavior of atomic layer deposition (ALD) on these modified substrates. An O2 and a He/H2 plasma treatment were performed on SiCOH low-k films to modify their chemical surface groups. Transmission FTIR and water contact angle (WCA) analysis showed that the O2 plasma changed the hydrophobic surface completely into a hydrophilic surface, while the He/H2 plasma changed it only partially. In a next step, in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF), ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used to characterize ALD growth of TiO2 on these substrates. The initial growth of TiO2 was found to be inhibited in the original low-k film containing only Si-CH3 surface groups, while immediate growth was observed in the hydrophilic O2 plasma treated film. The latter film was uniformly filled with TiO2 after 8 ALD cycles, while pore filling was delayed to 17 ALD cycles in the hydrophobic film. For the He/H2 plasma treated film, containing both Si-OH and Si-CH3 groups, the in situ XRF data showed that TiO2 could no longer be deposited in the He/H2 plasma treated film after 8 ALD cycles, while EP measurements revealed a remaining porosity. This can be explained by the faster deposition of TiO2 in the hydrophilic top part of the film than in the hydrophobic bulk which leaves the bulk porous, as confirmed by RBS depth profiling. The outcome of this research is not only of interest for the development of advanced interconnects in ULSI technology, but also demonstrates that ALD combined with RBS analysis is a handy approach to analyze the modifications induced by a plasma treatment on a nanoporous thin film.

  11. Formation and disruption of current paths of anodic porous alumina films by conducting atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyoshi, K., E-mail: oyoshi.keiji@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nigo, S.; Inoue, J.; Sakai, O.; Kitazawa, H.; Kido, G. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Anodic porous alumina (APA) films have a honeycomb cell structure of pores and a voltage-induced bi-stable switching effect. We have applied conducting atomic force microscopy (CAFM) as a method to form and to disrupt current paths in the APA films. A bi-polar switching operation was confirmed. We have firstly observed terminals of current paths as spots or areas typically on the center of the triangle formed by three pores. In addition, though a part of the current path showed repetitive switching, most of them were not observed again at the same position after one cycle of switching operations in the present experiments. This suggests that a part of alumina structure and/or composition along the current paths is modified during the switching operations.

  12. Measurement of transient atomic displacements in thin films with picosecond and femtometer resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kozina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of the transient structural response of weakly photo-excited thin films of BiFeO3, Pb(Zr,TiO3, and Bi and time-scales for interfacial thermal transport. Utilizing picosecond x-ray diffraction at a 1.28 MHz repetition rate with time resolution extending down to 15 ps, transient changes in the diffraction angle are recorded. These changes are associated with photo-induced lattice strains within nanolayer thin films, resolved at the part-per-million level, corresponding to a shift in the scattering angle three orders of magnitude smaller than the rocking curve width and changes in the interlayer lattice spacing of fractions of a femtometer. The combination of high brightness, repetition rate, and stability of the synchrotron, in conjunction with high time resolution, represents a novel means to probe atomic-scale, near-equilibrium dynamics.

  13. Photoelectric and passivation properties of atomic layer deposited gradient AZO thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Tang, Li-dan; Wang, Bing; Jia, Yi; Feng, Jia-heng

    2017-02-01

    Gradient Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were deposited at 150 °C by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with different Al concentration gradient, and their photoelectric and passivation properties were investigated. With increasing Al concentration gradient from 0.09 to 1.21%/nm, Hall-effect showed that the resistivity of gradient AZO thin films deteriorates. The minimal resistivity (2.81 × 10-3 Ω cm), the maximum mobility (9.03 cm2/Vs) and the maximum carrier concentration (2.46 × 1020 cm-3) were obtained at 0.09%/nm Al concentration gradient. The average transmittance of all the gradient AZO films can be more than 85% in the visible region. In addition, gradient AZO thin films demonstrated excellent passivation properties. The maximum minority carrier lifetime (120.6 μs) and the minimal surface recombination velocity (≤208.3 cm/s) were obtained at 0.71%/nm Al concentration gradient.

  14. Ultraviolet optical properties of aluminum fluoride thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennessy, John, E-mail: john.j.hennessy@jpl.nasa.gov; Jewell, April D.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Nikzad, Shouleh [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Aluminum fluoride (AlF{sub 3}) is a low refractive index material with promising optical applications for ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. An atomic layer deposition process using trimethylaluminum and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride has been developed for the deposition of AlF{sub 3} at substrate temperatures between 100 and 200 °C. This low temperature process has resulted in thin films with UV-optical properties that have been characterized by ellipsometric and reflection/transmission measurements at wavelengths down to 200 nm. The optical loss for 93 nm thick films deposited at 100 °C was measured to be less than 0.2% from visible wavelengths down to 200 nm, and additional microstructural characterization demonstrates that the films are amorphous with moderate tensile stress of 42–105 MPa as deposited on silicon substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows no signature of residual aluminum oxide components making these films good candidates for a variety of applications at even shorter UV wavelengths.

  15. The physical properties of cubic plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition TaN films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Lavoie, C.; Copel, M.; Narayanan, V.; Park, D.-G.; Rossnagel, S. M.

    2004-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) is a promising technique to produce high quality metal and nitride thin films at low growth temperature. In this study, very thin (<10 nm) low resistivity (350 μΩ cm) cubic TaN Cu diffusion barrier were deposited by PE-ALD from TaCl5 and a plasma of both hydrogen and nitrogen. The physical properties of TaN thin films including microstructure, conformality, roughness, and thermal stability were investigated by various analytical techniques including x-ray diffraction, medium energy ion scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The Cu diffusion barrier properties of PE-ALD TaN thin films were studied using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical scattering, and sheet resistance measurements during thermal annealing of the test structures. The barrier failure temperatures were obtained as a function of film thickness and compared with those of PE-ALD Ta, physical vapor deposition (PVD) Ta, and PVD TaN. A diffusion kinetics analysis showed that the microstructure of the barrier materials is one of the most critical factors for Cu diffusion barrier performance.

  16. Nanomechanical properties of SiC films grown from C{sub 60} precursors using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Balooch, M.; Hamza, A.V.; Belak, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The mechanical properties of SiC films grown via C{sub 60} precursors were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Conventional silicon nitride and modified diamond cantilever AFM tips were employed to determine the film hardness, friction coefficient, and elastic modulus. The hardness is found to be between 26 and 40 GPa by nanoindentation of the film with the diamond tip. The friction coefficient for the silicon nitride tip on the SiC film is about one third that for silicon nitride sliding on a silicon substrate. By combining nanoindentation and AFM measurements an elastic modulus of {approximately}300 GPa is estimated for these SiC films. In order to better understand the atomic scale mechanisms that determine the hardness and friction of SiC, we simulated the molecular dynamics of a diamond indenting a crystalline SiC substrate.

  17. Microfabricated cells for chip-scale atomic clock based on coherent population trapping: Fabrication and investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Ermak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A universal method for fabrication of miniature cells for frequency standards and quantum magnetometers containing 87Rb atoms in the atmosphere of inert gas neon based on integrated technologies is considered. The results of experimental studies of coherent population trapping signals observed for a series of cells which provided recovery of vapors of an alkali metal from the rubidium dichromate salt with the help of laser radiation are presented. The coherent population trapping signals with a typical linewidth of 2–3 kHz and a signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in the 1-Hz bandwidth were observed, which allows one to provide a relative frequency stability of atomic clock of 10−11 at 100 s.

  18. Atomic structure and phonons of a Pb ultrathin film on the Al(100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, G. G.; Borisova, S. D.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2014-10-01

    The atomic and phonon structures of a Pb ultrathin film on the Al(100) surface have been theoretically studied. Surface relaxation, local density of vibrational states, and polarization of the phonon modes of adatoms and atoms of a substrate have been discussed. It has been shown that the adsorption of Pb results in the oscillating relaxation of the surface of the substrate and warping of the structure in subsurface layers. Comparative analysis of the vibrational characteristics of the pure surface of the substrate and the surface with adatoms has shown that the adsorptive interaction in the system and its dynamic stability are governed by new vibrational modes that are not inherent in pure Al and Pb surfaces.

  19. Organic thin film transistors with polymer brush gate dielectrics synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, J.C.; Whiting, G.L.; Khodabakhsh, S.

    2008-01-01

    , synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), were used to fabricate low voltage OFETs with both evaporated pentacene and solution deposited poly(3-hexylthiophene). The semiconductor-dielectric interfaces in these systems were studied with a variety of methods including scanning force microscopy......Low operating voltage is an important requirement that must be met for industrial adoption of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). We report here solution fabricated polymer brush gate insulators with good uniformity, low surface roughness and high capacitance. These ultra thin polymer films...

  20. A study of the morphology of photochromic and thermochromic MoO 3 amorphous films using an atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovskii, F. A.; Schaefer, D. M.; Gavrilyuk, A. I.; Reifenberger, R.

    The surface morphology of amorphous MoO 3 films enhanced by a coating of N.N-dimethylformamide was studied with an atomic force microscope. Images of the as-grown films revealed a surface structure consisting of ˜25 nm diameter clusters which had coalesced to form irregular-shaped grains with dimensions ranging between 100 and 190 nm. Similar structure was found in the films after a photochromic or thermochromic transition had occured. The relative surface areas of the films have been calculated and little change is observed after the photochromic transition while a ˜29 increase in surface area is observed after the thermochromic transition has taken place.

  1. Gold supported on thin oxide films: from single atoms to nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risse, Thomas; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Nilius, Niklas; Sterrer, Martin; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2008-08-01

    [Figure: see text]. Historically, people have prized gold for its beauty and the durability that resulted from its chemical inertness. However, even the ancient Romans had noted that finely dispersed gold can give rise to particular optical phenomena. A decade ago, researchers found that highly dispersed gold supported on oxides exhibits high chemical activity in a number of reactions. These chemical and optical properties have recently prompted considerable interest in applications of nanodispersed gold. Despite their broad use, a microscopic understanding of these gold-metal oxide systems lags behind their application. Numerous studies are currently underway to understand why supported nanometer-sized gold particles show catalytic activity and to explore possible applications of their optical properties in photonics and biology. This Account focuses on a microscopic understanding of the gold-substrate interaction and its impact on the properties of the adsorbed gold. Our strategy uses model systems in which gold atoms and clusters are supported on well-ordered thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. As a result, we can investigate the systems with the rigor of modern surface science techniques while incorporating some of the complexity found in technological applications. We use a variety of different experimental methods, namely, scanning probe techniques (scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, STM and STS), as well as infrared (IR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, to evaluate these interactions and combine these results with theoretical calculations. We examined the properties of supported gold with increasing complexity starting from single gold atoms to one- and two-dimensional clusters and three-dimensional particles. These investigations show that the binding of gold on oxide surfaces depends on the properties of the oxide, which leads to different electronic properties of

  2. A single-chip event sequencer and related microcontroller instrumentation for atomic physics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, E E

    2011-01-01

    A 16-bit digital event sequencer with 50 ns resolution and 50 ns trigger jitter is implemented by using an internal 32-bit timer on a dsPIC30F4013 microcontroller, controlled by an easily modified program written in standard C. It can accommodate hundreds of output events, and adjacent events can be spaced as closely as 1.5 μs. The microcontroller has robust 5 V inputs and outputs, allowing a direct interface to common laboratory equipment and other electronics. A USB computer interface and a pair of analog ramp outputs can be added with just two additional chips. An optional display/keypad unit allows direct interaction with the sequencer without requiring an external computer. Minor additions also allow simple realizations of other complex instruments, including a precision high-voltage ramp generator for driving spectrum analyzers or piezoelectric positioners, and a low-cost proportional integral differential controller and lock-in amplifier for laser frequency stabilization with about 100 kHz bandwidth.

  3. Atom probe tomography study on Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} hetero-epitaxial film on Ge substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji, E-mail: ejkamiyama@aol.com [Technology, GlobalWafers Japan Corp. Ltd., 6-861-5 Higashiko, Seiro, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Terasawa, Kengo; Yamaha, Takashi; Nakatsuka, Osamu [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Zaima, Shigeaki [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Izunome, Koji; Kashima, Kazuhiko [Technology, GlobalWafers Japan Corp. Ltd., 6-861-5 Higashiko, Seiro, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Uchida, Hiroshi [Physical Analysis Technology Center, Toshiba Nanoanalysis Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the incorporation of C atoms into a ternary alloy Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} epitaxial film on Ge substrates on a sub-nanometer scale by using atom probe tomography. Periodic atom distributions from individual (111) atomic planes were observed both in the Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} film and at the Ge substrates. Sn/C atoms had non-uniform distributions in the film. They also demonstrated a clear positive correlation in their distributions. Substitutional C atoms were only incorporated into the film when an Sn atom beam was applied onto the substrates under film growth conditions. - Highlights: • Incorporation of C atoms into epitaxial Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} film was studied. • Individual (111) atomic planes were observed by atom probe tomography. • Sn/C atoms had non-uniform distributions in the film. • Clear positive correlation in Sn/C atoms distributions was obtained.

  4. Stripping scattering of fast atoms on surfaces of metal-oxide crystals and ultrathin films; Streifende Streuung schneller Atome an Oberflaechen von Metalloxid-Kristallen und ultraduennen Filmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blauth, David

    2010-03-11

    In the framework of the present dissertation the interactions of fast atoms with surfaces of bulk oxides, metals and thin films on metals were studied. The experiments were performed in the regime of grazing incidence of atoms with energies of some keV. The advantage of this scattering geometry is the high surface sensibility and thus the possibility to determine the crystallographic and electronic characteristics of the topmost surface layer. In addition to these experiments, the energy loss and the electron emission induced by scattered projectiles was investigated. The energy for electron emission and exciton excitation on Alumina/NiAl(110) and SiO{sub 2}/Mo(112) are determined. By detection of the number of projectile induced emitted electrons as function of azimuthal angle for the rotation of the target surface, the geometrical structure of atoms forming the topmost layer of different adsorbate films on metal surfaces where determined via ion beam triangulation. (orig.)

  5. Stable 85Rb micro vapour cells: fabrication based on anodic bonding and application in chip-scale atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Juan; Deng, Ke; Guo, Deng-Zhu; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Geng-Min; Chen, Xu-Zong

    2010-11-01

    We describe the microfabrication of 85Rb vapour cells using a glass-silicon anodic bonding technique and in situ chemical reaction between rubidium chloride and barium azide to produce Rb. Under controlled conditions, the pure metallic Rb drops and buffer gases were obtained in the cells with a few mm3 internal volumes during the cell sealing process. At an ambient temperature of 90 °C the optical absorption resonance of 85Rb D1 transition with proper broadening and the corresponding coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance, with a signal contrast of 1.5% and linewidth of about 1.7 kHz, have been detected. The sealing quality and the stability of the cells have also been demonstrated experimentally by using the helium leaking detection and the after-9-month optoelectronics measurement which shows a similar CPT signal as its original status. In addition, the physics package of chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) based on the cell was realized. The measured frequency stability of the physics package can reach to 2.1 × 10-10 at one second when the cell was heated to 100 °C which proved that the cell has the quality to be used in portable and battery-operated devices.

  6. Bismuth iron oxide thin films using atomic layer deposition of alternating bismuth oxide and iron oxide layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puttaswamy, Manjunath; Vehkamäki, Marko [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Kukli, Kaupo, E-mail: kaupo.kukli@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); University of Tartu, Institute of Physics, W. Ostwald 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); Dimri, Mukesh Chandra [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, EE-12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Kemell, Marianna; Hatanpää, Timo; Heikkilä, Mikko J. [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Mizohata, Kenichiro [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Stern, Raivo [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, EE-12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-07-29

    Bismuth iron oxide films with varying contributions from Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared using atomic layer deposition. Bismuth (III) 2,3-dimethyl-2-butoxide, was used as the bismuth source, iron(III) tert-butoxide as the iron source and water vapor as the oxygen source. The films were deposited as stacks of alternate Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. Films grown at 140 °C to the thickness of 200–220 nm were amorphous, but crystallized upon post-deposition annealing at 500 °C in nitrogen. Annealing of films with intermittent bismuth and iron oxide layers grown to different thicknesses influenced their surface morphology, crystal structure, composition, electrical and magnetic properties. Implications of multiferroic performance were recognized in the films with the remanent charge polarization varying from 1 to 5 μC/cm{sup 2} and magnetic coercivity varying from a few up to 8000 A/m. - Highlights: • Bismuth iron oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition at 140 °C. • The major phase formed in the films upon annealing at 500 °C was BiFeO{sub 3}. • BiFeO{sub 3} films and films containing excess Bi favored electrical charge polarization. • Slight excess of iron oxide enhanced saturative magnetization behavior.

  7. Thermodynamics and kinetic behaviors of thickness-dependent crystallization in high-k thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Xianglong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan, E-mail: madayan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Xu, Kewei [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049, People' s Republic of China and Department of Physics and Opt-electronic Engineering, Xi' an University of Arts and Science, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition is adopted to prepare HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} high-k thin films. The HfO{sub 2} thin films are amorphous at the initial growth stage, but become crystallized when the film thickness (h) exceeds a critical value (h{sub critical}{sup *}). This phase transition from amorphous to crystalline is enhanced at higher temperatures and is discussed, taking into account the effect of kinetic energy. At lower temperatures, the amorphous state can be maintained even when h>h{sub critical}{sup *} owing to the small number of activated atoms. However, the number of activated atoms increases with the temperature, allowing crystallization to occur even in films with smaller thickness. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films, on the other hand, maintain their amorphous state independent of the film thickness and temperature owing to the limited number of activated atoms. A thermodynamic model is proposed to describe the thickness-dependent phase transition.

  8. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  9. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovan, R.; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G.; Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y.; Fanciulli, M.

    2014-05-01

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er2O3 and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO3 and ErFe2O4 phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N2. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition Al2O3 Thin Films in Magnetized Radio Frequency Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingcun; Chen, Qiang; Sang, Lijun; Yang, Lizhen; Liu, Zhongwei; Wang, Zhenduo

    Self-limiting deposition of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) thin films were accomplished by the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using trimethyl aluminum (TMA) and O2 as precursor and oxidant, respectively, where argon was kept flowing in whole deposition process as discharge and purge gas. In here we present a novel plasma source for the atomic layer deposition technology, magnetized radio frequency (RF) plasma. Difference from the commercial RF source, magnetic coils were amounted above the RF electrode, and the influence of the magnetic field strength on the deposition rate and morphology are investigated in detail. It concludes that a more than 3 Å/ purging cycle deposition rate and the good quality of ALD Al2O3 were achieved in this plasma source even without extra heating. The ultra-thin films were characterized by including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The high deposition rates obtained at ambient temperatures were analyzed after in-situ the diagnostic of plasmas by Langmuir probe.

  11. The atomic structure and chemical composition of HfOx (x < 2) films prepared by ion-beam sputtering deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, V. S.; Gerasimova, A. K.; Kruchinin, V. N.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Prosvirin, I. P.; Badmaeva, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Non-stoichiometric HfOx films of different chemical composition (x partial pressure in a chamber. An effect of chemical composition on the atomic structure of the films was studied by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy methods. The films were found to be amorphous, consisting only of three components: Hf-metal clusters, Hf4O7 suboxide and stoichiometric HfO2. The relative concentration of these components varies with changing x. The surface of the films contains the increased oxygen content compared to the bulk. It was found that the Hf4O7 suboxide concentration is maximal at x = 1.8. The concept of hafnium oxide film growth by the IBSD method is proposed to explain the lack of suboxides variety in the films and the instability of HfO2, when annealed at high temperature.

  12. The investigation of spray pyrolysis grown CdS thin films doped with flourine atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yılmaz, Salih, E-mail: slh_yilmaz@yahoo.com.tr

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Undoped and F-doped CdS thin films were produced. • XRD data showed deterioration with the increase of F-doping. • SEM images indicated a grain growth after F-doping. • RTPL data exhibited an enhancement in the spectrum for F-doped CdS samples. • The best electrical and optical properties were obtained for 2 at.% F-doped CdS. - Abstract: Undoped and F-doped CdS thin films were succesfully grown on the glass substrates by the spray prolysis method. X-ray diffraction results showed that all the samples had hexagonal wurtzite structure with the (1 0 1) preferred orientation. It was found from scanning electron microscopy that an increase in the grain size was observed after F-doping. The band gap value of CdS thin films increased from 2.38 eV to 2.42 eV with the increase of F concentration from 0 to 6 at.%. The intensity of room temperature photoluminescence spectrum of undoped CdS thin films enhanced with the increment of F-doping amount that is related to the increase of point defects formed by the flourine atoms. Electrical measurements showed that the carrier concentration increased from 1.93 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} to 7.62 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} when CdS thin films were doped with 2 at.% F. However, further increase in F amount up to 6 at.% caused a decrease in the carrier concentration. On the other hand, resistivity value first decreased from 1.26 × 10{sup 5} Ω cm to 8.54 × 10{sup 4} Ω cm with the increase of F-doping up to 2 at.% and then increased to 1.65 × 10{sup 5} Ω cm for 6 at.% F-doping. It can be concluded that 2 at.% F-doped CdS thin films exhibited the best electrical and optical properties, which is suitable for the application of thin film solar cells.

  13. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of MgO thin films on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangelista, S.; Mantovan, R.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G.; Kutrzeba-Kotowska, B.; Spiga, S.; Fanciulli, M.

    2013-12-01

    Magnesium oxide (MgO) films have been grown by atomic layer deposition in the wide deposition temperature window of 80-350 °C by using bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium and H2O precursors. MgO thin films are deposited on both HF-last Si(1 0 0) and SiO2/Si substrates at a constant growth rate of ˜0.12 nm cycle-1. The structural, morphological and chemical properties of the synthesized MgO thin films are investigated by x-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy measurements. MgO layers are characterized by sharp interface with the substrate and limited surface roughness, besides good chemical uniformity and polycrystalline structure for thickness above 7 nm. C-V measurements performed on Al/MgO/Si MOS capacitors, with MgO in the 4.6-11 nm thickness range, allow determining a dielectric constant (κ) ˜ 11. Co layers are grown by chemical vapour deposition in direct contact with MgO without vacuum-break (base pressure 10-5-10-6 Pa). The as-grown Co/MgO stacks show sharp interfaces and no elements interdiffusion among layers. C-V and I-V measurements have been conducted on Co/MgO/Si MOS capacitors. The dielectric properties of MgO are not influenced by the further process of Co deposition.

  14. Atomic layer deposition assisted pattern transfer technology for ultra-thin block copolymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wenhui; Luo, Jun; Meng, Lingkuan; Li, Junjie; Xiang, Jinjuan; Li, Junfeng; Wang, Wenwu; Chen, Dapeng; Ye, Tianchun; Zhao, Chao

    2016-08-31

    As an emerging developing technique for next-generation lithography, directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymer (BCP) has attracted numerous attention and has been a potential alternative to supplement the intrinsic limitations of conventional photolithography. In this work, the self-assembling properties of a lamellar diblock copolymer poly(styrene-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA, 22k-b-22k, L{sub 0} = 25 nm) on Si substrate and an atomic layer deposition (ALD)-assisted pattern transfer technology for the application of DSA beyond 16/14 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology nodes, were investigated. Firstly, two key processing parameters of DSA, i.e. annealing temperatures and durations of BCP films, were optimized to achieve low defect density and high productivity. After phase separation of BCP films, self-assembling patterns of low defect density should be transferred to the substrate. However, due to the nano-scale thickness and the weak resistance of BCP films to dry etching, it is nearly impossible to transfer the BCP patterns directly to the substrate. Therefore, an ALD-based technology was explored in this work, in which deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} selectively reacts with PMMA blocks thus hardening the PMMA patterns. After removing PS blocks by plasma etching, hardened PMMA patterns were left and transferred to underneath SiO{sub 2} hard mask layer. Using this patterned hard mask, nanowire array of 25 nm pitch were realized on Si substrate. From this work, a high-throughput DSA baseline flow and related ALD-assisted pattern transfer technique were developed and proved to have good capability with the mainstream CMOS technology. - Highlights: • Optimization on self-assembly process for high productivity and low defectivity • Enhancement of etching ratio and resistance by atomic layer deposition (ALD) • A hard mask was used for pattern quality improvement and contamination control.

  15. Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of conformal Pt films in high aspect ratio trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkens, I. J. M.; Verheijen, M. A.; Knoops, H. C. M.; Keuning, W.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2017-02-01

    To date, conventional thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been the method of choice to deposit high-quality Pt thin films grown typically from (MeCp)PtMe3 vapor and O2 gas at 300 °C. Plasma-assisted ALD of Pt using O2 plasma can offer several advantages over thermal ALD, such as faster nucleation and deposition at lower temperatures. In this work, it is demonstrated that plasma-assisted ALD at 300 °C also allows for the deposition of highly conformal Pt films in trenches with high aspect ratio ranging from 3 to 34. Scanning electron microscopy inspection revealed that the conformality of the deposited Pt films was 100% in trenches with aspect ratio (AR) up to 34. These results were corroborated by high-precision layer thickness measurements by transmission electron microscopy for trenches with an aspect ratio of 22. The role of the surface recombination of O-radicals and the contribution of thermal ALD reactions is discussed.

  16. Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of titanium oxynitrides films: A comparative spectroscopic and electrical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowińska, Małgorzata, E-mail: malgorzata.sowinska@b-tu.de; Henkel, Karsten; Schmeißer, Dieter [Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg, Applied Physics and Sensors, K.-Wachsmann-Allee 17, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Kärkkänen, Irina; Schneidewind, Jessica; Naumann, Franziska; Gruska, Bernd; Gargouri, Hassan [SENTECH Instruments GmbH, Schwarzschildstraße 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The process parameters' impact of the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) method on the oxygen to nitrogen (O/N) ratio in titanium oxynitride (TiO{sub x}N{sub y}) films was studied. Titanium(IV)isopropoxide in combination with NH{sub 3} plasma and tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium by applying N{sub 2} plasma processes were investigated. Samples were characterized by the in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical characterization (current–voltage: I-V and capacitance–voltage: C-V) methods. The O/N ratio in the TiO{sub x}N{sub y} films is found to be very sensitive for their electric properties such as conductivity, dielectric breakdown, and permittivity. Our results indicate that these PE-ALD film properties can be tuned, via the O/N ratio, by the selection of the process parameters and precursor/coreactant combination.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of Nb-doped ZnO for thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A.; Wrench, J. S.; Jin, J. D.; Whittles, T. J.; Mitrovic, I. Z.; Raja, M.; Dhanak, V. R.; Chalker, P. R.; Hall, S.

    2016-11-01

    We present physical and electrical characterization of niobium-doped zinc oxide (NbZnO) for thin film transistor (TFT) applications. The NbZnO films were deposited using atomic layer deposition. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that the crystallinity of the NbZnO films reduces with an increase in the Nb content and lower deposition temperature. It was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy that Nb5+ is present within the NbZnO matrix. Furthermore, photoluminescence indicates that the band gap of the ZnO increases with a higher Nb content, which is explained by the Burstein-Moss effect. For TFT applications, a growth temperature of 175 °C for 3.8% NbZnO provided the best TFT characteristics with a saturation mobility of 7.9 cm2/Vs, the current On/Off ratio of 1 × 108, and the subthreshold swing of 0.34 V/decade. The transport is seen to follow a multiple-trap and release mechanism at lower gate voltages and percolation thereafter.

  18. Quantum confinement in amorphous TiO(2) films studied via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David M; Du, Xiaohua; Cavanagh, Andrew S; Weimer, Alan W

    2008-11-05

    Despite the significant recent increase in quantum-based optoelectronics device research, few deposition techniques can reliably create the required functional nanoscale systems. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used here to study the quantum effects attainable through the use of this ångström-level controlled growth process. Size-dependent quantum confinement has been demonstrated using TiO(2) layers of nanoscale thickness applied to the surfaces of silicon wafers. TiO(2) films were deposited at 100 °C using TiCl(4) and H(2)O(2) in a viscous flow ALD reactor, at a rate of 0.61 Å/cycle. The low-temperature process was utilized to guarantee the amorphous deposition of TiO(2) layers and post-deposition thermal annealing was employed to promote crystallite-size modification. Hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the residual chlorine that remained from a typical TiCl(4)-H(2)O ALD process at this temperature, down to 1.6%. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to quantify the optical properties both below and above the bandgap energy. A central composite design was employed to map the surface response of the film thickness-dependent bandgap shift for the as-deposited case and up to a thermal annealing temperature of 550 °C. The Brus model was used to develop a correlation between the amorphous TiO(2) film thickness and the quantum length to promote equivalent bandgap shifts.

  19. Properties of nanostructured undoped ZrO{sub 2} thin film electrolytes by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition for thin film solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gu Young; Noh, Seungtak; Lee, Yoon Ho; Cha, Suk Won, E-mail: ybkim@hanyang.ac.kr, E-mail: swcha@snu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Sanghoon [Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Soon Wook; Koo, Bongjun; Kim, Young-Beom, E-mail: ybkim@hanyang.ac.kr, E-mail: swcha@snu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); An, Jihwan [Manufacturing Systems and Design Engineering Programme, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Nanostructured ZrO{sub 2} thin films were prepared by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) and by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). The effects of the deposition conditions of temperature, reactant, plasma power, and duration upon the physical and chemical properties of ZrO{sub 2} films were investigated. The ZrO{sub 2} films by PEALD were polycrystalline and had low contamination, rough surfaces, and relatively large grains. Increasing the plasma power and duration led to a clear polycrystalline structure with relatively large grains due to the additional energy imparted by the plasma. After characterization, the films were incorporated as electrolytes in thin film solid oxide fuel cells, and the performance was measured at 500 °C. Despite similar structure and cathode morphology of the cells studied, the thin film solid oxide fuel cell with the ZrO{sub 2} thin film electrolyte by the thermal ALD at 250 °C exhibited the highest power density (38 mW/cm{sup 2}) because of the lowest average grain size at cathode/electrolyte interface.

  20. TiO{sub 2} anatase films obtained by direct liquid injection atomic layer deposition at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avril, L., E-mail: ludovic.avril@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Reymond-Laruinaz, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Decams, J.M. [Annealsys, rue de la Vieille Poste, 34055 Montpellier Cedex 1 (France); Bruyère, S.; Potin, V.; Lucas, M.C. Marco de; Imhoff, L. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2014-01-01

    TiO{sub 2} thin films were grown by direct liquid injection atomic layer deposition (DLI-ALD) with infrared rapid thermal heating using titanium tetraisopropoxide and water as precursors. This titanium tetraisopropoxide/water process exhibited a growth rate of 0.018 nm/cycle in a self-limited ALD growth mode at 280 °C. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analyses have shown a smooth surface with a low roughness. XPS results demonstrated that the films were pure and close to the TiO{sub 2} stoichiometric composition in depth. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the films were crystallized to the anatase structure in the as-deposited state at low temperature without necessity of high temperature annealing. Results obtained demonstrate that the liquid injection ALD is an efficient method of elaborating titanium oxide films using titanium tetraisopropoxide as precursor.

  1. Spatio-temporal behaviour of atomic-scale tribo-ceramic films in adaptive surface engineered nano-materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Rabinovich, G; Kovalev, A; Veldhuis, S; Yamamoto, K; Endrino, J L; Gershman, I S; Rashkovskiy, A; Aguirre, M H; Wainstein, D L

    2015-03-05

    Atomic-scale, tribo-ceramic films associated with dissipative structures formation are discovered under extreme frictional conditions which trigger self-organization. For the first time, we present an actual image of meta-stable protective tribo-ceramics within thicknesses of a few atomic layers. A mullite and sapphire structure predominates in these phases. They act as thermal barriers with an amazing energy soaking/dissipating capacity. Less protective tribo-films cannot sustain in these severe conditions and rapidly wear out. Therefore, a functional hierarchy is established. The created tribo-films act in synergy, striving to better adapt themselves to external stimuli. Under a highly complex structure and non-equilibrium state, the upcoming generation of adaptive surface engineered nano-multilayer materials behaves like intelligent systems - capable of generating, with unprecedented efficiency, the necessary tribo-films to endure an increasingly severe environment.

  2. Characterization of Al2O3 Thin Films on GaAs Substrate Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hong-Liang; LI Yan-Bo; XU Min; DING Shi-Jin; SUN Liang; ZHANG Wei; WANG Li-Kang

    2006-01-01

    @@ Al2O3 thin films are grown by atomic layer deposition on GaAs substrates at 300℃. The structural properties of the Al2O3 thin film and the Al2O3/GaAs interface are characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XRD results show that the as-deposited Al2O3 film is amorphous. For 30 atomic layer deposition growth cycles, the thicknesses of the Al2O3 thin film and the interface layer from the HRTEM are 3.3nm and 0.5nm, respectively.XPS analyses reveal that the Al2O3/GaAs interface is almost free from As2O3.

  3. Growth of thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on biaxially oriented polymer films by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaehae-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kauppi, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.kauppi@vti.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Sahagian, Khoren, E-mail: khoren@anasysinstruments.com [Anasys Instruments, 121 Gray Avenue, Suite 100, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (United States); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 AALTO (Finland); Peresin, Maria Soledad; Sievaenen, Jenni; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2012-11-01

    The effects of thin film nucleation and initial growth on roughness, chemistry and thermomechanical properties of polymer film surfaces were studied. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited onto commercial biaxially oriented polypropylene and polylactic acid films at 80 Degree-Sign C by using atomic layer deposition technique. Both substrates, especially the more hydrophobic polypropylene, showed initial growth through Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters. There was a faster deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on polylactic acid film than on polypropylene at the early stages of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition. There were also indications of chemical interactions between polylactic acid and trimethyl aluminum used as a precursor for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Changes in the thermo-mechanical properties of the polymer surfaces with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} also evidenced the differences between the substrate polymer films. The near surface interphase formed in polylactic acid probably contributed to the strong increase and scattering in the softening temperature during the early thin film growth. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth of atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at 80 Degree-Sign C was studied on commercial films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both substrate films showed early Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth through clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial growth rate depends on the nature of the substrate film surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were indications of chemical interactions between substrate and precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film thickness and chemical interactions affect thermo-mechanical properties.

  4. Microscratch testing method for systematic evaluation of the adhesion of atomic layer deposited thin films on silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Kilpi, Lauri; Ylivaara, Oili M.E.; Vaajoki, Antti; Malm, Jari; Sintonen, Sakari; Tuominen, Marko; Puurunen, Riikka L.; Ronkainen, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The scratch test method is widely used for adhesion evaluation of thin films and coatings. Usual critical load criteria designed for scratch testing of coatings were not applicable to thin atomic layer deposition (ALD) films on silicon wafers. Thus, the bases for critical load evaluation were established and the critical loads suitable for ALD coating adhesion evaluation on silicon wafers were determined in this paper as LCSi1, LCSi2, LCALD1, and LCALD2, representing the failure p...

  5. Effects of intermittent atomization on the properties of Al-doped ZnO thin films deposited by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Linjie; Wang, Lixin [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Qin, Xiujuan, E-mail: qinxj@ysu.edu.cn [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Cui, Li [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Shao, Guangjie [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2016-04-30

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were prepared on glass substrates with different atomization interval times by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. The structure, morphology, and optical and electrical properties were investigated by X-ray diffractometer, atomic force microscope, UV-vis double beam spectrophotometer and 4 point probe method. ZnO thin films exhibited strong growth orientation along the (002) plane and the crystalline was affected by the atomization interval time. All the films had high transmittance and the films with interval times of 2 min and 4 min had good haze values for the transparent conducting oxide silicon solar cell applications. The AZO thin film had the best optical and electrical properties when the atomization interval time was 4 min. This is very important for the optoelectronic device applications. The surface morphology of AZO films depended on the atomization interval time. - Highlights: • Intermittent atomization is proved to be an effective measure. • Atomization interval time has an important influence on the crystallinity of films. • The surface morphology of ZnO films depends on atomization interval time. • Different hazes can be obtained by changing the atomization interval time.

  6. Photoluminescence enhancement in porous SiC passivated by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Iwasa, Yoshimi; Ou, Yiyu

    2016-01-01

    Porous SiC co-doped with B and N was passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films to enhance the photoluminescence. After optimizing the deposition conditions, as high as 14.9 times photoluminescence enhancement has been achieved.......Porous SiC co-doped with B and N was passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films to enhance the photoluminescence. After optimizing the deposition conditions, as high as 14.9 times photoluminescence enhancement has been achieved....

  7. Self-organized thickness engineering of Al thin films by alternation of dense and diluted atomic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ying; Wu, Kehui; Tang, Zhe; Wang, Enge [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Ebert, Philipp [Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    We studied the growth of Al on Si(111)-{radical}(3) x {radical}(3)-Al substrates by by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction. We found that the Al film grown on an atomically sharp Al/Si interface exhibits of a superlattice structure of alternating densely-packed (1 x 1) and loosely-packed (likely {radical}(3) x {radical}(3)) atomic layers, at film thicknesses 0.9 nm. Above 0.9 nm Al starts to grow in the normal stacking of Al(111) layers. The phenomenon is explained within the theory of the quantum size effects in a jellium metal combined with strain effects.

  8. Photoluminescence enhancement in porous SiC passivated by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Iwasa, Yoshimi; Ou, Yiyu;

    2016-01-01

    Porous SiC co-doped with B and N was passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films to enhance the photoluminescence. After optimizing the deposition conditions, as high as 14.9 times photoluminescence enhancement has been achieved.......Porous SiC co-doped with B and N was passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films to enhance the photoluminescence. After optimizing the deposition conditions, as high as 14.9 times photoluminescence enhancement has been achieved....

  9. Microfluidics meets thin-film electronics: a new approach towards an integrated intelligent lab-on-a-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Heiko; Chemnitz, Steffen; Schumacher, Stephanie; Koziy, Volodymyr; Fischer, Alexander; Meixner, Alfred J.; Ehrhardt, Dietmar; Bohm, Markus

    2003-04-01

    A novel architecture for a lab-on-a-chip is presented. The architecture consists of a microfluidic system including integrated optical sensors and thin film transistors. The concept is based on the TFA (Thin Film on ASIC) technology that was developed at University of Siegen. The device consists of two substrate plates that are sandwiched together using oxygen plasma bonding. The thicker bottom plate contains the contacts to the microfluidic channels, while the thinner top plate contains the microfluidic system. The top plate is bonded face down onto the bottom substrate, and, on its reverse side, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) based pin-diodes and thin film transistors (TFTs) are deposited for optical detection and data transfer. The pin-diodes and the TFTs are manufactured by PECVD (Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition) from silane, ammonia and dopant gases at temperatures around 200°C. Sputtered ZnO:Al is used as semitransparent front contact for the diodes, while Al and Cr are used as contacts to the transistors. The TFTs are used as switches to read out an array of pin-diodes. Experimental results for an electrokinetic microfluidic pump and the a-Si:H devices are reported. Further developments and potential applications for microanalysis are outlined.

  10. Synthesis of indium oxi-sulfide films by atomic layer deposition: The essential role of plasma enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugot, Cathy; Schneider, Nathanaëlle; Lincot, Daniel; Donsanti, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the atomic layer deposition of In2(S,O)3 films by using In(acac)3 (acac = acetylacetonate), H2S and either H2O or O2 plasma as oxygen sources. First, the growth of pure In2S3 films was studied in order to better understand the influence of the oxygen pulses. X-Ray diffraction measurements, optical analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were performed to characterize the samples. When H2O was used as the oxygen source, the films have structural and optical properties, and the atomic composition of pure In2S3. No pure In2O3 films could be grown by using H2O or O2 plasma. However, In2(S,O)3 films could be successfully grown by using O2 plasma as oxygen source at a deposition temperature of T = 160 °C, because of an exchange reaction between S and O atoms. By adjusting the number of In2O3 growth cycles in relation to the number of In2S3 growth cycles, the optical band gap of the resulting thin films could be tuned.

  11. Synthesis of indium oxi-sulfide films by atomic layer deposition: The essential role of plasma enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Bugot

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the atomic layer deposition of In2(S,O3 films by using In(acac3 (acac = acetylacetonate, H2S and either H2O or O2 plasma as oxygen sources. First, the growth of pure In2S3 films was studied in order to better understand the influence of the oxygen pulses. X-Ray diffraction measurements, optical analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were performed to characterize the samples. When H2O was used as the oxygen source, the films have structural and optical properties, and the atomic composition of pure In2S3. No pure In2O3 films could be grown by using H2O or O2 plasma. However, In2(S,O3 films could be successfully grown by using O2 plasma as oxygen source at a deposition temperature of T = 160 °C, because of an exchange reaction between S and O atoms. By adjusting the number of In2O3 growth cycles in relation to the number of In2S3 growth cycles, the optical band gap of the resulting thin films could be tuned.

  12. First-principles study of sulfur atom doping and adsorption on α-Fe2O3 (0001) film

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jiao; Wanaguru, Prabath; Xia, Congxin; Tao, Meng; Zhang, Qiming

    2016-09-01

    Using the spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) and the DFT + U method, the geometric and electronic properties of the hematite α-Fe2O3 (0001) film with the sulfur (S) atom doping and adsorption have been investigated systematically. The most stable hematite α-Fe2O3 (0001) film with an anti-ferromagnetic arrangement is identified. For the study of sulfur adsorption on the film, the S adatom prefers to bond with three O atoms, in the center of a triangle formed by the three O atoms. The S acts as a cation at this site. The sulfur adsorption has introduced two gap states, in addition to the unoccupied surface states. Furthermore, with the most stable S-adsorption configuration, the diffusion of the S adatom from the surface to the inside is searched and the transition state along the minimum-energy pathway is also evaluated. For S-doping in the film, it is found that S substitution of O in the top layer is energetically favored than that in the deeper layer. It shows that the value of the band gap is reduced to ∼1.26 eV from ∼1.43 eV of the clean film. The formation energy of S substitution of O in the film is also obtained.

  13. Fabrication and design equation of film-type large-scale interdigitated supercapacitor chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Inho; Kim, Gil-Pyo; Park, Soomin; Park, Junsu; Kim, Nam Dong; Yi, Jongheop

    2012-12-07

    We report large-scale interdigitated supercapacitor chips based on pseudo-capacitive metal oxide electrodes. A novel method is presented, which provides a powerful fabrication technology of interdigitated supercapacitors operated by a pseudo-capacitive reaction. Also, we empirically develop an equation that describes the relationship between capacitance, mass, and sweep rate in an actual supercapacitor system.

  14. Suppressed grain-boundary scattering in atomic layer deposited Nb:TiO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Karppinen, Maarit, E-mail: maarit.karppinen@aalto.fi [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Shigematsu, Kei [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sano, Masahito [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-11-09

    We have fabricated high-quality thin films of the transparent conducting anatase Nb:TiO{sub 2} on glass substrates through atomic layer deposition, and a subsequent reductive heat treatment of the as-deposited amorphous films. Hall-effect measurements and Drude-fitting of the Vis-NIR spectra indicate that for lightly doped films deposited at temperatures around 170 °C, grain boundary scattering becomes negligible and the mobility is predominately limited by phonon-electron scattering inherent to the anatase lattice and by impurities. Simultaneously, such lighter doping leads to reduced plasma absorption, thereby improving material's performance as a transparent conductor.

  15. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  16. Comparison of the effects of 60 nm and 96 nm thick patterned permalloy thin films on the performance of on-chip spiral inductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulijala, Vasu; Syed, Azeemuddin

    2016-12-01

    In our earlier work it was shown that the 60 nm domain patterned Permalloy, incorporated on on-chip spiral inductors, gave better performance at frequencies greater than 5 GHz compared to the bulk Permalloy incorporated inductors, and the control structure. In this paper we compare the effects of 60 nm and 96 nm thick domain patterned Permalloy thin films, on the performance of on-chip spiral inductors. Experimental results show that the 60 nm thick both bulk and patterned Permalloys provide more improvement in inductance and quality factor of inductors, compared to that of 96 nm.

  17. Ellipsometry and XPS comparative studies of thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited Al2O3-films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Haeberle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on results on the preparation of thin (2O3 films on silicon substrates using thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD in the SENTECH SI ALD LL system. The T-ALD Al2O3 layers were deposited at 200 °C, for the PE-ALD films we varied the substrate temperature range between room temperature (rt and 200 °C. We show data from spectroscopic ellipsometry (thickness, refractive index, growth rate over 4” wafers and correlate them to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS results. The 200 °C T-ALD and PE-ALD processes yield films with similar refractive indices and with oxygen to aluminum elemental ratios very close to the stoichiometric value of 1.5. However, in both also fragments of the precursor are integrated into the film. The PE-ALD films show an increased growth rate and lower carbon contaminations. Reducing the deposition temperature down to rt leads to a higher content of carbon and CH-species. We also find a decrease of the refractive index and of the oxygen to aluminum elemental ratio as well as an increase of the growth rate whereas the homogeneity of the film growth is not influenced significantly. Initial state energy shifts in all PE-ALD samples are observed which we attribute to a net negative charge within the films.

  18. Electrical and mechanical stability of aluminum-doped ZnO films grown on flexible substrates by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luka, G., E-mail: gluka@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Witkowski, B.S.; Wachnicki, L.; Jakiela, R. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Virt, I.S. [University of Rzeszow, Rzeszow (Poland); Drohobych Ivan Franko State Pedagogical University, Drohobych (Ukraine); Andrzejczuk, M.; Lewandowska, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Godlewski, M. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, College of Science, Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Transparent and conductive ZnO:Al films were grown by atomic layer deposition. • The films were grown on flexible substrates at low growth temperatures (110–140 °C). • So-obtained films have low resistivities, of the order of 10{sup −3} Ω cm. • Bending tests indicated a critical bending radius of ≈1.2 cm. • Possible sources of the film resistivity changes upon bending are proposed. - Abstract: Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films were grown on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at low deposition temperatures (110–140 °C). The films have low resistivities, ∼10{sup −3} Ω cm, and high transparency (∼90%) in the visible range. Bending tests indicated a critical bending radius of ≈1.2 cm, below which the resistivity changes became irreversible. The films deposited on PET with additional buffer layer are more stable upon bending and temperature changes.

  19. Ellipsometry and XPS comparative studies of thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited Al2O3-films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberle, Jörg; Henkel, Karsten; Gargouri, Hassan; Naumann, Franziska; Gruska, Bernd; Arens, Michael; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    We report on results on the preparation of thin (<100 nm) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films on silicon substrates using thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) in the SENTECH SI ALD LL system. The T-ALD Al2O3 layers were deposited at 200 °C, for the PE-ALD films we varied the substrate temperature range between room temperature (rt) and 200 °C. We show data from spectroscopic ellipsometry (thickness, refractive index, growth rate) over 4" wafers and correlate them to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. The 200 °C T-ALD and PE-ALD processes yield films with similar refractive indices and with oxygen to aluminum elemental ratios very close to the stoichiometric value of 1.5. However, in both also fragments of the precursor are integrated into the film. The PE-ALD films show an increased growth rate and lower carbon contaminations. Reducing the deposition temperature down to rt leads to a higher content of carbon and CH-species. We also find a decrease of the refractive index and of the oxygen to aluminum elemental ratio as well as an increase of the growth rate whereas the homogeneity of the film growth is not influenced significantly. Initial state energy shifts in all PE-ALD samples are observed which we attribute to a net negative charge within the films.

  20. Preparation of high-content hexagonal boron nitride composite film and characterization of atomic oxygen erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-04-01

    Space aircrafts circling in low earth orbit are suffered from highly reactive atomic oxygen (AO). To shield AO, a flexible thin film with 80 wt.% hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and h-BN/epoxy film were fabricated through vacuum filtration and adding nanofibrillated cellulose fibers. H-BN nanosheets were hydroxylated for enhancing interaction in the films. Mass loss and erosion yield at accumulated AO fluence about 3.04 × 1020 atoms/cm2 were adopted to evaluate the AO resistance properties of the films. A carpet-like rough surface, chemical oxidations and change in crystal structure of h-BN were found after AO treatment, and the degrading mechanism was proposed. The mass loss and erosion yield under AO attack were compared between h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film, and the comparison was also done for various types of shielding AO materials. Excellent AO resistance property of h-BN film is shown, and the reasons are analyzed.

  1. Characteristics of atomic layer deposition grown HfO{sub 2} films after exposure to plasma treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.W. [Kookje Electric Korea Co. LTD, 4-2 Chaam-Dong, Chonan-Si, Chungcheongnam-Do (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: ywkim@kekorea.co.kr; Roh, Y. [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ji-Beom [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jibyoo@skku.ac.kr; Kim, Hyoungsub [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-22

    Ultra thin HfO{sub 2} films were grown by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique using tetrakismethylethylaminohafnium (Hf[N(CH){sub 3}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 4}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) as the precursors and subsequently exposed to various plasma conditions, i.e., CCP (capacitively coupled plasma) and MMT (modified magnetron typed plasma) in N{sub 2} or N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} ambient. The conventional CCP treatment was not effective in removing the carbon impurities, which were incorporated during the ALD process, from the HfO{sub 2} films. However, according to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, the MMT treated films exhibited a significant reduction in their carbon contents and the efficient incorporation of nitrogen atoms. Although the incorporated nitrogen was easily released during the post-thermal annealing of the MMT treated samples, it was more effective than the CCP treatment in removing the film impurities. Consequently, the MMT treated samples exhibited excellent electrical properties as compared to the as-deposited HfO{sub 2} films, including negligible hysteresis (flatband voltage shift), a low leakage current, and the reduced equivalent oxide thickness of the gate stack. In conclusion, MMT post treatment is more effective than conventional CCP treatment in improving the electrical properties of high-k films by reducing the carbon contamination and densifying the as-deposited defective films.

  2. Investigation of thermal atomic layer deposited TiAlX (X = N or C) film as metal gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jinjuan; Zhang, Yanbo; Li, Tingting; Wang, Xiaolei; Gao, Jianfeng; Yin, Huaxiang; Li, Junfeng; Wang, Wenwu; Ding, Yuqiang; Xu, Chongying; Zhao, Chao

    2016-08-01

    TiAlX (X = N or C) films are developed by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique as metal gate. The TiAlX films are deposited by using four different combinations of precursors: A: TiCl4-NH3-TMA-NH3, B: TiCl4-TMA-NH3, C: TiCl4-NH3-TMA and D: TiCl4-TMA. The physical characteristics of the TiAlX films such as chemical composition, growth rate, resistivity and surface roughness are estimated by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, four point probe method and atomic force microscopy respectively. Additionally, the electrical characteristics of the TiAlX films are investigated by using metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure. It is shown that NH3 presence in the reaction makes the film more like TiAlN(C) while NH3 absence makes the film more like TiAlC. The TiAlC film deposited by TiCl4-TMA has effective work function close to mid-gap of Si, which is rather potential for low power FinFET device application.

  3. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoye, Robert L. Z., E-mail: rlzh2@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L., E-mail: rlzh2@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Muñoz-Rojas, David [LMGP, University Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS, F-3800 Grenoble (France); Nelson, Shelby F. [Kodak Research Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York 14650 (United States); Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul [Holst Centre/TNO Thin Film Technology, Eindhoven, 5656 AE (Netherlands); Roozeboom, Fred [Holst Centre/TNO Thin Film Technology, Eindhoven, 5656 AE (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, Eindhoven, 5600 MB (Netherlands)

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-SALD technology will enable the commercial processing of thin films over large areas on a sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll basis, with new reactor designs emerging for flexible plastic and paper electronics.

  4. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Z. Hoye

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-SALD technology will enable the commercial processing of thin films over large areas on a sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll basis, with new reactor designs emerging for flexible plastic and paper electronics.

  5. Photocatalytic activity and photocorrosion of atomic layer deposited ZnO ultrathin films for the degradation of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan-Qiang; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Hang; Zhu, Lin; Li, Xin; Cao, Zheng-Yi; Wu, Di; Li, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-16

    ZnO ultrathin films with varied thicknesses of 7-70 nm were prepared at 200 °C on Si and fused quartz substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The impact of film thickness and annealing temperature on the crystallinity, morphology, optical bandgap, and photocatalytic properties of ZnO in the degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye under UV light irradiation (λ = 365 nm) has been investigated deeply. The as-deposited 28 nm thick ZnO ultrathin film exhibits highest photocatalytic activity, ascribed to the smallest band gap of 3.21 eV and proper thickness. The photocorrosion effect of ALD ZnO ultrathin films during photocatalytic process is observed. The presence of MB significantly accelerates the dissolution of ZnO ultrathin films. The possible photoetching mechanism of ZnO in MB solution is proposed.

  6. Direct method for magnetostriction coefficient measurement based on atomic force microscope, illustrated by the example of Tb–Co film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, B.L.S. [Laboratório de Sensores Óticos, Escola Politécnica, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Maximino, F.L. [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CEP:05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, J.C. [Laboratório de Sensores Óticos, Escola Politécnica, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, A.D., E-mail: adsantos@if.usp.br [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CEP:05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a method based on the Atomic Force Microscopy technique for direct measurement of magnetostriction coefficient of amorphous Tb–Co films deposited on Si(100) substrate. The magnetostriction coefficient of the film is determined by AFM measuring the deflection of the sample when applying a magnetic field. In order to maximize the deflection of the sample, in-plane magnetic anisotropy was induced by heat treatment under a magnetic field of 5 kOe. The value obtained for the saturation magnetostriction is 204×10{sup −6} for the Tb{sub 23}Co{sub 77} film. - Highlights: • Measurement of magnetostriction coefficient using AFM. • Tb–Co thin films produced by magnetron sputtering. • Magnetostriction characterization of magnetic thin films on nonmagnetic substrates.

  7. Formation and characterization of thin films from phthalocyanine complexes: An electrosynthesis study using the atomic-force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Vergara, M.E. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecatronica, Escuela de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac del Norte, Avenida Lomas de la Anahuac s/n, Col. Lomas Anahuac, 52786, Huixquilucan (Mexico)]. E-mail: elena.sanchez@anahuac.mx; Islas Bernal, I.F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera, M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz Rebollo, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacan, 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez Bada, J.R. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de Mexico, Calle del Puente 222, Col. Ejidos de Huipulco, 14380, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-05-07

    ({mu}-Cyano)(phthalocyaninato)metal(III) [PcMCN]{sub n} species with a central transition metal ion, such as Fe(III) and Co(III), were used to prepare molecular films on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode substrate by using the cyclic voltammetry technique. In order to investigate the influence of the ligand on the film properties, 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone and 2,6-dihydroxyanthraquinone as bivalent ligands were employed. The structure of the molecular materials was analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. The in situ film formation, texture, composition and conductivity of each film were further investigated using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and the four-probe technique, respectively. The [PcMCN]{sub n} complexes provided conductive films with an electrical conductivity of 1 x 10{sup -6} {omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at 298 K.

  8. Influences of different oxidants on the characteristics of HfAlOx films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Ji-Bin; Liu Hong-Xia; Ma Fei; Zhuo Qing-Qing; Hao Yue

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of two kinds of oxidants (H2O and O3) with the combinations of two metal precursors [trimethylaluminum (TMA) and tetrakis(ethylmethylamino) hafnium (TEMAH)] for atomic layer deposition (ALD) hafnium aluminum oxide (HfAlOx) films is carried out.The effects of different oxidants on the physical properties and electrical characteristics of HfAlOx films are studied.The preliminary testing results indicate that the impurity level of HfAlOx films grown with both H2O and O3 used as oxidants can be well controlled,which has significant effects on the dielectric constant,valence band,electrical properties,and stability of HfAlOx film.Additional thermal annealing effects on the properties of HfAlOx films grown with different oxidants are also investigated.

  9. Influence of dosing sequence and film thickness on structure and resistivity of Al-ZnO films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Evan B., E-mail: ebpollock@gmail.com; Lad, Robert J. [Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, University of Maine, 5708 ESRB-Barrows Hall, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films were deposited onto amorphous silica substrates using an atomic layer deposition process with diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl aluminum (TMA), and deionized water at 200 °C. Three different Al doping sequences were used at a ZnO:Al ratio of 11:1 within the films. A minimum film resistivity of 1.6 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm was produced using sequential dosing of DEZ, TMA, DEZ, followed by H{sub 2}O for the Al doping step. This “ZAZW” sequence yielded an AZO film resistivity that is independent of film thickness, crystallographic texture, and grain size, as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD). A pseudo-Voigt analysis method yields values for grain sizes that are smaller than those calculated using other XRD methods. Anisotropic grain sizes or variations in crystallographic texture have minimal influence on film resistivity, which suggests that factors other than film texture, such as intragrain scattering, may be important in influencing film resistivity.

  10. Building a Better Capacitor with Thin-Film Atomic Layer Deposition Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, Christopher [North Seattle College, WA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The goal of this research is to determine procedures for creating ultra-high capacity supercapacitors by using nanofabrication techniques and high k-value dielectrics. One way to potentially solve the problem of climate change is to switch the source of energy to a source that doesn’t release many tons of greenhouse gases, gases which cause global warming, into the Earth’s atmosphere. These trap in more heat from the Sun’s solar energy and cause global temperatures to rise. Atomic layer deposition will be used to create a uniform thin-film of dielectric to greatly enhance the abilities of our capacitors and will build them on the nanoscale.

  11. Statistical investigations of an ENIG Nickel film morphology by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germanicus Rosine Coq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of a Nickel layer grown by an Electroless Nickel Immersion Gold (ENIG technique used for microelectronics interconnections is determined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM investigations. The root mean square (rms roughness, determined over a scanned area is a function of the AFM scanned area size. In this work, we propose to consider the dynamic scale theory and the power spectrum density (PSD analysis in order to perform a comprehensive determination of the surface properties of the ENIG nickel layer. Results highlight the existence of a first regime with a roughness exponent of 0.95 and a fractal dimension (DF of the nickel film about 2.05. This case study is presented in order to propose further investigations. In fact, same experimental procedure should be performed in a magnetic shielded zone where a very low noise level is available such as the Low-Noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB of Rustrel (France.

  12. Trends of structural and electrical properties in atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarel, G.; Spiga, S.; Wiemer, C.; Tallarida, G.; Ferrari, S.; Fanciulli, M

    2004-06-15

    Understanding and optimizing electrical and structural properties of high-{kappa} oxides are key steps in view of their application as SiO{sub 2} substitutes in CMOS devices. In this work, we address the effects of growth temperature (T{sub g},) post-deposition annealing and substrate preparation on the structural, compositional, and electrical properties of thin films ({approx}13 nm thick), deposited on p-type Si(1 0 0)/SiO{sub 2} (chemical oxide) by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In particular, we investigate the effects of: (1) different T{sub g} (150, 250 and 350 deg. C); (2) rapid thermal annealing at 950 deg. C in N{sub 2} for 60 s; and (3) substrate in situ heat treatment before growth and longer pulses at the beginning of the deposition.

  13. Atomic Layer Deposited Thin Films for Dielectrics, Semiconductor Passivation, and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Runshen

    , ultra-thin layer of encapsulating ZnS is coated on the surface of GaSb and GaSb/InAs substrates. The 2 nm-thick ZnS film is found to provide a long-term protection against reoxidation for one order and a half longer times than prior reported passivation likely due to its amorphous structure without pinholes. Finally, a combination of binary ALD processes is developed and demonstrated for the growth of yttria-stabilized zirconia films using alkylamido-cyclopentadiengyls zirconium and tris(isopropyl-cyclopentadienyl)yttrium, as zirconium and yttrium precursors, respectively, with ozone being the oxidant. The desired cubic structure of YSZ films is apparently achieved after post-deposition annealing. Further, platinum is atomic layer deposited as electrode on YSZ (8 mol% of Yttria) within the same system. In order to control the morphology of as-deposited Pt thin structure, the nucleation behavior of Pt on amorphous and cubic YSZ is investigated. Three different morphologies of Pt are observed, including nanoparticle, porous and dense films, which are found to depend on the ALD cycle number and the structure and morphology of they underlying ALD YSZ films.

  14. Characteristics of Al-doped ZnO films grown by atomic layer deposition for silicon nanowire photovoltaic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Byeong-Yun; Han, Jin-Woo; Seo, Dae-Shik; Kim, Kwang-Young; Baek, Seong-Ho; Jang, Hwan Soo; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2012-07-01

    We report the structural, electrical, and optical characteristics of Al-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) films deposited on glass by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with various Al2O3 film contents for use as transparent electrodes. Unlike films fabricated by a sputtering method, the diffraction peak position of the films deposited by ALD progressively moved to a higher angle with increasing Al2O3 film content. This indicates that Zn sites were effectively replaced by Al, due to layer-by-layer growth mechanism of ALD process which is based on alternate self-limiting surface chemical reactions. By adjusting the Al2O3 film content, a ZnO:Al film with low electrical resistivity (9.84 x 10(-4) Omega cm) was obtained at an Al2O3 film content of 3.17%, where the Al concentration, carrier mobility, optical transmittance, and bandgap energy were 2.8 wt%, 11.20 cm2 V(-1) s(-1), 94.23%, and 3.6 eV, respectively. Moreover, the estimated figure of merit value of our best sample was 8.2 m7Omega(-1). These results suggest that ZnO:Al films deposited by ALD could be useful for electronic devices in which especially require 3-dimensional conformal deposition of the transparent electrode and surface passivation.

  15. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Lan, Minbo

    2016-02-01

    An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU-PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm2, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  16. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS2 films by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene Siegel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS2 films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS2 target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001 substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10−6 Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM, Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL measurements. The ablation of the MoS2 target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm2 was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS2 as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A1g and E12g peaks were observed at 404.6 cm−1 and 384.5 cm−1 with a spacing of 20.1 cm−1, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV and 615 nm (2.02 eV, with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS2 exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS2 films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n in the MoS2 films increases, the spacing between the A1g and E12g Raman peaks (Δf increases following an empirical relation, Δ f = 26 . 45 − 15 . 42 1 + 1 . 44 n 0 . 9 cm − 1 .

  17. Low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy of AlN ultrathin films by layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Huan-Yu; Lee, Wei-Hao; Kao, Wei-Chung; Chuang, Yung-Chuan; Lin, Ray-Ming; Lin, Hsin-Chih; Shiojiri, Makoto; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2017-01-03

    Low-temperature epitaxial growth of AlN ultrathin films was realized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) together with the layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing (ALA), instead of a high growth temperature which is needed in conventional epitaxial growth techniques. By applying the ALA with the Ar plasma treatment in each ALD cycle, the AlN thin film was converted dramatically from the amorphous phase to a single-crystalline epitaxial layer, at a low deposition temperature of 300 °C. The energy transferred from plasma not only provides the crystallization energy but also enhances the migration of adatoms and the removal of ligands, which significantly improve the crystallinity of the epitaxial layer. The X-ray diffraction reveals that the full width at half-maximum of the AlN (0002) rocking curve is only 144 arcsec in the AlN ultrathin epilayer with a thickness of only a few tens of nm. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy also indicates the high-quality single-crystal hexagonal phase of the AlN epitaxial layer on the sapphire substrate. The result opens a window for further extension of the ALD applications from amorphous thin films to the high-quality low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy, which can be exploited in a variety of fields and applications in the near future.

  18. Effects of growth temperature on the properties of atomic layer deposition grown ZrO2 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarel, G.; Ferrari, S.; Spiga, S.; Wiemer, C.; Tallarida, G.; Fanciulli, M.

    2003-07-01

    Zirconium dioxide films are grown in 200 atomic layer deposition cycles. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl4) and water (H2O) are used as precursors. A relatively high dielectric constant (κ=22), wide band gap, and conduction band offset (5.8 and 1.4 eV, respectively) indicate that zirconium dioxide is a most promising substitute for silicon dioxide as a dielectric gate in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. However, crystallization and chlorine ions in the films might affect their electrical properties. These ions are produced during atomic layer deposition in which the ZrCl4 precursor reacts with the growth surface. It is desirable to tune the composition, morphology, and structural properties in order to improve their benefit on the electrical ones. To address this issue it is necessary to properly choose the growth parameters. This work focuses on the effects of the growth temperature Tg. ZrO2 films are grown at different substrate temperatures: 160, 200, 250, and 350 °C. Relevant modification of the film structure with a change in substrate temperature during growth is expected because the density of reactive sites [mainly Si+1-(OH)-1 bonds] decreases with an increase in temperature [Y. B. Kim et al., Electrochem. Solid-State Lett. 3, 346 (2000)]. The amorphous film component, for example, that develops at Si+1-(OH)-1 sites on the starting growth surface, is expected to decrease with an increase in growth temperature. The size and consequences of film property modifications with the growth temperature are investigated in this work using x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy. Time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to study contaminant species in the films. From capacitance-voltage (CV) and current-voltage (IV) measurements, respectively, the dielectric constant κZrO2 and the leakage current are studied as a function of the film growth temperature.

  19. Antibacterial and barrier properties of oriented polymer films with ZnO thin films applied with atomic layer deposition at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044, VTT (Finland); Pitkänen, Marja; Salo, Erkki; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044, VTT (Finland); Tanskanen, Anne, E-mail: Anne.Tanskanen@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo, E-mail: timo.sajavaara@jyu.fi [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Putkonen, Matti; Sievänen, Jenni; Sneck, Asko; Rättö, Marjaana [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044, VTT (Finland); Karppinen, Maarit, E-mail: Maarit.Karppinen@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044, VTT (Finland)

    2014-07-01

    Concerns on food safety, and need for high quality and extended shelf-life of packaged foods have promoted the development of antibacterial barrier packaging materials. Few articles have been available dealing with the barrier or antimicrobial properties of zinc oxide thin films deposited at low temperature with atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto commercial polymer films typically used for packaging purposes. The purpose of this paper was to study the properties of ZnO thin films compared to those of aluminum oxide. It was also possible to deposit ZnO thin films onto oriented polylactic acid and polypropylene films at relatively low temperatures using ozone instead of water as an oxidizing precursor for diethylzinc. Replacing water with ozone changed both the structure and the chemical composition of films deposited on silicon wafers. ZnO films deposited with ozone contained large grains covered and separated probably by a more amorphous and uniform layer. These thin films were also assumed to contain zinc salts of carboxylic acids. The barrier properties of a 25 nm ZnO thin film deposited with ozone at 100 °C were quite close to those obtained earlier with ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of similar apparent thickness on similar polymer films. ZnO thin films deposited at low temperature indicated migration of antibacterial agent, while direct contact between ZnO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films and bacteria promoted antibacterial activity. - Highlights: • Thin films were grown from diethylzinc also with ozone instead of water at 70 and 100 °C. • ZnO films deposited with diethylzinc and ozone had different structures and chemistries. • Best barrier properties obtained with zinc oxide films close to those obtained with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} • Ozone as oxygen source provided better barrier properties at 100 °C than water. • Both aluminum and zinc oxide thin films showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli.

  20. Atomic layer deposition of absorbing thin films on nanostructured electrodes for short-wavelength infrared photosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jixian; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Fan, Fengjia; Sargent, Edward H., E-mail: ted.sargent@utoronto.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Kinge, Sachin [Advanced Technology, Materials and Research, Research and Development, Hoge Wei 33- Toyota Technical Centre, B-1930 Zaventem (Belgium)

    2015-10-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD), prized for its high-quality thin-film formation in the absence of high temperature or high vacuum, has become an industry standard for the large-area deposition of a wide array of oxide materials. Recently, it has shown promise in the formation of nanocrystalline sulfide films. Here, we demonstrate the viability of ALD lead sulfide for photodetection. Leveraging the conformal capabilities of ALD, we enhance the absorption without compromising the extraction efficiency in the absorbing layer by utilizing a ZnO nanowire electrode. The nanowires are first coated with a thin shunt-preventing TiO{sub 2} layer, followed by an infrared-active ALD PbS layer for photosensing. The ALD PbS photodetector exhibits a peak responsivity of 10{sup −2} A W{sup −1} and a shot-derived specific detectivity of 3 × 10{sup 9} Jones at 1530 nm wavelength.

  1. Phase change properties of Ti-Sb-Te thin films deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sannian; Shen, Lanlan; Song, Zhitang; Yao, Dongning; Guo, Tianqi; Li, Le; Liu, Bo; Wu, Liangcai; Cheng, Yan; Ding, Yuqiang; Feng, Songlin

    2016-10-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCM) appears to be the strongest candidate for next-generation high density nonvolatile memory. The fabrication of ultrahigh density PCM depends heavily on the thin film growth technique for the phase changing chalcogenide material. In this study, TiSb2Te4 (TST) thin films were deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using TiCl4, SbCl3, (Et3Si)2Te as precursors. The threshold voltage for the cell based on thermal ALD-deposited TST is about 2.0 V, which is much lower than that (3.5 V) of the device based on PVD-deposited Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) with the identical cell architecture. Tests of TST-based PCM cells have demonstrated a fast switching rate of 100 ns. Furthermore, because of the lower melting point and thermal conductivities of TST materials, TST-based PCM cells exhibit 19% reduction of pulse voltages for Reset operation compared with GST-based PCM cells. These results show that thermal ALD is an attractive method for the preparation of phase change materials.

  2. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) grown thin films for ultra-fine pitch pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Härkönen, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, CMS Upgrade Project, Helsinki (Finland); Ott, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, CMS Upgrade Project, Helsinki (Finland); Laboratory of Radio Chemistry, University of Helsinki (Finland); Mäkelä, M. [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki (Finland); Arsenovich, T.; Gädda, A.; Peltola, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, CMS Upgrade Project, Helsinki (Finland); Tuovinen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, CMS Upgrade Project, Helsinki (Finland); VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Microsystem and Nanoelectronics (Finland); Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, CMS Upgrade Project, Helsinki (Finland); Junkes, A. [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg (Germany); Niinistö, J.; Ritala, M. [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-09-21

    In this report we cover two special applications of Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) thin films to solve these challenges of the very small size pixel detectors. First, we propose to passivate the p-type pixel detector with ALD grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} field insulator with a negative oxide charge instead of using the commonly adopted p-stop or p-spray technologies with SiO{sub 2}, and second, to use plasma-enhanced ALD grown titanium nitride (TiN) bias resistors instead of the punch through biasing structures. Surface passivation properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} field insulator was studied by Photoconductive Decay (PCD) method and our results indicate that after appropriate annealing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} provides equally low effective surface recombination velocity as thermally oxidized Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. Furthermore, with properly designed annealing steps, the TiN thin film resistors can be tuned to have up to several MΩ resistances with a few µm of physical size required in ultra-fine pitch pixel detectors.

  3. The study of nanoscratch and nanomachining on hard multilayer thin films using atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Ching; Li, Chia-Lin; Lee, Jyh-Wei

    2012-01-01

    In this study, nanoscratching and nanomachining were conducted using an atomic force microscope (AFM) equipped with a doped diamond-coated probe (DDESP-10; VEECO) to evaluate the fabrication of nanopatterns on hard, Cr₂N/Cu multilayer thin films. The influence of normal force, scratch speed, and repeated scratches on the properties of hard multilayer thin films was also investigated. The nanoscratch experiments led researchers to establish a probe preparation and selection criteria (PPS criteria) to enhance the stability and accuracy of machining hard materials. Experimental results indicate that the depth of grooves produced by nanoscratching increased with an increase in normal force, while an increase in the number of scratches in a single location increased the groove depth but decreased friction. Therelationships among normal force and groove depth more closely resembled a logarithmic form than other mathematical models, as did the relationship between repeated scratching and its effect on groove depth and friction. The influence of scratch speed on friction was divided into two ranges. Between 0.1 and 2 µm/s, friction decreased logarithmically with an increase in scratch speed; however, when the speed exceeded 2 µm/s, the friction appeared stable. In this study, multilayered coatings were successfully machined, demonstrating considerable promise for the fabrication of nanopatterns in multilayered coatings at the nanoscale.

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) grown thin films for ultra-fine pitch pixel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härkönen, J.; Ott, J.; Mäkelä, M.; Arsenovich, T.; Gädda, A.; Peltola, T.; Tuovinen, E.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.; Junkes, A.; Niinistö, J.; Ritala, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this report we cover two special applications of Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) thin films to solve these challenges of the very small size pixel detectors. First, we propose to passivate the p-type pixel detector with ALD grown Al2O3 field insulator with a negative oxide charge instead of using the commonly adopted p-stop or p-spray technologies with SiO2, and second, to use plasma-enhanced ALD grown titanium nitride (TiN) bias resistors instead of the punch through biasing structures. Surface passivation properties of Al2O3 field insulator was studied by Photoconductive Decay (PCD) method and our results indicate that after appropriate annealing Al2O3 provides equally low effective surface recombination velocity as thermally oxidized Si/SiO2 interface. Furthermore, with properly designed annealing steps, the TiN thin film resistors can be tuned to have up to several MΩ resistances with a few μm of physical size required in ultra-fine pitch pixel detectors.

  5. A setup for transmission measurements of low energy multiply charged ions through free-standing few atomic layer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smejkal, V.; Gruber, E.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Brandl, L.; Heller, R.; Facsko, S.; Aumayr, F.

    2016-09-01

    We report the design and testing of a setup for transmission measurements of multiply charged ions through free-standing films with a thickness of a few atomic layers. The investigation thereof can yield deeper insight into charge equilibration and pre-equilibrium stopping phenomena which can ultimately be used to specifically tailor and modify these materials.

  6. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Michael, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Schlaf, Rudy, E-mail: mvschaefer@mail.usf.edu, E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru{sup 0}) and its oxide (RuO{sub 2}) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru{sup 0} and RuO{sub 2} films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO{sub 2} and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.{sup 0} An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO{sub 2}/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  7. Low-temperature SiON films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition method using activated silicon precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Sungin; Kim, Jun-Rae; Kim, Seongkyung; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Kim, Hyeong Joon, E-mail: thinfilm@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering with Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center (ISRC), Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Seung Wook, E-mail: tazryu78@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-2311 (United States); Cho, Seongjae [Department of Electronic Engineering and New Technology Component & Material Research Center (NCMRC), Gachon University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    It has not been an easy task to deposit SiN at low temperature by conventional plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) since Si organic precursors generally have high activation energy for adsorption of the Si atoms on the Si-N networks. In this work, in order to achieve successful deposition of SiN film at low temperature, the plasma processing steps in the PE-ALD have been modified for easier activation of Si precursors. In this modification, the efficiency of chemisorption of Si precursor has been improved by additional plasma steps after purging of the Si precursor. As the result, the SiN films prepared by the modified PE-ALD processes demonstrated higher purity of Si and N atoms with unwanted impurities such as C and O having below 10 at. % and Si-rich films could be formed consequently. Also, a very high step coverage ratio of 97% was obtained. Furthermore, the process-optimized SiN film showed a permissible charge-trapping capability with a wide memory window of 3.1 V when a capacitor structure was fabricated and measured with an insertion of the SiN film as the charge-trap layer. The modified PE-ALD process using the activated Si precursor would be one of the most practical and promising solutions for SiN deposition with lower thermal budget and higher cost-effectiveness.

  8. Growth process optimization of ZnO thin film using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Binbin; Wang, Jingyu; Larson, Preston; Liu, Yingtao

    2016-12-01

    The work reports experimental studies of ZnO thin films grown on Si(100) wafers using a customized thermal atomic layer deposition. The impact of growth parameters including H2O/DiethylZinc (DEZn) dose ratio, background pressure, and temperature are investigated. The imaging results of scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal that the dose ratio is critical to the surface morphology. To achieve high uniformity, the H2O dose amount needs to be at least twice that of DEZn per each cycle. If the background pressure drops below 400 mTorr, a large amount of nanoflower-like ZnO grains would emerge and increase surface roughness significantly. In addition, the growth temperature range between 200 °C and 250 °C is found to be the optimal growth window. And the crystal structures and orientations are also strongly correlated to the temperature as proved by electron back-scattering diffraction and x-ray diffraction results.

  9. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry and Research Center of Analysis and Test, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lan, Minbo, E-mail: minbolan@ecust.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry and Research Center of Analysis and Test, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Antifouling PVP brushes were successfully grafted on PU films by SI-ATRP. • The effect of polymerization time on surface property and topography was studied. • Hydrophilicity and protein fouling resistance of PVP–PU films were greatly promoted. • Competitive adsorption of three proteins on PVP–PU films was evaluated. - Abstract: An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU–PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU–PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU–PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm{sup 2}, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  10. Influence of ion/atom arrival ratio on structure and optical properties of AlN films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Jian-ping [Department of Energy Material and Technology, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); School of Engineering and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Fu, Zhi-qiang, E-mail: fuzq@cugb.edu.cn [School of Engineering and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xiao-peng [Department of Energy Material and Technology, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Yue, Wen; Wang, Cheng-biao [School of Engineering and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • AlN films were fabricated by dual ion beam sputtering. • Chemical bond status and phase composition of the films were studied by XPS and XRD. • Optical constants were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. • Influence of ion/atom arrival ratio on the films was studied. - Abstract: In order to improve the optical properties of AlN films, the influence of the ion/atom arrival ratio on the structure and optical characteristics of AlN films deposited by dual ion beam sputtering was studied by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and UV–vis spectroscopy. The films prepared at the ion/atom arrival ratio of 1.4 are amorphous while the crystalline quality is improved with the increase of the ion/atom arrival ratio. The films deposited at the ion/atom arrival ratio of no less than 1.8 have an approximately stoichiometric ratio and mainly consist of aluminum nitride with little aluminum oxynitride, while metallic aluminum component appears in the films deposited at the ion/atom arrival ratio of 1.4. When the ion/atom arrival ratio is not less than 1.8, films are smooth, high transmitting and dense. The films prepared with high ion/atom arrival ratio (≥1.8) display the characteristic of a dielectric. The films deposited at the ion/atom arrival ratio of 1.4 are coarse, opaque and show characteristic of cermet.

  11. Effect of Pretreatment of TaN Substrates on Atomic Layer Deposition Growth of Ru Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Mi; CHEN Tao; TAN Jing-Jing; RU Guo-Ping; JIANG Yu-Long; LIU Ran; QU Xin-Ping

    2007-01-01

    The polycrystalline ruthenium films are grown on TaN substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using bis(cyclopentadienyl) ruthenium [RuCp2] and oxygen as ruthenium precursor and reactant respectively at a deposition temperature of 330℃. The low-energy Ar ion bombardment and Ru pre-deposition are performed to the underlying TaN substrates before ALD process in order to improve the Ru nucleation. X-ray diffraction,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, canning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy are carried out to characterize the properties of ALD Ru films.The results show that the nucleation density of Ru films with Ar+ bombardment to the underlying TaN substrates is much higher than that of the ones without any pretreatment. The possible reasons are discussed.

  12. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Matteucci

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We compare ultrasonic welding (UW and thermal bonding (TB for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones obtained using TB. Parameters such as metal thickness of electrodes, depth of electrode embedding, delivered power, and height of energy directors (for UW, as well as pressure and temperature (for TB, were systematically studied to evaluate the two bonding methods and requirements for optimal electrochemical performance. The presented technology is intended for easy and effective integration of polymeric Lab-on-Chip systems to encourage their use in research, commercialization and education.

  13. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Marco; Heiskanen, Arto; Zór, Kinga; Emnéus, Jenny; Taboryski, Rafael

    2016-10-27

    We compare ultrasonic welding (UW) and thermal bonding (TB) for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM) microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones obtained using TB. Parameters such as metal thickness of electrodes, depth of electrode embedding, delivered power, and height of energy directors (for UW), as well as pressure and temperature (for TB), were systematically studied to evaluate the two bonding methods and requirements for optimal electrochemical performance. The presented technology is intended for easy and effective integration of polymeric Lab-on-Chip systems to encourage their use in research, commercialization and education.

  14. Thickness-dependent structure and properties of SnS2 thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Wondeok; Shin, Seokyoon; Ham, Giyul; Lee, Juhyun; Lee, Seungjin; Choi, Hyeongsu; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2017-03-01

    Tin disulfide (SnS2) thin films were deposited by a thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) method at low temperatures. The physical, chemical, and electrical characteristics of SnS2 were investigated as a function of the film thickness. SnS2 exhibited a (001) hexagonal plane peak at 14.9° in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) results and an A1g peak at 311 cm‑1 in the Raman spectra. These results demonstrate that SnS2 thin films grown at 150 °C showed a crystalline phase at film thicknesses above 11.2 nm. The crystallinity of the SnS2 thin films was evaluated by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that SnS2 consisted of Sn4+ and S2‑ valence states. Both the optical band gap and the transmittance of SnS2 decreased as the film thickness increased. The band gap of SnS2 decreased from 3.0 to 2.4 eV and the transmittance decreased from 85 to 32% at a wavelength of 400 nm. In addition, the resistivity of the thin film SnS2 decreased from 1011 to 106 Ω·cm as the film thickness increased.

  15. Optical and morphological characterization by atomic force microscopy of luminescent 2-styrylpyridine derivative compounds with Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Gutierrez, E., E-mail: cuper_enrique@msn.com [Centro de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Complejo de Ciencias, ICUAP, Edif. 103-F, 22 Sur y San Claudio, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Percino, M.J.; Chapela, V.M. [Centro de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Complejo de Ciencias, ICUAP, Edif. 103-F, 22 Sur y San Claudio, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Maldonado, J.L. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica A.C. (CIO), Lomas del Bosque 115, Col. Lomas del Campestre, C.P. 37150, Leon Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    The present work addresses the optical and morphological properties of organic films based on low molecular weight dyes styrylpyridine derivatives 2-styrylpyridine (A), 4-chlorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (B) and 4-fluorophenyl-2-vinylpyridine (C), embedded in a polymeric matrix poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK). The films were prepared by a spin-coating technique from solutions with dye:PVK ratios of 0.25:1, 0.5:1 and 1:1. Solvents were chloroform and toluene. The molar absorption coefficient ({epsilon}) spectra for a dye:PVK mixture in solution were a combination of the absorptions of both components separately, but for the deposited films, the shape of the spectrum showed that the poly(N-vinylcarbazole) absorption dominated. However, when the same films were dissolved again in CHCl{sub 3}, their spectra showed an absorption shape similar to that of the solution mixture before the deposition. Solution viscosity measurements were carried out with an Ubbelohde glass capillary viscometer to corroborate the results that showed a better mixture of the dye with the host in chloroform. The morphology of the prepared films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy and exhibited a solvent effect, with a pinhole-free, smooth surface when toluene was used and a wavy surface with chloroform. The ratio dye:matrix was the principal parameter for obtaining optical quality films; for 0.25:1 and 0.5:1 ratios, the films were of good quality, but for 1:1, the dye was expelled from the PVK and a crystallization was present over the surface of the films. Film thickness was also measured and films deposited from toluene solutions gave an average thickness of 54 nm while films from chloroform solutions had an average thickness greater than 160 nm that increased depending on chromophore concentration.

  16. Low-temperature roll-to-roll atmospheric atomic layer deposition of Al₂O₃ thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kamran; Choi, Kyung-Hyun

    2014-12-02

    The Al2O3 thin films deposition through conventional ALD systems is a well-established process. The process under low temperatures has been studied by few research groups. In this paper, we report on the detailed study of low-temperature Al2O3 thin films deposited via a unique in-house built system of roll-to-roll atmospheric atomic layer deposition (R2R-AALD) using a multiple-slit gas source head. Al2O3 thin films have been grown on polyethylene terephthalate substrates under a very low-temperature zone of room temperature to 50 °C and working pressure of 750 Torr, which is very near to atmospheric pressure (760 Torr). Al2O3 thin films with superior properties were achieved in the temperature range of the ALD window. An appreciable growth rate of 0.97 Å/cycle was observed for the films deposited at 40 °C. The films have good morphological features with a very low average arithmetic roughness (Ra) of 0.90 nm. The films also showed good chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics. It was observed that the film characteristics improve with the increase in deposition temperature to the range of the ALD window. The fabrication of Al2O3 films was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis with the appearance of Al 2p, Al 2s, and O 1s peaks at the binding energies of 74, 119, and 531 eV, respectively. The chemical composition was also supported by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The fabricated Al2O3 films demonstrate good insulating properties and optical transmittance of more than 85% in the visible region. The results state that Al2O3 thin films can be effectively fabricated through the R2R-AALD system at temperatures as low as 40 °C.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of VO2 films with Tetrakis-dimethyl-amino vanadium (IV) as vanadium precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xinrui; Cao, Yunzhen; Yan, Lu; Li, Ying; Song, Lixin

    2017-02-01

    VO2 thin films have been grown on Si(100) (VO2/Si) and fused silica substrates (VO2/SiO2) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tetrakis-dimethyl-amino vanadium (IV) (TDMAV) as a novel vanadium precursor and water as reactant gas. The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurement was performed to study the ALD process of VO2 thin film deposition, and a constant growth rate of about 0.95 Å/cycle was obtained at the temperature range of 150-200 °C. XRD measurement was performed to study the influence of deposition temperature and post-annealing condition on the crystallization of VO2 films, which indicated that the films deposited between 150 and 200 °C showed well crystallinity after annealing at 475 °C for 100 min in Ar atmosphere. XPS measurement verified that the vanadium oxidation state was 4+ for both as-deposited film and post-annealed VO2/Si film. AFM was applied to study the surface morphology of VO2/Si films, which showed a dense polycrystalline film with roughness of about 1 nm. The resistance of VO2/Si films deposited between 150 °C and 200 °C as a function of temperature showed similar semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) characters with the transition temperature for heating branch (Tc,h) of about 72 °C, a hysteresis width of about 10 °C and the resistance change of two orders of magnitude. The increase of Tc,h compared with the bulk VO2 (68 °C) may be attributed to the tensile stress along the c-axis in the film. Transmittance measurement of VO2/SiO2 films showed typical thermochromic property with a NIR switching efficiency of above 50% at 2 μm across the transition.

  18. Exploring electronic structure of one-atom thick polycrystalline graphene films: A nano angle resolved photoemission study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, José; Razado, Ivy; Lorcy, Stéphane; Fleurier, Romain; Pichonat, Emmanuelle; Vignaud, Dominique; Wallart, Xavier; Asensio, María C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce large, continuous and defect free films of graphene is presently a major challenge for multiple applications. Even though the scalability of graphene films is closely associated to a manifest polycrystalline character, only a few numbers of experiments have explored so far the electronic structure down to single graphene grains. Here we report a high resolution angle and lateral resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (nano-ARPES) study of one-atom thick graphene films on thin copper foils synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. Our results show the robustness of the Dirac relativistic-like electronic spectrum as a function of the size, shape and orientation of the single-crystal pristine grains in the graphene films investigated. Moreover, by mapping grain by grain the electronic dynamics of this unique Dirac system, we show that the single-grain gap-size is 80% smaller than the multi-grain gap recently reported by classical ARPES. PMID:23942471

  19. Atomic layer deposition of cobalt carbide films and their magnetic properties using propanol as a reducing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Mouhamadou; Bahlawane, Naoufal; Arl, Didier; Dossot, Manuel; McRae, Edward; Lenoble, Damien

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of highly conformal thin films using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is driven by a variety of applications in modern technologies. In particular, the emergence of 3D memory device architectures requires conformal materials with tuneable magnetic properties. Here, nanocomposites of carbon, cobalt and cobalt carbide are deposited by ALD using cobalt acetylacetonate with propanol as a reducing agent. Films were grown by varying the ALD deposition parameters including deposition temperature and propanol exposure time. The morphology, the chemical composition and the crystalline structure of the cobalt carbide film were investigated. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements revealed magnetic hysteresis loops with a coercivity reaching 500 Oe and a maximal saturation magnetization of 0.9 T with a grain size less than 15 nm. Magnetic properties are shown to be tuneable by adjusting the deposition parameters that significantly affect the microstructure and the composition of the deposited films.

  20. Characteristics and properties of metal aluminum thin films prepared by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Yu-Qing; Li Xing-Cun; Chen Qiang; Lei Wen-Wen; Zhao Qiao; Sang Li-Jun; Liu Zhong-Wei; Wang Zheng-Duo; Yang Li-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Metal aluminum (Al) thin films are prepared by 2450 MHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition on glass and p-Si substrates using trimethylaluminum as the precursor and hydrogen as the reductive gas.We focus our attention on the plasma source for the thin-film preparation and annealing of the as-deposited films relative to the surface square resistivity.The square resistivity of as-deposited Al films is greatly reduced after annealing and almost reaches the value of bulk metal.Through chemical and structural analysis,we conclude that the square resistivity is determined by neither the contaminant concentration nor the surface morphology,but by both the crystallinity and crystal size in this process.

  1. Effects of Al Doping on the Properties of ZnO Thin Films Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Chen-Hui; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Song-You; Liu, Juan; Dai, Ning; Chen, Liang-Yao

    2016-12-01

    The tuning of structural, optical, and electrical properties of Al-doped ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique is reported in this work. With the increasing Al doping level, the evolution from (002) to (100) diffraction peaks indicates the change in growth mode of ZnO films. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been applied to study the thickness, optical constants, and band gap of AZO films. Due to the increasing carrier concentration after Al doping, a blue shift of band gap and absorption edge can be observed, which can be interpreted by Burstein-Moss effect. The carrier concentration and resistivity are found to vary significantly among different doping concentration, and the optimum value is also discussed. The modulations and improvements of properties are important for Al-doped ZnO films to apply as transparent conductor in various applications.

  2. Effects of Al Doping on the Properties of ZnO Thin Films Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Chen-Hui; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Song-You; Liu, Juan; Dai, Ning; Chen, Liang-Yao

    2016-09-01

    The tuning of structural, optical, and electrical properties of Al-doped ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique is reported in this work. With the increasing Al doping level, the evolution from (002) to (100) diffraction peaks indicates the change in growth mode of ZnO films. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been applied to study the thickness, optical constants, and band gap of AZO films. Due to the increasing carrier concentration after Al doping, a blue shift of band gap and absorption edge can be observed, which can be interpreted by Burstein-Moss effect. The carrier concentration and resistivity are found to vary significantly among different doping concentration, and the optimum value is also discussed. The modulations and improvements of properties are important for Al-doped ZnO films to apply as transparent conductor in various applications.

  3. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography of Ti/TiN films deposited on Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, N A; Blanchard, P T; White, R; Vissers, M R; Diercks, D R; Davydov, A V; Pappas, D P

    2017-03-01

    Laser-assisted atom probe tomography (L-APT) was used to examine superconducting TiN/Ti/TiN trilayer films with nominal respective thicknesses of 5/5/5 (nm). Such materials are of interest for applications that require large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors. The trilayers were deposited on Si substrates by reactive sputtering. Electron energy loss microscopy performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM/EELS) was used to corroborate the L-APT results and establish the overall thicknesses of the trilayers. Three separate batches were studied where the first (bottom) TiN layer was deposited at 500°C (for all batches) and the subsequent TiN/Ti bilayer was deposited at ambient temperature, 250°C, and 500°C, respectively. L-APT rendered an approximately planar TiN/Si interface by making use of plausible mass-spectral assignments to N3(1+), SiN(1+), and SiO(1+). This was necessary since ambiguities associated with the likely simultaneous occurrence of Si(1+) and N2(1+) prevented their use in rendering the TiN/Si interface upon reconstruction. The non-superconducting Ti2N phase was also revealed by L-APT. Neither L-APT nor STEM/EELS rendered sharp Ti/TiN interfaces and the contrast between these layers diminished with increased film deposition temperature. L-APT also revealed that hydrogen was present in varying degrees in all samples including control samples that were composed of single layers of Ti or TiN.

  4. Passivation Effect of Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 Film on HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Sun, Chang-Hong; Chen, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Tian-Ning; Chen, Xin; Lin, Chun; Ding, Ring-Jun; He, Li

    2016-09-01

    The passivation effect of atomic layer deposition of (ALD) Al2O3 film on a HgCdTe infrared detector was investigated in this work. The passivation effect of Al2O3 film was evaluated by measuring the minority carrier lifetime, capacitance versus voltage ( C- V) characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, and resistance versus voltage ( R- V) characteristics of variable-area photodiodes. The minority carrier lifetime, C- V characteristics, and R- V characteristics of HgCdTe devices passivated by ALD Al2O3 film was comparable to those of HgCdTe devices passivated by e-beam evaporation of ZnS/CdTe film. However, the baking stability of devices passivated by Al2O3 film is inferior to that of devices passivated by ZnS/CdTe film. In future work, by optimizing the ALD Al2O3 film growing process and annealing conditions, it may be feasible to achieve both excellent electrical properties and good baking stability.

  5. Structure and morphology of Ru films grown by atomic layer deposition from 1-ethyl-1’-methyl-ruthenocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukli, Kaupo; Aarik, Jaan; Aidla, Aleks; Uustare, Teet; Jõgi, Indrek; Lu, Jun; Tallarida, Massimo; Kemell, Marianna; Kiisler, Alma-Asta; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2010-06-01

    Ru thin films were grown on TiO 2, Al 2O 3, HfO 2, and ZrO 2 films as well as on HF-etched silicon and SiO 2-covered silicon by atomic layer deposition from 1-ethyl-1'-methyl-ruthenocene, (CH 3C 5H 4)(C 2H 5C 5H 4)Ru, and oxygen. The growth of Ru was obtained and characterized at temperatures ranging from 250 to 325 °C. On epitaxial rutile, highly oriented growth of Ru with hexagonal structure was achieved, while on other substrates the films possessed nonoriented hexagonal structure. Ruthenium oxide was not detected in the films. The lowest resistivity value obtained for 5.0-6.6 nm thick films was 26 μΩ cm. The conductivity of the films depended somewhat on the deposition cycle time parameters and, expectedly, more strongly on the amount of deposition cycles. Increase in the deposition temperature of underlying metal oxide films increased the conductivity of Ru layers.

  6. Out-diffused silver island films for surface-enhanced Raman scattering protected with TiO2 films using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated self-assembled silver nanoisland films using a recently developed technique based on out-diffusion of silver from an ion-exchanged glass substrate in reducing atmosphere. We demonstrate that the position of the surface plasmon resonance of the films depends on the conditions of the film growth. The resonance can be gradually shifted up to 100 nm towards longer wavelengths by using atomic layer deposition of titania, from 3 to 100 nm in thickness, upon the film. Examination of the nanoisland films in surface-enhanced Raman spectrometry showed that, in spite of a drop of the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal after the titania spacer deposition, the Raman signal can be observed with spacers up to 7 nm in thickness. Denser nanoisland films show slower decay of the SERS signal with the increase in spacer thickness. PACS 78.67.Sc (nanoaggregates; nanocomposites); 81.16.Dn (self-assembly); 74.25.nd (Raman and optical spectroscopy) PMID:25170333

  7. The Effect of Cu:Ag Atomic Ratio on the Properties of Sputtered Cu–Ag Alloy Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janghsing Hsieh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cu–Ag thin films with various atomic ratios were prepared using a co-sputtering technique, followed by rapid thermal annealing at various temperatures. The films’ structural, mechanical, and electrical properties were then characterized using X-ray diffractometry (XRD, atomic force microscopy (AFM, FESEM, nano-indentation, and TEM as functions of compositions and annealing conditions. In the as-deposited condition, the structure of these films transformed from a one-phase to a dual-phase state, and the resistivity shows a twin-peak pattern, which can be explained in part by Nordheim’s Rule and the miscibility gap of Cu–Ag alloy. After being annealed, the films’ resistivity followed the mixture rule in general, mainly due to the formation of a dual-phase structure containing Ag-rich and Cu-rich phases. The surface morphology and structure also varied as compositions and annealing conditions changed. The recrystallization of these films varied depending on Ag–Cu compositions. The annealed films composed of 40 at % to 60 at % Cu had higher hardness and lower roughness than those with other compositions. Particularly, the Cu50Ag50 film had the highest hardness after being annealed. From the dissolution testing, it was found that the Cu-ion concentration was about 40 times higher than that of Ag. The galvanic effect and over-saturated state could be the cause of the accelerated Cu dissolution and the reduced dissolution of the Ag.

  8. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provine, J.; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Yongmin; Walch, Steve P.; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-06-01

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx), particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiNx films is a low wet etch rate (WER) in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of SiNx and evaluate the film's WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H2O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiNx film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiNx of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiNx from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  9. Preliminary indications from atomic force microscopy of the presence of rapidly-formed nanoscale films on aquifer material surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Claudia; Lead, Jamie R.; Renshaw, Joanna C.; Tellam, John H.

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if there is a nanoscale surface film on aquifer-like materials exposed to deep groundwaters, as has previously been found on surfaces exposed to surface and soil waters. Such surface films will modify surface properties that are so important in determining the mobility of many groundwater pollutants. Muscovite mica was used because a) it is a good analogue for the main sorbing phases of many clastic aquifers and b) its cleavage planes are atomically flat allowing high resolution imaging. Freshly-cleaved muscovite plates were exposed to groundwater from a sandstone aquifer for 30 min, and surface properties (morphology, coverage, roughness and tip-substrate force interactions) were measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A patchy surface film of several nanometres in depth, incorporating larger separate particles, was found on the mica surface. This film was associated with significantly increased roughness values and AFM probe-sample interaction forces compared with pure water and inorganic (synthetic groundwater) solution controls. Although the results reported are preliminary in nature, if confirmed, such films are likely to affect sorption reactions, surface-facilitated redox interactions, non-aqueous phase liquid wetting angles, and colloid-pathogen-rock attachment, and will thus be of importance in understanding natural attenuation and migration of dissolved, non-aqueous and particulate phases in groundwaters.

  10. Integrated magneto-optical traps on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Pollock, S; Laliotis, A; Hinds, E A

    2009-01-01

    We have integrated magneto-optical traps (MOTs) into an atom chip by etching pyramids into a silicon wafer. These have been used to trap atoms on the chip, directly from a room temperature vapor of rubidium. This new atom trapping method provides a simple way to integrate several atom sources on the same chip. It represents a substantial advance in atom chip technology and offers new possibilities for atom chip applications such as integrated single atom or photon sources and molecules on a chip.

  11. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  12. Pressure-dependent transition from atoms to nanoparticles in magnetron sputtering: Effect on WSi2 film roughness and stress

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We report on the transition between two regimes from several-atom clusters to much larger nanoparticles in Ar magnetron sputter deposition of WSi2, and the effect of nanoparticles on the properties of amorphous thin films and multilayers. Sputter deposition of thin films is monitored by in situ x-ray scattering, including x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering. The results show an abrupt transition at an Ar background pressure Pc; the transition is associated wi...

  13. Modification of a YBa2Cu3O7-δ Thin Film Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤立星; 尹晓波; 冯一军; 杨森祖; 康琳; 王牧; 吴培亨

    2002-01-01

    A YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin film is modified by a probe electric field of an atomic force microscope to form a ridge with the width of only a grain cell. The modification varies with the operation parameters of the bias voltage,the moving velocity of the probe and the ambient humidity. Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis shows only oxygen deficiency in the modified YBCO thin film. As a result, the suppressed superconductivity was found in the junction crossing the ridge.

  14. Interface morphology studies of liquid phase epitaxy grown HgCdTe films by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, M.; George, M. A.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.; Silberman, E.

    1994-04-01

    In this paper we report an investigation of the morphology of the interfaces of liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) grown HgCdTe thin films on CdTe and CdZnTe substrates by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on freshly cleaved (110) crystallographic planes. An empirical observation which may be linked to lattice mismatch was indicated by an angle between the cleavage steps of the substrate to those of the film. The precipitates with size ranging from 5 nm to 20 nm were found to be most apparent near the interface.

  15. Infrared and thermoelectric power generation in thin atomic layer deposited Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Harkirat S.; Lang, Brian N.; Schwab, Yosyp; Scarel, Giovanna, E-mail: scarelgx@jmu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, James Madison University, 901 Carrier Drive, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807 (United States); Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Karppinen, Maarit [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16100, Aalto, 00076 Finland (Finland)

    2015-01-15

    Infrared radiation is used to radiatively transfer heat to a nanometric power generator (NPG) device with a thermoelectric Nb-doped TiO{sub 2} film deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as the active element, onto a borosilicate glass substrate. The linear rise of the produced voltage with respect to the temperature difference between the “hot” and “cold” junctions, typical of the Seebeck effect, is missing. The discovery of the violation of the Seebeck effect in NPG devices combined with the ability of ALD to tune thermoelectric thin film properties could be exploited to increase the efficiency of these devices for energy harvesting purposes.

  16. Chip, Chip, Hooray!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a science laboratory using different brands of potato chips in which students test their oiliness, size, thickness, saltiness, quality, and cost, then analyze the results to determine the best chip. Gives a brief history of potato chips. (YDS)

  17. Indentation modulus and hardness of viscoelastic thin films by atomic force microscopy: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passeri, D., E-mail: daniele.passeri@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; Rossi, M.; Alippi, A. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Tamburri, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Lucci, M.; Davoli, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Berezina, S. [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, 01026, Univerzitna 1 Zilina (Slovakia)

    2009-11-15

    We propose a nanoindentation technique based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) that allows one to deduce both indentation modulus and hardness of viscoelastic materials from the force versus penetration depth dependence, obtained by recording the AFM cantilever deflection as a function of the sample vertical displacement when the tip is pressed against (loading phase) and then removed from (unloading phase) the surface of the sample. Reliable quantitative measurements of both indentation modulus and hardness of the investigated sample are obtained by calibrating the technique through a set of different polymeric samples, used as reference materials, whose mechanical properties have been previously determined by standard indentation tests. By analyzing the dependence of the cantilever deflection versus time, the proposed technique allows one to evaluate and correct the effect of viscoelastic properties of the investigated materials, by adapting a post-experiment data processing procedure well-established for standard depth sensing indentation tests. The technique is described in the case of the measurement of indentation modulus and hardness of a thin film of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(4-styrenesulfonate), deposited by chronoamperometry on an indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate.

  18. Atomic layer deposited tungsten nitride thin films as a new lithium-ion battery anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Dip K; Sen, Uttam K; Sinha, Soumyadeep; Dhara, Arpan; Mitra, Sagar; Sarkar, Shaibal K

    2015-07-14

    This article demonstrates the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of tungsten nitride using tungsten hexacarbonyl [W(CO)6] and ammonia [NH3] and its use as a lithium-ion battery anode. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements are carried out to confirm the self-limiting behaviour of the deposition. A saturated growth rate of ca. 0.35 Å per ALD cycle is found within a narrow temperature window of 180-195 °C. In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) vibrational spectroscopy is used to determine the reaction pathways of the surface bound species after each ALD half cycle. The elemental presence and chemical composition is determined by XPS. The as-deposited material is found to be amorphous and crystallized to h-W2N upon annealing at an elevated temperature under an ammonia atmosphere. The as-deposited materials are found to be n-type, conducting with an average carrier concentration of ca. 10(20) at room temperature. Electrochemical studies of the as-deposited films open up the possibility of this material to be used as an anode material in Li-ion batteries. The incorporation of MWCNTs as a scaffold layer further enhances the electrochemical storage capacity of the ALD grown tungsten nitride (WNx). Ex situ XRD analysis confirms the conversion based reaction mechanism of the as-grown material with Li under operation.

  19. Probabilistic distributions of pinhole defects in atomic layer deposited films on polymeric substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yersak, Alexander S., E-mail: alexander.yersak@colorado.edu; Lee, Yung-Cheng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1045 Regent Drive, 422 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0422 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Pinhole defects in atomic layer deposition (ALD) coatings were measured in an area of 30 cm{sup 2} in an ALD reactor, and these defects were represented by a probabilistic cluster model instead of a single defect density value with number of defects over area. With the probabilistic cluster model, the pinhole defects were simulated over a manufacturing scale surface area of ∼1 m{sup 2}. Large-area pinhole defect simulations were used to develop an improved and enhanced design method for ALD-based devices. A flexible thermal ground plane (FTGP) device requiring ALD hermetic coatings was used as an example. Using a single defect density value, it was determined that for an application with operation temperatures higher than 60 °C, the FTGP device would not be possible. The new probabilistic cluster model shows that up to 40.3% of the FTGP would be acceptable. With this new approach the manufacturing yield of ALD-enabled or other thin film based devices with different design configurations can be determined. It is important to guide process optimization and control and design for manufacturability.

  20. Efficient Fluorescence Based Protein Chip using Pseudo 3D Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-22

    by the software provided by ImaGene ®. Cross reactivity was also investigated by immersing a substrate containing the same arrays of probe proteins...magnification images of ?, ? and ? clearly depict significant differences in metal film thickness depending on the position of the device. For a visual

  1. Variation of local atomic structure due to devitrification of Ni-Zr alloy thin films probed by EXAFS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debarati; Tiwari, Nidhi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Jha, S. N.; Basu, S.

    2016-05-01

    Thin film metallic glasses (TFMGs) exhibit properties superior to their bulk counterparts allowing them to be potentially useful in many practical applications. Apart from their technological interest, when converted to crystallized state (devitrification) TFMGs can also act as precursors for partially crystallized or fully crystallized forms. Such devitrified forms are attractive due to their novel structural and magnetic properties. The amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of co-sputtered Ni-Zr alloy thin films through annealing was studied using EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements. Investigation through an atomic probe gives a better insight into the local environment of the atomic species, rendering a deeper understanding of thermal evolution of such materials.

  2. Variation of local atomic structure due to devitrification of Ni-Zr alloy thin films probed by EXAFS measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Debarati, E-mail: debarati@barc.gov.in; Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 India (India); Tiwari, Nidhi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Jha, S. N. [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 India (India)

    2016-05-23

    Thin film metallic glasses (TFMGs) exhibit properties superior to their bulk counterparts allowing them to be potentially useful in many practical applications. Apart from their technological interest, when converted to crystallized state (devitrification) TFMGs can also act as precursors for partially crystallized or fully crystallized forms. Such devitrified forms are attractive due to their novel structural and magnetic properties. The amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of co-sputtered Ni-Zr alloy thin films through annealing was studied using EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements. Investigation through an atomic probe gives a better insight into the local environment of the atomic species, rendering a deeper understanding of thermal evolution of such materials.

  3. Kinetics of reduction of a RuO2(110) film on Ru by atomic hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ugur, D.; Storm, A.J.; Verberk, R.; Brouwer, J.C.; Sloof, W.G.

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics and the mechanism of reduction of a RuO2(110) film, grown thermally on a Ru(0001) surface, has been studied in the temperature range of 60-200 °C by using an atomic hydrogen flux of 2 × 1019 at. H m-2 s-1. The reduction kinetics is dominated by the creation of oxygen vacancies at the su

  4. Thickness-dependent growth orientation of F-doped ZnO films formed by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyung-Mun; Choi, Yong-June; Park, Hyung-Ho, E-mail: hhpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Geun Young [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, and SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Kyunggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    ZnO thin films were doped with fluorine using atomic layer deposition (ALD) with an in-house F source at a deposition temperature of 140 °C. Structural and morphological properties of the resulting F-doped ZnO (ZnO:F) films were investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and grazing incidence wide-angle x-ray diffraction. During the initial growth stage of up to 200 ALD cycles, no difference was observed between the preferred growth orientations of undoped ZnO and ZnO:F films. However, after 300 ALD cycles, ZnO and ZnO:F films showed (002) and (100) preferred orientation, respectively. This difference in preferred growth orientation arose from the perturbation-and-passivation effect of F doping, which involves F anions filling the oxygen-related defect sites in the ZnO lattice. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic analyses were carried out to investigate the surface plane dependency of the films' work functions, which confirmed that the ZnO and ZnO:F films had different growth behaviors.

  5. Indium oxide thin film prepared by low temperature atomic layer deposition using liquid precursors and ozone oxidant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Choi, Dong-Won [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-719 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jozeph, E-mail: jozeph.park@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Seong, E-mail: jsparklime@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-719 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Transparent conducting Indium oxide (InO{sub x}) thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition at low deposition temperatures below 100 °C. For the comparative study with liquid precursors in low temperature thermal ALD, diethyl[1,1,1-trimethyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)silanaminato]-Indium, [3-(dimethylamino-kN)propyl-kC]dimethyl-Indium, and triethyl indium (TEIn) were used as the In precursors. Ozone was used as the oxidant for all precursors. InO{sub x} films grown using the three precursors all exhibit relatively low electrical resistivity below 10{sup −3} Ω cm at temperatures above 150 °C. Below 100 °C, the lowest resistivity (2 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm) was observed in the films grown with TEIn. The electrical, structural and optical properties were systematically investigated as functions of the deposition temperature and precursors. - Highlights: • InO{sub x} thin films were deposited by ALD at extremely low deposition temperatures below 100 °C. • InO{sub x} films exhibit relatively low electrical resistivity below 10{sup −3} Ω cm at temperatures above 150 °C. • Ozone stimulate the chemical reactions to yield dense indium oxide films at low temperatures.

  6. Zinc sulfide and terbium-doped zinc sulfide films grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, S J; Nam, K S

    1998-01-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) and terbium-doped ZnS (ZnS:Tb) thin films were grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). In the present work, ZnCl sub 2 , H sub 2 S, and tris (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptandionato) terbium (Tb(tmhd) sub 3) were used as the precursors. The dependence of crystallinity and Cl content of ZnS films was investigated on the growth temperature. ZnS and ZnS:Tb films grown at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 .deg. C showed a hexagonal-2H crystalline structure. The crystallinity of ZnS film was greatly enhanced as the temperature increased. At growth temperatures higher than 450.deg.C, the films showed preferred orientation with mainly (002) diffraction peak. The Cl content decreased from approximately 9 to 1 at.% with the increase in growth temperature from 400 to 500 .deg. C. The segregation of Cl near the surface region and the incorporation of O from Tb(tmhd) sub 3 during ALE process were also observed using Auger electron spectroscopy. The ALE-grown ZnS and ZnS:Tb films re...

  7. Morphology, composition and electrical properties of SnO{sub 2}:Cl thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hsyi-En, E-mail: sean@mail.stust.edu.tw; Wen, Chia-Hui; Hsu, Ching-Ming [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan 71005, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-15

    Chlorine doped SnO{sub 2} thin films were prepared using atomic layer deposition at temperatures between 300 and 450 °C using SnCl{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O as the reactants. Composition, structure, surface morphology, and electrical properties of the as-deposited films were examined. Results showed that the as-deposited SnO{sub 2} films all exhibited rutile structure with [O]/[Sn] ratios between 1.35 and 1.40. The electrical conductivity was found independent on [O]/[Sn] ratio but dependent on chlorine doping concentration, grain size, and surface morphology. The 300 °C-deposited film performed a higher electrical conductivity of 315 S/cm due to its higher chlorine doping level, larger grain size, and smoother film surface. The existence of Sn{sup 2+} oxidation state was demonstrated to minimize the effects of chlorine on raising the electrical conductivity of films.

  8. Method for Aluminum Oxide Thin Films Prepared through Low Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition for Encapsulating Organic Electroluminescent Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ying Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of dense alumina (Al2O3 thin film through atomic layer deposition (ALD provides a pathway to achieve the encapsulation of organic light emitting devices (OLED. Unlike traditional ALD which is usually executed at higher reaction n temperatures that may affect the performance of OLED, this application discusses the development on preparation of ALD thin film at a low temperature. One concern of ALD is the suppressing effect of ambient temperature on uniformity of thin film. To mitigate this issue, the pumping time in each reaction cycle was increased during the preparation process, which removed reaction byproducts and inhibited the formation of vacancies. As a result, the obtained thin film had both high uniformity and density properties, which provided an excellent encapsulation performance. The results from microstructure morphology analysis, water vapor transmission rate, and lifetime test showed that the difference in uniformity between thin films prepared at low temperatures, with increased pumping time, and high temperatures was small and there was no obvious influence of increased pumping time on light emitting performance. Meanwhile, the permeability for water vapor of the thin film prepared at a low temperature was found to reach as low as 1.5 × 10−4 g/(m2·day under ambient conditions of 25 °C and 60% relative humidity, indicating a potential extension in the lifetime for the OLED.

  9. Engineering the mechanical properties of ultrabarrier films grown by atomic layer deposition for the encapsulation of printed electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulusu, A.; Singh, A.; Kim, H. [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Wang, C. Y.; Dindar, A.; Fuentes-Hernandez, C.; Kippelen, B. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Cullen, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 MS-6064, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Graham, S., E-mail: sgraham@gatech.edu [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 MS-6064, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Direct deposition of barrier films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto printed electronics presents a promising method for packaging devices. Films made by ALD have been shown to possess desired ultrabarrier properties, but face challenges when directly grown onto surfaces with varying composition and topography. Challenges include differing nucleation and growth rates across the surface, stress concentrations from topography and coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch, elastic constant mismatch, and particle contamination that may impact the performance of the ALD barrier. In such cases, a polymer smoothing layer may be needed to coat the surface prior to ALD barrier film deposition. We present the impact of architecture on the performance of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})/hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) ALD nanolaminate barrier films deposited on fluorinated polymer layer using an optical calcium (Ca) test under damp heat. It is found that with increasing polymer thickness, the barrier films with residual tensile stress are prone to cracking resulting in rapid failure of the Ca sensor at 50 °C/85% relative humidity. Inserting a SiN{sub x} layer with residual compressive stress between the polymer and ALD layers is found to prevent cracking over a range of polymer thicknesses with more than 95% of the Ca sensor remaining after 500 h of testing. These results suggest that controlling mechanical properties and film architecture play an important role in the performance of direct deposited ALD barriers.

  10. Engineering the mechanical properties of ultrabarrier films grown by atomic layer deposition for the encapsulation of printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, A.; Singh, A.; Wang, C. Y.; Dindar, A.; Fuentes-Hernandez, C.; Kim, H.; Cullen, D.; Kippelen, B.; Graham, S.

    2015-08-01

    Direct deposition of barrier films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto printed electronics presents a promising method for packaging devices. Films made by ALD have been shown to possess desired ultrabarrier properties, but face challenges when directly grown onto surfaces with varying composition and topography. Challenges include differing nucleation and growth rates across the surface, stress concentrations from topography and coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch, elastic constant mismatch, and particle contamination that may impact the performance of the ALD barrier. In such cases, a polymer smoothing layer may be needed to coat the surface prior to ALD barrier film deposition. We present the impact of architecture on the performance of aluminum oxide (Al2O3)/hafnium oxide (HfO2) ALD nanolaminate barrier films deposited on fluorinated polymer layer using an optical calcium (Ca) test under damp heat. It is found that with increasing polymer thickness, the barrier films with residual tensile stress are prone to cracking resulting in rapid failure of the Ca sensor at 50 °C/85% relative humidity. Inserting a SiNx layer with residual compressive stress between the polymer and ALD layers is found to prevent cracking over a range of polymer thicknesses with more than 95% of the Ca sensor remaining after 500 h of testing. These results suggest that controlling mechanical properties and film architecture play an important role in the performance of direct deposited ALD barriers.

  11. Improvement of Light Extraction Efficiency in Flip-Chip Light Emitting Diodes on SiC Substrate via Transparent Haze Films with Morphology-Controlled Collapsed Alumina Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seunghwa; Kang, Gumin; Shin, Dongheok; Bae, Kyuyoung; Kim, Yong Hyun; Kim, Kyoungsik

    2016-01-13

    We demonstrate GaN-based flip-chip light emitting diodes (FC-LEDs) on SiC substrate achieving high extraction efficiency by simply attaching the optically transparent haze films consisting of collapsed alumina nanorods. Through controlled etching time of alumina nanorods, we obtain four types of films that have different morphologies with different optical transmittance and haze properties. We show that the light output power of the FC-LEDs with film, which has 95.6% transmittance and 62.7% haze, increases by 20.4% in comparison to the bare LEDs. The angular radiation pattern of the LEDs also follows the Lambertian emission pattern without deteriorating the electrical properties of the device. The improvement of light extraction is mainly attributed to the reduced total internal reflection (TIR) via efficient out-coupling of guided light from SiC substrate to air by collapsed alumina nanorod structures in the film. The high transparency of film and reduced Fresnel reflection via graded refractive index transition between the film and SiC substrate also contribute to the extraction enhancement of the device. We systematically investigate the influence of haze film's geometrical or optical properties on the extraction efficiency of FC-LEDs, and this study will provide a novel approach to enhance the performance of various optoelectronic devices.

  12. Ionic properties of ultrathin yttria-stabilized zirconia thin films fabricated by atomic layer deposition with water, oxygen, and ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Keun; Jang, Dong Young; Kim, Jun Woo [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Kiho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); High-Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Joon Hyung, E-mail: shimm@korea.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-31

    We compared the ionic properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using various oxidants including water, oxygen, and ozone. Cross-plane conductivity measurements were performed at low temperature (50 °C) and high temperature (450 °C) using AC impedance spectroscopy. As a result, we have confirmed that the conductivity of ALD YSZ films below 300 °C is greater by several orders of magnitude compared to the nano-scale YSZ thin films synthesized by other conventional techniques. Among the ALD YSZ samples, ALD YSZ fabricated using water showed the highest conductivity while ALD YSZ fabricated using ozone showed the lowest. We have analyzed this result in relation with grain morphology characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the chemical binding states measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). - Highlights: • YSZ is prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and O{sub 3} as oxidants. • Grain size of ALD YSZ membranes deposited using H{sub 2}O is the smallest. • Conductivity of ALD YSZ made with H{sub 2}O shows the highest value below 300 °C. • Conductivity trends coincide with the hydroxyl group content measured by XPS.

  13. Hardness, elastic modulus, and wear resistance of hafnium oxide-based films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdova, Maria; Liu, Xuwen; Franssila, Sami, E-mail: sami.franssila@aalto.fi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Aalto University, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Tallarida, Grazia; Cianci, Elena [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Fanciulli, Marco [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB), Italy and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università degli studi di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    The investigation of mechanical properties of atomic layer deposition HfO{sub 2} films is important for implementing these layers in microdevices. The mechanical properties of films change as a function of composition and structure, which accordingly vary with deposition temperature and post-annealing. This work describes elastic modulus, hardness, and wear resistance of as-grown and annealed HfO{sub 2}. From nanoindentation measurements, the elastic modulus and hardness remained relatively stable in the range of 163–165 GPa and 8.3–9.7 GPa as a function of deposition temperature. The annealing of HfO{sub 2} caused significant increase in hardness up to 14.4 GPa due to film crystallization and densification. The structural change also caused increase in the elastic modulus up to 197 GPa. Wear resistance did not change as a function of deposition temperature, but improved upon annealing.

  14. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provine, J., E-mail: jprovine@stanford.edu; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Yongmin; Walch, Steve P.; Kim, Hyo Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kim, Ki-Hyun [Manufacturing Technology Center, Samsung Electronics, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Prinz, Fritz B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}), particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiN{sub x} films is a low wet etch rate (WER) in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of SiN{sub x} and evaluate the film’s WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H{sub 2}O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiN{sub x} film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiN{sub x} of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiN{sub x} from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  15. Probing the role of an atomically thin SiNx interlayer on the structure of ultrathin carbon films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Rismani-Yazdi, Ehsan; Yeo, Reuben J; Goohpattader, Partho S; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Srinivasan, Narasimhan; Druz, Boris; Tripathy, S; Bhatia, C S

    2014-05-21

    Filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) processed carbon films are being considered as a promising protective media overcoat material for future hard disk drives (HDDs). However, at ultrathin film levels, FCVA-deposited carbon films show a dramatic change in their structure in terms of loss of sp3 bonding, density, wear resistance etc., compared to their bulk counterpart. We report for the first time how an atomically thin (0.4 nm) silicon nitride (SiNx) interlayer helps in maintaining/improving the sp3 carbon bonding, enhancing interfacial strength/bonding, improving oxidation/corrosion resistance, and strengthening the tribological properties of FCVA-deposited carbon films, even at ultrathin levels (1.2 nm). We propose the role of the SiNx interlayer in preventing the catalytic activity of Co and Pt in media, leading to enhanced sp3C bonding (relative enhancement~40%). These findings are extremely important in view of the atomic level understanding of structural modification and the development of high density HDDs.

  16. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Provine

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD of silicon nitride (SiNx, particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiNx films is a low wet etch rate (WER in hydrofluoric (HF acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD of SiNx and evaluate the film’s WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H2O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiNx film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiNx of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiNx from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  17. Correction: Enhanced photoelectrochemical water oxidation via atomic layer deposition of TiO2 on fluorine-doped tin oxide nanoparticle films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Isvar A.; Peng, Qing; Ferrall, Isa L.; Rieth, Adam J.; Hoertz, Paul G.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2015-07-01

    Correction for `Enhanced photoelectrochemical water oxidation via atomic layer deposition of TiO2 on fluorine-doped tin oxide nanoparticle films' by Isvar A. Cordova, et al., Nanoscale, 2015, 7, 8584-8592.

  18. Nanoscale morphological and electrical homogeneity of HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films studied by conducting atomic-force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremmer, S.; Wurmbauer, H.; Teichert, C.; Tallarida, G.; Spiga, S.; Wiemer, C.; Fanciulli, M.

    2005-04-01

    The morphological and electrical evolution of HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films is investigated on the nanoscale using conducting atomic-force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. Films of different thicknesses have been grown by atomic layer deposition. With increasing film thickness the film structure changes from amorphous to polycrystalline. By conducting atomic-force microscopy using local current-voltage curve statistics and two-dimensional current imaging it is found that the formation of crystallites has different effects on the electrical properties of the two dielectrics. In the case of HfO2, the crystalline fraction causes weak spots in the oxide, whereas for the ZrO2 films the crystallites exhibit lower leakage currents compared to the amorphous matrix and leakage is mainly determined by thickness fluctuations.

  19. Low-Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition of Crystalline and Photoactive Ultrathin Hematite Films for Solar Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steier, Ludmilla; Luo, Jingshan; Schreier, Marcel; Mayer, Matthew T; Sajavaara, Timo; Grätzel, Michael

    2015-12-22

    We developed a low-temperature atomic layer deposition route to deposit phase pure and crystalline hematite (α-Fe2O3) films at 230 °C without the need for postannealing. Homogenous and conformal deposition with good aspect ratio coverage was demonstrated on a nanostructured substrate and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. These as-deposited α-Fe2O3 films were investigated as photoanodes for photoelectrochemical water oxidation and found to be highly photoactive. Combined with a TiO2 underlayer and a low-cost Ni(OH)2 catalyst, hematite films of less than 10 nm in thickness reached photocurrent densities of 0.3 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V vs RHE and a photocurrent onset potential of less than 0.9 V vs RHE, previously unseen for films this thin and without high temperature annealing. In a thickness-dependent photoelectrochemical analysis, we identified a hematite thickness of only 10 nm to yield the highest internal quantum efficiency when using a suitable underlayer such as TiO2 that induces doping of the hematite film and reduces electron/hole recombination at the back contact. We find that, at high bias potentials, photocurrent density and quantum efficiency proportionally increase with light absorption in films thinner than 10 nm and are limited by the space charge layer width in thicker films. Thus, we propose to apply hematite films of 10 nm in thickness for future developments on suitable nanostructured conductive scaffolds that can now be extended to organic scaffolds due to our low-temperature process.

  20. Influence of energetic ions and neutral atoms on the L1 0 ordering of FePt films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantelli, V.; von Borany, J.; Mücklich, A.; Zhou, Shengqiang; Grenzer, J.

    2007-04-01

    The A1 → L10 phase transition of Fe50Pt50 films, deposited at room-temperature on amorphous SiO2 by dc magnetron co-sputtering at 0.3 Pa, was studied with in-situ X-ray diffraction. An almost complete transition characterized by a long-range order parameter S > 0.8 is obtained already after a heat treatment at (320 ± 20) °C. A post-deposition He ion irradiation (50 keV, 1 × 1015 - 3 × 1016 cm-2) does not further reduce the transition temperature. Theoretical calculations reveal that, due to the negligible thermalization of the sputtered atoms and reflected ions in the plasma, a considerable fraction of energetic ions and atoms meet the substrate surface. The low transition temperature is explained by the impact of energetic ions and atoms which provoke significant adatom mobility and a decrease of the activation energy for atomic reordering by vacancies. Consequently, using deposition parameters leading to a strong thermalized plasma, the FePt films showed an increase of the transition temperature up to 400 °C, a lower S-value (S ≅ 0.6) and a reduced coercivity.

  1. Luminescence properties of lanthanide and ytterbium lanthanide titanate thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Per-Anders, E-mail: p.a.hansen@kjemi.uio.no; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Nilsen, Ola [Department of Chemistry, Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, Sem Sælandsvei 26, 0371 Oslo (Norway); Finstad, Terje G. [Department of Physics, Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, Sem Sælandsvei 24, 0371 Oslo (Norway)

    2016-01-15

    Lanthanide based luminescent materials are highly suitable as down conversion materials in combination with a UV-absorbing host material. The authors have used TiO{sub 2} as the UV-absorbing host material and investigated the energy transfer between TiO{sub 2} and 11 different lanthanide ions, Ln{sup 3+} (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb) in thin films grown by atomic layer deposition. They have also investigated the possibility to improve the overall energy transfer from TiO{sub 2} to Yb{sup 3+} with a second Ln{sup 3+}, in order to enhance down conversion. The films were grown at a substrate temperature of 300 °C, using the Ln(thd){sub 3}/O{sub 3} (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione) and TiCl{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O precursor pairs. The focus of the work is to explore the energy transfer from TiO{sub 2} to Ln{sup 3+} ions, and the energy transfer between Ln{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions, which could lead to efficient down conversion. The samples have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and photoluminescence. All films were amorphous as deposited, and the samples have been annealed at 600, 800, and 1000 °C in order to investigate the correlation between the crystallinity and luminescence. The lanthanum titanium oxide samples showed a weak and broad emission centered at 540 nm, which was absent in all the other samples, indicating energy transfer from TiO{sub 2} to Ln{sup 3+} in all other lanthanide samples. In the amorphous phase, all samples, apart from La, Tb, and Tm, showed a typical f-f emission when excited by a 325 nm HeCd laser. None of the samples showed any luminescence after annealing at 1000 °C due to the formation of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Samples containing Nd, Sm, and Eu show a change in emission spectrum when annealed at 800 °C compared to the as-deposited samples, indicating that the smaller lanthanides crystallize in a different manner than the larger

  2. Molecular-dynamics simulation of lateral friction in contact-mode atomic force microscopy of alkane films: The role of molecular flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soza, P.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Taub, H.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations are used to investigate lateral friction in contact-mode atomic force microscopy of tetracosane (n-C24H50) films. We find larger friction coefficients on the surface of monolayer and bilayer films in which the long axis of the molecules is parallel to the interface ...

  3. Cathode encapsulation of OLEDs by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films and Al2O3/a-SiNx:H stacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuning, W.; Van de Weijer, P.; Lifka, H.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Creatore, M.

    2011-01-01

    Al2O3 thin films synthesized by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition(ALD) at room temperature (25 ºC) have been tested as water vapor per-meation barriers for OLED devices. Silicon nitride films (a-SiNx:H)deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) servedas reference and were

  4. Characterization and Electrochemical Performance at High Discharge Rates of Tin Dioxide Thin Films Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, M. Yu.; Novikov, P. A.; Nazarov, D. V.; Rymyantsev, A. M.; Silin, A. O.; Zhang, Y.; Popovich, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, thin films of tin dioxide have been synthesized on substrates of silicon and stainless steel by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with tetraethyl tin and by inductively coupled remote oxygen plasma as precursors. Studies of the surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy show a strong dependence on synthesis temperature. According to the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, the samples contain tin in the oxidation state +4. The thickness of the thin films for electrochemical performance was approximately 80 nm. Electrochemical cycling in the voltage range of 0.01-0.8 V have shown that tin oxide has a stable discharge capacity of approximately 650 mAh/g during 400 charge/discharge cycles with an efficiency of approximately 99.5%. The decrease in capacity after 400 charge/discharge cycles was around 5-7%. Synthesized SnO2 thin films have fast kinetics of lithium ions intercalation and excellent discharge efficiency at high C-rates, up to 40C, with a small decrease in capacity of less than 20%. Specific capacity and cyclic stability of thin films of SnO2 synthesized by ALD exceed the values mentioned in the literature for pure tin dioxide thin films.

  5. Low-Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition of CuSbS2 for Thin-Film Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riha, Shannon C; Koegel, Alexandra A; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F

    2017-02-08

    Copper antimony sulfide (CuSbS2) has been gaining traction as an earth-abundant absorber for thin-film photovoltaics given its near ideal band gap for solar energy conversion (∼1.5 eV), large absorption coefficient (>10(4) cm(-1)), and elemental abundance. Through careful in situ analysis of the deposition conditions, a low-temperature route to CuSbS2 thin films via atomic layer deposition has been developed. After a short (15 min) postprocess anneal at 225 °C, the ALD-grown CuSbS2 films were crystalline with micron-sized grains, exhibited a band gap of 1.6 eV and an absorption coefficient >10(4) cm(-1), as well as a hole concentration of 10(15) cm(-3). Finally, the ALD-grown CuSbS2 films were paired with ALD-grown TiO2 to form a photovoltaic device. This photovoltaic device architecture represents one of a very limited number of Cd-free CuSbS2 PV device stacks reported to date, and it is the first to demonstrate an open-circuit voltage on par with CuSbS2/CdS heterojunction PV devices. While far from optimized, this work demonstrates the potential for ALD-grown CuSbS2 thin films in environmentally benign photovoltaics.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of cobalt carbide films and their magnetic properties using propanol as a reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarr, Mouhamadou, E-mail: sarrtapha44@yahoo.fr [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Bahlawane, Naoufal; Arl, Didier [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Dossot, Manuel [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Microbiology for the Environment, UMR 7564 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54601 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); McRae, Edward [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198CNRS-Université de Lorraine, FST, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Lenoble, Damien, E-mail: damien.lenoble@list.lu [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Conformal carbon-Co-carbide thin films. • Chemically growth carbone-Co-carbide composite. • Tuneable magnetic properties. - Abstract: The investigation of highly conformal thin films using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is driven by a variety of applications in modern technologies. In particular, the emergence of 3D memory device architectures requires conformal materials with tuneable magnetic properties. Here, nanocomposites of carbon, cobalt and cobalt carbide are deposited by ALD using cobalt acetylacetonate with propanol as a reducing agent. Films were grown by varying the ALD deposition parameters including deposition temperature and propanol exposure time. The morphology, the chemical composition and the crystalline structure of the cobalt carbide film were investigated. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements revealed magnetic hysteresis loops with a coercivity reaching 500 Oe and a maximal saturation magnetization of 0.9 T with a grain size less than 15 nm. Magnetic properties are shown to be tuneable by adjusting the deposition parameters that significantly affect the microstructure and the composition of the deposited films.

  7. Analysis of layer-by-layer thin-film oxide growth using RHEED and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Eli; Sullivan, M. C.; Gutierrez-Llorente, Araceli; Joress, H.; Woll, A.; Brock, J. D.

    2015-03-01

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is commonly used as an in situ analysis tool for layer-by-layer thin-film growth. Atomic force microscopy is an equally common ex situ tool for analysis of the film surface, providing visual evidence of the surface morphology. During growth, the RHEED intensity oscillates as the film surface changes in roughness. It is often assumed that the maxima of the RHEED oscillations signify a complete layer, however, the oscillations in oxide systems can be misleading. Thus, using only the RHEED maxima is insufficient. X-ray reflectivity can also be used to analyze growth, as the intensity oscillates in phase with the smoothness of the surface. Using x-ray reflectivity to determine the thin film layer deposition, we grew three films where the x-ray and RHEED oscillations were nearly exactly out of phase and halted deposition at different points in the growth. Pre-growth and post-growth AFM images emphasize the fact that the maxima in RHEED are not a justification for determining layer completion. Work conducted at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) supported by NSF Awards DMR-1332208 and DMR-0936384 and the Cornell Center for Materials Research Shared Facilities are supported through DMR-1120296.

  8. Atomic-layer chemical-vapor-deposition of TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S; Kim, Y D; Kim, W M

    2000-01-01

    An atomic-layer chemical vapor deposition (AL-CVD) system was used to deposit TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111) substrates by cyclic exposures of TiCl sub 4 and NH sub 3. The growth rate was measured by using the number of deposition cycles, and the physical properties were compared with those of TiN films grown by using conventional deposition methods. To investigate the growth mechanism, we suggest a growth model for TiN n order to calculate the growth rate per cycle with a Cerius program. The results of the calculation with the model were compared with the experimental values for the TiN film deposited using the AL-CVD method. The stoichiometry of the TiN film was examined by using Auger electron spectroscopy, and the chlorine and the oxygen impurities were examined. The x-ray diffraction and the transmission electron microscopy results for the TiN film exhibited a strong (200) peak and a randomly oriented columnar microstructure. The electrical resistivity was found to decrease with increasing deposit...

  9. Atomic layer deposition grown MO{sub x} thin films for solar water splitting: Prospects and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Trilok; Lehnen, Thomas; Leuning, Tessa; Mathur, Sanjay, E-mail: sanjay.mathur@uni-koeln.de [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Cologne, Greinstrasse 6, D-50939 Cologne (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    The magnitude of energy challenge not only calls for efficient devices but also for abundant, inexpensive, and stable photoactive materials that can enable efficient light harvesting, charge separation and collection, as well as chemical transformations. Photoelectrochemical systems based on semiconductor materials have the possibility to transform solar energy directly into chemical energy the so-called “solar hydrogen.” The current challenge lies in the harvesting of a larger fraction of electromagnetic spectrum by enhancing the absorbance of electrode materials. In this context, atomically precise thin films of metal oxide semiconductors and their multilayered junctions are promising candidates to integrate high surface areas with well-defined electrode–substrate interface. Given its self-limited growth mechanism, the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique offers a wide range of capabilities to deposit and modify materials at the nanoscale. In addition, it opens new frontiers for developing precursor chemistry that is inevitable to design new processes. Herein, the authors review the properties and potential of metal oxide thin films deposited by ALD for their application in photoelectrochemical water splitting application. The first part of the review covers the basics of ALD processes followed by a brief discussion on the electrochemistry of water splitting reaction. The second part focuses on different MO{sub x} films deposited by atomic layer deposition for water splitting applications; in this section, The authors discuss the most explored MO{sub x} semiconductors, namely, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, WO{sub 3}, and ZnO, as active materials and refer to their application as protective coatings, conductive scaffolds, or in heterojunctions. The third part deals with the current challenges and future prospects of ALD processed MO{sub x} thin films for water splitting reactions.

  10. Thin films of copper oxide and copper grown by atomic layer deposition for applications in metallization systems of microelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waechtler, Thomas

    2010-05-25

    Copper-based multi-level metallization systems in today's ultralarge-scale integrated electronic circuits require the fabrication of diffusion barriers and conductive seed layers for the electrochemical metal deposition. Such films of only several nanometers in thickness have to be deposited void-free and conformal in patterned dielectrics. The envisaged further reduction of the geometric dimensions of the interconnect system calls for coating techniques that circumvent the drawbacks of the well-established physical vapor deposition. The atomic layer deposition method (ALD) allows depositing films on the nanometer scale conformally both on three-dimensional objects as well as on large-area substrates. The present work therefore is concerned with the development of an ALD process to grow copper oxide films based on the metal-organic precursor bis(trin- butylphosphane)copper(I)acetylacetonate [({sup n}Bu{sub 3}P){sub 2}Cu(acac)]. This liquid, non-fluorinated {beta}-diketonate is brought to react with a mixture of water vapor and oxygen at temperatures from 100 to 160 C. Typical ALD-like growth behavior arises between 100 and 130 C, depending on the respective substrate used. On tantalum nitride and silicon dioxide substrates, smooth films and selfsaturating film growth, typical for ALD, are obtained. On ruthenium substrates, positive deposition results are obtained as well. However, a considerable intermixing of the ALD copper oxide with the underlying films takes place. Tantalum substrates lead to a fast self-decomposition of the copper precursor. As a consequence, isolated nuclei or larger particles are always obtained together with continuous films. The copper oxide films grown by ALD can be reduced to copper by vapor-phase processes. If formic acid is used as the reducing agent, these processes can already be carried out at similar temperatures as the ALD, so that agglomeration of the films is largely avoided. Also for an integration with subsequent

  11. SnO{sub 2} thin films grown by atomic layer deposition using a novel Sn precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min-Jung [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Cheol Jin [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Chon; Pyeon, Jung Joon [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyung-Ho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo-Suk; Han, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Chang Gyoun; Chung, Taek-Mo [Division of Advanced Materials, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Joo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan, 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Beomjin [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Doo Seok; Baek, Seung-Hyub [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanomaterials, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chong-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sang [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Keun, E-mail: s.k.kim@kist.re.kr [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanomaterials, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • We developed a new ALD process for SnO{sub 2} films using dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propoxy-tin(II) as a novel Sn precursor. • The SnO{sub 2} films grown from Sn(dmamp){sub 2} has negligible impurity contents. • Sn ions in the films had a single binding state corresponding to Sn{sup 4+} in SnO{sub 2}. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2} thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propoxy-tin(II) (Sn(dmamp){sub 2}) and O{sub 3} in a temperature range of 100–230 °C. The ALD window was found to be in the range of 100–200 °C. The growth per cycle of the films in the ALD window increased with temperature in the range from 0.018 to 0.042 nm/cycle. Above 230 °C, the self-limiting behavior which is a unique characteristic of ALD, was not observed in the growth because of the thermal decomposition of the Sn(dmamp){sub 2} precursor. The SnO{sub 2} films were amorphous in the ALD window and exhibited quite a smooth surface. Sn ions in all films had a single binding state corresponding to Sn{sup 4+} in SnO{sub 2}. The concentration of carbon and nitrogen in the all SnO{sub 2} films was below the detection limit of the auger electron spectroscopy technique and a very small amount of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen was detected by secondary ions mass spectroscopy only. The impurity contents decreased with increasing the growth temperature. This is consistent with the increase in the density of the SnO{sub 2} films with respect to the growth temperature. The ALD process with Sn(dmamp){sub 2} and O{sub 3} shows excellent conformality on a hole structure with an aspect ratio of ∼9. This demonstrates that the ALD process with Sn(dmamp){sub 2} and O{sub 3} is promising for growth of robust and highly pure SnO{sub 2} films.

  12. Thickness and photocatalytic activity relation in TiO$_2$:N films grown by atomic layer deposition with methylene-blue and E. coli bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M M CONTRERAS TURRUBIARTES; E LÓPEZ LUNA; J L ENRIQUEZ-CARREJO; A PEDROZA RODRIGUEZ; J C SALCEDO REYES; M A VIDAL BORBOLLA; P G MANI-GONZALEZ

    2017-10-01

    This study presents an analysis of the photocatalytic efficiency in TiO$_2$:N thin films grown by atomic layer deposition related to the film thickness. The nitriding process was carried out with nitrogen plasma by molecular nitrogen decomposition after TiO$_2$ deposition. The study was performed using the time-dependent degradation of colour units for methylene-blue solutions and inactivation percentages for Escherichia coli bacteria, for potential applications in sewage purification. To determine the optoelectronic properties of the films, the optical, structural, surface and thickness characterizations were carried out by photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively.

  13. Growth and characterization of III-N ternary thin films by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepal, Neeraj; Anderson, Virginia R.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-08-31

    We report the growth and characterization of III-nitride ternary thin films (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N, In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N) at ≤ 500 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy (PA-ALE) over a wide stoichiometric range including the range where phase separation has been an issue for films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The composition of these ternaries was intentionally varied through alterations in the cycle ratios of the III-nitride binary layers (AlN, GaN, and InN). By this digital alloy growth method, we are able to grow III-nitride ternaries by PA-ALE over nearly the entire stoichiometry range including in the spinodal decomposition region (x = 15–85%). These early efforts suggest great promise of PA-ALE at low temperatures for addressing miscibility gap challenges encountered with conventional growth methods and realizing high performance optoelectronic and electronic devices involving ternary/binary heterojunctions, which are not currently possible. - Highlights: • III-N ternaries grown at ≤ 500 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy • Growth of InGaN and AlInN in the spinodal decomposition region (15–85%) • Epitaxial, smooth and uniform III-N film growth at low temperatures.

  14. The effect of deposition energy of energetic atoms on the growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N

    2014-05-16

    The growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The second-generation reactive-empirical-bond-order potential was used to model atomic interactions. Films with different structures were simulated by varying the deposition energy of carbon atoms in the range of 1-120 eV. Intrinsic film characteristics (e.g. density and internal stress) were determined after the system reached equilibrium. Short- and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering is examined in the context of atomic hybridization and ring connectivity simulation results. It is shown that relatively high deposition energy (i.e., 80 eV) yields a multilayer film structure consisting of an intermixing layer, bulk film and surface layer, consistent with the classical subplantation model. The highest film density (3.3 g cm-3), sp3 fraction (∼43%), and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering correspond to a deposition energy of ∼80 eV, which is in good agreement with experimental findings. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Atomic-Scale Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of {100}-Oriented Diamond Film Growth in C-H and C-H-Cl Systems by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安希忠; 张禹; 刘国权; 秦湘阁; 王辅忠; 刘胜新

    2002-01-01

    We simulate the { 100}-oriented diamond film growth of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) under different modelsin C-H and C-H-CI systems in an atomic scale by using the revised kinetic Monte Carlo method. The sirnulationresults show that: (1) the CVD diamond flm growth in the C-H system is suitable for high substrate temperature,and the flm surface roughness is very coarse; (2) the CVD diamond film can grow in the C-H-C1 system eitherat high temperature or at low temperature, and the film quality is outstanding; (3) atomic CI takes ala activerole for the growth of diamond film, especially at low temperatures. The concentration of atomic C1 should becontrolled in a proper range.

  16. Tuning the atomic and domain structure of epitaxial films of multiferroic BiFeO3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daumont, C. J. M.; Farokhipoor, S.; Ferri, A.; Wojdel, J. C.; Iniguez, Jorge; Kooi, B. J.; Noheda, Beatriz; Wojdeł, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent works have shown that the domain walls of room-temperature multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films can display distinct and promising functionalities. It is thus important to understand the mechanisms underlying domain formation in these films. High-resolution x-ray diffraction and piezoforce mi

  17. Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Alumina Films Created Using the Atomic Layer Deposition Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    23 (9) (2008) 2443–2457. [32] G.G. Stoney, The tension ofmetallic films deposited by electrolysis , Proc. R. Soc. A82 (553) (1909) 172–175. [33] M...Springer-Verlag, New York, 2006. [37] R.M. Keller, S.P. Baker, E. Arzt, Stress–temperature behavior of unpassivated thin copper films, Acta Mater. 47 (2

  18. Epitaxial growth of atomically flat gadolinia-doped ceria thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen;

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial growth of Ce0.8Gd0.2O2(CGO) films on (001) TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition was investigated using in situ reflective high energy electron diffraction. The initial film growth shows a Stransky–Krastanov growth mode. However, this three-dimensional island...

  19. Growth of nitrogen-doped p-type ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Chongmu; LIM Jongmin; PARK Suyoung; KIM Hyounwoo

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped, p-type ZnO thin films were grown successfully on sapphire (0001) substrates by using atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). Zn(C2H5)2[Diethylzinc,DEZn], H2O and NH3 were used as a zinc precursor, an oxidant and a doping source gas, respectively. The lowest electrical resistivity of the p-type ZnO films grown by ALE and annealed at 1000 ℃ in an oxygen atmosphere for 1 h was 18.3 Ω·m with a hole concentration of 3.71×1017cm-3 . Low temperature-photoluminescence analysis and time-dependent Hall measurement results support that the nitrogen-doped ZnO after annealing is ap-type semiconductor.

  20. Spectroscopic investigation of the electronic structure of thin atomic layer deposition HfO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrêa, Silma Alberton, E-mail: silma.alberton@ufrgs.br; Brizzi, Simone; Schmeisser, Dieter [Applied Physics and Sensors, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 17, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The electronic structure of HfO{sub 2} thin films is investigated employing resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (resPES). The detailed analysis of the O1s resonance profile enables the determination of the partial density of states for the valence and the conduction bands as well as the electronic band gap to be 6.2 eV. The position of the charge neutrality level is evaluated. Thereby, it is demonstrated that the resPES data are able to combine information both for the valence as well as for the conduction band states. In addition, evidences for intrinsic in-gap states attributed to polaronic and charge transfer states are given. Electronic charges within the atomic layer deposition-HfO{sub 2} films are identified, pointing out that the amount of charges is essential to determine the accurate position of the surface potentials.

  1. Bias-assisted atomic force microscope nanolithography on NbS2 thin films grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark, Hunyoung; Kwon, Sanghyuk; Lee, Changgu

    2016-12-01

    Niobium disulfide, one of the metallic transition metal dichalcogenides, has a high potential as an electrode material for electronic devices made of 2D materials. Here, we investigated the bias-assisted atomic force microscope nanolithography of NbS2 thin films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. We analyzed the lithographed pattern using Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and friction force microscopy. These analyses showed that lines having various widths and thicknesses could be generated using the lithography technique by simply varying the scan speed and applied voltage. These analyses also revealed that the NbS2 film transformed from a layered crystalline structure into an amorphous structure upon being lithographed. By generating four line segments forming a square and measuring I/V curves inside and outside of the square, the electrical properties of the lithographed material were characterized. These analyses indicate that NbS2 became hydrogenated and an insulator upon being lithographed.

  2. SERS Taper-Fiber Nanoprobe Modified by Gold Nanoparticles Wrapped with Ultrathin Alumina Film by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Xu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A taper-fiber SERS nanoprobe modified by gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs with ultrathin alumina layers was fabricated and its ability to perform remote Raman detection was demonstrated. The taper-fiber nanoprobe (TFNP with a nanoscale tip size under 80 nm was made by heated pulling combined with the chemical etching method. The Au-NPs were deposited on the TFNP surface with the electrostatic self-assembly technology, and then the TFNP was wrapped with ultrathin alumina layers by the atomic layer deposition (ALD technique. The results told us that with the increasing thickness of the alumina film, the Raman signals decreased. With approximately 1 nm alumina film, the remote detection limit for R6G aqueous solution reached 10−6 mol/L.

  3. Room temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition for TiO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Alexander; Schnabel, Hans-Dieter, E-mail: Hans.Dieter.Schnabel@fh-zwickau.de; Reinhold, Ullrich; Rauer, Sebastian; Neidhardt, Andreas [Department of Physical Engineering and Informatics, University of Applied Science, Westsächsische Hochschule Zwickau, Dr.-Friedrichs-Ring 2a, 08056 Zwíckau (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper presents a study on plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3} films on silicon substrates. At low temperatures, ALD processes, which are not feasible at high temperatures, could be possible. For example, temperatures at 180 °C and above allow no WO{sub 3} ALD process with WF{sub 6} as a precursor because etching processes hinder film growth. Further low temperature deposition techniques are needed to coat temperature sensitive materials. For the deposition, WF{sub 6} and TiCl{sub 4} are used as metal precursors and O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O as oxygen sources. The depositions were accomplished in the temperature range of 30 °C up to 180 °C for both metal oxides. Spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray reflection, and grazing incidence diffraction were used to investigate the deposited ALD thin films. Film growth, density, crystallinity, and roughness are discussed as functions of temperature after ensuring the ALD requirement of self-saturating adsorption. Growth rates and measured material properties are in good agreement with literature data.

  4. Erosion of POSS-polyimide films under hypervelocity impact and atomic oxygen: The role of mechanical properties at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verker, R. [Space Environment Group, Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)], E-mail: rverker@soreq.gov.il; Grossman, E. [Space Environment Group, Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Eliaz, N. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-02-15

    Low Earth orbital debris impacts on the external surfaces of satellites have increased dramatically in recent years. Polyimides are used as the outer layer of thermal control insulation blankets, covering most of the external spacecraft surfaces that are exposed to the space environment. A recently developed material, named polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-polyimide, shows significant enhancement in withstanding the space environment. In this work, the combined effect of ground-simulated hypervelocity space debris impacts and atomic oxygen (AO) on the erosion of POSS-containing polyimide films was investigated. During such hypervelocity impacts, elevated temperatures, on the order of hundreds degrees, are formed. A laser-driven flyer system was used to accelerate aluminum flyers to impact velocities of up to 3 km s{sup -1}. The impacted films were exposed to an oxygen RF plasma environment, simulating the effect of AO in the low Earth orbit. Impacted polyimide films exposed to AO revealed synergistic erosion effect, while impacted POSS-containing samples showed improved erosion resistance. The increased erosion rate of the impacted polyimide film is explained by formation of residual stresses that affect the oxidation mainly by increasing the diffusivity of oxygen into the subsurface layers. Mechanical properties of the POSS-containing samples performed at 450 deg. C and fractographic examination supports the above hypothesis.

  5. Characterization of Films with Thickness Less than 10 nm by Sensitivity-Enhanced Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muraoka Mikio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a method for characterizing ultrathin films using sensitivity-enhanced atomic force acoustic microscopy, where a concentrated-mass cantilever having a flat tip was used as a sensitive oscillator. Evaluation was aimed at 6-nm-thick and 10-nm-thick diamond-like carbon (DLC films deposited, using different methods, on a hard disk for the effective Young's modulus defined as E/(1 - ν2, where E is the Young's modulus, and ν is the Poisson's ratio. The resonant frequency of the cantilever was affected not only by the film's elasticity but also by the substrate even at an indentation depth of about 0.6 nm. The substrate effect was removed by employing a theoretical formula on the indentation of a layered half-space, together with a hard disk without DLC coating. The moduli of the 6-nm-thick and 10-nm-thick DLC films were 392 and 345 GPa, respectively. The error analysis showed the standard deviation less than 5% in the moduli.

  6. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoops, Harm C. M.; de Peuter, K.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2015-07-01

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiNx) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiNx by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiNx by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called "redeposition effect". This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiNx ALD using SiH2(NHtBu)2 as precursor and N2 plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiNx film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  7. Erosion effects of atomic oxygen on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-polyimide hybrid films in low earth orbit space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duo, Shuwang; Song, Mimi; Liu, Tingzhi; Hu, Changyuan; Li, Meishuan

    2013-02-01

    A novel polyimide (PI) hybrid nanocomposite containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) had been prepared by copolymerization of trisilanolphenyl-POSS, 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA), and pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA). The AO resistance of these PI/POSS hybrid films was tested in the ground-based AO simulation facility. Exposed and unexposed surfaces were characterized by SEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. SEM images showed that the surface of the 20 wt% PI/POSS became much less rough than that of the pristine polyimide. Mass measurements of the samples showed that the erosion yield of the PI/POSS (20 wt.%) hybrid film was 1.2 x 10(-25) cm3/atom, and reduced to 4% of the polyimide film. The XPS data indicated that the carbon content of the near-surface region was decreased from 60.1 to 13.2 at% after AO exposure. The oxygen and silicon concentrations in the near-surface region increased to 1.96 after AO exposure. The nanometer-sized structure of POSS, with its large surface area, had led AO-irradiated samples to form a SiO2 passivation layer, which protected the underlying polymer from further AO attack. The incorporation of POSS into the polyimide could dramatically improve the AO resistance of polyimide films in low earth orbit environment.

  8. Stable and High-Performance Flexible ZnO Thin-Film Transistors by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Yu; Hsu, Che-Chen; Tseng, Ming-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2015-10-14

    Passivation is a challenging issue for the oxide thin-film transistor (TFT) technologies because it requires prolonged high-temperature annealing treatments to remedy defects produced in the process, which greatly limits its manufacturability as well as its compatibility with temperature-sensitive materials such as flexible plastic substrates. This study investigates the defect-formation mechanisms incurred by atomic layer deposition (ALD) passivation processes on ZnO TFTs, based on which we demonstrate for the first time degradation-free passivation of ZnO TFTs by a TiO2/Al2O3 nanolaminated (TAO) film deposited by a low-temperature (110 °C) ALD process. By combining the TAO passivation film with ALD dielectric and channel layers into an integrated low-temperature ALD process, we successfully fabricate flexible ZnO TFTs on plastics. Thanks to the exceptional gas-barrier property of the TAO film (water vapor transmission rate (WVTR)20 cm2 V(-1) s(-1), subthreshold swing10,000 s), air-storage (>1200 h), and bending (1.3 cm radius for 1000 times).

  9. Atomic layer deposition of metal sulfide thin films using non-halogenated precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Alex B. F.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2015-05-26

    A method for preparing a metal sulfide thin film using ALD and structures incorporating the metal sulfide thin film. The method includes providing an ALD reactor, a substrate, a first precursor comprising a metal and a second precursor comprising a sulfur compound. The first and the second precursors are reacted in the ALD precursor to form a metal sulfide thin film on the substrate. In a particular embodiment, the metal compound comprises Bis(N,N'-di-sec-butylacetamidinato)dicopper(I) and the sulfur compound comprises hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2S) to prepare a Cu.sub.2S film. The resulting metal sulfide thin film may be used in among other devices, photovoltaic devices, including interdigitated photovoltaic devices that may use relatively abundant materials for electrical energy production.

  10. Iron atoms redistribution in oxide films of Zr-Fe, Zr-Fe-Cu alloys during corrosion in autoclave at 350°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, V.; Bateev, A.

    2016-04-01

    The data on changes of iron atoms state in the oxide films of binary Zr-1.24 mas.%Fe and ternary Zr-1.39 mas.%Fe-0.60 mas.%Cu zirconium alloys are obtained. Alloys are subjected to corrosion tests under autoclave conditions at 350°C temperature in a steam-water environment under pressure p = 16.8 MPa. In initial specimens of the alloys the iron atoms are in the form of intermetallic compounds. In oxide films the decomposition of intermetallic compounds and formation of new compounds occurs with structural phase distortion. In the oxide films metallic the metallic iron particles α-Fe, iron oxide in the form of hematite α-Fe2O3, solid solutions of iron ions in ZrO2 are formed. The phase composition of the oxide films depends on the alloy composition and changes during the growth process of the oxide film.

  11. High Current Density Effect on In-situ Atomic Migration Characteristics of a BiTe Thin Film System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seunghyun; Park, Yong-Jin; Joo, Young-Chang; Park, Young-Bae

    2013-10-01

    Understanding fundamental atomic migration characteristics of multicomponent chalcogenide materials such as GeSbTe (GST) and BiTe are important in order to investigate the failure mechanism related to the electrical reliability of thermoelectric materials under high current density. In this work, high current density effect on the in-situ atomic migration characteristics of the BiTe thermoelectric thin films was conducted by real-time observation inside an scanning electron microscope chamber. Under the high current density conditions ranging from 0.83×106 to 1.0×106 A/cm2 at 100 °C, Te migrated toward the cathode, and Bi migrated toward the anode because the electrostatic force was dominant by very high Joule heating effect.

  12. The Effect of Boron Addition on the Atomic Structure and Microwave Magnetic Properties of FeGaB Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J.; Yang, A; Chen, Y; Kirkland, J; Lou, J; Sun, N; Vittoria, C; Harris, V

    2009-01-01

    Varying amounts of boron were added to the host FeGa alloy to investigate its impact upon local atomic structure and magnetic and microwave properties. The impact of B upon the local atomic structure in FeGaB films was investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. The EXAFS fitting results revealed a contraction of lattice parameters with the introduction of B. The Debye-Waller factor determined from EXAFS fitting increases as a function of boron addition and abruptly changes during the structural evolution from crystalline to amorphous that occurs near 9% B. Upon the onset of this transition the static and microwave magnetic properties became exceptionally soft, with values of coercivity and ferromagnetic linewidth reducing to less than 1 Oe and 25 Oe, respectively.

  13. Photoluminescence Enhancement in Nanotextured Fluorescent SiC Passivated by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    The influence of thickness of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films on nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC passivation is investigated. The passivation effect on the light emission has been characterized by photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence at room temperature. The results show...... that 20nm thickness of Al2O3 layer is favorable to observe a large photoluminescence enhancement (25.9%) and long carrier lifetime (0.86ms). This is a strong indication for an interface hydrogenation that takes place during post-thermal annealing. These results show that an Al2O3 layer could serve...

  14. Analysis for positions of Sn atoms in epitaxial Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} film in low temperature depositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji, E-mail: ejkamiyama@aol.com [Dept. of Comm. Eng., Okayama Pref. Univ., 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan); Sueoka, Koji [Dept. of Comm. Eng., Okayama Pref. Univ., 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan); Nakatsuka, Osamu; Taoka, Noriyuki; Zaima, Shigeaki [Dept. of Cryst. Mat. Sci., Grad. School of Eng., Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Izunome, Koji; Kashima, Kazuhiko [Technology, GlobalWafers Japan Corp. Ltd, 6-861-5 Higashiko, Seiro, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan)

    2014-04-30

    We investigated the position of Sn atoms in Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} film grown at a low temperature by using the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) method. Vacancies had been expected to be introduced near the growing surface vicinity of a Sn atom and located at a split-vacancy position due to the binding nature between a Sn atom and a vacancy, which was predicted by the calculation for a bulk model in the literature. However, the EXAFS showed that almost all Sn atoms were located at the substitutional position and did not form a split-vacancy. - Highlights: • Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) study of epitaxial Ge{sub 1−x}Snx film • EXAFS shows that almost all Sn atoms are located at substitutional positions. • The amount of vacancies introduced in low-temperature epitaxial growth is small.

  15. Electrodeposition of a Pt monolayer film: using kinetic limitations for atomic layer epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimaud, Sylvain; Behm, R Jürgen

    2013-08-14

    A new and facile one-step method to prepare a smooth Pt monolayer film on a metallic substrate in the absence of underpotential deposition-type stabilizations is presented as a general approach and applied to the growth of Pt monolayer films on Au. The strongly modified electronic properties of these films were demonstrated by in situ IR spectroscopy at the electrified solid-liquid interface with adsorbed carbon monoxide serving as a probe molecule. The Pt monolayer on Au is kinetically stabilized by adsorbed CO, inhibiting further Pt deposition in higher layers.

  16. Transparent conducting properties of Ni doped zinc oxide thin films prepared by a facile spray pyrolysis technique using perfume atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouaoud, A.; Rmili, A.; Ouachtari, F.; Louardi, A.; Chtouki, T. [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Elidrissi, B., E-mail: e.bachir@mailcity.com [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Erguig, H. [Laboratoire des Hautes Energies, Sciences de l' Ingenierie et Reacteurs (LHESIR), Equipe Ingenierie et Materiaux (INMA), Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Ecole Nationale des Sciences Appliquees de Kenitra (ENSAK) (Morocco)

    2013-01-15

    Undoped and Ni doped zinc oxide (Ni-ZnO) thin films were prepared by a facile spray pyrolysis technique using perfume atomizer from aqueous solution of anhydrous zinc acetate (Zn(CH{sub 3}COOH){sub 2} and hexahydrated nickel chloride (NiCl{sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O) as sources of zinc and nickel, respectively. The films were deposited onto the amorphous glass substrates kept at (450 Degree-Sign C). The effect of the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of Ni doped ZnO thin film was studied. It was found from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis that both the undoped and Ni doped ZnO films were crystallized in the hexagonal structure with a preferred orientation of the crystallites along the [002] direction perpendicular to the substrate. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed a relatively dense surface structure composed of crystallites in the spherical form whose average size decreases when the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio increases. The optical study showed that all the films were highly transparent. The optical transmittance in the visible region varied between 75 and 85%, depending on the dopant concentrations. The variation of the band gap versus the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio showed that the energy gap decreases from 2.95 to 2.72 eV as the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio increases from 0 to 0.02 and then increases to reach 3.22 eV for [Ni]/[Zn] = 0.04. The films obtained with the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio = 0.02 showed minimum resistivity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {Omega} cm at room temperature. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optical transmittance of Ni doped ZnO varies between 75 and 85%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The energy gap of these films decreases from 2.95 to 2.72 eV as the [Ni]/[Zn] ratio increases from 0 to 0.02. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The energy gap increases to reach 3.22 eV for [Ni]/[Zn] = 0.04. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films obtained with [Ni]/[Zn] ratio = 0.02 show minimum resistivity of 2

  17. In situ Al-doped ZnO films by atomic layer deposition with an interrupted flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jheng-Ming [Program for Science and Technology of Accelerator Light Source, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Ku, Ching-Shun [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chih-Ming, E-mail: cmlin@mail.nhcue.edu.tw [Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 30014, Taiwan (China); Chen, San-Yuan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Yi, E-mail: hylee@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 30014, Taiwan (China)

    2015-09-01

    In situ aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) films were grown on glass substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with an interrupted flow at temperatures in range 200–280 °C; the optimal temperature, 260 °C, depended on the electrical properties. To assess the effect of the ratio of pulses of diethylzinc (DEZn) and trimethylaluminium (TMA) on the structural, optical and electrical properties, we grew AZO films with various pulse ratios of DEZn:TMA in a range from 3:1 to 10:1 at 260 °C. These properties and the content of Al were investigated with X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectivity (XRR), a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), a secondary-ion mass spectrometer (SIMS), transmission spectra, Hall measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). The electrical resistivity was least, 5.7 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm, for ALD-AZO films with pulse ratio 6:1; the carrier mobility was 8.80 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} and optical transmittance up to 94%. The epitaxial AZO films grown in situ also on m-plane sapphire exhibited the two-fold symmetry of ZnO (110) in the orthorhombic crystal system. All results show that a novel in situ doping method with an interrupted flow controls the Al content of AZO films more easily, and is more usefully applicable for a structure with a large aspect ratio for an advanced photoelectric device. - Highlights: • In situ Al-doped ZnO films were grown on glass substrates by ALD with an interrupted flow. • AZO films deposited at 260 °C show superior electrical and optical properties. • In situ doping method provides highly crystalline quality and improves the electrical properties. • In situ doping method controls the Al content of AZO films more easily. • In situ doping method is more suitable for a structure with a large aspect ratio for an advanced photoelectric device.

  18. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  19. On-chip highly sensitive saliva glucose sensing using multilayer films composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles, and glucose oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is very important for human health to rapidly and accurately detect glucose levels in biological environments, especially for diabetes mellitus. We proposed a simple, highly sensitive, accurate, convenient, low-cost, and disposable glucose biosensor on a single chip. A working (sensor electrode, a counter electrode, and a reference electrode are integrated on a single chip through micro-fabrication. The working electrode is functionalized through a layer-by-layer (LBL assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs and multilayer films composed of chitosan (CS, gold nanoparticles (GNp, and glucose oxidase (GOx to obtain high sensitivity and accuracy. The glucose sensor has following features: (1 direct electron transfer between GOx and the electrode surface; (2 on-a-chip; (3 glucose detection down to 0.1 mg/dL (5.6 μM; (4 good sensing linearity over 0.017–0.81 mM; (5 high sensitivity (61.4 μA/mM-cm2 with a small reactive area (8 mm2; (6 fast response; (7 high reproducibility and repeatability; (8 reliable and accurate saliva glucose detection. Thus, this disposable biosensor will be an alternative for real time tracking of glucose levels from body fluids, e.g. saliva, in a noninvasive, pain-free, accurate, and continuous way. In addition to being used as a disposable glucose biosensor, it also provides a suitable platform for on-chip electrochemical sensing for other chemical agents and biomolecules.

  20. Growth analysis of cadmium sulfide thin films by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, H.R.; Dhere, R.G.; Ramanathan, K.; Sheldon, P.; Kazmerski, L.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    CdS films have been deposited by solution growth on SnO{sub 2} and glass substrates. Nucleation on SnO{sub 2} occurs at early deposition times, and complete conformal coverage is observed at low thickness values. The average grain size of the CdS films is established at these early times. In films deposited on glass substrates, nucleation is slower and occurs through 3-dimensional islands that increase in size and number as deposition proceeds. Optical measurements show that the bandgap values of CdS films deposited on SnO{sub 2} depend mainly on substrate structure. Hydrogen heat treatment does not affect the surface morphology of the samples, but decreases bandgap values.

  1. Growth analysis of cadmium sulfide thin films by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, H.R.; Dhere, R.G.; Ramanathan, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    CdS films have been deposited by solution growth on SnO{sub 2} and glass substrates. Nucleation on SnO{sub 2} occurs at early deposition times, and complete conformal coverage is observed at low thickness values. The average grain size of the CdS films is established at these early times. In films deposited on glass substrates, nucleation is slower and occurs through 3-dimensional islands that increase in size and number as deposition proceeds. Optical measurements show that the bandgap values of CdS films deposited on SnO{sub 2} depend mainly on substrate structure. Hydrogen heat treatment does not affect the surface morphology of the samples, but decreases bandgap values.

  2. An iron(II) diketonate–diamine complex as precursor for thin film fabrication by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratvold, Jon E., E-mail: j.e.bratvold@kjemi.uio.no [Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology (SMN)/Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Carraro, Giorgio [Department of Chemistry, University of Padova and INSTM, via F. Marzolo 1, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Barreca, Davide [CNR-IENI and INSTM, Department of Chemistry, University of Padova, via F. Marzolo 1, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nilsen, Ola [Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology (SMN)/Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • First report of Fe(hfa){sub 2}TMEDA as precursor in ALD and MLD. • Hybrid organic–inorganic films with oxalic acid as co-reactant between 125 and 350 °C. • Surface saturation evidenced by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis. • XPS confirms complete preservation of Fe(II) from precursor to film. • Deposition of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} when using ozone as co-reactant. - Abstract: A new divalent Fe precursor has been explored for deposition of iron-containing thin films by atomic layer deposition and molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD). The Fe(II) β-diketonate-diamine complex, Fe(hfa){sub 2}TMEDA, (hfa = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionate, TMEDA = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylethylenediamine) can be handled in air, and sublimation at 60 °C ensures a satisfactory vaporization rate. The reactivity of the precursor does not allow for direct reaction with water as co-reactant. Nevertheless, it reacts with carboxylic acids, resulting in organic–inorganic hybrid materials, and with ozone, yielding α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The divalent oxidation state of iron was maintained during deposition when oxalic acid was used as co-reactant, demonstrating the first preservation of Fe(II) from precursor to film during an MLD process. A self-saturating growth mode was proven by in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, and the films were further characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  3. Electrical conductivity in Langmuir-Blodgett films of n-alkyl cyanobiphenyls using current sensing atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayathri, H. N.; Suresh, K. A., E-mail: suresh@cnsms.res.in [Centre for Nano and Soft Matter Sciences, P. B. No. 1329, Jalahalli, Bangalore 560013 (India)

    2015-06-28

    We report our studies on the nanoscale electrical conductivity in monolayers of n-alkyl cyanobiphenyl materials deposited on solid surface. Initially, the 8CB, 9CB, and 10CB monolayer films were prepared by the Langmuir technique at air-water interface and characterized by surface manometry and Brewster angle microscopy. The monolayer films were transferred on to solid substrates by the Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) technique. The 8CB, 9CB, and 10CB monolayer L-B films were deposited on freshly cleaved mica and studied by atomic force microscope (AFM), thereby measuring the film thickness as ∼1.5 nm. The electrical conductivity measurements were carried out on 9CB and 10CB monolayer L-B films deposited onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite using current sensing AFM. The nanoscale current-voltage (I-V) measurements show a non-linear variation. The nature of the curve indicates electron tunneling to be the mechanism for electrical conduction. Furthermore, analysis of the I-V curve reveals a transition in the electron conduction mechanism from direct tunneling to injection tunneling. From the transition voltage, we have estimated the values of barrier height for 9CB and 10CB to be 0.71 eV and 0.37 eV, respectively. For both 9CB and 10CB, the effective mass of electron was calculated to be 0.021 m{sub e} and 0.065 m{sub e}, respectively. These parameters are important in the design of molecular electronic devices.

  4. Atomic force microscopic characterization of films grown by inverse pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egerhazi, L. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Geretovszky, Zs. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Csako, T. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Szoerenyi, T. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: t.szorenyi@physx.u-szeged.hu

    2006-04-30

    Carbon nitride films have been deposited by KrF excimer laser ablation of a rotating graphite target in 5 Pa nitrogen ambient in an inverse pulsed laser deposition configuration, where the backward motion of the ablated species is utilised for film growth on substrates lying in the target plane. Topometric AFM scans of the films, exhibiting elliptical thickness distribution, have been recorded along the axes of symmetry of the deposition area. High resolution AFM scans revealed the existence of disk-like, or somewhat elongated rice-like features of 5-10 nm average thickness and {approx}100 nm largest dimension, densely packed over the whole, approximately 14 x 10 cm{sup 2} deposition area. The RMS roughness of the film decreased from 9 nm near to the laser spot down to 2 nm in the outer regions. Even the highest RMS value obtained for IPLD films was less than half of the typical, 25 nm roughness measured on simultaneously deposited PLD films.

  5. Heat capacity measurements of atoms and molecules adsorbed on evaporated metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, T.W.

    1989-05-01

    Investigations of the properties of absorbed monolayers have received great experimental and theoretical attention recently, both because of the importance of surface processes in practical applications such as catalysis, and the importance of such systems to the understanding of the fundamentals of thermodynamics in two dimensions. We have adapted the composite bolometer technology to the construction of microcalorimeters. For these calorimeters, the adsorption substrate is an evaporated film deposited on one surface of an optically polished sapphire wafer. This approach has allowed us to make the first measurements of the heat capacity of submonolayer films of /sup 4/He adsorbed on metallic films. In contrast to measurements of /sup 4/He adsorbed on all other insulating substrates, we have shown that /sup 4/He on silver films occupies a two-dimensional gas phase over a broad range of coverages and temperatures. Our apparatus has been used to study the heat capacity of Indium flakes. CO multilayers, /sup 4/He adsorbed on sapphire and on Ag films and H/sub 2/ adsorbed on Ag films. The results are compared with appropriate theories. 68 refs., 19 figs.

  6. SU-8 cantilever chip interconnection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Alicia Charlotte; Janting, Jakob; Schultz, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    the electrodes on the SU-8 chip to a printed circuit board. Here, we present two different methods of electrically connecting an SU-8 chip, which contains a microfluidic network and free-hanging mechanical parts. The tested electrical interconnection techniques are flip chip bonding using underfill or flip chip...... bonding using an anisotropic conductive film (ACF). These are both widely used in the Si industry and might also be used for the large scale interconnection of SU-8 chips. The SU-8 chip, to which the interconnections are made, has a microfluidic channel with integrated micrometer-sized cantilevers...... that can be used for label-free biochemical detection. All the bonding tests are compared with results obtained using similar Si chips. It is found that it is significantly more complicated to interconnect SU-8 than Si cantilever chips primarily due to the softness of SU-8....

  7. A low-temperature synthesis of electrochemical active Pt nanoparticles and thin films by atomic layer deposition on Si(111) and glassy carbon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Han, Lihao [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Photovoltaic Materials and Devices (PVMD) Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, GA Delft 2600 (Netherlands); Huang, Zhuangqun; Ferrer, Ivonne M. [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smets, Arno H.M.; Zeman, Miro [Photovoltaic Materials and Devices (PVMD) Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, GA Delft 2600 (Netherlands); Brunschwig, Bruce S., E-mail: bsb@caltech.edu [Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lewis, Nathan S., E-mail: nslewis@caltech.edu [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit nanoparticles and thin films of Pt onto etched p-type Si(111) wafers and glassy carbon discs. Using precursors of MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and ozone and a temperature window of 200–300 °C, the growth rate was 80–110 pm/cycle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the composition, structure, morphology, and thickness of the ALD-grown Pt nanoparticle films. The catalytic activity of the ALD-grown Pt for the hydrogen evolution reaction was shown to be equivalent to that of e-beam evaporated Pt on glassy carbon electrode. - Highlights: • Pure Pt films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe3 and ozone. • ALD-grown Pt thin films had high growth rates of 110 pm/cycle. • ALD-grown Pt films were electrocatalytic for hydrogen evolution from water. • Electrocatalytic activity of the ALD Pt films was equivalent to e-beam deposited Pt. • No carbon species were detected in the ALD-grown Pt films.

  8. Large-scale synthesis of uniform hexagonal boron nitride films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hamin; Kim, Tae Keun; Cho, Sung Woo; Jang, Hong Seok; Lee, Sang Ick; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2017-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been previously manufactured using mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition methods, which make the large-scale synthesis of uniform h-BN very challenging. In this study, we produced highly uniform and scalable h-BN films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, which were characterized by various techniques including atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The film composition studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy corresponded to a B:N stoichiometric ratio close to 1:1, and the band-gap value (5.65 eV) obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy was consistent with the dielectric properties. The h-BN-containing capacitors were characterized by highly uniform properties, a reasonable dielectric constant (3), and low leakage current density, while graphene on h-BN substrates exhibited enhanced electrical performance such as the high carrier mobility and neutral Dirac voltage, which resulted from the low density of charged impurities on the h-BN surface.

  9. Atomistic modeling of femtosecond laser-induced melting and atomic mixing in Au film - Cu substrate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Derek A.; Lin Zhibin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 395 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4745 (United States); Zhigilei, Leonid V., E-mail: lz2n@virginia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, 395 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4745 (United States); Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Kittel, Silke; Hergenroeder, Roland [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department of Material Analysis Bunsen-Kirchhoff-Str. 11, 44139 Dortmund (Germany)

    2009-09-30

    The mechanisms of femtosecond laser-induced transient melting and atomic mixing in a target composed of a 30 nm Au film deposited on a bulk Cu substrate are investigated in a series of atomistic simulations. The relative strength and the electron temperature dependence of the electron-phonon coupling of the metals composing the layered target are identified as major factors affecting the initial energy redistribution and the location of the region(s) undergoing transient melting and resolidification. The higher strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Cu, as compared to Au, results in a preferential sub-surface heating and melting of the Cu substrate, while the overlaying Au film largely retains its original crystalline structure. The large difference in the atomic mobility in the transiently melted and crystalline regions of the target makes it possible to connect the final distributions of the components in the resolidified targets to the history of the laser-induced melting process, thus allowing for experimental verification of the computational predictions.

  10. Atomistic modeling of femtosecond laser-induced melting and atomic mixing in Au film - Cu substrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Derek A.; Lin, Zhibin; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Kittel, Silke; Hergenröder, Roland

    2009-09-01

    The mechanisms of femtosecond laser-induced transient melting and atomic mixing in a target composed of a 30 nm Au film deposited on a bulk Cu substrate are investigated in a series of atomistic simulations. The relative strength and the electron temperature dependence of the electron-phonon coupling of the metals composing the layered target are identified as major factors affecting the initial energy redistribution and the location of the region(s) undergoing transient melting and resolidification. The higher strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Cu, as compared to Au, results in a preferential sub-surface heating and melting of the Cu substrate, while the overlaying Au film largely retains its original crystalline structure. The large difference in the atomic mobility in the transiently melted and crystalline regions of the target makes it possible to connect the final distributions of the components in the resolidified targets to the history of the laser-induced melting process, thus allowing for experimental verification of the computational predictions.

  11. Growth of amorphous zinc tin oxide films using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition from bis(1-dimethylamino-2-methyl-2propoxy)tin, diethylzinc, and oxygen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Byoung Kook; Jung, Eun Ae; Kim, Hyo-Suk; Kim, Seong Jun; Kim, Chang Gyoun; Chung, Taek-Mo; An, Ki-Seok

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous ZnSnOx (ZTO) films were prepared using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) in a temperature range of 100-200 °C. Metal-organic precursors of Sn(dmamp)2 (dmamp = bis(1-dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propoxide) and diethylzinc were employed as sources of Sn and Zn, respectively, in combination with O2 plasma as a reactant. Sn levels in the ZTO films were controlled by varying the SnO2/ZnO cycle ratio from 0 to 8. According to the growth behaviour of the ZTO film by alternating SnO2 and ZnO PEALD cycles, it was observed that ZnO growth on Sn-rich ZTO film is retarded, whereas SnO2 growth is enhanced on Zn-rich ZTO film. The chemical states of the ZTO films were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS); the chemical compositions of the ZTO films were characterised by XPS depth profiling. Grazing-angle X-ray diffraction revealed that the PEALD ZTO films possess an amorphous structure, irrespective of Sn levels from 20 to 59 at.%. ZTO films with intermediate Sn at.% exhibited smooth surface morphology compared to binary ZnO and SnO2 films. Additionally, the step coverage of a ZTO film deposited on hole pattern with an aspect ratio of 8 and opening diameter of 110 nm was about 93%, suggesting the realisation of self-limited growth.

  12. Hybrid functional IrO2-TiO2 thin film resistor prepared by atomic layer deposition for thermal inkjet printheads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Won-Sub KWACK; Hyoung-Seok MOON; Seong-Jun JEONG; Qi-min WANG; Se-Hun KWON

    2011-01-01

    IrO2-TiO2 thin films were prepared by atomic layer deposition using Ir(EtCp)(COD) and titanium isopropoxide (TTIP).in the IrO2-TiO2 thin films. The low temperature coefficient of resistance(TCR) values can be obtained by adopting IrO2-TiO2 composite thin films. Moreover, the change in the resistivity of lrO2-TiO2 thin films was below 10% even after O2 annealing process at 600 ℃. The step stress test results show that IrO2-TiO2 films have better characteristics than conventional TaN08 heater resistor.Therefore, IrO2-TiO2 composite thin films can be used as a heater resistor material in thermal inkjet printhead.

  13. Enhanced water vapor barrier properties for biopolymer films by polyelectrolyte multilayer and atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} double-coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Vaehae-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Biologinkuja 7, Espoo, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Salomaeki, Mikko [University of Turku, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Materials Chemistry and Chemical Analysis, Vatselankatu 2, FI-20014 (Finland); Areva, Sami [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biokatu 6, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Korhonen, Juuso T. [Aalto University School of Science, Department of Applied Physics, P.O. Box 15100 FI-00076 AALTO, Espoo (Finland); Karppinen, Maarit [Aalto University School of Chemical Technology, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 AALTO, Espoo (Finland)

    2011-09-01

    Commercial polylactide (PLA) films are coated with a thin (20 nm) non-toxic polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) film made from sodium alginate and chitosan and additionally with a 25-nm thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The double-coating of PEM + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is found to significantly enhance the water vapor barrier properties of the PLA film. The improvement is essentially larger compared with the case the PLA film being just coated with an ALD-grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The enhanced water vapor barrier characteristics of the PEM + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} double-coated PLA films are attributed to the increased hydrophobicity of the surface of these films.

  14. Surface structures from low energy electron diffraction: Atoms, small molecules and an ordered ice film on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materer, N.F.

    1995-09-01

    We investigated the surface bonding of various adsorbates (0, S, C{sub 2}H{sub 3} and NO) along with the resulting relaxation of the Pt(111) surface using low energy electron diffiraction (LEED). LEED experiments have been performed on these ordered overlayers along with theoretical structural analysis using automated tensor LEED (ATLEED). The resulting surface structures of these ordered overlayers exhibit similar adsorbate-induced relaxations. In all cases the adsorbate occupies the fcc hollow site and induces an approximately 0.1 A buckling of the metal surface. The three metal atoms directly bonded to the adsorbate are ``pulled`` out of the surface and the metal atom that is not bound to the adsorbate is `pushed`` inward. In order to understand the reliability of such details, we have carried out a comprehensive study of various non-structural parameters used in a LEED computation. We also studied the adsorption of water on the Pt(lll) surface. We ordered an ultra thin ice film on this surface. The film`s surface is found to be the (0001) face of hexagonal ice. This surface is apparently terminated by a full-bilayer, in which the uppermost water molecules have large vibrational amplitudes even at temperatures as low as 90 K. We examined two other metal surfaces besides Pt(111): Ni(111) and Fe(lll). On Ni(111), we have studied the surface under a high coverage of NO. On both Ni(111) and Pt(111) NO molecules occupy the hollow sites and the N-0 bond distances are practically identical. The challenging sample preparation of an Fe(111) surface has been investigated and a successful procedure has been obtained. The small interlayer spacing found on Fe(111) required special treatment in the LEED calculations. A new ATLEED program has been developed to handle this surface.

  15. Atomic mapping of Ruddlesden-Popper faults in transparent conducting BaSnO3-based thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W Y; Tang, Y L; Zhu, Y L; Suriyaprakash, J; Xu, Y B; Liu, Y; Gao, B; Cheong, S-W; Ma, X L

    2015-11-03

    Doped BaSnO3 has arisen many interests recently as one of the promising transparent conducting oxides for future applications. Understanding the microstructural characteristics are crucial for the exploration of relevant devices. In this paper, we investigated the microstructural features of 0.001% La doped BaSnO3 thin film using both conventional and aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes. Contrast analysis shows high densities of Ruddlesden-Popper faults in the film, which are on {100} planes with translational displacements of 1/2a  . Atomic EELS element mappings reveal that the Ruddlesden-Popper faults are Ba-O layer terminated, and two kinds of kink structures at the Ruddlesden-Popper faults with different element distributions are also demonstrated. Quantitative analysis on lattice distortions of the Ruddlesden-Popper faults illustrates that the local lattice spacing poses a huge increment of 36%, indicating that large strains exist around the Ruddlesden-Popper faults in the film.

  16. An iron(II) diketonate-diamine complex as precursor for thin film fabrication by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratvold, Jon E.; Carraro, Giorgio; Barreca, Davide; Nilsen, Ola

    2015-08-01

    A new divalent Fe precursor has been explored for deposition of iron-containing thin films by atomic layer deposition and molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD). The Fe(II) β-diketonate-diamine complex, Fe(hfa)2TMEDA, (hfa = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionate, TMEDA = N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylethylenediamine) can be handled in air, and sublimation at 60 °C ensures a satisfactory vaporization rate. The reactivity of the precursor does not allow for direct reaction with water as co-reactant. Nevertheless, it reacts with carboxylic acids, resulting in organic-inorganic hybrid materials, and with ozone, yielding α-Fe2O3. The divalent oxidation state of iron was maintained during deposition when oxalic acid was used as co-reactant, demonstrating the first preservation of Fe(II) from precursor to film during an MLD process. A self-saturating growth mode was proven by in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, and the films were further characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  17. Effects of a Pretreatment on Al-Doped ZnO Thin Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Byoung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ju; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Hwang, Dae-Kue

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the electrical, structural, and optical properties of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films approximately 50 nm thick grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on glass substrates at 200 °C. An H2O pretreatment was conducted for all AZO samples. The electrical properties of the AZO thin film were improved after the pretreatment process. The Al doping concentrations were controlled by inserting an Al2O3 cycle after every "n" ZnO cycles while varying n from 99 to 16. As the doping concentration increases, the resistivity decreases and the optical band gap increases. When the Al2O3 cycle ratio is 5%, the electrical resistivity showed the lowest value of 4.66 x 10(-3) Ω cm. A carrier concentration of 1.10 x 10(20) cm(-3), and the optical transmittance exceeding 90% were obtained in the visible and near-infrared region. The thin film was strongly textured along the (100) direction in the X-ray diffraction patterns.

  18. Effect of dangling bonds of ultra-thin silicon film surface on electronic states of internal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji, E-mail: ejkamiyama@aol.com [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan); Sueoka, Koji, E-mail: sueoka@c.oka-pu.ac.jp [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    We investigate how dangling bonds at the surface of ultra-thin films affect electronic states inside the film by first principles calculation. In the calculation models, dangling bonds at the surface are directly treated, and the impact on the electronic states of the internal atoms was estimated. Models with a H-terminated surface at both sides have no state in the bandgap. Whereas, new states appear at around the midgap by removing terminated H at surfaces of one or both sides. These mid-gap states appear at all layers, the states of which decrease as the layer moves away from the surface with dangling bonds. The sum of local DOS corresponds to the number of dangling bonds of the model. If the activation rate is assumed as 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}, which is an ordinary value of thermal oxide passivation on Si (1 0 0) surface, volume concentration and surface concentration at the 18th layer from the surface in a 36-layer model are estimated to be 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, respectively. These numbers are comparable to the values, especially the dopant volume concentration of Si substrate used in current VLSI technology ({approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}). Therefore, the midgap states inside ultra-thin films may degrade performance of the FinFETs.

  19. Phase-change properties of GeSbTe thin films deposited by plasma-enchanced atomic layer depositon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sannian; Yao, Dongning; Song, Zhitang; Gao, Lina; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Le; Shen, Lanlan; Wu, Liangcai; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Yan; Feng, Songlin

    2015-02-01

    Phase-change access memory (PCM) appears to be the strongest candidate for next-generation high-density nonvolatile memory. The fabrication of ultrahigh-density PCM depends heavily on the thin-film growth technique for the phase-changing chalcogenide material. In this study, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) and GeSb8Te thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) method using Ge [(CH3)2 N]4, Sb [(CH3)2 N]3, Te(C4H9)2 as precursors and plasma-activated H2 gas as reducing agent of the metallorganic precursors. Compared with GST-based device, GeSb8Te-based device exhibits a faster switching speed and reduced reset voltage, which is attributed to the growth-dominated crystallization mechanism of the Sb-rich GeSb8Te films. These results show that ALD is an attractive method for preparation of phase-change materials.

  20. Effects of Substrate and Post-Growth Treatments on the Microstructure and Properties of ZnO Thin Films Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseman, Micah; Saadatkia, P.; Winarski, D. J.; Selim, F. A.; Leedy, K. D.; Tetlak, S.; Look, D. C.; Anwand, W.; Wagner, A.

    2016-12-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) thin films were synthesized by atomic layer deposition on silicon, quartz and sapphire substrates and characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, conductivity mapping, Hall effect measurements and positron annihilation spectroscopy. XRD showed that the as-grown films are of single-phase ZnO wurtzite structure and do not contain any secondary or impurity phases. The type of substrate was found to affect the orientation and degree of crystallinity of the films but had no effect on the defect structure or the transport properties of the films. High conductivity of 10-3 Ω cm, electron mobility of 20 cm2/Vs and carrier density of 1020 cm-3 were measured in most films. Thermal treatments in various atmospheres induced a large effect on the thickness, structure and electrical properties of the films. Annealing in a Zn and nitrogen environment at 400°C for 1 h led to a 16% increase in the thickness of the film; this indicates that Zn extracts oxygen atoms from the matrix and forms new layers of ZnO. On the other hand, annealing in a hydrogen atmosphere led to the emergence of an Al2O3 peak in the XRD pattern, which implies that hydrogen and Al atoms compete to occupy Zn sites in the ZnO lattice. Only ambient air annealing had an effect on film defect density and electrical properties, generating reductions in conductivity and electron mobility. Depth-resolved measurements of positron annihilation spectroscopy revealed short positron diffusion lengths and high concentrations of defects in all as-grown films. However, these defects did not diminish the electrical conductivity in the films.

  1. Tuning of undoped ZnO thin film via plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition and its application for an inverted polymer solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-jin Jin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the tuning of structural and optical properties of ZnO thin film and its correlation to the efficiency of inverted solar cell using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD. The sequential injection of DEZn and O2 plasma was employed for the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin film. As the growth temperature of ZnO film was increased from 100 °C to 300 °C, the crystallinity of ZnO film was improved from amorphous to highly ordered (002 direction ploy-crystal due to self crystallization. Increasing oxygen plasma time in PEALD process also introduces growing of hexagonal wurtzite phase of ZnO nanocrystal. Excess of oxygen plasma time induces enhanced deep level emission band (500 ∼ 700 nm in photoluminescence due to Zn vacancies and other defects. The evolution of structural and optical properties of PEALD ZnO films also involves in change of electrical conductivity by 3 orders of magnitude. The highly tunable PEALD ZnO thin films were employed as the electron conductive layers in inverted polymer solar cells. Our study indicates that both structural and optical properties rather than electrical conductivities of ZnO films play more important role for the effective charge collection in photovoltaic device operation. The ability to tune the materials properties of undoped ZnO films via PEALD should extend their functionality over the wide range of advanced electronic applications.

  2. Local atomic and electronic structure of LaCoO3 /SrTiO3 thin films by HAADF STEM and EELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, Albina; Hyuck Jang, Jae; Kim, Young-Min; Qiao, Liang; Biegalski, Michael

    2013-03-01

    For perovskite films with several competing functionalities, magnetic and electronic properties can be affected both by structural order parameters and chemical factors. For example, in LaCoO3 (LCO) thin films, magnetic and transport properties are strongly dependent on strain state and oxygen content. For this study, LCO thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition method with different thicknesses (2, 5, 15 unit cell and 20 nm thickness) on SrTiO3 substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the grown films have demonstrated that Co 3p edges shift up to 2 eV for 15 u.c. and 20 nm films, indicating possible presence of 2D electron gas. The structure of the 5 u.c and 15 u.c LCO films was examined. Atomic position mapping from STEM HAADF and BF images can reveal lattice parameter and octahedral tilt behavior with atomic resolution. BF STEM imaging showed that octahedral tilts were active in the 15 u.c. film but not in the 5 u.c. film. A complex pattern of O K fine structure evolution at the interface was observed; results of the deconvolution of different contributions to this behavior using advanced simulations, as well as data on oxygen vacancy mapping, will be presented. Research supported by the US DOE-BES, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, and through a user project supported by ORNL's ShaRE User Program.

  3. Determination of the Glass Transition Temperature of Freestanding and Supported Azo-Polymer Thin Films by Thermal Assisted Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernykh Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce and apply the method for determination of the glass transition temperature of the sub-100 nm thick freestanding and supported polymer films based on thermally assisted atomic force microscopy (AFM. In proposed approach changes of the phase of an oscillating AFM cantilever are used to determine glass transition temperature. An anomalous decrease of the glass transition temperature for both free-standing and supported azobenzene-functionalized polymer thin films is shown.

  4. Atomically flat interface between a single-terminated LaAlO3 substrate and SrTiO3 thin film is insulating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Liu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The surface termination of (100-oriented LaAlO3 (LAO single crystals was examined by atomic force microscopy and optimized to produce a single-terminated atomically flat surface by annealing. Then the atomically flat STO film was achieved on a single-terminated LAO substrate, which is expected to be similar to the n-type interface of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG, i.e., (LaO-(TiO2. Particularly, that can serve as a mirror structure for the typical 2DEG heterostructure to further clarify the origin of 2DEG. This newly developed interface was determined to be highly insulating. Additionally, this study demonstrates an approach to achieve atomically flat film growth based on LAO substrates.

  5. Influence of ion-to-atom ratio on the microstructure of evaporated molybdenum thin films grown using low energy argon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Praveen Kumar, E-mail: praveenyadav@rrcat.gov.in; Nayak, Maheswar; Rai, Sanjay Kumar; Lodha, Gyanendra Singh [X-ray Optics Section, Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Sant, Tushar; Sharma, Surinder Mohan [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mukherjee, Chandrachur [Mechanical and Optical Support Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2014-03-15

    The authors report the effect of argon ion to molybdenum atom ratio (r) on the microstructure of low energy (70 eV) argon ion assisted electron beam evaporated Mo thin films. Surface roughness, morphology, and crystallinity of Mo films are found to strongly depend on “r.” Increase of “r” from 0 to 100 induces gradual loss in crystallinity, reduction in surface roughness and systematic increase in density of the film. For “r” ∼ 100, average atomic density of the film approaches the bulk value (97%) with lowest surface roughness. Further, increasing “r” up to 170 reduces the atomic density, increases roughness, and increase in crystallinity induced by low energy Ar ion beam. The observed surface roughness and grain size determined by x-ray reflectivity and glancing incidence x-ray diffraction correlate well with atomic force microscopy measurements. This study demonstrates that for r = 100 one gets lowest roughness Mo film with highest density and nearly amorphous microstructure. The growth model is discussed by structural zone model.

  6. Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S. Lau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously, Lau (one of the authors pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

  7. Atomic layer deposition for fabrication of HfO2/Al2O3 thin films with high laser-induced damage thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yaowei; Pan, Feng; Zhang, Qinghua; Ma, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on the laser damage resistance of thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is rare. In this work, the ALD process for thin film generation was investigated using different process parameters such as various precursor types and pulse duration. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) was measured as a key property for thin films used as laser system components. Reasons for film damaged were also investigated. The LIDTs for thin films deposited by improved process parameters reached a higher level than previously measured. Specifically, the LIDT of the Al2O3 thin film reached 40 J/cm(2). The LIDT of the HfO2/Al2O3 anti-reflector film reached 18 J/cm(2), the highest value reported for ALD single and anti-reflect films. In addition, it was shown that the LIDT could be improved by further altering the process parameters. All results show that ALD is an effective film deposition technique for fabrication of thin film components for high-power laser systems.

  8. Room temperature atomic layerlike deposition of ZnS on organic thin films: Role of substrate functional groups and precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zhiwei; Walker, Amy V., E-mail: amy.walker@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, RL10, 800 W. Campbell Rd., Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The room temperature atomic layerlike deposition (ALLD) of ZnS on functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was investigated, using diethyl zinc (DEZ) and in situ generated H{sub 2}S as reactants. Depositions on SAMs with three different terminal groups, –CH{sub 3,} –OH, and –COOH, were studied. It was found that the reaction of DEZ with the SAM terminal group is critical in determining the film growth rate. Little or no deposition is observed on –CH{sub 3} terminated SAMs because DEZ does not react with the methyl terminal group. ZnS does deposit on both –OH and –COOH terminated SAMs, but the grow rate on –COOH terminated SAMs is ∼10% lower per cycle than on –OH terminated SAMs. DEZ reacts with the hydroxyl group on –OH terminated SAMs, while on –COOH terminated SAMs it reacts with both the hydroxyl and carbonyl bonds of the terminal groups. The carbonyl reaction is found to lead to the formation of ketones rather than deposition of ZnS, lowering the growth rate on –COOH terminated SAMs. SIMS spectra show that both –OH and –COOH terminated SAMs are covered by the deposited ZnS layer after five ALLD cycles. In contrast to ZnO ALLD where the composition of the film differs for the first few layers on –COOH and –OH terminated SAMs, the deposited film composition is the same for both –COOH and –OH terminated SAMs. The deposited film is found to be Zn-rich, suggesting that the reaction of H{sub 2}S with the Zn-surface adduct may be incomplete.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of boron-containing films using B{sub 2}F{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, Anil U., E-mail: amane@anl.gov; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60126 (United States); Goldberg, Alexander; Halls, Mathew D. [Schrödinger, Inc., San Diego, California 92122 (United States); Seidel, Thomas E. [Seitek50, Palm Coast, Florida 32135 (United States); Current, Michael I. [Current Scientific, San Jose, California 95124 (United States); Despres, Joseph; Byl, Oleg; Tang, Ying; Sweeney, Joseph [Entegris, Danbury, Connecticut 06810 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Ultrathin and conformal boron-containing atomic layer deposition (ALD) films could be used as a shallow dopant source for advanced transistor structures in microelectronics manufacturing. With this application in mind, diboron tetrafluoride (B{sub 2}F{sub 4}) was explored as an ALD precursor for the deposition of boron containing films. Density functional theory simulations for nucleation on silicon (100) surfaces indicated better reactivity of B{sub 2}F{sub 4} in comparison to BF{sub 3}. Quartz crystal microbalance experiments exhibited growth using either B{sub 2}F{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD, or B{sub 2}F{sub 4}-disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) for B ALD, but in both cases, the initial growth per cycle was quite low (≤0.2 Å/cycle) and decreased to near zero growth after 8–30 ALD cycles. However, alternating between B{sub 2}F{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O and trimethyl aluminum (TMA)-H{sub 2}O ALD cycles resulted in sustained growth at ∼0.65 Å/cycle, suggesting that the dense –OH surface termination produced by the TMA-H{sub 2}O combination enhances the uptake of B{sub 2}F{sub 4} precursor. The resultant boron containing films were analyzed for composition by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and capacitance measurements indicated an insulating characteristic. Finally, diffused boron profiles less than 100 Å were obtained after rapid thermal anneal of the boron containing ALD film.

  10. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoops, Harm C. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Bristol BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Peuter, K. de; Kessels, W. M. M., E-mail: h.c.m.knoops@tue.nl, E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-07-06

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiN{sub x} by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiN{sub x} by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called “redeposition effect”. This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiN{sub x} ALD using SiH{sub 2}(NH{sup t}Bu){sub 2} as precursor and N{sub 2} plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiN{sub x} film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  11. On the solid phase crystallization of In2O3:H transparent conductive oxide films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macco, Bart; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Black, Lachlan E.; Barcones, Beatriz; Melskens, J.; Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen-doped indium oxide (In2O3:H) has emerged as a highly transparent and conductive oxide, finding its application in a multitude of optoelectronic devices. Recently, we have reported on an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process to prepare high quality In2O3:H. This process consists of ALD of In2O3:H films at 100 °C, followed by a solid phase crystallization step at 150-200 °C. In this work, we report on a detailed electron microscopy study of this crystallization process which reveals new insights into the crucial aspects for achieving the large grain size and associated excellent properties of the material. The key finding is that the best optoelectronic properties are obtained by preparing the films at the lowest possible temperature prior to post-deposition annealing. Electron microscopy imaging shows that such films are mostly amorphous, but feature a very low density of embedded crystallites. Upon post-deposition annealing, crystallization proceeds merely from isotropic crystal grain growth of these embedded crystallites rather than by the formation of additional crystallites. The relatively high hydrogen content of 4.2 at. % in these films is thought to cause the absence of additional nucleation, thereby rendering the final grain size and optoelectronic properties solely dependent on the density of embedded crystallites. The temperature-dependent grain growth rate has been determined, from which an activation energy of (1.39 ± 0.04) eV has been extracted. Finally, on the basis of the observed crystallization mechanism, a simple model to fully describe the crystallization process has been developed. This model has been validated with a numerical implementation thereof, which accurately predicts the observed temperature-dependent crystallization behaviour.

  12. Designing quantum-information-processing superconducting qubit circuits that exhibit lasing and other atomic-physics-like phenomena on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting (SC) circuits can behave like atoms making transitions between a few energy levels. Such circuits can test quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales and be used to conduct atomic-physics experiments on a silicon chip. This talk overviews a few of our theoretical studies on SC circuits and quantum information processing (QIP) including: SC qubits for single photon generation and for lasing; controllable couplings among qubits; how to increase the coherence time of qubits using a capacitor in parallel to one of the qubit junctions; hybrid circuits involving both charge and flux qubits; testing Bell's inequality in SC circuits; generation of GHZ states; quantum tomography in SC circuits; preparation of macroscopic quantum superposition states of a cavity field via coupling to a SC qubit; generation of nonclassical photon states using a SC qubit in a microcavity; scalable quantum computing with SC qubits; and information processing with SC qubits in a microwave field. Controllable couplings between qubits can be achieved either directly or indirectly. This can be done with and without coupler circuits, and with and without data-buses like EM fields in cavities (e.g., we will describe both the variable-frequency magnetic flux approach and also a generalized double-resonance approach that we introduced). It is also possible to ``turn a quantum bug into a feature'' by using microscopic defects as qubits, and the macroscopic junction as a controller of it. We have also studied ways to implement radically different approaches to QIP by using ``cluster states'' in SC circuits. For a general overview of this field, see, J.Q. You and F. Nori, Phys. Today 58 (11), 42 (2005)

  13. Optimized Coplanar Waveguide Resonators for a Superconductor-Atom Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, M A; Booth, D; Pritchard, J D; Saffman, M; McDermott, R

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide cavities tailored to facilitate strong coupling between superconducting quantum circuits and single trapped Rydberg atoms. For initial superconductor-atom experiments at 4.2 K, we show that resonator quality factors above $10^4$ can be readily achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the incorporation of thick-film copper electrodes at a voltage antinode of the resonator provides a route to enhance the zero-point electric fields of the resonator in a trapping region that is 40 $\\mu$m above the chip surface, thereby minimizing chip heating from scattered trap light. The combination of high resonator quality factor and strong electric dipole coupling between the resonator and the atom should make it possible to achieve the strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics with this system.

  14. Absorption Measurement of Zn Atom Density during ICP-assisted Magnetron Sputter-deposition of Al-doped ZnO Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the outlines of hollow cathode (HCD) lamp absorption system for the density measurement of sputtered metal atoms in the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted sputter-deposition process of Al doped ZnO thin films. As a result, absorbance of about 6.5% was obtained, which corresponds to the Zn atom density of 1.5×1012 cm-3.

  15. The interface between Gd2O3 films and Ge(001): A comparative study between molecular and atomic oxygen mediated growths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Alessandro; Perego, Michele; Bhuiyan, Md. Nurul Kabir; Wiemer, Claudia; Tallarida, Grazia; Fanciulli, Marco

    2007-08-01

    The interface properties of thin Gd2O3 films grown on Ge(001) are studied as a function of the oxidizing species used during the deposition. The mediation of molecular oxygen during growth produces a crystalline oxide with an atomically sharp and contamination-free interface on the Ge substrate. Conversely, an interface layer of substoichiometric germanium oxide occurs whenever atomic oxygen radicals are used. The two different Gd2O3/Ge interfacial configurations are discussed basing on thermodynamic arguments.

  16. High-performance solid-state on-chip supercapacitors based on Si nanowires coated with ruthenium oxide via atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen; Cheng, Qingmei; Wang, Dunwei; Thompson, Carl V.

    2017-02-01

    Solid-state on-chip supercapacitors based on ruthenium oxide coated silicon nanowires were fabricated using a process that is compatible with silicon integrated circuit processing. Ordered arrays of silicon nanowires were fabricated using metal-assisted anodic etching (MAAE). Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to form a uniform coating of ruthenium oxide on high-aspect-ratio silicon nanowires at a moderate temperature of 290 °C. Coated nanowire electrodes were studied using cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge tests in a neutral Na2SO4 electrolyte, and a specific capacitance of 19 mFcm-2 was achieved at 5 mVs-1. Solid state nanowire capacitors were then fabricated with symmetric face to face nanowire arrays separated by a polymer-based electrolyte. This device exhibited a specific capacitance as high as 6.5 mFcm-2 at 2 mVs-1. The full device was tested over 10000 cycles under galvanostatic charge-discharge at 0.4 mAcm-2, and showed a retention of 92% of the specific capacitance. The specific capacitance was found to scale with the total nanowire surface area, as controlled by controlling the aspect ratios of the wires. The solid state nanowire-based device also achieved high specific energies without sacrificing power performance.

  17. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature-Part II Simulation of CVD diamond film growth in C-H system and in Cl-containing systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100}-oriented CVD diamond film under two modifications of J-B-H model at low substrate temperatures was simulated by using a revised KMC method at atomic scale. The results were compared both in Cl-containing systems and in C-H system as follows: (1) Substrate temperature can produce an important effect both on film deposition rate and on surface roughness; (2) Aomic Cl takes an active role for the growth of diamond film at low temperatures; (3) {100}-oriented diamond film cannot deposit under single carbon insertion mechanism, which disagrees with the predictions before; (4) The explanation of the exact role of atomic Cl is not provided in the simulation results.

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy Studies on the Chemical Treatment of Nanocrystalline Porous TiO2 Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    AFM has been utilized to study the surface topography and the local conductivity of nanocrystalline TiO2 films. Improving the local conductivity by Ti(iso-C3H7O)4 treatment is characterized by quantitative analysis of the simultaneous current image. The mechanism of Ti(iso C3H7O)4 treatment is discussed.

  19. Hydrophilization of Poly(ether ether ketone) Films by Surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Eskimergen, Rüya; Burkrinsky, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    -modified PEEK using Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI ATRP). Surface reduction of PEEK to form hydroxyl groups [1, 2, 3] was .performed prior to the attachment of 2-bromoisobutyrate initiating groups. Each modification step of PEEK as well as the polymer grafting was followed...... and confirmed by ATR FTIR, water contact ang;le, and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The surface topography was evaluated by "Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the degree of functionalization. The performed modification allowed for successful...

  20. Hydrophilization of Poly(ether ether ketone) Films by Surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Eskimergen, Rüya; Burkrinsky, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    -modified PEEK using Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI ATRP). Surface reduction of PEEK to form hydroxyl groups [1, 2, 3] was .performed prior to the attachment of 2-bromoisobutyrate initiating groups. Each modification step of PEEK as well as the polymer grafting was followed...... and confirmed by ATR FTIR, water contact ang;le, and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The surface topography was evaluated by "Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the degree of functionalization. The performed modification allowed for successful...

  1. Study of atomic layer deposition of indium oxy-sulfide films for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugot, Cathy, E-mail: cathy-externe.bugot@edf.fr [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP, UMR 7174 CNRS-EDF-Chimie Paristech), Chatou (France); Schneider, Nathanaelle [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP, UMR 7174 CNRS-EDF-Chimie Paristech), Chatou (France); Bouttemy, Muriel; Etcheberry, Arnaud [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180 (CNRS-UVSQ), Versailles (France); Lincot, Daniel; Donsanti, Frédérique [Institut de Recherche et Développement sur l' Energie Photovoltaïque (IRDEP, UMR 7174 CNRS-EDF-Chimie Paristech), Chatou (France)

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores the growth mechanism of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of In{sub 2}(S,O){sub 3} films. The films were deposited using indium acetylacetonate (In(acac){sub 3}), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and Ar/O{sub 2} plasma as oxygen precursor. The films were characterized using X-ray reflectometry, spectrophotometry, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To understand the growth mechanism and especially the interactions between Ar/O{sub 2} plasma and In{sub 2}(S,O){sub 3} growing film, in-situ analyses were performed using quadrupole mass spectrometry. In-situ qualitative analysis revealed good correlation between the species detected in vapor phase and thin film properties. High concentrations of atomic and molecular oxygen were measured in the vapor phase during O{sub 2} plasma pulses. Significant decrease of these species could be observed by varying the plasma power from 2600 to 300 W, while the optical band gap remained at high values (> 2.6 eV). The analysis of the O{sub 2}-free/Ar plasma process showed that some of these oxygen species originate either from the indium precursor or from the substrate surface. This study explains the high oxygen content of the films, and allows us to reduce and control it. Generally, this report provides keys to understand the effect of plasma reactivity for the elaboration of oxide based materials. - Highlights: • In{sub 2}(S,O){sub 3} films were synthesized by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. • Growth mechanism was studied via gas phase analysis by Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry. • Good correlation between the vapor phase species and thin films properties was observed. • The film compositions and band gaps can be controlled by varying the plasma power.

  2. Tuning the Dirac cone of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films by substitutional nonmagnetic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenliang; Zhang, Zhen [Hunan Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology and Faculty of Materials and Optoelectronic Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Peng, Xiangyang, E-mail: xiangyang_peng@xtu.edu.cn [Hunan Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology and Faculty of Materials and Optoelectronic Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Zhong, Jianxin, E-mail: jxzhong@xtu.edu.cn [Hunan Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Energy Materials and Devices, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Laboratory for Quantum Engineering and Micro-Nano Energy Technology and Faculty of Materials and Optoelectronic Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China)

    2015-01-01

    Based on first‐principles calculations, it is found that the Dirac cone of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film, which is buried in the bulk valence bands, can be tuned by the substitutional nonmagnetic atoms. It is found that substituting the Bi layer at the two ends of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films with group III atoms Al, Ga, In and Tl, which have lower electronegativity than Bi atoms, can lead to an isolated Dirac cone with the Dirac point shifted into the bulk band gap and located on the Fermi level. Substituting the more electronegative Se, S and O atoms for Te atoms at the top and bottom layers of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film, only the most electronegative O atoms give rise to a nearly ideal Dirac cone. The charge distribution of the resulting isolated Dirac point state is concentrated at the Te layers facing the van der Waals layers and vanishes in the middle of the quintuple layers.

  3. Growth of zinc sulfide thin films on (100)Si with the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method studied by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkonen, Mika P.; Lindroos, Seppo; Resch, Roland; Leskelä, Markku; Friedbacher, Gernot; Grasserbauer, Manfred

    1998-10-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin films were grown on (100)Si substrates from solution with the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. Aqueous solutions of ZnCl 2 and Na 2S were used as precursors. The morphological development of the films with increasing number of SILAR cycles was monitored ex situ by atomic force microscopy (AFM) operated in tapping mode. Their roughness increased vs. the growth cycles. AFM studies on (100)Si substrates treated with Na 2S solution revealed that the dissolution of the silicon substrates is a process competing with the thin film growth and has to be considered when interpreting the AFM images.

  4. Polymerized LB Films Imaged with a Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Fluorescence Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined

  5. Atomic-Resolution Observations of Semi-Crystalline IntegranularThin Films in Silicon Nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, Alexander; Idrobo, Juan C.; Cinibulk, Michael K.; Kisielowski, Christian; Browning, Nigel D.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2005-08-01

    The thin intergranular phase in a silicon nitride (Si3N4)ceramic, which has been regarded for decades as having an entirely amorphous morphology, is shown to have a semi-crystalline structure. Using two different but complementary high-resolution electron microscopy methods, the intergranular atomic structure was directly imaged at the atomic level. These high-resolution images show that the atomic arrangement of the dopand element cerium takes very periodic positions not only along the interface between the intergranular phase and the Si3N4 matrix grains, but it arranges in a semi-crystalline structure that spans the entire width of the intergranular phase between two adjacent matrix grains, in principle connecting the two separate matrix grains. The result will have implications on the approach of understanding the materials properties of ceramics, most significantly on the mechanical properties and the associated computational modeling of the atomic structure of the thin intergranular phase in Si3N4 ceramics.

  6. Hydrophilization of poly(ether ether ketone) films by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI-ATRP) has been exploited to hydrophilize PEEK. The ketone groups on the PEEK surface were reduced to hydroxyl groups which were converted to bromoisobutyrate initiating sites for SI-ATRP. The modification steps were followed by contact...

  7. Polymerized LB films imaged with a combined atomic force microscope-fluorescence microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined microsc

  8. Enzymatic degradation of polyester films by a cutinase-like enzyme from Pseudozyma antarctica: surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Yukiko; Kikkawa, Yoshihiro; Sato, Shun; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Watanabe, Takashi; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Kitamoto, Hiroko K

    2013-10-01

    Enzymatic degradation of polyester films by a cutinase-like enzyme from Pseudozyma antarctica JCM10317 (PaE) was analyzed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The adsorption of PaE and the degradation rate for polyester films were quantitatively monitored by a positive and negative SPR signal shifts, respectively. The decrease in SPR signal and the erosion depth of amorphous poly(L-lactide) (a-PLLA) film measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) had a linear relationship, and the weight loss was estimated from the AFM data combined with a density of a-PLLA film. Furthermore, SPR sensorgrams for various polyester films showed that degradation rate of poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) which contain C6 units was higher than that of other polyesters such as poly(butylene succinate) and a-PLLA. These results suggest that C6 is the preferred chain length as substrates for PaE.

  9. Bi-layer Channel AZO/ZnO Thin Film Transistors Fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijin; Han, Dedong; Liu, Liqiao; Dong, Junchen; Cui, Guodong; Zhang, Shengdong; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yi

    2017-12-01

    This letter demonstrates bi-layer channel Al-doped ZnO/ZnO thin film transistors (AZO/ZnO TFTs) via atomic layer deposition process at a relatively low temperature. The effects of annealing in oxygen atmosphere at different temperatures have also been investigated. The ALD bi-layer channel AZO/ZnO TFTs annealed in dry O2 at 300 °C exhibit a low leakage current of 2.5 × 10(-13)A, I on/I off ratio of 1.4 × 10(7), subthreshold swing (SS) of 0.23 V/decade, and high transmittance. The enhanced performance obtained from the bi-layer channel AZO/ZnO TFT devices is explained by the inserted AZO front channel layer playing the role of the mobility booster.

  10. Bi-layer Channel AZO/ZnO Thin Film Transistors Fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijin; Han, Dedong; Liu, Liqiao; Dong, Junchen; Cui, Guodong; Zhang, Shengdong; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    This letter demonstrates bi-layer channel Al-doped ZnO/ZnO thin film transistors (AZO/ZnO TFTs) via atomic layer deposition process at a relatively low temperature. The effects of annealing in oxygen atmosphere at different temperatures have also been investigated. The ALD bi-layer channel AZO/ZnO TFTs annealed in dry O2 at 300 °C exhibit a low leakage current of 2.5 × 10-13A, I on/ I off ratio of 1.4 × 107, subthreshold swing (SS) of 0.23 V/decade, and high transmittance. The enhanced performance obtained from the bi-layer channel AZO/ZnO TFT devices is explained by the inserted AZO front channel layer playing the role of the mobility booster.

  11. Si surface passivation by Al2O3 thin films deposited using a low thermal budget atomic layer deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguini, G.; Cianci, E.; Wiemer, C.; Perego, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza MB (Italy); Saynova, D.; Van Roosmalen, J.A.M. [ECN Solar Energy, Westerduinweg 3, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-04-05

    High-quality surface passivation of crystalline Si is achieved using 10 nm thick Al2O3 films fabricated by thermal atomic layer deposition at 100C. After a 5 min post deposition annealing at 200C, the effective carrier lifetime is 1 ms, indicating a functional level of surface passivation. The interplay between the chemical and the field effect passivation is investigated monitoring the density of interface traps and the amount of fixed charges with conductance-voltage and capacitance-voltage techniques. The physical mechanisms underlying the surface passivation are described. The combination of low processing temperatures, thin layers, and good passivation properties facilitate a technology for low-temperature solar cells.

  12. Photoluminescence associated with basal stacking faults in c-plane ZnO epitaxial film grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.; Kuo, C. C.; Hsieh, W. F. [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Liu, W.-R. [Scientific Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Lin, B. H. [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Scientific Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Hsu, H.-C. [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Hsu, C.-H. [Scientific Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-05

    Basal plane stacking faults (BSFs) with density of {approx}1 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -1} are identified as the dominant defect in the annealed ZnO thin films grown on c-plane sapphire by atomic layer deposition. The dominant peak centered at 3.321 eV in low-temperature photoluminescence measurements is attributed to the emission from the BSFs. The emission mechanism is considered to be the confined indirect excitons in the region of quantum-well-like structure formed by the BSFs. The observed energy shift of 19 meV with respect to the BSF-bounded exciton at low temperature may be caused by the localization effect associated with the coupling between BSF quantum wells.

  13. Electron transport in dodecylamine capped gold nanocluster films using current sensing atomic force microscope (C-AFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Minakshi; Dey, Shirshendu; Date, Kalyani; Iyyer, S B; Dharmadhikaril, C V

    2009-09-01

    Electron transport across cataphoretically deposited dodecylamine capped gold nanocluster rough films on Si(111) substrate is investigated using current sensing atomic force microscopy. Contact mode images depict uniform deposition of agglomerates of gold nanoparticles. The current images display strong correlation with topographic images. The I-V measurement on a single agglomerate of approximately = 250 nm size at different forces exhibits force dependent threshold voltage. The electron transport from tip to sample is found to be ohmic in contrast to that from sample to tip which, exhibits Fowler-Nordheim behavior up to 35 nN force. At higher forces, the I-V behavior could be attributed to other electron transfer processes such as Schottky/Poole-Frenkel or trapping/detrapping, although no exact mechanism could be identified. The results are discussed in the light of models based on Coulomb blockaded collective charge transport in nanoparticle arrays duly accounting for the potential role of the capping layer.

  14. Suppression of conductivity deterioration of copper thin films by coating with atomic-layer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuong, Nguyen Thanh; Okada, Susumu

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical calculations are performed to explore the electronic structures and electron conducting properties of copper (Cu) thin films coated with graphene or h-boron-nitride (h-BN) layers. The Shockley surface states of Cu surfaces are preserved by the graphene and h-BN coatings which prevent the surface oxidation of Cu because of the weak interaction between the Cu surface and graphene or the h-BN layers. Furthermore, the Shockley surface states in Cu thin films possess quasi-two dimensional free-electron characteristics and exhibit a high conductivity of 1.62 × 107 (Ωm)-1 at room temperature. These hybrid structures may be suitable as interconnects in memory devices that can stably store data for long periods.

  15. Evaluation of Adhesive Properties in Polymeric Thin Film by Ultrasonic Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Dong Ryul; Park, Tae Sung; Park, Ik Keun; Mryasaka, Chiaki [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    This study presents the assessment results of adhesive properties on the interface between a silicon wafer and nano-scale polymer thin film pattern through UAFM images by using the contact resonance frequency of the cantilever. For the experiment, we varied surface treatment processes for the silicon wafer and fabricated a 300nm polymer thin film pattern through lithography. Images from the optical microscope were used to compare the produced test specimens for adhesive condition and the critical load value from the nano scratch test was used to verify the adhesive condition of the nano pattern. Each test specimen resulted in a 1{mu}mx1{mu}m surface image and subsurface adhesive image. Adhesive condition was evaluated by image contrast differences on the interface according to the changing amplitudes and phases of contact resonance frequency.

  16. Microchannel plate fabrication using glass capillary arrays with Atomic Layer Deposition films for resistance and gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popecki, M. A.; Adams, B.; Craven, C. A.; Cremer, T.; Foley, M. R.; Lyashenko, A.; O'Mahony, A.; Minot, M. J.; Aviles, M.; Bond, J. L.; Stochaj, M. E.; Worstell, W.; Elam, J. W.; Mane, A. U.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Ertley, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Granoff, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) have been used for many years in space flight instrumentation as fast, lightweight electron multipliers. A new MCP fabrication method combines a glass substrate composed of hollow glass capillary arrays with thin film coatings to provide the resistive and secondary electron emissive properties. Using this technique, the gain, resistance, and glass properties may be chosen independently. Large-area MCPs are available at moderate cost. Secondary emission films of Al2O3 and MgO provide sustained high gain as charge is extracted from the MCP. Long lifetimes are possible, and a total extracted charge of 7 C/cm2 has been demonstrated. Background rates are low because the glass substrate has little radioactive potassium 40. Curved MCPs are easily fabricated with this technique to suit instrument symmetries, simplifying secondary electron steering and smoothing azimuthal efficiency.

  17. The Growth of Gallium Nitride Films via the Innovative Technique of Atomic Layer Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    6 3.2 Aluminum Nitride and AIN/GaN Layered Structures ............ 8 3.3 Boron Nitride and BGaN Graded...of tearing in lower left region, indirectly indicating the presence of multiple layers of BGaN ............................... 14 12. Auger electron...electron spectroscopy sputtered depth profile of a BN/ BGaN /GaN/P-SiC film. Note peak in nitrogen trace as interface of BN is passed

  18. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-12-16

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction.

  19. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Okabe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna. In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT, the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction.

  20. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS{sub 2} films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Gene; Venkata Subbaiah, Y. P.; Prestgard, Megan C.; Tiwari, Ashutosh, E-mail: tiwari@eng.utah.edu [Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns) was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS{sub 2} target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001) substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10{sup −6} Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The ablation of the MoS{sub 2} target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}) was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS{sub 2} as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A{sub 1g} and E{sup 1}{sub 2g} peaks were observed at 404.6 cm{sup −1} and 384.5 cm{sup −1} with a spacing of 20.1 cm{sup −1}, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV) and 615 nm (2.02 eV), with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS{sub 2} exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n) in the MoS{sub 2} films increases, the spacing between the A{sub 1g} and E{sup 1}{sub 2g} Raman peaks (Δf) increases following an empirical relation, Δf=26.45−(15.42)/(1+1.44 n{sup 0.9}) cm{sup −1}.

  1. Effects of Annealing Ambient on the Characteristics of LaAlO3 Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Liu, Hong-xia; Wang, Xing; Fei, Chen-xi; Feng, Xing-yao; Wang, Yong-te

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effects of different annealing ambients on the physical and electrical properties of LaAlO3 films grown by atomic layer deposition. Post-grown rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was carried out at 600 °C for 1 min in vacuum, N2, and O2, respectively. It was found that the chemical bonding states at the interfacial layers (ILs) between LaAlO3 films and Si substrate were affected by the different annealing ambients. The formation of IL was enhanced during the RTA process, resulting in the decrease of accumulation capacitance, especially in O2 ambient. Furthermore, based on the capacitance-voltage characteristics of LaAlO3/Si MIS capacitors, positive V FB shifting tendency could be observed, indicating the decrease of positive oxide charges. Meanwhile, both trapped charge density and interface trap density showed decreased trends after annealing treatments. In addition, RTA process in various gaseous ambients can reduce the gate leakage current due to the enhancement of valence band offset and the reduction of defects in the LaAlO3/Si structure in varying degrees.

  2. Atomic Scale Interface Manipulation, Structural Engineering, and Their Impact on Ultrathin Carbon Films in Controlling Wear, Friction, and Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Yak, Leonard J K; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Dhand, Chetna; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2016-07-13

    Reducing friction, wear, and corrosion of diverse materials/devices using manipulation to engineer and control the friction, wear, corrosion, and structural characteristics of 0.7-1.7 nm carbon-based films on CoCrPt:oxide-based magnetic media. We demonstrate that when an atomically thin (∼0.5 nm) chromium nitride (CrNx) layer is sandwiched between the magnetic media and an ultrathin carbon overlayer (1.2 nm), it modifies the film-substrate interface, creates various types of interfacial bonding, increases the interfacial adhesion, and tunes the structure of carbon in terms of its sp(3) bonding. These contribute to its remarkable functional properties, such as stable and lowest coefficient of friction (∼0.15-0.2), highest wear resistance and better corrosion resistance despite being only ∼1.7 nm thick, surpassing those of ∼2.7 nm thick current commercial carbon overcoat (COC) and other overcoats in this work. While this approach has direct implications for advancing current magnetic storage technology with its ultralow thickness, it can also be applied to advance the protective and barrier capabilities of other ultrathin materials for associated technologies.

  3. Nanoscale semiconductor Pb1-xSnxSe (x = 0.2) thin films synthesized by electrochemical atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaoxiong; Zhang, Xin; Shi, Xuezhao; Wei, Jinping; Lu, Daban; Zhang, Yuzhen; Kou, Huanhuan; Wang, Chunming

    2011-04-01

    In this paper the fabrication and characterization of IV-VI semiconductor Pb1-xSnxSe (x = 0.2) thin films on gold substrate by electrochemical atomic layer deposition (EC-ALD) method at room temperature are reported. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is used to determine approximate deposition potentials for each element. The amperometric I-t technique is used to fabricate the semiconductor alloy. The elements are deposited in the following sequence: (Se/Pb/Se/Pb/Se/Pb/Se/Pb/Se/Sn …), each period is formed using four ALD cycles of PbSe followed by one cycle of SnSe. Then the deposition manner above is cyclic repeated till a satisfactory film with expected thickness of Pb1-xSnxSe is obtained. The morphology of the deposit is observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern is used to study its crystalline structure; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the deposit indicates an approximate ratio 1.0:0.8:0.2 of Se, Pb and Sn, as the expected stoichiometry for the deposit. Open-circuit potential (OCP) studies indicate a good p-type property, and the good optical activity makes it suitable for fabricating a photoelectric switch.

  4. Influence of different oxidants on the band alignment of HfO2 films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Ji-Bin; Liu Hong-Xia; Gao Bo; Ma Fei; Zhuo Qing-Qing; Hao Yue

    2012-01-01

    Based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),influences of different oxidants on band alignment of HfO2 films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are investigated in this paper.The measured valence band offset (VBO) value for H2O-based HfO2 increases from 3.17 eV to 3.32 eV after annealing,whereas the VBO value for O3-based HfO2 decreases from 3.57 eV to 3.46 eV.The research results indicate that the silicate layer changes in different ways for H2O-based and O3-based HfO2 films after the annealing process,which plays a key role in generating the internal electric field formed by the dipoles.The variations of the dipoles at the interface between the HfO2 and SiO2 after annealing may lead the VBO values of H2O-based and O3-based HfO2 to vary in different ways,which fits with the variation of fiat band (VFB) voltage.

  5. Copper Benzenetricarboxylate Metal-Organic Framework Nucleation Mechanisms on Metal Oxide Powders and Thin Films formed by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Paul C; Zhao, Junjie; Williams, Philip S; Walls, Howard J; Shepherd, Sarah D; Losego, Mark D; Peterson, Gregory W; Parsons, Gregory N

    2016-04-13

    Chemically functional microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals are attractive for filtration and gas storage applications, and recent results show that they can be immobilized on high surface area substrates, such as fiber mats. However, fundamental knowledge is still lacking regarding initial key reaction steps in thin film MOF nucleation and growth. We find that thin inorganic nucleation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) can promote solvothermal growth of copper benzenetricarboxylate MOF (Cu-BTC) on various substrate surfaces. The nature of the ALD material affects the MOF nucleation time, crystal size and morphology, and the resulting MOF surface area per unit mass. To understand MOF nucleation mechanisms, we investigate detailed Cu-BTC MOF nucleation behavior on metal oxide powders and Al2O3, ZnO, and TiO2 layers formed by ALD on polypropylene substrates. Studying both combined and sequential MOF reactant exposure conditions, we find that during solvothermal synthesis ALD metal oxides can react with the MOF metal precursor to form double hydroxy salts that can further convert to Cu-BTC MOF. The acidic organic linker can also etch or react with the surface to form MOF from an oxide metal source, which can also function as a nucleation agent for Cu-BTC in the mixed solvothermal solution. We discuss the implications of these results for better controlled thin film MOF nucleation and growth.

  6. Atom-probe tomography of tribological boundary films resulting from boron-based oil additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Baik, Sung-Il; Bertolucci-Coelho, Leonardo; Mazzaferro, Lucca; Ramirez, Giovanni; Erdemir, Ali; Seidman, D K

    2016-01-15

    Correlative characterization using atom-probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on a tribofilm formed during sliding frictional testing with a fully formulated engine oil, which also contains a boron-based additive. The tribofilm formed is ~15 nm thick and consists of oxides of iron and compounds of B, Ca, P, and S, which are present in the additive. This study provides strong evidence for boron being embedded in the tribofilm, which effectively reduces friction and wear losses.

  7. Atomically flat surface of (0 0 1) textured FePt thin films by residual stress control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S. H.; Hsiao, S. N.; Chou, C. L.; Chen, S. K.; Lee, H. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Single-layered Fe52Pt48 films with thickness of 10 nm were sputter-deposited on glass substrates. Rapid thermal annealing with different heating rates (10-110 K/s) was applied to transform as-deposited fcc phase into L10 phase and meanwhile to align [0 0 1]-axis of L10 crystal along plane normal direction. Based on X-ray diffractometry using synchrotron radiation source, the texture coefficient of (0 0 1)-plane increases with increasing heating rate from 10 to 40 K/s, which is correlated with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and in-plane tensile stress analyzed by asymmetric sin2 ψ method. Furthermore, it was revealed by atomic force microscopy that the dewetting process occurred as heating rate was raised up to 80 K/s and higher. The change in the microstructure due to stress relaxation leads to the degradation of (0 0 1) orientation and magnetic properties. Surface roughness is closely related to the in-plane tensile stress. Enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and atomically flat surface were achieved for the samples annealed at 40 K/s, which may be suitable for further practical applications. This work also suggests a feasible way for surface engineering by controlling internal stress of the FePt without introducing cap layer.

  8. ViriChip: a solid phase assay for detection and identification of viruses by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettikadan, Saju R.; Johnson, James C.; Vengasandra, Srikanth G.; Muys, James; Henderson, Eric

    2004-03-01

    Bionanotechnology can be viewed as the integration of tools and concepts in nanotechnology with the attributes of biomolecules. We report here on an atomic force microscopy-immunosensor assay (AFMIA) that couples AFM with solid phase affinity capture of biological entities for the rapid detection and identification of group B coxsackievirus particles. Virus identification is based on type-specific immunocapture and the morphological properties of the captured viruses as obtained by the AFM. Representatives of the six group B coxsackieviruses have been specifically captured from 1 µl volumes of clarified cell lysates, body fluids and environmental samples. Concentration and kinetic profiles for capture indicate that detection is possible at 103 TCID50 µl-1 and the dynamic range of the assay spans three logs. The results demonstrate that the melding of a nanotechnological tool (AFM) with biotechnology (solid phase immunocapture of virus particles) can create a clinically relevant platform, useful for the detection and identification of enterovirus particles in a variety of samples.

  9. Growth of bismuth telluride thin film on Pt by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen; YANG Jun-you; GAO Xian-hui; HOU Jie; ZHANG Tong-jun; CUI Kun

    2005-01-01

    An automated thin-layer flow cell electrodeposition system was developed for growing Bi2 Te3 thin film by ECALE. The dependence of the Bi and Te deposition potentials on Pt electrode was studied. In the first attempt,this reductive Te underpotential deposition (UPD)/reductive Bi UPD cycle was performed to 100 layers. A better linearity of the stripping charge with the number of cycles has been shown and confirmed a layer-by-layer growth mode, which is consistent with an epitaxial growth. The 4: 3 stoichiometric ratio of Bi to Te suggests that the incomplete charge transfer in HTeO2+ reduction excludes the possibility of Bi2 Te3 formation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis also reveals that the incomplete charge transfer in HTeO2+ occurs in Te direct deposition. The effective way of depositing Bi2 Te3 on Pt consists in oxidative Te UPD and reductive Bi UPD. The thin film deposited by this procedure was characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD), scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS). A polycrystalline characteristic was confirmed by XRD. The 2 : 3 stoichiometric ratio was confirmed by XPS. The SEM image indicates that the deposit looks like a series of buttons about 0.3 - 0.4 μm in diameter, which is corresponding with calculated thickness of the epitaxial film. This suggests that the particle growth appears to be linear with the number of cycles, as it is consistent with a layer by layer growth mode.

  10. Effects of annealing on the properties of atomic layer deposited Ru thin films deposited by NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} as reactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Joon; Kim, Soo-Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@ynu.ac.kr

    2016-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ru using a non-oxidizing reactant is indispensable considering its application as a seed layer for Cu electroplating and a bottom electrode for dynamic random access memory capacitors. In this study, ALD-Ru films were deposited using a sequential supply of dicarbonyl-bis(5-methyl-2,4-hexanediketonato) Ru(II) (C{sub 16}H{sub 22}O{sub 6}Ru) and potential non-oxidizing reducing agents, NH{sub 3} or H{sub 2}, as the reactants at a substrate temperature of 250 °C, and the effects of post-annealing in a H{sub 2} ambient on the film properties were investigated. The highly conformal deposition of Ru films was possible using the present reaction scheme but its resistivity was as high as ~ 750 μΩ-cm due to carbon incorporation into the film and the formation of an amorphous structure. Low temperature annealing at 300 °C at H{sub 2} ambient after deposition was found to improve the properties significantly in terms of the resistivity, impurities contents and crystallinity. For example, the film resistivity was decreased drastically to ~ 40 μΩ-cm with both the release of C in the film and crystallization after annealing based on secondary ion mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy, whereas perfect step coverage at a very small-sized dual trench (aspect ratio: ~ 3, the top opening size of 45 nm and bottom size of 20 nm) was maintained after annealing. - Highlights: • Ru thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} molecules. • Effects of low temperature (300 °C) post-annealing on the film properties were investigated. • Post annealing improved the properties of ALD-Ru films. • Perfect step coverage of ALD-Ru was confirmed at trench structure (top opening width: 45 nm).

  11. A comparative study on electrical characteristics of crystalline AlN thin films deposited by ICP and HCPA-sourced atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, Halit; Bayrak, Turkan

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we aimed to investigate the effects of two different plasma sources on the electrical properties of low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposited (PA-ALD) AlN thin films. To compare the electrical properties, 50 nm thick AlN films were grown on p-type Si substrates at 200 °C by using an inductively coupled RF-plasma (ICP) and a stainless steel hollow cathode plasma-assisted (HCPA) ALD systems. Al/AlN/ p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor devices were fabricated and capacitance versus voltage ( C- V) and current-voltage ( I- V) measurements performed to assess the basic important electrical parameters such as dielectric constant, effective charge density, flat-band voltage, breakdown field, and threshold voltage. In addition, structural properties of the films were presented and compared. The results show that although HCPA-ALD deposited AlN thin films has structurally better and has a lower effective charge density ( N eff ) value than ICP-ALD deposited AlN films, those films have large leakage current, low dielectric constant, and low breakdown field. This situation was attributed to the involvement of Si atoms into the AlN layers during the HCPA-ALD processing leads to additional current path at AlN/Si interface and might impair the electrical properties.

  12. A comparative study on electrical characteristics of crystalline AlN thin films deposited by ICP and HCPA-sourced atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, Halit; Bayrak, Turkan

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we aimed to investigate the effects of two different plasma sources on the electrical properties of low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposited (PA-ALD) AlN thin films. To compare the electrical properties, 50 nm thick AlN films were grown on p-type Si substrates at 200 °C by using an inductively coupled RF-plasma (ICP) and a stainless steel hollow cathode plasma-assisted (HCPA) ALD systems. Al/AlN/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor devices were fabricated and capacitance versus voltage (C-V) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements performed to assess the basic important electrical parameters such as dielectric constant, effective charge density, flat-band voltage, breakdown field, and threshold voltage. In addition, structural properties of the films were presented and compared. The results show that although HCPA-ALD deposited AlN thin films has structurally better and has a lower effective charge density (N eff ) value than ICP-ALD deposited AlN films, those films have large leakage current, low dielectric constant, and low breakdown field. This situation was attributed to the involvement of Si atoms into the AlN layers during the HCPA-ALD processing leads to additional current path at AlN/Si interface and might impair the electrical properties.

  13. Study of porogen removal by atomic hydrogen generated by hot wire chemical vapor deposition for the fabrication of advanced low-k thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godavarthi, S., E-mail: srinivas@cinvestav.mx [Program of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Universidad, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Wang, C.; Verdonck, P. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Matsumoto, Y.; Koudriavtsev, I. [Program of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); SEES, Electrical Engineering Department, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); Dutt, A. [SEES, Electrical Engineering Department, Cinvestav-IPN (Mexico); Tielens, H.; Baklanov, M.R. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-01-30

    In order to obtain low-k dielectric films, a subtractive technique, which removes sacrificial porogens from a hydrogenated silicon oxycarbide (SiOC:H) film, has been used successfully by different groups in the past. In this paper, we report on the porogen removal from porogenated SiOC:H films, using a hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) equipment. Molecular hydrogen is dissociated into atomic hydrogen by the hot wires and these atoms may successfully remove the hydrocarbon groups from the porogenated SiOC:H films. The temperature of the HWCVD filaments proved to be a determining factor. By Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity (XRR), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), ellipsometric porosimetry and capacitance-voltage analyses, it was possible to determine that for temperatures higher than 1700 °C, efficient porogen removal occurred. For temperatures higher than 1800 °C, the presence of OH groups was detected. The dielectric constant was the lowest, 2.28, for the samples processed at a filament temperature of 1800 °C, although porosity measurements showed higher porosity for the films deposited at the higher temperatures. XRR and SIMS analyses indicated densification and Tungsten (W) incorporation at the top few nanometers of the films.

  14. Thermal atomic layer deposition of In2O3 thin films using dimethyl(N-ethoxy-2,2-dimethylcarboxylicpropanamide)indium and H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbenyeke, Raphael Edem; Jung, Eun Ae; Park, Bo Keun; Chung, Taek-Mo; Kim, Chang Gyoun; Han, Jeong Hwan

    2017-10-01

    Indium oxide (In2O3) thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition using dimethyl(N-ethoxy-2,2-dimethylcarboxylicpropanamide)indium (Me2In(EDPA)) and H2O as the In-precursor and reactant, respectively. The In2O3 films exhibited a saturated growth rate of 0.083 nm/cycle at a deposition temperature of 300 °C. Porous and amorphous films were grown at 150 °C, whereas dense polycrystalline films were deposited at higher deposition temperatures of 200-300 °C. XPS analysis revealed negligible carbon and nitrogen impurities incorporation within the films. The estimated bandgap of the In2O3 films by spectroscopic ellipsometry and UV-vis spectroscopy was about 3.7 eV and the increase in refractive index with deposition temperature from 150 to 300 °C indicated that dense films were grown at higher temperatures. The high transmittance (>94% in visible light) and good electrical properties (resistivity ∼1.2-7 mΩ cm, Hall mobility ∼28-66 cm2/V s) of the In2O3 films make them a viable option for optoelectronic applications.

  15. Electrical and physicochemical properties of atomic-layer-deposited HfO{sub 2} film on Si substrate with interfacial layer grown by nitric acid oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hyun [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Tae Jun; Jin, Hyun Soo [Department of Materials Science & Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Byoung, E-mail: woo7838@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Energy Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Joo, E-mail: tjp@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science & Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ultrathin SiO{sub 2} interfacial layers grown using nitric acid oxidation and O{sub 3} oxidation were adopted at the interface of HfO{sub 2}/Si. • Higher physical density of interfacial layer grown using nitric acid oxidation resulted in the suppressed Si diffusion from substrate into the film. • The interface properties as well as permittivity of the film were improved by adoption of interfacial layer grown using nitric acid oxidation. - Abstract: The ultrathin SiO{sub 2} interfacial layer (IL) was adopted at the interface between atomic-layer-deposited HfO{sub 2} gate dielectric film and a Si substrate, which was grown using nitric acid oxidation (NAO) and O{sub 3} oxidation (OZO) prior to HfO{sub 2} film deposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy result revealed that Si diffusion from the substrate into the film was suppressed for the film with NAO compared to that with OZO, which was attributed to the higher physical density of IL. The electrical measurement using metal–insulator–semiconductor devices showed that the film with NAO exhibited higher effective permittivity and lower densities of fixed charge and slow state at the interface. Furthermore, the leakage current density at an equivalent electrical thickness was lower for the film with NAO than OZO.

  16. Quantum size effects in TiO2 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, Massimo; Das, Chittaranjan; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    We study the atomic layer deposition of TiO2 by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Ti precursor, titanium isopropoxide, was used in combination with H2O on Si/SiO2 substrates that were heated at 200 °C. The low growth rate (0.15 Å/cycle) and the in situ characterization permitted to follow changes in the electronic structure of TiO2 in the sub-nanometer range, which are influenced by quantum size effects. The modified electronic properties may play an important role in charge carrier transport and separation, and increase the efficiency of energy conversion systems.

  17. Quantum size effects in TiO2 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Tallarida, Massimo; Das, Chittaranjan; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    We study the atomic layer deposition of TiO2 by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Ti precursor, titanium isopropoxide, was used in combination with H2O on Si/SiO2 substrates that were heated at 200 °C. The low growth rate (0.15 Å/cycle) and the in situ characterization permitted to follow changes in the electronic structure of TiO2 in the sub-nanometer range, which are influenced by quantum size effects. The modified electronic properties may play an important role in charge carrier...

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition TiO2 Films and TiO2/SiNx Stacks Applied for Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-Po Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Titanium oxide (TiO2 films and TiO2/SiNx stacks have potential in surface passivation, anti-reflection coatings and carrier-selective contact layers for crystalline Si solar cells. A Si wafer, deposited with 8-nm-thick TiO2 film by atomic layer deposition, has a surface recombination velocity as low as 14.93 cm/s at the injection level of 1.0 × 1015 cm−3. However, the performance of silicon surface passivation of the deposited TiO2 film declines as its thickness increases, probably because of the stress effects, phase transformation, atomic hydrogen and thermal stability of amorphous TiO2 films. For the characterization of 66-nm-thick TiO2 film, the results of transmission electron microscopy show that the anatase TiO2 crystallinity forms close to the surface of the Si. Secondary ion mass spectrometry shows the atomic hydrogen at the interface of TiO2 and Si which serves for chemical passivation. The crystal size of anatase TiO2 and the homogeneity of TiO2 film can be deduced by the measurements of Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry, respectively. For the passivating contacts of solar cells, in addition, a stack composed of 8-nm-thick TiO2 film and a plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited 72-nm-thick SiNx layer has been investigated. From the results of the measurement of the reflectivity and effective carrier lifetime, TiO2/SiNx stacks on Si wafers perform with low reflectivity and some degree of surface passivation for the Si wafer.

  19. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part Ⅰ Simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition)diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge (J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC (Kinetic Monte Carlo) method. The results show that: (1) under Joe's model, the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature; (2) the deposition rate and surface roughness () under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature ()and not evident bymass fraction of atom chlorine; (3)the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate, i.e. the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature, in agreement with Grujicic's prediction; (4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  20. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part I simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe—Badgwell—Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xizhong; YuZhang; 等

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD( Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge(J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC(Kinetic Monte Carlo)method.The results show that:(1) under Joe's model,the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature;(2) the deposition rate and surface roughness(Rq) under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature(Ts) and not evident bymass fraction Wc1 of atom chlorine;(3) the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate.i.e.the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature,in agreement with Grujicic's prediction;(4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.