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Sample records for filler reinforced elastomers

  1. Rubber materials from elastomers and nanocellulose powders: filler dispersion and mechanical reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Matthieu; Berriot, Julien; de Gaudemaris, Benoit; Veyland, Anne; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Molina-Boisseau, Sonia; Heux, Laurent

    2018-04-04

    Rubber materials with well-dispersed fillers and large mechanical reinforcement have been obtained by melt-processing a diene elastomer matrix and tailored nanocellulose powders having both a high specific surface area and a modified interface. Such filler powders with a specific surface area of 180 m2 g-1 and 100 m2 g-1 have been obtained by freeze-drying suspensions of short needle-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and entangled networks of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) in tert-butanol/water, respectively. A quantitative and toposelective filler surface esterification was performed using a gas-phase protocol either with palmitoyl chloride (PCl) to obtain a hydrophobic but non-reactive nanocellulose interface, or with 3,3'-dithiopropionic acid chloride (DTACl) to introduce reactive groups that can covalently bind the nanocellulose interface to the dienic matrix in a subsequent vulcanization process. A set of filled materials was prepared varying the filler morphology, interface and volume fraction. Transmission electron microscopy images of ultrathin cryo-sections showed that modified nanocellulose fillers presented a relatively homogeneous distribution up to a volume fraction of 20%. The materials also exhibited a significant modulus increase, while keeping an extensibility in the same range as that of the neat matrix. Strikingly, in the case of the reactive interface, a strong stress-stiffening behavior was evidenced from the upward curvature of the tensile curve, leading to a large increase of the ultimate stress (up to 7 times that of the neat matrix). Taken together, these properties, which have never been previously reported for nanocellulose-filled elastomers, match well the mechanical characteristics of industrial carbon black or silica-loaded elastomers.

  2. Filler reinforcement in cross-linked elastomer nanocomposites: insights from fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Alexander S; Khalatur, Pavel G

    2016-06-28

    Using a fully atomistic model, we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of sulfur-cured polybutadiene (PB) and nanosilica-filled PB composites. A well-integrated network without sol fraction is built dynamically by cross-linking the coarse-grained precursor chains in the presence of embedded silica nanoparticles. Initial configurations for subsequent atomistic simulations are obtained by reverse mapping of the well-equilibrated coarse-grained systems. Based on the concept of "maximally inflated knot" introduced by Grosberg et al., we show that the networks simulated in this study behave as mechanically isotropic systems. Analysis of the network topology in terms of graph theory reveals that mechanically inactive tree-like structures are the dominant structural components of the weakly cross-linked elastomer, while cycles are mainly responsible for the transmission of mechanical forces through the network. We demonstrate that quantities such as the system density, thermal expansion coefficient, glass transition temperature and initial Young's modulus can be predicted in qualitative and sometimes even in quantitative agreement with experiments. The nano-filled system demonstrates a notable increase in the glass transition temperature and an approximately two-fold increase in the nearly equilibrium value of elastic modulus relative to the unfilled elastomer even at relatively small amounts of filler particles. We also examine the structural rearrangement of the nanocomposite subjected to tensile deformation. Under high strain-rate loading, the formation of structural defects (microcavities) within the polymer bulk is observed. The nucleation and growth of cavities in the post-yielding strain hardening regime mainly take place at the elastomer/nanoparticle interfaces. As a result, the cavities are concentrated just near the embedded nanoparticles. Therefore, while the silica nanofiller increases the elastic modulus of the elastomer, it also creates a more

  3. Reinforcement of dynamically vulcanized EPDM/PP elastomers using organoclay fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yuhsin; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Wu, Yao-Tsu; Li, Chia-Hao; Leu, Ming-Tsong

    2008-12-01

    Dynamically vulcanized EPDM/PP (ethylene-propylene-diene/polypropylene) elastomers reinforced with various amounts of organoclay were prepared using octylphenol-formaldehyde resin and stannous chloride dehydrate as vulcanizing agents. The effects of organoclay on vulcanization characteristics, rheological behavior, morphology, thermal stability and thermomechanical properties were studied. Experimental results showed that organoclay affected neither the vulcanization process nor the degree of vulcanization chemically. X-ray analysis revealed that these organoclay-filled thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) were intercalated. With respect to the mechanical properties, organoclay increased both the strength and degree of elongation of TPVs. The morphological observation of fractured surfaces suggested that organoclay acted as a nucleating agent in TPVs, improving their mechanical properties. However, adding organoclay reduced the thermal stability of TPVs by decomposing the swelling agents in the organoclay.

  4. Reinforcement of dynamically vulcanized EPDM/PP elastomers using organoclay fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai Yuhsin; Wu, J.-H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Li, C.-H.; Leu, M.-T. [Nano-Powder and Thin Film Technology Center, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Tainan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jhwu686@itri.org.tw

    2008-12-15

    Dynamically vulcanized EPDM/PP (ethylene-propylene-diene/polypropylene) elastomers reinforced with various amounts of organoclay were prepared using octylphenol-formaldehyde resin and stannous chloride dehydrate as vulcanizing agents. The effects of organoclay on vulcanization characteristics, rheological behavior, morphology, thermal stability and thermomechanical properties were studied. Experimental results showed that organoclay affected neither the vulcanization process nor the degree of vulcanization chemically. X-ray analysis revealed that these organoclay-filled thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) were intercalated. With respect to the mechanical properties, organoclay increased both the strength and degree of elongation of TPVs. The morphological observation of fractured surfaces suggested that organoclay acted as a nucleating agent in TPVs, improving their mechanical properties. However, adding organoclay reduced the thermal stability of TPVs by decomposing the swelling agents in the organoclay.

  5. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  6. ZnO as a cheap and effective filler for high breakdown strength elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2017-01-01

    . In this article, we explore the use of a cheap and abundant metal oxide filler, namely ZnO, as a filler in silicone-based dielectric elastomers. The electro-mechanical properties of the elastomer composites are investigated, and their performance is evaluated by means of figures of merit. Various commercial......Cheap, high-performance dielectric elastomers are in high demand from industry concerning new products based on dielectric elastomer transducers. However, formulating an elastomer that fulfils all the requirements for dielectric elastomers is difficult and, first and foremost, not cheap...... silicone elastomers and a self-formulated silicone elastomer are utilised as elastomer matrices, the effects of which on the final properties of the elastomer composite are investigated...

  7. In Situ Polymorphic Alteration of Filler Structures for Biomimetic Mechanically Adaptive Elastomer Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Tamil Selvan; Okamoto, Shigeru; Stöckelhuber, Klaus Werner; Wießner, Sven; Reuter, Uta; Fischer, Dieter; Ghosh, Anik Kumar; Heinrich, Gert; Das, Amit

    2018-04-30

    A mechanically adaptable elastomer composite is prepared with reversible soft-stiff properties that can be easily controlled. By the exploitation of different morphological structures of calcium sulfate, which acts as the active filler in a soft elastomer matrix, the magnitude of filler reinforcement can be reversibly altered, which will be reflected in changes of the final stiffness of the material. The higher stiffness, in other words, the higher modulus of the composites, is realized by the in situ development of fine nanostructured calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals, which are formed during exposure to water and, further, these highly reinforcing crystals can be transformed to a nonreinforcing hemihydrate mesocrystalline structure by simply heating the system in a controlled way. The Young's modulus of the developed material can be reversibly altered from ∼6 to ∼17 MPa, and the dynamic stiffness (storage modulus at room temperature and 10 Hz frequency) alters its value in the order of 1000%. As the transformation is related to the presence of water molecules in the crystallites, a hydrophilic elastomer matrix was selected, which is a blend of two hydrophilic polymers, namely, epichlorohydrin-ethylene oxide-allyl glycidyl ether terpolymer and a terpolymer of ethylene oxide-propylene oxide-allyl glycidyl ether. For the first time, this method also provides a route to regulate the morphology and structure of calcium sulfate nanocrystals in a confined ambient of cross-linked polymer chains.

  8. Magnetic and viscoelastic response of elastomers with hard magnetic filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramarenko, E Yu; Chertovich, A V; Semisalova, A S; Makarova, L A; Perov, N S; Khokhlov, A R; Stepanov, G V

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic elastomers (MEs) based on a silicone matrix and magnetically hard NdFeB particles have been synthesized and their magnetic and viscoelastic properties have been studied depending on the size and concentration of magnetic particles and the magnetizing field. It has been shown that magnetic particles can rotate in soft polymer matrix under applied magnetic field, this fact leading to some features in both magnetic and viscoelastic properties. In the maximum magnetic field used magnetization of MEs with smaller particles is larger while the coercivity is smaller due to higher mobility of the particles within the polymer matrix. Viscoelastic behavior is characterized by long relaxation times due to restructuring of the magnetic filler under the influence of an applied mechanical force and magnetic interactions. The storage and loss moduli of magnetically hard elastomers grow significantly with magnetizing field. The magnetic response of the magnetized samples depends on the mutual orientation of the external magnetic field and the internal sample magnetization. Due to the particle rotation within the polymer matrix, the loss factor increases abruptly when the magnetic field is turned on in the opposite direction to the sample magnetization, further decreasing with time. Moduli versus field dependences have minimum at non-zero field and are characterized by a high asymmetry with respect to the field direction. (paper)

  9. Thermal stability of segmented polyurethane elastomers reinforced by clay particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavličević Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the influence of clay nanoparticles on thermal properties of segmented polyurethanes based on hexamethylene- diisocyanate, aliphatic polycarbonate diol and 1,4-butanediol as chain extender. The organically modified particles of montmorillonite and bentonite were used as reinforcing fillers. The structure of elastomeric materials was varied either by diol type or chain extender content. The ratio of OH groups from diol and chain extender (R was either 1 or 10. Thermal properties of prepared materials were determined using modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC. Thermal stability of obtained elastomers has been studied by simultaneously thermogravimetry coupled with DSC. The glass transition temperature, Tg, of soft segments for all investigated samples was about -33°C. On the basis of DTG results, it was concluded that obtained materials were very stable up to 300°C.

  10. Thermal Analysis of Filler Reinforced Polymeric Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadge, Mahesh Devidas

    Improving heat dissipating property of composite materials is becoming increasingly important in domains ranging from the automotive industry, electronic devices to aeronautical industry. Effective heat dissipation is required especially in aircraft and racing tires to guarantee high performance and good service life [1]. The present study is focused on improving the thermal conductivity of Emulsion-styrene butadiene rubber (ESBR) which is a cheap alternative to other rubber composites. The disadvantages of ESBR are low thermal conductivity and high heat generation. Adding fillers with high thermal conductivity to ESBR is proposed as a technique for improving the thermal conductivity of ESBR. The purpose of the research is to predict the thermal conductivity of ESBR when filled with fillers of much higher thermal conductivity and also to find out to what extent the filler properties affect the heat transfer capabilities of the composite matrix. The influence of different filler shapes i.e. spherical, cylindrical and platelets on the overall thermal capability of composite matrix is studied, the finite element modelings are conducted using Abaqus. Three-dimensional and two-dimensional models are created in Abaqus to simulate the microstructure of the composite matrix filled with fillers. Results indicate that the overall thermal conductivity increases with increasing filler loading i.e. for a filler volume fraction of 0.27, the conductivity increased by around 50%. Filler shapes, orientation angle, and aspect ratio of the fillers significantly influences the thermal conductivity. Conductivity increases with increasing aspect ratio (length/diameter) of the cylindrical fillers since longer conductive chains are able to form at the same volume percentage as compared to spherical fillers. The composite matrix reaches maximum thermal conductivity when the cylindrical fillers are oriented in the direction of heat flow. The heat conductivity predicted by FEM for ESBR is

  11. Novel encapsulation technique for incorporation of high permittivity fillers into silicone elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazurek, Piotr Stanislaw; Hvilsted, Søren; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2014-01-01

    The research on soft elastomers with high dielectric permittivity for the use as dielectric electroactive polymers (DEAP) has grown substantially within the last decade. The approaches to enhance the dielectric permittivity can be categorized into three main classes: 1) Mixing or blending in high...... permittivity fillers, 2) Grafting of high permittivity molecules onto the polymer backbone in the elastomer, and 3) Encapsulation of high permittivity fillers. The approach investigated here is a new type of encapsulation which does not interfere with the mechanical properties to the same content...... as for the traditionally applied thermoplastic encapsulation. The properties of the elastomers are investigated as function of the filler content and type. The dielectric permittivity, dielectric loss, conductivity, storage modulus as well as viscous loss are compared to elastomers with the same amounts of high...

  12. Magnetorheological and deformation properties of magnetically controlled elastomers with hard magnetic filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, G.V.; Chertovich, A.V.; Kramarenko, E.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    Viscoelastic and deformational behavior of soft magnetic elastomers with hard magnetic fillers under the influence of a magnetic field is studied by different experimental techniques. The magnetic elastomers used in this work were synthesized on the basis of silicone rubber filled with FeNdB particles and were magnetized in a field of 3 and 15 kOe. We have shown that due to high residual magnetization the materials demonstrate well pronounced non-elastic behavior already in the absence of any external magnetic field. In particular, in contrast to magnetic elastomers based on soft magnetic fillers their elastic modulus is strain-dependent. Under the influence of external magnetic field the storage and loss moduli of magnetic elastomers with hard magnetic filler can both increase and decrease tremendously.

  13. Use of Semi-Reinforcement Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of partial natural rubber replaced with synthetic rubbers, styrene butadiene and cis butadiene, on failure and strength properties of bias tread NR/BR based compound was studied by efficient and conventional sulfur curing systems and mixtures of different carbon black grades. It was observed that failure behavior comprising tear resistance and crack growth in substituted compounds dropped significantly without any change in formulation. The type and crosslinking density were further studied with changes in sulfur/accelerator dosage and ratio. It was observed that tear resistance and crack growth improved with lowering sulfur/accelerator ratio, maintaining the same crosslink density,without any change in hysteresis. Other physico-mechanical properties of substituted NR/BR/SBR compound showed similar behavior as reference compound. The carbon black blends in NR/BR substituted compounds showed that using semi-reinforcing filler instead of the original reinforcing filler could improve crack growth resistance. Therefore, it is possible to decrease NR/BR ratio with modification of curing system and use of N330/N660 filler blends.

  14. A nanostructured carbon-reinforced polyisobutylene-based thermoplastic elastomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskas, Judit E; Foreman-Orlowski, Elizabeth A; Lim, Goy Teck; Porosky, Sara E; Evancho-Chapman, Michelle M; Schmidt, Steven P; El Fray, Mirosława; Piatek, Marta; Prowans, Piotr; Lovejoy, Krystal

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of a polyisobutylene (PIB)-based nanostructured carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer. This thermoplastic elastomer is based on a self-assembling block copolymer having a branched PIB core carrying -OH functional groups at each branch point, flanked by blocks of poly(isobutylene-co-para-methylstyrene). The block copolymer has thermolabile physical crosslinks and can be processed as a plastic, yet retains its rubbery properties at room temperature. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had more than twice the tensile strength of the neat polymer, exceeding the strength of medical grade silicone rubber, while remaining significantly softer. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer displayed a high T(g) of 126 degrees C, rendering the material steam-sterilizable. The carbon also acted as a free radical trap, increasing the onset temperature of thermal decomposition in the neat polymer from 256.6 degrees C to 327.7 degrees C. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had the lowest water contact angle at 82 degrees and surface nano-topography. After 180 days of implantation into rabbit soft tissues, the carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had the thinnest tissue capsule around the microdumbbell specimens, with no eosinophiles present. The material also showed excellent integration into bones. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Glycerol as high-permittivity liquid filler in dielectric silicone elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazurek, Piotr Stanislaw; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    of the composite. In combination with very low cost and easy preparation, the two property enhancements lead to a very attractive dielectric elastomer material. Experimental permittivity data are compared to various theoretical models that predict relative-permittivity changes as a function of filler loading...

  16. Glycerol as high-permittivity liquid filler in dielectric silicone elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazurek, Piotr Stanislaw; Yu, Liyun; Gerhard, R.

    2016-01-01

    of the composite. In combination with very low cost and easy preparation, the two property enhancements lead to an extremely attractive dielectric elastomer material. Experimental permittivity data arecompared to various theoretical models that predict relative permittivity changes as a function of filler loading...

  17. Effect of Filler Concentration on Thermal Stability of Vinyl Copolymer Elastomer (VCE) Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hubbard, Kevin Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Devlin, David James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henderson, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pacheco, Robin Montoya [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-06

    To study the thermal stability of vinyl copolymer elastomer (VCE) in its composite form, systematic TGA characterizations were conducted in both nonisothermal and isothermal modes. The effects of filler concentration on the aging behaviors of the VCE/filler composites were investigated under nitroplasticizer (NP) environment. FTIR characterization was used to probe the structural changes in the VCE polymer before and after the thermal treatments. This study suggests that the filler concentration significantly deteriorates the thermal stability of NP at a moderate temperature (< 70 °C). The degradation of NP, in turn, accelerates the aging process of the VCE polymer in its composite form.

  18. Suppression of electromechanical instability in fiber-reinforced dielectric elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The electromechanical instability of dielectric elastomers has been a major challenge for the application of this class of active materials. In this work, we demonstrate that dielectric elastomers filled with soft fiber can suppress the electromechanical instability and achieve large deformation. Specifically, we developed a constitutive model to describe the dielectric and mechanical behaviors of fiber-reinforced elastomers. The model was applied to study the influence of stiffness, nonlinearity properties and the distribution of fiber on the instability of dielectric membrane under an electric field. The results show that there exists an optimal fiber distribution condition to achieve the maximum deformation before failure.

  19. Silica-filled elastomers polymer chain and filler characterization by a SANS-SAXS approach

    CERN Document Server

    Botti, A; Richter, D; Urban, V; Ipns, A 6 4; Kohlbrecher, J; Straube, E

    2002-01-01

    A study of composites based upon commercially available silica fillers and networks of blends of protonated and deuterated anionically prepared polyisoprene is presented. The extraction of the single chain structure factor for SANS in the polymeric soft phase in isotropic and deformed state has been performed for the first time. The quasi three-component system could not be compositionally matched due to the internal structures of the activated fillers. For this, a parallel SAXS investigation provided the neccessary information on the filler structure which was lacking in the SANS analysis. Whereas mechanically clear reinforcement at low strains and filler-networking can be observed, the microscopic characterization of the chain deformation in the framework of the network tube model agrees with the estimates for hydrodynamic reinforcement of fractal fillers. (orig.)

  20. Anisotropic optical response of optically opaque elastomers with conductive fillers as revealed by terahertz polarization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Makoto; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Elastomers are one of the most important materials in modern society because of the inherent viscoelastic properties due to their cross-linked polymer chains. Their vibration-absorbing and adhesive properties are especially useful and thus utilized in various applications, for example, tires in automobiles and bicycles, seismic dampers in buildings, and seals in a space shuttle. Thus, the nondestructive inspection of their internal states such as the internal deformation is essential in safety. Generally, industrial elastomers include various kinds of additives, such as carbon blacks for reinforcing them. The additives make most of them opaque in a wide spectral range from visible to mid-infrared, resulting in that the nondestructive inspection of the internal deformation is quite difficult. Here, we demonstrate transmission terahertz polarization spectroscopy as a powerful technique for investigating the internal optical anisotropy in optically opaque elastomers with conductive additives, which are transparent only in the terahertz frequency region. The internal deformation can be probed through the polarization changes inside the material due to the anisotropic dielectric response of the conductive additives. Our study about the polarization-dependent terahertz response of elastomers with conductive additives provides novel knowledge for in situ, nondestructive evaluation of their internal deformation. PMID:28008942

  1. Rubber Composites Based on Polar Elastomers with Incorporated Modified and Unmodified Magnetic Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Kruželák

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rubber magnetic composites were prepared by incorporation of unmodified and surface modified strontium ferrite into rubber matrices based on NBR and NBR/PVC. Strontium ferrite was dosed to the rubber matrices in concentration scale ranging from 0 to 100 phr. The main goal was to investigate the influence of the type of ferrite on the curing process, physical-mechanical and magnetic properties of composites. The mutual interactions between the filler and rubber matrices were investigated by determination of cross-link density and SEM analysis. The incorporation of magnetic fillers leads to the increase of cross-link density and remanent magnetic induction of composites. Moreover, the improvement of physical-mechanical properties was achieved in dependence on the content of magnetic fillers. Surface modification of ferrite contributed to the enhancement of adhesion on the interphase filler-rubber. It can be stated that ferrite exhibits reinforcing effect in the composite materials and this reinforcing behavior was emphasized with the increase in polarity of the rubber matrix.

  2. Contribution of fine filler particles to energy dissipation during wet sliding of elastomer compounds on a rough surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    Elastomer compounds reinforced with precipitated silica can exhibit elevated wet sliding friction on a rough surface in comparison with corresponding compounds filled with carbon black particles. The underlying mechanism is currently not well understood. To unravel this puzzling observation, the variation of wet sliding friction with filler volume fraction is examined at the sliding speed of the order of 1 m s -1 under different lubrication conditions. Depending on the lubrication liquid-water or ethanol-a compound that shows both higher bulk hysteretic loss and lower modulus does not always exhibit a higher wet sliding friction. A thorough characterization of the bulk rheology of the compounds investigated fails to provide the rationale for such behaviour, thus constituting an apparent violation of the conventional viscoelastic understanding of rubber friction on a rough surface. On the other hand, the detected lowering of friction when the lubrication liquid is changed from water to ethanol resembles the effect of liquid medium on interfacial adhesion reported in the literature. Hence, it is suggested that a stronger interfacial attractive interaction should exist in water between the road surface and silica particles on the compound surface immediately next to the road surface. This should be related to the elevated wet sliding friction detected for silica-filled compounds under water lubrication

  3. Synthesis of Aluminum Triacrylate as Reactive Filler in EPDM Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Shokrzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The organo-metal salt of aluminum triacrylate (ALTA with a general formula of (CH2=CHCOO3Al was  synthesized  as  a  reactive  fller  for  elastomers through a two-step synthetic procedure. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, DSC and DTA were employed for ALTA analysis and to study its cure characteristics. In this research, two composites based on ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber (EPDM with two types of reactive fllers of  modifed organoclay and ALTA were prepared by a laboratory two-roll mill. The types and different ratios of organoclay and ALTA on curing characteristics, mechanical properties such as tensile properties, hardness, and abrasion resistance were studied. The increase in fller content of both composites  led  to  the  incremental  increase  in  tensile strength, modulus, hardness, elongation-at-break and also the incremental increase in abrasion resistance of both composites. The improvement in reinforcing properties of ALTA in comparison with nanoclay is attributed to homopolymerization and graft copolymerization of ALTA at the same time during curing of the EPDM composites by peroxide. Making such additives may be taken as an effective action to achieve more durable and cheaper way to reinforce elastomers.

  4. Electromechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced dielectric elastomer membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on its large deformation, light weight, and high energy density, dielectric elastomer (DE has been used as driven muscle in many areas. We design the fiber-reinforced DE membrane by adding fibers in the membrane. The deformation and driven force direction of the membrane can be tuned by changing the fiber arrangements. The actuation in the perpendicular direction of the DE membrane with long fibers first increases and then decreases by the increasing of the fiber spacing in the perpendicular direction. The horizontal actuation of the membrane decreases by decreasing the spacing of short fibers. In the membrane-inflating structure, the radially arranged fibers will break the axisymmetric behavior of the structure. The top area of the inflated balloon without fiber will buckle up when the voltage reaches a certain level. Finite element simulations based on nonlinear field theory are conducted to investigate the effects of fiber arrangement and verify the experimental results. This work can guide the design of fiber-reinforced DE.

  5. A new green methodology for surface modification of diatomite filler in elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamastra, F.R. [Italian Interuniversity Consortium on Materials Science and Technology (INSTM), Research Unit Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133, Rome (Italy); Mori, S.; Cherubini, V. [Italian Interuniversity Consortium on Materials Science and Technology (INSTM), Research Unit Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133, Rome (Italy); Department of Enterprise Engineering, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Via del Politecnico 1, 00133, Rome (Italy); Scarselli, M. [Department of Physics, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133, Rome (Italy); Nanni, F., E-mail: fnanni@ing.uniroma2.it [Italian Interuniversity Consortium on Materials Science and Technology (INSTM), Research Unit Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133, Rome (Italy); Department of Enterprise Engineering, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Via del Politecnico 1, 00133, Rome (Italy)

    2017-06-15

    chemically to elastomeric molecules during vulcanization process, could be used in rubber compounds as semi-reinforcing filler. - Highlights: • Few silanol groups were introduced on diatomite surface by a new protocol. • The modified diatomite was silanized with a coupling agent for rubber applications. • FTIR and XPS confirmed surface modification and the effectiveness of silanization. • A fine dispersion of the silanized diatomite in SBR unvulcanizates was obtained.

  6. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of a magnetoactive elastomer: Immobilization of the soft-magnetic filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnaruk, Andrii V.; Brunhuber, Alexander; Kalita, Viktor M.; Kulyk, Mykola M.; Snarskii, Andrei A.; Lozenko, Albert F.; Ryabchenko, Sergey M.; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic properties of a magnetoactive elastomer (MAE) filled with μm-sized soft-magnetic iron particles have been experimentally studied in the temperature range between 150 K and 310 K. By changing the temperature, the elastic modulus of the elastomer matrix was modified, and it was possible to obtain magnetization curves for an invariable arrangement of particles in the sample and in the case when the particles were able to change their position within the MAE under the influence of magnetic forces. At low (less than 220 K) temperatures, when the matrix becomes rigid, the magnetization of the MAE does not show a hysteresis behavior, and it is characterized by a negative value of the Rayleigh constant. At room temperature, when the polymer matrix is compliant, a magnetic hysteresis exists where the dependence of the differential magnetic susceptibility on the magnetic field exhibits local maxima. The appearance of these maxima is explained by the elastic resistance of the matrix to the displacement of particles under the action of magnetic forces.

  7. Effect on mechanical properties of glass reinforced epoxy (GRE) pipe filled with different geopolymer filler molarity for piping application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, M. F. Abu; Abdullah, M. M. A.; Ghazali, C. M. R.; Hussin, K.; Binhussain, M.

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the use of a novel white clay geopolymer as a filler to produce high strength glass reinforced epoxy pipe. It was found that using white clay geopolymer as filler gives better compressive strength to the glass reinforced epoxy pipe. The disadvantages of current glass reinforced epoxy pipes such low compressive strength which can be replaced by the composite pipes. Geopolymerization is an innovative technology that can transform several aluminosilicate materials into useful products called geopolymers or inorganic polymers. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with 10 - 40 weight percentages white clay geopolymer filler with 4 Molarity and 8 Molarity were prepared. Morphology of white clay geopolymer filler surface was indicates using scanning electron microscopy. The additions of white clay geopolymer filler for both 4 Molarity and 8 Molarity show higher compressive strength than glass reinforced epoxy pipe without any geopolymer filler. The compressive test of these epoxy geopolymer pipe samples was determined using Instron Universal Testing under compression mode. Nonetheless, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with white clay geopolymer filler continues to drop when added to 40 wt% of the geopolymer filler loading for both 4 Molarity and 8 Molarity. These outcomes showed that the mixing of geopolymer materials in epoxy system can be attained in this research.

  8. Effect of filler geometry on coefficient of thermal expansion in carbon nanofiber reinforced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M; Jang, J; Suhr, J

    2011-02-01

    This study involves the investigation of the geometry effect of nano-fillers on thermally induced dimensional stability of epoxy composites by experimentally evaluating the linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Carbon nanofibers (CNF) were chosen as the filler in epoxy matrix to investigate the effect of an aspect ratio on the CTE of the nanocomposites at three different volume fractions of 0.5, 1, and 2% of the nano-filler. The composites were fabricated using a mechanical mixing method. The CTE values were evaluated by measuring thermal strains of the composites and also compared with a micromechanics model. It was observed that the composites with short CNF (average L/d = 10) show better thermal stability than one of the composites with long CNF (average L/d = 70), and the thermal stability of the composites was proportional to the volume fraction of the filler in each composite. In addition, the CTE of mutliwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) reinforced epoxy composites was evaluated and compared with the CTE of the CNF reinforced composites. Interestingly, the MWNT reinforced composites show the greatest thermal stability with an 11.5% reduction in the CTE over the pure epoxy. The experimental data was compared with micromechanics model.

  9. Recent developments in annual growth lignocellulosics as reinforcing fillers in thermoplastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, R.E.; Caulfield, D.F.; Rowell, R.M. [Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Recent interest in reducing the environmental impact of materials is leading to the development of newer agricultural based materials that can reduce the stress to the environment. Several billion pounds of fillers and reinforcements are used annually in the plastics industry and their use is likely to increase, to reduce the amount of plastics used in a product, with improved compounding technology and new coupling agents. The use of lignocellulosic fibers (eg. kenaf, jute, etc.) as reinforcing fillers in plastics has generated significant interest in recent years. The use of lignocellosic fibers permit the use of high volume fillings due to their lower densities and non-abrasive properties, and therefore reduces the use of plastics in a product. The specific tensile and flexural moduli of a 50% weight of glass fiber-PP injection molded composite and are superior to typical calcium carbonate or talc based PP composites. Results indicate that annual growth lignocellulosic wastes and fibers are viable reinforcing fillers as long as the right processing conditions and aids are used, and for applications where the higher water absorption of the agro-base fiber composite is not critical.

  10. Bamboo reinforced concrete slab with styrofoam lamina filler as solution of lightweight concrete application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibowo Ari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy resilience is becoming more important nowadays especially in the field of building sustainability. Some implementations can be carried out including using recycled materials instead of nonrenewable materials such as steel. Hence, one of the investigation conducted in this paper is replacing steel reinforcement with bamboo bars and using recycled materials such as Styrofoam with the aim of producing a concrete element structure that is lighter and more economical. In this research stage, flexural strength test on bamboo reinforced concrete slab with Styrofoam lamination filler was conducted. The results showed that the flexural strength of specimens decreased by 15% but with the weight advantage of 20% less compared with those of normal reinforced concrete slab with the same dimension. It is considered good performance in practical design context, since the nominal flexural capacity of RC slab when designed with minimum reinforcement are usually much higher than the required moment.

  11. Mechanical and Electrical Ageing Effects on the Long-Term Stretching of Silicone Dielectric Elastomers with Soft Fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin; Yu, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric elastomer materials for actuators need to be soft and stretchable while possessing high dielectric permittivity. Soft silicone elastomers can be obtained through the use of silicone oils, while enhanced permittivity can be obtained through the use of dipolar groups on the polymer...

  12. Effect of Different Fillers on Adhesive Wear Properties of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Feyzullahoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric composites are used for different aims as substitute of traditional materials such as metals; due to their improved strength at small specific weight. The fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composite material consists of polymeric matrix and reinforcing material. Polymeric materials are commonly reinforced with synthetic fibers such as glass and carbon. The glass fiber reinforced polyester (GFRP composites are used with different filler materials. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different filler materials on adhesive wear behavior of GFRP. In this experimental study; polymetilmetacrilat (PMMA, Glass beads (GB and Glass sand (GS were used as filling material in GFRP composite samples. The adhesive wear behaviors of samples were carried out using ball on disc type tribometer. The friction force and coefficient of friction were measured during the test. The volume loss and wear rate values of samples were calculated according to test results. Barcol hardness values of samples were measured. The densities of samples were measured. Results show that the wear resistance of GB filled GFRP composite samples was much more than non-filled and PMMA filled GFRP composite samples.

  13. Design and Preparation of Cross-Linked Polystyrene Nanoparticles for Elastomer Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-linked polystyrene (PS particles in a latex form were synthesized by free radical emulsion polymerization. The nano-PS-filled elastomer composites were prepared by the energy-saving latex compounding method. Results showed that the PS particles took a spherical shape in the size of 40–60 nm with a narrow size distribution, and the glass-transition temperature of the PS nanoparticles increased with the cross-linking density. The outcomes from the mechanical properties demonstrated that when filled into styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR, nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR, and natural rubber (NR, the cross-linked PS nano-particles exhibited excellent reinforcing capabilities in all the three matrices, and the best in the SBR matrix. In comparison with that of the carbon black filled composites, another distinguished advantage of the cross-linked PS particles filled elastomer composites was found to be light weight in density, which could help to save tremendous amount of energy when put into end products.

  14. The study of mechanical and creep properties of glycidyl azide polyol energetic thermoplastic elastomer binder with bonding group with RDX and its interface reinforcement mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qili; Sang, Chao; Wang, Zhen; Luo, Yunjun

    2018-02-01

    Bonding agents as additional modifiers are used to improve the reinforcement effect between binder and high solid filler in propellant formula. However, polar bonding agents are easily soluble with polar plasticizer and weak bonding effect. Thus, grafting the bonding group into binder to form neutral polymeric is a novel approach to avoid the preceding shortcomings mentioned and is also meaningful to improve interface properties of propellant. In this work, glycidyl azide polyol energetic thermoplastic elastomer binder with –CN bonding group (named G-1binder) was synthesized and the influences of –CN bonding groups on the mechanical and creep resistance properties of G-1/RDX composites were studied. Then, the mechanism of interfacial interactions between binder with –CN group and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) were also illustrated through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle analyzer. Results demonstrated G-1/RDX propellants have stronger interfacial reinforcement effect and good mechanical and creep resistant properties. As well, the induced effect model was proposed, and the binding energy of interface was calculated by Materials Studio software. Computational results show that G-1/RDX propellant has a high binding energy and strong interactive force due to the existence of induced effect between –CN group and –NO2 group, which resulted in an increase in constrained regions around the RDX surface and led to the significant promotions of mechanical and creep resistance properties of G-1/RDX propellant.

  15. Effect of filler loading and silane modification on the biodegradability of SBR composites reinforced with peanut shell powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaniba, V.; Balan, Aparna K.; Sreejith, M. P.; Jinitha, T. V.; Subair, N.; Purushothaman, E.

    2017-06-01

    The development of biocomposites and their applications are important in material science due to environmental and sustainability issues. The extent of degradation depends on the nature of reinforcing filler, particle size and their modification. In this article, we tried to focus on the biodegradation of composites of Styrene Butadiene Rubber (SBR) reinforced with Peanut Shell Powder (PSP) by soil burial test. The composites of SBR with untreated PSP (UPSP) and silane modified PSP (SPSP) of 10 parts per hundred rubber (phr) and 20 phr filler loading in two particle size were buried in the garden soil for six months. The microbial degradation were assessed through the measurement of weight loss, tensile strength and hardness at definite period. The study shows that degradation increases with increase in filler loading and particle size. The chemical treatment of filler has been found to resist the degradation. The analysis of morphological properties by the SEM also confirmed biodegradation process by the microorganism in the soil.

  16. Renewable agricultural fibers as reinforcing fillers in plastics: Mechanical properties of Kenaf fiber-polpyropylene composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanadi, A.R.; Caulfield, D.F.; Jacobson, R.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus) is a fast growing annual growth plant that is harvested for its bast fibers. These fibers have excellent specific properties and have potential to be outstanding reinforcing fillers in plastics. In our experiments, the fibers and polypropylene (PP) were blended in a thermokinetic mixer and then injection molded, with the fiber weight fractions varying to 60%. A maleated polypropylene was used to improve the interaction and adhesion between the non-polar matrix and the polar lignocellulosic fibers. The specific tensile and flexural moduli of a 50 % by volume (39 % by volume) of kenaf-PP composites compares favorably with a 40 % by weight of glass fiber-PP injection molded composites, These results suggest that kenaf fibers are a viable alternative to inorganic/mineral based reinforcing fibers as long as the right processing conditions are used and for applications where the higher water absorption is not critical.

  17. Renewable agricultural fibers as reinforcing fillers in plastics: Mechanical properties of kenaf fiber-polypropylene composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanadi, A.R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Forestry; Caulfield, D.F.; Jacobson, R.E. [Dept. of Agriculture, Madison, WI (United States). Forest Products Lab.; Rowell, R.M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Forestry]|[Dept. of Agriculture, Madison, WI (United States). Forest Products Lab.

    1995-05-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) is a fast growing annual growth plant that is harvested for its bast fibers. These fibers have excellent specific properties and have potential to be outstanding reinforcing fillers in plastics. In these experiments, the fibers and polypropylene (PP) were blended in a thermokinetic mixer and then injection molded, with the fiber weight fractions varying to 60%. A maleated polypropylene was used to improve the interaction and adhesion between the nonpolar matrix and the polar lignocellulosic fibers. The specific tensile and flexural moduli of a 50% by weight (39% by volume) of kenaf-PP composite compare favorably with a 40% by weight of glass fiber-PP injection-molded composite. These results suggest that kenaf fibers are a viable alternative to inorganic/mineral-based reinforcing fibers as long as the right processing conditions are used and they are used in applications where the higher water absorption is not critical.

  18. The effect of filler aspect ratio on the electromagnetic properties of carbon-nanofibers reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vivo, B.; Lamberti, P.; Spinelli, G., E-mail: gspinelli@unisa.it; Tucci, V. [Department of Information Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Applied Mathematics—DIEM, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano SA (Italy); Guadagno, L.; Raimondo, M. [Department of Industrial Engineering—DIIn, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano SA (Italy)

    2015-08-14

    The effect of filler aspect ratio on the electromagnetic properties of epoxy-amine resin reinforced with carbon nanofibers is here investigated. A heat treatment at 2500 °C of carbon nanofibers seems to increase their aspect ratio with respect to as-received ones most likely due to a lowering of structural defects and the improvement of the graphene layers within the dixie cup conformation. These morphological differences revealed by Raman's spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses may be responsible for the different electrical properties of the resulting composites. The DC characterization of the nanofilled material highlights an higher electrical conductivity and a lower electrical percolation threshold for the heat-treated carbon nanofibers based composites. In fact, the electrical conductivity is about 0.107 S/m and 1.36 × 10{sup −3} S/m for the nanocomposites reinforced with heat-treated and as received fibers, respectively, at 1 wt. % of nanofiller loading, while the electrical percolation threshold falls in the range [0.05–0.32]wt. % for the first nanocomposites and above 0.64 wt. % for the latter. Moreover, also a different frequency response is observed since the critical frequency, which is indicative of the transition from a resistive to a capacitive-type behaviour, shifts forward of about one decade at the same filler loading. The experimental results are supported by theoretical and simulation studies focused on the role of the filler aspect ratio on the electrical properties of the nanocomposites.

  19. A structure-based constitutive equation for filler-reinforced rubber-like networks and for the description of the Mullins effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meissner, Bohumil; Matějka, Libor

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 23 (2006), s. 7997-8012 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2252 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : elastomers * fillers * constitutive equation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.773, year: 2006

  20. A biologically inspired artificial muscle based on fiber-reinforced and electropneumatic dielectric elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Chi; Luo, Meng; Chen, Xi; Li, Dichen; Chen, Hualing

    2017-08-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have great potential for use as artificial muscles because of the following characteristics: electrical activity, fast and large deformation under stimuli, and softness as natural muscles. Inspired by the traditional McKibben actuators, in this study, we developed a cylindrical soft fiber-reinforced and electropneumatic DE artificial muscle (DEAM) by mimicking the spindle shape of natural muscles. Based on continuum mechanics and variation principle, the inhomogeneous actuation of DEAMs was theoretically modeled and calculated. Prototypes of DEAMs were prepared to validate the design concept and theoretical model. The theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental results; they successfully predicted the evolutions of the contours of DEAMs with voltage. A pneumatically supported high prestretch in the hoop direction was achieved by our DEAM prototype without buckling the soft fibers sandwiched by the DE films. Besides, a continuously tunable prestretch in the actuation direction was achieved by varying the supporting pressure. Using the theoretical model, the failure modes, maximum actuations, and critical voltages were analyzed; they were highly dependent on the structural parameters, i.e., the cylinder aspect ratio, prestretch level, and supporting pressure. The effects of structural parameters and supporting pressure on the actuation performance were also investigated to optimize the DEAMs.

  1. Recycling of asbestos tailings used as reinforcing fillers in polypropylene based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Wensi; Wang, Yao; Deng, Yuan; Gao, Hongli; Lin, Zhen; Li, Mao

    2014-04-15

    In this work, asbestos tailings were recycled and used as reinforcing fillers to enhance the mechanical properties of polypropylene (PP). A silane coupling agent was used to chemically modify the asbestos tailings to increase the compatibility between asbestos tailings and polypropylene matrix. Both raw and chemically treated asbestos tailings with different loading levels (from 3 to 30 wt%) were utilized to fabricate composites. Mechanical properties of these composites have been investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile test and notched impact test. Results showed that hybridization of asbestos tailings in the composites enhanced the mechanical properties of neat PP evidently, and treated asbestos tailings/PP composites yielded even better mechanical properties compared with those of raw asbestos tailings/PP composites. This recycling method of asbestos tailings not only reduces disposal costs and avoids secondary pollution but also produces a new PP-based composite material with enhanced mechanical properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic nanoparticles based nano-composites: synthesis, contribution of the fillers dispersion and the chains conformation on the reinforcement properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbes, Anne-Sophie

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymeric nano-composite films can be considerably enhanced by the inclusion of inorganic nanoparticles due to two main effects: (i) the local structure of fillers dispersion and (ii) the potential modification of the chains conformation and dynamics in the vicinity of the filler/polymer interface. However, the precise mechanisms which permit to correlate these contributions at nano-metric scale to the macroscopic mechanical properties of the materials are actually poorly described. In such a context, we have synthesized model nano-composites based on magnetic nanoparticles of maghemite γ-Fe 2 O 3 (naked or grafted with a polystyrene (PS) corona by radical controlled polymerization) dispersed in a PS matrix, that we have characterized by combining small angle scattering (X-Ray and neutron) and transmission electronic microscopy. By playing on different parameters such as the particle size, the concentration, or the size ratio between the grafted chains and the ones of the matrix in the case of the grafted fillers, we have obtained nano-composite films a large panel of controlled and reproducible controlled filler structures, going from individual nanoparticles or fractal aggregates up to the formation of a connected network of fillers. By applying an external magnetic field during the film processing, we succeeded in aligning the different structures along the direction of the field and we obtained materials with remarkable anisotropic reinforcement properties. The conformation of the chains of the matrix, experimentally determined thanks to the specific properties of neutron contrast of the system, is not affected by the presence of the fillers, whatever their confinement, the dispersion the fillers or their chemical state surface. The alignment of the fillers along the magnetic field has allowed us to describe precisely the evolution of the reinforcement modulus of the materials with the structural reorganization of the fillers and

  3. Fiber-reinforced dielectric elastomer laminates with integrated function of actuating and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiefeng; Xie, Yuhan; Li, Chi; Yang, Xuxu; Jin, Yongbin; Liu, Junjie; Huang, Xiaoqiang

    2015-04-01

    The natural limbs of animals and insects integrate muscles, skins and neurons, providing both the actuating and sensing functions simultaneously. Inspired by the natural structure, we present a novel structure with integrated function of actuating and sensing with dielectric elastomer (DE) laminates. The structure can deform when subjected to high voltage loading and generate corresponding output signal in return. We investigate the basic physical phenomenon of dielectric elastomer experimentally. It is noted that when applying high voltage, the actuating dielectric elastomer membrane deforms and the sensing dielectric elastomer membrane changes the capacitance in return. Based on the concept, finite element method (FEM) simulation has been conducted to further investigate the electromechanical behavior of the structure.

  4. Fracture strength of direct surface-retained fixed partial dentures : Effect of fiber reinforcement versus the use of particulate filler composites only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Ozcan, Mutlu; User, Atilla

    This study compared the fracture strengths and analyzed the failure types of direct, surface-retained, anterior fixed-partial-dentures (FPD), reinforced with four types of fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) versus non-fiber-reinforced FPDs made of three particulate filler composites (PFC). To this

  5. Plasma Polymerization of Acetylene onto silica: and Approach to control the distribution of silica in single elastomers and immiscible blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, M.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.; Ooij, W.J.; Dierkes, Wilma K.

    2008-01-01

    Surface modification of silica by acetylene plasma polymerization is applied in order to improve the dispersion in and compatibility with single rubbers and their blends. Silica, used as a reinforcing filler for elastomers, is coated with a polyacetylene (PA) film under vacuum conditions. Water

  6. Ethanol production waste as rubber composite filler: examining the pyrolysis of dried distillers grains and other dry milling byproducts as potential rubber reinforcement materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current push for corn-based ethanol is creating a large surplus of affordable by-products that can potentially serve as filler material for rubber composites. Biomaterial fillers can help replace carbon black and reduce dependence on petroleum. This research examines the reinforcement behavior...

  7. Effect of Filler Loading on Mechanical and Tribological Properties of Wood Apple Shell Reinforced Epoxy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojha Shakuntala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last century, natural fibers and particulates are used as reinforcement in polymer composite that has been continuously growing in the composite industry. This polymer matrix composite has wide range of applications in hostile environment where they are exposed to external attacks such as solid particle erosion. Also, the mechanical properties of different polymer composites show the best alternate to replace the metal material. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to improve the mechanical and tribological behaviour of polymer matrix composite using wood apple shell particles as a filler material in polymer matrix. Also the temperature variation of the dynamic-mechanical parameters of epoxy matrix composites incorporated with 5, 10, 15, and 20 wt% of wood apple shell particles was investigated by DMA test. It is clearly observed that the incorporation of wood apple shell particles tends to increase the tensile strength, flexural strength, erosive wear resistance, and viscoelastic stiffness of the polymer composite. To validate the results, SEM of the polymer matrix composite has been studied.

  8. Imidazolium Ionic Liquid Modified Graphene Oxide: As a Reinforcing Filler and Catalyst in Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Lyu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of graphene oxide (GO is one of the most important issues to produce high performance GO/epoxy composites. In this paper, the imidazole ionic liquid (IMD-Si was introduced onto the surface of GO sheets by a cheap and simple method, to prepare a reinforcing filler, as well as a catalyst in epoxy resin. The interlayer spacing of GO sheets was obviously increased by the intercalation of IMD-Si, which strongly facilitated the dispersibility of graphene oxide in organic solvents and epoxy matrix. The addition of 0.4 wt % imidazolium ionic liquid modified graphene oxide (IMD-Si@GO, yielded a 12% increase in flexural strength (141.3 MPa, a 26% increase in flexural modulus (4.69 GPa, and a 52% increase in impact strength (18.7 kJ/m2, compared to the neat epoxy. Additionally the IMD-Si@GO sheets could catalyze the curing reaction of epoxy resin-anhydride system significantly. Moreover, the improved thermal conductivities and thermal stabilities of epoxy composites filled with IMD-Si@GO were also demonstrated.

  9. Effect of Coconut Fillers on Hybrid Coconut Kevlar Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Jani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This project focuses on the conversion of naturally available coconut fibers and shells into a useful composite. In addition to it, some mechanical properties of the resultant composite is determined and also the effect of coconut shell fillers on the composite is also investigated. The few portion of the composite is incorporated with synthetic Kevlar fiber, thus the coconut fiber is hybridized to enhance the mechanical properties of coconut. In this work two types of composite is fabricate, kevelar coconut fibre (kc composite and kevelarcoco nut fibre coconut shell filler (kccsf composite. Coconut fibers have low weight and considerable properties among the natural fibers, while coconut fillers have a good ductile and impact property. The natural fibers and fillers are treated with Na-OH to make it free of organic impurities. Epoxy resin is used as the polymer matrix. Two composite are produced one with fillers and the other without the fillers using compression molding method. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and water absorption tests are done with ASTM standard. It is observed that that the addition of filler materials improves the adhesiveness of the fibers leading to the increase in the above mentioned properties. The density of the composite is also low hence the strength to weight ratio is very high. The water absorption test also showed that the resultant composite had a small adhesion to water and absorption of water.

  10. Comparative study of cellulose nanofiber and carbon nanofiber effects as reinforcement fillers on mechanical properties of polypropylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Tahir, Paridah Md; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Kargarzadeh, Haniyeh

    2017-12-01

    Cellulose nanofiber (CNF1) as natural fiber and carbon nanofiber (CNF2) as synthetic fiber were used as reinforcement fillers in polypropylene (PP) polymer to improve the mechanical properties of the composite. The CNF1 was produced from Kenaf bast fibers by use of mechanical method and the CNF2 was synthesized by use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. The produced fillers were dispersed into polypropylene, to manufacture nanocomposites (CNF1/PP and CNF2/PP). Analysis and comparison were made on the effects of the natural fibers with synthetics fibers having the same size and dimension, on the properties of polymer matrix. The characteristics of the CNF1 and CNF2 such as morphology, structure and composition were studied through SEM, TEM and EDX. Tensile test is used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the produced nanocomposites.

  11. Thermal properties of oil palm nano filler/kenaf reinforced epoxy hybrid nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, N.; Paridah, M. T.; Abdan, K.; Ibrahim, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this research study was to fabricate nano oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB)/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites and to make comparative study on the thermal properties of nano OPEFB/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites with the montmorillonite (MMT)/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites and organically modified MMT (OMMT)/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites. Epoxy based kenaf hybrid nanocomposites was prepared by dispersing the nano filler (nano OPEFB filler, MMT, OMMT) at 3% loading through high speed mechanical stirrer followed by hand lay-up technique. Thermal properties of hybrid nanocomposites were analyzed through thermogravimetry analyzer (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Obtained results specified that addition of nano OPEFB filler improves the thermal stability and char yield of kenaf/epoxy composites. Furthermore, the increase in decomposition temperature by the nano OPEFB filler was quite comparable to the MMT/kenaf/epoxy but relatively less than OMMT/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites. We concluded from overall consequences that the nano OPEFB filler can be used as the promising and innovative alternative of existing expensive nano filler, with relatively lesser impact on the environment having marked pronounced impact on the construction, automotive, aerospace, electronics and semiconducting sectors as future industries based on bio-wastes with satisfactory light weight and thermal stability on other side.

  12. Silicone rubbers for dielectric elastomers with improved dielectric and mechanical properties as a result of substituting silica with titanium dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One prominent method of modifying the properties of dielectric elastomers (DEs is by adding suitable metal oxide fillers. However, almost all commercially available silicone elastomers are already heavily filled with silica to reinforce the otherwise rather weak silicone network and the resulting metal oxide filled elastomer may contain too much filler. We therefore explore the replacement of silica with titanium dioxide to ensure a relatively low concentration of filler. Liquid silicone rubber (LSR has relatively low viscosity, which is favorable for loading inorganic fillers. In the present study, four commercial LSRs with varying loadings of silica and one benchmark room-temperature vulcanizable rubber (RTV were investigated. The resulting elastomers were evaluated with respect to their dielectric permittivity, tear and tensile strengths, electrical breakdown, thermal stability and dynamic viscosity. Filled silicone elastomers with high loadings of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2 particles were also studied. The best overall performing formulation had 35 wt.% TiO2 nanoparticles in the POWERSIL® XLR LSR, where the excellent ensemble of relative dielectric permittivity of 4.9 at 0.1 Hz, breakdown strength of 160 V µm−1, tear strength of 5.3 MPa, elongation at break of 190%, a Young’s modulus of 0.85 MPa and a 10% strain response (simple tension in a 50 V μm−1 electric field was obtained.

  13. Effect of short glass fiber/filler particle proportion on flexural and diametral tensile strength of a novel fiber-reinforced composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; de Almeida, Letícia Nunes; Mendes, Gustavo Adolfo Martins; Kasuya, Amanda Vessoni Barbosa; Favarão, Isabella Negro; de Paula, Marcella Silva

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of glass fiber/filler particles proportion on flexural strength and diametral tensile strength of an experimental fiber-reinforced composite. Four experimental groups (N=10) were created using an experimental short fiber-reinforced composite, having as a factor under study the glass fiber (F) and filler particle (P) proportion: F22.5/P55 with 22.5 wt% of fiber and 55 wt% of filler particles; F25/P52.5 with 25 wt% of fiber and 52.5 wt% of filler particles; F27.5/P50 with 27.5 wt% of fiber and 50 wt% of filler particles; F30/P47.5 with 30 wt% of fiber and 47.5 wt% of filler particles. The experimental composite was made up by a methacrylate-based resin (50% Bis-GMA and 50% TEGDMA). Specimens were prepared for Flexural Strength (FS) (25 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm) and for Diametral Tensile Strength (DTS) (3×6 Ø mm) and tested at 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine. The results (in MPa) showed significance (different superscript letters mean statistical significant difference) for FS (ptensile strength of an experimental composite reinforced with glass fibers. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of nanoclay filler loading on the flexural strength of fiber-reinforced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2012-01-01

    Results: For groups with the same concentration of nanoparticles, PMMA-grafted filler-loaded group showed significantly higher flexural strength, except for 0.2% wt. For groups that contain PMMA-grafted nanoclay fillers, the 2% wt had the highest flexural strength value with significant difference to other subgroups. 1% wt and 2% wt showed significantly higher values compared to control (P 0.05. Flexural modulus of 2%, 5% wt PMMA-grafted and 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5% wt unmodified nanoclay particles-loaded subgroups decreased significantly compared to control group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: PMMA-grafted nanoclay filler loading may enhance the flexural strength of FRCs. Addition of unmodified nanoparticles cannot significantly improve the flexural strength of FRCs. Addition of both unmodified and PMMA-grafted nanoclay particles in some concentrations decreased the flexural modulus.

  15. The reuse of nonmetals recycled from waste printed circuit boards as reinforcing fillers in the polypropylene composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanhong; Shen, Zhigang; Cai, Chujiang; Ma, Shulin; Xing, Yushan

    2009-04-30

    The feasibility of reusing nonmetals recycled from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) as reinforcing fillers in the polypropylene (PP) composites is studied by using both mechanical and vicat softening temperature (VST) tests. The concentration of Cu leaded from the composites is also tested. The mechanical test shows that both tensile and flexural properties of the nonmetals/PP composites can be significantly improved by adding the nonmetals into PP. The maximum increment of tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength and flexural modulus of the PP composites is 28.4%, 62.9%, 87.8% and 133.0%, respectively. As much as 30 wt% nonmetals recycled from waste PCBs can be added in the PP composites without violating the environmental regulation. The VST test shows that the presence of nonmetals can improve the heat resistance of the nonmetals/PP composites for their potential applications. The optimum particle is the fine or medium nonmetals recycled from waste PCBs, and the optimum content of the nonmetals is 30 wt% basing on the comprehensive consideration. All the above results indicate that the reuse of nonmetals as reinforcing fillers in the PP composites represents a promising way for recycling resources and resolving the environmental pollutions.

  16. Mechanical and electrical properties of a polyester resin reinforced with clay-based fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buncianu, Dorel; Jadaneant, Mihai [UPT Timisoara, Timisoara (Romania); Tessier-Doyen, Nicolas; Absi, Joseph [Centre Européen de la Céramique, Limoges Cedex (France); Courreges, Fabien [Laboratoire XLIM, 123, Limoges Cedex (France)

    2017-03-15

    In this study, composite polymer-based materials were fabricated, in which a significant proportion of polyester resin was substituted by low-cost and environmentally-friendly clay-based raw materials. The main objective is to improve mechanical properties while maintaining a reasonable electrical insulating behavior. A homogenized distribution of fillers within the matrix compatible with the processing parameters was obtained up to a maximum added fraction of 20 vol%. Mechanical characterization using uniaxial traction tests and Charpy impact pendulum machine showed that stress-to-rupture can be enhanced of approximately 25 %. In addition, fracture energy was doubled for the best formulation. Dielectric constant was decreased and loss factor was slightly increased when electrical resistivity remained almost constant. In general, the composite materials with metakaolin fillers exhibited higher mechanical properties and greater electrical insulating behavior. Microstructural observation showed the presence of decohesive agglomerates of particles at the interface with the matrix. The mechanical properties were found to be more sensitive than electrical properties to the homogeneity of filler dispersion in the matrix.

  17. High Density Polyethylene Composites Reinforced with Hybrid Inorganic Fillers: Morphology, Mechanical and Thermal Expansion Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Runzhou; Xu, Xinwu; Lee, Sunyoung; Zhang, Yang; Kim, Birm-June; Wu, Qinglin

    2013-09-17

    The effect of individual and combined talc and glass fibers (GFs) on mechanical and thermal expansion performance of the filled high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites was studied. Several published models were adapted to fit the measured tensile modulus and strength of various composite systems. It was shown that the use of silane-modified GFs had a much larger effect in improving mechanical properties and in reducing linear coefficient of thermal expansion (LCTE) values of filled composites, compared with the use of un-modified talc particles due to enhanced bonding to the matrix, larger aspect ratio, and fiber alignment for GFs. Mechanical properties and LCTE values of composites with combined talc and GF fillers varied with talc and GF ratio at a given total filler loading level. The use of a larger portion of GFs in the mix can lead to better composite performance, while the use of talc can help lower the composite costs and increase its recyclability. The use of 30 wt % combined filler seems necessary to control LCTE values of filled HDPE in the data value range generally reported for commercial wood plastic composites. Tensile modulus for talc-filled composite can be predicted with rule of mixture, while a PPA-based model can be used to predict the modulus and strength of GF-filled composites.

  18. High Density Polyethylene Composites Reinforced with Hybrid Inorganic Fillers: Morphology, Mechanical and Thermal Expansion Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birm-June Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of individual and combined talc and glass fibers (GFs on mechanical and thermal expansion performance of the filled high density polyethylene (HDPE composites was studied. Several published models were adapted to fit the measured tensile modulus and strength of various composite systems. It was shown that the use of silane-modified GFs had a much larger effect in improving mechanical properties and in reducing linear coefficient of thermal expansion (LCTE values of filled composites, compared with the use of un-modified talc particles due to enhanced bonding to the matrix, larger aspect ratio, and fiber alignment for GFs. Mechanical properties and LCTE values of composites with combined talc and GF fillers varied with talc and GF ratio at a given total filler loading level. The use of a larger portion of GFs in the mix can lead to better composite performance, while the use of talc can help lower the composite costs and increase its recyclability. The use of 30 wt % combined filler seems necessary to control LCTE values of filled HDPE in the data value range generally reported for commercial wood plastic composites. Tensile modulus for talc-filled composite can be predicted with rule of mixture, while a PPA-based model can be used to predict the modulus and strength of GF-filled composites.

  19. Reinforcement of Aluminum Oxide Filler on the Flexural Strength of Different Types of Denture Base Resins: An In vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsa, G.; Shetty, Rohit; Huddar, Dayanand; Sankeshwari, Banashree; Chopade, Swapnil

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acrylic resins have been used extensively for the fabrication of denture bases because of their aesthetic qualities, ease of manipulation and repairability. Flexural fatigue of the denture base has been shown to be a factor in the clinical failure of polymethyl methacrylate resin dentures. Also, the fracture can result from impact, fatigue or degradation of the base material. Hence, there is a need to increase the strength of denture base resins. Aim To evaluate the effect of reinforcing alumina oxide filler on the flexural strength of different acrylic resins. Materials and Methods A total of 180 acrylic specimens were fabricated, which were divided into three groups self cure acrylic resin (SC), conventional heat cure resin (HC) and high strength heat cure resin (HI). Each group was divided into four subgroups i.e., control group and the specimens of the remaining three groups were reinforced with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) powder by 5%, 10% and 15% by weight. Specimens were stored in distilled water for one week; flexural strength was tested by universal testing machine. Results were analysed by one-way analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey paired group comparison tests. Results Flexural strength of SC increased by 9%, 13% and 19%, Flexural strength of HC increased by 8%, 15% and 19% and that of HI increased by 21%, 26% and 29% compared to control group by adding 5%,10% and 15% of alumina filler (p-value acrylic resin, conventional heat cure acrylic resin and high strength heat cure acrylic resin increased the flexural strength. Increasing the flexural strength of the acrylic resin base material could lead to more clinical success. PMID:28571274

  20. Experimental Investigation of the Magnetorheological Behavior of PDMS Elastomer Reinforced with Iron Micro/Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manuel Palacios-Pineda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article focuses on identifying how the addition of iron micro- and nanoparticles influences the physical properties of magnetorheological composite materials developed with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS matrix with different contents of silicone oil used as additive. A number of characterization techniques have been performed in order to fully characterize the samples, such as cyclic and uniaxial extension, rheology, swelling, Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR, X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The comparison between two matrices with different shore hardnesses and their mechanical and chemical properties are elucidated by swelling and tensile tests. In fact, swelling tests showed that higher crosslink density leads to increasing elongation at break and tensile strength values for the composite materials. The best mechanical performance in the magnetorheological material was observed for those samples manufactured using a higher silicone oil content in a hard polymeric matrix. Furthermore, it has been found that the magnetic properties are enhanced when nanoparticles are used as fillers instead of microparticles.

  1. High-Temperature Active Soldering of SiC Particle-Reinforced Al-MMC Using a Novel ZnAlGaMgTi Filler Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biqiang; Zhang, Guifeng; Zhang, Linjie; Xu, Tingting

    2017-10-01

    In order to broaden the application of SiC particle-reinforced aluminum matrix composite in electronics packaging, newly developed ZnAlGaMgTi filler with a low melting point of 418-441 °C was utilized as filler metal for active soldering of aluminum matrix composites (70 vol.%, SiCp/Al-MMCs) for the first time. The effect of loading pressure on joint properties of ZnAlGaMgTi active filler was investigated. The experimental results indicated that novel filler could successfully solder Al-MMCs, and the presence of Mg in the filler enhanced the penetration of Zn, while the forming of Zn-rich barrier layer influenced the active element MPD (melting point depressant) diffusion into parent composite, and the bulk-like (Mg-Si)-rich phase and Ti-containing phase were readily observed at the interface and bond seam. With the increase in loading pressure, the runout phenomenon appeared more significant, and the filler foil thickness and the Zn penetration depth varied pronouncedly. Sound joints with maximum shear strength of 29.6 MPa were produced at 480 °C at 1 MPa, and the crack occurred adjacent to the boundary of SiC particle and then propagated along the interface. A novel model describing the significant mutual diffusion of Al and Zn atoms between the parent material and solder was proposed.

  2. Graphene nanoplatelets as novel reinforcement filler in poly(lactic acid)/epoxidized palm oil green nanocomposites: mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieng, Buong Woei; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Giita Silverajah, V S

    2012-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelet (xGnP) was investigated as a novel reinforcement filler in mechanical properties for poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/epoxidized palm oil (EPO) blend. PLA/EPO/xGnP green nanocomposites were successfully prepared by melt blending method. PLA/EPO reinforced with xGnP resulted in an increase of up to 26.5% and 60.6% in the tensile strength and elongation at break of the nanocomposites respectively, compared to PLA/EPO blend. XRD pattern showed the presence of peak around 26.5° in PLA/EPO nanocomposites which corresponds to characteristic peak of graphene nanoplatelets. However, incorporation of xGnP has no effect on the flexural strength and modulus. Impact strength of PLA/5 wt% EPO improved by 73.6% with the presence of 0.5 wt% xGnP loading. Mechanical properties of PLA were greatly improved by the addition of a small amount of graphene nanoplatelets (<1 wt%).

  3. Morphological Structure, Rheological Behavior, Mechanical Properties and Sound Insulation Performance of Thermoplastic Rubber Composites Reinforced by Different Inorganic Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanpei Fei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The application area of a sound insulation material is highly dependent on the technology adopted for its processing. In this study, thermoplastic rubber (TPR, polypropylene/ethylene propylene diene monomer composites were simply prepared via an extrusion method. Two microscale particles, CaCO3 and hollow glass microspheres (HGW were chosen to not only enhance the sound insulation but also reinforced the mechanical properties. Meanwhile, the processing capability of composites was confirmed. SEM images showed that the CaCO3 was uniformly dispersed in TPR matrix with ~3 μm scale aggregates, while the HGM was slightly aggregated to ~13 μm scale. The heterogeneous dispersion of micro-scale fillers strongly affected the sound transmission loss (STL value of composites. The STL values of TPR composites with 40 wt % CaCO3 and 20 wt % HGM composites were about 12 dB and 7 dB higher than that of pure TPR sample, respectively. The improved sound insulation performances of the composites have been attributed to the enhanced reflection and dissipate sound energy in the heterogeneous composite. Moreover, the mechanical properties were also enhanced. The discontinued sound impedance and reinforced stiffness were considered as crucial for the sound insulation.

  4. Graphene Nanoplatelets as Novel Reinforcement Filler in Poly(lactic acid/Epoxidized Palm Oil Green Nanocomposites: Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Giita Silverajah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Graphene nanoplatelet (xGnP was investigated as a novel reinforcement filler in mechanical properties for poly(lactic acid (PLA/epoxidized palm oil (EPO blend. PLA/EPO/xGnP green nanocomposites were successfully prepared by melt blending method. PLA/EPO reinforced with xGnP resulted in an increase of up to 26.5% and 60.6% in the tensile strength and elongation at break of the nanocomposites respectively, compared to PLA/EPO blend. XRD pattern showed the presence of peak around 26.5° in PLA/EPO nanocomposites which corresponds to characteristic peak of graphene nanoplatelets. However, incorporation of xGnP has no effect on the flexural strength and modulus. Impact strength of PLA/5 wt% EPO improved by 73.6% with the presence of 0.5 wt% xGnP loading. Mechanical properties of PLA were greatly improved by the addition of a small amount of graphene nanoplatelets ( < 1 wt%.

  5. A grey relational analytical approach to orange peel filler particulates for tapped density experiments of green composite reinforcements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseyi Ayodele Ajibade

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring density changes during transportation of composite fillers is the principal reason for composite industries implementing the tapped density concept. Till date, very sparse literature information exists on tapped density optimisation for orange peel particles (OPPs. A unique application of grey relational analysis (GRA in the optimisation of tapped process parameters for OPPs is contributed in this paper. Experimental results on the principal process parameters indicate G1H1I2J3 as the best experimental run, which translates to 257.956 g and 78.076 cm3 as well as 254.939 g and 72.94 cm3 for masses and volumes of the 0.425 and 0.600 mm OPPs, respectively. In addition, Taguchi method was applied to arrive at an optimal parametric setting of G2H2I1J1 for comparative purposes which translate to 257.723 g and 75.031 cm3 for mass and volume of the 0.425 OPPs, as well as 254.952 g and 77.982 cm3 for the mass and volume of 0.600 mm OPPs. By comparison, the GRA values produced positive percentage improvement over other optimal values. The unique contribution of this paper are principally the (i application of GRA in a novel manner, incorporating harmonic mean in factor-level determination and computation of S/N responses; (ii development of new indices of tapped density; and (iii introduction of economic factors in tapped density computations, incorporating inflation and interest factors. The practical utility of the demonstrated approach lies in reducing the uncertainties about density measurements in the transportation of green fillers for use as composite reinforcements.

  6. Influence of Sawdust Bio-filler on the Tensile, Flexural, and Impact Properties of Mangifera Indica Leaf Stalk Fibre Reinforced Polyester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heckadka Srinivas Shenoy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to have biodegradable composites is aloft in today’s market as they are environment friendly and are also easy to fabricate. In this study, mangifera indica leaf stalk fibres were used as reinforcement along with saw dust as bio-filler material. Unsaturated isophthalic polyester resin was used as the matrix. The fibres were treated with 6 % vol. NaOH and neutralized with 3 % vol. of dilute HCl. Treatment of sawdust fillers was done by using 2% vol. NaOH solution. Hand layup method and compression moulding technique was used to fabricate the composite laminates. Specimens for evaluating the mechanical properties were prepared by using water jet machining. The results indicated an increase in tensile, flexural and impact strength of composites with addition of sawdust upto 3%. Further addition of the bio-filler resulted in decrease of mechanical properties.

  7. The use of atomic force microscopy as an important technique to analyze the dispersion of nanometric fillers and morphology in nanocomposites and polymer blends based on elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Fabiula Danielli Bastos de; Scuracchio, Carlos Henrique, E-mail: fabiuladesousa@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do ABC (CECS/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas

    2014-11-15

    AFM has been recognized as one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of surface morphologies because it creates three-dimensional images at angstrom and nano scale. This technique has been exhaustively used in the analyses of dispersion of nanometric components in nanocomposites and in polymer blends, because of the easiness of sample preparation and lower equipment maintenance costs compared to electron microscopy. In this review, contributions using AFM are described, with emphasis on the dispersion of nanofillers in polymeric matrices. It is aimed to show the importance of technical analysis for nanocomposites and polymer blends based on elastomers. (author)

  8. Ball milled bauxite residue as a reinforcing filler in phosphate-based intumescent system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiat Ibironke Arogundade

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bauxite residue (BR is an alumina refinery waste with a global disposal problem. Of the 120 MT generated annually, only 3 MT is disposed via utilization. One of the significant challenges to sustainable utilization has been found to be the cost of processing. In this work, using ball milling, we achieved material modification of bauxite residue. Spectrometric imaging with FESEM showed the transformation from an aggregate structure to nano, platy particulates, leading to particle size homogeneity. BET analysis showed surface area was increased by 23%, while pH was reduced from 10.8 to 9.1 due to collapsing of the hydroxyl surface by the fracturing action of the ball mill. Incorporation of this into a phosphate-based fire retardant, intumescent formulation led to improved material dispersion and the formation of reinforcing heat shielding char nodules. XRD revealed the formation of ceramic metal phosphates which acted as an additional heat sink to the intumescent system, thereby reducing char oxidation and heat transfer to the substrate. Steel substrate temperature from a Bunsen burner test reduced by 33%. Therefore, ball milling can serve as a simple, low-cost processing route for the reuse of bauxite residue in intumescent composites.

  9. Adhesive retention of experimental fiber-reinforced composite, orthodontic acrylic resin, and aliphatic urethane acrylate to silicone elastomer for maxillofacial prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosor, Begüm Yerci; Artunç, Celal; Şahan, Heval

    2015-07-01

    A key factor of an implant-retained facial prosthesis is the success of the bonding between the substructure and the silicone elastomer. Little has been reported on the bonding of fiber reinforced composite (FRC) to silicone elastomers. Experimental FRC could be a solution for facial prostheses supported by light-activated aliphatic urethane acrylate, orthodontic acrylic resin, or commercially available FRCs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding of the experimental FRC, orthodontic acrylic resin, and light-activated aliphatic urethane acrylate to a commercially available high-temperature vulcanizing silicone elastomer. Shear and 180-degree peel bond strengths of 3 different substructures (experimental FRC, orthodontic acrylic resin, light-activated aliphatic urethane acrylate) (n=15) to a high-temperature vulcanizing maxillofacial silicone elastomer (M511) with a primer (G611) were assessed after 200 hours of accelerated artificial light-aging. The specimens were tested in a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 10 mm/min. Data were collected and statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA, followed by the Bonferroni correction and the Dunnett post hoc test (α=.05). Modes of failure were visually determined and categorized as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed and were statistically analyzed with the chi-squared goodness-of-fit test (α=.05). As the mean shear bond strength values were evaluated statistically, no difference was found among the experimental FRC, aliphatic urethane acrylate, and orthodontic acrylic resin subgroups (P>.05). The mean peel bond strengths of experimental fiber reinforced composite and aliphatic urethane acrylate were not found to be statistically different (P>.05). The mean value of the orthodontic acrylic resin subgroup peel bond strength was found to be statistically lower (P.05). Shear forces predominantly exhibited cohesive failure (64.4%), whereas peel forces predominantly exhibited adhesive failure (93.3%). The

  10. Elastomers Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Primary capabilities include: elastomer compounding in various sizes (micro, 3x5, 8x12, 8x15 rubber mills); elastomer curing and post curing (two 50-ton presses, one...

  11. Mechanical properties of dental composite materials reinforced with micro and nano-size Al2O3 filler particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroutan, F.; Javadpour, J.; Khavandi, A.; Atai, M.

    2011-01-01

    Composite specimens were prepared by dispersion of various amounts of nano-sized Al 2 O 3 fillers in a monomer system containing 60 p ercent B is-GMA and 40 p ercent T EGDMA. For comparative purposes, composite samples containing micrometer size Al 2 O 3 fillers were also prepared following the same procedure. The mechanical properties of the light- cured samples were assessed by three-point flexural strength, diametral tensile strength, and microhardness tests. The results indicated a more than hundred percent increase in the flexural strength and nearly an eighty percent increase in the diametral tensile strength values in the samples containing nano-size Al 2 O 3 filler particles. It is interesting to note that, this improvement was observed at a much lower nano-size filler content. Fracture surfaces analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, indicated a brittle type of fracture in both sets of specimens.

  12. Research progress of composite fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixuan ZHAO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Using composite filler is a very potential way to braze dissimilar material, especially braze metals with ceramics. The composite filler which is added varieties of high temperature alloy, carbon fiber and ceramic particles has a suitable coefficient of thermal expansion. The application of composite filler can release the residual stress caused by mismatch of thermal expansion coefficient in the brazing joints and improve the overall performance significantly. According to the traditional classification method of composite materials, the composite filler is divided into micron-reinforced composite filler and nano-reinforced composite filler, of which the feature and research status are discussed in this text. According to the influence of different size reinforced phases on microstructure and mechanical property of the brazing joints, nano-reinforced composite filler has more uniform and better structure compared with micron-reinforced composite filler, and higher joint strengh can be obtained by using it. However, the reinforced mechanism is still an open question, and will become the key area of the future research work.

  13. Effects of fillers on the properties of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin

    have to be modified according to the specifications of their respective applications. One such prominent method of modifying the properties is by adding suitable fillers. Liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs) have relatively low viscosities when compared with thermoplastics, which is favorable for loading...... modified. The filled elastomers have both favorable properties and shortcomings. The shortcomings are of various types. Fumed silica reinforces the networks with no increase in permittivity (εr,SiO2 ~ 3.9). Barium titanate possesses high dielectric constant (εr,BaTiO3 ~ 150) but its heavy density (6.08 g...

  14. Epoxy elastomers reinforced with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stimuli-responsive shape memory materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lama, G. C.; Nasti, G.; Cerruti, P.; Gentile, G.; Carfagna, C.; Ambrogi, V.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the incorporation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into epoxy-based elastomers was carried out in order to obtain nanocomposite systems with shape memory effect. For the preparation of elastomeric matrices, p-bis(2,3-epoxypropoxy)-α-methylstilbene (DOMS) was cured with sebacic acid. DOMS was synthesized in our laboratory and it is characterized by a rigid-rod, potentially liquid crystalline structure. A lightly cross-linked liquid crystalline elastomer was obtained. As for nanocomposites, variable amounts (0.75, 1.50, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0 wt.%) of COOH-MWCNTs were employed. In order to improve the nanotubes dispersibility and the interfacial adhesion with the epoxy matrix, an optimized two-step procedure was developed, which consisted in grafting the epoxy monomer onto the nanotube surface and then curing it in presence of crosslinking agent. DOMS-functionalized MWCNT were characterized through solvent dispersion experiments, FTIR spectroscopy and TGA analysis, which demonstrated the occurred covalent functionalization of the nanotubes with the epoxy monomers. The morphological analysis through electron microscopy demonstrated that this was an efficient strategy to improve the dispersion of nanotubes within the matrix. The second part of the work was devoted to the structural, thermal, mechanical and electric characterization of elastomeric nanocomposites. The results indicated a general improvement of properties of nanocomposites. Also, independently of the nanotube content, a smectic phase formed. Shape memory features of LC systems were also evaluated. It was demonstrated the shape could be recovered through heating, solvent immersion, as well as upon the application of an electrical field

  15. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis and Three-Body Abrasive Wear Behaviour of Thermoplastic Copolyester Elastomer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanth Rajashekaraiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various amounts of short fibers (glass and carbon and particulate fillers like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, silicon carbide (SiC, and alumina (Al2O3 were systematically introduced into the thermoplastic copolyester elastomer (TCE matrix for reinforcement purpose. The mechanical properties such as storage modulus, loss modulus, and Tan δ by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA and three-body abrasive wear performance on a dry sand rubber wheel abrasion tester have been investigated. For abrasive wear study, the experiments were planned according to L27 orthogonal array by considering three factors and three levels. The complex moduli for TCE hybrid composites were pushed to a higher level relative to the TCE filled PTFE composite. At lower temperatures (in the glassy region, the storage modulus increases with increase in wt.% of reinforcement (fiber + fillers and the value is maximum for the composite with 40 wt.% reinforcement. The loss modulus and damping peaks were also found to be higher by the incorporation of SiC and Al2O3 microfillers. The routine abrasive wear test results indicated that TCE filled PTFE composite exhibited better abrasion resistance. Improvements in the abrasion resistance, however, have not been achieved by short-fiber and particlaute filler reinforcements. From the Taguchi’s experimental findings, optimal combination of control factors were obtained for minimum wear volume and also predictive correlations were proposed. Further, the worn surface morphology of the samples was discussed.

  16. Radiation preparation of graphene/carbon nanotubes hybrid fillers for mechanical reinforcement of poly(vinyl alcohol) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Youwei; Wang, Shuojue; Sun, Chao; Yu, Hongyan; Zeng, Xinmiao; Zhai, Maolin

    2016-01-01

    Graphene/carbon nanotubes (G/CNTs) hybrid fillers were synthesized by γ-ray radiation reduction of graphene oxide (GO) in presence of CNTs. The obtained hybrid fillers with three-dimensional (3D) interconnected network structure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite films with enhanced mechanical properties and thermal stability were subsequently prepared by solution blending of G/CNTs with PVA matrix. The tensile strength and Young's modulus of PVA composite films containing 1 wt% G/CNTs were measured to be 81.9 MPa and 3.9 GPa respectively, which were 56% and 33.6% higher than those of pure PVA. These substantial improvements could be attributed to the interconnected 3D structure of G/CNTs, homogeneous dispersion as well as the strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between G/CNTs and PVA macromolecular chains.

  17. Influence of graphite filler on two-body abrasive wear behaviour of carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresha, B.; Ramesh, B.N.; Subbaya, K.M.; Ravi Kumar, B.N.; Chandramohan, G.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of graphite filler additions on two-body abrasive wear behaviour of compression moulded carbon-epoxy (C-E) composites have been evaluated using reciprocating wear unit and pin-on-disc wear unit under single pass and multi-pass conditions respectively. The carbon fabric used in the present study is a plain one; each warp fiber pass alternately under and over each weft fiber. The fabric is symmetrical, with good stability and reasonable porosity. Abrasive wear studies were carried out under different loads/abrading distance using different grades of SiC abrasive paper (150 and 320 grit size). Graphite filler in C-E reduced the specific wear rate. Further, the wear volume loss drops significantly with increase in graphite content. Comparative wear performance of all the composites showed higher specific wear rate in two-body wear (single-pass conditions) compared to multi-pass conditions. Further, the tribo-performance of C-E indicated that the graphite filler inclusion resulted in enhancement of wear behaviour significantly. Wear mechanisms were suggested and strongly supported by worn surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Preparation of magnetorheological elastomers and their slip-free characterization by means of parallel-plate rotational rheometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Bastian L.; Pelteret, Jean-Paul; Kaschta, Joachim; Schubert, Dirk W.; Steinmann, Paul

    2017-08-01

    A systematic study is presented to highlight a methodology of sample preparation and subsequent slip-free characterization of magnetorheological (MR) elastomers in parallel-plate rotational rheometry. Focusing on the magnetic field-dependent nonlinear viscoelastic behavior an array of oscillatory strain sweep measurements is conducted with samples cured within the rheometer. The examined nonlinear material response (i.e. the amplitude dependence of the storage and loss moduli) as a function of the applied magnetic field is found to be qualitatively similar to the amplitude dependence of particle reinforced elastomers (i.e. the Payne effect). Therefore, the experimental data (both moduli) is decomposed similar to that for reinforced elastomers and a phenomenological model is formulated for both the storage and loss modulus to account for the physical mechanisms governing the nonlinear material characteristics. Parameter identification suggests that the material response at low magnetic fields is dominated by the polymeric network whereas the strong magneto-reinforced microstructure governs the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic behavior at high magnetic fields. The overall experimental outcome further suggests that the underlying concept of the phenomenological model for particle reinforced elastomers (i.e. destruction and reformation of the filler network) can be transfered to MR materials. Consequently, the proposed phenomenological model can be applied to quantify and further analyze the nonlinear response characteristics of MR elastomers (i.e. the amplitude dependence of the storage and loss modulus as a function of the applied magnetic field) that is closely linked to microstructural changes of the magnetizable particle network.

  19. Effect of addition of plants-derived polyamide 11 elastomer on the mechanical and tribological properties of hemp fiber reinforced polyamide 1010 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaida, Jun; Nishitani, Yosuke; Kitano, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    For the purpose of developing the new engineering materials such as structural materials and tribomaterials based on all plants-derived materials, the effect of the addition of plant-derived polyamide 11 Elastomer (PA11E) on the mechanical and tribological properties of hemp fiber(HF) reinforced polyamide 1010 (HF/PA1010) composites was investigated. PA1010 and PA11E (except the polyether groups used as soft segment) were made from plant-derived castor oil. Hemp fiber was surface-treated by two types of treatment: alkali treatment by NaOH solution and surface treatment by ureido silane coupling agent. HF/PA1010/PA11E ternary composites were extruded by a twin screw extruder and injection-molded. Their mechanical properties such as tensile, bending, Izod impact and tribological properties by ring-on-plate type sliding wear testing were evaluated. The effect of the addition of PA11E on the mechanical and tribological properties of HF/PA1010 composite differed for each property. Izod impact strength and specific wear rate improved with the addition of PA11E although tensile strength, modulus, and friction coefficient decreased with PA11E. It follows from these results that it may be possible to develop the new engineering materials with sufficient balance between mechanical and tribological properties.

  20. Mechanical and thermal behaviour of isotactic polypropylene reinforced with inorganic fullerene-like WS{sub 2} nanoparticles: Effect of filler loading and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros (ICTP-CSIC), Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Naffakh, Mohammed, E-mail: mohammed.naffakh@upm.es [Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencia de los Materiales, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-09-16

    The thermal and mechanical behaviour of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) nanocomposites reinforced with different loadings of inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide (IF-WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles was investigated. The IF-WS{sub 2} noticeably enhanced the polymer stiffness and strength, ascribed to their uniform dispersion, the formation of a large nanoparticle–matrix interface combined with a nucleating effect on iPP crystallization. Their reinforcement effect was more pronounced at high temperatures. However, a drop in ductility and toughness was found at higher IF-WS{sub 2} concentrations. The tensile behaviour of the nanocomposites was extremely sensitive to the strain rate and temperature, and their yield strength was properly described by the Eyring's equation. The activation energy increased while the activation volume decreased with increasing nanoparticle loading, indicating a reduction in polymer chain motion. The nanoparticles improved the thermomechanical properties of iPP: raised the glass transition and heat deflection temperatures while decreased the coefficient of thermal expansion. The nanocomposites also displayed superior flame retardancy with longer ignition time and reduced peak heat release rate. Further, a gradual rise in thermal conductivity was found with increasing IF-WS{sub 2} loading both in the glassy and rubbery states. The results presented herein highlight the benefits and high potential of using IF-nanoparticles for enhancing the thermomechanical properties of thermoplastic polymers compared to other nanoscale fillers. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The thermal and mechanical behaviour of iPP/IF-WS{sub 2} nanocomposites was studied. • Low IF-WS{sub 2} contents provide a good balance between stiffness, strength and toughness. • Their tensile behaviour is sensitive to the strain rate and temperature. • The nanocomposites exhibit superior thermal conductivity and flame retardancy than iPP. • The

  1. Mechanical and thermal behaviour of isotactic polypropylene reinforced with inorganic fullerene-like WS2 nanoparticles: Effect of filler loading and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M.; Naffakh, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical behaviour of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) nanocomposites reinforced with different loadings of inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide (IF-WS 2 ) nanoparticles was investigated. The IF-WS 2 noticeably enhanced the polymer stiffness and strength, ascribed to their uniform dispersion, the formation of a large nanoparticle–matrix interface combined with a nucleating effect on iPP crystallization. Their reinforcement effect was more pronounced at high temperatures. However, a drop in ductility and toughness was found at higher IF-WS 2 concentrations. The tensile behaviour of the nanocomposites was extremely sensitive to the strain rate and temperature, and their yield strength was properly described by the Eyring's equation. The activation energy increased while the activation volume decreased with increasing nanoparticle loading, indicating a reduction in polymer chain motion. The nanoparticles improved the thermomechanical properties of iPP: raised the glass transition and heat deflection temperatures while decreased the coefficient of thermal expansion. The nanocomposites also displayed superior flame retardancy with longer ignition time and reduced peak heat release rate. Further, a gradual rise in thermal conductivity was found with increasing IF-WS 2 loading both in the glassy and rubbery states. The results presented herein highlight the benefits and high potential of using IF-nanoparticles for enhancing the thermomechanical properties of thermoplastic polymers compared to other nanoscale fillers. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The thermal and mechanical behaviour of iPP/IF-WS 2 nanocomposites was studied. • Low IF-WS 2 contents provide a good balance between stiffness, strength and toughness. • Their tensile behaviour is sensitive to the strain rate and temperature. • The nanocomposites exhibit superior thermal conductivity and flame retardancy than iPP. • The benefits of using IF-WS 2 compared

  2. Electrical Breakdown and Mechanical Ageing in Dielectric Elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakaria, Shamsul Bin

    that affect the breakdown strength of the pre-stretched DEs was developed. Breakdown strength was determined for samples with and without volume conservation and was found to depend strongly on the strain and the thickness of the samples. In order for DEs to be fully implementable in commercial products...... fillers (e.g. oils). Interestingly, the results also showed that soft fillers significantly influence the long-term electromechanical reliability of PDMS elastomers. However, despite the pre-stretched PDMS elastomers filled with hard and soft filler experience difficulties to maintain their long...

  3. Recycled newspaper fibers as reinforcing fillers in thermoplastics. Part I, Analysis of tensile and impact properties in polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. R. Sanadi; R. A. Young; C. Clemons; R. M. Rowell

    1994-01-01

    Recycled newspaper fibers (ONP) are potentially outstanding nonabrasive reinforcing fibers with high specific properties. In this study, a high energy thermokinetic mixer was used to mix these fibers in a polypropylene (PP) matrix, and the blends were then injection molded in order to observe the tensile and impact strengths of the composites. A 40% (weight) of ONP in...

  4. Fabrication and tribological response of aluminium 6061 hybrid composite reinforced with bamboo char and boron carbide micro-fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chethan, K. N.; Pai, Anand; Keni, Laxmikant G.; Singhal, Ashish; Sinha, Shubham

    2018-02-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have a wide scope of industrial applications and triumph over conventional materials due to their light weight, higher specific strength, good wear resistance and lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The present study aims at establishing the feasibility of using Bamboo charcoal particulate and boron carbide as reinforcements in Al-6061 alloy matrix and to investigate their effect on the wear of composites taking into consideration the interfacial adhesion of the reinforcements in the alloy. Al-6061 alloy was chosen as a base metallic alloy matrix. Sun-dried bamboo canes were used for charcoal preparation with the aid of a muffle furnace. The carbon content in the charcoal samples was determined by EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy). In present study, stir casting technique was used to prepare the samples with 1%, 2%, and 3% weight of bamboo charcoal and boron carbide with Al-6061. The fabricated composites were homogenised at 570°C for 6 hours and cooled at room temperature. Wear studies were carried out on the specimens with different speed and loads. It was found that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with increase in the reinforcement content.

  5. Comparative studies of Titanium Dioxide and Zinc Oxide as a potential filler in Polypropylene reinforced rice husk composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang, M.; Mohd, W. R. Wan

    2018-04-01

    Arising global environmental issues have triggered the search of new products and processes that are compatible with the environment while maintaining novel properties of materials. In this work, green composites containing rice husk (RH), polypropylene (PP), and incorporated with two different fillers namely titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) were prepared using an internal mixer and were injected into desired specimen by using an injection molding method. Mechanical properties of the composite were studied using Instron universal testing machine with load cell of 30kN capacity. Morphological of tensile fractured surface of composites was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the composites with the addition of TiO2 gave an excellent mechanical properties than the composites filled with ZnO. Furthermore, morphological image of PP/RH/TiO2 also shows a good interaction occurred between polymer matrix and RH particles as compared to that of PP/RH/ZnO.

  6. Effect of carbon nanotube reinforcement on the properties of the recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate)/poly(ethylene naphthalate) (r-PET/PEN) blends containing functional elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yesil, Sertan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Mechanical properties of r-PET improved with addition of PEN, elastomers and CNT. • Elastomer size and dispersion played important role in the variation of properties. • Selective localization of CNT affected the mechanical and electrical properties. • E-EA-MAH based samples had higher mechanical properties than E-MA-GMA based ones. - Abstract: In this study, the mechanical, thermomechanical, thermal, electrical properties and the morphology of the composites, based on blends of recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate) (r-PET) and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) that were mixed with functional elastomers and multi walled carbon nanotube (CNT) were investigated. Two types of functional elastomers; terpolymer of ethylene–ethyl acrylate–maleic anhydride (E-EA-MAH) and terpolymer of ethylene–methyl acrylate–glycidyl methacrylate (E-MA-GMA), were used to ensure the miscibility between PET and PEN during the preparation of the blends and composites. All composite and blend samples were extruded by using a laboratory scale twin screw microcompounder. Test samples were prepared via laboratory scale injection molding machine. According to the results of the thermomechanical tests, usage of both elastomers enhanced the miscibility between r-PET and PEN. Morphological analyses showed that the blends and composites which contain E-EA-MAH exhibited better elastomer phase dispersion with smaller domain sizes when compared with the samples with E-MA-GMA. Samples prepared with E-EA-MAH had better mechanical properties than the ones containing E-MA-GMA due to the better elastomer phase dispersion. Moreover, addition of CNT also improved the mechanical properties of the samples for both elastomer types. In contrast to mechanical test results, samples prepared with E-MA-GMA had higher electrical conductivity values when compared with those of the ones containing E-EA-MAH due to the differences in the selective distribution of CNT particles between the

  7. Evaluation of thermal conductivity and flexural strength properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) denture base material reinforced with different fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul, Esra; Aladağ, Lütfü İhsan; Yesildal, Ruhi

    2016-11-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is widely used in prosthodontics as a denture base material. However, it has several disadvantages, including low strength and low thermal conductivity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate thermal conductivity and flexural strength after adding powdered Ag, TiO 2 , ZrO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , SiC, SiC-nano, Si 3 N 4 , and HA-nano in ratios of 10 wt% to PMMA. A total of 144 specimens were fabricated and divided into 18 groups. Specimens were left in water for 30 days. Thermal conductivity values were measured using a heat flowmeter, flexural strength was measured with a 3-point bend test, and specimens were investigated with environmental scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA was used to compare means followed by using Duncan multiple range test (α=.05). The thermal conductivity value of PMMA increased significantly after the addition of Si 3 N 4 , SiC, Al 2 O 3 , SiC-nano, TiO 2 , ZrO 2 , HA-nano, and Ag. Progressive increases in thermal conductivity were observed in Si 3 N 4 , SiC, and Al 2 O 3 fillers. Flexural strength values of the control group were not significantly different from those of the SiC, Al 2 O 3 , or Ag group (P>.05). In the other groups, flexural strength values decreased significantly (Pthermal conductivity values that are dissipated more homogeneously in PMMA. Although the addition of 10 wt% SiC, Al 2 O 3, and Ag powder to PMMA significantly increased thermal conductivity, the flexural strength values of PMMA were not significantly changed. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preparation of micro-pored silicone elastomer through radiation crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiaoling; Gu Mei; Xie Xubing; Huang Wei

    2013-01-01

    The radiation crosslinking was adopted to prepare the micro-pored silicone elastomer, which was performed by vulcanization and foaming respectively. Radiation crosslinking is a new method to prepare micro-pored material with high performance by use of radiation technology. Silicon dioxide was used as filler, and silicone elastomer was vulcanized by electron beams, then the micro-pored material was made by heating method at a high temperature. The effects of absorbed dose and filler content on the performance and morphology were investigated. The structure and distribution of pores were observed by SEM. The results show that the micro-pored silicon elastomer can be prepared successfully by controlling the absorbed dose and filler content. It has a smooth surface similar to a rubber meanwhile the pores are round and unconnected to each other with the minimum size of 14 μm. And the good mechanical performance can be suitable for further uses. (authors)

  9. Influence of Nanogels on Mechanical, Dynamic Mechanical, and Thermal Properties of Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Suman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Use of sulfur crosslinked nanogels to improve various properties of virgin elastomers was investigated for the first time. Natural rubber (NR and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR nanogels were prepared by prevulcanization of the respective rubber lattices. These nanogels were characterized by dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy (AFM, solvent swelling, mechanical, and dynamic mechanical property measurements. Intermixing of gel and matrix at various ratios was carried out. Addition of NR gels greatly improved the green strength of SBR, whereas presence of SBR nanogels induced greater thermal stability in NR. For example, addition of 16 phr of NR gel increased the maximum tensile stress value of neat SBR by more than 48%. Noticeable increase in glass transition temperature of the gel filled systems was also observed. Morphology of these gel filled elastomers was studied by a combination of energy dispersive X-ray mapping, transmission electron microscopy, and AFM techniques. Particulate filler composite reinforcement models were used to understand the reinforcement mechanism of these nanogels.

  10. Multifunctional Graphene-Silicone Elastomer Nanocomposite, Method of Making the Same, and Uses Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuyang (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    A nanocomposite composition having a silicone elastomer matrix having therein a filler loading of greater than 0.05 wt %, based on total nanocomposite weight, wherein the filler is functional graphene sheets (FGS) having a surface area of from 300 sq m/g to 2630 sq m2/g; and a method for producing the nanocomposite and uses thereof.

  11. Multifunctional Graphene-Silicone Elastomer Nanocomposite, Method of Making the Same, and Uses Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuyang (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A nanocomposite composition having a silicone elastomer matrix having therein a filler loading of greater than 0.05 weight percentage, based on total nanocomposite weight, wherein the filler is functional graphene sheets (FGS) having a surface area of from 300 square meters per gram to 2630 square meters per gram; and a method for producing the nanocomposite and uses thereof.

  12. Tailoring Silica Surface Properties by Plasma Polymerization for Elastomer Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, M.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Datta, Rabin; Talma, Auke; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.; van Ooij, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    The surface properties of reinforcing fillers are a crucial factor for dispersion and filler–polymer interaction in rubber compounds, as they strongly influence the final vulcanized properties of the rubber article. Silica is gaining more and more importance as reinforcing filler for rubbers, as it

  13. Tailoring Silica Surface Properties by Plasma Polymerization for Elastomer Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, M.; Dierkes, W.K.; Datta, R.N.; Talma, A.G.; Noordermeer, J.W.M.; van Ooij, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    The surface properties of reinforcing fillers are a crucial factor for dispersion and filler–polymer interaction in rubber compounds, as they strongly influence the final vulcanized properties of the rubber article. Silica is gaining more and more importance as reinforcing filler for rubbers, as it

  14. Reinforcement with fluoroplastic additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, R.A.; Stewart, C.W.; Thomas, E.W.; Stahl, W.M.

    1991-05-01

    The use of high molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a reinforcing additive to improve the tear strength of elastomers was studied in silicone rubber by the mid-1950s and in fluoroelastomers by the late-1960s. Although the PTFE is added as a powder, the shear developed during compounding into an elastomer fibrillates the power into a continuous network of nodes and fibers. This network structure effectively reinforces elastomers but it also leads to distortion of finished parts and unacceptably high hardness and modulus of vulcanizates. A new high molecular weight TFE/HFP fluoroplastic micropowder has recently been developed (Teflon MP1500, Du Pont) which forms short fibers, ribbons or platelets when compounded with sufficient shear into elastomers. The controlled structure developed during compounding allows high levels of incorporation of the micropowder into elastomers with uniform dispersion and results in significant improvements in tear strength and abrasion resistance, as well as reduced coefficients of friction.

  15. Radiation Curing of Rubber/Thermoplastic Composites Containing Different Inorganic Fillers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Zayat, M.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Blending of polymeric materials has proved to be a successful method for preparing new polymeric materials having not only the main properties of the blends components but also new modification as well as specific ones. High density polyethylene (HDPE) and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) are both soild and constitute the blend components to be investigated in present study and hence the method of mechanical blending is the most suitable one for its preparation . HDPE thermoplastic is a semi – crystalline polymer ; on the other hand , NBR elastomer is totally amorphous polymer. Both polymers are categorized as crosslinking polymers with respect to ionizing gamma rays with different extents. In order to increase the efficiency of irradiation curing of such NBR/HDPE blend , it may be required to add suitable additives such as reinforcing fillers that may increase the extent of crosslinking at the same irradiation dose . Thus synthetic fillers are used commercially in industrial processing of rubber formulation due to its specific characteristics and hence its high reinforcing capacity and suitable price . To follow property changes occurred to the blend as well as its composites , measurements have been done to monitor the changes that happened to mechanical, physical and thermal properties as a function of irradiation dose and composition of blends and composites.

  16. Synthesis and surface modification of inorganic particles for use in elastomers and lithium-ion batteries; Darstellung und Oberflaechenmodifizierung anorganischer Partikel zum Einsatz in Elastomeren und Lithium-Ionen-Batterien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joege, Frank

    2010-11-12

    A new type of filler (chlorosiloxane-particles) was synthesized and the correlation between its properties and the synthesis parameters were examined. 200 g of these particles were produced in order to test their reinforcing behavior in elastomers, in cooperation with Continental AG. Different commercial fillers were surface modified by a simple two step process, which was developed in our group. Firstly, the fillers were treated with siliciumtetrachloride and defined amounts of water. Secondly these materials were hydrolyzed in buffer-solution or functionalized with organic nucleophiles to obtain silica coated hydrophilic surfaces, or functionalized hydrophobic surfaces, respectively. The correlation between the physical properties and the synthesis parameters of these materials was examined. The process was used in cooperation with Continental AG to enhance the reinforcing behavior of carbon black (N339) in elastomers in order to reduce or substitute the amount of more expensive fillers and additives without compromising the performance of the final product. Within the BMBF funded research project LiVe we applied this process to graphitic carbon to enhance its electrochemical properties and cycle life in lithium-ion batteries. The graphitic carbons were modified in a solution or in a gas phase apparatus. The correlation between the physical properties and the synthesis parameters of these materials were examined and their electrochemical performance was tested in the group of Professor Winter at the University of Munster. The surface modification leads to an increase in cycle life and in some cases to an increase of the reversible capacity. Additionally, the carbons functionalized with organic substances were easier to process and exhibited a better wettability.

  17. Silicone rubbers for dielectric elastomers with improved dielectric and mechanical properties as a result of substituting silica with titanium dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2016-01-01

    metal oxide filled elastomer may contain too much filler. We therefore explore the replacement of silica with titanium dioxide to ensure a relatively low concentration of filler. Liquid silicone rubber (LSR) has relatively low viscosity, which is favorable for loading inorganic fillers. In the present...... and dynamic viscosity. Filled silicone elastomers with high loadings of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles were also studied. The best overall performing formulation had 35 wt.% TiO2 nanoparticles in the POWERSIL® XLR LSR, where the excellent ensemble of relative dielectric permittivity of 4.9 at 0...

  18. Load-bearing capacity of indirect inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses made of particulate filler composite alone or reinforced with E-glass fibers impregnated with various monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Koekoek, Winand; Pekkan, Gurel

    2012-08-01

    The load-bearing capacity and failure types of indirect inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDP), made of particulate filler composite (PFC) (Estenia) alone or reinforced with E-glass fibers impregnated with various monomers were evaluated. Indirect inlay-retained FDPs were made between first premolars and first molars (N=30, 10/per group). The inlay parts of the specimens were silica coated and silanized and the specimens were cemented with dual-polymerized resin cement under ultrasonic vibrations. The experimental groups were as follows: Group 1: FRC1 (BR-100, UTMA) + PFC; Group 2: FRC2 (everStick C&B, Bis-GMA/PMMA) + PFC; Group 3: PFC only. The specimens were kept in distilled water at 37 °C for one month and then subjected to fracture strength test. No significant difference was found between the Group 1 and Group 2 FDPs (1357±301 N and 1213±316 N, respectively) (p>0.05) (ANOVA). Group 3 (856±299 N) showed significantly lower results than those of FRC reinforced groups (pinlay cavities. FDPs made of PFC only showed mainly catastrophic fracture of the pontic. In the FRC reinforced groups, predominantly delamination of the veneering was observed. The use of silica coating and silanization in combination with the dual-polymerized resin cement used; under ultrasonic cementation procedure provided sufficient adhesion to withstand static loading forces at the cementation interface, since the failures were predominantly delamination of the veneering in the FRC reinforced groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Techniques for hot embossing microstructures on liquid silicone rubbers with fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    the versatility of this method that has been established for softer silicone elastomers. Also, as a proof of concept, a microstructured metal (nickel (Ni)) plate is used as an embosser for the films successfully. The ideal condition for hot embossing the LSR formulation (XLR 630 with titanium dioxide fillers......Embossing is an established process for the thermoplastic elastomers but not yet for the thermosetting elastomers. It has already been shown that hot embossing is a viable technology for imprinting microstructures in addition to curing thin silicone films at their gel point. It is one...... of the simplest, most cost-effective, and time-saving methods for replicating microstructures. In the present study, films made fromliquid silicone rubber (LSR) formulations containing fillers are hot embossed under modified operating conditions. The use of such relatively hard silicone elastomers shows...

  20. Mechanical Design Handbook for Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, M.; Zorzi, E.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical Design Handbook for Elastomers reviews state of art in elastomer-damper technology with particular emphasis on applications of highspeed rotor dampers. Self-contained reference but includes some theoretical discussion to help reader understand how and why dampers used for rotating machines. Handbook presents step-by-step procedure for design of elastomer dampers and detailed examples of actual elastomer damper applications.

  1. Preparation and properties of poly(vinyl alcohol/chitosan blend bionanocomposites reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals/ZnO-Ag multifunctional nanosized filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizi S

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Susan Azizi,1 Mansor Bin Ahmad,1 Mohd Zobir Hussein,1 Nor Azowa Ibrahim,1 Farideh Namvar2,31Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, 2Institute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Products, University Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad, IranAbstract: A series of novel bionanocomposites were cast using different contents of zinc oxide-silver nanoparticles (ZnO-AgNPs stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNC as multifunctional nanosized fillers in poly(vinyl alcohol/chitosan (PVA/Cs matrices. The morphological structure, mechanical properties, ultraviolet-visible absorption, and antimicrobial properties of the prepared films were investigated as a function of their CNC/ZnO-AgNP content and compared with PVA/chitosan/CNC bionanocomposite films. X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopic analyses showed that the CNC/ZnO-AgNPs were homogeneously dispersed in the PVA/Cs matrix and the crystallinity increased with increasing nanosized filler content. Compared with pure PVA/Cs, the tensile strength and modulus in the films increased from 0.055 to 0.205 GPa and from 0.395 to 1.20 GPa, respectively. Ultraviolet and visible light can be efficiently absorbed by incorporating ZnO-AgNPs into a PVA/Cs matrix, suggesting that these bionanocomposite films show good visibility and ultraviolet-shielding effects. The bionanocomposite films had excellent antimicrobial properties, killing both Gram-negative Salmonella choleraesuis and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. The enhanced physical properties achieved by incorporating CNC/ZnO-AgNPs could be beneficial in various applications.Keywords: multifunctional nanofiller, bionanocomposite, cellulose nanocrystals, antimicrobial properties, poly(vinyl alcohol/chitosan blend

  2. Bimodal condensation silicone elastomers as dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    as well as high electrical and mechanical breakdown strengths. [1] Most model elastomers are prepared by an end-linking process using a crosslinker with a certain functionality ƒ and a linear polymer with functional groups in both ends, and the resulting networks are so-called unimodal networks where...... unimodal refers to that there is one polymer only in the system. As an alternative to unimodal networks there are the bimodal networks where two polymers with significantly different molecular weights are mixed with one crosslinker. [2]Silicone rubber can be divided into condensation type and addition type...... elastomers were prepared by mixing different mass ratios (9:1, 8:2, 7:3, 6:4, 5:5, 4:6) between long polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chains and short PDMS chains. The resulting elastomers were investigated with respect to their rheology, dielectric properties, tensile strength, electrical breakdown, as well...

  3. Silicone elastomers with superior softness and dielectric properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin

    commercial elastomer, while the dielectric losses remained at a low level. The increase in dielectric permittivity stemmed from the high dipole moment of the chloride groups. Furthermore, the alkyl chloride units yielded a larger free volume resulted in a less dense material with a lower Young's modulus.[3]......Dielectric elastomers (DEs) change their shape and size under a high voltage or reversibly generate a high voltage when deformed. The obstacle of high driving voltages, however, limits the commercial viability of the technology at present. Driving voltage can be lowered by decreasing the Young’s...... modulus and increasing the dielectric permittivity of silicone elastomers. One such prominent method of modifying the properties is by adding suitable additives. [1] The major drawbacks for adding solid fillers are agglomeration and increasing stiffness which is often accompanied by the decrease...

  4. Waste-wood-derived fillers for plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent English; Craig M. Clemons; Nicole Stark; James P. Schneider

    1996-01-01

    Filled thermoplastic composites are stiffer, stronger, and more dimensionally stable than their unfilled counterparts. Such thermoplastics are usually provided to the end-user as a precompounded, pelletized feedstock. Typical reinforcing fillers are inorganic materials like talc or fiberglass, but materials derived from waste wood, such as wood flour and recycled paper...

  5. Plasma polymerization surface modification of Carbon black and its effect in elastomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathew, T.; Datta, Rabin; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Talma, Auke; Ooij, W.J.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface modification of carbon black by plasma polymerization was aimed to reduce its surface energy in order to compatibilize the filler with various elastomers. A fullerenic carbon black was used for the modification process. Thermogravimetric analysis, wetting behavior with liquids of known

  6. Dielectric elastomer memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; McKay, Thomas G.; Xie, Sheng Q.; Calius, Emilio P.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2011-04-01

    Life shows us that the distribution of intelligence throughout flexible muscular networks is a highly successful solution to a wide range of challenges, for example: human hearts, octopi, or even starfish. Recreating this success in engineered systems requires soft actuator technologies with embedded sensing and intelligence. Dielectric Elastomer Actuator(s) (DEA) are promising due to their large stresses and strains, as well as quiet flexible multimodal operation. Recently dielectric elastomer devices were presented with built in sensor, driver, and logic capability enabled by a new concept called the Dielectric Elastomer Switch(es) (DES). DES use electrode piezoresistivity to control the charge on DEA and enable the distribution of intelligence throughout a DEA device. In this paper we advance the capabilities of DES further to form volatile memory elements. A set reset flip-flop with inverted reset line was developed based on DES and DEA. With a 3200V supply the flip-flop behaved appropriately and demonstrated the creation of dielectric elastomer memory capable of changing state in response to 1 second long set and reset pulses. This memory opens up applications such as oscillator, de-bounce, timing, and sequential logic circuits; all of which could be distributed throughout biomimetic actuator arrays. Future work will include miniaturisation to improve response speed, implementation into more complex circuits, and investigation of longer lasting and more sensitive switching materials.

  7. Dielectric constant enhancement in a silicone elastomer filled with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallone, Giuseppe; Carpi, Federico; De Rossi, Danilo; Levita, Giovanni; Marchetti, Augusto

    2007-01-01

    Lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) ferroelectric powder was used to develop a particulated composite based on a silicone elastomer matrix, with improved dielectric permittivity. The filler was characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Complex dielectric permittivity (10-10 8 Hz) and tensile mechanical properties (elastic modulus and ultimate stress) of composites at various filler contents (up to 30% by vol.) were compared with those of the neat silicone elastomer. Both the dielectric constant and loss factor regularly increased with the filler content. The elastic modulus increased with a lower rate than that of the dielectric constant. Even though the addition of filler resulted in a detriment of both toughness, ultimate stress and elongation at break, a good stretchability was still retained, as elongation ratios greater than 3 were possible at the highest filler content. Several dielectric models were compared to the experimental data and the best match was achieved by the Bruggeman model, which can be used as a predictive rule for different volume contents of filler

  8. Dielectric constant enhancement in a silicone elastomer filled with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallone, Giuseppe [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: gallone@ing.unipi.it; Carpi, Federico [Interdepartmental Research Centre ' E. Piaggio' , University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: f.carpi@ing.unipi.it; De Rossi, Danilo [Interdepartmental Research Centre ' E. Piaggio' , University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: d.derossi@ing.unipi.it; Levita, Giovanni [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: levita@ing.unipi.it; Marchetti, Augusto [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: marchetti@ing.unipi.it

    2007-01-15

    Lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) ferroelectric powder was used to develop a particulated composite based on a silicone elastomer matrix, with improved dielectric permittivity. The filler was characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Complex dielectric permittivity (10-10{sup 8} Hz) and tensile mechanical properties (elastic modulus and ultimate stress) of composites at various filler contents (up to 30% by vol.) were compared with those of the neat silicone elastomer. Both the dielectric constant and loss factor regularly increased with the filler content. The elastic modulus increased with a lower rate than that of the dielectric constant. Even though the addition of filler resulted in a detriment of both toughness, ultimate stress and elongation at break, a good stretchability was still retained, as elongation ratios greater than 3 were possible at the highest filler content. Several dielectric models were compared to the experimental data and the best match was achieved by the Bruggeman model, which can be used as a predictive rule for different volume contents of filler.

  9. Investigation of magnetorheological elastomer surface properties by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacobescu, G.E.; Balasoiu, M.; Bica, I.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers consist of a natural or synthetic rubber matrix interspersed with micron-sized ferromagnetic particles. The magnetoelastic properties of such a composite are not merely a sum of elasticity of the polymer and stiffness and magnetic properties of the filler, but also the result of a complex synergy of several effects, relevant at different length scales and detectable by different techniques. In the present work we investigate the microstructures, the surface magnetic properties and the elastic properties of new isotropic and anisotropic magnetorheological elastomer prepared using silicone rubber and soft magnetic carbonyl iron microspheres. The measurements were performed by atomic force microscopy in the following modes: standard imaging-non-contact atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy and nanoindentation. A comparative study for the samples with different particle concentrations and strength of magnetic field applied during the polymerization process is developed

  10. Mechanical properties of heterophase polymer blends of cryogenically fractured soy flour composite filler and poly(styrene-butadiene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinforcement effect of cryogenically fractured soy Flour composite filler in soft polymer was investigated in this study. Polymer composites were prepared by melt-mixing polymer and soy flour composite fillers in an internal mixer. Soy flour composite fillers were prepared by blending aqueous dis...

  11. Reinforced poly(propylene oxide)- a very soft and extensible dielectric electroactive polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goswami, Kaustav; Galantini, F.; Mazurek, Piotr Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    was reinforced with hexamethylenedisilazane treated fumed silica to improve the mechanical properties of PPO. The mechanical properties of PPO and composites thereof were investigated by shear rheology and stress–strain measurements. It was found that incorporation of silica particles improved the stability......Poly(propylene oxide) (PPO), a novel soft elastomeric material, and its composites were investigated as a new dielectric electroactive polymer (EAP). The PPO networks were obtained from thiol-ene chemistry by photochemical crosslinking of ,!-diallyl PPO with a tetra-functional thiol. The elastomer...... of the otherwise mechanically weak pure PPO network. Dielectric spectroscopy revealed high relative dielectric permittivity of PPO at 103 Hz of 5.6. The relative permittivity was decreased slightly upon addition of fillers, but remained higher than the commonly used acrylic EAP material VHB4910...

  12. Reinforced poly(propylene oxide): a very soft and extensible dielectric electroactive polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, K; Mazurek, P; Daugaard, A E; Skov, A L; Galantini, F; Gallone, G

    2013-01-01

    Poly(propylene oxide) (PPO), a novel soft elastomeric material, and its composites were investigated as a new dielectric electroactive polymer (EAP). The PPO networks were obtained from thiol-ene chemistry by photochemical crosslinking of α,ω-diallyl PPO with a tetra-functional thiol. The elastomer was reinforced with hexamethylenedisilazane treated fumed silica to improve the mechanical properties of PPO. The mechanical properties of PPO and composites thereof were investigated by shear rheology and stress–strain measurements. It was found that incorporation of silica particles improved the stability of the otherwise mechanically weak pure PPO network. Dielectric spectroscopy revealed high relative dielectric permittivity of PPO at 10 3 Hz of 5.6. The relative permittivity was decreased slightly upon addition of fillers, but remained higher than the commonly used acrylic EAP material VHB4910. The electromechanical actuation performance of both PPO and its composites showed properties as good as VHB4910 and a lower viscous loss. (paper)

  13. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 600 ºC, during 3 h. Unsettled material samples were soaked in acetone and chloroform for removal of the organic portion. The remaining filler particles were sputter-coated with gold evaluation of their morphology and size, under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexitime Easy Putty was the material with the highest results for volumetric particle fraction, while Impregum Soft had the lowest values. Silon 2 APS Fluid presented the lowest mean filler size values, while Clonage Putty had the highest values. SEM micrographs of the inorganic particles showed several morphologies - lathe-cut, spherical, spherical-like, sticks, and sticks mixed to lathe-cut powder. The results of this study revealed differences in particle characteristics among the elastometic materials that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  14. Improving Filler Dispersion And Physical Properties Of Epoxidized Natural Rubber/ Silica Compound By Using Dual fillers And Coupling Agent In Mixing Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teku Zakwan Zaeimoedin; Ahmad Kifli Che Aziz; Mazlina Mustafa Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of Green Tyre concept, in the early 90s, the use of silica as reinforcing fillers has spread and grown worldwide. The general advantages of silica as reinforcing filler over carbon black filler are better rolling resistance by achieving at least equal wet traction while tread wear should not be adversely affected. In general, high filler loading in ENR attributes poor dispersion and lack of adhesion to the rubber matrix which in turn affect the processability and physical properties of the rubber compounds. In this work, effect of dual fillers (silica and carbon black) and coupling agent in ENR/ silica compound was studied respectively. The mixing was done in a Banbury® BR 1600 internal mixer and the filler dispersion and physical properties were analysed. The carbon black filler was varied from 5 phr to 20 phr, where the total filler was fixed at 60 phr for truck tyre tread compound. The coupling agent was mixed in the mixing at two different stages which is first stage and finalizing stage of mixing. The rheological properties test was conducted by using Mooney Viscometer. The hardness, abrasion and tensile strength for physical properties evaluation were also conducted in this study. In addition, the filler dispersion property was determined by using disperGraderTM. The results showed that some of ENR/silica compound properties such as tensile, hardness, filler dispersion and abrasion resistance were slightly improved as compared to control compound. (author)

  15. Effects of Surface Modification of MWCNT on the Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Fluoro Elastomer/MWCNT Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification is a good way to improve the surface activity and interfacial strength of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs when used as fillers in the polymer composites. Among the reported methods for nanotube modification, mixed acid oxidation and plasma treatment is often used by introducing polar groups to the sidewall of MWCNT successfully. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of different surface modification of MWCNT on the mechanical property and electrical conductivity of Fluoro-elastomer (FE/MWCNT nanocomposites. MWCNTs were surface modified by mixed oxidation and CF4 plasma treatment and then used to reinforce the fluoro elastomer (FE, a copolymer of trifluorochloroethylene and polyvinylidene fluoride. FE/MWCNT composite films were prepared from mixture solutions of ethylacetate and butylacetate, using untreated CNTs (UCNTs, acid-modified CNTs (ACNTs, and CF4 plasma-modified CNT (FCNTs. In each case, MWCNT content was 0.01 wt%, 0.05 wt%, 0.1 wt%, and 0.2 wt% with respect to the polymer. Morphology and mechanical properties were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy, as well as dynamic mechanical tests. The SEM results indicated that dispersion of ACNTs and especially FCNTs in FE was better than that of UCNTs. DMA indicated mechanical properties of FCNT composites were improved over ACNT and UCNT filled FE. The resulting electrical properties of the composites ranged from dielectric behavior to bulk conductivities of 10-2 Sm-1 and were found to depend strongly on the surface modification methods of MWCNTs.

  16. Mechanical and Morphological Properties of Nano Filler Polyester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnia Noor Najmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is focusing on mechanical and morphological properties of unsaturated polyester (UP reinforced with two different types of filler which is nano size clay Cloisite 30B (C30B and Carbon Black (CB. Samples were fabricated via hand lay-up and open molding technique. Percentages of Cloisite 30B & Carbon Black (CB used vary from 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 wt%. The mechanical properties were evaluated by impact, flexural and hardness testing. Result shows that the mechanical strength of C30B was better compare to CB filled composite. The combination of UP with C30B helps to improve the properties due to the high surface area of nanosize filler in the matrix. The result shows that increasing of filler content had increased mechanical properties of composites. Optimum percentage represent good mechanical properties are 4% for both fillers. SEM images showed that rough surface image indicate to agglomeration of filler in the matrix for CB sample and smooth surface image on C30B sample indicate to homogenous blending between filler and matrix polyester. SEM images proved that mechanical properties result indicate that C30B polyester composite is a good reinforcement compare to CB polyester composite.

  17. Effect of filler addition on the compressive and impact properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Flyash is incorporated in glass fibre reinforced epoxies to study their response to the filler addition. Low cost of flyash can reduce the overall cost of the component. Only very low volume fractions of filler are investigated in the present study. To obtain further clarification of the observed phenomenon, another.

  18. Sustainable Elastomers from Renewable Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongkai; Yuan, Liang; Tang, Chuanbing

    2017-07-18

    Sustainable elastomers have undergone explosive growth in recent years, partly due to the resurgence of biobased materials prepared from renewable natural resources. However, mounting challenges still prevail: How can the chemical compositions and macromolecular architectures of sustainable polymers be controlled and broadened? How can their processability and recyclability be enabled? How can they compete with petroleum-based counterparts in both cost and performance? Molecular-biomass-derived polymers, such as polymyrcene, polymenthide, and poly(ε-decalactone), have been employed for constructing thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs). Plant oils are widely used for fabricating thermoset elastomers. We use abundant biomass, such as plant oils, cellulose, rosin acids, and lignin, to develop elastomers covering a wide range of structure-property relationships in the hope of delivering better performance. In this Account, recent progress in preparing monomers and TPEs from biomass is first reviewed. ABA triblock copolymer TPEs were obtained with a soft middle block containing a soybean-oil-based monomer and hard outer blocks containing styrene. In addition, a combination of biobased monomers from rosin acids and soybean oil was formulated to prepare triblock copolymer TPEs. Together with the above-mentioned approaches based on block copolymers, multigraft copolymers with a soft backbone and rigid side chains are recognized as the first-generation and second-generation TPEs, respectively. It has been recently demonstrated that multigraft copolymers with a rigid backbone and elastic side chains can also be used as a novel architecture of TPEs. Natural polymers, such as cellulose and lignin, are utilized as a stiff, macromolecular backbone. Cellulose/lignin graft copolymers with side chains containing a copolymer of methyl methacrylate and butyl acrylate exhibited excellent elastic properties. Cellulose graft copolymers with biomass-derived polymers as side chains were

  19. New fluorocarbon elastomers for seals for geothermal and other aggressive environments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagow, R.J.

    1982-12-01

    Saturated ethyllenic elastomers having a range of methyl group substitution, and a range of partial fluorine substitution were screened. Elastomers based on vinylidene fluoride hexafluoropropylene (VDFHFP) and those based on tetrafluoroethylenepropylene (TFEP) (alternating) were successfully cross-linked by electron-beam radiation and fluorinated to yield elastomeric products, but those based on ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) elastomer became brittle after fluorination. The best products were evaluated using tensile strength, elongation at break, solvent swelling, thermogravimetric analysis and infrared. A wide range of carbon-black filled compositions using the TFEP elastomer were cross-linked. The compositions were then fluorinated at or near room temperature for extended periods of time. After fluorination the samples were subjected to geothermal brine at 300/sup 0/C. The best carbon-black filled composition again lasted at least 100 days in the geothermal brine. This filler-elastomer composition was chosen for use in the production of 0-rings. The 0-rings were produced by compression molding using a 30 ton hydraulic press. Various sizes of 0-rings were produced ranging fro 0.8 to 2.0 inches in diameter and from 1/16 to 3/16 inches in width. The final 0-rings were cross-linked at 40 Mrad and fluorinated under the optimized conditions developed for the samples.

  20. Magnetorheological Fluids and Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginder, John

    2002-03-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) materials possess mechanical or rheological properties that can be controlled by magnetic fields. MR fluids, perhaps the prototypical MR materials, comprise magnetically soft particles dispersed in polar or nonpolar liquids. The particles in these fluids align to form chains or more complex structures when a magnetic field is applied; these structures resist mechanical deformation, reversibly transforming the fluid into a weak viscoelastic solid. Other MR materials include magnetic powders, in which the magnetic particles are dispersed in air and which also become weak solids in an applied field. MR elastomers, a third class of these materials, contain magnetizable particles dispersed in elastomeric solids. These elastomers are magnetostrictive, possessing substantial field-induced modulus increases and elongations. The fascinating behavior of these materials, together with their many potential uses in the automobile and elsewhere, has motivated considerable scientific and technological progress over the last decade. While magnetic powders have been used in industrial applications for decades, the first components using MR fluids were marketed in the mid-1990s, and the first commercial automotive applications are imminent. In this presentation, I will survey the physical properties of MR materials and sketch our understanding of their origins, paying particular attention to the central role of field-induced interparticle magnetic forces and the nature and dynamics of the resulting microstructure. I will describe some possible automotive applications based on these materials, focusing on the material properties and component performance that is required. Finally, I will identify some of the open scientific and technical issues in this growing field.

  1. Towards development of lignin reinforced elastomeric compounds with reduced energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Kushal

    This research deals with development of lignin as reinforcing filler for elastomeric compounds. Lignins are naturally abundant and cost competitive wood derivatives possessing strong mechanical properties and offering reactive functional groups on their surfaces. The presence of the functional groups imparts polarity to the lignin molecules and makes them incompatible with non-polar elastomers. Also, the large particle size of lignin does not produce desired mechanical reinforcement. The present study deals with solving the outstanding issues associated with the use of lignin as fillers for polymeric compounds. In addition, the work specifically focuses on producing rubber compounds with reduced energy dissipation via partial replacement of carbon black with lignin. The first part of this study is devoted to suppression of the polarity of lignin and achievement of compatibility with rubber matrix via modification of lignosulfonates (LS) with cyclohexylamine (CA). CA reduces the polarity of lignin via interactions originating from proton transfer and hydrogen bonding. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the attachment of CA on the surfaces of lignin. The mechanical properties of rubber compounds increase substantially along with improvement in cure properties and increase in crosslink density in the presence of LS particles modified with CA. The tensile strength and storage modulus show an increase by 45% and 41% respectively. The values of the 100% modulus and elongation at break also improve by 35% and 60% respectively. The second part of this study exploits the non-covalent interactions between lignin and carbon black (CB) for the design of novel hybrid filler particles exhibiting lower energy loss in rubber compounds. The hybrid fillers offer unique morphology consisting of coating layers of lignin on carbon black particle aggregates. It is found that such coating layers are formed due to pi-pi interactions between lignin and carbon black. Raman

  2. Mechanical design handbook for elastomers. [the design of elastomer dampers for application in rotating machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, M.; Zorzi, E.

    1981-01-01

    A comprehensive guide for the design of elastomer dampers for application in rotating machinery is presented. Theoretical discussions, a step by step procedure for the design of elastomer dampers, and detailed examples of actual elastomer damper applications are included. Dynamic and general physical properties of elastomers are discussed along with measurement techniques.

  3. A fiber-reinforced composite prosthesis restoring a lateral midfacial defect: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurunmäki, Hemmo; Kantola, Rosita; Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watts, David C; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This clinical report describes the use of a glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) substructure to reinforce the silicone elastomer of a large facial prosthesis. The FRC substructure was shaped into a framework and embedded into the silicone elastomer to form a reinforced facial prosthesis. The prosthesis is designed to overcome the disadvantages associated with traditionally fabricated prostheses; namely, delamination of the silicone of the acrylic base, poor marginal adaptation over time, and poor simulation of facial expressions.

  4. Artificial muscle using nonlinear elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratna, Banahalli

    2002-03-01

    Anisotropic freestanding films or fibers of nematic elastomers from laterally attached side-chain polymers show muscle-like mechanical properties. The orientational order of the liquid crystal side groups imposes a conformational anisotropy in the polymer backbone. When a large change in the order parameter occurs, as at the nematic-isotropic phase transition, there is a concomitant loss of order in the backbone which results in a contraction of the film in the direction of the director orientation. The crosslinked network imposes a symmetry-breaking field on the nematic and drives the nematic-isotropic transition towards a critical point with the application of external stress. Isostrain studies on these nonlinear elastomers, show that there are large deviations from ideal classical rubber elasticity and the contributions from total internal energy to the elastic restoring force cannot be ignored. The liquid crystal elastomers exhibiting anisoptopic contraction/extension coupled with a graded strain response to an applied external stimulus provide an excellent framework for mimicking muscular action. Liquid crystal elastomers by their very chemical nature have a number of ‘handles’ such as the liquid crystalline phase range, density of crosslinking, flexibility of the backbone, coupling between the backbone and the mesogen and the coupling between the mesogen and the external stimulus, that can be tuned to optimize the mechanical properties. We have demonstrated actuation in nematic elastomers under thermal and optical stimuli. We have been able to dope the elastomers with dyes to make them optically active. We have also doped them with carbon nanotubes in order to increase the thermal and electrical conductivity of the elastomer.

  5. Foam injection molding of elastomers with iron microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Valentina; D'Auria, Marco; Sorrentino, Luigi; Davino, Daniele; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a preliminary study of foam injection molding of a thermoplastic elastomer, Engage 8445, and its microcomposite loaded with iron particles was carried out, in order to evaluate the effect of the iron microparticles on the foaming process. In particular, reinforced samples have been prepared by using nanoparticles at 2% by volume. Nitrogen has been used as physical blowing agent. Foamed specimens consisting of neat and filled elastomer were characterized by density measurements and morphological analysis. While neat Engage has shown a well developed cellular morphology far from the injection point, the addition of iron microparticles considerably increased the homogeneity of the cellular morphology. Engage/iron foamed samples exhibited a reduction in density greater than 32%, with a good and homogeneous cellular morphology, both in the transition and in the core zones, starting from small distances from the injection point.

  6. Silicone elastomers with aromatic voltage stabilizers

    OpenAIRE

    A Razak, Aliff Hisyam; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown causes short-circuiting of dielectric elastomers (DEs) resulting in irreversible destruction of the DE. The electrical field at which the un-actuated elastomer breaks down is known as the electrical breakdown strength. Numerous studies have been performed in order to obtain elastomers with high relative permittivity and low Young’s modulus in order to increase the actuation performance at a given voltage, but the optimised elastomers often possess relatively low electrica...

  7. Effects of tritium in elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    Elastomers are used as flange gaskets in the piping system of the Savannah River Plant tritium facilities. A number of elastomers is being examined to identify those compounds more radiation-resistant than the currently specified Buna-N rubber and to study the mechanism of tritium radiation damage. Radiation resistance is evaluated by compression set tests on specimens exposed to about 1 atm tritium for several months. Initial results show that ethylene-propylene rubber and three fluoroelastomers are superior to Buna-N. Off-gassing measurements and autoradiography show that retained surface absorption of tritium varies by more than an order of magnitude among the different elastomer compounds. Therefore, tritium solubility and/or exchange may have a role in addition to that of chemical structure in the damage process. Ongoing studies of the mechanism of radiation damage include: (1) tritium absorption kinetics, (2) mass spectroscopy of radiolytic products, and (3) infrared spectroscopy

  8. Effects of tritium in elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    Elastomers are used as flange gaskets in the piping system of the Savannah River Plant tritium facilities. A number of elastomers is being examined to identify those compounds more radiation-resistant than the currently specified Buna-N rubber and to study the mechanism of tritium radiation damage. Radiation resistance is evaluated by compression set tests on specimens exposed to about 1 atm tritium for several months. Initial results show that ethylene-propylene rubber and three fluoroelastomers are superior to Buna-N. Off-gassing measurements and autoradiography show that retained surface absorption of tritium varies by more than an order of magnitude among the different elastomer compounds. Therefore, tritium solubility and/or exchange may have a role in addition to that of chemical structure in the damage process. Ongoing studies of the mechanism of radiation damage include: (1) tritium absorption kinetics, (2) mass spectroscopy of radiolytic products, and (3) infrared spectroscopy.

  9. 7 CFR 30.14 - Cigar filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cigar filler. 30.14 Section 30.14 Agriculture... Cigar filler. The tobacco that forms the core or inner part of a cigar. Cigar-filler tobacco is tobacco of the kind and quality commonly used for cigar fillers. Cigar-filler types are those which produce...

  10. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian Guo [Newton, MA; Lao, Jing Y [Chestnut Hill, MA; Li, Wenzhi [Brookline, MA

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  11. Micromechanical analysis on anisotropy of structured magneto-rheological elastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, R; Zhang, Z; Wang, X J; Chen, S W

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the equivalent elastic modulus of structured magneto-rheological elastomer (MRE) in the absence of magnetic field. We assume that both matrix and ferromagnetic particles are linear elastic materials, and ferromagnetic particles are embedded in matrix with layer-like structure. The structured composite could be divided into matrix layer and reinforced layer, in which the reinforced layer is composed of matrix and the homogenously distributed ferromagnetic particles in matrix. The equivalent elastic modulus of reinforced layer is analysed by the Mori-Tanaka method. Finite Element Method (FEM) is also carried out to illustrate the relationship between the elastic modulus and the volume fraction of ferromagnetic particles. The results show that the anisotropy of elastic modulus becomes noticeable, as the volume fraction of particles increases. (paper)

  12. Silicone-based Dielectric Elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    energy efficient solutions are highly sought. These properties allow for interesting products ranging very broadly, e.g. from eye implants over artificial skins over soft robotics to huge wave energy harvesting plants. All these products utilize the inherent softness and compliance of the dielectric...... investigated but rarely discussed in the context of mechani-cal integrity and thus product reliability. Focus here is on long-term reliability of the dielectric elastomers and how to achieve this by means of careful elastomer design. This thesis presents methods and results of analyses acquired in the cross...

  13. Analysis of filler--fibre interaction in fly ash filled short fibre-epoxy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These properties showed an improvement of about 30-40% as compared to the ones where a single reinforcement either ash or fibre was used. Further, they exhibited uniform distribution of defects whose population was least compared to the situation where only one component (either filler or fibre) as reinforcement was ...

  14. Evaluating corn starch and corn stover biochar as renewable filler in carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn starch, corn flour, and corn stover biochar were evaluated as potential renewable substitutes for carbon black as filler in rubber composites using carboxylated styrene-butadiene as the rubber matrix. Previous work has shown that starch-based fillers have very good reinforcement properties at t...

  15. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON EPDM ELASTOMER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, E.

    2009-12-11

    Samples of four formulations of ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM) elastomer were exposed to initially pure tritium gas at one atmosphere and ambient temperature for various times up to about 420 days in closed containers. Two formulations were carbon-black-filled commercial formulations, and two were the equivalent formulations without filler synthesized for this work. Tritium effects on the samples were characterized by measuring the sample volume, mass, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties and by noting changes in appearance. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature increased significantly with tritium exposure, and the unfilled formulations ceased to behave as elastomers after the longest tritium exposure. The filled formulations were more resistant to tritium exposure. Tritium exposure made all samples significantly stiffer and therefore much less able to form a reliable seal when employed as O-rings. No consistent change of volume or density was observed; there was a systematic lowering of sample mass with tritium exposure. In addition, the significant radiolytic production of gas, mainly protium (H{sub 2}) and HT, by the samples when exposed to tritium was characterized by measuring total pressure in the container at the end of each exposure and by mass spectroscopy of a gas sample at the end of each exposure. The total pressure in the containers more than doubled after {approx}420 days tritium exposure.

  16. Soft Functional Silicone Elastomers with High Dielectric Permittivty: Simple Additives vs. Cross-Linked Synthesized Copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    Though dielectric elastomers (DEs) have many favorable properties, the issue of high driving voltages limits the commercial viability of the technology. Improved actuation at lower voltages can be obtained by decreasing the Young’s modulus and/or decreasing the dielectric permittivity of the elas......Though dielectric elastomers (DEs) have many favorable properties, the issue of high driving voltages limits the commercial viability of the technology. Improved actuation at lower voltages can be obtained by decreasing the Young’s modulus and/or decreasing the dielectric permittivity...... of the elastomer. A decrease in Young’s modulus, however, is often accompanied by the loss of mechanical stability and thereby the lifetime of the DE whereas addition of high permittivity fillers such as metal oxides often increases Young’s modulus such that improved actuation is not accomplished. New soft...... silicone elastomers with high dielectric permittivity were prepared through the use of chloropropyl-functional silicones. One method was through the synthesis of modular cross-linkable chloropropyl-functional copolymers that allow for a high degree of chemical freedom such that a tuneable silicone...

  17. Effects Of Radiation On Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Report provides data on effects of radiation on elastomers. Quantifies effects by giving minimum radiation levels to induce changes of 1 percent and 25 percent in given properties. Electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties included in data. Combined effects of heat and radiation briefly considered. Data summarized in graphic form useful to designers.

  18. Polyurethane elastomers in armour applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Broos, J.P.F.

    2012-01-01

    The use of elastomers in ballistic protection products (armour) is limited to low threat levels and transparent armour solution components. Often armor is considered a parasitic mass that increases with increasing threat levels. Therefore, low weight solutions are welcomed and bulk polymers,

  19. Influence of Quartz Fillers in Dielectric Composites on Electrostrictive Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Shivamurthy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation E-glass epoxy composite filled with different amount of quartz powder were prepared by compression moulding and hot curing. Plain waived E-glass cloth with density 200gm / meter square was used as reinforcement. Epoxy resin LY556 mixed with Hardener HT907 and accelerator DY063 in the ratio 100:80:2 was used as matrix. The quartz powder of 30 microns particle size was used as fillers. Four types of composites were prepared with different amount of quartz fillers like 0%, 3%, 6% and 9% with unchanged reinforcement. For all the samples, dielectric dissipation factor (tan δ, dielectric constant and a. c. conductivity and electrostriction have been measured by using a LCR meter at 1 KHz frequency. The phenomenon of electrostriction was examined for all samples (of different percentage of quartz filled composites. It is observed that the percentage of filler influences the electrostriction phenomena in the composites. The 6 % filler content composites samples exhibits the improved electrostriction phenomenon required for sensors compared to other types of composites.

  20. Mechanical behavior of glass fiber polyester hybrid composite filled with natural fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G.; Gupta, A.; Dhanola, A.; Raturi, A.

    2016-09-01

    Now-a-days, the natural fibers and fillers from renewable natural resources offer the potential to act as a reinforcing material for polymer composite material alternative to the use of synthetic fiber like as; glass, carbon and other man-made fibers. Among various natural fibers and fillers like banana, wheat straw, rice husk, wood powder, sisal, jute, hemp etc. are the most widely used natural fibers and fillers due to its advantages like easy availability, low density, low production cost and reasonable physical and mechanical properties This research work presents the effect of natural fillers loading with 5%, 10% and 15% on mechanical behavior of polyester based hybrid composites. The result of test depicted that hybrid composite has far better properties than single fibre glass reinforced composite under impact and flexural loads. However it is found that the hybrid composite have better strength as compared to single glass fibre composites.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties for Tamarind Shell Particles as Filler in Epoxy Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivas K. R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of tamarind shell particles as a filler in epoxy composites. The tamarind shell particles reinforced epoxy composites plates were prepared by varying both tamarind shell particle and epoxy volume percentage. The mechanical properties such as tensile strength, deflection, impact, hardness and specific gravity are evaluated for different composition of composite plates.This paper explores the potential of tamarind shell particles as a filler in epoxy composites...

  2. Influence of fillers on mechanical properties of filled rubbers during ageing by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planes, Emilie

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of the evolution of mechanical properties and the prediction of the lifetime of material environment is a recurring problem. This question is very important to develop polymer formulations used for electrical cables in nuclear power plants. Thus it is important to know the evolution of materials when they are submitted to usual conditions in nuclear power plants. There are in literature some studies concerning the ageing by gamma irradiation of unfilled elastomer but the addition of fillers in the material can have consequences on the evolution of the mechanical properties during irradiation. Thus this work concerns the study of the ageing by gamma irradiation of filled rubbers and the identification of the role of fillers in the degradation mechanisms. The studied matrix, which commonly used for the type of application is EPDM. The fillers are: nano-scopic silica and aluminium trihydrate. Their surfaces have been treated in order to understand the role of filler-matrix interfaces during ageing. To evaluate the influence of fillers on the degradation mechanisms and on the evolution of the mechanical properties, the evolution during ageing of these materials filled or not has been studied for an ageing by irradiation: they have been physico-chemically, micro-structurally and mechanically characterized at various levels of ageing [fr

  3. Electrical breakdown phenomena of dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    breakdown patterns of two similar chloro propyl functionalized silicone elastomers which break down electrically in a rather different way as well as we compare them to a silicone based reference. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to evaluate the elastomers...... elastomer electrically. In order to tailor the elastomers, more knowledge is needed but these copolymers pave the first path towards a better understanding of the complex connection between electrical and thermal stability. Minor changes in the polymer backbone structure result in changes in electrical...

  4. Novel silicone elastomer formulations for DEAPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Benslimane, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that the force output and work density of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based dielectric elastomer transducers can be significantly enhanced by the addition of high permittivity titanium dioxide nanoparticles which was also shown by Stoyanov et al[1] for pre-stretched elastomers...... and by Carpi et al for RTV silicones[2]. Furthermore the elastomer matrix is optimized to give very high breakdown strengths. We obtain an increase in the dielectric permittivity of a factor of approximately 2 with a loading of 12% TiO2 particles compared to the pure modified silicone elastomer with breakdown...

  5. The Electrical Breakdown of Thin Dielectric Elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakaria, Shamsul Bin; Morshuis, Peter H. F.; Yahia, Benslimane Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, we model the electrothermal breakdown in thin PDMS based dielectric elastomers in order to evaluate the thermal mechanisms behind the electrical failures. The objective is to predict the operation range of PDMS based dielectric elastomers with respect to the temperature at given electric field....... We performed numerical analysis with a quasi-steady state approximation to predict thermal runaway of dielectric elastomer films. We also studied experimentally the effect of temperature on dielectric properties of different PDMS dielectric elastomers. Different films with different percentages...

  6. PMMA denture base material enhancement: a review of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Mohammed M; Fouda, Shaimaa M; Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Näpänkangas, Ritva; Raustia, Aune

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews acrylic denture base resin enhancement during the past few decades. Specific attention is given to the effect of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) properties. The review is based on scientific reviews, papers, and abstracts, as well as studies concerning the effect of additives, fibers, fillers, and reinforcement materials on PMMA, published between 1974 and 2016. Many studies have reported improvement of PMMA denture base material with the addition of fillers, fibers, nanofiller, and hybrid reinforcement. However, most of the studies were limited to in vitro investigations without bioactivity and clinical implications. Considering the findings of the review, there is no ideal denture base material, but the properties of PMMA could be improved with some modifications, especially with silanized nanoparticle addition and a hybrid reinforcement system. PMID:28553115

  7. Pitfalls of elastomer compatibility testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friese, Gilbert J.

    1982-10-08

    An extensive compatibility test program was conducted starting with 34 compounds and six 190 C fluids. Both immersion tests and simulation tests were conducted for time periods ranging from 46 hours to over six months. Deficiencies in both types of tests were determined. Immersion tests, while useful for reducing the number of candidate compounds, can easily lead to incorrect conclusions. it is essential that simulation tests be conducted before a final elastomer is selected for use in a critical design.

  8. Influence of fiber type and coating on the composite properties of EPDM compounds reinforced with short aramid fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hintze, C.; Sadatshirazi, S.; Wiessner, S.; Talma, Auke; Heinrich, G.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in the application of short aramid fibers in elastomers because of the considerable improvement in mechanical and dynamic properties of the corresponding rubber composites. Possible applications of short aramid fiber–reinforced elastomers are tires, dynamically loaded

  9. The challenges of silica-silane reinforcement of natural rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierkes, Wilma K.; Sarkawi, S.S.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, highly-dispersible silica has become the preferred alternative to carbon-black as reinforcing filler for low rolling-resistance tires. However, the application of this filler system is so far limited to passenger car tires, as their treads contain styrene butadiene rubber (SBR). In

  10. Biodegradable xylitol-based elastomers: In vivo behavior and biocompatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Bruggeman (Joost); C.J. Bettinger (Christopher); R.S. Langer (Robert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBiodegradable elastomers based on polycondensation reactions of xylitol with sebacic acid, referred to as poly(xylitol sebacate) (PXS) elastomers have recently been developed. We describe the in vivo behavior of PXS elastomers. Four PXS elastomers were synthesized, characterized, and

  11. Characterization of carbon silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires by the STEM–EDX method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hartomy, Omar A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk 71491 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Al Said, Said A. Farha [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk 71491 (Saudi Arabia); Dishovsky, Nikolay, E-mail: dishov@uctm.edu [Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Ward, Michael B. [LEMAS, Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mihaylov, Mihail; Ivanov, Milcho [Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-03-15

    Dual phase carbon–silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis-cum-water vapor of waste green tires have been characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope, silicate analysis, weight analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy and by inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy. The results achieved have shown that the location and distribution of the phases in the carbon silica hybrid fillers as well as their most essential characteristics are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions. The carbon phase of the filler thus obtained is located predominantly in the space among silica aggregates which have already been existing while it has been formed by elastomer destruction in the course of pyrolysis. The presence of ZnS also has been found in the hybrid fillers investigated. - Highlights: • Dual phase fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires have been characterized. • The STEM–EDX method was used for characterization. • The phase distributions in the fillers are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions.

  12. Changes in mechanical properties and morphology of elastomer coatings after immersion in salt solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terán Arce, Fernando; Avci, Recep; Beech, Iwona; Cooksey, Keith; Wigglesworth-Cooksey, Barbara

    2004-03-01

    RTV11 (^TM GE Silicones) and Intersleek (^TM International Paints) are two elastomers of considerable significance to the navy and maritime industry for their application as fouling release coatings. Both materials are composed of polymeric matrices with embedded filler particles, which provide increased strength and durability to the elastomer. Using Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface and bulk analysis techniques, we have found surface regions with microelastic properties, which correlate with the locations of filler particles inside the coatings. These particles are able to undergo elastic displacements of hundreds of nm inside the polymeric matrix during compression by the AFM tip. While elastic properties of Intersleek remain largely unchanged after immersion in salt solutions, roughening, embrittlement and stiffening occurs in RTV11 coatings depending on the amount of curing agent and humidity used during preparation and curing, respectively. Interestingly, such transformations are absent after immersion in pure water. In particle free regions, elastic moduli of RTV11 take values of 2 - 3 MPa before immersion in salt solutions. After immersion, those values increase 5 - 10 times.

  13. Effect of Red Mud and Copper Slag Particles on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Bamboo-Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhyarani Biswas; Amar Patnaik; Ritesh Kaundal

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, a series of bamboo-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated by using red mud and copper slag particles as filler materials. A filler plays an important role in determining the properties and behavior of particulate composites. The effects of these two fillers on the mechanical properties of bamboo-epoxy composites are investigated. Comparative analysis shows that with the incorporation of these fillers, the tensile strength of the composites increases significantl...

  14. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE-PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ˜6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE-PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE-PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation.

  15. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE–PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ∼6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE–PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE–PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation. (paper)

  16. Electrical breakdown phenomena of dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    years. However, optimization with respect to the dielectric permittivity solely may lead to other problematic phenomena such as premature electrical breakdown. In this work, we focus on the chloro propyl functionalized silicone elastomers prepared in Madsen et al[2] and we investigate the electrical...... breakdown patterns of two similar chloro propyl functionalized silicone elastomers which break down electrically in a rather different way as well as we compare them to a silicone based reference. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) are used to evaluate...... the elastomers after electrical breakdown....

  17. Joint Workplan on Filler Investigations for DPCs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick Vane [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This workplan addresses filler attributes (i.e., possible requirements), assumptions needed for analysis, selection of filler materials, testing needs, and a long-range perspective on R&D activities leading to filler demonstration and a safety basis for implementation.

  18. Interpenetrated polymer networks based on commercial silicone elastomers and ionic networks with high dielectric permittivity and self-healing properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogliani, Elisa; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    the applicability. One method used to avoid this limitation is to increase the dielectric permittivity of the material in order to improve the actuation response at a given field. Recently, interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) based on covalently cross-linked commercial silicone elastomers and ionic networks...... from amino- and carboxylic acid- functional silicones have been designed[2] (Figure 1). This novel system provides both the mechanical stability and the high breakdown strength given by the silicone part of the IPNs and the high permittivity and the softening effect of the ionic network. Thus...... these improved properties are achieved without consequently increased Young’s moduli and decreased breakdown strength compared, for example, with other silicone elastomers containing fillers. In particular, the interpenetrating systems show dielectric permittivity ε’ from 6,7 to 2 x 103 at low frequencies (0...

  19. PMMA denture base material enhancement: a review of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gad MM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed M Gad,1 Shaimaa M Fouda,1,2 Fahad A Al-Harbi,1 Ritva Näpänkangas,2,3 Aune Raustia2,3 1Department of Substitutive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Research Unit of Oral Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; 3Medical Research Center, Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland Abstract: This paper reviews acrylic denture base resin enhancement during the past few decades. Specific attention is given to the effect of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition on poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA properties. The review is based on scientific reviews, papers, and abstracts, as well as studies concerning the effect of additives, fibers, fillers, and reinforcement materials on PMMA, published between 1974 and 2016. Many studies have reported improvement of PMMA denture base material with the addition of fillers, fibers, nanofiller, and hybrid reinforcement. However, most of the studies were limited to in vitro investigations without bioactivity and clinical implications. Considering the findings of the review, there is no ideal denture base material, but the properties of PMMA could be improved with some modifications, especially with silanized nanoparticle addition and a hybrid reinforcement system. Keywords: denture base, PMMA, reinforcement, nanoparticles, fibers, fillers

  20. Effect of filler addition on the compressive and impact properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Effect of filler addition on the compressive and impact properties of glass fibre reinforced epoxy. NIKHIL GUPTA*, BALRAJ SINGH BRAR† and EYASSU WOLDESENBET. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. †Baba Banda Singh Engineering College, Fateh Garh ...

  1. Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Clay: Unique Nanostructured Filler for High-Performance Polymer Nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Wei-De; Phang, In Yee; Liu, Tianxi

    2006-01-01

    High-performance composites are produced using nanostructured clay-carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrids as a reinforcing filler. The intercalation of iron particles between the clay platelets serves as the catalyst for the growth of CNTs, while the platelets are exfoliated by the CNTs, forming the unique

  2. The Effect of Size and Crumb Rubber Composition as a Filler with Compatibilizer Pp-G-Ma in Polypropylene Blends and Sir-20 Compound on Mechanical and Thermal Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Frida

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Having been researched the development of thermoplastic elastomer material of polypropylene and natural rubber SIR-20 compound with Crumb Rubber as the filler. Reinforced polypropylene with size 60 mesh with 1 mm, and the composition of the Crumb rubber (30, 40, and 50 wt%. Observed mechanical properties are tensile strength, fracture elongation, Young's modulus, tear strength and impact strength. Thermal properties are analyzed by DSC and DTA/TGA. It is acquired that for the size of 60 mesh crumb rubber tensile strength, fracture elongation, Young’s modulus, tear strength and impact strength are bigger than 1mm size. The addition of 60 mesh crumb rubber increases but it decreases by adding of 50 weight%. While for crumb rubber 1 mm tensile strength, fracture elongation, tear strength and impact strength decreas. Based on analysis of DSC that the addition of crumb rubber does not make a difference boiling point significantly between samples containing crumb rubber and polypropylene Analysis TGA/DTA to an increase in enthalpy and decomposition temperature with the addition of crumb rubber used and thermal stability.

  3. Model FORC diagrams for hybrid magnetic elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaganov, M.V.; Linke, J.; Odenbach, S.; Raikher, Yu.L.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a model of hybrid magnetic elastomers filled with a mixture of magnetically soft and magnetically hard microparticles. The magnetically hard particles are described by the Stoner–Wohlfarth model, the magnetically soft phase obeys the Fröhlich–Kennelly equation. The interaction between the two types of particles is described by the mean-field approach. First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams were calculated for different values of the elastomer matrix elasticity. We demonstrate that the diagrams display specific new features, which identify the presence of both a deformable matrix and the two types of magnetic particles. - Highlights: • A model of hybrid magnetic elastomers is proposed. • The magnetically hard particles are described by the Stoner–Wohlfarth model. • The magnetically soft phase obeys the Fröhlich–Kennelly equation. The interaction between the phases is described by the mean-field approach. • FORC diagrams are calculated for different values of the elastomer matrix elasticity.

  4. Carbon nanofiber-filled conductive silicone elastomers as soft, dry bioelectronic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slipher, Geoffrey A; Hairston, W David; Bradford, J Cortney; Bain, Erich D; Mrozek, Randy A

    2018-01-01

    Soft and pliable conductive polymer composites hold promise for application as bioelectronic interfaces such as for electroencephalography (EEG). In clinical, laboratory, and real-world EEG there is a desire for dry, soft, and comfortable interfaces to the scalp that are capable of relaying the μV-level scalp potentials to signal processing electronics. A key challenge is that most material approaches are sensitive to deformation-induced shifts in electrical impedance associated with decreased signal-to-noise ratio. This is a particular concern in real-world environments where human motion is present. The entire set of brain information outside of tightly controlled laboratory or clinical settings are currently unobtainable due to this challenge. Here we explore the performance of an elastomeric material solution purposefully designed for dry, soft, comfortable scalp contact electrodes for EEG that is specifically targeted to have flat electrical impedance response to deformation to enable utilization in real world environments. A conductive carbon nanofiber filled polydimethylsiloxane (CNF-PDMS) elastomer was evaluated at three fill ratios (3, 4 and 7 volume percent). Electromechanical testing data is presented showing the influence of large compressive deformations on electrical impedance as well as the impact of filler loading on the elastomer stiffness. To evaluate usability for EEG, pre-recorded human EEG signals were replayed through the contact electrodes subjected to quasi-static compressive strains between zero and 35%. These tests show that conductive filler ratios well above the electrical percolation threshold are desirable in order to maximize signal-to-noise ratio and signal correlation with an ideal baseline. Increasing fill ratios yield increasingly flat electrical impedance response to large applied compressive deformations with a trade in increased material stiffness, and with nominal electrical impedance tunable over greater than 4 orders of

  5. Carbon nanofiber-filled conductive silicone elastomers as soft, dry bioelectronic interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey A Slipher

    Full Text Available Soft and pliable conductive polymer composites hold promise for application as bioelectronic interfaces such as for electroencephalography (EEG. In clinical, laboratory, and real-world EEG there is a desire for dry, soft, and comfortable interfaces to the scalp that are capable of relaying the μV-level scalp potentials to signal processing electronics. A key challenge is that most material approaches are sensitive to deformation-induced shifts in electrical impedance associated with decreased signal-to-noise ratio. This is a particular concern in real-world environments where human motion is present. The entire set of brain information outside of tightly controlled laboratory or clinical settings are currently unobtainable due to this challenge. Here we explore the performance of an elastomeric material solution purposefully designed for dry, soft, comfortable scalp contact electrodes for EEG that is specifically targeted to have flat electrical impedance response to deformation to enable utilization in real world environments. A conductive carbon nanofiber filled polydimethylsiloxane (CNF-PDMS elastomer was evaluated at three fill ratios (3, 4 and 7 volume percent. Electromechanical testing data is presented showing the influence of large compressive deformations on electrical impedance as well as the impact of filler loading on the elastomer stiffness. To evaluate usability for EEG, pre-recorded human EEG signals were replayed through the contact electrodes subjected to quasi-static compressive strains between zero and 35%. These tests show that conductive filler ratios well above the electrical percolation threshold are desirable in order to maximize signal-to-noise ratio and signal correlation with an ideal baseline. Increasing fill ratios yield increasingly flat electrical impedance response to large applied compressive deformations with a trade in increased material stiffness, and with nominal electrical impedance tunable over greater

  6. Isolation and damping properties of magnetorheologic elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collette, C; Kroll, G; Avraam, M; Preumont, A [University of Brussels, 50 av. F.D. Roosevelt, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Saive, G [Techspace Aero (SAFRAN Group), 121, route de Liers, 4041 Herstal (Belgium); Guillemier, V [MATIS Benelux, 121, route de Liers, 4041 Herstal (Belgium)], E-mail: christophe.collette@ulb.ac.be

    2009-02-01

    This paper considers two systems based on a magnetorheological elastomer (MRE): a MRE isolator under a frequency varying harmonic excitation and a MRE Dynamic Vibration Absorber (DVA) mounted on a frequency-varying structure under a random excitation. It is shown that the commandability of the elastomer improves the isolation performances in the first case, and decreases the stress level in the structure in the second case.

  7. Operation tools with dielectric elastomer pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böse, Holger; Müller, Dominik; Ehrlich, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    New sensors based on dielectric elastomers have recently been shown to exhibit high sensitivity for compression loads. The basic design of these sensors exhibits two profiled surfaces coated with electrode layers between which an elastomer film with the counter-electrode is confined. All components of the sensor are prepared with silicone whose stiffness can be varied in a wide range. Depending on the details of the sensor design, various effects contribute to the enhancement of the capacitance. The intermediate elastomer film is stretched upon compression, the elastomer profiles are deformed and the electrode layers on the elastomer profiles and in the elastomer film approach each other. Beside the detection of pressure, such sensors can also be used for operation tools in human-machine interfaces. To demonstrate this potential, a touch pad with six pressure-sensitive fields is presented. The corresponding sensors integrated in the touch fields detect the exerted forces of the finger, show them on a display and control the brightness of some LEDs. As a second example, the integration of sensor-based control fields on an automotive steering wheel is shown. Finally, the sensors can also be used in fabrics to control arbitrary functions of wearable electronic devices.

  8. Fracture of elastomers by cavitation

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdi, Adel

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation phenomenon is studied in rubber-like materials by combining experimental, theoretical and numerical approaches. Specific tests are carried out on a Styrene Butadiene Rubber to point out main characteristics of cavitation phenomenon. Hydrostatic depression is numerically modelled using finite element method. Numerical results are compared to Ball\\'s and Hou & Abeyaratne\\'s models with regard to cavity nucleation in the material. Both models well fit experimental observations suggesting that the cavitation nucleation in elastomers depends on the confinement degree of the specimen. Finally, critical hydrostatic pressure and critical global deformation are proved to govern cavitation nucleation in the studied material. Critical loadings are identified by comparing experimental and numerical load-displacement curves. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Evaluation on the feasibility of using bamboo fillers in plastic gear manufacturing via the Taguchi optimization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehat, N. M.; Kamaruddin, S.

    2017-10-01

    An increase in demand for industrial gears has instigated the escalating uses of plastic-matrix composites, particularly carbon or glass fibre reinforced plastics as gear material to enhance the properties and limitation in plastic gears. However, the production of large quantity of these synthetic fibres reinforced composites has posed serious threat to ecosystem. Therefore, this work is conducted to study the applicability and practical ability of using bamboo fillers particularly in plastic gear manufacturing as opposed to synthetic fibres via the Taguchi optimization method. The results showed that no failure mechanism such as gear tooth root cracking and severe tooth wear were observed in gear tested made of 5-30 wt% of bamboo fillers in comparing with the unfilled PP gear. These results indicated that bamboo can be practically and economically used as an alternative filler in plastic material reinforcement as well as in minimizing the cost of raw material in general.

  10. Effect of Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE pipe filled with Geopolymer Materials for Piping Application: Compression Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Hashim Mohammad Firdaus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to achieve the highest compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with the geopolymer filler content of weight percentage that were used in glass reinforced epoxy pipe. The samples were prepared by using the filament winding method. The effect of weight percentage of geopolymer materials in epoxy hardener was studied under mechanical testing, which is using the compression test. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with 10 – 40 weight percentage geopolymer filler which is white clay were prepared. The compression strength of the glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled geopolymer materials is determined using Instron Universal Testing under compression mode. It was found that compressive strength for samples with white clay geopolymer filler are much higher compare to glass reinforced epoxy pipe without geopolymer filler. Moreover, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with white clay geopolymer filler was increased from 10 wt% to 30 wt% of geopolymer content. However, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with white clay geopolymer filler suddenly decreased when added to 40 wt%. The results indicated that the blending of geopolymer materials in epoxy system can be obtained in this study.

  11. Morphological characterization of ceramic fillers made from Indonesian natural sand as restorative dental materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlina, E.; Susra, S.; Fatmala, Y.; Hartoyo, H. M.; Takarini, V.; Usri, K.; Febrida, R.; Djustiana, N.; Panatarani, C.; Joni, I. M.

    2018-02-01

    Dental composite as restorative dental materials can be reinforced using ceramic fillers. Homogeneous distribution of filler particles shall improve its mechanical properties. This paper presents the results of the preliminary study on the ZrO2-Al2O3-SiO2 ceramic fillers made from Indonesian natural sand that can increase the mechanical properties of dental composite. The synthesis was done using zirconium silicate sand (ZrSiO4) and aluminium oxide (Al2O3) precursors, which dissolved together with 70:30 weight ratios. Two types of sand were used: (1) manufactured sand (mesh #80) and (2) natural sand (mesh #400). The samples then heated in the furnace at 1100 °C for 8 hours. The morphological characterization was then evaluated using JEOL Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for the surface structure that analyze particles size and distribution. Ceramic fillers made from natural sand is homogenous, well distributed with average particle size of 5-10 µm. Comparably, ceramic filler made from the manufactured sand is heterogeneous, poorly distributed and appear as agglomerates with average particle size are 30-50 µm. The results suggest that ceramic fillers made from natural sand demonstrate better character to represent as a functional restorative dental material.

  12. Sensing and actuating capabilities of a shape memory polymer composite integrated with hybrid filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Haibao; Yu, Kai; Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Yanju

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, hybrid fillers, including carbon black (CB) and chopped short carbon fibers (SCF), are integrated into a styrene-based shape memory polymer (SMP) with sensing and actuating capabilities. The hybrid filler is expected to transform insulating SMP into conducting. Static mechanical properties of the SMP composites containing various filler concentrations of hybrid filler reinforcement are studied first, and it is theoretically and experimentally confirmed that the mechanical properties are significantly improved by a factor of filler content of SCF. The excellent electrical properties of this novel type of SMP composite are determined by a four-point-probe method. As a consequence, the sensing properties of SMP composite filled with 5 wt% CB and 2 wt% SCF are characterized by functions of temperature and strain. These two experimental results both aid the use of SMP composites as sensors that respond to changes in temperature or mechanical loads. On the other hand, the actuating capability of SMP composites is also validated and demonstrated. The dynamic mechanical analysis result reveals that the output strength of SMP composites is improved with an increase in filler content of SCF. The actuating capability of SMP composites is subsequently demonstrated in a series of photographs

  13. Electrically conductive epoxy nanocomposites with expanded graphite/carbon nanotube hybrid fillers prepared by direct hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan; Kang, Hyokyung; Lim, Yun-Soo; Lee, Churl Seung; Shin, Kwonwoo; Park, Ji Sun; Han, Jong Hun

    2014-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are generally used to promote the electrical conductivity of the polymer nanocomposites. However, in spite of their superior properties, CNT's high cost has limited their commercial application, so far. Thus, the development of hybrid carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) composed of CNTs and cheaper CNMs such as carbon fibers (CFs), expanded graphites (EGs), and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) is important in terms of reducing the cost of CNT-based fillers. In this study, we prepared EG/CNT hybrid fillers via direct CNT synthesis on the EG support using modified combustion method and thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and investigated the electrical conductivity of the expoxy nanocomposite with EG/CNT hybrid fillers. The epoxy nanocomposites with EG/CNT hybrid fillers at 20 wt% filler loading showed 260% and 170% electrical conductivity enhancement in comparison with the EG and the simply mixed EG and CNT fillers, respectively. Our approach provides various applications including electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials, thermal interface materials (TIMs), and reinforced nanocomposites.

  14. Soy-based fillers for thermoset composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Paula

    Considerable work has been done with bio-based fillers in thermoplastics. Wood dust has been used for decades in wood plastic composites in conjunction with recycled high HDPE and PET. In recent years rapidly renewable fillers derived from dried distillery grains and from wood have been introduced commercially for thermoset polymers. These fillers provide bio-content and weight reduction to thermoset molding compounds but issues with moisture absorption and polymerization inhibition have limited their commercial acceptance. The intent of this research was to develop a bio-based filler suitable for thermoset composites. This filler would provide a low density alternative to mined mineral filler, such as CaCO3 or clay. Composites made with these fillers would be lighter in weight, which is desirable for many markets, particularly transportation. Cost parity to the mineral fillers, on a volume basis, was desirable and the use of green chemistry principles was a key objective of the project. This work provides a basis from which further development of modified soy flours as fillers for thermoset composites will continue. Biomass has been evaluated as fillers for thermoset composites since the early 1980s but failed to gain commercial acceptance due to excessive water absorption and inhibition issues with free radical curing. Biomass, with a large percentage of carbohydrates, are very hydrophilic due to their abundance of hydroxyl groups, while biomass, high in lignin, resulted in inhibition of the free radical cure of the unsaturated styrenated polyester matrix systems. Generally protein use as a filler is not desirable due to its food value. Torrefaction has proved to be a good, cost effective, process to reduce hydrophilicity of high cellulose feedstock. Surprising, however, some levels of torrefaction were found to induce the inhibition effect of the filler. Scientific inquiry into this problem proved that aromatics form during the torrefaction process and can

  15. Effect of graphene oxide nano filler on dynamic behaviour of GFRP composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujar, Nagabhushan V.; Nanjundaradhya, N. V.; Sharma, Ramesh S.

    2018-04-01

    Nano fillers like Alumina oxide, Titanium oxide, Carbon nano tube, Nano clay have been used to improve the mechanical and damping properties of fiber reinforced polymer composites. In the recent years Graphene oxide nano filler is receiving considerable attention for its outstanding properties. Literature available shows that Graphene oxide nano filler can be used to improve the mechanical properties. The use of Graphene oxide in vibration attenuation by enhancing the passive damping in fiber reinforced polymer composite has not been fully explored. The objective of this work is to investigate the dynamic behaviour of Glass fiber-reinforced composite embedded with Graphene oxide nano filler. Graphene oxide is dispersed in epoxy resin with various concentration (0.1%, 0.5% and 1%wt) using ultra-sonification process. Composite laminates were made using the traditional hand-lay-up followed by vacuum bag process. Experimental modal analysis using traditional `strike method' is used to evaluate modal parameters using FFT analyzer and Data Acquisition System. Experiments were carried out for two different fiber orientations viz 0 ➙ & 45 ➙ and two boundary conditions (Free-Free and Cantilever). The modal parameters such as natural frequency, mode shape, damping ratio were studied. This research work demonstrates the vibration damping behaviour with incorporation of Graphene oxide and provides a basic understanding of the damping characteristics in design and manufacture of high performance composites.

  16. The Current State of Silicone-Based Dielectric Elastomer Transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Hvilsted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Silicone elastomers are promising materials for dielectric elastomer transducers (DETs) due to their superior properties such as high efficiency, reliability and fast response times. DETs consist of thin elastomer films sandwiched between compliant electrodes, and they consti- tute an interesting...

  17. High-strain actuator materials based on dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelrine, R.; Kornbluh, R.; Kofod, G.

    2000-01-01

    Dielectric elastomers are a new class of actuator materials that exhibit excellent performance. The principle of operation, as well as methods to fabricate and test these elastomers, is summarized here. The Figure is a sketch of an elastomer film (light gray) stretched on a frame (black...

  18. Role of catalysis in sustainable production of synthetic elastomers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elastomer business plays a significant role in the transportation industry. In fact, elastomers make the world move. Due to limited availability of natural rubber, synthetic elastomers bridge the gap between demand and supply in today's growing tyre and automobile industry.With more than ∼10000 KTA total world ...

  19. Phase topology of a NR/BR elastomer blend with active filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plavšić Milenko B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The relations between the structure and mechanical properties of a polymer blend of natural (NR and polybutadiene (BR rubber (i.e. a NR/BR blend with the weight ratio of the components 70/30 filled with active carbon black were analysed. The properties of the individual phases in the blend were resolved by modeling the stress-strain relationship according to the Bauer procedure for high extensions. The obtained results indicated that BR is the dispersed phase, having a higher modulus, which was also confirmed by the much better fit of the experimental data to the series type of phase coupling according to the Takanayagy theory.

  20. Energy conversion in magneto-rheological elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebald, Gael; Nakano, Masami; Lallart, Mickaël; Tian, Tongfei; Diguet, Gildas; Cavaille, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) elastomers contain micro-/nano-sized ferromagnetic particles dispersed in a soft elastomer matrix, and their rheological properties (storage and loss moduli) exhibit a significant dependence on the application of a magnetic field (namely MR effect). Conversely, it is reported in this work that this multiphysics coupling is associated with an inverse effect (i.e. the dependence of the magnetic properties on mechanical strain), denoted as the pseudo-Villari effect. MR elastomers based on soft and hard silicone rubber matrices and carbonyl iron particles were fabricated and characterized. The pseudo-Villari effect was experimentally quantified: a shear strain of 50 % induces magnetic induction field variations up to 10 mT on anisotropic MR elastomer samples, when placed in a 0.2 T applied field, which might theoretically lead to potential energy conversion density in the mJ cm -3 order of magnitude. In case of anisotropic MR elastomers, the absolute variation of stiffness as a function of applied magnetic field is rather independent of matrix properties. Similarly, the pseudo-Villari effect is found to be independent to the stiffness, thus broadening the adaptability of the materials to sensing and energy harvesting target applications. The potential of the pseudo-Villari effect for energy harvesting applications is finally briefly discussed.

  1. High performance natural rubber composites with a hierarchical reinforcement structure of carbon nanotube modified natural fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzounis, Lazaros; Debnath, Subhas; Rooj, Sandip; Fischer, Dieter; Mäder, Edith; Das, Amit; Stamm, Manfred; Heinrich, Gert

    2014-01-01

    A simple and facile method for depositing multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) onto the surface of naturally occurring short jute fibers (JFs) is reported. Hierarchical multi-scale structures were formed with CNT-networks uniformly distributed and fully covering the JFs (JF–CNT), as depicted by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. The impact of these hybrid fillers on the mechanical properties of a natural rubber (NR) matrix was systematically investigated. Pristine JFs were cut initially to an average length of 2.0 mm and exposed to an alkali treatment (a-JFs) to remove impurities existing in the raw jute. MWCNTs were treated under mild acidic conditions to generate carboxylic acid moieties. Afterward, MWCNTs were dispersed in an aqueous media and short a-JFs were allowed to react with them. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the chemical interaction between CNTs and JFs. The JF–CNT exposed quite hydrophobic behavior as revealed by the water contact angle measurements, improving the wettability of the non-polar NR. Consequently, the composite interfacial adhesion strength was significantly enhanced while a micro-scale “mechanical interlocking” mechanism was observed from the interphase-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. SEM analysis of the composite fracture surfaces demonstrated the interfacial strength of NR/a-JF and NR/JF–CNT composites, at different fiber loadings. It can be presumed that the CNT-coating effectively compatibillized the composite structure acting as a macromolecular coupling agent. A detailed analysis of stress-strain and dynamic mechanical spectra confirmed the high mechanical performance of the hierarchical composites, consisting mainly of materials arising from natural resources. - Highlights: • Natural rubber (NR) composites reinforced with CNT-modified short jute fibers. • MWCNTs deposited to the surface of jute fibers via non-covalent interactions. • Hierarchical reinforcement structure with

  2. Deformation and instabilities in dielectric elastomer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyuan; Landis, Chad M.

    2012-09-01

    The deformation behavior in dielectric elastomer composites due to applied mechanical and electrical loadings is investigated using finite element methods. The composite structure consists of a dielectric elastomer matrix with a regular square array of cylindrical holes or rigid conducting inclusions. The dielectric elastomer material is represented with either a compressible Neo-Hookean model for the elasticity or a compressible Gent model. Following previous work, the dielectric constant relating the true electric displacement to the true electric field is taken to be independent of the deformation. The finite element method is used to analyze the electromechanical behavior of representative unit cells of the composite material structure. Results are presented for the stress-strain, electric field-electric displacement and coupled electromechanical responses of the different composite types.

  3. Current Concepts in Filler Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Amir; Watson, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    When evaluating the face in thirds, the upper face, midface, and lower face, one may assume the lateral the temple, midface, and lateral mandible as the pillars of these subdivisions. Many of our facial aesthetic procedures address these regions, including the lateral brow lift, midface lift, and lateral face lift. As the use of facial fillers has advanced, more emphasis is placed on the correction of the temples, midlateral face, and lateral jaw line. This article is dedicated to these facial aesthetic pillars. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of shearing on the reinforcement properties of vital wheat gluten

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reinforcement properties of vital wheat gluten as a biomaterial filler for a carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber were examined to assess its effectiveness as a filler for carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber composites. Composites were formulated using 10-40% vital wheat gluten by mixing aqu...

  5. Synthesis and characterization of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetic nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires. Formation of magnetic structured elastomers by magnetic field-induced alignment of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonel, P. Soledad [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Instituto de Química Física de Materiales, Ambiente y Energía (INQUIMAE) (Argentina); Oliveira, Cristiano L. P. [Universidade de São Paulo, Grupo de Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Jorge, Guillermo A. [Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Instituto de Ciencias (Argentina); Perez, Oscar E. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (Argentina); Leyva, A. Gabriela, E-mail: leyva@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Grupo de Materia Condensada, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología (Argentina); Negri, R. Martín, E-mail: rmn@qi.fcen.uba.ar [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Instituto de Química Física de Materiales, Ambiente y Energía (INQUIMAE) (Argentina)

    2015-07-15

    Magnetic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires were synthesized by the template method. The materials are highly crystalline and formed by compactly packed ceramic particles whose equivalent size diameter depends on the nanostructure type. Nanotubes and nanorods present the remarkable characteristic of having very large coercive fields (1000–1100 Oe) in comparison with nanoparticles of the same crystallite size (400 Oe) while keeping similar saturation magnetization (53–55 emu/g). Nanorods were used as filler material in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer composites, which were structured by curing in the presence of uniform magnetic field, H{sub curing}. In that way the nanorods agglomerate in the cured elastomer, forming needles-like structures (pseudo-chains) oriented in the direction of H{sub curing}. SEM analysis show that pseudo-chains are formed by bunches of nanorods oriented in that direction. At the considered filler concentration (1 % w/w), the structured elastomers conserve the magnetic properties of the fillers, that is, high coercive fields without observing magnetic anisotropy. The elastomer composites present strong elastic anisotropy, with compression constants about ten times larger in the direction parallel to the pseudo-chains than in the perpendicular direction, as determined by compression stress–strain curves. That anisotropic factor is about three-four times higher than that observed when using spherical CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles or elongated Ni nanochains. Hence, the use of morphological anisotropic structures (nanorods) results in composites with enhanced elastic anisotropy. It is also remarkable that the large elastic anisotropy was obtained at lower filler concentration compared with the above-mentioned systems (1 % w/w vs. 5–10 % w/w)

  6. Skin rejuvenation without a scalpel. I. Fillers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneke, E.

    2006-01-01

    Fillers are an important tool in the armamentarium of the physician combating aging phenomena. A wide variety of filler substances are now available that meet many, but by far not all, needs in aesthetic medicine. The most commonly used substances now are hyaluronic acid and collagen preparations

  7. Dermal Fillers: Tips to Achieve Successful Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Vedamurthy, Maya; Vedamurthy, Amar

    2008-01-01

    Fillers have become a common aesthetic treatment for several cosmetic problems. Several types of fillers are available from different sources and of different longevities. It is important that the treating physician be aware of the different techniques of administration and their possible side effects. This article reviews the available literature on the subject.

  8. Filler functionality in edible solid foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sman, R G M

    2016-05-01

    We review the functionality of particulate ingredients in edible brittle foams, such as expanded starchy snacks. In food science and industry there is not a complete awareness of the full functionality of these filler ingredients, which can be fibers, proteins, starch granules and whole grains. But, we show that much can be learned about that from the field of synthetic polymeric foams with (nano)fillers. For edible brittle foams the enhancement of mechanical strength by filler ingredients is less relevant compared to the additional functionalities such as 1) the promotion of bubble nucleation and 2) cell opening-which are much more relevant for the snack texture. The survey of particulate ingredients added to snack formulations shows that they cannot be viewed as inert fillers, because of their strong hygroscopic properties. Hence, these fillers will compete with starch for water, and that will modify the glass transition and boiling point, which are important factors for snack expansion. Filler properties can be modified via extrusion, but it is better if that processing step is decoupled from the subsequent processing steps as mixing and expansion. Several filler ingredients are also added because of their nutritional value, but can have adverse effect on snack expansion. These adverse effects can be reduced if the increase of nutritional value is decoupled from other filler functionality via compartmentalization using micropellets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging Frozen...

  10. Magnetic and elastic anisotropy in magnetorheological elastomers using nickel-based nanoparticles and nanochains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landa, Romina A.; Soledad Antonel, Paula; Ruiz, Mariano M.; Negri, R. Martín, E-mail: rmn@qi.fcen.uba.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Instituto de Química Física de Materiales, Ambiente y Energía (INQUIMAE), Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Perez, Oscar E. [Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Butera, Alejandro [Centro Atómico Bariloche (Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica. Argentina) and Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina); Jorge, Guillermo [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Oliveira, Cristiano L. P. [Grupo de Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-12-07

    Nickel (Ni) based nanoparticles and nanochains were incorporated as fillers in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers and then these mixtures were thermally cured in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. In this way, macroscopically structured-anisotropic PDMS-Ni based magnetorheological composites were obtained with the formation of pseudo-chains-like structures (referred as needles) oriented in the direction of the applied magnetic field when curing. Nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature, under air ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure) and then calcined at 400 °C (in air atmosphere also). The size distribution was obtained by fitting Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments with a polydisperse hard spheres model and a Schulz-Zimm distribution, obtaining a size distribution centered at (10.0 ± 0.6) nm with polydispersivity given by σ = (8.0 ± 0.2) nm. The SAXS, X-ray powder diffraction, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) experiments are consistent with single crystal nanoparticles of spherical shape (average particle diameter obtained by TEM: (12 ± 1) nm). Nickel-based nanochains (average diameter: 360 nm; average length: 3 μm, obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy; aspect ratio = length/diameter ∼ 10) were obtained at 85 °C and ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure). The magnetic properties of Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains at room temperature are compared and discussed in terms of surface and size effects. Both Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains were used as fillers for obtaining the PDMS structured magnetorheological composites, observing the presence of oriented needles. Magnetization curves, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra, and strain-stress curves of low filler's loading composites (2% w/w of fillers) were determined as functions of the relative orientation with respect to the needles. The results indicate that even at low loadings it is

  11. Dynamic response of a sensor element made of magnetic hybrid elastomer with controllable properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, T. I.; Zimmermann, K.; Borin, D. Yu.; Stepanov, G. V.; Storozhenko, P. A.

    2018-03-01

    Smart materials like magnetic hybrid elastomers (MHEs) are based on an elastic composite with a complex hybrid filler of magnetically hard and soft particles. Due to their unique magnetic field depending characteristics, these elastomers offer great potential for designing sensor systems with a complex adaptive behaviour and operating sensitivity. The present paper deals with investigations of the material properties and motion behaviour displayed by synthesised MHE beams in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The distribution and structure formation of the magnetic components inside the elastic matrix depending on the manufacturing conditions are examined. The specific magnetic features of the MHE material during the magnetising process are revealed. Experimental investigations of the in-plane free vibrational behaviour displayed by the MHE beams with the fixed-free end conditions are performed for various magnitudes of an imposed uniform magnetic field. For the samples pre-magnetised along the length axis, it is demonstrated that the deflection of the beam can be identified unambiguously by magnetic field distortion measurements. It is shown that the material properties of the vibrating MHE element can be specifically adjusted by means of an external magnetic field control. The dependence of the first eigenfrequency of free bending vibrations of the MHE beams on the strength of an imposed uniform magnetic field is obtained. The results are aimed to assess the potential of MHEs to design acceleration sensor systems with an adaptive magnetically controllable sensitivity range.

  12. Thermal Characterization of Modified Tacca Leontopetaloides Starch and Natural Rubber Based Thermoplastic Elastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainatul Mardhiah Mohd Amin; Nur Shahidah Ab Aziz; Nurul Shuhada Mohd Makhtar; Miradatul Najwa Mohd Rodhi; Suhaila Mohd Sauid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the potential of Tacca leontopetaloides starch as bio-based thermoplastic elastomers, TPEs. Starch based polymer had been recognized to have highly potential in replace existing source of conventional elastomeric polymer. The modification process of blending starch with natural rubber, plasticizers, additives, and filler contribute to the enhancement and improvement for the properties of starch in order to produce biopolymers by approaching the properties of TPEs. Thermal properties of starch based thermoplastic was studied to evaluate the decomposition and degradation of the samples by using Thermogravimetric Analysis, TGA while the properties of endothermic reactions of the samples were thermally analyzed via Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC. From the analysis, it was found that the thermal properties of samples were revealed by recognizing GM-2 (green materials, GM) has high thermal resistance towards high temperature up to 480.06 degree Celsius with higher amount of residue which is 4.97 mg compared to other samples. This indicates GM-2 comprises of superior combination of ratio between natural rubbers and glycerol (plasticizer) in purpose of approaching the properties of Thermoplastic Elastomers, TPEs. (author)

  13. Ionic elastomers based on carboxylated nitrile rubber (XNBR and magnesium aluminum layered double hydroxide (hydrotalcite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Laskowska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of carboxyl groups in carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR allows it to be cured with different agents. This study considers the effect of crosslinking of XNBR by magnesium aluminum layered double hydroxide (MgAl-LDH, known also as hydrotalcite (HT, on rheometric, mechano-dynamical and barrier properties. Results of XNBR/HT composites containing various HT loadings without conventional curatives are compared with XNBR compound crosslinked with commonly used zinc oxide. Hydrotalcite acts as an effective crosslinking agent for XNBR, as is particularly evident from rheometric and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR studies. The existence of ionic crosslinks was also detected by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA of the resulting composites. DMA studies revealed that the XNBR/HT composites exhibited two transitions – one occurring at low temperature is associated to the Tg of elastomer and the second at high temperature corresponds to the ionic transition temperature Ti. Simultaneous application of HT as a curing agent and a filler may deliver not only environmentally friendly, zinc oxide-free rubber product but also ionic elastomer composite with excellent mechanical, barrier and transparent properties.

  14. Recycled Polypropylene Improved with Thermoplastic Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Matei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of recycled polypropylene (RPP as raw material for various industries has been known. However, the mechanical and thermal properties of recycled products are lower than those of raw material. The objective of this study was to obtain and investigate the modified recycled polypropylene (RPP with commercial elastomers for possible applications. The compounded RPP-based thermoplastic elastomers were investigated in order to determine their thermal properties (melt flow index (MFI, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, VICAT softening temperature (VST, and heat deflection temperature (HDT, structural characteristics (optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD, and mechanical properties (tensile properties, density, and IZOD impact. The RPP compounded with 10% elastomer recorded higher tensile properties than the unmodified RPP. Also, IZOD impact strength increased from 4.3±0.2 kJ/m2 (registered for RPP to 21.7±2.5 kJ/m2 for the PPR/SIS30 compound, while the degree of crystallinity decreased for all compounds. The obtained results recommend the RPP/elastomers compounds both for environmental remediation from postconsumer PP wastes and to realize new goods with high performance for various applications.

  15. Rheological properties of olefinic thermoplastic elastomer blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengers, W.G.F.

    2005-01-01

    Thermoplastic Elastomers (TPE) are a class of materials that have rubber-like properties and can be processed like thermoplastic polymers. In this thesis, the rheological properties of two TPE blends are correlated to their morphology. The thermoplastic vulcanisates (TPV) consist of micron-sized,

  16. Electrical breakdown phenomena of dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2017-01-01

    years. However, optimization with respect to the dielectric permittivity solely may lead to other problematic phenomena such as premature electrical breakdown. In this work, we investigate the electrical breakdown phenomena of various types of permittivity-enhanced silicone elastomers. Two types...

  17. Actuation response of polyacrylate dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, G.; Kornbluh, R.; Pelrine, R.

    2001-01-01

    Polyacrylate dielectric elastomers have yielded extremely large strain and elastic energy density suggesting that they are useful for many actuator applications. A thorough understanding of the physics underlying the mechanism of the observed response to an electric field can help develop improve...

  18. Molecular Models of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajshekhar

    Liquid crystal elastomers combine the elastic properties of conventional rubbers with the optical properties of liquid crystals. This dual nature gives rise to unusual physical properties, including the stress induced transition from a polydomain state, consisting of multiple nematic regions with independent orientations, to a monodomain state consisting of a single nematic region with a uniform director. We propose several molecular-scale coarse-grained models of liquid crystal elastomers with varying degrees of resolution. The models employ the Gay-Berne soft potential, and exhibit the chain connectivity of a diamond network. Simulation results show that these models are able to capture the polydomain state exhibited by liquid crystal elastomers in the absence of any external stress. When subjected to uniaxial stress, our models exhibit a polydomain to monodomain transition. We explain that the polydomain state occurs through the aggregation of liquid crystal molecules assisted by crosslinking sites, and conclude that the transition mechanism to the monodomain state is based on the reorientation of nematic domains along the direction of applied stress. Our modeling efforts are primarily focused on three models. The first two models consider the effects of rigid and flexible crosslinkers in liquid crystal elastomers with a diamond topology for chain connectivity. The third model deviates from the diamond network topology and adopts a random network topology.

  19. Conductive elastomers by a new latex process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrically conductive polymers such as polyaniline can be used to in production of light-emitting diodes, printed circuit board components, antistatic materials, etc. Highly filled elastomers, such as those filled with metallic powders, can also conduct electricity. However, limitations due to co...

  20. Contact lines on silicone elastomers promote contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourlier-Fargette, Aurelie; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Neukirch, Sebastien

    2017-11-01

    Silicone elastomers are used in contact with aqueous liquids in a large range of applications. Due to numerous advantages such as its flexibility, optical transparency, or gas permeability, polydimethylsiloxane is widely spread in rapid prototyping for microfluidics or elastocapillarity experiments. However, silicone elastomers are known to contain a small fraction of uncrosslinked low-molecular-weight oligomers, the effects of which are not completely understood. We show that in various setups involving an air-water-silicone elastomer contact line, a capillarity-induced extraction of uncrosslinked oligomers occurs, leading to a contamination of water-air interfaces. We investigate the case of a static air-water-PDMS contact line, before focusing on moving contact lines. A water droplet sliding down on a PDMS inclined plane or an air bubble rising on an immersed PDMS plane exhibits two successive speed regimes: the second regime is reached only when a monolayer of oligomers completely covers the water-air interface. These experiments involve processes occurring at the polymer network scale that have significant macroscopic consequences, and therefore provide a simple test to evaluate the presence of uncrosslinked oligomers in an elastomer sample.

  1. Surface Modified Characteristics of the Tetracalcium Phosphate as Light-Cured Composite Resin Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to characterize the properties of light-cured composite resins that are reinforced with whisker surface-modified particles of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP and to investigate the influence of thermal cycling on the reinforced composites properties. The characteristics of ultimate diametral tensile strength (DTS, moduli, pH values, and fracture surfaces of the samples with different amounts of surface-modified TTCP (30%–60% were determined before and after thermal cycling between 5°C and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. The trends of all groups were ductile prior to thermal cycling and the moduli of all groups increased after thermal cycling. The ductile property of the control group without filler was not significantly affected. Larger amounts of fillers caused the particles to aggregate, subsequently decreasing the resin’s ability to disperse external forces and leading to brittleness after thermal cycling. Therefore, the trend of composite resins with larger amounts of filler would become more brittle and exhibited higher moduli after thermal cycling. This developed composite resin with surface modified-TTCP fillers has the potential to be successful dental restorative materials.

  2. Effects of silane-modified fillers on properties of dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydınoğlu, Aysu; Yoruç, Afife Binnaz Hazar

    2017-10-01

    The effect of silanization on the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of dental composites was investigated. Silica fillers were obtained from colloidal silica solution, Ludox® HS-40 and they were silanized by using 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) in an acidic media. Mineralogical and chemical structures of unsilanized and silanized fillers were determined by using XRD and FT-IR analyses. The modification of unsilanized/silanized fillers were investigated by performing XPS and TGA analyses. The morphological evaluations, surface area, and particle size measurements were performed by using SEM, BET, and Zeta-Sizer, respectively. Eventually, pure and amorphous silica fillers were obtained. Furthermore, the weight percentage of the silane in silica/silane structure was compatible with theoretical values. SEM images, surface area, and particle size measurements showed that agglomeration tendencies of silanized fillers were lower compared to silanized fillers because of the MPTMS addition. Experimental composites (5/10/10/5BisGMA/HEMA/UDMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 70wt% silanized/unsilanized SiO 2 ) were fabricated into 4mm diameter×6mm thick discs for compressive strength (CS), angular flexural strength (AFS), curing depth (CD), and polymerization shrinkage (PS) on a 25×2×2mm rectangular Teflon mold for flexural strength (FS) and modulus of elasticity (E) tests. The curing depth (CD) and degree of polymerization percentage (DP) of composites were determined. Consequently, results showed that mechanical properties and DP of composite resins can be greatly influenced by silanization as a result of the organic matrix-inorganic filler interface bonding formed by silane structures. Despite of these findings, silanization of the SiO 2 was not effected DC and PS values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the influence of the polymer-filler interaction on compounds based on epoxidized elastomeric matrix and precipitated silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana L. A. C. Rocha

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of epoxy groups into the main chain of elastomers has emerged as a promising alternative, considering the monitoring of polymer-filler interaction leading to changes in the properties of vulcanizates. The epoxidation reaction (in situ was chosen to modify elastomers, such as polybutadiene (BR and copolymer of styrene-butadiene-rubber (SBR, because it is a simple, easily controlled reaction, even considering the small epoxidation degree. The modification degree of the polymeric chain was studied with FT-IR and ¹H-NMR. The shift of the Tg to high temperatures with the increase of the epoxy group in the polymer chain was monitored through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. An analysis of the dynamic modulus of the material in relation to its dependence on the amplitude and temperature was carried out. The interaction between epoxidized elastomeric matrix and silica as filler was extremely improved, even in the presence of very low content of epoxy groups into the polymer chain.

  4. MWCNT/TiO2hybrid nano filler toward high-performance epoxy composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Kaushal; Ghosh, P K; Yadav, K L

    2018-03-01

    In this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are decorated by TiO 2 nanoparticles and formed a new hybrid structure of filler (MWCNT/TiO 2 hybrid filler). The MWCNT/TiO 2 hybrid filler is reinforced in epoxy matrix and studied the mechanical and anti-corrosion properties of epoxy. The morphology of newly formed MWCNT/TiO 2 hybrid nano filler has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) images of tensile fracture surface confirmed the superior dispersion of MWCNT/TiO 2 in the epoxy matrix. The resultant MWCNT/TiO 2 hybrid-epoxy nanocomposite exhibits superior anti-corrosion and mechanical performance than the nanocomposite produced by loading of only MWCNTs or TiO 2 nanoparticles as well as neat epoxy. For example, tensile strength and storage modulus of epoxy increased by 61% and 43% respectively on loading of MWCNT/TiO 2 hybrid nano filler. Furthermore, the coating of MWCNT/TiO 2 hybrid-epoxy nanocomposite on mild steel reduces the corrosion rate upto 0.87×10 -3 MPY from 16.81MPY. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Cutaneous ultrasound and dermal fillers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas Fernández, C; Burón Álvarez, I; Fernández-Tresguerres Centeno, A; Alfageme Roldán, F; de Cabo Francés, F

    2015-11-01

    Requests for fillers or dermatological implants have dramatically increased in dermatology consultations in the last few years, either for the correction of superficial age-related wrinkles and cutaneous creases or to increase the volume of specific areas (cheeks, lips...). Dermatologists are often the first professionals to provide these treatments. Nevertheless, in other situations, the patients have already been treated, and many of them do not know the type of material that has been implanted or may even deny previous treatment, even when evident on clinical examination. In these occasions, cutaneous ultrasound is an effective and reliable tool for the real-time diagnosis of the kind of implant that has been used, its location, and the study of its possible complications. Copyright © 2015 Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Dielectric Elastomers for Fluidic and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, David James

    Dielectric elastomers have demonstrated tremendous potential as high-strain electromechanical transducers for a myriad of novel applications across all engineering disciplines. Because their soft, viscoelastic mechanical properties are similar to those of living tissues, dielectric elastomers have garnered a strong foothold in a plethora of biomedical and biomimetic applications. Dielectric elastomers consist of a sheet of stretched rubber, or elastomer, coated on both sides with compliant electrode materials; application of a voltage generates an electrostatic pressure that deforms the elastomer. They can function as soft generators, sensors, or actuators, and this last function is the focus of this dissertation. Many design configurations are possible, such as stacks, minimum energy structures, interpenetrating polymer networks, shape memory dielectric elastomers, and others; dielectric elastomers are already being applied to many fields of biomedicine. The first part of the original research presented in this dissertation details a PDMS microfluidic system paired with a dielectric elastomer stack actuator of anisotropically prestrained VHB(TM) 4910 (3M(TM)) and single-walled carbon nanotubes. These electroactive microfluidic devices demonstrated active increases in microchannel width when 3 and 4 kV were applied. Fluorescence microscopy also indicated an accompanying increase in channel depth with actuation. The cross-sectional area strains at 3 and 4 kV were approximately 2.9% and 7.4%, respectively. The device was then interfaced with a syringe pump, and the pressure was measured upstream. Linear pressure-flow plots were developed, which showed decreasing fluidic resistance with actuation, from 0.192 psi/(microL/min) at 0 kV, to 0.160 and 0.157 psi/(microL/min) at 3 and 4 kV, respectively. This corresponds to an ~18% drop in fluidic resistance at 4 kV. Active de-clogging was tested in situ with the device by introducing ~50 microm diameter PDMS microbeads and

  7. Elastomer Nanocomposites Based on Organoclay/IIR/EPDM: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Basiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite samples based on elastomer blends of butyl rubber (IIR and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM were prepared using a laboratory scale two-roll mill in order to study the effect of Cloisite 15A organoclay content (i.e., 1, 3, 5 and 7 wt% on the mechanical and morphological properties  of  IIR/EPDM/Cloisite  15A  nanocomposites  compared  to  the  unflled EPDM/IIR blends. Rheometer (RPA, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM were utilized for relevant characterization of cure behavior and microstructural properties of the prepared samples. Cure characteristics of the prepared compounds including optimum cure time (t90 and scorch time (t5, depicted a decrease in these two parameters with increasing nanoclay content; where the cure time was prolonged with EPDM increasing content. In fact, nanoclay not only acts as a reinforcing agent in nanocomposites but also accelerates the cure process of IIR/EPDM elastomer compounds. Intercalation of elastomer chains into the organoclay silicate layers was determined by d-spacing values calculated according to the results of X-ray diffraction patterns. XRD results of all the nanocomposites samples prepared here showed a leftward shift towards lower diffraction angles in the organoclay characteristic peak, indicating an increase in the d-spacing values compared to the pure organoclay which emphasizes the intercalation of elastomer chains into the clay galleries. This phenomenon was also confrmed according  to  the direct observation of the cryogenically fracture surfaces of the samples by SEM micrographs depicting a combination of intercalated and exfoliated microstructures. However, there appeared incrementally slowed down rate in higher clay contents. With addition of nanoclay, mechanical properties of the nanocomposite samples including hardness, fatigue strength, tensile modulus and tensile strength were observed to be improved. Elongation-at-break and

  8. Compatibility of selected elastomers with plutonium glovebox environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, R.

    1994-06-01

    This illustrative test was undertaken as a result of on-going failure of elastomer components in plutonium gloveboxes. These failures represent one of the major sources of required maintenance to keep gloveboxes operational. In particular, it was observed that the introduction of high specific activity Pu-238 into a glovebox, otherwise contaminated with Pu-239, resulted in an inordinate failure of elastomer components. Desiring to keep replacement of elastomer components to a minimum, a decision to explore a few possible alternative elastomer candidates was undertaken and reported upon herewith. Sample specimens of Neoprene, Urethane, Viton, and Hypalon elastomeric formulations were obtained from the Bacter Rubber Company. Strips of the elastomer specimens were placed in a plutonium glovebox and outside of a glovebox, and were observed for a period of three years. Of the four types of elastomers, only Hypalon remained completely viable

  9. Adverse reactions to injectable soft tissue fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Requena, Luis; Requena, Celia; Christensen, Lise

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, injections with filler agents are often used for wrinkle-treatment and soft tissue augmentation by dermatologists and plastic surgeons. Unfortunately, the ideal filler has not yet been discovered and all of them may induce adverse reactions. Quickly biodegradable or resorbable...... agents may induce severe complications, but they will normally disappear spontaneously in a few months. Slowly biodegradable or nonresorbable fillers may give rise to severe reactions that show little or no tendency to spontaneous improvement. They may appear several years after the injection, when...

  10. Composites reinforcement by rods a SAS study

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, V; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Richter, D; Straube, E

    2002-01-01

    The mechanical properties of composites are governed by size, shape and dispersion degree of so-called reinforcing particles. Polymeric fillers based on thermodynamically driven microphase separation of block copolymers offer the opportunity to study a model system of controlled rod-like filler particles. We chose a triblock copolymer (PBPSPB) and carried out SAS measurements with both X-rays and neutrons, in order to characterize separately the hard phase and the cross-linked PB matrix. The properties of the material depend strongly on the way that stress is carried and transferred between the soft matrix and the hard fibers. The failure of the strain-amplification concept and the change of topological contributions to the free energy and scattering factor have to be addressed. In this respect the composite shows a similarity to a two-network system, i.e. interpenetrating rubber and rod-like filler networks. (orig.)

  11. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  12. Effect of Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) pipe filled with Geopolymer Materials for Piping Application: Compression Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Hashim Mohammad Firdaus; Abdullah Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Ghazali Che Mohd Ruzaidi; Hussin Kamarudin; Binhussain Mohammed; Omar Mohd Firdaus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to achieve the highest compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with the geopolymer filler content of weight percentage that were used in glass reinforced epoxy pipe. The samples were prepared by using the filament winding method. The effect of weight percentage of geopolymer materials in epoxy hardener was studied under mechanical testing, which is using the compression test. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled wi...

  13. Biodegradation behavior of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) reinforced with modified coconut shell powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, M. P.; Balan, Aparna K.; Shaniba, V.; Jinitha, T. V.; Subair, N.; Purushothaman, E.

    2017-06-01

    Biodegradation behavior of styrene butadiene rubber composites reinforced with natural filler, coconut shell powder (CSP), with different filler loadings were carried out under soil burial conditions for three to six months. The extent of biodegradation of the composites was evaluated through weight loss, tensile strength and hardness measurements. It was observed that the permanence of the composites was remarkably dependent on filler modification, size of the filler particle and filler content. Composites containing silane modified filler were found to be more resistant to attack by the microbes present in the soil. Mechanical properties such as tensile strength, Young's modulus and hardness were decreased after soil burial testing due to the microbial attack onto the samples.

  14. Co-extruded mechanically tunable multilayer elastomer laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimanno, Michael; Mao, Guilin; Andrews, James; Singer, Kenneth; Baer, Eric; Hiltner, Anne; Song, Hyunmin; Shakya, Bijayandra

    2011-04-01

    We have fabricated and studied mechanically tunable elastomer dye lasers constructed in large area sheets by a single-step layer-multiplying co-extrusion process. The laser films consist of a central dye-doped (Rhodamine-6G) elastomer layer between two 128-layer distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) films comprised of alternating elastomer layers with different refractive indices. The central gain layer is formed by folding the coextruded DBR film to enclose a dye-doped skin layer. By mechanically stretching the elastomer laser film from 0% to 19%, a tunable miniature laser source was obtained with ˜50 nm continuous tunability from red to green.

  15. Seismic base isolation: Elastomer characterization, bearing modeling and system response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Wang, C.Y.; Hughes, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses several major aspects of seismic base isolation systems that employ laminated elastomer bearings. Elastomer constitutive models currently being used to represent the nonlinear elastic and hysteretic behavior are discussed. Some aspects of mechanical characterization testing of elastomers is presented along with representative tests results. The development of a finite element based mesh generator for laminated elastomer bearings is presented. Recent advances in the simulation of base isolated structures to earthquake motions are presented along with a sample problem. 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  16. Seismic base isolation: Elastomer characterization, bearing modeling and system response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R.F.; Wang, C.Y.; Hughes, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses several major aspects of seismic base isolation systems that employ laminated elastomer bearings. Elastomer constitutive models currently being used to represent the nonlinear elastic and hysteretic behavior are discussed. Some aspects of mechanical characterization testing of elastomers is presented along with representative tests results. The development of a finite element based mesh generator for laminated elastomer bearings is presented. Recent advances in the simulation of base isolated structures to earthquake motions are presented along with a sample problem. 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Filler metal development for Hastelloy alloy XR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Nakajima, Hajime; Sahira, Kensho

    1991-11-01

    In order to develop the filler metal for Hastelloy alloy XR structure with thick wall, the weldability and high temperature strength properties of Hastelloy alloy XR weldment were investigated using the filler metals, which were alloy-designed on the basis of multiple regression analysis. The former was examined through the chemical analysis in the deposited metal, bend test, FISCO cracking test, optical microscopy and hardness measurement. The latter was investigated by means of tensile and creep test. It was found from these results that the crack susceptibility in the weldment was apparent to be lowered without degrading the high temperature strength properties. Therefore, it is concluded that these filler metals possess excellent performance as the filler metal for Hastelloy alloy XR structure with thick wall. (author)

  18. A strategy of precipitated calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) fillers for enhancing the mechanical properties of polypropylene polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thenepalli, Thriveni; Ahn, Ji Whan [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Young Jun; Han, Choon [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ramakrishna, Chilakala [Hanil Cement, Danyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    A wide variety of fillers are currently used in more than twenty types of polymer resins, although four of them alone (polypropylene, polyamides, thermoplastic polyesters, and polyvinyl chloride) account for 90% of the market of mineral fillers in plastics. Polypropylene (PP) and PVC dominate the market for calcium carbonate. PP is a versatile reinforcement material that can meet engineering and structural specifications and is widely used for automotive components, home appliances, and industrial applications. Talc, mica, clay, kaolin, wollastonite, calcium carbonates, feldspar, aluminum hydroxide, glass fibers, and natural fibers are commonly used in fillers. Among these, calcium carbonate (both natural and synthetic) is the mos abundant and affords the possibility of improved surface finishing, control over the manufacture of products, and increased electric resistance and impact resistance. Meeting the global challenge to reduce the weight of vehicles by using plastics is a significant issue. The current the global plastic and automobile industry cannot survive without fillers, additives, and reinforcements. Polypropylene is a major component of the modern plastic industry, and currently is used in dashboards, wheel covers, and some engine parts in automobiles. This article reports that the use of calcium carbonate fillers with polypropylene is the best choice to enhance the mechanical properties of plastic parts used in automobiles.

  19. A strategy of precipitated calcium carbonate (CaCO3) fillers for enhancing the mechanical properties of polypropylene polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thenepalli, Thriveni; Ahn, Ji Whan; Ahn, Young Jun; Han, Choon; Ramakrishna, Chilakala

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of fillers are currently used in more than twenty types of polymer resins, although four of them alone (polypropylene, polyamides, thermoplastic polyesters, and polyvinyl chloride) account for 90% of the market of mineral fillers in plastics. Polypropylene (PP) and PVC dominate the market for calcium carbonate. PP is a versatile reinforcement material that can meet engineering and structural specifications and is widely used for automotive components, home appliances, and industrial applications. Talc, mica, clay, kaolin, wollastonite, calcium carbonates, feldspar, aluminum hydroxide, glass fibers, and natural fibers are commonly used in fillers. Among these, calcium carbonate (both natural and synthetic) is the mos abundant and affords the possibility of improved surface finishing, control over the manufacture of products, and increased electric resistance and impact resistance. Meeting the global challenge to reduce the weight of vehicles by using plastics is a significant issue. The current the global plastic and automobile industry cannot survive without fillers, additives, and reinforcements. Polypropylene is a major component of the modern plastic industry, and currently is used in dashboards, wheel covers, and some engine parts in automobiles. This article reports that the use of calcium carbonate fillers with polypropylene is the best choice to enhance the mechanical properties of plastic parts used in automobiles

  20. Structural phase transitions in isotropic magnetic elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meilikhov, E. Z., E-mail: meilikhov@yandex.ru; Farzetdinova, R. M. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic elastomers represent a new type of materials that are “soft” matrices with “hard” magnetic granules embedded in them. The elastic forces of the matrix and the magnetic forces acting between granules are comparable in magnitude even under small deformations. As a result, these materials acquire a number of new properties; in particular, their mechanical and/or magnetic characteristics can depend strongly on the polymer matrix filling with magnetic particles and can change under the action of an external magnetic field, pressure, and temperature. To describe the properties of elastomers, we use a model in which the interaction of magnetic granules randomly arranged in space with one another is described in the dipole approximation by the distribution function of dipole fields, while their interaction with the matrix is described phenomenologically. A multitude of deformation, magnetic-field, and temperature effects that are described in this paper and are quite accessible to experimental observation arise within this model.

  1. Silicone elastomers with aromatic voltage stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A Razak, Aliff Hisyam; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    A method to synthesise a polydimethylsiloxane-polyphenylmethylsiloxane (PDMS-PPMS) copolymer with electron-trapping effects has been developed utilising a quickhydrosilylation reaction at ambient temperature and crosslinking via hydrosilylation by a vinyl-functional crosslinker. The mechanism...... of electron-trapping by aromatic compounds grafted to silicone backbones in a crosslinked PDMS is illustrated in Fig. 1. The electrical breakdown strength, the storage modulus and the loss modulus of the elastomer were investigated, as well as the excitation energy from the collision between electron carriers...... and benzene rings in PDMS-PPMS copolymer was measured by UV-vis spectroscopy. The developed elastomers were inherently soft with enhanced electrical breakdown strength due to delocalized pi-electrons of aromatic rings attached to the silicone backbone. The dielectric relative permittivity of PDMS...

  2. Metallic glass-strengthened thermoplastic elastomer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Liu, Hao; Wang, Dong; Wang, Enpeng; Liu, Wenjian; Yao, Kefu; Chen, Na

    2017-06-01

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) and metallic glasses (MGs), both lack of long-range ordering structure, have different physical and mechanical properties. To combine unique viscoelasticity of elastomers and excellent wear resistance of MGs, we propose to introduce a Pd40Ni40Si4P16 MG into a commercial styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) TPE to form MG/TPE composites. Serving as a hard and strong second phase dispersed in the SBS matrix, the micrometer-sized MG particles can effectively improve the wear resistance of the matrix due to a strengthening effect. In particular, the MG/TPE composite with an addition of 60 wt% MG shows significantly enhanced wear resistance up to about three times that of the SBS matrix. The present results provide a new way to enhance the wear resistance of the widely used TPEs, which may generate immense economic value by extending their service life.

  3. Geometry of Thin Nematic Elastomer Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Hillel; Sharon, Eran; Kupferman, Raz

    2014-12-01

    A thin sheet of nematic elastomer attains 3D configurations depending on the nematic director field upon heating. In this Letter, we describe the intrinsic geometry of such a sheet and derive an expression for the metric induced by general nematic director fields. Furthermore, we investigate the reverse problem of constructing a director field that induces a specified 2D geometry. We provide an explicit recipe for how to construct any surface of revolution using this method. Finally, we show that by inscribing a director field gradient across the sheet's thickness, one can obtain a nontrivial hyperbolic reference curvature tensor, which together with the prescription of a reference metric allows dictation of actual configurations for a thin sheet of nematic elastomer.

  4. Modeling elastic instabilities in nematic elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Ye, Fangfu; Selinger, Jonathan V.; Selinger, Robin L. B.

    2010-11-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers are cross-linked polymer networks covalently bonded with liquid crystal mesogens. In the nematic phase, due to strong coupling between mechanical strain and orientational order, these materials display strain-induced instabilities associated with formation and evolution of orientational domains. Using a three-dimensional finite element elastodynamics simulation, we investigate one such instability, the onset of stripe formation in a monodomain film stretched along an axis perpendicular to the nematic director. In our simulation, we observe the formation of striped domains with alternating director rotation. This model allows us to explore the fundamental physics governing dynamic mechanical response of nematic elastomers and also provides a potentially useful computational tool for engineering device applications.

  5. Disorder by random crosslinking in smectic elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambreva, Denitza M.; Jeu, Wim H. de; Ostrovskii, Boris I.; Finkelmann, Heino

    2004-01-01

    We present a high-resolution x-ray study of the effects of disorder due to random crosslinking on the one-dimensional translational ordering in smectic elastomers. At a small crosslink density of about 5%, the elastomer network stabilizes the smectic structure against layer-displacement fluctuations, and the algebraically decaying layer ordering extends up to several micrometers. With increasing concentration of crosslinks, the finite size of these domains is strongly reduced, indicating that disordering takes over. Finally, at a crosslink concentration of 20%, the structure factor can be described by a Lorentzian, which signals extended short-range correlations. The findings are discussed in terms of recent theories of randomly quenched disorder

  6. Biological Evaluation of Flexible Polyurethane/Poly l-Lactic Acid Composite Scaffold as a Potential Filler for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk Fai Lui

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Degradable bone graft substitute for large-volume bone defects is a continuously developing field in orthopedics. With the advance in biomaterial in past decades, a wide range of new materials has been investigated for their potential in this application. When compared to common biopolymers within the field such as PLA or PCL, elastomers such as polyurethane offer some unique advantages in terms of flexibility. In cases of bone defect treatments, a flexible soft filler can help to establish an intimate contact with surrounding bones to provide a stable bone-material interface for cell proliferation and ingrowth of tissue. In this study, a porous filler based on segmented polyurethane incorporated with poly l-lactic acid was synthesized by a phase inverse salt leaching method. The filler was put through in vitro and in vivo tests to evaluate its potential in acting as a bone graft substitute for critical-sized bone defects. In vitro results indicated there was a major improvement in biological response, including cell attachment, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase expression for osteoblast-like cells when seeded on the composite material compared to unmodified polyurethane. In vivo evaluation on a critical-sized defect model of New Zealand White (NZW rabbit indicated there was bone ingrowth along the defect area with the introduction of the new filler. A tight interface formed between bone and filler, with osteogenic cells proliferating on the surface. The result suggested polyurethane/poly l-lactic acid composite is a material with the potential to act as a bone graft substitute for orthopedics application.

  7. Affects of organic amine inhibitors on elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, T.W.; Ivey, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The inhibitive properties of long chain, high molecular weight polar materials have permitted long term operation of oil and gas wells which otherwise might not have been economical to keep in production. It is a well known fact that as these inhibitors are introduced into the well, they can attack fluoroelastomer seals which are otherwise very chemical resistant. This paper presents data concerning the attack of these inhibitors on certain elastomers

  8. Numerical analysis of laminated elastomer by FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazda, T.; Shiojiri, H.

    1993-01-01

    A Computer code based on mixed finite element method was developed for three dimensional large strain analyses of laminated elastomers including nonlinear bulk stress vs. bulk strain relationships. The adopted element is the variable node element with maximum node numbers of 27 for displacements and 4 for pressures. At first, the displacements and pressures were calculated by the code using single element under various loading conditions. The results were compared with theoretical solutions and the both results' exactly coincided with each other. Next, the analyses of laminated elastomers subjected to axial loadings were conducted using both the new code and ABAQUS code, and the results were compared with the test results. The agreement of the results of the present code were better than ABAQUS code mainly due to the capability of handling wider range of material properties. Lastly, the shearing tests of laminated elastomers were simulated by the new code. The results were shown to be in good agreement with the test results. (author)

  9. Optimization of the crystallinity of polypropylene/submicronic-talc composites: The role of filler ratio and cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Makhlouf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Micronic and submicronic mineral fillers recently appeared as efficient reinforcing agents for polyolefins in addition to the benefit of bypassing the exfoliation/dispersion problem encountered in the case of incorporation of nanoscopic fillers such as clay. Submicronic-talc, designated as μ-talc, belongs to this kind of new fillers. This work was aimed at searching to optimize the crystallinity ratio of isotactic polypropylene in the presence of μ-talc in relation to the filler ratio of the composites and the cooling rate from the melt. In order to highlight the efficiency of the μ-talc on the crystallization of polypropylene comparison has been made with PP composites containing conventional talc particles. The study has been carried out on samples having μ-talc weight fractions covering the range 3–30%. In the context of optimizing the crystallinity ratio of the polypropylene matrix in the composites, calorimetric experiments have been planned using a full factorial design. The results were statistically processed by analysis of the variance via mathematical models for predicting the crystallinity ratio in relation to the cooling rate and the filler ratio. Contour graphs have been plotted to determine the effect of each parameter on crystallinity. The cooling rate proved to have a significantly stronger influence on crystallinity than the type and content of filler.

  10. An evaluation of Fluorescent elastomer for marking killifish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated the subdermal injection of fluorescent elastomer for tagging two sympatric aplocheilids, Epiplatys bifasciatus and E. spilargyreius, in pond and stream conditions. The smallest size that could be injected without mortality was 28 mm TL. The Visible Implant Elastomer (VIE) tag did not affect the growth or survival ...

  11. Influence of Network Structure on Glass Transition Temperature of Elastomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandzierz, K.; Reuvekamp, Louis A.E.M.; Dryzek, J.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Blume, Anke; Bielinski, D.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally believed that only intermolecular, elastically-effective crosslinks influence elastomer properties. The role of the intramolecular modifications of the polymer chains is marginalized. The aim of our study was the characterization of the structural parameters of cured elastomers, and

  12. Protection of elastomers with DLC film : deposition, characterization and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez Martinez, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Elastomers are materials which suffer from strong wear and cause high friction losses when subjected to dynamic contact, leading quite often to failure of the components in devices. In this Thesis, the protection of elastomers by the deposition of carbon-based films (DLC) is studied. To accomplish

  13. Role of catalysis in sustainable production of synthetic elastomers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    significant role in the sustainable development of elastomers with special reference to polybutadiene rubber. Keywords. Elastomers; catalysis; tyres and ... polymer known to mankind and its first use was as an eraser.1 Apparently, the name ... and sticky depending upon the environmental condi- tions. Charles Goodyear,1 ...

  14. The influence of filler on the properties of elastomeric materials based on poly(ethylene-co-propylene-co-2-ehylidene-5-norbornene rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budinski-Simendić Jaroslava

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Crosslinked samples based on poly(ethylene-co-propylene-co-2-ehylidene5-norbornene EPDM rubber, carbon black as active filler and natural chalk as inactive filler were cured with sulphur. The content of carbon black was varied from 100 to 200 pph. The content of chalk was varied from 0 to 100 pph. The content of paraffin oil was also varied in some samples. The compounds were prepared by mixing ingredients on a laboratory two-roll mill. Vulcanizates were prepared by curing at 180°C. Various methods were used for the physical and mechanical characterizations. The dynamic mechanical properties of the elastomers were measured in the temperature range from -120 to 80°C.

  15. Reinforcing effect of nanosilica on polypropylene-nylon fibre composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Sinto [Department of Polymer Science and Rubber Technology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-22, Kerala (India); Suma, K.K. [Department of Polymer Science and Rubber Technology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-22, Kerala (India); Department of Chemistry, Maharaja' s college, Ernakulam, Kerala (India); Mendez, Jude Martin [Department of Polymer Science and Rubber Technology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-22, Kerala (India); Department of Chemistry, St. Alberts college, Ernakulam, Kerala (India); George, K.E., E-mail: kegeorge@cusat.ac.i [Department of Polymer Science and Rubber Technology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-22, Kerala (India)

    2010-04-15

    Polymer composites reinforced by both the micro and nano fillers is the subject of this paper. Polypropylene (PP)-nylon micro-fibre composites modified with nanosilica and modified nanosilica (using silane coupling agent) were prepared by melt compounding. The nanosilica prepared in the laboratory was used as reinforcing filler in PP-nylon fibre composites. The compounding characteristics and mechanical properties of the composites were studied. The equilibrium torque during compounding increased with the addition of nanosilica and modified nanosilica. The use of two types of fillers leads to synergistic effect on the mechanical properties of the composite. Composites with 1 wt.% nanosilica and 30 wt.% nylon fibre show high tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength and flexural modulus. Composites modified with 1 wt.% nanosilica and 10 wt.% nylon fibre-PP composite show higher impact strength.

  16. Electromechanical stability domain of dielectric elastomer film actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shouhua; Liu, Liwu; Zhang, Zhen; Yu, Kai; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2009-07-01

    The dielectric elastomer film will encounter electrical breaking-down frequently in its working state due to the coupling effect of electric field and mechanical force field. Referring to the electromechanical coupling system stability theory of dielectric elastomer proposed by Suo and Zhao, the electromechanical stability analysis of dielectric elastomer has been investigated. The free energy function of dielectric elastomer can be represented by the principle of superposition based on Suo's theory. Unstable domain of electromechanical coupling system of Neo-Hookean type silicone was analyzed by R. Díaz-Calleja et al. In the current work, the elastic strain energy function with two material constants was used to analyze the stable domain of electromechanical coupling system of Mooney-Rivlin type silicone, and the results seem to support R. Díaz-Calleja's theory. These results provide useful guidelines for the design and fabrication of actuators based on dielectric elastomer.

  17. Use of Almond Shells and Rice Husk as Fillers of Poly(Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Sabbatini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, wood fibres have often been applied as the reinforcement of thermoplastic materials, such as polypropylene, whereas their use in combination with thermosetting resin has been less widespread. This study concerns the production of PMMA-based composites by partly replacing alumina trihydrate (ATH with wood waste fillers, namely rice husks and almond shells, which would otherwise be disposed by incineration. The amount of filler introduced was limited to 10% as regards rice husks and 10 or 15% almond shells, since indications provided by reactivity tests and viscosity measurements did not suggest the feasibility of total replacement of ATH. As a matter of fact, the introduction of these contents of wood waste filler in PMMA-based composite did not result in any significant deterioration of its mechanical properties (Charpy impact, Rockwell M hardness and flexural performance. Some reduction of these properties was only observed in the case of introduction of 15% almond shells. A further issue concerned the yellowing of the organic filler under exposure to UV light. On the other hand, a very limited amount of water was absorbed, never exceeding values around 0.6%, despite the significant porosity revealed by the filler’s microscopic evaluation. These results are particularly interesting in view of the application envisaged for these composites, i.e., wood replacement boards.

  18. Density and Morphological Properties of Some Reinforced Polymers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The morphology of some reinforced blends of Polystyrene (PS) and Polyvinyl Acetate (PVAc) were estimated by density measurements, showing a definite pattern except that the filler composition increases the densities of the blends with 30/70, 20/80 and 10/90, PS/PVAc having highest values than other compositions. Also ...

  19. Density and Morphological Properties of Some Reinforced Polymers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    ABSTRACT: The morphology of some reinforced blends of Polystyrene (PS) and Polyvinyl Acetate. (PVAc) were estimated by density measurements, showing a definite pattern except that the filler composition increases the densities of the blends with 30/70, 20/80 and 10/90, PS/PVAc having highest values than other ...

  20. Temporal fossa defects: techniques for injecting hyaluronic acid filler and complications after hyaluronic acid filler injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Margit Lai Wun; Marmur, Ellen S

    2015-09-01

    Facial changes with aging include thinning of the epidermis, loss of skin elasticity, atrophy of muscle, and subcutaneous fat and bony changes, all which result in a loss of volume. As temporal bones become more concave, and the temporalis atrophies and the temporal fat pad decreases, volume loss leads to an undesirable, gaunt appearance. By altering the temporal fossa and upper face with hyaluronic acid filler, those whose specialty is injecting filler can achieve a balanced and more youthful facial structure. Many techniques have been described to inject filler into the fossa including a "fanned" pattern of injections, highly diluted filler injection, and the method we describe using a three-injection approach. Complications of filler in the temporal fossa include bruising, tenderness, swelling, Tyndall effect, overcorrection, and chewing discomfort. Although rare, more serious complications include infection, foreign body granuloma, intravascular necrosis, and blindness due to embolization into the ophthalmic artery. Using reversible hyaluronic acid fillers, hyaluronidase can be used to relieve any discomfort felt by the patient. Injectors must be aware of the complications that may occur and provide treatment readily to avoid morbidities associated with filler injection into this sensitive area. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Monitoring diver kinematics with dielectric elastomer sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher R.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2017-04-01

    Diving, initially motivated for food purposes, is crucial to the oil and gas industry, search and rescue, and is even done recreationally by millions of people. There is a growing need however, to monitor the health and activity of divers. The Divers Alert Network has reported on average 90 fatalities per year since 1980. Furthermore an estimated 1000 divers require recompression treatment for dive-related injuries every year. One means of monitoring diver activity is to integrate strain sensors into a wetsuit. This would provide kinematic information on the diver potentially improving buoyancy control assessment, providing a platform for gesture communication, detecting panic attacks and monitoring diver fatigue. To explore diver kinematic monitoring we have coupled dielectric elastomer sensors to a wetsuit worn by the pilot of a human-powered wet submarine. This provided a unique platform to test the performance and accuracy of dielectric elastomer strain sensors in an underwater application. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of strain sensors to monitor the kinematics of a diver. This study was in collaboration with the University of Auckland's human-powered submarine team, Team Taniwha. The pilot, completely encapsulated in a hull, pedals to propel the submarine forward. Therefore this study focused on leg motion as that is the primary motion of the submarine pilot. Four carbon-filled silicone dielectric elastomer sensors were fabricated and coupled to the pilot's wetsuit. The first two sensors were attached over the knee joints, with the remaining two attached between the pelvis and thigh. The goal was to accurately measure leg joint angles thereby determining the position of each leg relative to the hip. A floating data acquisition unit monitored the sensors and transmitted data packets to a nearby computer for real-time processing. A GoPro Hero 4 silver edition was used to capture the experiments and provide a means of post-validation. The

  2. A Recipe for Soft Fluidic Elastomer Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Andrew D; Katzschmann, Robert K; Rus, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    This work provides approaches to designing and fabricating soft fluidic elastomer robots. That is, three viable actuator morphologies composed entirely from soft silicone rubber are explored, and these morphologies are differentiated by their internal channel structure, namely, ribbed, cylindrical, and pleated. Additionally, three distinct casting-based fabrication processes are explored: lamination-based casting, retractable-pin-based casting, and lost-wax-based casting. Furthermore, two ways of fabricating a multiple DOF robot are explored: casting the complete robot as a whole and casting single degree of freedom (DOF) segments with subsequent concatenation. We experimentally validate each soft actuator morphology and fabrication process by creating multiple physical soft robot prototypes.

  3. Effect of filler size and filler loading on wear of experimental flowable resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Shinkai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The relationship between wear resistance and filler size or filler loading was clarified for the universal resin composite; however, their relationship in flowable resin composites has not been clarified. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of filler size and filler loading on wear of experimental flowable resin composites by using a cyclic loading device. Material and Methods: Nine experimental flowable resin composites consisting of three different sizes (70, 200 and 400 nm and loading (50, 55 and 60 wt% of filler were prepared. Bowl-shaped cavities were prepared on a flat surface of ceramic blocks using a No. 149 regular cut diamond point. The cavities were treated with a silane coupling agent and an all-in-one adhesive and then filled with each experimental flowable resin composite. The restored surfaces were finished and polished with a 1500-grit silicon carbide paper. The specimens were subjected to an in vitro two-body wear test using a cyclic loading device. The localized worn surfaces were evaluated at 10,000, 20,000, 30,000, and 40,000 cycles using a computer-controlled three-dimensional measuring microscope (n=5. The volumetric wear loss of the materials was calculated automatically by the equipment. Data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey test. Results: Two-way ANOVA showed that the filler size significantly influenced wear volume (p0.05. A post hoc Tukey test detected significant differences in filler size between 70 nm and 400 nm, and 200 nm and 400 nm (p<0.007. Conclusion: The experimental flowable resin composite containing a mean filler size of 400 nm exhibited significantly lower wear resistance in two-body wear compared with those containing mean filler sizes of 200 nm or 70 nm.

  4. Processing of oil palm empty fruit bunch as filler material of polymer recycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saepulloh, D. R.; Nikmatin, S.; Hardhienata, H.

    2017-05-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB) is waste from crude palm oil (CPO) processing plants. This research aims to process OPEFB to be a reinforcement polymer recycle with the mechanical milling method and identify each establishment molecular with the orbital hybridization theory. OPEFB fibers were synthesized using a mechanical milling until the size shortfiber and microfiber. Then do the biocomposite granular synthesis with single screw extruder. TAPPI chemical test shows levels of α-cellulose fibers amounted 41.68%. Based on density, the most optimum composition contained in the filler amounted 15% with the size is the microfiber. The test results of morphology with SEM showed deployment of filler OPEFB fiber is fairly equitable distributed. Regarding the molecular interaction between matrix with OPEFB fiber, described by the theory of orbital hybridization. But the explanation establishment of the bond for more complex molecules likes this from the side of the molecular orbital theory is necessary complete information of the hybrid levels.

  5. Thermal Properties of Asphalt Mixtures Modified with Conductive Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byong Chol Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the thermal properties of asphalt mixtures modified with conductive fillers used for snow melting and solar harvesting pavements. Two different mixing processes were adopted to mold asphalt mixtures, dry- and wet-mixing, and two conductive fillers were used in this study, graphite and carbon black. The thermal conductivity was compared to investigate the effects of asphalt mixture preparing methods, the quantity, and the distribution of conductive filler on thermal properties. The combination of conductive filler with carbon fiber in asphalt mixture was evaluated. Also, rheological properties of modified asphalt binders with conductive fillers were measured using dynamic shear rheometer and bending beam rheometer at grade-specific temperatures. Based on rheological testing, the conductive fillers improve rutting resistance and decrease thermal cracking resistance. Thermal testing indicated that graphite and carbon black improve the thermal properties of asphalt mixes and the combined conductive fillers are more effective than the single filler.

  6. 46 CFR 56.75-5 - Filler metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filler metal. 56.75-5 Section 56.75-5 Shipping COAST... Brazing § 56.75-5 Filler metal. (a) The filler metal used in brazing must be a nonferrous metal or alloy having a melting point above 1,000 °F. and below that of the metal being joined. The filler metal must...

  7. Superhydrophobic elastomer surfaces with nanostructured micronails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarikoski, Inka; Joki-Korpela, Fatima; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tuula T.; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to the fabrication of microstructures of special shape were developed for polymers. Unusual superhydrophobic surface structures were achieved with the use of flexible polymers and hierarchical molds. Flexible polyurethane-acrylate coatings were patterned with microstructures with use of microstructured aluminum mold in a controlled UV-curing process. Electron microscope images of the UV-cured coatings on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates revealed micropillars that were significantly higher than the corresponding depressions of the mold (even 47 vs. 35 μm). The elongation was achieved by detaching the mold from the flexible, partially cured acrylate surface and then further curing the separated microstructure. The modified acrylate surface is superhydrophobic with a water contact angle of 156° and sliding angle of Acrylic thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) were patterned with micro-nanostructured aluminum oxide molds through injection molding. The hierarchical surface of the elastomer showed elongated micropillars (57 μm) with nail-head tops covered with nanograss. Comparison with a reference microstructure of the same material (35 μm) indicated that the nanopores of the micro-nanomold assisted the formation of the nail-shaped micropillars. The elasticity of the TPE materials evidently plays a role in the elongation because similar elongation has not been found in hierarchically structured thermoplastic surfaces. The hierarchical micronail structure supports a high water contact angle (164°), representing an increase of 88° relative to the smooth TPE surface. The sliding angle was close to zero degrees, indicating the Cassie-Baxter state.

  8. Stress measurements of planar dielectric elastomer actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmani, Bekim; Aeby, Elise A.; Müller, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) micro- and nano-structures are referred to artificial muscles because of their specific continuous power and adequate time response. The bending measurement of an asymmetric, planar DEA is described. The asymmetric cantilevers consist of 1 or 5 μm-thin DEAs deposited on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrates 16, 25, 38, or 50 μm thick. The application of a voltage to the DEA electrodes generates an electrostatic pressure in the sandwiched silicone elastomer layer, which causes the underlying PEN substrate to bend. Optical beam deflection enables the detection of the bending angle vs. applied voltage. Bending radii as large as 850 m were reproducibly detected. DEA tests with electric fields of up to 80 V/μm showed limitations in electrode’s conductivity and structure failures. The actuation measurement is essential for the quantitative characterization of nanometer-thin, low-voltage, single- and multi-layer DEAs, as foreseen for artificial sphincters to efficiently treat severe urinary and fecal incontinence.

  9. Stress measurements of planar dielectric elastomer actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmani, Bekim; Aeby, Elise A.; Müller, Bert [Biomaterials Science Center, University of Basel, Gewerbestrasse 14, 4123 Allschwil (Switzerland)

    2016-05-15

    Dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) micro- and nano-structures are referred to artificial muscles because of their specific continuous power and adequate time response. The bending measurement of an asymmetric, planar DEA is described. The asymmetric cantilevers consist of 1 or 5 μm-thin DEAs deposited on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrates 16, 25, 38, or 50 μm thick. The application of a voltage to the DEA electrodes generates an electrostatic pressure in the sandwiched silicone elastomer layer, which causes the underlying PEN substrate to bend. Optical beam deflection enables the detection of the bending angle vs. applied voltage. Bending radii as large as 850 m were reproducibly detected. DEA tests with electric fields of up to 80 V/μm showed limitations in electrode’s conductivity and structure failures. The actuation measurement is essential for the quantitative characterization of nanometer-thin, low-voltage, single- and multi-layer DEAs, as foreseen for artificial sphincters to efficiently treat severe urinary and fecal incontinence.

  10. Soft Dielectric Elastomer Oscillators Driving Bioinspired Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, E-F Markus; Schlatter, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A

    2017-12-01

    Entirely soft robots with animal-like behavior and integrated artificial nervous systems will open up totally new perspectives and applications. To produce them, we must integrate control and actuation in the same soft structure. Soft actuators (e.g., pneumatic and hydraulic) exist but electronics are hard and stiff and remotely located. We present novel soft, electronics-free dielectric elastomer oscillators, which are able to drive bioinspired robots. As a demonstrator, we present a robot that mimics the crawling motion of the caterpillar, with an integrated artificial nervous system, soft actuators and without any conventional stiff electronic parts. Supplied with an external DC voltage, the robot autonomously generates all signals that are necessary to drive its dielectric elastomer actuators, and it translates an in-plane electromechanical oscillation into a crawling locomotion movement. Therefore, all functional and supporting parts are made of polymer materials and carbon. Besides the basic design of this first electronic-free, biomimetic robot, we present prospects to control the general behavior of such robots. The absence of conventional stiff electronics and the exclusive use of polymeric materials will provide a large step toward real animal-like robots, compliant human machine interfaces, and a new class of distributed, neuron-like internal control for robotic systems.

  11. Modeling shape selection of buckled dielectric elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langham, Jacob; Bense, Hadrien; Barkley, Dwight

    2018-02-01

    A dielectric elastomer whose edges are held fixed will buckle, given a sufficiently applied voltage, resulting in a nontrivial out-of-plane deformation. We study this situation numerically using a nonlinear elastic model which decouples two of the principal electrostatic stresses acting on an elastomer: normal pressure due to the mutual attraction of oppositely charged electrodes and tangential shear ("fringing") due to repulsion of like charges at the electrode edges. These enter via physically simplified boundary conditions that are applied in a fixed reference domain using a nondimensional approach. The method is valid for small to moderate strains and is straightforward to implement in a generic nonlinear elasticity code. We validate the model by directly comparing the simulated equilibrium shapes with the experiment. For circular electrodes which buckle axisymetrically, the shape of the deflection profile is captured. Annular electrodes of different widths produce azimuthal ripples with wavelengths that match our simulations. In this case, it is essential to compute multiple equilibria because the first model solution obtained by the nonlinear solver (Newton's method) is often not the energetically favored state. We address this using a numerical technique known as "deflation." Finally, we observe the large number of different solutions that may be obtained for the case of a long rectangular strip.

  12. Modeling of Magnetostriction of Soft Elastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petr, Andriushchenko; Leonid, Afremov; Mariya, Chernova

    2014-01-01

    Small magnetic particles placed in a relatively soft polymer (with elastic modulus E ∼ 10 ÷ 100 kPa) are magnetically soft elastomers. The external magnetic field acts on each particle which leads to microscopic deformation of the material and consequently to changing of its shape – magnetostriction. For purposes of studying of magnetostriction the model of movable cellular automata (MCA), in which a real heterogeneous material is an ensemble of interacting elements of finite size – automata, is used. It's supposed to be that the motion of each automata can be described by Newton's Second law. The force acting on the i-th automata consists of the following components: volume-dependent force acting on the automata i which is caused by pressure from the surrounding automata; force of an external magnetic field acting on the i-th automata with some magnetic moment; and normal and tangential interaction force between a pair of i and j automata. This approach was used for modeling of magnetostriction elastomer

  13. Effect of Biomass Waste Filler on the Dielectric Properties of Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yew Been Seok

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of biomass waste fillers, namely coconut shell (CS and sugarcane bagasse (SCB on the dielectric properties of polymer composite was investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of CS and SCB to be used as conductive filler (natural source of carbon in the polymer composite. The purpose of the conductive filler is to increase the dielectric properties of the polymer composite. The carbon composition the CS and SCB was determine through carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur (CHNS elemental analysis whereas the structural morphology of CS and SCB particles was examined by using scanning electron microscope. Room temperature open-ended coaxial line method was used to determine the dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor over broad band frequency range of 200 MHz-20 GHz. Based on this study, the results found that CS and SCB contain 48% and 44% of carbon, which is potentially useful to be used as conductive elements in the polymer composite. From SEM morphology, presence of irregular shape particles (size ≈ 200 μm and macroporous structure (size ≈ 2.5 μm were detected on CS and SCB. For dielectric properties measurement, it was measured that the average dielectric constant (ε' is 3.062 and 3.007 whereas the average dielectric loss factor (ε" is 0.282 and 0.273 respectively for CS/polymer and SCB/polymer composites. The presence of the biomass waste fillers have improved the dielectric properties of the polymer based composite (ε' = 2.920, ε" = 0.231. However, the increased in the dielectric properties is not highly significant, i.e. up to 4.86 % increase in ε' and 20% increase in ε". The biomass waste filler reinforced polymer composites show typical dielectric relaxation characteristic at frequency of 10 GHz - 20 GHz and could be used as conducting polymer composite for suppressing EMI at high frequency range.

  14. Active vibration isolation platform on base of magnetorheological elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailov, Valery P., E-mail: mikhailov@bmstu.ru; Bazinenkov, Alexey M.

    2017-06-01

    The article describes the active vibration isolation platform on base of magnetorheological (MR) elastomers. An active damper based on the MR elastomers can be used as an actuator of micro- or nanopositioning for a vibroinsulated object. The MR elastomers give such advantages for active control of vibration as large range of displacements (up to 1 mm), more efficient absorption of the vibration energy, possibility of active control of amplitude-frequency characteristics and positioning with millisecond response speed and nanometer running accuracy. The article presents the results of experimental studies of the most important active damper parameters. Those are starting current, transient time for stepping, transmission coefficient of the vibration displacement amplitude.

  15. Hybrid filler composition optimization for tensile strength of jute fibre ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of weight content of bagasse fibre, carbon black and calcium carbonate on tensile strength of pultruded GFRP composite is evaluated and the optimum hybrid filler composition for maximizing the tensile strength is determined. Different compositions of hybrid filler are prepared by mixing three fillers using Taguchi ...

  16. Filler functionality in edible solid foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    We review the functionality of particulate ingredients in edible brittle foams, such as expanded starchy snacks. In food science and industry there is not a complete awareness of the full functionality of these filler ingredients, which can be fibers, proteins, starch granules and whole grains.

  17. Synthesis, structure and properties of highly elastic poly(dimethylsiloxane)/graphene oxide composite elastomer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Heonjoo; Park, Jaesung; Freeman, Benny D.; Ellison, Christopher J.

    This study illustrates that amine functional groups on the ends of telechelic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) can undergo post-processing reactions with surface epoxy groups on graphene oxide (GO) to form a robust elastomer during simple heating. In these materials, GO acts as a nanofiller that reinforces the mechanical properties and participates as a multifunctional crosslinker that promotes elastic properties. Experiments indicate that the telechelic PDMS/GO elastomer is highly crosslinked (e.g., more than 75 wt % is a non-dissolving crosslinked gel) but highly flexible such that it can be stretched up to 300% of its original length. After processing these materials into membranes, the permeability for some common gases was studied as a function of GO concentration. Due to the macromolecular network and tortuous pathways formed during the curing reaction, factor of two enhancements in gas selectivities were observed for CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4 compared to neat PDMS membranes. Considering the expected thermal and chemical tolerance of the PDMS/GO composite membrane detailed in this work suggests these membranes could be useful in applications such as post-combustion CO2 capture, CO2 removal from natural gas and in other industries that use or process CO2.

  18. Effect of Red Mud and Copper Slag Particles on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Bamboo-Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhyarani Biswas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a series of bamboo-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated by using red mud and copper slag particles as filler materials. A filler plays an important role in determining the properties and behavior of particulate composites. The effects of these two fillers on the mechanical properties of bamboo-epoxy composites are investigated. Comparative analysis shows that with the incorporation of these fillers, the tensile strength of the composites increases significantly, whereas the flexural strength and impact strength decrease with increase in filler content (red mud and copper slag fillers in the epoxy-bamboo fiber composites. The density and hardness are also affected by the type and content of filler particles. It is found that the addition of copper slag filler improves the hardness of the bamboo-epoxy composites, whereas the addition of red mud filler reduces the hardness value of bamboo-epoxy composites. The study reveals that the addition of copper slag filler in bamboo-epoxy composites shows better physical and mechanical properties as compared to the red-mud-filled composites.

  19. Thermally conductive polyamide 6/carbon filler composites based on a hybrid filler system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sung Min; Kwon, O Hwan; Oh, Yu Gyeong; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Sung-Goo; Won, Jong Chan; Cho, Kwang Soo; Kim, Byoung Gak; Yoo, Youngjae

    2015-12-01

    We explored the use of a hybrid filler consisting of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polyamide 6 (PA 6) matrix. The composites containing PA 6, powdered GNP, and SWCNT were melt-processed and the effect of filler content in the single filler and hybrid filler systems on the thermal conductivity of the composites was examined. The thermal diffusivities of the composites were measured by the standard laser flash method. Composites containing the hybrid filler system showed enhanced thermal conductivity with values as high as 8.8 W (m · K) -1 , which is a 35-fold increase compared to the thermal conductivity of pure PA 6. Thermographic images of heat conduction and heat release behaviors were consistent with the thermal conductivity results, and showed rapid temperature jumps and drops, respectively, for the composites. A composite model based on the Lewis-Nielsen theory was developed to treat GNP and SWCNT as two separate types of fillers. Two approaches, the additive and multiplicative approaches, give rather good quantitative agreement between the predicted values of thermal conductivity and those measured experimentally.

  20. Bioactive glass particulate filler composite: Effect of coupling of fillers and filler loading on some physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Onur; Lassila, Lippo V; Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silanization of biostable and bioactive glass fillers in a polymer matrix on some of the physical properties of the composite. The water absorption, solubility, flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness of different particulate filler composite resins were studied in vitro. Five different specimen groups were analyzed: A glass-free control, a non-silanized bioactive glass, a silanized bioactive glass, a non-silanized biostable glass and a silanized biostable glass groups. All of these five groups were further divided into sub-groups of dry and water-stored materials, both of them containing groups with 3wt%, 6wt%, 9wt% or 12wt% of glass particles (n=8 per group). The silanization of the glass particles was carried out with 2% of gamma-3-methacryloxyproyltrimethoxysilane (MPS). For the water absorption and solubility tests, the test specimens were stored in water for 60 days, and the percentages of weight change were statistically analyzed. Flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness values were tested with a three-point bending test and statistically analyzed. Higher solubility values were observed in non-silanized glass in proportion to the percentage of glass particles. Silanization, on the other hand, decreased the solubility values of both types of glass particles and polymer. While 12wt% non-silanized bioactive glass specimens showed -0.98wt% solubility, 12wt% silanized biostable glass specimens were observed to have only -0.34wt% solubility. The three-point bending results of the dry specimens showed that flexural strength, toughness and flexural modulus decreased in proportion to the increase of glass fillers. The control group presented the highest results (106.6MPa for flexural strength, 335.7kPA for toughness, 3.23GPa for flexural modulus), whereas for flexural strength and toughness, 12wt% of non-silanized biostable glass filler groups presented the lowest (70.3MPa for flexural strength

  1. Reinforcement of poly(dimethylsiloxane by sol-gel in situ generated silica and titania particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The usual sol-gel process was applied to precipitate silica or titania particles in a preformed poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS network under the presence of dibutyltin diacetate used as a catalyst. The resulting structures of the reinforcing fillers were studied by transmission electron microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering. Stress-strain measurements in elongation and equilibrium swelling experiments revealed distinct behaviors mainly attributed to the nature and the size of the generated particles and to the formation, in the case of titania, of a filler network even at low filler loadings.

  2. Molecular recognition in poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-based thermoplastic elastomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisse, Eva; Spiering, A. J. H.; van Leeuwen, Ellen N. M.; Renken, Raymond A. E.; Dankers, Patricia Y. W.; Brouwer, Linda A.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Meijer, E. W.

    2006-01-01

    The molecular recognition properties of the hydrogen bonding segments in biodegradable thermoplastic elastomers were explored, aiming at the further functionalization of these potentially interesting biomaterials. A poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-based poly(urea) 2 was synthesized and characterized in

  3. Space-Qualifiable Cyanate Ester Elastomer, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG) proposes to design and develop a space-qualifiable cyanate ester elastomer for application in self-deployable space structures...

  4. Space-Qualifiable Cyanate Ester Elastomer, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase 1, CRG demonstrated the feasibility of a novel approach to prepare cyanate ester based elastomers. This approach polymerizes in-situ siloxane within a...

  5. Functional silicone copolymers and elastomers with high dielectric permittivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Hvilsted, Søren

    , thereby forming a capacitor [1]. Silicone elastomers are one of the most used materials for DEs due to their high efficiency, fast response times and low viscous losses. The major disadvantage of silicone elastomers is that they possess relatively low dielectric permittivity, which means that a high...... electrical field is necessary to operate the DE. The necessary electrical field can be lowered by creating silicone elastomers with higher dielectric permittivity, i.e. with a higher energy density.The aim of this work is to create new and improved silicone elastomers with high dielectric permittivity....... This was done trough the synthesis of new functionalizable siloxane copolymers [2] that allow for the attachment of high dielectric permittivity molecules through copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC) reactions. The synthesised siloxane copolymers were prepared via the tris...

  6. Amino alcohol-based degradable poly(ester amide) elastomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Bettinger (Christopher); J.P. Bruggeman (Joost); J.T. Borenstein (Jeffrey); R.S. Langer (Robert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCurrently available synthetic biodegradable elastomers are primarily composed of crosslinked aliphatic polyesters, which suffer from deficiencies including (1) high crosslink densities, which results in exceedingly high stiffness, (2) rapid degradation upon implantation, or (3) limited

  7. EFFECTS OF GAMMA IRRADIATION ON EPDM ELASTOMERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, E.

    2011-09-22

    Two formulations of EPDM elastomer, one substituting a UV stabilizer for the normal antioxidant in this polymer, and the other the normal formulation, were synthesized and samples of each were exposed to gamma irradiation in initially pure deuterium gas to compare their radiation stability. Stainless steel containers having rupture disks were designed for this task. After 130 MRad dose of cobalt-60 radiation in the SRNL Gamma Irradiation Facility, a significant amount of gas was created by radiolysis; however the composition indicated by mass spectroscopy indicated an unexpected increase in the total amount deuterium in both formulations. The irradiated samples retained their ductility in a bend test. No change of sample weight, dimensions, or density was observed. No change of the glass transition temperature as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis was observed, and most of the other dynamic mechanical properties remained unchanged. There appeared to be an increase in the storage modulus of the irradiated samples containing the UV stabilizer above the glass transition, which may indicate hardening of the material by radiation damage. Polymeric materials become damaged by exposure over time to ionizing radiation. Despite the limited lifetime, polymers have unique engineering material properties and polymers continue to be used in tritium handling systems. In tritium handling systems, polymers are employed mainly in joining applications such as valve sealing surfaces (eg. Stem tips, valve packing, and O-rings). Because of the continued need to employ polymers in tritium systems, over the past several years, programs at the Savannah River National Laboratory have been studying the effect of tritium on various polymers of interest. In these studies, samples of materials of interest to the SRS Tritium Facilities (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon{reg_sign}), Vespel{reg_sign} polyimide, and the elastomer

  8. Dual-cure luting composites: Part I: Filler particle distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, S; Willems, G; Van Meerbeek, B; Lambrechts, P; Braem, M; Vanherle, G

    1993-03-01

    Fourteen dual-cure luting composites were analyzed for their filler particle shape, predominant and maximum filler size, and filler weight in function of their clinical use. Polished surfaces were etched with an argon ion beam and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. The type of filler particles, either inorganic or prepolymerized, could clearly be recognized. Their shapes were angular, rounded or spherical, depending on the product. The maximum filler size varied extremely from less than 1 micron to 250 microns. A particle-size distribution analyser disclosed a bell-shaped filler-size distribution. The predominant filler size for all the products was much smaller than the maximum filler size. The filler weight varied from 36 to 77%. After ion etching, some products showed small areas with a low degree of filler loading. A classification of the luting composites based on the maximum filler size is proposed. Since the particle size varies widely within the group of products analyzed, a standard specification for luting composites is urgently needed.

  9. Effect of Wood Fillers on the Viscoelastic and Thermophysical Properties of HDPE-Wood Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood polymer composites (WPC have well proven their applicability in several fields of the plasturgy sector, due to their aesthetics and low maintenance costs. However, for plasturgy applications, the characterization of viscoelastic behavior and thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of WPC with the temperature and wood filler contents is essential. Therefore, the processability of polymer composites made up with different percentage of wood particles needs a better understanding of materials behaviors in accordance with temperature and wood particles contents. To this end, a numerical analysis of the viscoelastic, mechanical, and thermophysical properties of composite composed of high density polyethylene (HDPE reinforced with soft wood particles is evaluated.

  10. Treatment to Control Adhesion of Silicone-Based Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Seals are used to facilitate the joining of two items, usually temporarily. At some point in the future, it is expected that the items will need to be separated. This innovation enables control of the adhesive properties of silicone-based elastomers. The innovation may also be effective on elastomers other than the silicone-based ones. A technique has been discovered that decreases the level of adhesion of silicone- based elastomers to negligible levels. The new technique causes less damage to the material compared to alternative adhesion mitigation techniques. Silicone-based elastomers are the only class of rubber-like materials that currently meet NASA s needs for various seal applications. However, silicone-based elastomers have natural inherent adhesive properties. This stickiness can be helpful, but it can frequently cause problems as well, such as when trying to get items apart. In the past, seal adhesion was not always adequately addressed, and has caused in-flight failures where seals were actually pulled from their grooves, preventing subsequent spacecraft docking until the seal was physically removed from the flange via an extravehicular activity (EVA). The primary method used in the past to lower elastomer seal adhesion has been the application of some type of lubricant or grease to the surface of the seal. A newer method uses ultraviolet (UV) radiation a mixture of UV wavelengths in the range of near ultraviolet (NUV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelengths.

  11. Arrayed Force Sensors Made of Paper, Elastomer, and Hydrogel Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyue Zou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a sensor for detecting the distribution of forces on a surface. The device with nine buttons consisted of an elastomer-based layer as a touch interface resting on a substrate of patterned metallized paper. The elastomer-based layer included a three-by-three array of deformable, hemispherical elements/reliefs, facing down toward an array of interdigitated capacitive sensing units on patterned metallized paper. Each hemispherical element is 20 mm in diameter and 8 mm in height. When a user applied pressure to the elastomer-based layer, the contact area between the hemispherical elements and the interdigitated capacitive sensing units increased with the deformation of the hemispherical elements. To enhance the sensitivity of the sensors, embedded particles of hydrogel in the elastomer-based layer increased the measured electrical responses. The measured capacitance increased because the effective dielectric permittivity of the hydrogel was greater than that of air. Electromechanical characterization verified that the hydrogel-filled elastomer was more sensitive to force at a low range of loads (23.4 pF/N than elastomer alone without embedded hydrogel (3.4 pF/N, as the hydrogel reduced the effective elastic modulus of the composite material by a factor of seven. A simple demonstration suggests that the force-sensing array has the potential to contribute to wearable and soft robotic devices.

  12. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-08-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer`s response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping.

  13. Elastomer degradation sensor using a piezoelectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olness, Dolores U.; Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B.

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring the degradation of elastomeric materials is provided. Piezoelectric oscillators are placed in contact with the elastomeric material so that a forced harmonic oscillator with damping is formed. The piezoelectric material is connected to an oscillator circuit,. A parameter such as the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q value of the oscillating system is related to the elasticity of the elastomeric material. Degradation of the elastomeric material causes changes in its elasticity which, in turn, causes the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q of the oscillator to change. These changes are monitored with a peak height monitor, frequency counter, Q-meter, spectrum analyzer, or other measurement circuit. Elasticity of elastomers can be monitored in situ, using miniaturized sensors.

  14. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1992-07-01

    Information contained in this reporters designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. Swell measurements have been made on approximately 50% of the proposed elastomers (94 total)in both the lubricant (7 total) and refrigerant (10 total) materials. Swell behavior in the these fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  15. Polyurethane elastomers from morphology to mechanical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Prisacariu, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive account of the physical / mechanical behaviour of polyurethanes (PU´s) elastomers, films and blends of variable crystallinity. Aspects covered include the elasticity and inelasticity of amorphous to crystalline PUs, in relation to their sensitivity to chemical and physical structure. A study is made of how aspects of the constitutive responses of PUs vary with composition: the polyaddition procedure, the hard segment, soft segment and chain extender (diols and diamines) are varied systematically in a large number of systems of model and novel crosslinked andthermoplastic PUs. Results will be related to: microstructural changes, on the basis of evidence from x-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS), and also dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and IR dichroism. Inelastic effects will be investigated also by including quantitative correlations between the magnitude of the Mullins effect and the fractional energy dissipation by hysteresis under cyclic straining, g...

  16. Interfacial friction damping properties in magnetorheological elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Yanceng; Gong, Xinglong; Xuan, Shouhu; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Jian; Jiang, Wanquan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the interfacial friction damping properties of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) were investigated experimentally. Two kinds of carbonyl iron particles, with sizes of 1.1 µm and 9.0 µm, were used to fabricate four MRE samples, whose particle weight fractions were 10%, 30%, 60% and 80%, respectively. Their microstructures were observed using an environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM). The dynamic performances of these samples, including shear storage modulus and loss factor were measured with a modified dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). The experimental results indicate that MRE samples fabricated with 1.1 µm carbonyl iron particles have obvious particle agglomeration, which results in the fluctuation of loss factor compared with other MRE samples fabricated with large particle sizes. The analysis implies that the interfacial friction damping mainly comes from the frictional sliding at the interfaces between the free rubber and the particles

  17. Pneumatic Multi-Pocket Elastomer Actuators for Metacarpophalangeal Joint Flexion and Abduction-Adduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapio Veli Juhani Tarvainen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, interest has been rising towards developing fluidic fiber-reinforced elastomer actuators for wearable soft robotics used in hand rehabilitation and power-assist. However, they do not enable finger abduction-adduction, which plays an important role in activities of daily living, when grasping larger objects. Furthermore, the developed gloves often do not have separate control of joints, which is important for doing various common rehabilitation motions. The main obstacle for the development of a fully-assisting glove is moving a joint with multiple degrees of freedom. If the functions are built into the same structure, they are naturally coupled and affect each other, which makes them more difficult to design and complex to control than a simple flexion-extension actuator. In this study, we explored the key design elements and fabrication of pneumatic multi-pocket elastomer actuators for a soft rehabilitation glove. The goal was to gain more control over the metacarpophalangeal joint’s response by increasing the degree of actuation. Three main functional designs were tested for achieving both flexion and abduction-adduction. Five prototypes, with four different actuator geometries and four different reinforcement types, were designed and fabricated. They were evaluated by recording their free motion with motion capture and measuring their torque output using a dummy finger. Results showed the strengths and weaknesses of each design in separating the control of the two functions. We discuss the different improvements that are needed in order to make each design plausible for developing an actuator that meets the requirements for full assist of the hand’s motions. In conclusion, we show that it is possible to produce multi-pocket actuators for assisting MCP joint motion in both flexion and abduction-adduction, although coupling between the separate functions is still problematic and should be considered further.

  18. Skin-Inspired Hydrogel-Elastomer Composite with Application in a Moisture Permeable Prosthetic Limb Liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Esteban

    Recent advances in fields such as 3D printing, and biomaterials, have enabled the development of a moisture permeable prosthetic liner. This project demonstrates the feasibility of the invention by addressing the three primary areas of risk including the mechanical strength, the permeability, and the ability to manufacture. The key enabling technology which allows the liner to operate is the skin inspired hydrogel elastomer composite. The skin inspiration is reflected in the molecular arrangement of the double network of polymers which mimics collagen-elastin toughening in the natural epidermis. A custom formulation for a novel tough double network nanocomposite reinforced hydrogel was developed to improve manufacturability of the liner. The liner features this double network nanocomposite reinforced hydrogel as a permeable membrane which is reinforced on either side by perforated silicone layers manufactured by 3d printing assisted casting. Uniaxial compression tests were conducted on the individual hydrogels, as well as a representative sample of off the shelf prosthetic liners for comparison. Permeability testing was also done on the same set of materials and compared to literature values for traditional hydrogels. This work led to the manufacture of three generations of liner prototypes, with the second and third liner prototype being tested with human participants.

  19. Composite Fillers and their Influence on Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauer, Milan; Kalenda, Petr; Honner, Milan; Vacíková, Petra

    The research work presented in this paper shows influence of filler composition in inorganic composite on its emissivity. Development of system which will provide a very high emissivity (0.90 - 0.99) within a short wavelength range is the intention of our project. Active ingredients (Chromium Oxide, Iron powder, Kaolin, Silicon Carbide, Boron Carbide, Boron Nitride and Aluminum Nitride) were built in matrix of the composite. Furrier Transform Infra- Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy method was applied for measurement of spectral emissivity. Block hot plate was used for heating samples in relative emissivity measurement and laser beam in absolute emissivity measurement. These tests demonstrated that filler composition is able to influence emissive properties in range of short IR wavelength (1.5-4.0 μm) within 0.7 - 1.5 times (against the reference). Also influence of content of active ingredient in ceramic matrix on emissivity was measured. Content of active ingredients had no significant effect on emissivity.

  20. Fillers in the skin of color population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Candrice R; Taylor, Susan C

    2011-05-01

    The skin of color population in the United States is rapidly growing and the cosmetic industry is responding to the demand for skin of color targeted treatments. The aging face in skin of color patients has a unique pattern that can be successfully augmented by dermal fillers. Though many subjects with skin of color were not included in the pre-market dermal filler clinical trials, some post-market studies have examined the safety and risks of adverse events in this population. The safety data from a selection of these studies was examined. Though pigmentary changes occurred, there have been no reports of keloid development. Developing a patient-specific care plan and instituting close follow up is emphasized.

  1. Particle synthesis, characterization, and properties of filled polymer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohls, Douglas J.

    This dissertation presents results on the reinforcement of an elastomer system using different types of fillers and comparing the resulting mechanical properties of compounds made with these fillers. The analytic approach uses two classical models with which fillers are thought to reinforce elastomers. The first mechanism being based on filler structure while the second involves the interaction of the filler with an elastomer. Two new types of fillers are investigated: a fumed silica-carbon composite and a layered silicate. These fillers are compounded into elastomers using formulations that are standard in the tire industry for tire tread compounds. This work builds off of previous studies that use techniques such as microscopy and gas adsorption to characterize filler structure by adding the use of small-angle x-ray scattering to characterize fillers based on three structural levels. Classical rubber elasticity principles with recent fractal model analysis are used to describe how the structural levels of the fillers relate to elastomer reinforcement. Analysis of the SAXS data gives information about the size of the primary particle and of the aggregate formed by these primary particles. It is found, through analyzing the SAXS data, that the ratio of these two structural sizes gives the degree of aggregation or the number of particles in an aggregate. The measurement and analysis of the degree of aggregation and how it correlates with measured mechanical properties of compounds is presented in this dissertation. The results from the USAXS and the mechanical testing of elastomers showed that the degree of aggregation, z, helps to identify what is a 'reinforcing' filler. Higher degree of aggregation correlated with better mechanical properties. While other studies have shown the effects of surface modifications, filler concentration, and surface area, the studies in this dissertation conclude that the degree of aggregation is an important parameter that can predict

  2. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) as compliant electrodes for dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Soo-Lim; Neo, Xin-Hui; Lau, Gih-Keong

    2011-04-01

    A stacked dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) consists of multiple layers of elastomeric dielectrics interleaved with compliant electrodes. It is capable of taking a tensile load if only the interleaving compliant electrodes provide a good bonding and enough elasticity. However, the stacked configuration of DEA was found to produce less actuation strain as compared to a single-layer configuration of pre-stretched membrane. It is believed the binder for compliant electrodes has a significant influence on the actuation strain. Yet, there has yet systematic study on the effect of binder. In this paper, we will study the effects of binder, solvent, and surface fictionalization on the compliant electrodes using the conductive filler of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT). Two types of binders are used, namely a soft silicone rubber (Mold Max 10T) and a soft silicone gel (Sylgard 527 gel). The present experiments show that the actuators using binders in the compliant electrodes produce a much lower areal strain as compared to the ones without binders in them. It is found that introducing a binder in the electrodes decreases the conductivity. The MWCNT compliant electrode with binder remains conductive (<1TΩ) up to a strain of 300%, whereas the one without binder remains conductive up to a strain of 800%. Changing the type of binder to a softer and less-viscous one increases the percolation ratio for MWCNT-COOH filler from 5% to 15% but this does not significantly increase the actuation strain. In addition, this study investigates the effect of MWCNT functionalization on the dielectric elastomeric actuation. The compliant electrodes using the MWCNT functionalized with (-COOH) group was also found to have a lower electrical conductivity and areal actuation strain, in comparison to the ones using the pristine MWCNT filler. In addition to binder, solvent for dispersing MWCNT-COOH was found to affect the actuation strain even though the solvent is eventually removed by

  3. Effect of filler porosity on the abrasion resistance of nanoporous silica gel/polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J; Lannutti, J J; Seghi, R R

    1998-01-01

    This laboratory study was designed to investigate the effect of controlled nanoporosity on the wear resistance of polymeric composites reinforced with silica gel powders and to determine the mechanisms controlling the abrasive wear properties of these unique nanostructured materials. Silica gels were prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) using four different catalysts to modify the porous structure of the resulting polysilicate silanation, an organic monomer (TEGDMA) containing various initiators was introduced into the gel powders to form a paste. The various pastes were then polymerized inside a glass mold. A pin-on-disk apparatus was then used to record the specimen length and number of revolutions. Abrasive wear rates were determined by regression analysis and statistical differences were determined by analysis of variance and multiple comparisons. BET was used to characterize the filler pore structure and scanning electron microscopy was used used to visually examine the abraded surfaces. Significant differences (p particle pullout. Porous particles prepared via sol-gel show some promise as fillers that improve the wear resistance of photopolymerized resins. The wear resistance of the fillers appears to be directly related to nanoporous structure of the gel particles. Unlike conventional dental composites, these materials rely primarily on nanomechanical coupling for improved wear resistance. This new principle should benefit subsequent investigations.

  4. Influence of using nanoobjects as filler on functionality-based energy use of nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roes, A. L., E-mail: a.l.roes@uu.nl; Tabak, L. B.; Shen, L.; Nieuwlaar, E.; Patel, M. K. [Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute, Department of Science, Technology and Society (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    The goal of our study was to investigate the potential benefits of reinforcing polymer matrices with nanoobjects for structural applications by looking at both the mechanical properties and environmental impacts. For determining the mechanical properties, we applied the material indices defined by Ashby for stiffness and strength. For the calculation of environmental impacts, we applied the life cycle assessment methodology, focusing on non-renewable energy use (NREU). NREU has shown to be a good indicator also for other environmental impacts. We then divided the NREU by the appropriate Ashby index to obtain the 'functionality-based NREU'. We studied 23 different nanocomposites, based on thermoplastic and thermosetting polymer matrices and organophilic montmorillonite, silica, carbon nanotubes (single-walled and multiwalled) and calcium carbonate as filler. For 17 of these, we saw a decrease of the functionality-based NREU with increasing filler content. We draw the conclusion that the use of nanoobjects as filler can have benefits from both an environmental point of view and with respect to mechanical properties.

  5. PROCESS TIME OPTIMIZATION IN DEPOSITOR AND FILLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Iván Ruíz-Ibarra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As in any industry, in soft drink manufacturing demand, customer service and production is of great importance that forces this production to have their equipment and production machines in optimal conditions for the product to be in the hands of the consumer without delays, therefore it is important to have the established times of each process, since the syrup is elaborated, packaged, distributed, until it is purchased by the consumer. After a chronometer analysis, the most common faults were detected in each analyzed process. In the filler machine the most frequent faults are: accumulation of bottles in the subsequent and previous processes to filling process, which in general the cause of the collection of bottles is due to failures in the other equipment of the production line. In the process of unloading the most common faults are: boxes jammed in bump and pusher (pushing boxes; boxes fallen in rollers and platforms transporter. According to observations in each machine, the actions to be followed are presented to solve the problems that arise. Also described the methodology to obtain results, to data analyze and decisions. Firstly an analysis of operations is done to know each machine, supported by the manuals of the machines and the operators themselves a study of times is done by chronometer to determine the standard time of the process where also they present the most common faults, then observations are made on the machines according to the determined sample size, thus obtaining the information necessary to take measurements and to make the study of optimization of the production processes. An analysis of the predetermined process times is also performed by the MTM methods and the MOST time analysis. The results of operators with MTM: Fault Filler = 0.846 minutes, Faultless Filler = 0.61 minutes, Fault Breaker = 0.74 minutes and Fault Flasher = 0.45 minutes. The results of MOST operators are: Fault Filler = 2.58 minutes, Filler Fails

  6. Pad printing 1-10 mm thick elastomer membranes for DEAs

    OpenAIRE

    Poulin, Alexandre; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    We present a technique for stamping patterned silicone elastomer membranes with thicknesses ranging from 1 to 10 um. Silicone elastomers are becoming the material of choice for dielectric elastomer transducers. The variety of readily available materials, their versatility in terms of film thicknesses and their excellent mechanical properties have made them a very appealing alternative to the widely used acrylic elastomer VHB from 3M. Silicone films are typically blade casted or spin coated, t...

  7. Filler Migration: A Number of Mechanisms to Consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, David R; Stoica, Bazil

    2015-01-01

    To report 3 representative cases of soft tissue filler identified in locations other than their intended injected sites (possible migration) and review the literature on pathogenesis of filler migration. Soft tissue fillers are continuing to increase in popularity throughout North America and worldwide as a means of volume restoration and contour enhancement. With increasing recognition of their value in restoring a more youthful appearance and the ease of office injection, soft tissue fillers have become one of the most commonly performed nonsurgical cosmetic procedures. Soft tissue fillers are also foreign bodies in our system and therefore have the potential for a myriad of complications both immediately after the injection and potentially months or years later. Filler migration is one such complication and has a number of potential mechanisms. The authors reviewed the medical records of 3 patients with filler located in areas other than their intended injected sites possibly as a result of migration. All patients were from the practice of 1 individual (DRJ). A MEDLINE search of the English-language literature on filler migration was conducted to investigate the various causes responsible for migration of filler. Clinical manifestations of the possible filler migration in the 3 cases included eyelid swelling in 2 patients and a noninflammatory mass adjacent to the area of filler injection in the third patient. Surgery was performed on 1 patient, and filler was visualized in the tissue and dissolved with hyaluronidase. Hyaluronidase was also used to dissolve the suspected filler in a second patient, and the third patient has elected to continue with observation. Filler migration is one of the potential complications associated with the injection of soft tissue fillers. It is important all physicians assessing nodules/masses/swelling in the facial area be aware that soft tissue fillers may migrate to a location away from their intended site of injection by several

  8. Thermal tuning of a silicon photonic crystal cavity infilled with an elastomer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdamar, A.K.; Van Leest, M.M.; Picken, S.J.; Caro, J.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal tuning of the transmission of an elastomer infilled photonic crystal cavity is studied. An elastomer has a thermal expansion-induced negative thermo-optic coefficient that leads to a strong decrease of the refractive index upon heating. This property makes elastomer highly suitable for

  9. Advances and Refinement in Hyaluronic Acid Facial Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Christopher R; Kordestani, Reza; Small, Kevin H; Rohrich, Rod J

    2016-08-01

    Fillers temporarily augment deflated or ptotic facial compartments to restore a youthful appearance. Hyaluronic acids predominate the fillers market because of their focal volumization, duration of effect, low incidence of adverse reactions, and reversibility. Being able to properly perform these in-office procedures will ensure safety for patients and provide aesthetically optimal results. This communication provides the senior author's (R.J.R.) stepwise approach to facial aging and deflation with soft-tissue injectable fillers.

  10. Study of low weight percentage filler on dielectric properties of MCWNT-epoxy nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manindra Trihotri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to study the effect of low weight percentage multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT powder on dielectric properties of MWCNT reinforced epoxy composites. For that MWCNT (of different low weight percentage reinforced epoxy composite was prepared by dispersing the MWCNT in resin. Samples were prepared by solution casting process and characterized for their dielectric properties such as dielectric constant (ε′, dielectric dissipation factor (tan δ and AC conductivity (σac. The main objective is the investigation of the dielectric properties of the prepared samples at the low weight percentage of the filler at different temperatures and frequencies. From the two mechanisms of electrical conduction, first the leakage current obtained by the formation of a percolation network in the matrix and the other by tunneling of electrons formed among conductors nearby (tunneling current; here we are getting conduction by the second mechanism. Generally, leakage current makes more contribution to conductivity than tunneling current. Dielectric dissipation factor at 250Hz frequency is greater than all other frequencies and starts increasing from 60∘C. The peak height of the transition temperature decreases with increasing frequency. This study shows that the addition of a low weight percentage of MWCNT can modify considerably the electrical behavior of epoxy nanocomposites without chemical functionalization of filler.

  11. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer's response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping

  12. Complications caused by injection of dermal filler in Danish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Charlotte Caspara; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Zachariae, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Background: The usage of dermal fillers has increased significantly in recent years. Soft tissue augmentation with fillers helps to diminish the facial lines and to restore volume and fullness in the face at a relatively low cost. With the increasing number of treatments, the number of complicati......Background: The usage of dermal fillers has increased significantly in recent years. Soft tissue augmentation with fillers helps to diminish the facial lines and to restore volume and fullness in the face at a relatively low cost. With the increasing number of treatments, the number...

  13. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  14. Inkjet 3D printing of UV and thermal cure silicone elastomers for dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, David; Rosset, Samuel; Schlatter, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2017-12-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are an attractive form of electromechanical transducer, possessing high energy densities, an efficient design, mechanical compliance, high speed, and noiseless operation. They have been incorporated into a wide variety of devices, such as microfluidic systems, cell bioreactors, tunable optics, haptic displays, and actuators for soft robotics. Fabrication of DEA devices is complex, and the majority are inefficiently made by hand. 3D printing offers an automated and flexible manufacturing alternative that can fabricate complex, multi-material, integrated devices consistently and in high resolution. We present a novel additive manufacturing approach to DEA devices in which five commercially available, thermal and UV-cure DEA silicone rubber materials have been 3D printed with a drop-on-demand, piezoelectric inkjet system. Using this process, 3D structures and high-quality silicone dielectric elastomer membranes as thin as 2 μm have been printed that exhibit mechanical and actuation performance at least as good as conventionally blade-cast membranes. Printed silicone membranes exhibited maximum tensile strains of up to 727%, and DEAs with printed silicone dielectrics were actuated up to 6.1% area strain at a breakdown strength of 84 V μm-1 and also up to 130 V μm-1 at 2.4% strain. This approach holds great potential to manufacture reliable, high-performance DEA devices with high throughput.

  15. Nanoparticle-Liquid Crystalline Elastomer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs exhibit a number of remarkable physical effects, including a uniquely high-stroke reversible mechanical actuation triggered by external stimuli. Fundamentally, all such stimuli affect the degree of liquid crystalline order in the polymer chains cross-linked into an elastic network. Heat and the resulting thermal actuation act by promoting entropic disorder, as does the addition of solvents. Photo-isomerization is another mechanism of actuation, reducing the orientational order by diminishing the fraction of active rod-like mesogenic units, mostly studied for azobenzene derivatives incorporated into the LCE composition. Embedding nanoparticles provides a new, promising strategy to add functionality to LCEs and ultimately enhance their performance as sensors and actuators. The motivation for the combination of nanoparticles with LCEs is to provide better-controlled actuation stimuli, such as electric and magnetic fields, and broad-spectrum light, by selecting and configuring the appropriate nanoparticles in the LCE matrix. Here we give an overview of recent advances in this area with a focus on preparation, physical properties and actuation performance of the resultant nanocomposites.

  16. Hysteretic behavior of soft magnetic elastomer composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krautz, Maria; Werner, David [Institute for Complex Materials, IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Schrödner, Mario [Thuringian Institute of Textile and Plastics Research e.V., Breitscheidstraße 97, D-07407 Rudolstadt (Germany); Funk, Alexander [Institute for Complex Materials, IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Jantz, Alexander; Popp, Jana [Thuringian Institute of Textile and Plastics Research e.V., Breitscheidstraße 97, D-07407 Rudolstadt (Germany); Eckert, Jürgen [Institute for Complex Materials, IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Jahnstraße 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Department of Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben, Jahnstraße 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Waske, Anja [Institute for Complex Materials, IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Composites of polymer and micron-sized particles of carbonyl-iron were investigated in terms of their magnetization behavior. Thermoplastic elastomers with varying Young's modulus (E{sub Polymer}=0.14–14.6 MPa) were used as matrix material. Field dependent magnetization curves reveal that the hysteretic behavior of the composites strongly depends on both the particle fraction (7, 10, 14, 21, 31 vol%) and on the mechanical properties of the polymer. It is shown that hysteresis only appears above a certain fraction of magnetic particles which can be accounted to the magnetic exchange between the particles. However, hysteresis is suppressed in the composite with largest Young's modulus of the polymer matrix, even at largest particle fraction. - Highlights: • Composites with soft magnetic Iron Particles show hysteretic magnetization behavior. • Origin of the hysteresis is the alignment of particles along field direction. • Hysteresis depends on both, mechanical properties of matrix and particle fraction.

  17. Continuum vibration analysis of dielectric elastomer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbach, S.; Rizzello, G.; Seelecke, S.

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomer (DE) transducers are well known for the possibility of responding to an applied voltage with relatively large actuation strains, often larger than 100%, and for their relatively high actuation bandwidth (order of several kHz). However, up to date there are relatively few applications which use the dynamic behavior of DEs. Some relevant examples include loudspeakers and fluid dispensers. Motivated by the potentialities of DEs in high-frequency applications, the aim of this work is the investigation of the continuous vibrations observed when DE membranes are actuated electrically. The system under analysis consists of a circular DE membrane pre-loaded with a spring. While exciting the DE membrane actuator with high-voltage, high-frequency signals, the motion of the membrane is detected with a 3D laser vibrometer which uses Doppler effect to reconstruct the system spectrum and vibration modes. An extensive experimental investigation is performed to study the influence of system parameters, such as membrane geometry and pre-stress, on the membrane frequency spectrum and vibrational modes.

  18. Bent Core Liquid Crystal Polymers and Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduzco, Rafael; Hong, Seung Ho; Harden, John; Jakli, Antal; Sprunt, Sam; Gleeson, Jim

    2010-03-01

    Bent-core liquid crystals (LCs) have a kinked, or bent, molecular shape in contrast to the more common rod-like LCs. Due to their bent molecular shape, bent-core LCs form locally polar clusters, which result in novel LC phases and potentially useful properties such as ferroelectricity. Polymeric bent-core LCs are of particular interest because they can lead to new nanostructured soft materials with confined bent-core LCs. In this work, we investigate the synthesis, nanoscale structure, and physical properties of a variety of bent-core LCs and polymeric bent-core LCs. SAXS reveals the presence of polar clusters over a wide temperature range in the nematic phase for all materials studied, including bent-core side-group LC polymers and bent-core LC elastomers. The presence of locally polar clusters can account for the unexpected physical properties in nematic bent-core LCs, such as enhanced flexoelectricity. Direct flexoelectric measurements on pure bent-core LCs and swollen LCEs show that nematic bent-core materials have a flexoelectric coupling three orders orders of magnitude larger than calamitic LCs. Nematic clusters in bent-core LCs represent an unexpected and potentially useful phenomenon for building responsive LC devices.

  19. Energy harvesting for dielectric elastomer sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain A.; Illenberger, Patrin; O'Brien, Ben M.

    2016-04-01

    Soft and stretchy dielectric elastomer (DE) sensors can measure large strains on robotic devices and people. DE strain measurement requires electric energy to run the sensors. Energy is also required for information processing and telemetering of data to phone or computer. Batteries are expensive and recharging is inconvenient. One solution is to harvest energy from the strains that the sensor is exposed to. For this to work the harvester must also be wearable, soft, unobtrusive and profitable from the energy perspective; with more energy harvested than used for strain measurement. A promising way forward is to use the DE sensor as its own energy harvester. Our study indicates that it is feasible for a basic DE sensor to provide its own power to drive its own sensing signal. However telemetry and computation that are additional to this will require substantially more power than the sensing circuit. A strategy would involve keeping the number of Bluetooth data chirps low during the entire period of energy harvesting and to limit transmission to a fraction of the total time spent harvesting energy. There is much still to do to balance the energy budget. This will be a challenge but when we succeed it will open the door to autonomous DE multi-sensor systems without the requirement for battery recharge.

  20. BD monomer and elastomer production processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J

    2001-06-01

    The monomer 1,3 butadiene (BD) is a product of the petrochemical industry. It is used to make several elastomers including the very high volume styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) that comprises the bulk of automobile tires. It is also used to make polybutadiene rubber that is used in parts of tires, coatings, composites and other products. The monomer can be converted to chlorobutadiene (chloroprene) and used to make polychloroprene (neoprene). BD is one of the several olefins created by cracking hydrocarbons in the presence of steam. A mixed C4 stream from the steam cracker is then sent to a BD monomer extraction unit. Modern units typically use dimethyl formamide as the extraction solvent. SBR is commonly made by the copolymerization of BD and styrene, along with various additives to control the reaction, in a water emulsion. The reaction proceeds in a continuous chain of reactors until it is 'shortstopped' by a strong reducing agent. After removing unreacted monomers from the stabilized latex, it is blended, coagulated and dewatered. The resulting dry rubber crumb is bailed, film wrapped and stored in crates. The polymerization of BD to make polybutadiene rubber can be conducted as a water suspension type polymerization similar to SBR or in a solvent system followed by solvent recovery and transfer into water suspension.

  1. Shear Stress Sensing using Elastomer Micropillar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Lin, Yi; Jackson, Allen M.; Cissoto, Alexxandra; Sheplak, Mark; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of shear stress developed as a fluid moves around a solid body is difficult to measure. Stresses at the fluid-solid interface are very small and the nature of the fluid flow is easily disturbed by introducing sensor components to the interface. To address these challenges, an array of direct and indirect techniques have been investigated with various advantages and challenges. Hot wire sensors and other indirect sensors all protrude significantly into the fluid flow. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices, although facilitating very accurate measurements, are not durable, are prone to contamination, and are difficult to implement into existing model geometries. One promising approach is the use of engineered surfaces that interact with fluid flow in a detectable manner. To this end, standard lithographic techniques have been utilized to generate elastomeric micropillar arrays of various lengths and diameters. Micropillars of controlled length and width were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer using a soft-lithography technique. The 3D mold for micropillar replication was fabricated using laser ablative micromachining and contact lithography. Micropillar dimensions and mechanical properties were characterized and compared to shear sensing requirements. The results of this characterization as well as shear stress detection techniques will be discussed.

  2. Interfacing dielectric elastomer actuators with liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Maffli, Luc; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    Methods and materials for liquid encapsulation in thin (19 μm) silicone membranes are presented in this work. A set of 12 liquids including solvents, oils, silicone pre-polymers and one ionic liquid are experimentally tested. We show that all selected liquids are chemically inert to silicone and that vapor pressure is the key parameter for stable encapsulation. It is demonstrated that encapsulated volume of silicone pre-polymers and ionic liquids can stay stable for more than 1 month. The actuation of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) in conductive liquids is also investigated. An analysis of the equivalent electrical circuits of immersed DEAs shows that non-overlapping regions of the electrodes should be minimized. It also provides guidelines to determine when the electrodes should be passivated. The effects of immersion in a conductive liquid are assessed by measuring the actuation strain and capacitance over periodic actuation. The experimental results show no sign of liquid-induced degradation over more than 45k actuation cycles.

  3. Mechanical tests for validation of seismic isolation elastomer constitutive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    High damping laminated elastomeric bearings are becoming the preferred device for seismic isolation of large buildings and structures, such as nuclear power plants. The key component of these bearings is a filled natural rubber elastomer. This material exhibits nonlinear behavior within the normal design range. The material damping cannot be classified as either viscous or hysteritic, but it seems to fall somewhere in between. This paper describes a series of tests that can be used to characterize the mechanical response of these elastomers. The tests are designed to determine the behavior of the elastomer in the time scale of the earthquake, which is typically from 30 to 60 seconds. The test results provide data for use in determining the material parameters associated with nonlinear constitutive models. 4 refs

  4. Fracture Behavior of Dielectric Elastomer under Pure Shear Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, D.; Patra, K.

    2017-09-01

    Dielectric elastomer has become a very important material for many emerging applications areas like optics, micro fluidics, sensors, actuators and energy harvesting. However, these elastomer components are prone to fracture or catastrophic failure because of defects likes notches, flaws, and fatigue crack, impurities which occur during production or during service. To make better use of this material, it is important to investigate fracture characteristics under different operating conditions. This study experimentally investigated the effects of notch length and strain rate on the fracture toughness, failure stretch and failure stress of acrylic elastomer under pure shear deformation mode. It is observed that failure stretch depends on notch length and independent of strain rate, but failure stress decreases with increasing notch length and increases with increasing strain rate. It is also found that fracture toughness is independent of notch lengths. However, fracture toughness is found to increase with strain rate.

  5. Mechanical tests for validation of seismic isolation elastomer constitutive models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1992-05-01

    High damping laminated elastomeric bearings are becoming the preferred device for seismic isolation of large buildings and structures, such as nuclear power plants. The key component of these bearings is a filled natural rubber elastomer. This material exhibits nonlinear behavior within the normal design range. The material damping cannot be classified as either viscous or hysteritic, but it seems to fall somewhere in between. This paper describes a series of tests that can be used to characterize the mechanical response of these elastomers. The tests are designed to determine the behavior of the elastomer in the time scale of the earthquake, which is typically from 30 to 60 seconds. The test results provide data for use in determining the material parameters associated with nonlinear constitutive models. 4 refs.

  6. Mechanical tests for validation of seismic isolation elastomer constitutive models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    High damping laminated elastomeric bearings are becoming the preferred device for seismic isolation of large buildings and structures, such as nuclear power plants. The key component of these bearings is a filled natural rubber elastomer. This material exhibits nonlinear behavior within the normal design range. The material damping cannot be classified as either viscous or hysteritic, but it seems to fall somewhere in between. This paper describes a series of tests that can be used to characterize the mechanical response of these elastomers. The tests are designed to determine the behavior of the elastomer in the time scale of the earthquake, which is typically from 30 to 60 seconds. The test results provide data for use in determining the material parameters associated with nonlinear constitutive models. 4 refs.

  7. Liquid crystal elastomers: Bent core flexo-electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Martin; Verduzco, Rafael; Sprunt, Samuel; Gleeson, James T.; Jakli, Antal

    2009-03-01

    We report on the swelling of calamitic liquid crystal elastomers (LCE) with bent-core mesogens (BCM); this swelling took place at a temperature where both materials were in their isotropic phase. The BCM used varied in the degree of saturation of their hydrocarbon tails, which affects both viscosity and phase behaviour. We determined both swelling magnitude and dynamics. The host LCE systems homogeneously imbibe BCM up to 30-40 % mol. Based on differential scanning calorimetry, shape change anisotropy, and optical birefringence measurements, the swollen elastomers are all found to exhibit nematic phases, with some possessing a lower temperature smectic phase. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers and swollen calamitic LCE in BCM were investigated for the flexoelectric properties by inducing a mechanical deformation. The value of the bend flexoelectric constant, e3 of the swollen BCM containing LCE systems is comparable of that of the neat bent-core liquid crystal.

  8. Dynamic self-stiffening in liquid crystal elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Aditya; Chipara, Alin C.; Shamoo, Yousif; Patra, Prabir K.; Carey, Brent J.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Chapman, Walter G.; Verduzco, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    Biological tissues have the remarkable ability to remodel and repair in response to disease, injury and mechanical stresses. Synthetic materials lack the complexity of biological tissues, and man-made materials that respond to external stresses through a permanent increase in stiffness are uncommon. Here we report that polydomain nematic liquid crystal elastomers increase in stiffness by up to 90% when subjected to a low-amplitude (5%), repetitive (dynamic) compression. Elastomer stiffening is influenced by liquid crystal content, the presence of a nematic liquid crystal phase and the use of a dynamic as opposed to static deformation. Through rheological and X-ray diffraction measurements, stiffening can be attributed to a mobile nematic director, which rotates in response to dynamic compression. Stiffening under dynamic compression has not been previously observed in liquid crystal elastomers and may be useful for the development of self-healing materials or for the development of biocompatible, adaptive materials for tissue replacement.

  9. Super soft silicone elastomers with high dielectric permittivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Yu, Liyun; Hvilsted, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have many favourable properties. The obstacle of high driving voltages, however, limits the commercial viability of the technology at present. Driving voltage can be lowered by decreasing the Young’s modulus and increasing the dielectric permittivity of silicone...... elastomers. A decrease in Young’s modulus, however, is often accompanied by the loss of mechanical stability and thereby the lifetime of the DE. New soft elastomer matrices with high dielectric permittivity and low Young’s modulus, with no loss of mechanical stability, were prepared by two different...... approaches using chloropropyl-functional silicone polymers. The first approach was based on synthesised chloropropyl-functional copolymers that were cross-linkable and thereby formed the basis of new silicone networks with high dielectric permittivity (e.g. a 43% increase). These networks were soft without...

  10. Standard guidelines for the use of dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedamurthy Maya

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently used fillers vary greatly in their sources, efficacy duration and site of deposition; detailed knowledge of these properties is essential for administering them. Indications for fillers include facial lines (wrinkles, folds, lip enhancement, facial deformities, depressed scars, periocular melanoses, sunken eyes, dermatological diseases-angular cheilitis, scleroderma, AIDS lipoatrophy, earlobe plumping, earring ptosis, hand, neck, dιcolletι rejuvenation. Physicians′ qualifications : Any qualified dermatologist may use fillers after receiving adequate training in the field. This may be obtained either during postgraduation or at any workshop dedicated to the subject of fillers. The physicians should have a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the area designated to receive an injection of fillers and the aesthetic principles involved. They should also have a thorough knowledge of the chemical nature of the material of the filler, its longevity, injection techniques, and any possible side effects. Facility: Fillers can be administered in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room. Preoperative counseling and informed consent: Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, and longevity of the filler should be discussed with the patient. Patients should be given brochures to study and adequate opportunity to seek information. Detailed consent forms need to be completed by the patients. A consent form should include the type of filler, longevity expected and possible postoperative complications. Preoperative photography should be carried out. Choice of the filler depends on the site, type of defect, results needed, and the physician′s experience. Injection technique and volume depend on the filler and the physician′s preference, as outlined in these guidelines.

  11. Evaluation of Different Mineral Filler Aggregates for Asphalt Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, Marta; Małaszkiewicz, Dorota; Ignatiuk, Natalia

    2017-10-01

    Mineral filler aggregates play an important role in asphalt mixtures because they fill voids in paving mix and improve the cohesion of asphalt binder. Limestone powder containing over 90% of CaCO3 is the most frequently used type of filler. Waste material from the production of coarse aggregate can be successfully used as a mineral filler aggregate for hot asphalt concrete mixtures as the limestone powder replacement. This paper presents the experimental results of selected properties of filler aggregates which were obtained from rocks with different mineral composition and origin. Five types of rocks were used as a source of the mineral filler aggregate: granite, gabbro, trachybasalt, quartz sandstone and rocks from postglacial deposits. Limestone filler was used in this study as the reference material. The following tests were performed: grading (air jet sieving), quality of fines according to methylene blue test, water content by drying in a ventilated oven, particle density using pyknometer method, Delta ring and ball test, Bitumen Number, fineness determined as Blaine specific surface area. Mineral filler aggregates showed significant differences when they were mixed with bitumen and stiffening effect in Delta ring and ball test was evaluated. The highest values were achieved when gabbro and granite fillers were used. Additionally, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis of grain shape and size was carried out. Significant differences in grain size and shape were observed. The highest non-homogeneity in size was determined for quartz sandstone, gabbro and granite filler. Their Blaine specific surface area was lower than 2800 cm2/g, while for limestone and postglacial fillers with regular and round grains it exceeded 3000 cm2/g. All examined mineral filler aggregates met requirements of Polish National Specification WT-1: 2014 and could be used in asphalt mixtures.

  12. Hydrogen release from irradiated elastomers measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagielski, J., E-mail: jacek.jagielski@itme.edu.pl [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-926 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Ostaszewska, U. [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials & Dyes, Division of Elastomers & Rubber Technology, Harcerska 30, 05-820 Piastow (Poland); Bielinski, D.M. [Technical University of Lodz, Institute of Polymer & Dye Technology, Stefanowskiego 12/16, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Grambole, D. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf, PO Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Romaniec, M.; Jozwik, I.; Kozinski, R. [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-926 Warszawa (Poland); Kosinska, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    Ion irradiation appears as an interesting method of modification of elastomers, especially friction and wear properties. Main structural effect caused by heavy ions is a massive loss of hydrogen from the surface layer leading to its smoothening and shrinking. The paper presents the results of hydrogen release from various elastomers upon irradiation with H{sup +}, He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} studied by using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) method. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that the hydrogen release is controlled by inelastic collisions between ions and target electrons. The last part of the study was focused on preliminary analysis of mechanical properties of irradiated rubbers.

  13. A Molecular View of Liquid Crystalline Elastomers and Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo, Juan

    2011-03-01

    A combination of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations is used to examine the order-disorder transitions that arise in model liquid crystalline elastomers and colloidal gels as a function of concentration and strain, respectively. Two models are considered. In the first, a lattice model is used to represent a colloidal gel of nematogens and nanoparticles. In the second, a cross-linked elastomer of Gay-Berne mesogens is adopted to examine the order-disroder transition that arises as a function of strain. The results of simulations are compared to those of recent experiments for these two classes of systems.

  14. Functional silicone elastomers via novel siloxane copolymers and chain extenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Hvilsted, Søren

    of siloxane copolymers[1] (via the tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane catalysed Piers-Rubinsztajn reaction[2]), which allows for the attachment of functional molecules through copper-catalysed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC)[3]. The synthesised copolymers allow for a high degree of chemical freedom...... by changing the feed of functional molecules. As a result, a completely tuneable elastomer system, with respect to functionalisation, is achieved. The second method of functionalising silicone elastomers involves the synthesis of a so-called ‘chain extender’ that allows for chemical modifications such as CuAAC...

  15. Biocomposites from polyhydroxybutyrate and bio-fillers by solvent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 2. Biocomposites from polyhydroxybutyrate and bio-fillers by solvent casting method ... alpha cellulose (AC) and cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) were prepared to investigate the effect of the bio-fillers on the properties of PHB by a solvent casting method.

  16. Biocomposites from polyhydroxybutyrate and bio-fillers by solvent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biocomposites from polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and some bio-fillers such as lignin (L), alpha cellulose (AC) and cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) were prepared to investigate the effect of the bio-fillers on the properties of PHB by a solvent casting method. The thermal properties by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA–DTG and ...

  17. Dermal fillers in the Netherlands : A market surveillance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizers P; van Drongelen A; Geertsma R; Hodemaekers H; de Jong W; Lamme E; Oostlander A; Roszek B; Schwillens P; Venhuis B; Janssen R; PRS; GZB

    2017-01-01

    Dermal fillers, or just fillers, are products that are injected into or under the skin for medical or cosmetic purposes. This could be to restore the natural contours of the body after an operation for example, but also to mask the visible effects of ageing. The National Institute for Public

  18. Charcoal byproducts as potential styrene-butadiene rubber composte filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon black, a byproduct of the petroleum industry, is the world's most predominant filler for rubber composites. In this study, various renewable charcoals in the form of pyrolyzed agricultural byproducts were evaluted as potential carbon-based filler for rubber composites made with carboxylated s...

  19. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry Milk...

  20. Flame Retardant Effect of Nano Fillers on Polydimethylsiloxane Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagdale, Pravin; Salimpour, Samera; Islam, Md Hujjatul; Cuttica, Fabio; Hernandez, Francisco C Robles; Tagliaferro, Alberto; Frache, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane has exceptional fire retardancy characteristics, which make it a popular polymer in flame retardancy applications. Flame retardancy of polydimethylsiloxane with different nano fillers was studied. Polydimethylsiloxane composite fire property varies because of the shape, size, density, and chemical nature of nano fillers. In house made carbon and bismuth oxide nano fillers were used in polydimethylsiloxane composite. Carbon from biochar (carbonised bamboo) and a carbon by-product (carbon soot) were selected. For comparative study of nano fillers, standard commercial multiwall carbon nano tubes (functionalised, graphitised and pristine) as nano fillers were selected. Nano fillers in polydimethylsiloxane positively affects their fire retardant properties such as total smoke release, peak heat release rate, and time to ignition. Charring and surface ceramization are the main reasons for such improvement. Nano fillers in polydimethylsiloxane may affect the thermal mobility of polymer chains, which can directly affect the time to ignition. The study concludes that the addition of pristine multiwall carbon nano tubes and bismuth oxide nano particles as filler in polydimethylsiloxane composite improves the fire retardant property.

  1. Hybrid filler composition optimization for tensile strength of jute fibre ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to weight ratio from renewable resources. Environmentally- sound natural fibres having several ecological benefits have been used and established as filler materials .... A protective surface of 25 μm thick hard chrome plating is done to avoid abrasion of die due to the pultrusion of hard filler particles. For heating the die, an ...

  2. Effect of different carbon fillers and dopant acids on electrical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electrically conducting nanocomposites of polyaniline (PANI) with carbon-based fillers have evinced considerable interest for various applications such as rechargeable batteries, microelectronics, sensors, electrochromic displays and light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. The nature of both the carbon filler and the ...

  3. Managing complications of fillers: Rare and not-so-rare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckart Haneke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fillers belong to the most frequently used beautifying products. They are generally well tolerated, but any one of them may occasionally produce adverse side effects. Adverse effects usually last as long as the filler is in the skin, which means that short-lived fillers have short-term side effects and permanent fillers may induce life-long adverse effects. The main goal is to prevent them, however, this is not always possible. Utmost care has to be given to the prevention of infections and the injection technique has to be perfect. Treatment of adverse effects is often with hyaluronidase or steroid injections and in some cases together with 5-fluorouracil plus allopurinol orally. Histological examination of biopsy specimens often helps to identify the responsible filler allowing a specific treatment to be adapted.

  4. Microvascular complications associated with injection of cosmetic facelift dermal fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Prendes, Mark; Chang, Shu-Hong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-02-01

    Minimally-invasive cosmetic surgeries such as injection of subdermal fillers have become very popular in the past decade. Although rare, some complications may follow injections such as tissue necrosis and even blindness. There exist two hypothesis regarding source of these complications both of which include microvasculature. The first hypothesis is that fillers in between the tissue structures and compress microvasculature that causes blockage of tissue neutrition and oxygen exchange in the tissue. In another theory, it is hypothesized that fillers move inside major arteries and block the arteries/veins. In this paper, we study these hypotheses using optical coherence tomography and optical microangiography technologies with different hyaluronic-acid fillers in a mouse ear model. Based on our observations, the fillers eventually block arteries/veins if injected directly into them that eventually causes tissue necrosis.

  5. Penggunaan precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC sebagai filler untuk sol karet sepatu olah raga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminiwati

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of the research was to investigate the utilization of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC as filler in producing sport shoe rubber soles. PCC is a white filler needed for production of nonblack colour rubber products. There are four types of PCC that have been used including two local PCC from Wonosari and East Java, and two imported PCC from Japan and Taiwan. The amount of PCC added into the sport shoe sole rubber compound was varied in 30,45,60,75 and 90 per hundred rubber (phr. The compounding was carried-out by using two roll mills machine, and the compound was subsequently measured their optimum vulcanization time by using rheometer. The produced compound was then subjected to vulcanistion process by using hydrolic press at temperature 1500C and pressure 150 kg/ cm2. The quality of shoes sole vulcanisates were compare to standard quality of SNI. 12-7075-2005 about cemented system sport shoes. The results indicated that the best formula of rubber compound for sport shoes sole were made by using NR 80 phr, NBR 20 phr, paraffinic oil 10 phr, aluminium silicate 30 phr, ZnO 5 phr, TiO2 10 phr, stearic acid 1 phr, vulkanox SP 1 phr, paraffin wax 1 phr, TMTD 0,5 phr, CBS 2 phr, sulphur 1,2 phr with the amount of PCC Actifort 700 of 45 phr. The best formula meet the requirement SNI 12-7075-2005 and they were characterized by tensile sterength 16,79 N/mm2, elongation at break 529,92% tear resistance 9,06 N/mm2, specific gravity 1,28 g/cm3, hardness 55 shore A, Grasselli absrassion resistancing filler. The local PCC from Wonosari can be used for substitution of the imported PCC as the white filler for the production of rubber compound sport shoes sole. However, particle size reduction and coating or surface treatment of local PCC were needed for improving the quality and the role of reinforcing filler.

  6. Carbon nanotube reinforced polymer composites–A state of the art

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    tional-filled polymers. The reinforcement of polymers are done by fillers, which play a major role in strengthening ... remarkable mechanical and electrical properties (Kracke and Damaschke 2000; Ishikawa et al 2001). ... plays a key role in the mechanical properties of compo- sites. If the adhesion between the matrix and the ...

  7. Morphology of Silica-Reinforced Natural Rubber: Effect of Silane Coupling Agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkawi, S.S.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2015-01-01

    A good dispersion of silica in a rubber vulcanizate is important as it influences the filler-to-rubber interaction and consequently the final properties. This article presents an investigation into the morphology of silica-reinforced natural rubber (NR) in the presence and absence of a silane

  8. Toughness of natural rubber composites reinforced with hydrolyzed and modified wheat gluten aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toughness of natural rubber can be improved by using fillers for various rubber applications. Dry wheat gluten is a protein from wheat flour and is sufficiently rigid for rubber reinforcement. The wheat gluten was hydrolyzed to reduce its particle size and microfluidized to reduce and homogenize...

  9. Effect of combination ultrasonic and ball milling techniques of commercial fillers dispersion on mechanical properties of natural rubber (NR) latex films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamran, Noramirah; Rashid, Azura A.

    2017-07-01

    Commercial fillers such as silica and carbon black generally impart the reinforcing effects in dry rubber compound, but have an adverse effect on Natural rubber (NR) latex compounds. The addition of commercial fillers in NR latex has reduced the mechanical properties of NR latex films due to the destabilization effect in the NR latex compounds which govern by the dispersion quality, particle size and also the pH of the dispersion itself. The ball milling process is the conventional meth od of preparation of dispersions and ultrasonic has successfully used in preparation of nano fillers such as carbon nanotube (CNT). In this study the combination between the conventional methods; ball milling together the ultrasonic method were used to prepare the silica and carbon black dispersions. The different duration of ball milling (24, 48 and 72 hours) was compared with the ultrasonic method (30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes). The combination of ball milling and ultrasonic from the optimum individual technique was used to investigate the reduction of particle size of the fillers. The particle size analyzer, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) test were carried out to investigate the obtained particle size and the tensile and tear test were carried out to investigate the mechanical properties of the NR latex films. The reduction of filler particle size is expected to impart the properties of NR latex films.

  10. Novel polycarbonate-based polyurethane elastomers: composition–property relationship

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špírková, Milena; Pavličevic, J.; Strachota, Adam; Poreba, Rafal; Bera, O.; Kaprálková, Ludmila; Baldrian, Josef; Šlouf, Miroslav; Lazić, N.; Budinski-Simendic, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2011), s. 959-972 ISSN 0014-3057 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/0195 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyurethane elastomer * polycarbonate diol * montmorillonite Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.739, year: 2011

  11. Influence of gamma irradiation in the thermoplastic elastomer (TPE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Camila B.; Parra, Duclerc F.; Marchini, Leonardo G.

    2017-01-01

    The TPE is the nomenclature used for the thermoplastic elastomer, which is also known as thermoplastic rubber. It belongs to an under-researched class of engineering plastics, however, in recent years there has been steady growth due to its important and unusual combination of properties. During its use, it behaves like an elastomer, but, unlike traditional elastomers (vulcanized rubbers), it can be processed using conventional technologies and equipment used for thermoplastics, such as extrusion and injection. The processing of polymers, such as TPE by means of radiation, constitutes a technological area dedicated to the study of the physical and chemical effects caused by high energy radiation, such as gamma radiation. Thus the objective of this work is to evaluate the mechanical and thermal properties of TPE irradiated by 60 Co source of gamma radiation in different doses. The thermoplastic elastomer being modified by means of ionizing radiation at doses of 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 kGy the effects of the radiation on the mechanical and thermal properties of this material are evaluated through the tests of tensile tests, TGA, FTIR and Fluency Index

  12. Silicone elastomers with superior softness and dielectric properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) change their shape and size under a high voltage or reversibly generate a high voltage when deformed. The obstacle of high driving voltages, however, limits the commercial viability of the technology at present. Driving voltage can be lowered by decreasing the Young’s ...

  13. The dynamic contact area of elastomers at different velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khafidh, Muhammad; Rodriguez, N.V.; Masen, Marc Arthur; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2016-01-01

    The friction in tribo-systems that contain viscoelastic materials, such as elastomers, is relevant for a large number of applications. Examples include tyres, hoses, transmission and conveyor belts. To quantify the friction in these applications, one must first understand the contact behaviour of

  14. Conductive Elastomers for Stretchable Electronics, Sensors and Energy Harvesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Seo Noh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There have been a wide variety of efforts to develop conductive elastomers that satisfy both mechanical stretchability and electrical conductivity, as a response to growing demands on stretchable and wearable devices. This article reviews the important progress in conductive elastomers made in three application fields of stretchable technology: stretchable electronics, stretchable sensors, and stretchable energy harvesters. Diverse combinations of insulating elastomers and non-stretchable conductive materials have been studied to realize optimal conductive elastomers. It is noted that similar material combinations and similar structures have often been employed in different fields of application. In terms of stretchability, cyclic operation, and overall performance, fields such as stretchable conductors and stretchable strain/pressure sensors have achieved great advancement, whereas other fields like stretchable memories and stretchable thermoelectric energy harvesting are in their infancy. It is worth mentioning that there are still obstacles to overcome for the further progress of stretchable technology in the respective fields, which include the simplification of material combination and device structure, securement of reproducibility and reliability, and the establishment of easy fabrication techniques. Through this review article, both the progress and obstacles associated with the respective stretchable technologies will be understood more clearly.

  15. Patterning conductive PDMS nanocomposite in an elastomer using microcontact printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chao-Xuan; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a simple method of embedding conductive and flexible elastomer micropatterns into a bulk elastomer. Employing microcontact printing and cast molding techniques, patterns consisting of conductive poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) composites mixed with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are embedded into bulk PDMS to form all-elastomer devices. To pattern conductive composites, a micromachined printing mold is utilized to transfer composite ink from a spin-coated thin layer to another substrate. Distinct from previously reported approaches, the printing mold in this technique, once fabricated, can be repeatedly used to generate new patterns and therefore greatly simplifies the device fabrication process and improves its efficiency. Manufactured devices with embedded conductive patterns exhibit excellent mechanical flexibility. With characterization of printing reliability, electrical conductivity of the composites is also shown with different loading percentages of MWCNTs. Furthermore, a simple strain gauge was fabricated and tested to demonstrate the potential applications of embedded conductive patterns. Overall, this approach demonstrates feasibility to be a simple method to pattern conductive elastomers that work as electrodes or sensing probes in PDMS-based devices. With further development, this technology yields many potential applications in lab-on-a-chip systems

  16. Diffraction from relief gratings on a biomimetic elastomer cast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, Raphael A.; Aranas, Erika B.

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetic optical elements combine the optimized designs of nature with the versatility of materials engineering. We employ a beetle carapace as the template for fabricating relief gratings on an elastomer substrate. Biological surface features are successfully replicated by a direct casting procedure. Far-field diffraction effects are discussed in terms of the Fraunhofer approximation in Fourier space.

  17. Self-Healing, High-Permittivity Silicone Dielectric Elastomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2016-01-01

    possesses high dielectric permittivity and consists of an interpenetrating polymer network of silicone elastomer and ionic silicone species that are cross-linked through proton exchange between amines and acids. The ionically cross-linked silicone provides self-healing properties after electrical breakdown...

  18. Mechanical stretch influence on lifetime of dielectric elastomer films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannarelli, A.; Ghaffarian Niasar, M.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2017-01-01

    Film pre-stretching is a widely adopted solution to improve dielectric strength of the DEA systems. However, to date, long term reliability of this solution has not been investigated. In this work it is explored how the dielectric elastomer lifetime is affected by film pre-stretching. The dielectric

  19. Applications of pressure-sensitive dielectric elastomer sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böse, Holger; Ocak, Deniz; Ehrlich, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer sensors for the measurement of compression loads with high sensitivity are described. The basic design of the sensors exhibits two profiled surfaces between which an elastomer film is confined. All components of the sensor were prepared with silicone whose stiffness can be varied in a wide range. Depending on details of the sensor design, various effects contribute to the enhancement of the capacitance. The intermediate elastomer film is stretched upon compression and electrode layers on the elastomer profiles and in the elastomer film approach each other. Different designs of the pressure sensor give rise to very different sensor characteristics in terms of the dependence of electric capacitance on compression force. Due to their inherent flexibility, the pressure sensors can be used on compliant substrates such as seats or beds or on the human body. This gives rise to numerous possible applications. The contribution describes also some examples of possible sensor applications. A glove was equipped with various sensors positioned at the finger tips. When grabbing an object with the glove, the sensors can detect the gripping forces of the individual fingers with high sensitivity. In a demonstrator of the glove equipped with seven sensors, the capacitances representing the gripping forces are recorded on a display. In another application example, a lower limb prosthesis was equipped with a pressure sensor to detect the load on the remaining part of the leg and the load is displayed in terms of the measured capacitance. The benefit of such sensors is to detect an eventual overload in order to prevent possible pressure sores. A third example introduces a seat load sensor system based on four extended pressure sensor mats. The sensor system detects the load distribution of a person on the seat. The examples emphasize the high performance of the new pressure sensor technology.

  20. Dielectric elastomer actuators with zero-energy fixity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Takashima, Kazuto; Mukai, Toshiharu

    2010-04-01

    Although dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are becoming more powerful and more versatile, one disadvantage of DEAs is the need to continuously supply electrical power in order to maintain an actuated state. Previous solutions to this problem have involved the construction of a bistable or multi-stable rigid mechanical structure or the addition of some external locking mechanism. Such structures and mechanisms add unwanted complexity and bulk. In this paper we present a dielectric elastomer actuator that exhibits zero-energy fixity. That is, the actuator can be switched into a rigid state where it requires no energy to maintain its actuated shape. This is achieved without any additional mechanical complexity. This actuator relies on changes to the elastic properties of the elastomer material in response to a secondary stimulus. The elastomer can be switched from a rigid glass-like state to a soft rubber-like state as required. We present a dielectric elastomer actuator that utilizes shape-memory polymer properties to achieve such state switching. We call this a dielectric shape memory polymer actuator (DSMPA). In this case control of the elastic properties is achieved through temperature control. When the material is below its glass transition temperature (Tg) it is in its rigid state and dielectric actuation has no effect. When the temperature is elevated above Tg the material becomes soft and elastic, and dielectric actuation can be exploited. We present preliminary results showing that the necessary conditions for this zero-energy fixity property have been achieved. Applications are widespread in the fields of robotics and engineering and include morphing wings that only need energy to change shape and control valves that lock rigidly into position.

  1. Mechanical properties of epoxy/coconut shell filler particle composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapuan, S.M.; Harimi, M.; Maleque, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the tensile and flexural properties of composites made from coconut shell filler particles and epoxy resin. The tensile and flexural tests of composites based on coconut shell filler particles at three different filler contents viz., 5%, 0% and 15%were carried out using universal tensile testing machine according to ASTM D 3039/D M-95a and ASTM D790-90 tensile respectively and their results were presented. Experimental results showed that tensile and flexural properties of the composites increased with the increase of the filler particle content. The composite materials demonstrate somewhat linear behavior and sharp structure for tensile and slight nonlinear behavior and sharp fracture of flexural testing. The relation between stress and percentage of filler for tensile and flexural tests were found to b linear with correlation factors of 0.9929 and 0.9973 respectively. Concerning the relation between the modulus and percentage of filler for tensile and flexural tests, it was found to be a quadratic relation with the same correlation factor approximated to 1. The same behavior was observed for the strain versus percentage of filler tensile and flexural tests, with the same correlation factor. (author)

  2. Peculiarities of Shape Recovery in Polymer Composites with Compacting Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Beloshenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of the shape memory effect development in composites based on the epoxy polymer and various fillers, such as thermoexpanded graphite, aerosils, metallized graphite, and basalt flakes, have been investigated. It has been determined that straining followed by the shape recovery of composites is accompanied by changes in their volume. Extent and character of the changes depend on the ability of fillers to compaction under pressure, deformation scheme, adsorption ability of the filler. It is shown that the combined deformation consisting of compression and stretching of specimens in different sequence gives structural states for which the longitudinal strain-transverse strain ratio can take zero, positive, or negative values.

  3. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivkin AZ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Z Rivkin David Geffen/UCLA School of Medicine Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. Keywords: dermal fillers, hands, volumization, hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxylapatite

  4. Late-Onset Inflammatory Response to Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahera Bhojani-Lynch, MRCOphth, CertLRS, MBCAM, DipCS

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion:. Late-onset inflammatory reactions to HA fillers may be self-limiting but are easily and rapidly treatable with oral steroids, and with hyaluronidase in the case of lumps. It is likely these reactions are due to a Type IV delayed hypersensitivity response. Delayed inflammation associated with HA fillers is nonbrand specific. However, the case where 2 different brands were injected during the same session, but only 1 brand triggered a hypersensitivity reaction, suggests that the technology used in the manufacturing process, and the subsequent differing products of degradation, may have an influence on potential allergic reactions to HA fillers.

  5. Silicone elastomers with high dielectric permittivity and high dielectric breakdown strength based on dipolar copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    2014-01-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DES) are a promising new transducer technology, but high driving voltages limit their current commercial potential. One method used to lower driving voltage is to increase dielectric permittivity of the elastomer. A novel silicone elastomer system with high dielectric permi......-4-nitrobenzene. Here, a high increase in dielectric permittivity (similar to 70%) was obtained without compromising other favourable DE properties such as elastic modulus, gel fraction, dielectric loss and electrical breakdown strength. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.......Dielectric elastomers (DES) are a promising new transducer technology, but high driving voltages limit their current commercial potential. One method used to lower driving voltage is to increase dielectric permittivity of the elastomer. A novel silicone elastomer system with high dielectric...

  6. Effect of filler surface functionalization on the performance of Nafion/Titanium oxide composite membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonis, Catia de; Cozzi, Dafne; Mecheri, Barbara; D'Epifanio, Alessandra; Rainer, Alberto; De Porcellinis, Diana; Licoccia, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The phenylsulfonic functionalized nanometric titania (TiO 2 -PhSO 3 H) was synthesized to be used as filler in Nafion-based composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications. The organic moieties were covalently bound on the surface of TiO 2 nanoparticles and the hybrid product was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. TiO 2 -PhSO 3 H showed higher ion exchange capacity (IEC) and proton conductivity values with respect to those of TiO 2 . The incorporation of TiO 2 -PhSO 3 H in Nafion led to a mechanical reinforcement of the membranes and higher conductivity than that obtained with unfilled Nafion. The composite membrane containing 10 wt.% of TiO 2 -PhSO 3 H showed an increased crystallinity and the highest conductivity, reaching 0.11 S cm −1 at 140 °C. DMFC tests were carried out showing that the use of the organic-inorganic hybrid filler leads to a general improvement in the cell performance, in terms of higher current and power density and reduced methanol crossover

  7. A Review on Potentiality of Nano Filler/Natural Fiber Filled Polymer Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Saba

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for greener and biodegradable materials leading to the satisfaction of society requires a compelling towards the advancement of nano-materials science. The polymeric matrix materials with suitable and proper filler, better filler/matrix interaction together with advanced and new methods or approaches are able to develop polymeric composites which shows great prospective applications in constructions and buildings, automotive, aerospace and packaging industries. The biodegradability of the natural fibers is considered as the most important and interesting aspects of their utilization in polymeric materials. Nanocomposite shows considerable applications in different fields because of larger surface area, and greater aspect ratio, with fascinating properties. Being environmentally friendly, applications of nanocomposites offer new technology and business opportunities for several sectors, such as aerospace, automotive, electronics, and biotechnology industries. Hybrid bio-based composites that exploit the synergy between natural fibers in a nano-reinforced bio-based polymer can lead to improved properties along with maintaining environmental appeal. This review article intended to present information about diverse classes of natural fibers, nanofiller, cellulosic fiber based composite, nanocomposite, and natural fiber/nanofiller-based hybrid composite with specific concern to their applications. It will also provide summary of the emerging new aspects of nanotechnology for development of hybrid composites for the sustainable and greener environment.

  8. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M., E-mail: engr.ziamustafa@gmail.com; Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad [Mechanical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  9. Measurement and Modeling of the Ability of Crack Fillers to Prevent Chloride Ingress into Mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Scott Z; Bentz, Dale P; Davis, Jeffrey M; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Molloy, John L; Sieber, John R

    2017-09-01

    A common repair procedures applied to damaged concrete is to fill cracks with an organic polymer. This operation is performed to increase the service life of the concrete by removing a preferential pathway for the ingress of water, chlorides, and other deleterious species. To effectively fulfill its mission of preventing chloride ingress, the polymer must not only fully fill the macro-crack, but must also intrude the damage zone surrounding the crack perimeter. Here, the performance of two commonly employed crack fillers, one epoxy, and one methacrylate, are investigated using a combined experimental and computer modeling approach. Neutron tomography and microbeam X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μXRF) measurements are employed on pre-cracked and chloride-exposed specimens to quantify the crack filling and chloride ingress limiting abilities, respectively, of the two polymers. A two-dimensional model of chloride transport is derived from a mass balance and solved by the finite element method. Crack images provided by μXRF are used to generate the input microstructure for the simulations. When chloride binding and a time-dependent mortar diffusivity are both included in the computer model, good agreement with the experimental results is obtained. Both crack fillers significantly reduce chloride ingress during the 21 d period of the present experiments; however, the epoxy itself contains approximately 4 % by mass chlorine. Leaching studies were performed assess the epoxy as a source of deleterious ions for initiating corrosion of the steel reinforcement in concrete structures.

  10. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M.; Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad

    2015-07-01

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  11. Development of procedures for calculating stiffness and damping of elastomers in engineering applications, part 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, A.; Zorzi, E.

    1980-01-01

    An elastomer shear damper was designed, tested, and compared with the performance of the T 55 power turbine supported on the production engine roller bearing support. The Viton 70 shear damper was designed so that the elastomer damper could be interchanged with the production T 55 power turbine roller bearing support. The results show that the elastomer sheer dampener permitted stable operation of the power turbine to the maximum operating speed of 16,000 rpm.

  12. Enhancement of dielectric permittivity by incorporating PDMS-PEG multiblock copolymers in silicone elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A Razak, Aliff Hisyam; Szabo, Peter; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    A silicone elastomer from PDMS-PEG multiblock copolymer has been prepared by use of silylation reactions for both copolymer preparation and crosslinking. The dielectric and mechanical properties of the silicone elastomers were carefully investigated, as well as the morphology of the elastomers wa...... to a significantly increased dielectric permittivity. The conductivity also remained low due to the resulting discontinuity in PEG within the silicone matrix....

  13. Design of Elastomer Structure to Facilitate Incorporation of Expanded Graphite in Silicones Without Compromising Electromechanical Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassouneh, Suzan Sager; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The development of elastomer materials with a high dielectric permittivity has attracted increased interest over the past years due to their use in, for example, dielectric elastomers. For this particular use, both the electrically insulating properties - as well as the mechanical properties......-functional crosslinker, which allows for development of a suitable network matrix. The dielectric permittivity was increased by almost a factor of 4 compared to a benchmark silicone elastomer....

  14. (Methacrylic Acid-Co-Divinylbenzene) Resin as Filler

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    divinylbenzene) resin (PMD) as a new filler-binder for direct compression tablets. Methods: Powder properties of PMD and MCC were characterized. Tablets made from PMD and MCC with and without propranolol hydrochloride were evaluated for ...

  15. Use of Cellulose-Containing Fillers in Composites with Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna LAKA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The composites, containing recycled polypropylene and fillers, obtained from different lignocellulosics by the thermocatalytic destruction method, were investigated. Birch sawdust, newsprint wastes, cotton residues and wood bleached sulphate pulp were used as raw materials for obtaining fillers. The indices of mechanical properties (tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, deformation at break, shear modulus, toughness, twisting moment of the composites' samples were determined. It has been found that the obtained composites have relatively good mechanical properties. Better results were obtained, using fillers from sawdust and wood pulp. After treating the fillers with rapeseed oil, their water vapour sorption and water retention value (WRV decreased. In this case, the strength of the composites was higher.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.2.484

  16. The recycling of comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin from electronic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huabo; Jia, Weifeng; Li, Jinhui

    2010-05-01

    The reuse of comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin with various granularities gathered from printed circuit manufacturing residues was investigated. As fillers, these residues were converted into polymeric composite board by an extrusion and injection process using polypropylene as a bonding agent. The mechanical properties of the reproduced composite board were examined by considering the effects of mass fraction and glass-fiber distribution. Interfacial-layer micrograph analysis of the composite material fracture surface was used to study the fiber reinforcement mechanism. Results showed that using comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin as a filler material greatly enhanced the performance properties of the composite board. Although the length and diameter of filler varied, these variations had no appreciable effect on the mechanical properties of the processed board. Maximum values of 48.30 MPa for flexural strength, 31.34 MPa for tensile strength, and 31.34 J/m for impact strength were achieved from a composite board containing mass fractions of 30, 10, and 20% glass-fiber-reinforced resin waste, respectively. It was found that the maximum amount of recyclate that could be added to a composite board was 30% of weight. Beyond these percentages, the materials blend became unmanageable and the mixture less amenable to impregnation with fiber. Presented studies indicated that comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin waste-filled polypropylene composites are promising candidates for structural applications where high stiffness and fracture resistance are required.

  17. Elastomer damper performance - A comparison with a squeeze film for a supercritical power transmission shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, E. S.; Burgess, G.; Cunningham, R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of an elastomer damper on a super-critical power transmission shaft. The elastomers were designed to provide acceptable operation through the fourth bending mode and to control synchronous as well as nonsynchronous vibration throughout the operating range. The design of the elastomer was such that it could be incorporated into the system as a replacement for a squeeze-film damper without a reassembly, which could have altered the imbalance of the shaft. This provided a direct comparison of the elastomer and squeeze-film dampers without having to assess the effect of shaft imbalance changes.

  18. Influence of the geometry on magnetic interactions in a retina fixator based on a magnetoactive elastomer seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadzharyan, T. A.; Makarova, L. A.; Kazimirova, E. G.; Perov, N. S.; Kramarenko, E. Yu

    2018-03-01

    We study the effects the geometric configuration has on magnetic interactions between a magnetoactive elastomer (MAE) sample and various systems of permanent magnets for problems with both flat and curved geometry. MAEs consist of a silicone polymer matrix and iron filler microparticles embedded in it. Permanent magnets are cylindrical neodymium magnets arranged in a line on a flat or curved solid surfaces. We use computer simulations, namely the finite element method, in order to study the interaction force and magnetic pressure in a system with an MAE sample and permanent magnets. The model is based on classical Maxwell magnetostatics and two factors taking into account field dependence of MAE’s magnetic properties and inhomogeneities caused by local demagnetization. We calculate magnetic pressure dependences on various geometric parameters of the system, namely, the diameter and the height of permanent magnets, the distance between the magnets and dimensions of MAE samples. This research aims to create a set of guidelines for choosing the geometric configuration of a retina fixator based on MAE seals to be used in eye surgery for retinal detachment treatment.

  19. Shape Memory Composites Based on Electrospun Poly(vinyl alcohol) Fibers and a Thermoplastic Polyether Block Amide Elastomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirole, Anuja; Sapkota, Janak; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed at developing new thermally responsive shape-memory composites, that were fabricated by compacting mats of electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fibers and sheets of a thermoplastic polyether block amide elastomer (PEBA). This design was based on the expectation that the combination of the rubber elasticity of the PEBA matrix and the mechanical switching exploitable through the reversible glass transition temperature (Tg) of the PVA filler could be combined to create materials that display shape memory characteristics as an emergent effect. Dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA) show that, upon introduction of 10-20% w/w PVA fibers, the room-temperature storage modulus (E') increased by a factor of 4-5 in comparison to the neat PEBA, and they reveal a stepwise reduction of E' around the Tg of PVA (85 °C). This transition could indeed be utilized to fix a temporary shape and recover the permanent shape. At low strain, the fixity was 66 ± 14% and the recovery was 98 ± 2%. Overall, the data validate a simple and practical strategy for the fabrication of shape memory composites that involves a melt compaction process and employs two commercially available polymers.

  20. Research of Surface Properties of Fillers for Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Semakina, Olga Konstantinovna; Phomenko, A. N.; Leonteva, A. A.; Rymanova, Irina Evgenievna

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of filler particles in the polymer matrix on a physical model representing the suspension of solid particles in the apolar liquid has been studied. Relative sedimentation volumes of powder components included in the polymer composition for the cable insulation in liquids of different polarity have been identified. The dependence of the effect of hygroscopic powder fillers on the relative sedimentation volume of powders and a ratio of wetting has been studied. It has been found th...

  1. Advanced Laser Techniques for Filler-Induced Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassuto, D.; Marangoni, O.; Santis, G. De

    2009-01-01

    discomfort and pain. RESULTS All 20 patients experienced reduction or complete resolution, the latter increasing with repeated treatments. CONCLUSION Laser-assisted treatment offers a successful solution for patients who have been suffering from disfiguring nodules from injected fillersFoften for many years....... The procedure broadens the range of treatment options in cases of untoward reactions to fillers, in line with surgical removal but with lower morbidity and less cosmetic disfigurement Udgivelsesdato: 2009/10...

  2. Undesirable effects after treatment with dermal fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Barata, Ana Rita; Camacho-Martínez, Francisco M

    2013-04-01

    Soft tissue augmentation is one of the most frequent techniques in cosmetic dermatology. Nowadays, there are a high number of available materials. Nonanimal hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of most useful fillers for lip augmentation and for treating nasolabial folds, marionette lines, and the dynamic wrinkles of the upper face. To evaluate the type and management of undesirable effects of nonanimal reticulated or stabilized HA observed in our cosmetic unit in the past 3 years. The consecutive patients using HA attending to our clinic in the past 3 years were divided into 3 categories, according to the time of presentation of the adverse reactions: immediate, early, and late-onset complications. All patients were treated. Twenty-three patients presented to our clinic complaining of complications after soft tissue augmentation with HA. Ten patients presented immediate-onset complications, 8 showed early-onset complications, and 5 cases complaint of late-onset complications. Treatment of the first group consisted of hyaluronidase injection, massage, and topical antibiotics. Early- and late-onset complications were treated with intralesional triamcinolone acetonide. All patients improved, with the exception of a woman with recurrent granulomas. Generally, undesirable effects of HA (immediate, early, or late onset) are not frequent, and when present, they improve if treated properly. Physicians need to be aware of these possible adverse events in order to establish proper treatment and prevent scarring or other sequelae.

  3. Analysis of filler particle levels and sizes in dental alginates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lemes Carlo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the inorganic filler fractions and sizes of commercially alginates. The inorganic particles volumetric fractions of five alginates - Jeltrate(J, Jeltrate Plus(JP, Jeltrate Chromatic Ortho(JC, Hydrogum(H and Ezact Krom(E were accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 450 °C for 3 hours. Unsettled materials were soaked in acetone and chloroform and sputter-coated with gold for SEM evaluation of fillers' morphology and size. The results for the volumetric inorganic particle content were (%: J - 48.33, JP - 48.33, JC - 33.79, H - 37.55 and E - 40.55. The fillers presented a circular appearance with helical form and various perforations. Hydrogum fillers looked like cylindrical, perforated sticks. The mean values for fillers size were (μm: J - 12.91, JP - 13.67, JC - 13.44, E - 14.59 and H - 9 (diameter, 8.81 (length. The results of this study revealed differences in filler characteristics that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  4. Modified and Unmodified Zinc Oxide as Coagent in Elastomer Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kołodziejczak-Radzimska Agnieszka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the activity of unmodified and modified ZnO in the peroxide crosslinking of hydrogenated acrylonitrile-butadiene elastomer (HNBR and ethylene-propylene copolymer (EPM. In the first step, zinc oxide was obtained by emulsion precipitation. Maleic acid was introduced onto the surface of ZnO using an in situ method. The unmodified and modified zinc oxide was characterized using dispersive and morphological analysis, BET surface area analysis, and elemental, spectroscopic and thermal analysis. In the second stage of the research, the ZnO/MA systems were incorporated into the structure of elastomer compounds improving the kinetic and mechanical properties of vulcanizates. The proposed modification method had a favorable effect on the physicochemical properties of the zinc oxide and on the kinetic and mechanical properties of the vulcanizates. This study demonstrated that modification of zinc oxide by maleic acid is a promising technique.

  5. Magnetic force induced tristability for dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Qiang; Li, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Zou, Hong-Xiang; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) with three stable states. By introducing magnetic forces and coupling them with two cone dielectric elastomer (DE) films, an inherent tristability for the DEA is obtained with a compact design. It is easy to switch between the three stable states by controlling the voltages applied to the DE films. A theoretical model of the system’s potential energy that contains the free energy of the DEs and the potential energy of the applied magnetic field was developed for the tristable mechanism. The experimental results demonstrate that controllable transitions between the three stable states can be achieved with this design by applying over-critical voltages to the various DE films. The maximum dynamic range of the DEA can exceed 53.8% of the total length of the device and the DE’s creep speed was accelerated under the action of the magnetic field.

  6. Synthetic Strategies for High Dielectric Constant Silicone Elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt

    synthetic strategies were developed in this Ph.D. thesis, in order to create silicone elastomers with high dielectric constants and thereby higher energy densities. The work focused on maintaining important properties such as dielectric loss, electrical breakdown strength and elastic modulus...... extender’ that allowed for chemical modifications such as Cu- AAC. This route was promising for one-pot elastomer preparation and as a high dielectric constant additive to commercial silicone systems. The second approach used the borane-catalysed Piers-Rubinsztajn reaction to form spatially well...... of functional groups was identified. At a concentration of 5.6 wt% of a nitrobenzene functional group the dielectric permittivity increased 70% while at this loading important properties such as electrical breakdown strength, elastic modulus and dielectric loss were not significantly compromised. The developed...

  7. Rolling dielectric elastomer actuator with bulged cylindrical shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potz, Marco; Artusi, Matteo; Soleimani, Maryam; Menon, Carlo; Cocuzza, Silvio; Debei, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    This note presents preliminary investigations on the design and development of a rolling dielectric elastomer actuator (rDEA) with a bulged cylindrical shape. The actuator is based on an inflated silicone-based hollow cylinder consisting of a series of dielectric elastomer actuator sectors. The electrical activation of the sectors changes the shape of the rDEA; the induced geometrical change causes a variation of the position of the rDEA's centre of gravity and a consequent initiation of rolling of the rDEA. This paper presents a simplified parametric analytical model which is used to simulate the quasi-static behaviour of the rDEA. A testing procedure is used to assess the potential rolling performance of the rDEA prototypes. (technical note)

  8. Evaluation of polyaryl adhesives in elastomer-stainless steel joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, M.; Carciello, N.; Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1992-10-01

    Polyaryl thermoplastic adhesives (polyetheretherketone, PEEK, polyphenylene sulfide PPS, polyphenylethersulfone, PES) were evaluated for ability to bond elastomer to metal for use in geothermal environments. Strength of elastomer-to-metal joints adhesives blends (such as in drill pipe or casing protectors) were determined using peel tests. Parameters involved in making the joints were temperature, time and atmosphere, in addition to type of adhesive. Physical chemical analyses have aided endeavors to determine the cause of adhesion failure in the joint: differential thermal analyses, thermal gravimetric analyses, infrared spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Tests showed that joints made of adhesive blends which contained greater than 50% PES survived simulated geothermal conditions (200C, water vapor pressure 200 psi) for weeks without significant decrease in peel strength. Chemical components of the adhesive appear to be highly stable under the conditions required to make the joints and in subsequent exposure to the simulated geothermal environment.

  9. Reliability in maintenance and design of elastomer sealed closures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    The methods of reliability are considered for maintenance and design of elastomer sealed containment closures. Component reliability is used to establish a replacement schedule for system maintenance. Reliability data on elastomer seals is used to evaluate the common practice of annual replacement, and to calculate component reliability values for several typical shipment time periods. System reliability methods are used to examine the relative merits of typical closure designs. These include single component and redundant seal closure, with and without closure verification testing. The paper presents a general method of quantifying the merits of closure designs through the use of reliability analysis, which is a probabilistic technique. The reference list offers a general source of information in the field of reliability, and should offer the opportunity to extend the procedures discussed in this paper to other design safety applications

  10. Soft Elasticity in Main Chain Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm C. Griffin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Main chain liquid crystal elastomers exhibit several interesting phenomena, such as three different regimes of elastic response, unconventional stress-strain relationship in one of these regimes, and the shape memory effect. Investigations are beginning to reveal relationships between their macroscopic behavior and the nature of domain structure, microscopic smectic phase structure, relaxation mechanism, and sample history. These aspects of liquid crystal elastomers are briefly reviewed followed by a summary of the results of recent elastic and high-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the shape memory effect and the dynamics of the formation of the smectic-C chevron-like layer structure. A possible route to realizing auxetic effect at molecular level is also discussed.

  11. A mechanical characterisation on multiple timescales of electroconductive magnetorheological elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schümann, M.; Morich, J.; Kaufhold, T.; Böhm, V.; Zimmermann, K.; Odenbach, S.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers are a type of smart hybrid material which combines elastic properties of a soft elastomer matrix with magnetic properties of magnetic micro particles. This leads to a material with magnetically controllable mechanical properties of which the magnetorheological effect is the best known. The addition of electroconductive particles to the polymer mix adds electrical properties to the material behaviour. The resulting electrical resistance of the sample can be manipulated by external magnetic fields and mechanical loads. This results in a distinct interplay of mechanical, electrical and magnetic effects with a highly complex time behaviour. In this paper a mechanical characterisation on multiple time scales was conducted to get an insight on the short and long-term electrical and mechanical behaviour of this novel material. The results show a complex resistivity behaviour on several timescales, sensitive to magnetic fields and strain velocity. The observed material exhibits fatigue and relaxation behaviour, whereas the magnetorheological effect appears not to interfere with the piezoresistive properties.

  12. Microstructure of magnetite doped elastomers investigated by SAXS and SANS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balasoiu, M.; Craus, M. L.; Kuklin, A. I.; Pleštil, Josef; Haramus, V.; Islamov, A. H.; Erhan, R.; Anitas, E. M.; Lozovan, M.; Tripadus, V.; Petrescu, C.; Savu, D.; Savu, S.; Bica, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 11 (2008), s. 2932-2935 ISSN 1454-4164. [International Balkan Workshop on Applied Physics /9./. Constanta, 07.07.2008-09.07.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : SANS * SAXS * magnetic elastomers * ferrofluids Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.577, year: 2008 http://inoe.inoe.ro/joam/index.php?option=magazine&op=list&revid=32

  13. Micropatterning on silicon elastomer (PDMS) with deep UVs

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Nicolas CARPI, Matthieu PIEL, Ammar Azioune, Damien Cuvelier & Jenny Fink ### Abstract This protocol describes a technique to imprint adhesive micropatterns on silicon elastomers like PDMS (poly-dimethyl siloxane). The micropatterns are stable for days (depending on the cell type) and regions outside the patterns prevent cell attachment. This technique is fast and easy and can be useful to combine cell stretching and micro-patterning. ### Introduction This protoco...

  14. Localized soft elasticity in liquid crystal elastomers (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-23

    improve strain insensitivity, a film of silver nanowires was deposited to serve as a ductile conductor . On deformation the soft elastic region increases...orders of magnitude lower than the failure strain of elastomers8. As a result, electrical components in traditional geometries fail when built on... silver , a spatially variable strain evolves in the coating under load. In Fig. 3a,b, optical micrographs show the interface between soft elastic and

  15. Dispersion mechanisms of carbon black in an elastomer matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Collin, Véronique; Peuvrel-Disdier, Edith

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Dispersion mechanisms of carbon black pellets in an uncured SBR elastomer matrix under shear conditions were studied using a rheo-optical approach. A transparent counter-rotating plate-and-plate shear cell coupled with an optical microscope was used. Elementary mechanisms of dispersion such as rupture, erosion of isolated carbon black pellets were investigated. A criterion for rupture and an erosion law were determined. The rupture mechanism was shown to be governed by...

  16. Characteristics and utilization of thermoplastic elastomers (TPE)-an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roestamsjah [R and D Center for Applied Chemistry, Indonesian Inst. of Sciences (Indonesia)

    1998-10-01

    The unique feature of thermoplastic elastomer, the combining of processing characteristics of thermoplastics with the physical properties of vulcanized rubber is reviewed. Highlights of TPE and its characteristics is aimed to generate interest in TPE, where SANS technique will be utilized for its characterization. The topics discussed include rubber elasticity, state of aggregation of polymers, microseparation in block copolymer system, application of TPE, and finally some notes in developing interest in TPE and SANS in Indonesia. (author)

  17. REINFORCED COMPOSITE PANEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A composite panel having front and back faces, the panel comprising facing reinforcement, backing reinforcement and matrix material binding to the facing and backing reinforcements, the facing and backing reinforcements each independently comprising one or more reinforcing sheets, the facing...... reinforcement being located on or embedded in matrix material adjacent to the front face of the panel, the backing reinforcement being located in a plane or planes substantially parallel to the plane or planes of the facing reinforcement, and being substantially coextensive therewith, and spaced therefrom...... by matrix material, the facing and backing reinforcements being interconnected to resist out-of-plane relative movement. The reinforced composite panel is useful as a barrier element for shielding structures, equipment and personnel from blast and/or ballistic impact damage....

  18. Aromatic polyamide short fibres-reinforced elastomers: adhesion mechanisms and the composite's performance properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadatshirazi, S.

    2012-01-01

    The current thesis consists of a chapter as literature review in which different scientific sources and the results of investigation of various researchers are reviewed, followed by 5 chapters (2 to 6) and an appendix covering the results of the experimental work performed. The results can be

  19. Influence of the surroundings conditions on the evolution of elastomers in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davenas, J.; Stevenson, I.; Celette, N.; David, L.; Vigier, G.; David, L.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution under radiations of EPDM elastomers used as cable insulators reveals the determining role of the surrounding atmosphere. The formation of unsaturated bonds and a recovery of the reticulation are revealed for irradiations in inert atmosphere, whereas a lot of oxidized species are formed in presence of oxygen. The dynamic mechanical relaxation spectroscopy shows a decrease of the molecular mobility in all the cases. This ones results of the reticulation under inert atmosphere, but its origin is less clear during the radio-oxidation where the chain cleavages constitute the main process. The evolution of the conservation modulus with the irradiation dose is in agreement with the waited evolution after the melting of the crystallites. The number of reticulation intersection increases until a dose corresponding to the complete consumption of diene, for decreasing then under the influence of the chain cleavages. The crystallites growth due to chain cleavages explains then the evolution at ambient temperature in presence of oxygen. The mechanical properties at the great deformations show the role of reinforcement of the crystallites at ambient temperature which disappears during the crystallites melting. The evolution of the EPDM properties results of a complex equilibrium between reticulations, chain cleavages and crystallites growth, which is controlled by the temperature and the atmosphere. (O.M.)

  20. Temperature dependence of viscoelasticity of crystalline cellulose with different molecular weights added to silicone elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, Naoto; Nakajima, Shinya; Kameda, Takao; Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    Silicone elastomers ( polydimethylsiloxane _ PDMS) are widely used in the field of imprint lithography and microcontactprinting (μCP). When performing microcontactprinting, the mechanical properties of the PCMS as a base material have a great influence on the performance of the device. Cellulose nanofibers having features of high strength, high elasticity and low coefficient of linear expansion have attracted attention in recent years due to their characteristics. Therefore, three types of crystalline cellulose having different molecular weights were added to PDMS to prepare a composite material, and dynamic viscoelasticity was measured using a rheometer. The PDMS with the highest molecular weight crystalline cellulose added exhibited smaller storage modulus than PDMS with other molecular weight added in all temperature ranges. Furthermore, when comparing PDMS to which crystalline cellulose was added and PDMS which is not added, the storage modulus of PDMS to which cellulose was added in the low temperature region was higher than that of PDMS to which it was not added, but it was reversed in the high temperature region It was a result. When used in a low temperature range (less than 150 ° C.), it can be said that cellulose can function as a reinforcing material for PDMS.

  1. PZT/PLZT - elastomer composites with improved piezoelectric voltage coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, K.; Bavbande, D. V.; Mohan, Dhirendra; Manoharan, B.; Prasad, M. R. S.; Kalyanakrishnan, G.

    2018-02-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) and Lanthanum-modified Lead Zirconate Titanate (PLZT) ceramic sensor materials are widely used because of their excellent piezoelectric coefficients. These materials are brittle, high density and have low achievable piezoelectric voltage coefficients. The density of the sintered ceramics shall be reduced by burnable polymeric sponge method. The achievable porosity level in this case is nearly 60 - 90%. However, the porous ceramic structure with 3-3 connectivity produced by this method is very fragile in nature. The strength of the porous structure is improved with Sylgard®-184 (silicone elastomer) by vacuum impregnation method maintaining the dynamic vacuum level in the range of -650 mm Hg. The elastomer Sylgard®-184 is having low density, low dielectric constant and high compliance (as a resultant stiffness of the composites is increased). To obtain a net dipole moment, the impregnated ceramic composites were subjected to poling treatment with varying conditions of D.C. field and temperature. The properties of the poled PZT/PLZT - elastomer composites were characterized with LCR meter for measuring the dielectric constant values (k), d33 meter used for measuring piezo-electric charge coefficient values (d33) and piezo-electric voltage coefficient (g33) values which were derived from d33 values. The voltage coefficient (g33) values of these composites are increased by 10 fold as compared to the conventional solid ceramics demonstrates that it is possible to fabricate a conformable detector.

  2. Aging of elastomers in CANDU pressure boundary service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanBerlo, C.; Leidner, J.

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the properties and aging of elastomers, and examines the performance of major elastomeric components in CANDU pressure boundary service. The components examined are vacuum building roof seals, pressure relief duct seals, airlock door seals, fuelling machine hoses, and cable penetrations. For each of these components, the design requirements, technical specifications and component testing procedures are compared with applicable standards. Information on actual and recommended monitoring and maintenance methods is presented. Operational and environmental stressors are identified. Component failure modes, causes and frequencies are described, as well as the remedial action taken. Many different elastomers are used in CANDU plants, for many different applications. Standards and manufacturers' recommendations are not consistent and may vary from one component to another. Accordingly, the monitoring, maintenance and replacement practices tend to vary from one application to another, and may also be different at different stations. Recommendations are given in this report for improved monitoring and maintenance, in an attempt to provide more consistency in approach. A summary of some experiences with elastomers from non-Canadian sources is contained in the last section. 125 refs

  3. Zipping dielectric elastomer actuators: characterization, design and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffli, L; Rosset, S; Shea, H R

    2013-01-01

    We report on miniature dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) operating in zipping mode with an analytical model that predicts their behavior. Electrostatic zipping is a well-known mechanism in silicon MEMS to obtain large deformations and forces at lower voltages than for parallel plate electrostatic actuation. We extend this concept to DEAs, which allows us to obtain much larger out-of-plane displacements compared to silicon thanks to the softness of the elastomer membrane. We study experimentally the effect of sidewall angles and elastomer prestretch on 2.3 mm diameter actuators with PDMS membranes. With 15° and 22.5° sidewall angles, the devices zip in a bistable manner down 300 μm to the bottom of the chambers. The highly tunable bistable behavior is controllable by both chamber geometry and membrane parameters. Other specific characteristics of zipping DEAs include well-controlled deflected shape, tunable displacement versus voltage characteristics to virtually any shape, including multi-stable modes, sealing of embedded holes or channels for valving action and the reduction of the operating voltage. These properties make zipping DEAs an excellent candidate for applications such as integrated microfluidics actuators or Braille displays. (paper)

  4. A survey on dielectric elastomer actuators for soft robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guo-Ying; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Li-Min; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2017-01-23

    Conventional industrial robots with the rigid actuation technology have made great progress for humans in the fields of automation assembly and manufacturing. With an increasing number of robots needing to interact with humans and unstructured environments, there is a need for soft robots capable of sustaining large deformation while inducing little pressure or damage when maneuvering through confined spaces. The emergence of soft robotics offers the prospect of applying soft actuators as artificial muscles in robots, replacing traditional rigid actuators. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are recognized as one of the most promising soft actuation technologies due to the facts that: i) dielectric elastomers are kind of soft, motion-generating materials that resemble natural muscle of humans in terms of force, strain (displacement per unit length or area) and actuation pressure/density; ii) dielectric elastomers can produce large voltage-induced deformation. In this survey, we first introduce the so-called DEAs emphasizing the key points of working principle, key components and electromechanical modeling approaches. Then, different DEA-driven soft robots, including wearable/humanoid robots, walking/serpentine robots, flying robots and swimming robots, are reviewed. Lastly, we summarize the challenges and opportunities for the further studies in terms of mechanism design, dynamics modeling and autonomous control.

  5. Rapid Formation of Soft Hydrophilic Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efimenko,K.; Crowe, J.; Manias, E.; Schwark, D.; Fischer, D.; Genzer, J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the rapid formation of hydrophilic silicone elastomer surfaces by ultraviolet/ozone (UVO) irradiation of poly(vinylmethylsiloxane) (PVMS) network films. Our results reveal that the PVMS network surfaces render hydrophilic upon only a short UVO exposure time (seconds to a few minutes). We also provide evidence that the brief UVO irradiation treatment does not cause dramatic changes in the surface modulus of the PVMS network. We compare the rate of formation of hydrophilic silicone elastomer surfaces made of PVMS to those of model poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) and commercial-grade PDMS (Sylgard-184). We find that relative to PVMS, 20 times longer UVO treatment times are needed to oxidize the PDMS network surfaces in order to achieve a comparable density of surface-bound hydrophilic moieties. The longer UVO treatment times for PDMS are in turn responsible for the dramatic increase in surface modulus of UVO treated PDMS, relative to PVMS. We also study the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) made of semifluorinated organosilane precursors on the PVMSUVO and PDMS-UVO network surfaces. By tuning the UVO treatment times and by utilizing mono- and tri-functional organosilanes we find that while mono-functionalized organosilanes attach directly to the substrate, SAMs of tri-functionalized organosilanes form in-plane networks on the underlying UVO-modified silicone elastomer surface, even with only short UVO exposure times.

  6. Statistical analysis of magnetically soft particles in magnetorheological elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundermann, T.; Cremer, P.; Löwen, H.; Menzel, A. M.; Odenbach, S.

    2017-04-01

    The physical properties of magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) are a complex issue and can be influenced and controlled in many ways, e.g. by applying a magnetic field, by external mechanical stimuli, or by an electric potential. In general, the response of MRE materials to these stimuli is crucially dependent on the distribution of the magnetic particles inside the elastomer. Specific knowledge of the interactions between particles or particle clusters is of high relevance for understanding the macroscopic rheological properties and provides an important input for theoretical calculations. In order to gain a better insight into the correlation between the macroscopic effects and microstructure and to generate a database for theoretical analysis, x-ray micro-computed tomography (X-μCT) investigations as a base for a statistical analysis of the particle configurations were carried out. Different MREs with quantities of 2-15 wt% (0.27-2.3 vol%) of iron powder and different allocations of the particles inside the matrix were prepared. The X-μCT results were edited by an image processing software regarding the geometrical properties of the particles with and without the influence of an external magnetic field. Pair correlation functions for the positions of the particles inside the elastomer were calculated to statistically characterize the distributions of the particles in the samples.

  7. Investigating the influence of alkalization on the mechanical and water absorption properties of coconut and sponge fibers reinforced polypropylene composites

    OpenAIRE

    Okikiola Ganiu AGBABIAKA; Isiaka Oluwole OLADELE; Paul Toluwalagbara OLORUNLEYE

    2014-01-01

    Natural fibers are products made from renewable agricultural and forestry feedstock, which can include wood, grasses, and crops, as well as wastes and residues. There are two primary ways these fibers are used: to create polymers or as reinforcement and filler. Thermoplastic polymer may be reinforced or filled using natural fibers such as coir, sponge, hemp, flax, or sisal. This paper focused on the influence of alkalization (NaOH treatment) on the mechanical and water absorption properties o...

  8. Voltage-stabilised elastomers with increased relative permittivity and high electrical breakdown strength by means of phase separating binary copolymer blends of silicone elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A Razak, Aliff Hisyam; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2017-01-01

    Increased electrical breakdown strength and increased dielectric permittivity of silicone-based dielectric elastomers are achieved by means of the addition of so-called voltage-stabilisers prepared from PDMS–PPMS copolymers as well as PDMS–PEG copolymers in order to compensate for the negative...... effect of softness on electrical stability of silicone elastomers. The voltage-stabilised elastomer, incorporating a high-permittivity PDMS–PEG copolymer, possesses increased relative permittivity, high electrical breakdown strength, excellent network integrity and low dielectric loss and paves the way...

  9. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart U of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Elastomer Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... From the Production of Elastomer Products Organic HAP/chemical name (CAS No.) Elastomer product... Production of Elastomer Products 5 Table 5 to Subpart U of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Dichloride (107062) ✔ Ethylene Oxide (75218) ✔ ✔ Formaldehyde (50000) ✔ ✔ Hexane (110543) ✔ ✔ ✔ Methanol...

  10. Effect of cocoa pod husk filler loading on tensile properties of cocoa pod husk/polylactic acid green biocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyang, M. L.; Sapuan, S. M.; Haron, M.

    2017-10-01

    Over the years, cocoa-pod husk (CPH) generation significantly increased due to the growing global demand of chocolate products, since cocoa bean is the main ingredient for chocolate production. Proper utilization of CPH as natural filler for reinforcement of polymer composites provides economic advantages as well as environmental solutions for CPH waste disposal problems. In this study, CPH filled PLA composite films were developed using solution casting method. The effect of CPH loading on the tensile properties of CPH/PLA composite films were investigated. The obtained results manifested that increasing CPH loading from 0% to 10 % significantly increased tensile strength of CPH/PLA composite. However, further addition of CPH loading up to 15 % decreased the tensile strength of film samples. As CPH loading increased from 0% to 15%, tensile modulus of CPH/PLA composite films also increased from 1.5MPa to 10.4MPa, whereas their elongation at break reduced from 190% to 90%. These findings points out CPH as a potential natural filler for reinforcing thermoplastic polymer composites.

  11. Silica-reinforced natural rubber for low rolling resistance, energy-saving tires: aspects of mixing, formulation and compatibilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaewsakul, Wisut

    2013-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR) is a renewable material, which combines excellent mechanical and dynamic properties. It has been and still is in use in a variety of applications, mostly in the form of filled vulcanizates. Silica filler technology used for rubber is relatively new, since silica can reinforce

  12. Role of Magnetorheological Fluids and Elastomers in Today’s World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skalski Paweł

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the role of magnetorheological fluids and elastomers in today’s world. A review of applications of magnetorheological fluids and elastomers in devices and machines is presented. Magnetorheological fluids and elastomers belong to the smart materials family. Properties of magnetorheological fluids and elastomers can be controlled by a magnetic field. Compared with magnetorheological fluids, magnetorheological elastomers overcome the problems accompanying applications of MR fluids, such as sedimentation, sealing issues and environmental contamination. Magnetorheological fluids and elastomers, due to their ability of dampening vibrations in the presence of a controlled magnetic field, have great potential present and future applications in transport. Magnetorheological fluids are used e.g. dampers, shock absorbers, clutches and brakes. Magnetorheological dampers and magnetorheological shock absorbers are applied e.g. in damping control, in the operation of buildings and bridges, as well as in damping of high-tension wires. In the automotive industry, new solutions involving magnetorheological elastomer are increasingly patented e.g. adaptive system of energy absorption, system of magnetically dissociable [hooks/detents/grips], an vibration reduction system of the car’s drive shaft. The application of magnetorheological elastomer in the aviation structure is presented as well.

  13. ON THE THEORY OF DIFFUSION AND SWELLING IN FINITELY DEFORMING ELASTOMERS

    OpenAIRE

    Gary J., Templet; Steigmann:, David J.

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The role of a relaxed local intermediate configuration associated with free swelling is examined in the context of diffusion of a liquid in an isotropic elastomer. It is found that this configuration is energetically optimal if the free-energy function of the polymer-liquid gel is polyconvex. Further aspects of the general theory of diffusion in elastomers are also discussed.

  14. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  15. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age

  16. [Facial angioedema after filler injections. Description of five cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosatti, Micaela; Fernández Romero, Diego S; Juri, María Cecilia; Malbrán, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    The use of fillers for cosmetic purposes is becoming increasingly frequent. Although initially considered inert, these products produce adverse reactions around the injection site. We present 5 cases of women with a history of filler injections who presented a hard and persistent angioedema followed by local subcutaneous nodules. They were referred to the allergist for suspected allergy related angioedema without response to usual antihistamine treatment. The angioedema episodes initiated 27.6 months (range 1 to 48) after the fillers treatment. The patients underwent exacerbations and remissions of angioedema, partially relieved with oral steroids and, in 2 cases, local triamcinolone injections. Mean time from onset of symptoms to remission of angioedema was 8.75 months (range 1 to 24). Until October 2009 four patients continued into remission after 24.5 months (range 7 to 36) free of symptoms. One patient continued with exacerbations 11 months after the initial symptoms. Fillers may cause angioedema as an adverse event and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of persistent angioedema. They are only sensitive to steroid treatment and in some steroid dependent cases they respond to ciclosporin. The frequency of angioedema after filler injections among patients with angioedema in the Unit of Asthma Allergy and Clinical Immunology was 0.5%.

  17. Labia Majora Augmentation with Hyaluronic Acid Filler: Technique and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasola, Elena; Gazzola, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    External female genitalia lose elasticity and volume with age. In the literature several techniques address the redundancy of the labia minora, but only few reports describe the augmentation of labia majora with fat grafting. At present, no studies describe the augmentation of the labia majora with hyaluronic acid. This study aims to present our technique of infiltration of hyaluronic acid filler, analyzing effectiveness, patient satisfaction, and complications. We retrospectively analyzed 54 patients affected by hypotrophy of the labia majora; they were treated with hyaluronic acid filler between November 2010 and December 2014. The Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS) filled out by the doctor and the patients was used to evaluate the results 12 months after the infiltration. Complications were recorded. A total of 31 patients affected by mild to moderate labia majora hypotrophy were treated with 19 mg/mL HA filler; 23 patients affected by severe labia majora hypotrophy were treated with 21 mg/mL HA filler. Among the first group of patients, one underwent a second infiltration 6 months later with 19 mg/mL HA filler (maximum 1 mL). A significant improvement (P labia majora is able to provide a significant rejuvenation with a simple outpatient procedure. We achieved significant improvements with one infiltration in all cases. The treatment is repeatable, has virtually no complications and it is reversible. 4 Therapeutic. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + γ → γ + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L → L + γ → γ. In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions

  19. Recycling graphene from supercapacitor electrodes as reinforcing filler for epoxy resins

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Guozhan; Pickering, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    A wet shredding process has been developed for recycling graphene from the electrodes of supercapacitors into polymer composites. At first, supercapacitors are cut open to expose the interior graphene based electrodes. The electrodes are heat-treated at 200o C to remove the contained solvent, and the heat treatment temperature can be further increased to remove the polymer binder, which binds the graphene on an aluminium foil current collector. After heat treatment, the electrodes are shredde...

  20. Thermal performance of alumina filler reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz; Ullah, Sami; Farhana Mohammad, Wan; Farth Shariff, M.

    2014-06-01

    In the modern construction, fire safety has significant consideration for the protection of people and assets. Several intumescent fire protection systems are in practice and have constrain of releasing toxic gases on degradation forms an insulating char layer protecting underlying substrate. An intumescent coating expands many times of its thickness on exposure to fire and protect the underlying substrate from fire. This study presents the results of thermal performance of an intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC) developed for structural application. IFRC was developed using expandable graphite (EG), ammonium poly phosphate (APP) and melamine (MEL), epoxy resin Bisphenol-A (BPA) and hardener triethylenetetramine (TETA) were used as a binder as a curing agent. Char expansion of IFRC was measured by furnace fire test at 450°C, thermal performance was measured using a Bunsen burner at 950°C and temperature of substrate was recorded for 60 min at an interval of two min. Results showed that IFRC containing 3wt% alumina showed char expansion X19. After one hour exposure of coating to heat, substrate temperature recorded was 154°C. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed the presence of high temperature compounds present in the char of coating, considered responsible to reduce the penetration of heat to the substrate.

  1. Graphene oxide modified with PMMA via ATRP as a reinforcement filler

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Gil; Marques, Paula A. A. P.; Barros-Timmons, Ana; Bdikin, Igor; Singh, Manoj K.; Emami, Nazanin; Grácio, José

    2010-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional new allotrope of carbon, which is stimulating great curiosity due to its superior mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties. Particularly attractive is the availability of bulk quantities of graphene (G) which can be easily processed by chemical exfoliation, yielding graphene oxide (GO). The resultant oxygenated graphene sheets covered with hydroxyl, epoxy and carboxyl groups offer tremendous opportunities for further functionalization opening plenty...

  2. The reinforcing potentials of Velvet tamarind seed shell as filler in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cure characteristics, physico-mechanical and equilibrium swelling properties of natural rubber, Standard Nigerian Rubber (SNR10) vulcanizates separately filled with commercial grade carbon black (CB), N330 and pulverized natural plant material, Velvet tamarind (VT), seed shell were investigated. The results of the ...

  3. RESIDUAL PROPERTIES OF FIBER-REINFORCED REFRACTORY COMPOSITES WITH A FIRECLAY FILLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Jogl

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to develop a composite material for industrial use that is resistant to the effect of high temperatures. The binder system based on aluminous cement was modified by adding finely-ground ceramic powder and metakaolin to reduce costs and also to reduce adverse effects on the environment due to high energy consumption for cement production. Additives were applied as a partial aluminous cement replacement in doses of 10, 20 and 30% by weight. The composites were evaluated on the basis of their mechanical properties and their bulk density after gradual temperature loading. The influence of basalt fibers and modifications to the binder system were studied at the same time. Basalt fibers were applied in doses of 0.5% and 2.0% by volume. The results confirmed the potential of the mineral additives studied here for practical applications, taking into account the residual mechanical parameters after thermal loading. The addition of ceramic powder reduced the bulk density by 5% for each 10% of cement substitution, but the residual values were very similar. The bulk density and the compressive strength were reduced when basalt fibers were applied, and the flexural strength was significantly increased in proportion to the fiber dosages. Metakaolin seems to be a more suitable additive than the ceramic powder that was applied here, because there was a significant increase in the mechanical parameters and also in the residual values of all properties that were studied.

  4. Utilization of oil palm ash as an reinforcing filler in natural rubber biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malawet, Chutarat; Jarnthong, Methakarn; Intharapat, Punyanich; Liao, Lusheng; Zhang, Fuquan; Wang, Yueqiong; Li, Puwang; Peng, Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Biocomposites based on blending of natural rubber (NR) and oil palm ash (OPA) were prepared. The properties of OPA filled NR composites were investigated in terms of mechanical, morphological and thermal properties. Mechanical tests indicated that the addition of the OPA resulted in an increase in the modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break of the films. However, no significant changes were observed to glass transition temperature (Tg) of NR/OPA composites.

  5. A thermo-reversible silicone elastomer with remotely controlled self-healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogliani, E.; Yu, L.; Javakhishvili, I.

    2018-01-01

    . As a consequence of temperature responsiveness and high thermal stability, the elastomer is proven recyclable, by withstanding multiple reprocessing procedures with no substantial effects on the resulting properties. The synergy of these valuable characteristics makes this novel material a smart candidate......Soft thermoplastic elastomers with increased durability and reliability are in high demand for a broad spectrum of applications. Silicone elastomers are soft and durable, but they are not thermoplastic in nature, and under extreme conditions such as high voltage or large deformations, reliability...... may also suffer. Thus, as a solution to these shortcomings, which are typical of silicone elastomers, it is natural to propose a thermo-reversible, self-healing, and recyclable silicone-based elastomer. Stimuli-responsivity is imparted to the silicone polymer by incorporating supramolecular 2-ureido-4...

  6. Degradation patterns of silicone-based dielectric elastomers in electrical fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2017-01-01

    Silicone elastomers have been heavily investigated as candidates for the flexible insulator material in dielectric elastomer transducers and are as such almost ideal candidates because of their inherent softness and compliance. However, silicone elastomers suffer from low dielectric permittivity....... This shortcoming has been attempted optimized through different approaches during recent years. Material optimization with the sole purpose of increasing the dielectric permittivity may lead to the introduction of problematic phenomena such as premature electrical breakdown due to high leakage currents of the thin...... elastomer film. Within this work, electrical breakdown phenomena of various types of permittivity-enhanced silicone elastomers are investigated. Results showed that different types of polymer backbone chemistries lead to differences in electrical breakdown patterns, which were revealed through SEM imaging...

  7. Physicochemical properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber reinforced resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiting; Qin, Wei; Garoushi, Sufyan; He, Jingwei; Lin, Zhengmei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2018-01-30

    The objective of this study was to investigate several physicochemical properties of an experimental discontinuous S2-glass fiber-reinforced resin composite. The experimental composite was prepared by mixing 10 wt% of discontinuous S2-glass fibers with 27.5 wt% of resin matrix and 62.5 wt% of particulate fillers. Flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), fracture toughness (FT), work of fracture (WOF), double bond conversion (DC), Vickers hardness, volume shrinkage (VS) and fiber length distribution were determined. These were compared with two commercial resin composites. The experimental composite showed the highest FS, WOF and FT compared with two control composites. The DC of the experimental composite was comparable with controls. No significant difference was observed in VS between the three tested composites. The use of discontinuous glass fiber fillers with polymer matrix and particulate fillers yielded improved physical properties and substantial improvement was associated with the use of S2-glass fiber.

  8. Incorporation of coconut shell based nanoparticles in kenaf/coconut fibres reinforced vinyl ester composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Abdul Khalil H. P.; Masri, M.; Saurabh, Chaturbhuj K.; Fazita, M. R. N.; Azniwati, A. A.; Sri Aprilia, N. A.; Rosamah, E.; Dungani, Rudi

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, a successful attempt has been made on enhancing the properties of hybrid kenaf/coconut fibers reinforced vinyl ester composites by incorporating nanofillers obtained from coconut shell. Coconut shells were grinded followed by 30 h of high energy ball milling for the production of nanoparticles. Particle size analyzer demonstrated that the size of 90% of obtained nanoparticles ranged between 15-140 nm. Furthermore, it was observed that the incorporation of coconut shell nanofillers into hybrid composite increased water absorption capacity. Moreover, tensile, flexural, and impact strength increased with the filler loading up to 3 wt.% and thereafter decrease was observed at higher filler concentration. However, elongation at break decreased and thermal stability increased in nanoparticles concentration dependent manner. Morphological analysis of composite with 3% of filler loading showed minimum voids and fiber pull outs and this indicated that the stress was successfully absorbed by the fiber.

  9. Numbers or apologies? Customer reactions to telephone waiting time fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munichor, Nira; Rafaeli, Anat

    2007-03-01

    The authors examined the effect of time perception and sense of progress in telephone queues on caller reactions to 3 telephone waiting time fillers: music, apologies, and information about location in the queue. In Study 1, conducted on 123 real calls, call abandonment was lowest, and call evaluations were most positive with information about location in the queue as the time filler. In Study 2, conducted with 83 participants who experienced a simulated telephone wait experience, sense of progress in the queue rather than perceived waiting time mediated the relationship between telephone waiting time filler and caller reactions. The findings provide insight for the management and design of telephone queues, as well as theoretical insight into critical cognitive processes that underlie telephone waiting, opening up an important new research agenda. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber/hybrid filler composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mousa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface properties of the OSW and NLS are measured with the dynamic contact-angle technique. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS of the OSW reveals that the OSW possesses various reactive functional groups namely hydroxyl groups (OH. Hybrid filler from NLS and OSW were incorporated into carboxylated nitrile rubber (XNBR to produce XNBR hybrid composites. The reaction of OH groups from the OSW with COOH of the XNBR is checked by attenuated total reflectance spectra (ATR-IR of the composites. The degree of curing ΔM (maximum torque-minimum torque as a function of hybrid filler as derived from moving die rheometer (MDR is reported. The stress-strain behavior of the hybrid composites as well as the dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA is studied. Bonding quality and dispersion of the hybrid filler with and in XNBR are examined using scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM in SEM.

  11. Advanced Laser Techniques for Filler-Induced Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassuto, D.; Marangoni, O.; Santis, G. De

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The increasing use of injectable fillers has been increasing the occurrence of disfiguring anaerobic infection or granulomas. This study presents two types of laser-assisted evacuation of filler material and inflammatory and necrotic tissue that were used to treat disfiguring facial...... nodules after different types of gel fillers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Infectious lesions after hydrogels were drained using a lithium triborate laser at 532 nm, with subsequent removal of infected gel and pus (laser assisted evacuation). Granuloma after gels containing microparticles were treated using...... an 808-nm diode laser using intralesional laser technique. The latter melted and liquefied the organic and synthetic components of the granulomas, facilitating subsequent evacuation. Both lasers had an easily controllable thin laser beam, which enabled the physician to control tissue damage and minimize...

  12. Lower Face: Clinical Anatomy and Regional Approaches with Injectable Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, André; Humphrey, Shannon; Weinkle, Susan; Yee, G Jackie; Remington, B Kent; Lorenc, Z Paul; Yoelin, Steve; Waldorf, Heidi A; Azizzadeh, Babak; Butterwick, Kimberly J; de Maio, Mauricio; Sadick, Neil; Trevidic, Patrick; Criollo-Lamilla, Gisella; Garcia, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The use of injectable fillers enables facial sculpting through treatment of volume depletion and modeling of facial contours. Injectable fillers are among the most frequently performed minimally invasive cosmetic procedures.However, treatment of the lower third of the face can be challenging and requires expertise in facial anatomy. In this article, the authors provide a comprehensive review of the anatomy of the lower third of the face, highlighting danger zones. In addition, the authors describe their preferred approach and detailed technique used in the treatment of each specific area, namely the jawline, prejowl sulcus, melomental folds, and lips.

  13. Injectable Filler Techniques for Facial Rejuvenation, Volumization, and Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Lawrence S

    2015-11-01

    Multiple fillers are available: various hyaluronic acid products, calcium hydroxylapatite, and a few others that are biocompatible with good duration and a variety of mechanical properties allowing intradermal, subdermal, and supraperiosteal injection. Facial features can be reshaped with great control using these fillers. Aging changes, including facial volume loss, can be well-corrected. These treatments have become a mainstay of rejuvenation in the early facial aging patient. Injection technique is critical to obtaining excellent results. Threading, fanning, cross-hatching, bleb, and pillar techniques must be mastered. Technical execution can only measure up to, but not exceed, the quality of the aesthetic analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fiber reinforced engineering plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Rodney E. Jacobson; Karl D. Sears; John H. Underwood

    2001-01-01

    Although natural fiber reinforced commodity thermoplastics have a wide range of nonstructural applications in the automotive and decking industries, there have been few reports of cellulosic fiber-reinforced engineering thermoplastics. The commonly held belief has been that the only thermoplastics amenable to natural-fibre reinforcement are limited to low-melting (...

  15. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  16. Nanomechanical probing of thin-film dielectric elastomer transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmani, Bekim; Seifi, Saman; Park, Harold S.; Leung, Vanessa; Töpper, Tino; Müller, Bert

    2017-08-01

    Dielectric elastomer transducers (DETs) have attracted interest as generators, actuators, sensors, and even as self-sensing actuators for applications in medicine, soft robotics, and microfluidics. Their performance crucially depends on the elastic properties of the electrode-elastomer sandwich structure. The compressive displacement of a single-layer DET can be easily measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the contact mode. While polymers used as dielectric elastomers are known to exhibit significant mechanical stiffening for large strains, their mechanical properties when subjected to voltages are not well understood. To examine this effect, we measured the depths of 400 nanoindentations as a function of the applied electric field using a spherical AFM probe with a radius of (522 ± 4) nm. Employing a field as low as 20 V/μm, the indentation depths increased by 42% at a load of 100 nN with respect to the field-free condition, implying an electromechanically driven elastic softening of the DET. This at-a-glance surprising experimental result agrees with related nonlinear, dynamic finite element model simulations. Furthermore, the pull-off forces rose from (23.0 ± 0.4) to (49.0 ± 0.7) nN implying a nanoindentation imprint after unloading. This embossing effect is explained by the remaining charges at the indentation site. The root-mean-square roughness of the Au electrode raised by 11% upon increasing the field from zero to 12 V/μm, demonstrating that the electrode's morphology change is an undervalued factor in the fabrication of DET structures.

  17. Determination of the refractive indices of liquid crystal elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Israel; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Liquid Crystal Elastomers (LCEs) are fascinating materials due to the coupling between orientational order and mechanical strain. We investigate this coupling by studying the optical properties of LCEs. We have measured the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices of nematic LCEs as function of strain using two different techniques. In both cases, the strain is applied along the nematic director. The first technique is a Brewster's angle measurement which is based on reflection of the incident light and the second is a conoscopic Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on transmission. We present our experimental results and methods of analysis. We compare our observations with theoretical predictions.

  18. A modelling approach for the heterogeneous oxidation of elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, A.; Sekerakova, L.; Johlitz, M.; Lion, A.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of oxygen on elastomers, known as oxidation, is one of the most important ageing processes and becomes more and more important for nowadays applications. The interaction with thermal effects as well as antioxidants makes oxidation of polymers a complex process. Based on the polymer chosen and environmental conditions, the ageing processes may behave completely different. In a lot of cases the influence of oxygen is limited to the surface layer of the samples, commonly referred to as diffusion-limited oxidation. For the lifetime prediction of elastomer components, it is essential to have detailed knowledge about the absorption and diffusion behaviour of oxygen molecules during thermo-oxidative ageing and how they react with the elastomer. Experimental investigations on industrially used elastomeric materials are executed in order to develop and fit models, which shall be capable of predicting the permeation and consumption of oxygen as well as changes in the mechanical properties. The latter are of prime importance for technical applications of rubber components. Oxidation does not occur homogeneously over the entire elastomeric component. Hence, material models which include ageing effects have to be amplified in order to consider heterogeneous ageing, which highly depends on the ageing temperature. The influence of elevated temperatures upon accelerated ageing has to be critically analysed, and influences on the permeation and diffusion coefficient have to be taken into account. This work presents phenomenological models which describe the oxygen uptake and the diffusion into elastomers based on an improved understanding of ongoing chemical processes and diffusion limiting modifications. On the one side, oxygen uptake is modelled by means of Henry's law in which solubility is a function of the temperature as well as the ageing progress. The latter is an irreversible process and described by an inner differential evolution equation. On the other side

  19. Curvature by design and on demand in liquid crystal elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, B. A.; Mostajeran, C.; Godman, N. P.; Warner, M.; White, T. J.

    2018-01-01

    The shape of liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) with spatial variation in the director orientation can be transformed by exposure to a stimulus. Here, informed by previously reported analytical treatments, we prepare complex spiral patterns imprinted into LCEs and quantify the resulting shape transformation. Quantification of the stimuli-induced shapes reveals good agreement between predicted and experimentally observed curvatures. We conclude this communication by reporting a design strategy to allow LCE films to be anchored at their external boundaries onto rigid substrates without incurring internal, mechanical-mismatch stresses upon actuation, a critical advance to the realization of shape transformation of LCEs in practical device applications.

  20. Characterization of waste of soda-lime glass generated from lapping process to reuse as filler in composite materials as thermal insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. P. Galvão

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe beneficiation plate process by soda-lime glass lapping in the glass industry generates, an untapped residue (waste. The waste of this material is sent to landfills, causing impact on the environment. This work aimed to characterize and evaluate the waste of soda-lime glass (GP lapping. After its acquisition, the GP was processed by grinding and sieving and further characterized by the chemical/mineralogical analysis (XRF, EDS and XRD, SEM morphology, particle size by laser diffraction, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA and DSC and thermophysical analyses. It was observed that the GP particles are irregular and micrometric with the predominant presence of Na, Si and Ca elements characteristic of amorphous soda-lime glass. The assessment of the chemical/mineralogical, morphological, thermophysical and thermal gravimetric characteristics of GP suggest its reuse as reinforcing fillers or filler in composite materials to obtain thermal insulation.

  1. Effect of precipitated calcium carbonate--Cellulose nanofibrils composite filler on paper properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Cho, Byoung-Uk; Won, Jong Myoung

    2016-01-20

    A new concept of composite filler was developed by using cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) and cationic starch (C-starch). In this study, cellulose nanofibrils were utilized in two different ways: a PCC-CNF composite filler and a papermaking additive in sheet forming. The aim was to elucidate their effects on flocculation, filler retention and the strength and optical properties of handsheets. The highest filler retention was obtained by using the PCC-CNF composite filler in paper sheets. The paper filled with the composite fillers had much higher bursting and tensile strengths than conventional PCC loading. It was also found that the paper prepared with PCC-CNF composite fillers became denser with increasing the filler content of paper. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hybrid filler composition optimization for tensile strength of jute fibre ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reinforced polyester (GFRP) composite and experiments have been performed on an indigenously developed pultrusion experimental setup. The developed composite consists of natural jute fibre as reinforcement and unsaturated polyester resin as ...

  3. Synthesis of wrinkled mesoporous silica and its reinforcing effect for dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruili; Habib, Eric; Zhu, X X

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the reinforcing effect of wrinkled mesoporous silica (WMS), which should allow micromechanical resin matrix/filler interlocking in dental resin composites, and to investigate the effect of silica morphology, loading, and compositions on their mechanical properties. WMS (average diameter of 496nm) was prepared through the self-assembly method and characterized by the use of the electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and the N 2 adsorption-desorption measurements. The mechanical properties of resin composites containing silanized WMS and nonporous smaller silica were evaluated with a universal mechanical testing machine. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to study the fracture morphology of dental composites. Resin composites including silanized silica particles (average diameter of 507nm) served as the control group. Higher filler loading of silanized WMS substantially improved the mechanical properties of the neat resin matrix, over the composites loaded with regular silanized silica particles similar in size. The impregnation of smaller secondary silica particles with diameters of 90 and 190nm, denoted respectively as Si90 and Si190, increased the filler loading of the bimodal WMS filler (WMS-Si90 or WMS-Si190) to 60wt%, and the corresponding composites exhibited better mechanical properties than the control fillers made with regular silica particles. Among all composites, the optimal WMS-Si190- filled composite (mass ratio WMS:Si190=10:90, total filler loading 60wt%) exhibited the best mechanical performance including flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength and Vickers microhardness. The incorporation of WMS and its mixed bimodal fillers with smaller silica particles led to the design and formulation of dental resin composites with superior mechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Graphene nanoplatelet-reinforced silicone for the valvular prosthesis application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordeus, Makensley; Estrada, Angie; Stewart, Danique; Dua, Rupak; Zhang, Cheng; Agarwal, Arvind; Ramaswamy, Sharan

    2015-01-01

    Newly developed elastomer heart valves have been shown to better re-create the flow physics of native heart valves, resulting in preferable hemodynamic responses. This emergence has been motivated in part by the recent introduction of percutaneous valve approaches in the clinic. Unfortunately, elastomers such as silicone are prone to structural failure, which drastically limits their applicability the development of a valve prosthesis. To produce a mechanically more robust silicone substrate, we reinforced it with graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs). The nanoplatelets were introduced into a two-part silicone mixture and allowed to cure. Cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility tests revealed that the incorporation of GNPs did not adversely affect cell proliferation or augment adhesion of platelets on the surface of the composite materials. Static mechanical characterization by loading in the tensile direction subsequently showed no observable effect when graphene was utilized. However, cyclic tensile testing (0.05 Hz) demonstrated that silicone samples containing 250 mg graphene/L of uncured silicone significantly improved (p<0.05) material fatigue properties compared with silicone-only controls. This finding suggests that for the silicone-graphene composite, static loads were principally transferred onto the matrix. On the other hand, in cyclic loading conditions, the GNPs were recruited effectively to delay failure of the bulk material. We conclude that application of GNPs to extend silicone durability is useful and warrants further evaluation at the trileaflet valve configuration.

  5. Polyetheretherketone Hybrid Composites with Bioactive Nanohydroxyapatite and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyetheretherketone (PEEK hybrid composites reinforced with inorganic nanohydroxyapatite (nHA and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT were prepared by melt-compounding and injection molding processes. The additions of nHA and MWNT to PEEK were aimed to increase its elastic modulus, tensile strength, and biocompatibility, rendering the hybrids suitable for load-bearing implant applications. The structural behavior, mechanical property, wettability, osteoblastic cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of the PEEK/nHA-MWNT hybrids were studied. X-ray diffraction and SEM observation showed that both nHA and MWNT fillers are incorporated into the polymer matrix of PEEK-based hybrids. Tensile tests indicated that the elastic modulus of PEEK can be increased from 3.87 to 7.13 GPa by adding 15 vol % nHA and 1.88 vol % MWNT fillers. The tensile strength and elongation at break of the PEEK/(15% nHA-(1.88% MWNT hybrid were 64.48 MPa and 1.74%, respectively. Thus the tensile properties of this hybrid were superior to those of human cortical bones. Water contact angle measurements revealed that the PEEK/(15% nHA-(1.88% MWNT hybrid is hydrophilic due to the presence of nHA. Accordingly, hydrophilic PEEK/(15% nHA-(1.88% MWNT hybrid promoted the adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts on its surface effectively on the basis of cell culture, fluorescence microscopy, MTT assay, WST-1 assay, alkaline phosphatase activity, and Alizarin red staining tests. Thus the PEEK/(15% nHA-(1.88% MWNT hybrid has the potential to be used for fabricating load-bearing bone implants.

  6. Influencia de la adición del filler calizo sobre el fraguado del cemento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menéndez, Ignacio

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals about the infuence that addition of calcareous "filler" has on the set of portland cement which rates are from 0 up to 50% of filler.

    En el presente artículo se estudia la influencia que la adición de "filler" calizo ejerce sobre el fraguado del cemento portland, al que se le añaden porcentajes desde O al 50% en filler.

  7. Chitosan solutions as injectable systems for dermal filler applications: Rheological characterization and biological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, C; Montembault, A; Guerry, A; Delair, T; Viguier, E; Fulchiron, R; David, L

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of dermal filler for wrinkle filler based on chitosan was compared to current hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers by using a new rheological performance criterion based on viscosity during injection related to Newtonian viscosity. In addition an in vivo evaluation was performed for preclinical evidence of chitosan use as dermal filler. In this way, biocompatibility and dermis reconstruction was evaluated on a pig model.

  8. Electrical conductivity of short carbon fibers and carbon black-reinforced chloroprene rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshniat, A. R.; MirAli, M.; Hemmati, M.; Afshar Taromi, F.; Katbab, A.

    2002-01-01

    Elastomers and plastics are intrinsically insulating materials, but by addition of some conductive particles such as conductive carbon black, carbon fibers and metals, they can change to conductive form. Conductivity of these composites are due to formation of the lattices of conductive filler particles in polymer chains. In this report, conductivity of chloroprene rubber filled with carbon black and carbon fibers as a function of temperature and pressure are studied. Electrical conductivity of chloroprene in a function of temperature and pressure are studied. Electrical conductivity of chloroprene in the presence of carbon black with proper mixing conditions increases to the conductivity level of semiconductors and even in the presence of carbon fibers it increases to the level of a conductor material. Meanwhile, the sensitivity of this compound to heat and pressure rises. Thus these composites have found various applications in the manufacture of heat and pressure sensitive sensors

  9. Energy harvesting by dielectric elastomer generator and self-priming circuit: verification by radio transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegame, Toru; Takagi, Kentaro; Ito, Takamasa; Kojima, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    This paper discusses energy harvesting and its application using dielectric elastomer and self-priming circuit. With the self-priming circuit attached to the dielectric elastomer, the generated voltage increases exponentially according to the variation of the capacitance caused by applied deformation to the elastomer. Two-stage self-priming circuit is selected for optimal harvesting. The self-priming harvesting technique is able to increase the voltage of the dielectric elastomer from a few volts to kV order, however in this paper the generated voltage is limited up to 1kV in order to avoid the destruction of the dielectric elastomer. The ability of energy harvesting using dielectric elastomer and self-priming circuit is confirmed by both numerical simulation and experiments. In the experiment, the dielectric elastomer is deformed by an electric motor, and the harvested energy is stored to a charging capacitor through Zener diodes. A low-power microcomputer which has a radio transmitter is connected to the charging capacitor for the application example. The experimental results show that the temperature data can be transmitted only by the harvested energy. In addition, the efficiency of the energy harvesting is calculated by comparing the generated power with the charged power.

  10. Preparation and application of nanocrystalline cellulose derived from sugarcane waste as filler modified alkanolamide on crosslink of natural rubber latex film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, Hamidah; Hayat, Nuim; Lubis, Marfuah

    2017-07-01

    Sugarcane waste is abundant sources of cellulose and it has potential to reutilize. Cellulose from sugarcane waste can be derived into nanocystalline cellulose (NCC) from crystalline region. The NCC as a filler has capability to reinforce natural rubber latex product. The crosslink in vulcanized natural rubber latex film influences several properties of product. In this work, we extracted NCC from sugarcane waste then added into natural rubber latex as filler modified alkanolamide (ALK) and also studied the crosslink of natural rubber latex films. NCC were produced from sugarcane waste by hydrolysis process with sulfuric acid 45%. The obtained NCC was characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and fourier transform infra red (FTIR). NCC was modified by alkanolamide and dispersed in water with filler concentration of 10%. Then the dispersion were added into latex system followed by pre-vulcanization at 70 °C. The films were prepared by coagulant dipping method and dried at 100 °C and 120 °C for 20 minutes. Characterization of NCC from sugarcane waste by using FTIR was done, it clearly showed the functional groups of cellulose. TEM showed the obtained NCC were rod-shaped with about 40-160 nm in diameter and several hundred nm in length, and XRD showed that the degree of crystalinity of NCC from sugarcane waste is 92.33%. The crosslink of natural rubber films were studied by measure the crosslink density for different filler loading by using swelling measurement with toluene solution. The result show that the crosslink density increased in line with amount of filler which added into the system, and also the crosslink density that obtained from vulcanization at 120 °C were higher than 100 °C.

  11. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE that links behavioral and neural based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009;Rankin et al., 2009. We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect ‘accelerated-HRE’. Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3045 - Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device. 888.3045 Section 888.3045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... salt bone void filler device. (a) Identification. A resorbable calcium salt bone void filler device is...

  13. Preparation of fibrin networks on polymers containing nano-filler

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozlowska, A.; Piegat, A.; Skrobot, J.; Strzalkowska, D.; El Fray, M.; Kubies, Dana; Riedel, Tomáš; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Rypáček, František

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 92, - (2010), s. 8-10 ISSN 1429-7248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk MEB050833 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : fibrin networks * nano-filler Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry http://www.biomat.krakow.pl/gazeta/archiwum/92.pdf

  14. Influence of fillers on the alkali activated chamotte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembovska, L.; Bumanis, G.; Vitola, L.; Bajare, D.

    2017-10-01

    Alkali-activated materials (AAM) exhibit remarkable high-temperature resistance which makes them perspective materials for high-temperature applications, for instance as fire protecting and insulating materials in industrial furnaces. Series of experiments were carried out to develop optimum mix proportions of AAM based on chamotte with quartz sand (Q), olivine sand (OL) and firebrick sawing residues (K26) as fillers. Aluminium scrap recycling waste was considered as a pore forming agent and 6M NaOH alkali activation solution has been used. Lightweight porous AAM have been obtained with density in range from 600 to 880 kg/m3 and compressive strength from 0.8 to 2.7 MPa. The XRD and high temperature optical microscopy was used to characterize the performance of AAM. The mechanical, physical and structural properties of the AAM were determined after the exposure to elevated temperatures at 800 and 1000°C. The results indicate that most promising results for AAM were with K26 filler where strength increase was observed while Q and OL filler reduced mechanical properties due to structure deterioration caused by expansive nature of selected filler.

  15. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  16. Automatic reel controls filler wire in welding machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, A. V.

    1966-01-01

    Automatic reel on automatic welding equipment takes up slack in the reel-fed filler wire when welding operation is terminated. The reel maintains constant, adjustable tension on the wire during the welding operation and rewinds the wire from the wire feed unit when the welding is completed.

  17. Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

    2009-04-30

    The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

  18. Biocomposites from polyhydroxybutyrate and bio-fillers by solvent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    −1 to avoid sample oxidation. The degradation temperature for weight loss at 10, 50, 75 and 90% (T10%,. T50%, T75% and T90%) was also calculated. Dynamic thermal. 0. 25. 50. 75. 100. 50. 150. 250. 350. 450. 550. Weight loss (%). Temperature (°C). L. AC. CNFs. Figure 2. Weight loss percentage of bio-fillers during ...

  19. Induction heating of mastic containing conductive fibers and fillers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García, Á.; Schlangen, E.; Van de Ven, M.; Van Vliet, D.

    The objective of this research is to examine the induction heating of mastic through the addition of electrically conductive fillers and fibers (graphite and steel wool), and to prove that this material can be healed with induction energy. The effect of fibers content, sand–bitumen ratio and the

  20. Induction heating of mastic containing conductive fibers and fillers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García, Á.; Schlangen, E.; Ven, M. van de; Vliet, D. van

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the induction heating of mastic through the addition of electrically conductive fillers and fibers (graphite and steel wool), and to prove that this material can be healed with induction energy. The effect of fibers content, sand-bitumen ratio and the

  1. Superhydrophobic/superoleophilic magnetic elastomers by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milionis, Athanasios, E-mail: am2vy@virginia.edu [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Fragouli, Despina; Brandi, Fernando; Liakos, Ioannis; Barroso, Suset [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Athanassiou, Athanassia, E-mail: athanassia.athanassiou@iit.it [Smart Materials-Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets. • Laser irradiation of the nanocomposites induces chemical and structural changes to the surface. • The laser-patterned surfaces exhibit superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. • The particle contribution in altering the surface and bulk properties of the material is studied. - Abstract: We report the development of magnetic nanocomposite sheets with superhydrophobic and supeoleophilic surfaces generated by laser ablation. Polydimethylsiloxane elastomer free-standing films, loaded homogeneously with 2% wt. carbon coated iron nanoparticles, were ablated by UV (248 nm), nanosecond laser pulses. The laser irradiation induces chemical and structural changes (both in micro- and nano-scale) to the surfaces of the nanocomposites rendering them superhydrophobic. The use of nanoparticles increases the UV light absorption efficiency of the nanocomposite samples, and thus facilitates the ablation process, since the number of pulses and the laser fluence required are greatly reduced compared to the bare polymer. Additionally the magnetic nanoparticles enhance significantly the superhydrophobic and oleophilic properties of the PDMS sheets, and provide to PDMS magnetic properties making possible its actuation by a weak external magnetic field. These nanocomposite elastomers can be considered for applications requiring magnetic MEMS for the controlled separation of liquids.

  2. Outdoor weathering of facial prosthetic elastomers differing in Durometer hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Emily S; Beatty, Mark W

    2015-03-01

    Facial prosthetic elastomers with wide ranges in hardness are available, yet material weatherability is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess color, Durometer hardness, and tensile property changes after 3000 hours of outdoor weathering. Unpigmented elastomers with Durometer hardness 5, 30, 50, 70, and A-2186 were polymerized into dumbbells (ASTM D412) and disks, 34 mm in diameter by 6 mm thick. Materials were subjected to outdoor or time passage environments for 3000 hours. CIELab color (n=5), Durometer hardness (n=5), and tensile mechanical properties (n=10) were measured at 0 and 3000 hours, and group differences were assessed by material and weathering condition (ANOVA/Tukey, α=.05). Except for A-2186, the mean Durometer changes for all materials were 1 unit or less, with no significant differences observed between time passage and weathered groups (P≥.05). Three-thousand-hour tensile mechanical property results demonstrated nonsignificant differences between time passage and weathered materials but significantly changed properties from immediately tested materials (Phardness 5 and 30 and A-2186. With a few exceptions, outdoor weathering produced relatively small changes in color, Durometer hardness, or tensile properties compared with time passage. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Strong, Resilient, and Sustainable Aliphatic Polyester Thermoplastic Elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Annabelle; Kurokawa, Naruki; Hillmyer, Marc A. (UMM)

    2017-05-03

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) composed of ABA block polymers exhibit a wide variety of properties and are easily processable as they contain physical, rather than chemical, cross-links. Poly(γ-methyl-ε-caprolactone) (PγMCL) is an amorphous polymer with a low entanglement molar mass (Me = 2.9 kg mol–1), making it a suitable choice for tough elastomers. Incorporating PγMCL as the midblock with polylactide (PLA) end blocks (fLA = 0.17) results in TPEs with high stresses and elongations at break (σB = 24 ± 2 MPa and εB = 1029 ± 20%, respectively) and low levels of hysteresis. The use of isotactic PLA as the end blocks (fLLA = 0.17) increases the strength and toughness of the material (σB = 30 ± 4 MPa, εB = 988 ± 30%) due to its semicrystalline nature. This study aims to demonstrate how the outstanding properties in these sustainable materials are a result of the entanglements, glass transition temperature, segment–segment interaction parameter, and crystallinity, resulting in comparable properties to the commercially relevant styrene-based TPEs.

  4. Magnetoactive elastomer as an element of a magnetic retina fixator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, L. A.; Nadzharyan, T. A.; Alekhina, Yu A.; Stepanov, G. V.; Kazimirova, E. G.; Perov, N. S.; Kramarenko, E. Yu

    2017-09-01

    We explore the possibility of creating an effective retinal fixator on the basis of magnetoactive elastomers (MAEs) and systems of permanent magnets. MAEs consist of silicone elastomer matrix with embedded magnetic iron microparticles. We study theoretically and experimentally magnetic forces acting between MAE samples and permanent magnets in various configurations. The theoretical model is based around classical magnetostatics and Maxwell equations with different parameters accounting for peculiarities of the material and the setup. Approximation of the experimentally measured magnetization curves for MAE samples was used to find input parameters for the theoretical model. To test the model, we conducted a series of experimental measurements of magnetic forces accompanied by model predictions for the system of one cylindrical magnet and a cuboid MAE sample. Calculated dependences of the average pressure arising from magnetic interactions on the distance between the closest faces of MAE samples and a permanent magnet are in a good agreement with the experimental data. The proof on concept for smaller magnetic systems required for eye surgery includes data for 10 magnets configuration and a thin MAE band. This research demonstrates high prospects of using MAE as an element of a magnetic fixator for treatment of complicated retinal detachments.

  5. Biaxial experimental and analytical characterization of a dielectric elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Alexander; Doumit, Marc; Shaheen, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) have emerged as a strong contender for use in low-cost efficient actuators in multiple applications especially related to biomimetic and mobile-assistive devices. Dielectric elastomers (DE), a subcategory of these smart materials, have been of particular interest due to their large achievable deformation and favourable mechanical and electro-mechanical properties. Previous work has been completed to understand the behaviour of these materials; however, their properties require further investigation to properly integrate them into real-world applications. In this study, a biaxial tensile experimental evaluation of 3M™ VHB 4905 and VHB 4910 is presented with the purpose of illustrating the elastomers' transversely isotropic mechanical behaviours. These tests were applied to both tapes for equibiaxial stretch rates ranging between 0.025 and 0.300 s-1. Subsequently, a dynamic planar biaxial visco-hyperelastic constitutive relationship was derived from a Kelvin-Voigt rheological model and the general Hooke's law for transversely isotropic materials. The model was then fitted to the experimental data to obtain three general material parameters for either tapes. The model's ability to predict tensile stress response and internal energy dissipation, with respect to experimental data, is evaluated with good agreement. The model's ability to predict variations in mechanical behaviour due to changes in kinematic variables is then illustrated for different conditions.

  6. Novel Arrangements for High Performance and Durable Dielectric Elastomer Actuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runan Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper advances the design of Rod Pre-strained Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (RP-DEAs in their capability to generate comparatively large static actuation forces with increased lifetime via optimized electrode arrangements. RP-DEAs utilize thin stiff rods to constrain the expansion of the elastomer and maintain the in-plane pre-strain in the rod longitudinal direction. The aim is to study both the force output and the durability of the RP-DEA. Initial design of the RP-DEA had poor durability, however, it generated significantly larger force compared with the conventional DEA due to the effects of pre-strain and rod constraints. The durability study identifies the in-electro-active-region (in-AR lead contact and the non-uniform deformation of the structure as causes of pre-mature failure of the RP-DEA. An optimized AR configuration is proposed to avoid actuating undesired areas in the structure. The results show that with the optimized AR, the RP-DEA can be effectively stabilized and survive operation at least four times longer than with a conventional electrode arrangement. Finally, a Finite Element simulation was also performed to demonstrate that such AR design and optimization can be guided by analyzing the DEA structure in the state of pre-activation.

  7. A novel variable stiffness mechanism for dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Zou, Hong-Xiang; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a novel variable stiffness mechanism is proposed for the design of a variable stiffness dielectric elastomer actuator (VSDEA) which combines a flexible strip with a DEA in a dielectric elastomer minimum energy structure. The DEA induces an analog tuning of the transverse curvature of the strip, thus conveniently providing a voltage-controllable flexural rigidity. The VSDEA tends to be a fully flexible and compact structure with the advantages of simplicity and fast response. Both experimental and theoretical investigations are carried out to reveal the variable stiffness performances of the VSDEA. The effect of the clamped location on the bending stiffness of the VSDEA is analyzed, and then effects of the lengths, the loading points and the applied voltages on the bending stiffness are experimentally investigated. An analytical model is developed to verify the availability of this variable stiffness mechanism, and the theoretical results demonstrate that the bending stiffness of the VSDEA decreases as the applied voltage increases, which agree well with the experimental data. Moreover, the experimental results show that the maximum change of the relative stiffness can reach about 88.80%. It can be useful for the design and optimization of active variable stiffness structures and DEAs for soft robots, vibration control, and morphing applications.

  8. Resonant wave energy harvester based on dielectric elastomer generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Giacomo; Pietro Rosati Papini, Gastone; Righi, Michele; Forehand, David; Ingram, David; Vertechy, Rocco; Fontana, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) are a class of capacitive solid-state devices that employ highly stretchable dielectrics and conductors to convert mechanical energy into high-voltage direct-current electricity. Their promising performance in terms of convertible energy and power density has been mostly proven in quasi-static experimental tests with prescribed deformation. However, the assessment of their ability in harvesting energy from a dynamic oscillating source of mechanical energy is crucial to demonstrate their effectiveness in practical applications. This paper reports a first demonstration of a DEG system that is able to convert the oscillating energy carried by water waves into electricity. A DEG prototype is built using a commercial polyacrylate film (VHB 4905 by 3M) and an experimental campaign is conducted in a wave-flume facility, i.e. an artificial basin that makes it possible to generate programmed small-scale waves at different frequencies and amplitudes. In resonant conditions, the designed system demonstrates the delivery of a maximum of 0.87 W of electrical power output and 0.64 J energy generated per cycle, with corresponding densities per unit mass of dielectric elastomer of 197 W kg-1 and 145 J kg-1. Additionally, a notable maximum fraction of 18% of the input wave energy is converted into electricity. The presented results provide a promising demonstration of the operation and effectiveness of ocean wave energy converters based on elastic capacitive generators.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of energetic thermoplastic elastomers for propellant formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida M. Kawamoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of energetic ABA-type thermoplastic elastomers for propellant formulations has been carried out. Following the working plan elaborated, the synthesis and characterization of Poly 3- bromomethyl-3-methyl oxetane (PolyBrMMO, Poly 3- azidomethyl-3-methyl oxetane (PolyAMMO, Poly 3,3-bis-azidomethyl oxetane (PolyBAMO and Copolymer PolyBAMO/AMMO (by TDI end capping has been successfully performed. The thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs were synthesized using the chain elongation process PolyAMMO, GAP and PolyBAMO by diisocyanates. In this method 2.4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI is used to link block A (hard and mono- functional to B (soft and di-functional. For the hard A-block we used PolyBAMO and for the soft B-block we used PolyAMMO or GAP.This is a joint project set up, some years ago, between the Chemistry Division of the Institute of Aeronautics and Space (IAE - subordinated to the Brazilian Ministry of Defense - and the Fraunhofer Institut Chemische Technologie (ICT, in Germany. The products were characterized by different techniques as IR- and (1H,13CNMR spectroscopies, elemental and thermal analyses. New methodologies based on FT-IR analysis have been developed as an alternative for the determination of the molecular weight and CHNO content of the energetic polymers.

  10. Material Properties of Three Candidate Elastomers for Space Seals Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastrzyk, Marta B.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Oswald, Jay J.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    A next-generation docking system is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to support Constellation Space Exploration Missions to low Earth orbit (LEO), to the Moon, and to Mars. A number of investigations were carried out to quantify the properties of candidate elastomer materials for use in the main interface seal of the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). This seal forms the gas pressure seal between two mating spacecraft. Three candidate silicone elastomer compounds were examined: Esterline ELA-SA-401, Parker Hannifin S0383-70, and Parker Hannifin S0899-50. All three materials were characterized as low-outgassing compounds, per ASTM E595, so as to minimize the contamination of optical and solar array systems. Important seal properties such as outgas levels, durometer, tensile strength, elongation to failure, glass transition temperature, permeability, compression set, Yeoh strain energy coefficients, coefficients of friction, coefficients of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and diffusivity were measured and are reported herein.

  11. Characterization of the dynamic mechanical behavior of magneto - elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrittesser, B; Major, Z; Filipcsei, G

    2009-01-01

    Due to their magnetic field dependent mechanical response, polymeric materials filled with magnetic particles have become of major practical and theoretical interest. the dynamic-mechanical behavior of polydimethylsiloxane rubber filled with ferro-oxide with and without magnetic field has been investigated in this study. Specimens with different hardness and with two distinct orientations of the fillers (isotropy, anisotropy) were prepared. Dynamic mechanical analysis experiments were performed to determine the storage and loss modulus over a wide amplitude and frequency range with and without external magnetic field. In order to characterize the influence of the ferro-oxide filler particles, a permanent magnetic field to the specimen grips has been attached. The complex-, storage- and loss modulus and the loss factor values were determined. Finally, to compare the isotropic and anisotropic materials a magnetic stiffening factor (MSF) was defined and applied.

  12. Dielectric elastomers, with very high dielectric permittivity, based on silicone and ionic interpenetrating networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Hvilsted, Søren

    2015-01-01

    permittivity and the Young's modulus of the elastomer. One system that potentially achieves this involves interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs), based on commercial silicone elastomers and ionic networks from amino- and carboxylic acid-functional silicones. The applicability of these materials as DEs...... are obtained while dielectric breakdown strength and Young's modulus are not compromised. These good overall properties stem from the softening effect and very high permittivity of ionic networks – as high as ε′ = 7500 at 0.1 Hz – while the silicone elastomer part of the IPN provides mechanical integrity...

  13. A new soft dielectric silicone elastomer matrix with high mechanical integrity and low losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    2015-01-01

    Though dielectric elastomers (DEs) have many favourable properties, the issue of high driving voltages limits the commercial viability of the technology. Driving voltage can be lowered by decreasing the Young's modulus and increasing the dielectric permittivity of silicone elastomers. A decrease...... in Young's modulus, however, is often accompanied by the loss of mechanical stability and thereby the lifetime of the DE. A new soft elastomer matrix, with no loss of mechanical stability and high dielectric permittivity, was prepared through the use of alkyl chloride-functional siloxane copolymers...

  14. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelle, Klaus [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

    2013-08-25

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections. and it is important to understand the effect that new manufacturing methods of calcium carbonates have on the energy efficiency and paper production. Research conducted under this award showed that the new fiber filler composite material has the potential to increase the paper filler content by up to 5% without losing mechanical properties. Benefits of the technology can be summarized as follows for a 1% filler increase per metric ton of paper produced: (i) production cost savings over $12, (ii) Energy savings of 100,900 btu, (iii) CO{sub 2} emission savings of 33 lbs, and additional savings for wood preparation, pulping, recovery of 203593 btu with a 46lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per 1% filler increase. In addition the technology has the potential to save: (i) additional $3 per ton of bleached pulp produced, (ii) bleaching energy savings of 170,000 btu, (iii) bleaching CO{sub 2} emission savings of 39 lbs, and (iv) additional savings for replacing conventional bleaching chemicals with a sustainable bleaching chemical is estimated to be 900,000 btu with a 205 lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per ton of bleached pulp produced. All the above translates to a estimated annual savings for a 12% filler increase of 296 trillion buts or 51 million barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) or 13.7% of the industries energy demand. This can lead to a increase of renewable energy usage from 56% to close to 70% for the industry sector. CO{sub 2} emission of the industry at a 12% filler increase could be lowered by over 39 million tons annually

  15. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the

  16. Mechanical properties of fiber reinforced restorative composite with two distinguished fiber length distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Lippo; Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Säilynoja, Eija

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reinforcing effect of discontinuous glass fiber fillers with different length scales on fracture toughness and flexural properties of dental composite. Experimental fiber reinforced composite (Exp-FRC) was prepared by mixing 27wt% of discontinuous E-glass fibers having two different length scales (micrometer and millimeter) with various weight ratios (1:1, 2:1, 1:0 respectively) to the 23wt% of dimethacrylate based resin matrix and then 50wt% of silane treated silica filler were added gradually using high speed mixing machine. As control, commercial FRC and conventional posterior composites were used (everX Posterior, Alert, and Filtek Superme). Fracture toughness, work of fracture, flexural strength, and flexural modulus were determined for each composite material following ISO standards. The specimens (n=6) were dry stored (37°C for 2 days) before they were tested. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the microstructure of the experimental FRC composites. The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey׳s test. Level of significance was set at 0.05. ANOVA revealed that experimental composites reinforced with different fiber length scales (hybrid Exp-FRC) had statistically significantly higher mechanical performance of fracture toughness (4.7MPam(1/2)) and flexural strength (155MPa) (plength scales of discontinues fiber fillers (hybrid) with polymer matrix yielded improved mechanical performance compared to commercial FRC and conventional posterior composites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Nanocomposite with Controlled CNT Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingyu

    2005-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered an ideal reinforcing fillers in polymer nanocomposites because of their high aspect ratio, nanosize diameter, very low density and excellent physical properties (such as extremely high mechanical strength, high electrical and thermal conductivity). However, in order to achieve homogeneous dispersion of CNTs without damaging their extraordinary properties, non-covalent functionalization is an essential step. Our study of functionalization of CNTs via controlled polymer crystallization method has resulted in the formation of ``nano hybrid shish-kebab'' (NHSK), which is CNT periodically decorated with polymer lamellar crystals. Preliminary results show that the periodicity varies from 20-70nm. By tuning the experimental parameters such as concentration of polymer and crystallization temperature, hybrid polymer spherulite with CNT inside was achieved. This can be considered as CNT reinforced composite with ideal CNT dispersion. Both Nylon 6, 6 and PE were used as matrix materials. Structure and properties of this novel composite were studied using varieties of characterization techniques.

  18. The Use of the Fiberglass at the Reinforced Concrete Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Giuşcă

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The main constituent of the reinforced fiberglass concrete are: the glass fibers, the binder, the sand and the water. In order to change certain characteristics there can be used different types of additives of fillers. The fiberglass is used in the shape of beams and cords having the lengths comprised between 12 and 15 mm; the cutting is realized with different devices, which are designed, built and used by variant firms. The reinforced fiberglass concretes use the following binders: hydraulic binders - based on Portland cement, like the normal Portland cement, the Portland cement with additions, the fast - hardening cement (in Romania the RIM, the white and coloured cements; the alumina cements, non-hydraulic binders - the burnt plaster, the magnesite cement, clay.

  19. Inorganic-whisker-reinforced polymer composites synthesis, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Qiuju

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic-Whisker-Reinforced Polymer Composites: Synthesis, Properties and Applications gives a comprehensive presentation of inorganic microcrystalline fibers, or whiskers, a polymer composite filler. It covers whisker synthesis, surface modification, applications for reinforcing polymer-matrix composites, and analysis of resulting filled polymer composites. It focuses on calcium carbonate whiskers as a primary case study, introducing surface treatment methods for calcium carbonate whiskers and factors that influence them. Along with calcium carbonate, the book discusses potassium titanate and aluminum borate whiskers, which also comprise the new generation of inorganic whiskers. According to research results, composites filled by inorganic whiskers show improved strength, wear-resistance, thermal conductivity, and antistatic properties. It explains the importance of modifying polymer materials for use with inorganic whiskers and describes preparation and evaluation methods of polymers filled with inorganic ...

  20. Effect of Zirconia and Alumina Fillers on the Microstructure and Mechanical Strength of Dental Glass Ionomer Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Júlio C M; Silva, Joel B; Aladim, Andrea; Carvalho, Oscar; Nascimento, Rubens M; Silva, Filipe S; Martinelli, Antonio E; Henriques, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Glass-ionomer cements perform a protective effect on the dentin-pulp complex considering the F ions release and chemical bonding to the dental structures. On the other hand, those materials have poor physic-mechanical properties in comparison with the restorative resin composite. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of zirconia and/or alumina fillers on the microstructure and strength of a resin modified glass-ionomer cement after thermal cycling. An in vitro experimental study was carried out on 9 groups (n = 10) of cylindrical samples (6 x 4 mm) made from resin modified glass-ionomer (Vitremer, 3M, USA) with different contents of alumina and/or zirconia fillers. A nano-hybrid resin composite was tested as a control group. Samples were mechanically characterized by axial compressive tests and electron scanning microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry (EDS), before and after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling procedures were performed at 3000, 6000 and 10000 cycles in Fusayama´s artificial saliva at 5 and 60 (o)C. An improvement of compressive strength was noticed on glass-ionomer reinforced with alumina fillers in comparison with the commercial glass ionomer. SEM images revealed the morphology and distribution of alumina or zirconia in the microstructure of glass-ionomers. Also, defects such as cracks and pores were detected on the glass-ionomer cements. The materials tested were not affected by thermal cycling in artificial saliva. Addition of inorganic particles at nano-scale such as alumina can increase the mechanical properties of glass-ionomer cements. However, the presence of cracks and pores present in glass-ionomer can negatively affect the mechanical properties of the material because they are areas of stress concentration.

  1. The substitutability of reinforcers

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Leonard; Freed, Debra E.

    1993-01-01

    Substitutability is a construct borrowed from microeconomics that describes a continuum of possible interactions among the reinforcers in a given situation. Highly substitutable reinforcers, which occupy one end of the continuum, are readily traded for each other due to their functional similarity. Complementary reinforcers, at the other end of the continuum, tend to be consumed jointly in fairly rigid proportion, and therefore cannot be traded for one another except to achieve that proportio...

  2. Three-dimensional structure of olefinic thermoplastic elastomer blends using electron tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, P.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2005-01-01

    The present communication reports the first use of electron tomography in reconstructing the three-dimensional morphology in thermoplastic elastomer blends. The blends investigated were dynamically vulcanized blends of ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) rubber/poly(propylene)/oil and

  3. Development of procedures for calculating stiffness and damping of elastomers in engineering applications, part 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, A.; Burgess, G.; Zorzi, E.

    1980-01-01

    An elastomer damper was designed, tested, and compared with the performance of a hydraulic damper for a power transmission shaft. The six button Viton-70 damper was designed so that the elastomer damper or the hydraulic damper could be activated without upsetting the imbalance condition of the assembly. This permitted a direct comparison of damper effectiveness. The elastomer damper consistently performed better than the hydraulic mount and permitted stable operation of the power transmission shaft to speeds higher than obtained with the squeeze film damper. Tests were performed on shear specimens of Viton-79, Buna-N, EPDM, and Neoprene to determine performance limitations imposed by strain, temperature, and frequency. Frequencies of between 110 Hz and 1100 Hz were surveyed with imposed strains between 0.0005 and 0.08 at temperatures of 32 C, 66 C, and 80 C. A set of design curves was generated in a unified format for each of the elastomer materials.

  4. A simple method for reducing inevitable dielectric loss in high-permittivity dielectric elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Yu, Liyun; Mazurek, Piotr Stanislaw

    2016-01-01

    Commercial viability of dielectric elastomers (DEs) is currently limited by a few obstacles, including high driving voltages (in the kV range). Driving voltage can be lowered by either decreasing the Young's modulus or increasing the dielectric permittivity of silicone elastomers, or a combination...... thereof. A decrease in the Young's modulus, however, is often accompanied by a loss in mechanical stability, whereas increases in dielectric permittivity are usually followed by a large increase in dielectric loss followed by a decrease in breakdown strength and thereby the lifetime of the DE. A new soft...... elastomer matrix, with high dielectric permittivity and a low Young's modulus, aligned with no loss of mechanical stability, was prepared through the use of commercially available chloropropyl-functional silicone oil mixed into a tough commercial liquid silicone rubber silicone elastomer. The addition...

  5. A small biomimetic quadruped robot driven by multistacked dielectric elastomer actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Canh Toan; Phung, Hoa; Nguyen, Tien Dat; Lee, Choonghan; Kim, Uikyum; Lee, Donghyouk; Moon, Hyungpil; Koo, Jachoon; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Nam, Jae-do

    2014-01-01

    A kind of dielectric elastomer (DE) material, called ‘synthetic elastomer’, has been developed based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) to be used as a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA). By stacking single layers of synthetic elastomer, a linear actuator, called a multistacked actuator, is produced, and used by mechatronic and robotic systems to generate linear motion. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of the multistacked dielectric elastomer actuator in a biomimetic legged robot. A miniature robot driven by a biomimetic actuation system with four 2-DOF (two-degree-of-freedom) legged mechanisms is realized. Based on the experimental results, we evaluate the performance of the proposed robot and validate the feasibility of the multistacked actuator in a locomotion system as a replacement for conventional actuators. (paper)

  6. Effect of newly developed pigments and ultraviolet absorbers on the color change of pigmented silicone elastomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit G Kheur

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The newly developed pigment led to increased color stability as compared to commercially available pigments. Addition of UV stabilizer, Chimassorb led to a further reduction in color change of the pigmented elastomer.

  7. A new approach to modeling liquid crystal elastomers using phase field methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, W S; Wang, H

    2009-01-01

    A phase field modeling framework is developed to quantify domain structure evolution in nematic phase liquid crystal elastomers. A hyperelastic energy function is combined with liquid crystal energy relations to formulate a constitutive model for liquid crystal elastomers that undergo thermo-mechanical loads and finite deformation. A set of balance laws and constitutive relations are defined which lead to coupling behavior when finite deformation is introduced within the energy description. The theoretical framework is implemented numerically using a non-linear finite element phase field modeling approach which couples deformation of the elastomer network with microscopic liquid crystal domain structure evolution. A comparison of monodomain and polydomain behavior is analyzed to illustrate spontaneous deformation and polydomain evolution during heating and mechanical stretching. Many of the essential constitutive relations governing these materials are obtained without the use of explicit phenomenological coupling between the liquid crystals and the host elastomer

  8. Effect of cassava peel and cassava bagasse natural fillers on mechanical properties of thermoplastic cassava starch: Comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edhirej, Ahmed; Sapuan, S. M.; Jawaid, Mohammad; Zahari, Nur Ismarrubie; Sanyang, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Increased awareness of environmental and sustainability issues has generated increased interest in the use of natural fiber reinforced composites. This work focused on the use of cassava roots peel and bagasse as natural fillers of thermoplastic cassava starch (TPS) materials based on cassava starch. The effect of cassava bagasse (CB) and cassava peel (CP) content on the tensile properties of cassava starch (CS) biocomposites films was studied. The biocomposites films were prepared by casting technique using cassava starch (CS) as matrix and fructose as plasticizer. The CB and CP were added to improve the properties of the films. The addition of both fibers increased the tensile strength and modulus while decreased the elongation at break of the biocomposites films. Films containing CB showed higher tensile strength and modulus as compared to the films containing the same amount of CP. The addition of 6 % bagasse increased the modulus and maximum tensile stress to 581.68 and 10.78 MPa, respectively. Thus, CB is considered to be the most efficient reinforcing agent due to its high compatibility with the cassava starch. The use of CB and CP as reinforcement agents for CS thermoplastic cassava added value to these waste by-products and increase the suitability of CS composite films as environmentally friendly food packaging material.

  9. Thermal and mechanical behaviour of sub micron sized fly ash reinforced polyester resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantha Kumar, P.; Rajadurai, A.; Muthuramalingam, T.

    2018-04-01

    The utilization of particles reinforced resin matrix composites is being increased owing to its lower density and high strength to weight ratio. In the present study, an attempt has been made to synthesize fly ash particles reinforced polyester resin composite for engine cowling application. The thermal stability and mechanical behaviours such as hardness and flexural strength of the composite with 2, 3 and 4 weight % of reinforcement is studied and analyzed. The thermo gravimetric analysis indicates that the higher addition of reinforcement increases the decomposition temperature due to its refractory nature. It is also observed that the hardness increases with higher filler addition owing to the resistance of FA particles towards penetration. The flexural strength is found to increase up to the addition of 3% of FA particles, whereas the polyester resin composite prepared with 4% FA particles addition is observed to have low flexural strength owing to agglomeration of particles.

  10. The influence of lubrication on two body abrasive wear of sealing elastomers

    OpenAIRE

    Mofidi, Mohammad; Prakash, Braham

    2008-01-01

    Elastomeric seals are prone to failure caused by abrasion during sliding against rough surfaces. In this research, the two body abrasive wear of sealing elastomers in dry and lubricated conditions has been studied. A two body abrasive wear tester has been used to investigate the abrasive wear of the elastomers under varying test parameters. This test aparatus reciprocates a rectangular elastomeric sample against an abrasive paper wrapped around the circumferential surface of a wheel. The samp...

  11. Change in color of a maxillofacial prosthetic silicone elastomer, following investment in molds of different materials

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi, Tania; Kheur, Mohit; Coward, Trevor; Patel, Naimesha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In the authors? experience, the color of silicone elastomer following polymerization in molds made of gypsum products is slightly different from the color that was matched in the presence of the patient, before the silicone is packed. It is hypothesized that the investing materials and separating media have an effect on the color during the polymerization process of the silicone. Materials and Methods: This study compares and evaluates the change in color of silicone elastomer packed...

  12. Recovery characteristics of high damping elastomers used in seismic isolation bearings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R. F.

    1998-06-02

    The protection of nuclear and civil structures from the destructive effects of earthquakes has been the focus of intense research and development throughout the world. Seismic isolation is an effective means for reducing and even eliminating the devastating consequences of earthquakes on people, equipment and structures. Engineers have developed many devices for implementing the seismic isolation strategy and the most effective and economical ones have been identified through the test of time. One of these devices is the laminated elastomeric isolation bearing. The behavior of high damping elastomer bearings during several recent earthquakes has shown that they are a viable device for mitigating the effects of earthquakes. In this paper, results are presented from recent tests on two different elastomers. The first is a highly filled, high modulus, high damping elastomer and the second is a highly-filled, low modulus, high damping elastomer. The stiffness recovery characteristics of the high modulus elastomer subjected to beyond design basis strains and the results of seven years of aging on the low modulus elastomer are presented.

  13. Magnetically-tunable rebound property for variable elastic devices made of magnetic elastomer and polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Tsubasa; Endo, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Mika; Mitsumata, Tetsu

    2017-12-01

    A device consisting of a phase of magnetic elastomer, a phase of polyurethane foam (PUF), and permanent magnet was fabricated and the stress–strain curves for the two-phase magnetic elastomer were measured by a uniaxial compression measurement. A disk of magnetic elastomer was adhered on a disk of PUF by an adhesive agent. The PUF thickness was varied from 1 mm to 5 mm while the thickness of magnetic elastomers was constant at 5 mm. The stress at a strain of 0.15 for the two-phase magnetic elastomers was evaluated in the absence and in the presence of a magnetic field of 410 mT. The stress at 0 mT decreased remarkably with the PUF thickness due to the deformation of the PUF phase. On the other hand, the stress at 410 mT slightly decreased with the thickness; however, it kept high values even at high thickness. When the PUF thickness was 5 mm, the maximum stress increment with 45 times to the off-field stress was observed. An experiment using ping-pong balls demonstrated that the coefficient of restitution for the two-phase magnetic elastomers can be dramatically altered by the magnetic field.

  14. Liquid Crystal Elastomer Actuators from Anisotropic Porous Polymer Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Yu, Li; Yu, Meina; Zhao, Dongyu; Song, Ping; Chi, Hun; Guo, Lin; Yang, Huai

    2017-08-01

    Controlling self-assembly behaviors of liquid crystals is a fundamental issue for designing them as intelligent actuators. Here, anisotropic porous polyvinylidene fluoride film is utilized as a template to induce homogeneous alignment of liquid crystals. The mechanism of liquid crystal alignment induced by anisotropic porous polyvinylidene fluoride film is illustrated based on the relationship between the alignment behavior of liquid crystals and surface microstructure of anisotropic polyvinylidene fluoride film. Liquid crystal elastomer actuators with fast responsiveness, large strain change, and reversible actuation behaviors are achieved by the photopolymerization of liquid crystal monomer in liquid crystal cells coated with anisotropic porous films. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A solid-state dielectric elastomer switch for soft logic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, Nixon [Biomimetics Laboratory, Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Level 6, 70 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Slipher, Geoffrey A., E-mail: geoffrey.a.slipher.civ@mail.mil; Mrozek, Randy A. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); O' Brien, Benjamin M. [StretchSense, Ltd., 27 Walls Rd., Penrose, Auckland 1061 (New Zealand); Anderson, Iain A. [Biomimetics Laboratory, Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Level 6, 70 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); StretchSense, Ltd., 27 Walls Rd., Penrose, Auckland 1061 (New Zealand); Department of Engineering Science, School of Engineering, The University of Auckland, Level 3, 70 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2016-03-07

    In this paper, we describe a stretchable solid-state electronic switching material that operates at high voltage potentials, as well as a switch material benchmarking technique that utilizes a modular dielectric elastomer (artificial muscle) ring oscillator. The solid-state switching material was integrated into our oscillator, which self-started after 16 s and performed 5 oscillations at a frequency of 1.05 Hz with 3.25 kV DC input. Our materials-by-design approach for the nickel filled polydimethylsiloxane based switch has resulted in significant improvements over previous carbon grease-based switches in four key areas, namely, sharpness of switching behavior upon applied stretch, magnitude of electrical resistance change, ease of manufacture, and production rate. Switch lifetime was demonstrated to be in the range of tens to hundreds of cycles with the current process. An interesting and potentially useful strain-based switching hysteresis behavior is also presented.

  16. Stretchable biocompatible electronics by embedding electrical circuitry in biocompatible elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshahi, Amir; Salvo, Pietro; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Stretchable and curvilinear electronics has been used recently for the fabrication of micro systems interacting with the human body. The applications range from different kinds of implantable sensors inside the body to conformable electrodes and artificial skins. One of the key parameters in biocompatible stretchable electronics is the fabrication of reliable electrical interconnects. Although very recent literature has reported on the reliability of stretchable interconnects by cyclic loading, work still needs to be done on the integration of electrical circuitry composed of rigid components and stretchable interconnects in a biological environment. In this work, the feasibility of a developed technology to fabricate simple electrical circuits with meander shaped stretchable interconnects is presented. Stretchable interconnects are 200 nm thin Au layer supported with polyimide (PI). A stretchable array of light emitting diodes (LEDs) is embedded in biocompatible elastomer using this technology platform and it features a 50% total elongation.

  17. Enhanced adhesion of bioinspired nanopatterned elastomers via colloidal surface assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerboom, Sabine; Appel, Jeroen; Labonte, David; Federle, Walter; Sprakel, Joris; Kamperman, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    We describe a scalable method to fabricate nanopatterned bioinspired dry adhesives using colloidal lithography. Close-packed monolayers of polystyrene particles were formed at the air/water interface, on which polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was applied. The order of the colloidal monolayer and the immersion depth of the particles were tuned by altering the pH and ionic strength of the water. Initially, PDMS completely wetted the air/water interface outside the monolayer, thereby compressing the monolayer as in a Langmuir trough; further application of PDMS subsequently covered the colloidal monolayers. PDMS curing and particle extraction resulted in elastomers patterned with nanodimples. Adhesion and friction of these nanopatterned surfaces with varying dimple depth were studied using a spherical probe as a counter-surface. Compared with smooth surfaces, adhesion of nanopatterned surfaces was enhanced, which is attributed to an energy-dissipating mechanism during pull-off. All nanopatterned surfaces showed a significant decrease in friction compared with smooth surfaces. PMID:25392404

  18. The pressure-dependent MR effect of magnetorheological elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Xufeng; Qi, Min; Chen, Ran; Ma, Ning; Li, Jinhai; Ou, Jinping

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism for the influence of the normal pressure on the magnetic-induced shear modulus of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) was analyzed. Pre-structured MRE samples with 30% micro-sized (∼4 μm) carbonyl iron particles by volume fraction and silicon rubber were prepared under a constant magnetic field of 200 kA m −1 . A parallel-plate MR rheometer was used to conduct dynamic measurements. Under constant strain amplitude (1%) and frequency (10 Hz), different normal pressures (32–128 kPa) were applied on the samples to investigate the normal pressure-dependence properties of MREs. The results indicated that as the normal pressure increases, the magnetic-induced shear modulus of an MRE increases, while the relative MR effect decreases. (paper)

  19. Multiphase design of autonomic self-healing thermoplastic elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Kushner, Aaron M.; Williams, Gregory A.; Guan, Zhibin

    2012-06-01

    The development of polymers that can spontaneously repair themselves after mechanical damage would significantly improve the safety, lifetime, energy efficiency and environmental impact of man-made materials. Most approaches to self-healing materials require the input of external energy, healing agents, solvent or plasticizer. Despite intense research in this area, the synthesis of a stiff material with intrinsic self-healing ability remains a key challenge. Here, we show a design of multiphase supramolecular thermoplastic elastomers that combine high modulus and toughness with spontaneous healing capability. The designed hydrogen-bonding brush polymers self-assemble into a hard-soft microphase-separated system, combining the enhanced stiffness and toughness of nanocomposites with the self-healing capability of dynamic supramolecular assemblies. In contrast to previous self-healing polymers, this new system spontaneously self-heals as a single-component solid material at ambient conditions, without the need for any external stimulus, healing agent, plasticizer or solvent.

  20. Pattern formation in plastic liquid films on elastomers by ratcheting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiangshui; Yang, Jiawei; Jin, Lihua; Clarke, David R; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-04-20

    Plastic liquids, also known as Bingham liquids, retain their shape when loads are small, but flow when loads exceed a threshold. We discovered that plastic liquid films coated on elastomers develop wavy patterns under cyclic loads. As the number of cycles increases, the wavelength of the patterns remains unchanged, but the amplitude of the patterns increases and then saturates. Because the patterns develop progressively under cyclic loads, we call this phenomenon as "patterning by ratcheting". We observe the phenomenon in plastic liquids of several kinds, and studied the effects of thickness, the cyclic frequency of the stretch, and the range of the stretch. Finite element simulations show that the ratcheting phenomenon can occur in materials described by a commonly used model of elastic-plastic deformation.

  1. Thermoplastic Polyurethane Elastomer Nanocomposites: Morphology, Thermophysical, and Flammability Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai K. Ho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel materials based on nanotechnology creating nontraditional ablators are rapidly changing the technology base for thermal protection systems. Formulations with the addition of nanoclays and carbon nanofibers in a neat thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer (TPU were melt-compounded using twin-screw extrusion. The TPU nanocomposites (TPUNs are proposed to replace Kevlar-filled ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer rubber, the current state-of-the-art solid rocket motor internal insulation. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was conducted to study the char characteristics of the TPUNs at elevated temperatures. Specimens were examined to analyze the morphological microstructure during the pyrolysis reaction and in fully charred states. Thermophysical properties of density, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity of the different TPUN compositions were determined. To identify dual usage of these novel materials, cone calorimetry was employed to study the flammability properties of these TPUNs.

  2. Investigations on response time of magnetorheological elastomer under compression mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mi; Yu, Miao; Qi, Song; Fu, Jie

    2018-05-01

    For efficient fast control of vibration system with magnetorheological elastomer (MRE)-based smart device, the response time of MRE material is the key parameter which directly affects the control performance of the vibration system. For a step coil current excitation, this paper proposed a Maxwell behavior model with time constant λ to describe the normal force response of MRE, and the response time of MRE was extracted through the separation of coil response time. Besides, the transient responses of MRE under compression mode were experimentally investigated, and the effects of (i) applied current, (ii) particle distribution and (iii) compressive strain on the response time of MRE were addressed. The results revealed that the three factors can affect the response characteristic of MRE quite significantly. Besides the intrinsic importance for contributing to the response evaluation and effective design of MRE device, this study may conduce to the optimal design of controller for MRE control system.

  3. Optimization of large-scale fabrication of dielectric elastomer transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassouneh, Suzan Sager

    films. Currently, the films are contacted without adhesion, in order to yield double-sided corrugations, which in turn causes friction between the layers and thus reduces the lifespan of the transducer. Furthermore, air can be trapped in the interface, thereby causing a decrease in electrical breakdown...... electrodes on the corrugated surface, and due to these corrugated surfaces the metal electrodes maintain conductivities up to more than 100% strain of the elastomer film. The films are then laminated in multiple layers to fabricate DE transducers. However, the current manufacturing process is not trouble...... the PDMS surface through plasma treatment, which demonstrated that the laminates were slightly stiffer and more fragile in respect to tearing. The other route involved modifying the surfaces through plasma treatment and by adhering the layers, which showed to be a suitable method and allowed high...

  4. Mechanical stretch influence on lifetime of dielectric elastomer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannarelli, A.; Niasar, M. Ghaffarian

    2017-04-01

    Film pre-stretching is a widely adopted solution to improve dielectric strength of the DEA systems. However, to date, long term reliability of this solution has not been investigated. In this work it is explored how the dielectric elastomer lifetime is affected by film pre-stretching. The dielectric loss of soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films is studied for different stretch ratios by measuring tanδ. Additionally, time-to-breakdown was measured at DC electric stress for different stretch ratios. For this purpose, accelerated life test (ALT) were performed. The results obtained are compared with non-pre-stretched samples. This study suggests that no additional dielectric losses are caused by film stretching up to 80% of original dimensions.

  5. Influence of Network Structure on Glass Transition Temperature of Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bandzierz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that only intermolecular, elastically-effective crosslinks influence elastomer properties. The role of the intramolecular modifications of the polymer chains is marginalized. The aim of our study was the characterization of the structural parameters of cured elastomers, and determination of their influence on the behavior of the polymer network. For this purpose, styrene-butadiene rubbers (SBR, cured with various curatives, such as DCP, TMTD, TBzTD, Vulcuren®, DPG/S8, CBS/S8, MBTS/S8 and ZDT/S8, were investigated. In every series of samples a broad range of crosslink density was obtained, in addition to diverse crosslink structures, as determined by equilibrium swelling and thiol-amine analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA were used to study the glass transition process, and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS to investigate the size of the free volumes. For all samples, the values of the glass transition temperature (Tg increased with a rise in crosslink density. At the same time, the free volume size proportionally decreased. The changes in Tg and free volume size show significant differences between the series crosslinked with various curatives. These variations are explained on the basis of the curatives’ structure effect. Furthermore, basic structure-property relationships are provided. They enable the prediction of the effect of curatives on the structural parameters of the network, and some of the resulting properties. It is proved that the applied techniques—DSC, DMA, and PALS—can serve to provide information about the modifications to the polymer chains. Moreover, on the basis of the obtained results and considering the diversified curatives available nowadays, the usability of “part per hundred rubber” (phr unit is questioned.

  6. Synthesis and properties of butadiene-alpha-methylstyrene thermoplastic elastomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Firsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Butadiene-α-methylstyrene block – copolymer – a thermoplastic elastomer (TPE-R DMST occupies a special place among the ethylene – vinyl aromatic block copolymers. TPE-R DMST comprising as plastic – poly-α-methylstyrene unit and elastic – polybutadiene block. TPE-R DMST has high heat resistance, flexibility, abrasion resistance compared to butadiene-styrene thermoplastic elastomer (TPE DST. The synthesis of block copolymers of butadiene and α-methylstyrene was carried out. The process of polymerization the α-methylstyrene characterized the high speed of polymerization in polar medium and low reaction speed in hydrocarbon solvents. Anionic catalyst nbutyllithium (n-BuLi and high concentration – 60–80% α-methylstyrene in the mixture influenced by synthesis of the 1st block of TPE-R DMST, it’s technologically difficult. Found that the low temperature of polymerization α-methylstyrene (+61 o C, the reversibility of these reactions and the high concentration of residual monomer are very importance. It was revealed that a high polymerization rate α-methylstyrene can be achieved by conducting the reaction in a hydrocarbon solvent with polar additives compounds such as tetrahydrofuran (THF and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE. The conditions for the synthesis of P-DMST were developed. The kinetics of polymerization for the first DMST-P unit was obtained. Analysis of physical and mechanical properties DMST-P samples was conducted. The optimum content of bound α-methylstyrene block copolymer provides a good combination of properties in a relatively wide temperature range. The tensile strength at normal and elevated temperatures, the hardness and the stiffness of the polymer increased by increasing the content of bound α-methylstyrene. The elongation and the elasticity reduced by increasing the content of bound α-methylstyrene.

  7. Synthesis of thermoplastic poly(ester-olefin elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanasijević Branka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of thermoplastic poly(ester-olefin elastomers, based on poly(ethylene-stat-butylene, HO-PEB-OH, as the soft segment and poly (butylene terephthalate, PBT, as the hard segment, were synthesized by a catalyzed transesterification reaction in solution. The incorporation of soft hydrogenated poly(butadiene segments into the copolyester backbone was accomplished by the polycondensation of α, ω-dihydroxyl telechelic HO-PEB-OH, (PEB Mn = 3092 g/mol with 1,4-butanediol (BD and dimethyl terephthalate (DMT in the presence of a 50 wt-% high boiling solvent i.e., 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. The molar ratio of the starting comonomers was selected to result in a constant hard to soft weight ratio of 60:40. The synthesis was optimized in terms of both the concentration of catalyst, tetra-n-butyl-titanate (Ti(OBu4, and stabilizer, N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD, as well as the reaction time. It was found that the optimal catalyst concentration (Ti(OBu4 for the synthesis of these thermoplastic elastomers was 1.0 mmol/mol ester and the optimal DPPD concentration was 1.0 wt-%. The extent of the reaction was followed by measuring the inherent viscosity of the reaction mixture. The effectiveness of the incorporation of the soft segments into the copolymer chains was proved by Soxhlet extraction with chloroform. The molecular structures, composition and the size of the synthesized poly(ester-butylenes were verified by 1H NMR spectroscopy, viscometry of dilute solutions and the complex dynamic melt viscosity. The thermal properties of poly(ester-olefins were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The degree of crystallinity was also determined by DSC. The thermal and thermo-oxidative stability were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The rheological properties of poly(ester-olefins were investigated by dynamic mechanical spectroscopy in the melt and solid state.

  8. Toughening mechanism in elastomer-modified epoxy resins, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, A. F.; Pearson, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The role of matrix ductility on the toughenability and toughening mechanism of elastomer-modified DGEBRA epoxies was investigated. Matrix ductility was varied by using epoxide resins of varying epoxide monomer molecular weights. These epoxide resins were cured using 4,4' diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) and, in some cases, modified with 10% HYCAR(r)CTBN 1300X8. Fracture roughness values for the neat epoxies were found to be almost independent on the monomer molecular weight of the epoxide resin used. However, it was found that the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified epoxies was very dependent upon the epoxide monomer molecular weight. Tensile dilatometry indicated that the toughening mechanism, when present, is similar to the mechanisms found for the piperidine cured epoxies in Part 1. SEM and OM corroborate this finding. Dynamic mechanical studies were conducted to shed light on the toughenability of the epoxies. The time-dependent small strain behavior of these epoxies were separated into their bulk and shear components. The bulk component is related to brittle fracture, whereas the shear component is related to yielding. It can be shown that the rates of shear and bulk strain energy buildup for a given stress are uniquely determined by the values of Poisson's ratio, nu. It was found that nu increases as the monomer molecular weight of the epoxide resin used increases. This increase in nu can be associated with the low temperature beta relaxation. The effect of increasing cross-link density is to shift the beta relaxation to higher temperatures and to decrease the magnitude of the beta relaxation. Thus, increasing cross-link density decreases nu and increases the tendency towards brittle fracture.

  9. Chitosan nanocomposites based on distinct inorganic fillers for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Duarte; Mano, João F; Paiva, Maria C; Alves, Natália M

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CHI), a biocompatible and biodegradable polysaccharide with the ability to provide a non-protein matrix for tissue growth, is considered to be an ideal material in the biomedical field. However, the lack of good mechanical properties limits its applications. In order to overcome this drawback, CHI has been combined with different polymers and fillers, leading to a variety of chitosan-based nanocomposites. The extensive research on CHI nanocomposites as well as their main biomedical applications are reviewed in this paper. An overview of the different fillers and assembly techniques available to produce CHI nanocomposites is presented. Finally, the properties of such nanocomposites are discussed with particular focus on bone regeneration, drug delivery, wound healing and biosensing applications.

  10. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksy, Mariusz; Szwarc-Rzepka, Karolina; Heneczkowski, Maciej; Oliwa, Rafał; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2014-08-22

    A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP) with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS) curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM.

  11. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Oleksy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM.

  12. Filler segmentation of SEM paper images based on mathematical morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Kbir, M; Benslimane, Rachid; Princi, Elisabetta; Vicini, Silvia; Pedemonte, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    Recent developments in microscopy and image processing have made digital measurements on high-resolution images of fibrous materials possible. This helps to gain a better understanding of the structure and other properties of the material at micro level. In this paper SEM image segmentation based on mathematical morphology is proposed. In fact, paper models images (Whatman, Murillo, Watercolor, Newsprint paper) selected in the context of the Euro Mediterranean PaperTech Project have different distributions of fibers and fillers, caused by the presence of SiAl and CaCO3 particles. It is a microscopy challenge to make filler particles in the sheet distinguishable from the other components of the paper surface. This objectif is reached here by using switable strutural elements and mathematical morphology operators.

  13. [Effect of fillers on the strength of silicone systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snejdrová, E; Zelenka, J; Rehula, M

    2002-07-01

    The present paper examines the strength behaviour of addition silicone systems composed of Lukopren A 6200 and three inorganic fillers (Skron SF 600, Cab-O-Sil LM 150, sodium chloride) in different concentrations and particle sizes. The tensile strength sigma (MPa) and the relative lengthening of samples on rupture epsilon (%) were measured. With increasing concentration of the filler in the system relative lengthening of matrices is decreased. This trend corresponds with the theoretical hypotheses and it is understandable also with regard to the fact that the filler, in comparison with silicone rubber, possesses very low ductility. An addition of Sikron increases tensile strength of samples. Dependence of tensile strength on the amount of Sikron in the system is linear. This behaviour is typical of fibrous composites and the composites with high adhesion between the filler and matrix. Concentrations of Cab-O-Sil up to 5% did not exert an effect on tensile strength. An important increase in strength was shown only by the systems containing 10% of Cab-O-Sil. Experimental dependence of tensile strength on the amount of Cab-O-Sil in the system can be described by the equation for composites with Hookean behaviour till destruction. The effect of sodium chloride on tensile strength is more complicated. In the systems with NaCl particles of 20 microns, strength is not practically changed up to a content of 40% of NaCl in the system. In larger size fractions, tensile strength is decreased, and with a change in particle size, shape is probably changed as well.

  14. Continuous Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with stress and stiffness estimates of continuous reinforced concrete beams with different stiffnesses for negative and positive moments e.g. corresponding to different reinforcement areas in top and bottom. Such conditions are often met in practice.The moment distribution...

  15. Reinforced Airfoil Shaped Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    and surrounds an internal volume of the body, a distance member that is connected to the facing inside the body and extends from the facing and into the internal volume of the body, and at least one reinforcing member that operates in tension for reinforcing the facing against inward deflections...

  16. Oxidation of nano-reinforced polyolefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Castro, G.G.

    2010-11-01

    Nano-composite materials attract search due to their improvements on barrier properties by incorporating low level of nano-filler of 5%w. Nowadays, organically modified montmorillonite (MMT-O) is the most used filler due to its high aspect ratio which permits stronger clay/polymer interactions. If nano-reinforced materials are highly performing, the ways in which clay presence affects polyolefin durability have not being subject of a rigorous study, thus they are not yet clear. Our goal was to examine unstabilized clay polypropylene and unstabilized clay polyethylene nano composites to get a better comprehension of the clay effects on their thermo-oxidation process under low temperatures. The effects induced by a dual physic-chemical nature of the clay were explored. The problem was tackled from both experimental and theoretical point of views for degradation process not controlled and controlled by oxygen diffusion (homogenous and heterogeneous respectively). It seems that MMT-O speeds up oxidation. This phenomenon was modeled by adding a catalytic reaction between metallic particles initially present in the MMT-O and hydroperoxide groups (main responsible of oxidation). Regarding the oxygen permeability two situations were confronted: for the clay polypropylene system a decrease of 45% of oxygen permeability was measured. On the other hand, no variation was found for the polyethylene case. This effect was attributed to the fact that polyethylene nano-composite reached a blend morphology less developed than those of the polypropylene nano-composite. Kinetics and oxidation products profiles across the sample thickness were simulated for both systems by coupling oxidation reactions with oxygen diffusion equations. For the polyethylene case, the effects induced by oxidation on molar mass and crystalline morphology were also simulated. Finally, based on a structure-property relationship, simulations of mechanic modulus profiles were performed for the heterogeneous

  17. Investigation of Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Hybrid Composites Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes and Micrometer-Sized Silica Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Yun; You, Byeong Il; Ahn, Ji Ho; Lee, Gyo Woo [Chonbuk Nat’l Univ., Junju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, to enhance the electrical insulation of composite specimens in addition to the improved mechanical properties, the epoxy composite were reinforced with carbon nanotubes and silica particles. Tensile strength, Young's modulus, dynamic mechanical behavior, and electrical resistivity of the specimens were measured with varied contents of the two fillers. The mechanical and electrical properties were discussed, and the experimental results related to the mechanical properties of the specimens were compared with those from several micromechanics models. The hybrid composites specimens with 0.6 wt% of carbon nanotubes and 50 wt% of silica particles showed improved mechanical properties, with increase in tensile strength and Young's modulus up to 11% and 35%, respectively, with respect to those of the baseline specimen. The electrical conductivity of the composite specimens with carbon nanotubes filler also improved. Further, the electrical insulation of the hybrid composites specimens with the two fillers improved in addition to the improvement in mechanical properties.

  18. Thermal Degradation of Filler/PP Composite and Its Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Hiroshi; Funami, Fumiyasu; Yasuda, Naoki; Nomura, Manabu; Yui, Hiroshi; Ikuta, Nobuo

    To examine thermal degradation accelerated by filling inorganic particles in polypropylene (PP), the composites were made with three types of inorganic powders : talc, magnesium hydroxide, and mica. They were easily degraded with the fillers in this order in the thermal aging test. A commercial heat resistance agent, ‘Plenlizer MK-400’, was added while making the composites. The degradation resistance of the agent remarkably appeared in the reverse order. That is, thermal degradation was most depressed in talc-filled composite with the agent. In another experience, soxhlet extraction was carried out to the filler with an organic solvent, o-xylene, that was able to dissolve PP. A lot of inorganic ions were detected in the extractant. In particular, the detected amount of aluminum ion increased in the order of talc, magnesium hydroxide, and mica. This order was the same as the fillers indicated by the degree of degradation. Infrared analysis of the agent with inorganic ions in chloroform showed that the peaks due to the agent were much stronger with aluminum ion than those with iron ion. These results suggested that a cause of degradation was aluminum ion dispersed from particles to PP matrix during the molding.

  19. The Effect of Particulate Fillers on Hardness of Polymer Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Dulebova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of polymeric composites can be quite challenging because the samples are often consist of complex nature due to the presence of various groups of additives, compounding ingredients, and fillers. In this contribution, changes of hardness of Polypropylene (PP composites during and after exposure materials to UV chamber and low temperatures were investigated. The particulate fillers talc and chalk in weight fraction from 10 to 50 % and montmorillonite (MMT in weight fraction 4 % were used as fillers in the polypropylene matrix. The composites were mixed in the extruder while the length, diameter of screw, as well as number of grooves in the feed zone were changed. Influence of ageing – UV radiation and low temperature was examined by change of Shore hardness after 360 h and 720 h of exposure. According to the performed tests we can conclude that tested materials may be exposed to UV radiation and low temperature of -20 ºC without significant changes of hardness.

  20. Nanostructures and dynamics of macromolecules bound to attractive filler surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Tad; Barkley, Deborah; Jiang, Naisheng; Endoh, Maya; Masui, Tomomi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Michihiro; Satija, Sushil; Taniguchi, Takashi

    We report in-situ nanostructures and dynamics of polybutadiene (PB) chains bound to carbon black (CB) fillers (the so-called ``bound polymer layer (BPL)'') in a good solvent. The BPL on the CB fillers were extracted by solvent leaching of a CB-filled PB compound and subsequently dispersed in deuterated toluene to label the BPL for small-angle neutron scattering and neutron spin echo techniques. Intriguingly, the results demonstrate that the BPL is composed of two regions regardless of molecular weights of PB: the inner unswollen region of ~ 0.5 nm thick and outer swollen region where the polymer chains display a parabolic profile with a diffuse tail. This two-layer formation on the filler surface is similar to that reported for polymer chains adsorbed on planar substrates from melts. In addition, the results show that the dynamics of the swollen bound chains can be explained by the so-called ``breathing mode'' and is generalized with the thickness of the swollen BPL. Furthermore, we will discuss how the breathing collective dynamics is affected by the presence of polymer chains in a matrix solution. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.