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Sample records for filament binding elasticity

  1. Elasticity of a Filament with Kinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein

    2017-12-01

    Using the wormlike chain model, we analytically study the elasticity of a filament with kinks. We calculate the position probability density function and the force constant of a kinked filament with a general kink angle. Then, using the mathematical induction, we obtain the positional-orientational probability density function of a filament with regular kinks. For this filament, we compute the force constant in two different directions. In longitudinal direction of the filament, the force constant is proportional to the inverse of the number of the segments, i.e., 1 / m, while in transverse direction, it is proportional to 1/m^3.

  2. The elastic modulus of isolated polytetrafluoroethylene filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Drawe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report vibrational Raman spectra of small extended perfluoro-n-alkanes (CnF2n+2 with n = 6, 8–10, 12–14 isolated in supersonic jet expansions and use wavenumbers of longitudinal acoustic vibrations to extrapolate the elastic modulus of cold, isolated polytetrafluoroethylene filaments. The derived value E = 209(10 GPa defines an upper limit for the elastic modulus of the perfectly crystalline, noninteracting polymer at low temperatures and serves as a benchmark for quantum chemical predictions.

  3. Bundling of elastic filaments induced by hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yi; Page, William; Poole, Robert J.; Lauga, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Peritrichous bacteria swim in viscous fluids by rotating multiple helical flagellar filaments. As the bacterium swims forward, all its flagella rotate in synchrony behind the cell in a tight helical bundle. When the bacterium changes its direction, the flagellar filaments unbundle and randomly reorient the cell for a short period of time before returning to their bundled state and resuming swimming. This rapid bundling and unbundling is, at its heart, a mechanical process whereby hydrodynamic interactions balance with elasticity to determine the time-varying deformation of the filaments. Inspired by this biophysical problem, we present in this paper what is perhaps the simplest model of bundling whereby two or more straight elastic filaments immersed in a viscous fluid rotate about their centerline, inducing rotational flows which tend to bend the filaments around each other. We derive an integrodifferential equation governing the shape of the filaments resulting from mechanical balance in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number. We show that such equation may be evaluated asymptotically analytically in the long-wavelength limit, leading to a local partial differential equation governed by a single dimensionless bundling number. A numerical study of the dynamics predicted by the model reveals the presence of two configuration instabilities with increasing bundling numbers: first to a crossing state where filaments touch at one point and then to a bundled state where filaments wrap along each other in a helical fashion. We also consider the case of multiple filaments and the unbundling dynamics. We next provide an intuitive physical model for the crossing instability and show that it may be used to predict analytically its threshold and adapted to address the transition to a bundling state. We then use a macroscale experimental implementation of the two-filament configuration in order to validate our theoretical predictions and obtain excellent agreement. This long

  4. Growth-induced axial buckling of a slender elastic filament embedded in an isotropic elastic matrix

    KAUST Repository

    O'Keeffe, Stephen G.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the problem of an axially loaded, isotropic, slender cylinder embedded in a soft, isotropic, outer elastic matrix. The cylinder undergoes uniform axial growth, whilst both the cylinder and the surrounding elastic matrix are confined between two rigid plates, so that this growth results in axial compression of the cylinder. We use two different modelling approaches to estimate the critical axial growth (that is, the amount of axial growth the cylinder is able to sustain before it buckles) and buckling wavelength of the cylinder. The first approach treats the filament and surrounding matrix as a single 3-dimensional elastic body undergoing large deformations, whilst the second approach treats the filament as a planar, elastic rod embedded in an infinite elastic foundation. By comparing the results of these two approaches, we obtain an estimate of the foundation modulus parameter, which characterises the strength of the foundation, in terms of the geometric and material properties of the system. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Actin filaments growing against an elastic membrane: Effect of membrane tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Raj Kumar; Chatterjee, Sakuntala

    2018-03-01

    We study the force generation by a set of parallel actin filaments growing against an elastic membrane. The elastic membrane tries to stay flat and any deformation from this flat state, either caused by thermal fluctuations or due to protrusive polymerization force exerted by the filaments, costs energy. We study two lattice models to describe the membrane dynamics. In one case, the energy cost is assumed to be proportional to the absolute magnitude of the height gradient (gradient model) and in the other case it is proportional to the square of the height gradient (Gaussian model). For the gradient model we find that the membrane velocity is a nonmonotonic function of the elastic constant μ and reaches a peak at μ =μ* . For μ state and the membrane energy keeps increasing with time. For the Gaussian model, the system always reaches a steady state and the membrane velocity decreases monotonically with the elastic constant ν for all nonzero values of ν . Multiple filaments give rise to protrusions at different regions of the membrane and the elasticity of the membrane induces an effective attraction between the two protrusions in the Gaussian model which causes the protrusions to merge and a single wide protrusion is present in the system. In both the models, the relative time scale between the membrane and filament dynamics plays an important role in deciding whether the shape of elasticity-velocity curve is concave or convex. Our numerical simulations agree reasonably well with our analytical calculations.

  6. Superhelical architecture of the myosin filament-linking protein myomesin with unusual elastic properties.

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    Nikos Pinotsis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Active muscles generate substantial mechanical forces by the contraction/relaxation cycle, and, to maintain an ordered state, they require molecular structures of extraordinary stability. These forces are sensed and buffered by unusually long and elastic filament proteins with highly repetitive domain arrays. Members of the myomesin protein family function as molecular bridges that connect major filament systems in the central M-band of muscle sarcomeres, which is a central locus of passive stress sensing. To unravel the mechanism of molecular elasticity in such filament-connecting proteins, we have determined the overall architecture of the complete C-terminal immunoglobulin domain array of myomesin by X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, solution X-ray scattering, and atomic force microscopy. Our data reveal a dimeric tail-to-tail filament structure of about 360 Å in length, which is folded into an irregular superhelical coil arrangement of almost identical α-helix/domain modules. The myomesin filament can be stretched to about 2.5-fold its original length by reversible unfolding of these linkers, a mechanism that to our knowledge has not been observed previously. Our data explain how myomesin could act as a highly elastic ribbon to maintain the overall structural organization of the sarcomeric M-band. In general terms, our data demonstrate how repetitive domain modules such as those found in myomesin could generate highly elastic protein structures in highly organized cell systems such as muscle sarcomeres.

  7. The self-assembly, elasticity, and dynamics of cardiac thin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassieri, M; Evans, R M L; Barbu-Tudoran, L; Trinick, J; Waigh, T A

    2008-03-15

    Solutions of intact cardiac thin filaments were examined with transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and particle-tracking microrheology. The filaments self-assembled in solution with a bell-shaped distribution of contour lengths that contained a population of filaments of much greater length than the in vivo sarcomere size ( approximately 1 mum) due to a one-dimensional annealing process. Dynamic semiflexible modes were found in DLS measurements at fast timescales (12.5 ns-0.0001 s). The bending modulus of the fibers is found to be in the range 4.5-16 x 10(-27) Jm and is weakly dependent on calcium concentration (with Ca2+ > or = without Ca2+). Good quantitative agreement was found for the values of the fiber diameter calculated from transmission electron microscopy and from the initial decay of DLS correlation functions: 9.9 nm and 9.7 nm with and without Ca2+, respectively. In contrast, at slower timescales and high polymer concentrations, microrheology indicates that the cardiac filaments act as short rods in solution according to the predictions of the Doi-Edwards chopsticks model (viscosity, eta approximately c(3), where c is the polymer concentration). This differs from the semiflexible behavior of long synthetic actin filaments at comparable polymer concentrations and timescales (elastic shear modulus, G' approximately c(1.4), tightly entangled) and is due to the relative ratio of the contour lengths ( approximately 30). The scaling dependence of the elastic shear modulus on the frequency (omega) for cardiac thin filaments is G' approximately omega(3/4 +/- 0.03), which is thought to arise from flexural modes of the filaments.

  8. Mechanosensitive kinetic preference of actin-binding protein to actin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-04-01

    The kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments is altered by external forces on the filament. Such an altered kinetic preference is largely responsible for remodeling the actin cytoskeletal structure in response to intracellular forces. During remodeling, actin-binding proteins and actin filaments interact under isothermal conditions, because the cells are homeostatic. In such a temperature homeostatic state, we can rigorously and thermodynamically link the chemical potential of actin-binding proteins to stresses on the actin filaments. From this relationship, we can construct a physical model that explains the force-dependent kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments. To confirm the model, we have analyzed the mechanosensitive alternation of the kinetic preference of Arp2/3 and cofilin to actin filaments. We show that this model captures the qualitative responses of these actin-binding proteins to the forces, as observed experimentally. Moreover, our theoretical results demonstrate that, depending on the structural parameters of the binding region, actin-binding proteins can show different kinetic responses even to the same mechanical signal tension, in which the double-helix nature of the actin filament also plays a critical role in a stretch-twist coupling of the filament.

  9. Twist and Stretch of Helices Explained via the Kirchhoff-Love Rod Model of Elastic Filaments

    KAUST Repository

    Đuričković, Bojan

    2013-09-05

    In various single-molecule experiments, a chiral polymer, such as DNA, is simultaneously pulled and twisted. We address an elementary but fundamental question raised by various authors: does the molecule overwind or unwind under tension? We show that within the context of the classic Kirchhoff-Love rod model of elastic filaments, both behaviors are possible, depending on the precise constitutive relations of the polymer. More generally, our analysis provides an effective linear response theory for helical structures that relates axial force and axial torque to axial translation and rotation. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  10. An efficient immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for the hydrodynamic interaction of elastic filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Luo, Haoxiang; Zhu, Luoding; Liao, James C.; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2012-01-01

    We have introduced a modified penalty approach into the flow-structure interaction solver that combines an immersed boundary method (IBM) and a multi-block lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to model an incompressible flow and elastic boundaries with finite mass. The effect of the solid structure is handled by the IBM in which the stress exerted by the structure on the fluid is spread onto the collocated grid points near the boundary. The fluid motion is obtained by solving the discrete lattice Boltzmann equation. The inertial force of the thin solid structure is incorporated by connecting this structure through virtual springs to a ghost structure with the equivalent mass. This treatment ameliorates the numerical instability issue encountered in this type of problems. Thanks to the superior efficiency of the IBM and LBM, the overall method is extremely fast for a class of flow-structure interaction problems where details of flow patterns need to be resolved. Numerical examples, including those involving multiple solid bodies, are presented to verify the method and illustrate its efficiency. As an application of the present method, an elastic filament flapping in the Kármán gait and the entrainment regions near a cylinder is studied to model fish swimming in these regions. Significant drag reduction is found for the filament, and the result is consistent with the metabolic cost measured experimentally for the live fish. PMID:23564971

  11. Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin on actin during thin filament activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, William; Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Our thesis is that thin filament function can only be fully understood and muscle regulation then elucidated if atomic structures of the thin filament are available to reveal the positions of tropomyosin on actin in all physiological states. After all, it is tropomyosin influenced by troponin that regulates myosin-crossbridge cycling on actin and therefore controls contraction in all muscles. In addition, we maintain that a complete appreciation of thin filament activation also requires that the mechanical properties of tropomyosin itself are recognized and then related to the effect of myosin-association on actin. Taking the Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin into account, coupled with our electron microscopy structures and computational chemistry, we propose a comprehensive mechanism for tropomyosin regulatory movement over the actin filament surface that explains the cooperative muscle activation process. In fact, well-known point mutations of critical amino acids on the actin-tropomyosin binding interface disrupt Gestalt-binding and are associated with a number of inherited myopathies. Moreover, dysregulation of tropomyosin may also be a factor that interferes with the gatekeeping operation of non-muscle tropomyosin in the controlling interactions of a wide variety of cellular actin-binding proteins. The clinical relevance of Gestalt-binding is discussed in articles by the Marston and the Gunning groups in this special journal issue devoted to the impact of tropomyosin on biological systems.

  12. Binding and assembly of actin filaments by plasma membranes from dictyostelium discoideum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.A.; Luna, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of native, 125 I-Bolton-Hunter-labeled actin to purified Dictyostelium discoideum plasma membranes was measured using a sedimentation assay. Binding was saturable only in the presence of the actin capping protein, gelsolin. The binding curves were sigmoidal, indicating positive cooperativity at low actin concentrations. This cooperativity appeared to be due to actin-actin associations during polymerization, since phalloidin converted the curve to a hyperbolic shape. This membrane-bound actin stained with rhodamine-phalloidin and was cross-linked by m-maleimidobenzoyl succinimide ester, a bifunctional cross-linker, into multimers with the same pattern observed for cross-linked F-actin. The authors conclude that D. discoideum plasma membranes bind actin specifically and saturably and that these membranes organize actin into filaments below the normal critical concentration for polymerization. This interaction probably occurs between multiple binding sites on the membrane and the side of the actin filament, and may be related to the clustering of membrane proteins

  13. Probing the flexibility of tropomyosin and its binding to filamentous actin using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Barua, Bipasha; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E

    2013-10-15

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is a coiled-coil protein that binds to filamentous actin (F-actin) and regulates its interactions with actin-binding proteins like myosin by moving between three positions on F-actin (the blocked, closed, and open positions). To elucidate the molecular details of Tm flexibility in relation to its binding to F-actin, we conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations for both Tm alone and Tm-F-actin complex in the presence of explicit solvent (total simulation time >400 ns). Based on the simulations, we systematically analyzed the local flexibility of the Tm coiled coil using multiple parameters. We found a good correlation between the regions with high local flexibility and a number of destabilizing regions in Tm, including six clusters of core alanines. Despite the stabilization by F-actin binding, the distribution of local flexibility in Tm is largely unchanged in the absence and presence of F-actin. Our simulations showed variable fluctuations of individual Tm periods from the closed position toward the open position. In addition, we performed Tm-F-actin binding calculations based on the simulation trajectories, which support the importance of Tm flexibility to Tm-F-actin binding. We identified key residues of Tm involved in its dynamic interactions with F-actin, many of which have been found in recent mutational studies to be functionally important, and the rest of which will make promising targets for future mutational experiments. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional display of platelet-binding VWF fragments on filamentous bacteriophage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Yee

    Full Text Available von Willebrand factor (VWF tethers platelets to sites of vascular injury via interaction with the platelet surface receptor, GPIb. To further define the VWF sequences required for VWF-platelet interaction, a phage library displaying random VWF protein fragments was screened against formalin-fixed platelets. After 3 rounds of affinity selection, DNA sequencing of platelet-bound clones identified VWF peptides mapping exclusively to the A1 domain. Aligning these sequences defined a minimal, overlapping segment spanning P1254-A1461, which encompasses the C1272-C1458 cystine loop. Analysis of phage carrying a mutated A1 segment (C1272/1458A confirmed the requirement of the cystine loop for optimal binding. Four rounds of affinity maturation of a randomly mutagenized A1 phage library identified 10 and 14 unique mutants associated with enhanced platelet binding in the presence and absence of botrocetin, respectively, with 2 mutants (S1370G and I1372V common to both conditions. These results demonstrate the utility of filamentous phage for studying VWF protein structure-function and identify a minimal, contiguous peptide that bind to formalin-fixed platelets, confirming the importance of the VWF A1 domain with no evidence for another independently platelet-binding segment within VWF. These findings also point to key structural elements within the A1 domain that regulate VWF-platelet adhesion.

  15. Direct measurement of elastic modulus of Nb 3Sn using extracted filaments from superconducting composite wire and resin impregnation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Tanaka, M.; Sugano, M.; Ochiai, S.; Miyashita, K.

    2006-10-01

    Young's modulus of Nb3Sn filaments in Nb3Sn/Cu superconducting composite wire was investigated in detail. Nb3Sn filaments were first extracted from composite wire. Nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid were used to remove copper stabilizer, Nb3Sn/Nb barrier and bronze. Then, Nb3Sn filaments were impregnated with epoxy resin to form simple filament bundle composite rods. A large difference in Young's moduli of filaments and epoxy resin enhance the accuracy of the measurement of Nb3Sn filament modulus. The ratio of Nb3Sn to Nb in filaments and the number of filaments in the fiber bundle composite rods were used in the final calculation of the Young's modulus of Nb3Sn. The obtained modulus of 127 GPa was the lower bound of the already reported values.

  16. Direct measurement of elastic modulus of Nb3Sn using extracted filaments from superconducting composite wire and resin impregnation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Tanaka, M.; Sugano, M.; Ochiai, S.; Miyashita, K.

    2006-01-01

    Young's modulus of Nb 3 Sn filaments in Nb 3 Sn/Cu superconducting composite wire was investigated in detail. Nb 3 Sn filaments were first extracted from composite wire. Nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid were used to remove copper stabilizer, Nb 3 Sn/Nb barrier and bronze. Then, Nb 3 Sn filaments were impregnated with epoxy resin to form simple filament bundle composite rods. A large difference in Young's moduli of filaments and epoxy resin enhance the accuracy of the measurement of Nb 3 Sn filament modulus. The ratio of Nb 3 Sn to Nb in filaments and the number of filaments in the fiber bundle composite rods were used in the final calculation of the Young's modulus of Nb 3 Sn. The obtained modulus of 127 GPa was the lower bound of the already reported values

  17. Calculation of elastic constants of BCC transition metals: tight-binding recursion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, K.; Hamada, N.; Terakura, K.

    1984-01-01

    The elastic constants of BCC transition metals (Fe, Nb, Mo and W) are calculated by using the tight-binding d band and the Born-Mayer repulsive potential. Introducing a small distortion characteristic to C 44 (or C') elastic deformation and calculating the energy change up to second order in the atomic displacement, the shear elastic constants C 44 and C' are determined. The elastic constants C 11 and C 12 are then calculated by using the relations B=1/3(C 11 + 2C 12 ) and C'=1/2(C 11 -C 12 ), where B is the bulk modulus. In general, the agreement between the present results and the experimental values is satisfactory. The characteristic elasticity behaviour, i.e. the strong Nsub(d) (number of d electrons) dependence of the observed anisotropy factor A=C 44 /C', will also be discussed. (author)

  18. Vimentin filament organization and stress sensing depend on its single cysteine residue and zinc binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Oeste, Clara L.; Martínez, Alma E.; Carrasco, M. Jesús; Garzón, Beatriz; Cañada, F. Javier

    2015-01-01

    The vimentin filament network plays a key role in cell architecture and signalling, as well as in epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Vimentin C328 is targeted by various oxidative modifications, but its role in vimentin organization is not known. Here we show that C328 is essential for vimentin network reorganization in response to oxidants and electrophiles, and is required for optimal vimentin performance in network expansion, lysosomal distribution and aggresome formation. C328 may fulfil these roles through interaction with zinc. In vitro, micromolar zinc protects vimentin from iodoacetamide modification and elicits vimentin polymerization into optically detectable structures; in cells, zinc closely associates with vimentin and its depletion causes reversible filament disassembly. Finally, zinc transport-deficient human fibroblasts show increased vimentin solubility and susceptibility to disruption, which are restored by zinc supplementation. These results unveil a critical role of C328 in vimentin organization and open new perspectives for the regulation of intermediate filaments by zinc. PMID:26031447

  19. A peek into tropomyosin binding and unfolding on the actin filament.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tropomyosin is a prototypical coiled coil along its length with subtle variations in structure that allow interactions with actin and other proteins. Actin binding globally stabilizes tropomyosin. Tropomyosin-actin interaction occurs periodically along the length of tropomyosin. However, it is not well understood how tropomyosin binds actin. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tropomyosin's periodic binding sites make differential contributions to two components of actin binding, cooperativity and affinity, and can be classified as primary or secondary sites. We show through mutagenesis and analysis of recombinant striated muscle alpha-tropomyosins that primary actin binding sites have a destabilizing coiled-coil interface, typically alanine-rich, embedded within a non-interface recognition sequence. Introduction of an Ala cluster in place of the native, more stable interface in period 2 and/or period 3 sites (of seven increased the affinity or cooperativity of actin binding, analysed by cosedimentation and differential scanning calorimetry. Replacement of period 3 with period 5 sequence, an unstable region of known importance for cooperative actin binding, increased the cooperativity of binding. Introduction of the fluorescent probe, pyrene, near the mutation sites in periods 2 and 3 reported local instability, stabilization by actin binding, and local unfolding before or coincident with dissociation from actin (measured using light scattering, and chain dissociation (analyzed using circular dichroism. CONCLUSIONS: This, and previous work, suggests that regions of tropomyosin involved in binding actin have non-interface residues specific for interaction with actin and an unstable interface that is locally stabilized upon binding. The destabilized interface allows residues on the coiled-coil surface to obtain an optimal conformation for interaction with actin by increasing the number of local substates that the side chains can sample. We suggest

  20. Capping protein binding to S100B: implications for the tentacle model for capping the actin filament barbed end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Martin A; Cooper, John A

    2004-04-02

    S100B binds tightly to a 12-amino acid peptide derived from heterodimeric capping protein. In native intact capping protein, this sequence is in the C terminus of the alpha-subunit, which is important for capping the actin filament. This C-terminal region is proposed to act as a flexible "tentacle," extending away from the body of capping protein in order to bind actin. To this hypothesis, we analyzed the interaction between S100B and capping protein in solution. The C-terminal 28 amino acids of the alpha-subunit, the proposed tentacle, bound to S100B as a free synthetic peptide or a glutathione S-transferase fusion (K(d) approximately 0.4-1 microm). In contrast, S100B did not bind to whole native capping protein or functionally affect its capping activity. S100B does not bind, with any significant affinity, to the proposed alpha-tentacle sequence of whole native capping protein in solution. In the NMR structure of S100B complexed with the alpha-subunit-derived 12-amino acid peptide, the hydrophobic side of a short alpha-helix in the peptide, containing an important tryptophan residue, contacts S100B. In the x-ray structure of native capping protein, the corresponding sequence of the alpha-subunit C terminus, including Trp(271), interacts closely with the body of the protein. Therefore, our results suggest the alpha-subunit C terminus is not mobile as predicted by the tentacle model. Addition of non-ionic detergent allowed whole capping protein to bind weakly to S100B, indicating that the alpha-subunit C terminus can be mobilized from the surface of the capping protein molecule, presumably by weakening the hydrophobic binding at the contact site.

  1. DNA Binding Proteins of the Filamentous Phages CTXφ and VGJφ of Vibrio cholerae▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falero, Alina; Caballero, Andy; Ferrán, Beatriz; Izquierdo, Yovanny; Fando, Rafael; Campos, Javier

    2009-01-01

    The native product of open reading frame 112 (orf112) and a recombinant variant of the RstB protein, encoded by Vibrio cholerae pathogen-specific bacteriophages VGJφ and CTXφ, respectively, were purified to more than 90% homogeneity. Orf112 protein was shown to specifically bind single-stranded genomic DNA of VGJφ; however, RstB protein unexpectedly bound double-stranded DNA in addition to the single-stranded genomic DNA. The DNA binding properties of these proteins may explain their requirement for the rolling circle replication of the respective phages and RstB's requirement for single-stranded-DNA chromosomal integration of CTXφ phage dependent on XerCD recombinases. PMID:19617366

  2. DNA binding proteins of the filamentous phages CTXphi and VGJphi of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falero, Alina; Caballero, Andy; Ferrán, Beatriz; Izquierdo, Yovanny; Fando, Rafael; Campos, Javier

    2009-09-01

    The native product of open reading frame 112 (orf112) and a recombinant variant of the RstB protein, encoded by Vibrio cholerae pathogen-specific bacteriophages VGJphi and CTXphi, respectively, were purified to more than 90% homogeneity. Orf112 protein was shown to specifically bind single-stranded genomic DNA of VGJphi; however, RstB protein unexpectedly bound double-stranded DNA in addition to the single-stranded genomic DNA. The DNA binding properties of these proteins may explain their requirement for the rolling circle replication of the respective phages and RstB's requirement for single-stranded-DNA chromosomal integration of CTXphi phage dependent on XerCD recombinases.

  3. Probing the Energetics of Dynactin Filament Assembly and the Binding of Cargo Adaptor Proteins Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Electrostatics-Based Structural Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2017-01-10

    Dynactin, a large multiprotein complex, binds with the cytoplasmic dynein-1 motor and various adaptor proteins to allow recruitment and transportation of cellular cargoes toward the minus end of microtubules. The structure of the dynactin complex is built around an actin-like minifilament with a defined length, which has been visualized in a high-resolution structure of the dynactin filament determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). To understand the energetic basis of dynactin filament assembly, we used molecular dynamics simulation to probe the intersubunit interactions among the actin-like proteins, various capping proteins, and four extended regions of the dynactin shoulder. Our simulations revealed stronger intersubunit interactions at the barbed and pointed ends of the filament and involving the extended regions (compared with the interactions within the filament), which may energetically drive filament termination by the capping proteins and recruitment of the actin-like proteins by the extended regions, two key features of the dynactin filament assembly process. Next, we modeled the unknown binding configuration among dynactin, dynein tails, and a number of coiled-coil adaptor proteins (including several Bicaudal-D and related proteins and three HOOK proteins), and predicted a key set of charged residues involved in their electrostatic interactions. Our modeling is consistent with previous findings of conserved regions, functional sites, and disease mutations in the adaptor proteins and will provide a structural framework for future functional and mutational studies of these adaptor proteins. In sum, this study yielded rich structural and energetic information about dynactin and associated adaptor proteins that cannot be directly obtained from the cryo-EM structures with limited resolutions.

  4. A First Approach to Filament Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P. E. S.; de Abreu, F. Vistulo; Simoes, R.; Dias, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive…

  5. Assembly of Superparamagnetic Filaments in External Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiachen; Song, Fan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2016-09-13

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of anchored magneto-elastic filaments in external magnetic field. The filaments are composed of a mixture of superparamagnetic and nonmagnetic colloidal beads interlinked with elastic springs. We explore the steady-state structures of filaments with various composition and bending rigidity subject to external magnetic field parallel to the surface. The interplay of elastic and induced magnetic interactions results in a rich phase behavior with morphologies reminiscent of macromolecular folding: bent filaments, loops, sheets, helicoids, and other collapsed structures. Our results provide new insights into the design of hierarchically assembled supramolecular structures with controlled response to external stimuli.

  6. Characterization of Microfibrillar-associated Protein 4 (MFAP4) as a Tropoelastin- and Fibrillin-binding Protein Involved in Elastic Fiber Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilecki, Bartosz; Holm, Anne T; Schlosser, Anders

    2016-01-01

    MFAP4 (microfibrillar-associated protein 4) is an extracellular glycoprotein found in elastic fibers without a clearly defined role in elastic fiber assembly. In the present study, we characterized molecular interactions between MFAP4 and elastic fiber components. We established that MFAP4...... primarily assembles into trimeric and hexameric structures of homodimers. Binding analysis revealed that MFAP4 specifically binds tropoelastin and fibrillin-1 and -2, as well as the elastin cross-linking amino acid desmosine, and that it co-localizes with fibrillin-1-positive fibers in vivo. Site...

  7. An explicitly solvated full atomistic model of the cardiac thin filament and application on the calcium binding affinity effects from familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy linked mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The previous version of our cardiac thin filament (CTF) model consisted of the troponin complex (cTn), two coiled-coil dimers of tropomyosin (Tm), and 29 actin units. We now present the newest revision of the model to include explicit solvation. The model was developed to continue our study of genetic mutations in the CTF proteins which are linked to familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. Binding of calcium to the cTnC subunit causes subtle conformational changes to propagate through the cTnC to the cTnI subunit which then detaches from actin. Conformational changes propagate through to the cTnT subunit, which allows Tm to move into the open position along actin, leading to muscle contraction. Calcium disassociation allows for the reverse to occur, which results in muscle relaxation. The inclusion of explicit TIP3 water solvation allows for the model to get better individual local solvent to protein interactions; which are important when observing the N-lobe calcium binding pocket of the cTnC. We are able to compare in silica and in vitro experimental results to better understand the physiological effects from mutants, such as the R92L/W and F110V/I of the cTnT, on the calcium binding affinity compared to the wild type.

  8. Magnetic vortex filament flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Manuel; Cabrerizo, Jose L.; Fernandez, Manuel; Romero, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    We exhibit a variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with a Killing magnetic field in dimension 3. In this context, the solutions of the Lorentz force equation are viewed as Kirchhoff elastic rods and conversely. This provides an amazing connection between two apparently unrelated physical models and, in particular, it ties the classical elastic theory with the Hall effect. Then, these magnetic flows can be regarded as vortex filament flows within the localized induction approximation. The Hasimoto transformation can be used to see the magnetic trajectories as solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation showing the solitonic nature of those

  9. C0 and C1 N-terminal Ig domains of myosin binding protein C exert different effects on thin filament activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha P; Belknap, Betty; Van Sciver, Robert E; White, Howard D; Galkin, Vitold E

    2016-02-09

    Mutations in genes encoding myosin, the molecular motor that powers cardiac muscle contraction, and its accessory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C), are the two most common causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recent studies established that the N-terminal domains (NTDs) of cMyBP-C (e.g., C0, C1, M, and C2) can bind to and activate or inhibit the thin filament (TF). However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which NTDs modulate interaction of myosin with the TF remains unknown and the contribution of each individual NTD to TF activation/inhibition is unclear. Here we used an integrated structure-function approach using cryoelectron microscopy, biochemical kinetics, and force measurements to reveal how the first two Ig-like domains of cMyPB-C (C0 and C1) interact with the TF. Results demonstrate that despite being structural homologs, C0 and C1 exhibit different patterns of binding on the surface of F-actin. Importantly, C1 but not C0 binds in a position to activate the TF by shifting tropomyosin (Tm) to the "open" structural state. We further show that C1 directly interacts with Tm and traps Tm in the open position on the surface of F-actin. Both C0 and C1 compete with myosin subfragment 1 for binding to F-actin and effectively inhibit actomyosin interactions when present at high ratios of NTDs to F-actin. Finally, we show that in contracting sarcomeres, the activating effect of C1 is apparent only once low levels of Ca(2+) have been achieved. We suggest that Ca(2+) modulates the interaction of cMyBP-C with the TF in the sarcomere.

  10. Interaction between TATA-Binding Protein (TBP and Multiprotein Bridging Factor-1 (MBF1 from the Filamentous Insect Pathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Song

    Full Text Available TATA-binding protein (TBP is a ubiquitous component of eukaryotic transcription factors that acts to nucleate assembly and position pre-initiation complexes. Multiprotein bridging factor 1 (MBF1 is thought to interconnect TBP with gene specific transcriptional activators, modulating transcriptional networks in response to specific signal and developmental programs. The insect pathogen, Beauveria bassiana, is a cosmopolitan fungus found in most ecosystems where it acts as an important regulator of insect populations and can form intimate associations with certain plants. In order to gain a better understanding of the function of MBF1 in filamentous fungi, its interaction with TBP was demonstrated. The MBF1 and TBP homologs in B. bassiana were cloned and purified from a heterologous E. coli expression system. Whereas purified BbTBP was shown to be able to bind oligonucleotide sequences containing the TATA-motif (Kd ≈ 1.3 nM including sequences derived from the promoters of the B. bassiana chitinase and protease genes. In contrast, BbMBF1 was unable to bind to these same target sequences. However, the formation of a ternary complex between BbMBF1, BbTBP, and a TATA-containing target DNA sequence was seen in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA. These data indicate that BbMBF1 forms direct interactions with BbTBP, and that the complex is capable of binding to DNA sequences containing TATA-motifs, confirming that BbTBP can link BbMBF1 to target sequences as part of the RNA transcriptional machinery in fungi.

  11. Interaction between TATA-Binding Protein (TBP) and Multiprotein Bridging Factor-1 (MBF1) from the Filamentous Insect Pathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chi; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Xia; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2015-01-01

    TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a ubiquitous component of eukaryotic transcription factors that acts to nucleate assembly and position pre-initiation complexes. Multiprotein bridging factor 1 (MBF1) is thought to interconnect TBP with gene specific transcriptional activators, modulating transcriptional networks in response to specific signal and developmental programs. The insect pathogen, Beauveria bassiana, is a cosmopolitan fungus found in most ecosystems where it acts as an important regulator of insect populations and can form intimate associations with certain plants. In order to gain a better understanding of the function of MBF1 in filamentous fungi, its interaction with TBP was demonstrated. The MBF1 and TBP homologs in B. bassiana were cloned and purified from a heterologous E. coli expression system. Whereas purified BbTBP was shown to be able to bind oligonucleotide sequences containing the TATA-motif (Kd ≈ 1.3 nM) including sequences derived from the promoters of the B. bassiana chitinase and protease genes. In contrast, BbMBF1 was unable to bind to these same target sequences. However, the formation of a ternary complex between BbMBF1, BbTBP, and a TATA-containing target DNA sequence was seen in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). These data indicate that BbMBF1 forms direct interactions with BbTBP, and that the complex is capable of binding to DNA sequences containing TATA-motifs, confirming that BbTBP can link BbMBF1 to target sequences as part of the RNA transcriptional machinery in fungi.

  12. Development of a Novel Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Binding Assay to Study the Association of Plakins with Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Bertrand; Begré, Nadja; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Borradori, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are fundamental for most biological processes, such as the formation of cellular structures and enzymatic complexes or in signaling pathways. The identification and characterization of protein-protein interactions are therefore essential for understanding the mechanisms and regulation of biological systems. The organization and dynamics of the cytoskeleton, as well as its anchorage to specific sites in the plasma membrane and organelles, are regulated by the plakins. These structurally related proteins anchor different cytoskeletal networks to each other and/or to other cellular structures. The association of several plakins with intermediate filaments (IFs) is critical for maintenance of the cytoarchitecture. Pathogenic mutations in the genes encoding different plakins can lead to dramatic manifestations, occurring principally in the skin, striated muscle, and/or nervous system, due to cytoskeletal disorganization resulting in abnormal cell fragility. Nevertheless, it is still unclear how plakins bind to IFs, although some general rules are slowly emerging. We here describe in detail a recently developed protein-protein fluorescence binding assay, based on the production of recombinant proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and their use as fluid-phase fluorescent ligands on immobilized IF proteins. Using this method, we have been able to assess the ability of C-terminal regions of GFP-tagged plakin proteins to bind to distinct IF proteins and IF domains. This simple and sensitive technique, which is expected to facilitate further studies in this area, can also be potentially employed for any kind of protein-protein interaction studies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A penny-shaped crack in a filament-reinforced matrix. I - The filament model. II - The crack problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The study deals with the elastostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which is reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack. An elastic filament model is first developed, followed by consideration of the application of the model to the penny-shaped crack problem in which the filaments of finite length are asymmetrically distributed around the crack. Since the primary interest is in the application of the results to studies relating to the fracture of fiber or filament-reinforced composites and reinforced concrete, the main emphasis of the study is on the evaluation of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. Using the filament model developed, the elastostatic interaction problem between a penny-shaped crack and a slender inclusion or filament in an elastic matrix is formulated.

  14. Attractive interactions among intermediate filaments determine network mechanics in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Pawelzyk

    Full Text Available Mechanical and structural properties of K8/K18 and vimentin intermediate filament (IF networks have been investigated using bulk mechanical rheometry and optical microrheology including diffusing wave spectroscopy and multiple particle tracking. A high elastic modulus G0 at low protein concentration c, a weak concentration dependency of G0 (G0 ∼ c(0.5 ± 0.1 and pronounced strain stiffening are found for these systems even without external crossbridgers. Strong attractive interactions among filaments are required to maintain these characteristic mechanical features, which have also been reported for various other IF networks. Filament assembly, the persistence length of the filaments and the network mesh size remain essentially unaffected when a nonionic surfactant is added, but strain stiffening is completely suppressed, G0 drops by orders of magnitude and exhibits a scaling G0 ∼ c(1.9 ± 0.2 in agreement with microrheological measurements and as expected for entangled networks of semi-flexible polymers. Tailless K8Δ/K18ΔT and various other tailless filament networks do not exhibit strain stiffening, but still show high G0 values. Therefore, two binding sites are proposed to exist in IF networks. A weaker one mediated by hydrophobic amino acid clusters in the central rod prevents stretched filaments between adjacent cross-links from thermal equilibration and thus provides the high G0 values. Another strong one facilitating strain stiffening is located in the tail domain with its high fraction of hydrophobic amino acid sequences. Strain stiffening is less pronounced for vimentin than for K8/K18 due to electrostatic repulsion forces partly compensating the strong attraction at filament contact points.

  15. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  16. Structural, elastic and electronic Properties of isotropic cubic crystals of carbon and silicon nanotubes : Density functional based tight binding calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Ivanovskii

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic models of cubic crystals (CC of carbon and graphene-like Si nanotubes are offered and their structural, cohesive, elastic and electronic properties are predicted by means of the DFTB method. Our main findings are that the isotropic crystals of carbon nanotubes adopt a very high elastic modulus B and low compressibility β, namely B = 650 GPa, β = 0.0015 1/GPa. In addition, these crystals preserve the initial conductivity type of their “building blocks”, i.e. isolated carbon and Si nanotubes. This feature may be important for design of materials with the selected conductivity type.

  17. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  18. Membrane Buckling Induced by Curved Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Martin; Crow, Daniel J. G.; Joanny, Jean-François

    2009-07-01

    We present a novel buckling instability relevant to membrane budding in eukaryotic cells. In this mechanism, curved filaments bind to a lipid bilayer without changing its intrinsic curvature. As more and more filaments adsorb, newly added ones are more and more strained, which destabilizes the flat membrane. We perform a linear stability analysis of filament-dressed membranes and find that the buckling threshold is within reasonable in vivo parameter values. We account for the formation of long tubes previously observed in cells and in purified systems. We study strongly deformed dressed membranes and their bifurcation diagram numerically. Our mechanism could be validated by a simple experiment.

  19. A first approach to filament dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, P E S; De Abreu, F Vistulo; Dias, R G [Department of Physics, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Simoes, R, E-mail: fva@ua.p [I3N-Institute for Nanostructures, Nanomodelling and Nanofabrication (Portugal)

    2010-11-15

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive equations governing the dynamics of an elastic lament suitable for a computer simulation implementation. The derivation starts from the relation between forces and potential energy in conservative systems in order to derive the equation of motion of any bead in the filament. Only two-dimensional movements are considered, but extensions to three dimensions can follow similar lines. Suggestions for computer implementations are provided in Matlab as well as an example of application related to the generation of musical sounds. This example allows a critical analysis of the numerical results obtained using a cross-disciplinary perspective. Since derivations start from basic physics equations, use simple calculus and computational implementations are straightforward, this paper proposes a different approach to introduce simple molecular dynamics simulations or animations of real systems in undergraduate elasticity or computer modelling courses.

  20. A first approach to filament dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P E S; De Abreu, F Vistulo; Dias, R G; Simoes, R

    2010-01-01

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive equations governing the dynamics of an elastic lament suitable for a computer simulation implementation. The derivation starts from the relation between forces and potential energy in conservative systems in order to derive the equation of motion of any bead in the filament. Only two-dimensional movements are considered, but extensions to three dimensions can follow similar lines. Suggestions for computer implementations are provided in Matlab as well as an example of application related to the generation of musical sounds. This example allows a critical analysis of the numerical results obtained using a cross-disciplinary perspective. Since derivations start from basic physics equations, use simple calculus and computational implementations are straightforward, this paper proposes a different approach to introduce simple molecular dynamics simulations or animations of real systems in undergraduate elasticity or computer modelling courses.

  1. The modulation of Jahn-Teller coupling by elastic and binding strain perturbations-a novel view on an old phenomenon and examples from solid-state chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinen, Dirk

    2012-04-16

    Cations in 6-coordination with orbitally degenerate E(g) ground states, such as Cu(2+) and low-spin Co(2+), play an important role in coordination chemistry-in particular, in modern complex biochemistry. The stereochemistry and the binding properties within the basic polyhedra are the subject of pronounced modifications due to vibronic coupling in such cases, but may be also significantly influenced by what is usually called an imposed strain. The latter effect makes allowance for the general observation that the host sites into which the Jahn-Teller unstable centers are substituted are seldom of O(h) symmetry and built from six equal ligands. Hence, the finally observed molecular and binding structure of the pseudo-octahedral complex is the result of the combined action of vibronic coupling and strain. The closer analysis of host-site strain effects demands to distinguish between elastic strain components, which modify the force constant of the vibronically active (here, ε(g)) vibration, and binding strain perturbations, which take account of possibly present ligands with different binding properties. A symmetry-met semiempirical strain model on such a basis is presented and a corresponding formulation within the vibronic coupling formalism is given, on the molecular level. Well-established model examples of Cu(2+) in octahedral fluoride coordination in various host solids, where a great variety of experimental results is available, are given. The derived parameters allow a detailed characterization of the structural and energy qualities of the Jahn-Teller centers, and might help to steer these properties in cases where synthesis strategies are needed. The proposed strain concept is more complex than that of Ham [F. S. Ham, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance; Plenum Press: New York, 1972; F. S. Ham, Phys. Rev. 1965, A138, 1727]; the advantage is that it is directly tied to the structure and energy of the Jahn-Teller complex in focus, although more data (experimental

  2. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments - Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Filaments are formed in magnetic loops that hold relatively cool, dense gas suspended above the surface of the Sun (David Hathaway/NASA)

  3. Patterns of molecular motors that guide and sort filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Beat; Nédélec, François

    2012-11-21

    Molecular motors can be immobilized to transport filaments and loads that are attached to these filaments inside a nano-device. However, if motors are distributed uniformly over a flat surface, the motility is undirected, and the filaments move equally in all directions. For many applications it is important to control the direction in which the filaments move, and two strategies have been explored to achieve this: applying external forces and confining the filaments inside channels. In this article, we discuss a third strategy in which the topography of the sample remains flat, but the motors are distributed non-uniformly over the surface. Systems of filaments and patterned molecular motors were simulated using a stochastic engine that included Brownian motion and filament bending elasticity. Using an evolutionary algorithm, patterns were optimized for their capacity to precisely control the paths of the filaments. We identified patterns of motors that could either direct the filaments in a particular direction, or separate short and long filaments. These functionalities already exceed what has been achieved with confinement. The patterns are composed of one or two types of motors positioned in lines or along arcs and should be easy to manufacture. Finally, these patterns can be easily combined into larger designs, allowing one to precisely control the motion of microscopic objects inside a device.

  4. Failure and nonfailure of fluid filaments in extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Kolte, Mette Irene; Renardy, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The phenomenon of ductile failure of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid filaments without surface tension is studied by a 2D finite element method and by ID non-linear analysis. The viscoelastic fluids are described by single integral constitutive equations. The main conclusions are: (1) Newtonian...... fluid filaments do not exhibit ductile failure without surface tension; (2) some viscoelastic fluids form stable filaments while other fluids exhibit ductile failure as a result of an elastic instability; (3) for large Deborah numbers, the Considere condition may be used to predict the Hencky strain...

  5. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  6. Proteomics of Filamentous Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Schaap, P.J.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae traditionally have had an important role in providing enzymes and enzyme cocktails that are used in food industry. In recent years the genome sequences of many filamentous fungi have become available. This combined with

  7. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Evolution of Filament Barbs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Rui; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2010-01-01

    We present a selected few cases in which the sense of chirality of filament barbs changed within as short as hours. We investigate in detail a quiescent filament on 2003 September 10 and 11. Of its four barbs displaying such changes only one overlay a small polarity inversion line inside the EUV filament channel (EFC). No magnetic elements with magnitude above the noise level were detected at the endpoints of all barbs. In particular, a pair of barbs first approached toward and then departed ...

  9. Filamin actin-binding and titin-binding fulfill distinct functions in Z-disc cohesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicanor González-Morales

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins contribute to the contractile properties of muscles, most notably myosin thick filaments, which are anchored at the M-line, and actin thin filaments, which are anchored at the Z-discs that border each sarcomere. In humans, mutations in the actin-binding protein Filamin-C result in myopathies, but the underlying molecular function is not well understood. Here we show using Drosophila indirect flight muscle that the filamin ortholog Cheerio in conjunction with the giant elastic protein titin plays a crucial role in keeping thin filaments stably anchored at the Z-disc. We identify the filamin domains required for interaction with the titin ortholog Sallimus, and we demonstrate a genetic interaction of filamin with titin and actin. Filamin mutants disrupting the actin- or the titin-binding domain display distinct phenotypes, with Z-discs breaking up in parallel or perpendicularly to the myofibril, respectively. Thus, Z-discs require filamin to withstand the strong contractile forces acting on them.

  10. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, See Leang

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond Laser Filamentation gives a comprehensive review of the physics of propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in optical media (principally air) and the applications and challenges of this new technique. This book presents the modern understanding of the physics of femtosecond laser pulse propagation, including unusual new effects such as the self-transformation of the pulse into a white light laser pulse, intensity clamping, the physics of multiple filamentation and competition, and how filaments’ ability to melt glass leads to wave guide writing. The potential applications of laser filamentation in atmospheric sensing and the generation of other electromagnetic pulses from the UV to the radio frequency are treated, together with possible future challenges in the excitation of super-excited states of molecules. Exciting new phenomena such as filament induced ultrafast birefringence and the excitation of molecular rotational wave packets and their multiple revivals in air (gases) will also ...

  11. A catalytic oligomeric motor that walks along a filament track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-06-01

    Most biological motors in the cell execute chemically powered conformational changes as they walk on biopolymer filaments in order to carry out directed transport functions. Synthetic motors that operate in a similar manner are being studied since they have the potential to perform similar tasks in a variety of applications. In this paper, a synthetic nanomotor that moves along a filament track, without invoking motor conformational changes, is constructed and its properties are studied in detail. The motor is an oligomer comprising three linked beads with specific binding properties. The filament track is a stiff polymer chain, also described by a linear chain of linked coarse-grained molecular groups modeled as beads. Reactions on the filament that are catalyzed by a motor bead and use fuel in the environment, in conjunction within the binding affinities of the motor beads to the filament beads, lead to directed motion. The system operates out of equilibrium due to the state of the filament and supply of fuel. The motor, filament, and surrounding medium are all described at microscopic level that permits a full analysis of the motor motion. A stochastic model that captures the main trends seen in the simulations is also presented. The results of this study point to some of the key features that could be used to construct nanomotors that undergo biased walks powered by chemical reactions on filaments.

  12. Three-dimensional simulations of viscoelastic instability in polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    1999-01-01

    The three-dimensional Langrangian integral method is used to simulate the elastic end-plate instability that occurs in the rapid extension of some polymeric filaments between parallel plates. It is demonstrated that the upper convected Maxwell model describes the essential features of the instabi...

  13. Filament Substructures and their Interrelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Martin, S. F.; Engvold, O.

    The main structural components of solar filaments, their spines, barbs, and legs at the extreme ends of the spine, are illustrated from recent high-resolution observations. The thread-like structures appear to be present in filaments everywhere and at all times. They are the fundamental elements of solar filaments. The interrelation of the spines, barbs and legs are discussed. From observations, we present a conceptual model of the magnetic field of a filament. We suggest that only a single physical model is needed to explain filaments in a continuous spectrum represented by active region filaments at one end and quiescent filaments at the other end.

  14. Morphogenesis of filaments growing in flexible confinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, R.; Wittel, F. K.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-07-01

    Space-saving design is a requirement that is encountered in biological systems and the development of modern technological devices alike. Many living organisms dynamically pack their polymer chains, filaments or membranes inside deformable vesicles or soft tissue-like cell walls, chorions and buds. Surprisingly little is known about morphogenesis due to growth in flexible confinements—perhaps owing to the daunting complexity lying in the nonlinear feedback between packed material and expandable cavity. Here we show by experiments and simulations how geometric and material properties lead to a plethora of morphologies when elastic filaments are growing far beyond the equilibrium size of a flexible thin sheet they are confined in. Depending on friction, sheet flexibility and thickness, we identify four distinct morphological phases emerging from bifurcation and present the corresponding phase diagram. Four order parameters quantifying the transitions between these phases are proposed.

  15. Filament-filament switching can be regulated by separation between filaments together with cargo motor number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Erickson

    Full Text Available How intracellular transport controls the probability that cargos switch at intersections between filaments is not well understood. In one hypothesis some motors on the cargo attach to one filament while others attach to the intersecting filament, and the ensuing tug-of-war determines which filament is chosen. We investigate this hypothesis using 3D computer simulations, and discover that switching at intersections increases with the number of motors on the cargo, but is not strongly dependent on motor number when the filaments touch. Thus, simply controlling the number of active motors on the cargo cannot account for in vivo observations that found reduced switching with increasing motor number, suggesting additional mechanisms of regulation. We use simulations to show that one possible way to regulate switching is by simultaneously adjusting the separation between planes containing the crossing filaments and the total number of active motors on the cargo. Heretofore, the effect of filament-filament separation on switching has been unexplored. We find that the switching probability decreases with increasing filament separation. This effect is particularly strong for cargos with only a modest number of motors. As the filament separation increases past the maximum head-to-head distance of the motor, individual motors walking along a filament will be unable to reach the intersecting filament. Thus, any switching requires that other motors on the cargo attach to the intersecting filament and haul the cargo along it, while motor(s engaged on the original filament detach. Further, if the filament separation is large enough, the cargo can have difficulty proceeding along the initial filament because the engaged motors can walk underneath the intersecting filament, but the cargo itself cannot fit between the filaments. Thus, the cargo either detaches entirely from the original filament, or must dip to the side of the initial filament and then pass below

  16. Filament-filament switching can be regulated by separation between filaments together with cargo motor number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Robert P; Gross, Steven P; Yu, Clare C

    2013-01-01

    How intracellular transport controls the probability that cargos switch at intersections between filaments is not well understood. In one hypothesis some motors on the cargo attach to one filament while others attach to the intersecting filament, and the ensuing tug-of-war determines which filament is chosen. We investigate this hypothesis using 3D computer simulations, and discover that switching at intersections increases with the number of motors on the cargo, but is not strongly dependent on motor number when the filaments touch. Thus, simply controlling the number of active motors on the cargo cannot account for in vivo observations that found reduced switching with increasing motor number, suggesting additional mechanisms of regulation. We use simulations to show that one possible way to regulate switching is by simultaneously adjusting the separation between planes containing the crossing filaments and the total number of active motors on the cargo. Heretofore, the effect of filament-filament separation on switching has been unexplored. We find that the switching probability decreases with increasing filament separation. This effect is particularly strong for cargos with only a modest number of motors. As the filament separation increases past the maximum head-to-head distance of the motor, individual motors walking along a filament will be unable to reach the intersecting filament. Thus, any switching requires that other motors on the cargo attach to the intersecting filament and haul the cargo along it, while motor(s) engaged on the original filament detach. Further, if the filament separation is large enough, the cargo can have difficulty proceeding along the initial filament because the engaged motors can walk underneath the intersecting filament, but the cargo itself cannot fit between the filaments. Thus, the cargo either detaches entirely from the original filament, or must dip to the side of the initial filament and then pass below the crossing

  17. Elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter investigates the following five aspects of engineering-material solid-state elastic constants: general properties, interrelationships, relationships to other physical properties, changes during cooling from ambient to near-zero temperature, and near-zero-temperature behavior. Topics considered include compressibility, bulk modulus, Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, Hooke's law, elastic-constant measuring methods, thermodynamic potentials, higher-order energy terms, specific heat, thermal expansivity, magnetic materials, structural phase transitions, polymers, composites, textured aggregates, and other-phenomena correlations. Some of the conclusions concerning polycrystalline elastic properties and their temperature dependence are: elastic constants are physical, not mechanical, properties which relate thermodynamically to other physical properties such as specific heat and thermal expansivity; elastic constants at low temperatures are nearly temperature independent, as required by the third law of thermodynamics; and elastic constants can be used to study directional properties of materials, such as textured aggregates and composites

  18. Evolution of filament barbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.

    We present a selected few cases in which the sense of chirality of filament barbs changed within periods as short as hours. We investigate in detail a quiescent filament on 2003 September 10 and 11. Of its four barbs displaying such changes, only one overlays a small polarity inversion line inside the EUV filament channel (EFC). No magnetic elements with magnitude above the noise level were detected at the endpoints of all barbs. In particular, a pair of barbs first approached toward, and then departed from, each other in Halpha , with the barb endpoints migrating as far as ˜ 10 arcsec. We conclude that the evolution of the barbs was driven by flux emergence and cancellation of small bipolar units at the EFC border.

  19. Filaments in Lupus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Rodon, J.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Plunkett, A.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms behind the formation of sub-stellar mass sources are key to determine the populations at the low-mass end of the stellar distribution. Here, we present mapping observations toward the Lupus I cloud in C18O(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) obtained with APEX. We have identified a few velocity-coherent filaments. Each contains several substellar mass sources that are also identified in the 1.1mm continuum data (see also SOLA catalogue presentation). We will discuss the velocity structure, fragmentation properties of the identified filaments, and the nature of the detected sources.

  20. Positrusion Filament Recycling System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes a novel process to produce 3d printer feedstock filament out of scrap ABS on the ISS. Currently the plastic filament materials that most 3d printers use...

  1. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prominences and filaments are two manifestations of the same phenomenon. Both prominences and filaments are features formed above the chromosphere by cool dense...

  2. Elastic strips

    OpenAIRE

    Chubelaschwili, David; Pinkall, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of finding an explicit description of a developable narrow Moebius strip of minimal bending energy, which was first formulated by M. Sadowsky in 1930, we will develop the theory of elastic strips. Recently E.L. Starostin and G.H.M. van der Heijden found a numerical description for an elastic Moebius strip, but did not give an integrable solution. We derive two conservation laws, which describe the equilibrium equations of elastic strips. In applying these laws we find...

  3. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...... also shares in vivo properties of assembly and dynamics with IF proteins by forming stable filamentous structures that continuously incorporate subunits along their length and that grow in a nonpolar fashion. De novo assembly of crescentin is biphasic and involves a cell size-dependent mechanism...... a new function for MreB and providing a parallel to the role of actin in IF assembly and organization in metazoan cells. Additionally, analysis of an MreB localization mutant suggests that cell wall insertion during cell elongation normally occurs along two helices of opposite handedness, each...

  4. Filamentous Fungi Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anders; Stocks, Stuart; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi (including microorganisms such as Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae) represent an enormously important platform for industrial fermentation. Two particularly valuable features are the high yield coefficients and the ability to secrete products. However, the filamentous...... morphology, together with non-Newtonian rheological properties (shear thinning), result in poor oxygen transfer unless sufficient energy is provided to the fermentation. While genomic research may improve the organisms, there is no doubt that to enable further application in future it will be necessary...... to match such research with studies of oxygen transfer and energy supply to high viscosity fluids. Hence, the implementation of innovative solutions (some of which in principle are already possible) will be essential to ensure the further development of such fermentations....

  5. The evolution of compositionally and functionally distinct actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Whitaker, Shane; Popp, David; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    The actin filament is astonishingly well conserved across a diverse set of eukaryotic species. It has essentially remained unchanged in the billion years that separate yeast, Arabidopsis and man. In contrast, bacterial actin-like proteins have diverged to the extreme, and many of them are not readily identified from sequence-based homology searches. Here, we present phylogenetic analyses that point to an evolutionary drive to diversify actin filament composition across kingdoms. Bacteria use a one-filament-one-function system to create distinct filament systems within a single cell. In contrast, eukaryotic actin is a universal force provider in a wide range of processes. In plants, there has been an expansion of the number of closely related actin genes, whereas in fungi and metazoa diversification in tropomyosins has increased the compositional variety in actin filament systems. Both mechanisms dictate the subset of actin-binding proteins that interact with each filament type, leading to specialization in function. In this Hypothesis, we thus propose that different mechanisms were selected in bacteria, plants and metazoa, which achieved actin filament compositional variation leading to the expansion of their functional diversity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Elastic Beanstalk

    CERN Document Server

    Vliet, Jurg; Wel, Steven; Dowd, Dara

    2011-01-01

    While it's always been possible to run Java applications on Amazon EC2, Amazon's Elastic Beanstalk makes the process easier-especially if you understand how it works beneath the surface. This concise, hands-on book not only walks you through Beanstalk for deploying and managing web applications in the cloud, you'll also learn how to use this AWS tool in other phases of development. Ideal if you're a developer familiar with Java applications or AWS, Elastic Beanstalk provides step-by-step instructions and numerous code samples for building cloud applications on Beanstalk that can handle lots

  7. Filament wound structure and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritt, W.S.; Gerth, H.L.; Knight, C.E. Jr.; Pardue, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A filament wound spherical structure is described comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness

  8. Rotational elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  9. Solar Filament Extraction and Characterizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Shih, F. Y.; Jing, J.; Wang, H.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to extract and characterize solar filaments from H-alpha full-disk images produced by Big Bear Solar Observatory. A cascading Hough Transform method is designed to identify solar disk center location and radius. Solar disks are segmented from the background, and unbalanced illumination on the surface of solar disks is removed using polynomial surface fitting. And then a localized adaptive thresholding is employed to extract solar filament candidates. After the removal of small solar filament candidates, the remaining larger candidates are used as the seeds of region growing. The procedure of region growing not only connects broken filaments but also generate complete shape for each filament. Mathematical morphology thinning is adopted to produce the skeleton of each filament, and graph theory is used to prune branches and barbs to get the main skeleton. The length and the location of the main skeleton is characterized. The proposed method can help scientists and researches study the evolution of solar filament, for instance, to detect solar filament eruption. The presented method has already been used by Space Weather Research Lab of New Jersey Institute of Technology (http://swrl.njit.edu) to generate the solar filament online catalog using H-alpha full-disk images of Global H-alpha Network (http://swrl.njit.edu/ghn_web/).

  10. Elastic anisotropy in multifilament Nb$_3$Sn superconducting wires

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Alknes, P; Arnau, G; Bjoerstad, R; Bordini, B

    2015-01-01

    The elastic anisotropy caused by the texture in the Nb3Sn filaments of PIT and RRP wires has been calculated by averaging the estimates of Voigt and Reuss, using published Nb3Sn single crystal elastic constants and the Nb3Sn grain orientation distribution determined in both wire types by Electron Backscatter Diffraction. At ambient temperature the calculated Nb3Sn E-moduli in axial direction in the PIT and the RRP wire are 130 GPa and 140 GPa, respectively. The calculated E-moduli are compared with tensile test results obtained for the corresponding wires and extracted filament bundles.

  11. Resemblance of actin-binding protein/actin gels to covalently crosslinked networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmey, Paul A.; Hvidt, Søren; Lamb, Jennifer; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1990-05-01

    THE maintainance of the shape of cells is often due to their surface elasticity, which arises mainly from an actin-rich cytoplasmic cortex1,2. On locomotion, phagocytosis or fission, however, these cells become partially fluid-like. The finding of proteins that can bind to actin and control the assembly of, or crosslink, actin filaments, and of intracellular messages that regulate the activities of some of these actin-binding proteins, indicates that such 'gel sol' transformations result from the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich networks3. Alternatively, on the basis of a study of the mechanical properties of mixtures of actin filaments and an Acanthamoeba actin-binding protein, α-actinin, it has been proposed that these transformations can be accounted for by rapid exchange of crosslinks between actin filaments4: the cortical network would be solid when the deformation rate is greater than the rate of crosslink exchange, but would deform or 'creep' when deformation is slow enough to permit crosslinker molecules to rearrange. Here we report, however, that mixtures of actin filaments and actin-binding protein (ABP), an actin crosslinking protein of many higher eukaryotes, form gels Theologically equivalent to covalently crosslinked networks. These gels do not creep in response to applied stress on a time scale compatible with most cell-surface movements. These findings support a more complex and controlled mechanism underlying the dynamic mechanical properties of cortical cytoplasm, and can explain why cells do not collapse under the constant shear forces that often exist in tissues.

  12. Sarcomere lattice geometry influences cooperative myosin binding in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand C W Tanner

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In muscle, force emerges from myosin binding with actin (forming a cross-bridge. This actomyosin binding depends upon myofilament geometry, kinetics of thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and kinetics of cross-bridge cycling. Binding occurs within a compliant network of protein filaments where there is mechanical coupling between myosins along the thick-filament backbone and between actin monomers along the thin filament. Such mechanical coupling precludes using ordinary differential equation models when examining the effects of lattice geometry, kinetics, or compliance on force production. This study uses two stochastically driven, spatially explicit models to predict levels of cross-bridge binding, force, thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and ATP utilization. One model incorporates the 2-to-1 ratio of thin to thick filaments of vertebrate striated muscle (multi-filament model, while the other comprises only one thick and one thin filament (two-filament model. Simulations comparing these models show that the multi-filament predictions of force, fractional cross-bridge binding, and cross-bridge turnover are more consistent with published experimental values. Furthermore, the values predicted by the multi-filament model are greater than those values predicted by the two-filament model. These increases are larger than the relative increase of potential inter-filament interactions in the multi-filament model versus the two-filament model. This amplification of coordinated cross-bridge binding and cycling indicates a mechanism of cooperativity that depends on sarcomere lattice geometry, specifically the ratio and arrangement of myofilaments.

  13. Chaperonin filaments : their formation and an evaluation of methods for studying them.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaoi, T.; Kagawa, K. H.; Trent, J. D.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1998-08-01

    Chaperonins are multisubunit protein complexes that can be isolated from cells as high-molecular-weight structures that appear as double rings in the electron microscope. We recently discovered that chaperonin double rings isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, when incubated at physiological temperatures in the presence of ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, stacked into filaments; we hypothesized that these filaments are related to filaments seen inside S. shibatae cells and that chaperonins exist as filaments in vivo. This paper elucidates the conditions under which we have observed S. shibatae chaperonins to form filaments and evaluates native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation as methods for studying these filaments. We observed that in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} combined with ATP, ADP, ATP{gamma}S, or GTP, native PAGE indicated that chaperonin subunits assembled into double rings and that the conformation of these double rings was effected by nucleotide binding, but we saw no indication of chaperonin filament formation. Under these same conditions, however, TEM, spectroscopy, and centrifugation methods indicated that chaperonin subunits and double rings had assembled into filaments. We determined that this discrepancy in the representation of the chaperonin structure was due to the native PAGE method itself. When we exposed chaperonin filaments to the electrophoretic field used in native PAGE, the filaments dissociated into double rings. This suggests that TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation are the preferred methods for studying the higher-order structures of chaperonins, which are likely to be of biological significance.

  14. Single-cell mechanics--An experimental-computational method for quantifying the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartibi, M; Liu, Y X; Liu, G-Y; Komvopoulos, K

    2015-11-01

    The membrane-cytoskeleton system plays a major role in cell adhesion, growth, migration, and differentiation. F-actin filaments, cross-linkers, binding proteins that bundle F-actin filaments to form the actin cytoskeleton, and integrins that connect the actin cytoskeleton network to the cell plasma membrane and extracellular matrix are major cytoskeleton constituents. Thus, the cell cytoskeleton is a complex composite that can assume different shapes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based techniques have been used to measure cytoskeleton material properties without much attention to cell shape. A recently developed surface chemical patterning method for long-term single-cell culture was used to seed individual cells on circular patterns. A continuum-based cell model, which uses as input the force-displacement response obtained with a modified AFM setup and relates the membrane-cytoskeleton elastic behavior to the cell geometry, while treating all other subcellular components suspended in the cytoplasmic liquid (gel) as an incompressible fluid, is presented and validated by experimental results. The developed analytical-experimental methodology establishes a framework for quantifying the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity of live cells. This capability may have immense implications in cell biology, particularly in studies seeking to establish correlations between membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity and cell disease, mortality, differentiation, and migration, and provide insight into cell infiltration through nonwoven fibrous scaffolds. The present method can be further extended to analyze membrane-cytoskeleton viscoelasticity, examine the role of other subcellular components (e.g., nucleus envelope) in cell elasticity, and elucidate the effects of mechanical stimuli on cell differentiation and motility. This is the first study to decouple the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity from cell stiffness and introduce an effective approach for measuring the elastic modulus. The

  15. Filamentous bacteriophage fd as an antigen delivery system in vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisco, Antonella; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Peptides displayed on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage fd are able to induce humoral as well as cell-mediated immune responses, which makes phage particles an attractive antigen delivery system to design new vaccines. The immune response induced by phage-displayed peptides can be enhanced by targeting phage particles to the professional antigen presenting cells, utilizing a single-chain antibody fragment that binds dendritic cell receptor DEC-205. Here, we review recent advances in the use of filamentous phage fd as a platform for peptide vaccines, with a special focus on the use of phage fd as an antigen delivery platform for peptide vaccines in Alzheimer's Disease and cancer.

  16. Occurrence of proteinaceous 10-nm filaments throughout the cytoplasm of algae of the order Dasycladales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, S; Wittke, W; Traub, P

    1998-05-01

    Previously, whole-mount electron microscopy of nuclei extruded together with residual cytoplasm from the rhizoids of several algal species of the order Dasycladales has revealed the occurrence of an intra- and perinuclear network of 10-nm filaments morphologically indistinguishable from that of mammalian vimentin intermediate filaments. The present investigation demonstrates the existence of a filament system throughout the cytoplasm of the rhizoid, stalk, and apical tip of these giant cells. However, while the perinuclear 10-nm filaments interconnecting the nuclear surface with a perinuclear layer of large, electron-dense bodies filled with nucleoprotein material are of smooth appearance, those continuing within and beyond the perinuclear bodies are densely covered with differently sized, globular structures and, therefore, are of a very rough appearance. The filaments in the very apical tip of the cells are mainly of the smooth type. The transition from smooth to rough filaments seems to occur in the numerous perinuclear dense bodies surrounding the large nucleus. Digestion of the rough filaments with proteinase K removes the globules from the filament surface, revealing that throughout the nonvacuolar, intracellular space the filaments have the same basic 10-nm structure. On the other hand, gold-conjugated RNase A strongly binds to the filament-attached globules but not to the smooth, perinuclear, and the proteinase K-treated, rough filaments. In addition, an antibody raised against Xp54, a highly conserved protein which in Xenopus oocytes is an integral component of stored mRNP particles, decorates the rough but not the smooth 10-nm filaments. These results support the notion that the 10-nm filament system of Dasycladales cells plays a role in the transient storage of ribonucleoprotein particles in the cytoplasm and possibly fulfils a supportive function in the actomyosin-based transport of such material to various cytological destinations.

  17. Comparative Biomechanics of Thick Filaments and Thin Filaments with Functional Consequences for Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The scaffold of striated muscle is predominantly comprised of myosin and actin polymers known as thick filaments and thin filaments, respectively. The roles these filaments play in muscle contraction are well known, but the extent to which variations in filament mechanical properties influence muscle function is not fully understood. Here we review information on the material properties of thick filaments, thin filaments, and their primary constituents; we also discuss ways in which mechanical properties of filaments impact muscle performance.

  18. Colloidal transport by active filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Raj Kumar; Kumar, P B Sunil; Adhikari, R

    2017-01-14

    Enhanced colloidal transport beyond the limit imposed by diffusion is usually achieved through external fields. Here, we demonstrate the ballistic transport of a colloidal sphere using internal sources of energy provided by an attached active filament. The latter is modeled as a chain of chemo-mechanically active beads connected by potentials that enforce semi-flexibility and self-avoidance. The fluid flow produced by the active beads and the forces they mediate are explicitly taken into account in the overdamped equations of motion describing the colloid-filament assembly. The speed and efficiency of transport depend on the dynamical conformational states of the filament. We characterize these states using filament writhe as an order parameter and identify ones yielding maxima in speed and efficiency of transport. The transport mechanism reported here has a remarkable resemblance to the flagellar propulsion of microorganisms which suggests its utility in biomimetic systems.

  19. Colloidal transport by active filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Raj Kumar; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Adhikari, R.

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced colloidal transport beyond the limit imposed by diffusion is usually achieved through external fields. Here, we demonstrate the ballistic transport of a colloidal sphere using internal sources of energy provided by an attached active filament. The latter is modeled as a chain of chemo-mechanically active beads connected by potentials that enforce semi-flexibility and self-avoidance. The fluid flow produced by the active beads and the forces they mediate are explicitly taken into account in the overdamped equations of motion describing the colloid-filament assembly. The speed and efficiency of transport depend on the dynamical conformational states of the filament. We characterize these states using filament writhe as an order parameter and identify ones yielding maxima in speed and efficiency of transport. The transport mechanism reported here has a remarkable resemblance to the flagellar propulsion of microorganisms which suggests its utility in biomimetic systems.

  20. Stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhmaidi, D.; Provenzale, A.; Lili, T.; Babiano, A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the results of a numerical study on the stability of two-dimensional vorticity filaments around a circular vortex. We illustrate how the stability of the filaments depends on the balance between the strain associated with the far field of the vortex and the local vorticity of the filament, and we discuss an empirical criterion for filament stability

  1. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siccardi, Stefano, E-mail: ssiccardi@2ssas.it [The Unconventional Computing Centre, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom); Tuszynski, Jack A., E-mail: jackt@ualberta.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Adamatzky, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.adamatzky@uwe.ac.uk [The Unconventional Computing Centre, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-08

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications. - Highlights: • We simulate interaction between voltage pulses using on actin filaments. • We use a coupled nonlinear transmission line model. • We design Boolean logical gates via interactions between the voltage pulses. • We construct one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses.

  2. Elastic waves and transition to elastic turbulence in a two-dimensional viscoelastic Kolmogorov flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, S.; Boffetta, G.

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the two-dimensional periodic Kolmogorov flow of a viscoelastic fluid, described by the Oldroyd-B model, by means of direct numerical simulations. Above a critical Weissenberg number the flow displays a transition from stationary to randomly fluctuating states, via periodic ones. The increasing complexity of the flow in both time and space at progressively higher values of elasticity accompanies the establishment of mixing features. The peculiar dynamical behavior observed in the simulations is found to be related to the appearance of filamental propagating patterns, which develop even in the limit of very small inertial nonlinearities, thanks to the feedback of elastic forces on the flow.

  3. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  4. A Nanodiamond-peptide Bioconjugate for Fluorescence and ODMR Microscopy of a Single Actin Filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genjo, Takuya; Sotoma, Shingo; Tanabe, Ryotaro; Igarashi, Ryuji; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the importance of conformational changes in actin filaments induced by mechanical stimulation of a cell has been increasingly recognized, especially in terms of mechanobiology. Despite its fundamental importance, however, long-term observation of a single actin filament by fluorescent microscopy has been difficult because of the low photostability of traditional fluorescent molecules. This paper reports a novel molecular labeling system for actin filaments using fluorescent nanodiamond (ND) particles harboring nitrogen-vacancy centers; ND has flexible chemical modifiability, extremely high photostability and biocompatibility, and provides a variety of physical information quantitatively via optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements. We performed the chemical surface modification of an ND with the actin filament-specific binding peptide Lifeact and observed colocalization of pure Lifeact-modified ND and actin filaments by the ODMR selective imaging protocol, suggesting the capability of long-term observation and quantitative analysis of a single molecule by using an ND particle.

  5. Biophysically realistic filament bending dynamics in agent-based biological simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Alberts

    Full Text Available An appealing tool for study of the complex biological behaviors that can emerge from networks of simple molecular interactions is an agent-based, computational simulation that explicitly tracks small-scale local interactions--following thousands to millions of states through time. For many critical cell processes (e.g. cytokinetic furrow specification, nuclear centration, cytokinesis, the flexible nature of cytoskeletal filaments is likely to be critical. Any computer model that hopes to explain the complex emergent behaviors in these processes therefore needs to encode filament flexibility in a realistic manner. Here I present a numerically convenient and biophysically realistic method for modeling cytoskeletal filament flexibility in silico. Each cytoskeletal filament is represented by a series of rigid segments linked end-to-end in series with a variable attachment point for the translational elastic element. This connection scheme allows an empirically tuning, for a wide range of segment sizes, viscosities, and time-steps, that endows any filament species with the experimentally observed (or theoretically expected static force deflection, relaxation time-constant, and thermal writhing motions. I additionally employ a unique pair of elastic elements--one representing the axial and the other the bending rigidity- that formulate the restoring force in terms of single time-step constraint resolution. This method is highly local -adjacent rigid segments of a filament only interact with one another through constraint forces-and is thus well-suited to simulations in which arbitrary additional forces (e.g. those representing interactions of a filament with other bodies or cross-links / entanglements between filaments may be present. Implementation in code is straightforward; Java source code is available at www.celldynamics.org.

  6. On the motion of Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquid filaments: Stretching, beading, blistering, pinching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, Linda Beth

    The motion and stability of a liquid filament drawn out behind a falling drop is examined experimentally and mathematically for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. We confirm experimentally that an exact solution for the interfacial motion of an infinite Newtonian filament captures the thinning of the filament in experiments with several fluids. We also show experimentally that a linear stability analysis of this solution correctly predicts whether the filament end-pinches or internally-pinches, creating either one or several satellite drops. We derive an exact solution for a purely extensional cylindrical filament of non-Newtonian fluid that satisfies both the Upper Convected Maxwell and Oldroyd-B constitutive laws. The resulting prediction of decreasing filament thickness agrees with our experimental measurements for dilute polymer solutions. In the limit t → infinity, the exact solution approaches that for a Newtonian fluid. In experiments with a polyelectrolyte polymer (xanthan gum) solution, the drop length sensitively depends on the ionic strength of the solvent environment due to charge screening effects. We also study the "beadon-string" phenomenon, in which a nascent disturbance grows to finite size along a filament. In experiments with an aqueous polymer solution the perturbation grows logarithmically, and may saturate in size to a nearly spherical shape. Numerical simulations of a simple 1-D model for the bead predicts the logarithmic growth, but fail to capture saturation. Finally, in experiments with surfactant solutions composed of wormlike micelles, with low concentrations, the drop pinches-off in one location along the filament, and the free filament ends contract toward the orifice or drop. For higher concentrations, this free filament does not fully retract, instead it retains some of its deformation. The drop may also stall in its downward motion, such that elasticity balances the weight of the drop. For still higher concentration surfactant

  7. Three-dimensional stochastic model of actin–myosin binding in the sarcomere lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M.; Kayser-Herold, Oliver; Stojanovic, Boban; Nedic, Djordje; Irving, Thomas C.; Geeves, MA (Harvard); (IIT); (U. Kent); (Kragujevac)

    2016-11-18

    The effect of molecule tethering in three-dimensional (3-D) space on bimolecular binding kinetics is rarely addressed and only occasionally incorporated into models of cell motility. The simplest system that can quantitatively determine this effect is the 3-D sarcomere lattice of the striated muscle, where tethered myosin in thick filaments can only bind to a relatively small number of available sites on the actin filament, positioned within a limited range of thermal movement of the myosin head. Here we implement spatially explicit actomyosin interactions into the multiscale Monte Carlo platform MUSICO, specifically defining how geometrical constraints on tethered myosins can modulate state transition rates in the actomyosin cycle. The simulations provide the distribution of myosin bound to sites on actin, ensure conservation of the number of interacting myosins and actin monomers, and most importantly, the departure in behavior of tethered myosin molecules from unconstrained myosin interactions with actin. In addition, MUSICO determines the number of cross-bridges in each actomyosin cycle state, the force and number of attached cross-bridges per myosin filament, the range of cross-bridge forces and accounts for energy consumption. At the macroscopic scale, MUSICO simulations show large differences in predicted force-velocity curves and in the response during early force recovery phase after a step change in length comparing to the two simplest mass action kinetic models. The origin of these differences is rooted in the different fluxes of myosin binding and corresponding instantaneous cross-bridge distributions and quantitatively reflects a major flaw of the mathematical description in all mass action kinetic models. Consequently, this new approach shows that accurate recapitulation of experimental data requires significantly different binding rates, number of actomyosin states, and cross-bridge elasticity than typically used in mass action kinetic models to

  8. Beam distribution function after filamentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Decker, F.J.; Seeman, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the authors calculate the beam distribution function after filamentation (phase-mixing) of a focusing mismatch. This distribution is relevant when interpreting beam measurements and sources of emittance dilution in linear colliders. It is also important when considering methods of diluting the phase space density, which may be required for the machine protection system in future linear colliders, and it is important when studying effects of trapped ions which filament in the electron beam potential. Finally, the resulting distribution is compared with measured beam distributions from the SLAC linac.

  9. Computational Elastic Knots

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Xin

    2013-05-01

    Elastic rods have been studied intensively since the 18th century. Even now the theory of elastic rods is still developing and enjoying popularity in computer graphics and physical-based simulation. Elastic rods also draw attention from architects. Architectural structures, NODUS, were constructed by elastic rods as a new method of form-finding. We study discrete models of elastic rods and NODUS structures. We also develop computational tools to find the equilibria of elastic rods and the shape of NODUS. Applications of elastic rods in forming torus knot and closing Bishop frame are included in this thesis.

  10. Polymerization and oscillation stuttering in a filamentous model of the subcellular Min oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Sengupta, Supratim; Sain, Anirban; Derr, Julien

    2011-03-01

    We present a computational model of the E. coli Min oscillation that involves polymerization of MinD filaments followed by depolymerization stimulated by filament-end zones of MinE. Our stochastic model is fully three-dimensional, and tracks the diffusion and interactions of every MinD and MinE molecule. We recover self-organized Min oscillations. We investigate the experimental phenomenon of oscillation stuttering, which we relate to the disruption of MinE tip-binding at the filament scale.

  11. Magnetic helicity and active filament configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F.; Poedts, S.; Soenen, A.; Zuccarello, F. P.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The role of magnetic helicity in active filament formation and destabilization is still under debate. Aims: Although active filaments usually show a sigmoid shape and a twisted configuration before and during their eruption, it is unclear which mechanism leads to these topologies. In order to provide an observational contribution to clarify these issues, we describe a filament evolution whose characteristics seem to be directly linked to the magnetic helicity transport in corona. Methods: We applied different methods to determine the helicity sign and the chirality of the filament magnetic field. We also computed the magnetic helicity transport rate at the filament footpoints. Results: All the observational signatures provided information on the positive helicity and sinistral chirality of the flux rope containing the filament material: its forward S shape, the orientation of its barbs, the bright and dark threads at 195 Å. Moreover, the magnetic helicity transport rate at the filament footpoints showed a clear accumulation of positive helicity. Conclusions: The study of this event showed a correspondence between several signatures of the sinistral chirality of the filament and several evidences of the positive magnetic helicity of the filament magnetic field. We also found that the magnetic helicity transported along the filament footpoints showed an increase just before the change of the filament shape observed in Hα images. We argued that the photospheric regions where the filament was rooted might be the preferential ways where the magnetic helicity was injected along the filament itself and where the conditions to trigger the eruption were yielded.

  12. The effects of polymer molecular weight on filament thinning and drop breakup in microchannels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arratia, P E; Cramer, L-A; Gollub, J P; Durian, D J

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effects of fluid elasticity on the dynamics of filament thinning and drop breakup processes in a cross-slot microchannel. Elasticity effects are examined using dilute aqueous polymeric solutions of molecular weight (MW) ranging from 1.5x10 3 to 1.8x10 7 . Results for polymeric fluids are compared to those for a viscous Newtonian fluid. The shearing or continuous phase that induces breakup is mineral oil. All fluids possess similar shear-viscosity (∼0.2 Pa s) so that the viscosity ratio between the oil and aqueous phases is close to unity. Measurements of filament thickness as a function of time show different thinning behavior for the different aqueous fluids. For Newtonian fluids, the thinning process shows a single exponential decay of the filament thickness. For low MW fluids (10 3 , 10 4 and 10 5 ), the thinning process also shows a single exponential decay, but with a decay rate that is slower than for the Newtonian fluid. The decay time increases with polymer MW. For high MW (10 6 and 10 7 ) fluids, the initial exponential decay crosses over to a second exponential decay in which elastic stresses are important. We show that the decay rate of the filament thickness in this exponential decay regime can be used to measure the steady extensional viscosity of the fluids. At late times, all fluids cross over to an algebraic decay which is driven mainly by surface tension.

  13. Filament Winding. A Unified Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koussios, S.

    2004-01-01

    In this dissertation we have presented an overview and comprehensive treatment of several facets of the filament winding process. With the concepts of differential geometry and the theory of thin anisotropic shells of revolution, a parametric shape generator has been formulated for the design

  14. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...

  15. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The capillary thinning of filaments of a Newtonian polybutene fluid and a viscoelastic polyisobutylene solution are analyzed experimentally and by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially, a liquid sample is placed between two cylindrical plates. Then...

  16. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    The capillary thinning of a polymeric filament is analysed experimentally as well as by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially a liquid sample is kept between two cylindrical plates. Then the bottom plate is lowered under gravity to yield a given strain...

  17. Various Barbs in Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Boris

    2017-07-01

    Interest to lateral details of the solar filament shape named barbs, motivated by their relationship to filament chirality and helicity, showed their different orientation relative to the expected direction of the magnetic field. While the majority of barbs are stretched along the field, some barbs seem to be transversal to it and are referred to as anomalous barbs. We analyse the deformation of helical field lines by a small parasitic polarity using a simple flux rope model with a force-free field. A rather small and distant source of parasitic polarity stretches the bottom parts of the helical lines in its direction creating a lateral extension of dips below the flux-rope axis. They can be considered as normal barbs of the filament. A stronger and closer source of parasitic polarity makes the flux-rope field lines to be convex below its axis and creates narrow and deep dips near its position. As a result, the narrow structure, with thin threads across it, is formed whose axis is nearly perpendicular to the field. The structure resembles an anomalous barb. Hence, the presence of anomalous barbs does not contradict the flux-rope structure of a filament.

  18. Transient filament stretching rheometer II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The Lagrangian sspecification is used to simulate the transient stretching filament rheometer. Simulations are performed for dilute PIB-solutions modeled as a four mode Oldroyd-B fluid and a semidilute PIB-solution modeled as a non-linear single integral equation. The simulations are compared...

  19. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...... propagation structures in lasers and amplifiers which suppress lateral reflections....

  20. Positrusion Filament Recycling System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes a novel process to produce 3d printer feedstock filament out of scrap ABS on the ISS. Currently the plastic filament materials that most 3d printers use...

  1. Tissue elasticity and the ageing elastic fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Sherratt, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of elastic tissues to deform under physiological forces and to subsequently release stored energy to drive passive recoil is vital to the function of many dynamic tissues. Within vertebrates, elastic fibres allow arteries and lungs to expand and contract, thus controlling variations in blood pressure and returning the pulmonary system to a resting state. Elastic fibres are composite structures composed of a cross-linked elastin core and an outer layer of fibrillin microfibrils. Th...

  2. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Huai Liang Xu; See Leang Chin

    2010-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence sp...

  3. Filament Winding Of Carbon/Carbon Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoy, Paul J.; Schmitigal, Wesley P.; Phillips, Wayne M.

    1991-01-01

    Improved method of winding carbon filaments for carbon/carbon composite structures less costly and labor-intensive, also produces more consistent results. Involves use of roller squeegee to ensure filaments continuously wet with resin during winding. Also involves control of spacing and resin contents of plies to obtain strong bonds between carbon filaments and carbon matrices. Lends itself to full automation and involves use of filaments and matrix-precursor resins in their simplest forms, thereby reducing costs.

  4. Solar Filaments as Tracers of Subsurface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Filaments are clouds of relatively cool and dense gas in the solar atmosphere. ... First-tier filaments may be related to a peculiar feature of the solar dynamo. .... Still, an appeal to subsurface processes should be resisted, but surface motion models have been able to reproduce neither the pattern of filament field orientations ...

  5. Striation and convection in penumbral filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, H.C.; Scharmer, G.B.; Löfdahl, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Observations with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope of the flows seen in penumbral filaments are presented. Time sequences of bright filaments show overturning motions strikingly similar to those seen along the walls of small isolated structures in the active regions. The filaments show outward

  6. Solar Filaments as Tracers of Subsurface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    according to which, probably all the magnetic flux that emerges into the photosphere is twisted. Twisted flux forms sunspots, active regions (ARs) and filaments. The twist accumulates in filaments and coronal arcades. Eventually the accumulated, highly twisted fields become unstable and erupt. From a study of filament ...

  7. Coupled elasticity-diffusion model for the effects of cytoskeleton deformation on cellular uptake of cylindrical nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jizeng; Li, Long

    2015-01-06

    Molecular dynamic simulations and experiments have recently demonstrated how cylindrical nanoparticles (CNPs) with large aspect ratios penetrate animal cells and inevitably deform cytoskeletons. Thus, a coupled elasticity-diffusion model was adopted to elucidate this interesting biological phenomenon by considering the effects of elastic deformations of cytoskeleton and membrane, ligand-receptor binding and receptor diffusion. The mechanism by which the binding energy drives the CNPs with different orientations to enter host cells was explored. This mechanism involved overcoming the resistance caused by cytoskeleton and membrane deformations and the change in configurational entropy of the ligand-receptor bonds and free receptors. Results showed that deformation of the cytoskeleton significantly influenced the engulfing process by effectively slowing down and even hindering the entry of the CNPs. Additionally, the engulfing depth was determined quantitatively. CNPs preferred or tended to vertically attack target cells until they were stuck in the cytoskeleton as implied by the speed of vertically oriented CNPs that showed much faster initial engulfing speeds than horizontally oriented CNPs. These results elucidated the most recent molecular dynamics simulations and experimental observations on the cellular uptake of carbon nanotubes and phagocytosis of filamentous Escherichia coli bacteria. The most efficient engulfment showed the stiffness-dependent optimal radius of the CNPs. Cytoskeleton stiffness exhibited more significant influence on the optimal sizes of the vertical uptake than the horizontal uptake. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonlinear Loading-Rate-Dependent Force Response of Individual Vimentin Intermediate Filaments to Applied Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Johanna; Witt, Hannes; Candelli, Andrea; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Janshoff, Andreas; Köster, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells are to a great extent determined by the cytoskeleton, a composite network of different filamentous proteins. Among these, intermediate filaments (IFs) are exceptional in their molecular architecture and mechanical properties. Here we directly record stress-strain curves of individual vimentin IFs using optical traps and atomic force microscopy. We find a strong loading rate dependence of the mechanical response, supporting the hypothesis that IFs could serve to protect eukaryotic cells from fast, large deformations. Our experimental results show different unfolding regimes, which we can quantitatively reproduce by an elastically coupled system of multiple two-state elements.

  9. Liquid droplets of cross-linked actin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirich, Kimberly; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayan; Gardel, Margaret

    Soft materials constructed from biomolecules self-assemble into a myriad of structures that work in concert to support cell physiology. One critical soft material is the actin cytoskeleton, a viscoelastic gel composed of cross-linked actin filaments. Although actin networks are primarily known for their elastic properties, which are crucial to regulating cell mechanics, the viscous behavior has been theorized to enable shape changes and flows. We experimentally demonstrate a fluid phase of cross-linked actin, where cross-linker condenses dilute short actin filaments into spindle-shaped droplets, or tactoids. Tactoids have shape dynamics consistent with a continuum model of liquid crystal droplets. The cross-linker, which acts as a long range attractive interaction, analogous to molecular cohesion, controls the tactoid shape and dynamics, which reports on the liquid's interfacial tension and viscosity. We investigate how the cross-linker properties and filament length influence the liquid properties. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism to control organization of the actin cytoskeleton and provide insight into design principles for complex, macromolecular liquid phases.

  10. Tissue elasticity and the ageing elastic fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherratt, Michael J

    2009-12-01

    The ability of elastic tissues to deform under physiological forces and to subsequently release stored energy to drive passive recoil is vital to the function of many dynamic tissues. Within vertebrates, elastic fibres allow arteries and lungs to expand and contract, thus controlling variations in blood pressure and returning the pulmonary system to a resting state. Elastic fibres are composite structures composed of a cross-linked elastin core and an outer layer of fibrillin microfibrils. These two components perform distinct roles; elastin stores energy and drives passive recoil, whilst fibrillin microfibrils direct elastogenesis, mediate cell signalling, maintain tissue homeostasis via TGFβ sequestration and potentially act to reinforce the elastic fibre. In many tissues reduced elasticity, as a result of compromised elastic fibre function, becomes increasingly prevalent with age and contributes significantly to the burden of human morbidity and mortality. This review considers how the unique molecular structure, tissue distribution and longevity of elastic fibres pre-disposes these abundant extracellular matrix structures to the accumulation of damage in ageing dermal, pulmonary and vascular tissues. As compromised elasticity is a common feature of ageing dynamic tissues, the development of strategies to prevent, limit or reverse this loss of function will play a key role in reducing age-related morbidity and mortality.

  11. Chaperonin filaments: their formation and an evaluation of methods for studying them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, T; Kagawa, H K; Trent, J D

    1998-08-01

    Chaperonins are multisubunit protein complexes that can be isolated from cells as high-molecular-weight structures that appear as double rings in the electron microscope. We recently discovered that chaperonin double rings isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, when incubated at physiological temperatures in the presence of ATP and Mg2+, stacked into filaments; we hypothesized that these filaments are related to filaments seen inside S. shibatae cells and that chaperonins exist as filaments in vivo (J. D. Trent et al., 1997, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 5383-5388). This paper elucidates the conditions under which we have observed S. shibatae chaperonins to form filaments and evaluates native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation as methods for studying these filaments. We observed that in the presence of Mg2+ combined with ATP, ADP, ATPgammaS, or GTP, native PAGE indicated that chaperonin subunits assembled into double rings and that the conformation of these double rings was effected by nucleotide binding, but we saw no indication of chaperonin filament formation. Under these same conditions, however, TEM, spectroscopy, and centrifugation methods indicated that chaperonin subunits and double rings had assembled into filaments. We determined that this discrepancy in the representation of the chaperonin structure was due to the native PAGE method itself. When we exposed chaperonin filaments to the electrophoretic field used in native PAGE, the filaments dissociated into double rings. This suggests that TEM, spectrophotometry, and centrifugation are the preferred methods for studying the higher-order structures of chaperonins, which are likely to be of biological significance. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  12. UNUSUAL FILAMENTS INSIDE THE UMBRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleint, L. [High Altitude Observatory/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Sainz Dalda, A., E-mail: kleintl@ucar.edu [Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research, Stanford University, HEPL, 466 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We analyze several unusual filamentary structures which appeared in the umbra of one of the sunspots in AR 11302. They do not resemble typical light bridges in morphology or in evolution. We analyze data from SDO/HMI to investigate their temporal evolution, Hinode/SP for photospheric inversions, IBIS for chromospheric imaging, and SDO/AIA for the overlying corona. Photospheric inversions reveal a horizontal, inverse Evershed flow along these structures, which we call umbral filaments. Chromospheric images show brightenings and energy dissipation, while coronal images indicate that bright coronal loops seem to end in these umbral filaments. These rapidly evolving features do not seem to be common, and are possibly related to the high flare-productivity of the active region. Their analysis could help to understand the complex evolution of active regions.

  13. [Chitinolytic activity of filamentous fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubakov, A A; Kucheriavykh, P S

    2004-01-01

    The chitinolytic activity of nine species of filamentous fungi, classified with seven genera (specifically, Aspergillus, Penicillium, Trichoderma, Paecilomyces, Sporotrichum, Beaueria, and Mucor), was studied. When cultured in liquid medium containing 1% crystalline chitin, all fungi produced extracellular chitosans with activity varying from 0.2 U/mg protein (Sporotrichum olivaceum, Mucor sp., etc.) to 4.0-4.2 U/mg protein (Trichoderma lignorum, Aspergillus niger).

  14. Lighting the universe with filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Theuns, Tom

    2007-09-14

    The first stars in the universe form when chemically pristine gas heats as it falls into dark-matter potential wells, cools radiatively because of the formation of molecular hydrogen, and becomes self-gravitating. Using supercomputer simulations, we demonstrated that the stars' properties depend critically on the currently unknown nature of the dark matter. If the dark-matter particles have intrinsic velocities that wipe out small-scale structure, then the first stars form in filaments with lengths on the order of the free-streaming scale, which can be approximately 10(20) meters (approximately 3 kiloparsecs, corresponding to a baryonic mass of approximately 10(7) solar masses) for realistic "warm dark matter" candidates. Fragmentation of the filaments forms stars with a range of masses, which may explain the observed peculiar element abundance pattern of extremely metal-poor stars, whereas coalescence of fragments and stars during the filament's ultimate collapse may seed the supermassive black holes that lurk in the centers of most massive galaxies.

  15. Elastic Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Fagertun, Jens; Larsen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a fusion of the active appearance model (AAM) and the Riemannian elasticity framework which yields a non-linear shape model and a linear texture model – the active elastic appearance model (EAM). The non-linear elasticity shape model is more flexible than the usual linear subs...

  16. Numerical prediction of the elastic characteristics of spatially reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoshkin, A. N.; Pisarev, P. V.; Ermakov, D. A.; Maksimova, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the effective elastic characteristics of spatially reinforced composite materials is calculated. The problem is solved by the finite element method in the Ansys Workbench software using the periodicity cell of the material. When constructing the model, were considered the weaving scheme, the volume fraction of the reinforcing skeleton, and the geometric shape of the reinforcing filaments. The effective elastic modulesare determined by the volume averaging method. To obtain nine independent characteristics of the orthotropic material, six calculation modes were used: tensionalong the axis and ashear in the planes. The stress-strain state of reinforcing filaments is analyzed.

  17. Actin in dividing cells: contractile ring filaments bind heavy meromyosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, T E

    1973-06-01

    Many microfilaments and microtubules are well preserved after glycerol-extraction of HeLa cells at room temperature (22 degrees ). Incubation in heavy meromyosin from rabbit skeletal muscle results in conspicuous and characteristic "decoration" of microfilaments of the contractile ring. Decoration is completely prevented by 10 mM ATP or 2 mM pyrophosphate, and fails to occur if heavy meromyosin is either omitted or replaced by egg albumin, a nonspecific protein. Decorated microfilaments have a substructure consisting of polarized, repeating arrowheads 27-35 nm apart. The specificity of these results strongly suggests that microfilaments of the contractile ring in HeLa cells are closely related to muscle actin. Very thin undecorated strands among the microfilaments of the contractile ring possibly represent a myosin component. These findings are discussed in terms of: the actomyosin-like properties of the contractile ring as a mechanochemical organelle that causes cell cleavage; the probable universal occurrence of actin-like protein in all dividing animal cells; and the contractile ring's combined sensitivity to cytochalasin B and its affinity for heavy meromyosin, a combination unique among microfilamentous organelles.

  18. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Liang Xu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation.

  19. Metal ion-dependent, reversible, protein filament formation by designed beta-roll polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotter, Andrew J; Guo, Meng; Tomczak, Melanie M; Daley, Margaret E; Campbell, Robert L; Oko, Richard J; Bateman, David A; Chakrabartty, Avijit; Sykes, Brian D; Davies, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    Background A right-handed, calcium-dependent β-roll structure found in secreted proteases and repeat-in-toxin proteins was used as a template for the design of minimal, soluble, monomeric polypeptides that would fold in the presence of Ca2+. Two polypeptides were synthesised to contain two and four metal-binding sites, respectively, and exploit stacked tryptophan pairs to stabilise the fold and report on the conformational state of the polypeptide. Results Initial analysis of the two polypeptides in the presence of calcium suggested the polypeptides were disordered. The addition of lanthanum to these peptides caused aggregation. Upon further study by right angle light scattering and electron microscopy, the aggregates were identified as ordered protein filaments that required lanthanum to polymerize. These filaments could be disassembled by the addition of a chelating agent. A simple head-to-tail model is proposed for filament formation that explains the metal ion-dependency. The model is supported by the capping of one of the polypeptides with biotin, which disrupts filament formation and provides the ability to control the average length of the filaments. Conclusion Metal ion-dependent, reversible protein filament formation is demonstrated for two designed polypeptides. The polypeptides form filaments that are approximately 3 nm in diameter and several hundred nm in length. They are not amyloid-like in nature as demonstrated by their behaviour in the presence of congo red and thioflavin T. A capping strategy allows for the control of filament length and for potential applications including the "decoration" of a protein filament with various functional moieties. PMID:17908326

  20. The Mysterious Case of the Missing Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections, or CMEs, are large solar eruptions that can have major debilitating impacts on society. Typically, these eruptions have the three following key structures: the leading edge, the empty chamber known as the cavity, and the filament which often is the brightest part of the CME. When we can see all three structures clearly with a coronagraph, it is called a classic three-part CME, also referred to as a 'lightbulb' CME. According to current knowledge, when a CME erupts, a filament should also erupt or lift off the Sun in order to have the bright center within the CME. However, we do not always see a filament erupt at the surface, and yet we still get a 'filament' within the coronagraph CME. To better understand what might be occurring with these missing filaments, we looked at three-part CMEs using the SOHO LASCO CME Catalog and filaments from the SDO AIA Filament Catalog in order to create a list of 50 CMEs without a listed filament erupting at the surface. For those CMEs without filaments in the list we closely inspected the AIA images for evidence of filament eruption. To ensure that there were no filaments past the limb of the Sun, we used data from the STEREO-A and STEREO-B spacecraft's to look at the Sun from other angles. We have found numerous events where no filament erupts from the surface, but we still see the classic three-part CME. We believe this may be due to an optical illusion occurring from the twisting of the flux rope.

  1. The Apis mellifera Filamentous Virus Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gauthier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A complete reference genome of the Apis mellifera Filamentous virus (AmFV was determined using Illumina Hiseq sequencing. The AmFV genome is a double stranded DNA molecule of approximately 498,500 nucleotides with a GC content of 50.8%. It encompasses 247 non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs, equally distributed on both strands, which cover 65% of the genome. While most of the ORFs lacked threshold sequence alignments to reference protein databases, twenty-eight were found to display significant homologies with proteins present in other large double stranded DNA viruses. Remarkably, 13 ORFs had strong similarity with typical baculovirus domains such as PIFs (per os infectivity factor genes: pif-1, pif-2, pif-3 and p74 and BRO (Baculovirus Repeated Open Reading Frame. The putative AmFV DNA polymerase is of type B, but is only distantly related to those of the baculoviruses. The ORFs encoding proteins involved in nucleotide metabolism had the highest percent identity to viral proteins in GenBank. Other notable features include the presence of several collagen-like, chitin-binding, kinesin and pacifastin domains. Due to the large size of the AmFV genome and the inconsistent affiliation with other large double stranded DNA virus families infecting invertebrates, AmFV may belong to a new virus family.

  2. Theory of Spacetime Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Andrei A.; Lurie, Sergey A.

    We present the theory of spacetime elasticity and demonstrate that it involves traditional thermoelasticity. Assuming linear-elastic constitutive behavior and using spacetime transversely-isotropic elastic constants, we derive all principal thermodynamic relations of classical thermoelasticity. We introduce the spacetime principle of virtual work, and use it to derive the equations of motion for both reversible and dissipative thermoelastic dynamics. We show that spacetime elasticity directly implies the Fourier and the Maxwell-Cattaneo laws of heat conduction. However, spacetime elasticity is richer than classical thermoelasticity, and it advocates its own equations of motion for coupled thermoelasticity, complemented by the spectrum of boundary and interface conditions. We argue that the presented framework of spacetime elasticity should prove adequate for describing the thermoelastic phenomena occurring at low temperatures, for interpreting the results of molecular simulations of heat conduction in solids, and also for the optimal heat and stress management in the microelectronic components and the thermoelectric devices.

  3. Subcutaneous implants of polypropylene filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, T C; Chartoff, R P; Cosgrove, S L; McCuskey, R S

    1976-11-01

    Extruded filaments of unmodified polypropylene (PP) with and without antioxidant were implanted subcutaneously in hamsters in order to determine their rate of degradation. Specimens were removed periodically during a 5 month test period and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical testing. The analyses show that degradation beigns to occur after only a few days. Although the reaction sequence is not known, several factors suggest that the in vivo degradation process is similar to autoxidation which occurs in air or oxygen. The infrared data indicate that the hydroxyl content of the implants increases at a rate of 0.061 mg/g polypropylene per day during the initiation phase of the reaction. An induction time of 108 days was extablished. Carbonyl bonds appear after an implantation time of 50--90 days and increase therafter. Mechanical tests indicate a decrease in the dynamic loss tangent, tan delta, during the first month of implantation for unmodified polypropylene. No change in the infrared spectra or tan delta was observed, however, for implants containing an antioxidant. Thus, it is apparent that polypropylene filaments implanted subcutaneously in hamsters degrade by an oxidation process which is retarded effectively by using an antioxidant. While the findings reported are specific to subcutaneous polypropylene implants, they suggest that degradation of other systems may involve similar processes. This notion suggests directions for further research on increasing the in vivo stability of synthetic polymers. Long-term effects of polymer implantation upon tissue were not studied in this work.

  4. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of a Cryptochrome from the Filamentous Fungus Neurospora crassa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Froehlich, Allan C.; Chen, Chen-Hui; Belden, William J.; Madeti, Cornelia; Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    In plants and animals, cryptochromes function as either photoreceptors or circadian clock components. We have examined the cryptochrome from the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and demonstrate that Neurospora cry encodes a DASH-type cryptochrome that appears capable of binding flavin adenine

  5. Effectors of Filamentous Plant Pathogens: Commonalities amid Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschetti, Marina; Maqbool, Abbas; Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Maximiliano J; Pennington, Helen G; Kamoun, Sophien; Banfield, Mark J

    2017-06-01

    Fungi and oomycetes are filamentous microorganisms that include a diversity of highly developed pathogens of plants. These are sophisticated modulators of plant processes that secrete an arsenal of effector proteins to target multiple host cell compartments and enable parasitic infection. Genome sequencing revealed complex catalogues of effectors of filamentous pathogens, with some species harboring hundreds of effector genes. Although a large fraction of these effector genes encode secreted proteins with weak or no sequence similarity to known proteins, structural studies have revealed unexpected similarities amid the diversity. This article reviews progress in our understanding of effector structure and function in light of these new insights. We conclude that there is emerging evidence for multiple pathways of evolution of effectors of filamentous plant pathogens but that some families have probably expanded from a common ancestor by duplication and diversification. Conserved folds, such as the oomycete WY and the fungal MAX domains, are not predictive of the precise function of the effectors but serve as a chassis to support protein structural integrity while providing enough plasticity for the effectors to bind different host proteins and evolve unrelated activities inside host cells. Further effector evolution and diversification arise via short linear motifs, domain integration and duplications, and oligomerization. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Filament poisoning at typical carbon nanotube deposition conditions by hot-filament CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the poisoning of tungsten filaments during the hot-filament chemical vapour deposition process at typical carbon nanotube (CNT) deposition conditions and filament temperatures ranging from 1400 to 2000 °C. The morphological...

  7. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Written in an engaging, easy-to-follow style, the recipes will help you to extend the capabilities of ElasticSearch to manage your data effectively.If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications, manage data, or have decided to start using ElasticSearch, this book is ideal for you. This book assumes that you've got working knowledge of JSON and Java

  8. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  9. Human actin mutations associated with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies demonstrate distinct thin filament regulatory properties in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debold, Edward P; Saber, Walid; Cheema, Yaser; Bookwalter, Carol S; Trybus, Kathleen M; Warshaw, David M; Vanburen, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Two cardiomyopathic mutations were expressed in human cardiac actin, using a Baculovirus/insect cell system; E99K is associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy whereas R312H is associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypothesis that the divergent phenotypes of these two cardiomyopathies are associated with fundamental differences in the molecular mechanics and thin filament regulation of the underlying actin mutation was tested using the in vitro motility and laser trap assays. In the presence of troponin (Tn) and tropomyosin (Tm), beta-cardiac myosin moved both E99K and R312H thin filaments at significantly (pATP concentration revealed similar ATP binding rates but slowed ADP release rates for the two actin mutants compared to WT. Single molecule laser trap experiments performed using both unregulated (i.e. actin) and regulated thin filaments in the absence of Ca(++) revealed that neither actin mutation significantly affected the myosin's unitary step size (d) or duration of strong actin binding (t(on)) at 20 microM ATP. However, the frequency of individual strong-binding events in the presence of Tn and Tm, was significantly lower for E99K than WT at comparable myosin surface concentrations. The cooperativity of a second myosin head binding to the thin filament was also impaired by E99K. In conclusion, E99K inhibits the activation of the thin filament by myosin strong-binding whereas R312H demonstrates enhanced calcium activation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA Bending elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, David Alexander

    DNA bending elasticity on length scales of tens of basepairs is of critical importance in numerous biological contexts. Even the simplest models of DNA bending admit of few simple analytic results, thus there is a need for numerical methods to calculate experimental observables, such as distance distributions, forces, FRET efficiencies, and timescales of particular large-scale motions. We have implemented and helped develop a coarse-grained representation of DNA and various other covalently-linked groups that allows simple calculation of such observables for varied experimental systems. The simple freely-jointed chain (FJC) model and extremely coarse resolution proved useful in understanding DNA threading through nanopores, identifying steric occlusion by other parts of the chain as a prime culprit for slower capture as distance to the pore decreased. Enhanced sampling techniques of a finer resolution discrete wormlike chain (WLC) model permitted calculation of cyclization rates for small chains and identified the ramifications of a thermodynamically-sound treatment of thermal melts. Adding treatment of double-stranded DNA's helical nature and single-stranded DNA provided a model system that helped demonstrate the importance of statistical fluctuations in even highly-stressed DNA mini-loops, and allowed us to verify that even these constructs show no evidence of excitation-induced softening. Additional incorporation of salt-sensitivity to the model allowed us to calculate forces and FRET efficiencies for such mini-loops and their uncircularized precursors, thereby furthering the understanding of the nature of IHF binding and bending of its recognition sequence. Adding large volume-excluding spheres linked to the ends of the dsDNA permits calculation of distance distributions and thus small-angle X-ray scattering, whereby we demonstrated the validity of the WLC in describing bending fluctuations in DNA chains as short as 42 bp. We also make important connections

  11. Fine filament NbTi superconductive composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S.; Grabinsky, G.; Marancik, W.; Pattanayak, D.

    1986-01-01

    The large superconducting magnet for the high energy physics accelerator requires fine filament composite to minimize the field error due to the persistent current in the filaments. New concepts toward the fine filament composite and its cable fabrication are discussed. Two-stage cables of fine wire with intermediate number of filaments were introduced. The first stage was six wires cables around one and in the second stage this was used to produce a Rutherford cable. The advantage of this process is in the ease of billet fabrication since the number of filaments in a single wire is within the range of easy billet fabrication. The disadvantage is in the cable fabrication. One of the major concerns in the fabrication of fine NbTi filaments composite in a copper matrix is the intermetallic compound formation during the extrusion and heat treatment steps. The hard intermetallic particles degrade the uniformity of the filaments and reduce the critical current density. The process of using Nb barrier between the filaments and copper matrix in order to prevent this CuTi intermetallic particle formation is described

  12. Theory of Semiflexible Filaments and Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanlong Meng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review the recent developments in the theory of individual semiflexible filaments, and of a crosslinked network of such filaments, both permanent and transient. Starting from the free energy of an individual semiflexible chain, models on its force-extension relation and other mechanical properties such as Euler buckling are discussed. For a permanently crosslinked network of filaments, theories on how the network responds to deformation are provided, with a focus on continuum approaches. Characteristic features of filament networks, such as nonlinear stress-strain relation, negative normal stress, tensegrity, and marginal stability are discussed. In the new area of transient filament network, where the crosslinks can be dynamically broken and re-formed, we show some recent attempts for understanding the dynamics of the crosslinks, and the related rheological properties, such as stress relaxation, yield stress and plasticity.

  13. Epithelial Intermediate Filaments: Guardians against Microbial Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Geisler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are abundant cytoskeletal components of epithelial tissues. They have been implicated in overall stress protection. A hitherto poorly investigated area of research is the function of intermediate filaments as a barrier to microbial infection. This review summarizes the accumulating knowledge about this interaction. It first emphasizes the unique spatial organization of the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton in different epithelial tissues to protect the organism against microbial insults. We then present examples of direct interaction between viral, bacterial, and parasitic proteins and the intermediate filament system and describe how this affects the microbe-host interaction by modulating the epithelial cytoskeleton, the progression of infection, and host response. These observations not only provide novel insights into the dynamics and function of intermediate filaments but also indicate future avenues to combat microbial infection.

  14. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  15. Kinetics of filamentous phage assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploss, Martin; Kuhn, Andreas

    2010-12-01

    Filamentous phages release their progeny particles by a secretory process without lysing the bacterial cell. By this process about 6 viral particles per min are secreted from each cell. We show here that when the major coat protein (gp8) is provided from a plasmid we observe a phage progeny production rate depending on the induction of gp8 by IPTG. We also show that a transfection of Escherichia coli lacking F-pili is observed using a mutant of M13 that carries an ampicillin resistance gene, and phage particles are secreted in the absence of an F-plasmid. Extruding phage was visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using gold-labeled antibodies to the major coat protein.

  16. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    , this thesis deals with some of the aspects of hyphal growth, which is an important virulence factor for pathogenic fungi infecting both humans and plants. Hyphal establishment through continuous polar growth is a complex process, requiring the careful coordination of a large subset of proteins involved...... in polarity establishment and maintenance, cytoskeleton dynamics and intracellular transport. The first part of this thesis addresses the A. gossypii Arf3 small GTPase and its GEF- and GAP regulators; Yel1 and Gts1, which has been implicated in polar growth in a wide range of organisms. We could demonstrate......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...

  17. Polar patterns of driven filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Volker; Weber, Christoph; Semmrich, Christine; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R

    2010-09-02

    The emergence of collective motion exhibited by systems ranging from flocks of animals to self-propelled microorganisms to the cytoskeleton is a ubiquitous and fascinating self-organization phenomenon. Similarities between these systems, such as the inherent polarity of the constituents, a density-dependent transition to ordered phases or the existence of very large density fluctuations, suggest universal principles underlying pattern formation. This idea is followed by theoretical models at all levels of description: micro- or mesoscopic models directly map local forces and interactions using only a few, preferably simple, interaction rules, and more macroscopic approaches in the hydrodynamic limit rely on the systems' generic symmetries. All these models characteristically have a broad parameter space with a manifold of possible patterns, most of which have not yet been experimentally verified. The complexity of interactions and the limited parameter control of existing experimental systems are major obstacles to our understanding of the underlying ordering principles. Here we demonstrate the emergence of collective motion in a high-density motility assay that consists of highly concentrated actin filaments propelled by immobilized molecular motors in a planar geometry. Above a critical density, the filaments self-organize to form coherently moving structures with persistent density modulations, such as clusters, swirls and interconnected bands. These polar nematic structures are long lived and can span length scales orders of magnitudes larger than their constituents. Our experimental approach, which offers control of all relevant system parameters, complemented by agent-based simulations, allows backtracking of the assembly and disassembly pathways to the underlying local interactions. We identify weak and local alignment interactions to be essential for the observed formation of patterns and their dynamics. The presented minimal polar-pattern-forming system

  18. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications and want to sharpen your understanding of the core elements and applications, this is the book for you. It is assumed that you've got working knowledge of JSON and, if you want to extend ElasticSearch, of Java and related technologies.

  19. Controlling the Morphology of Organic Crystals with Filamentous Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Whirang; Liu, Xiaomeng; Forrest, James; Fowler, Jeffrey D; Furst, Eric M

    2015-07-29

    The preparation of thiamethoxam (TMX) organic crystals with high morphological uniformity was achieved by controlled aggregation-driven crystallization of primitive TMX crystals and phage using the filamentous M13 bacteriophage. The development of a regular, micrometer-sized, tetragonal-bipyramidal crystal structure was dependent on the amount of phage present. The phage appears to affect the supersaturation driving force for crystallization. The phage adsorption isotherm to TMX was well-fitted by the Satake-Yang model, which suggests a cooperative binding between neighboring phages as well as a binding of phage with the TMX crystal surface. This study shows the potential of phage additives to control the morphology and morphological uniformity of organic crystals.

  20. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of two filaments that showed a quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) were made to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17 - 20 (SOL2013-08-17) and September 29 (SOL2013-09-29). The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4×1021 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest a similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed three days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2×1020 Mx, about one order of magnitude lower than that of the first event. Two patches of parasitic polarity in the vicinity of the barb merged, then cancelled with nearby network fields. About 20 hours after the onset of the emergence, the filament erupted. Our findings imply that the location of emerging flux within the filament channel is probably crucial to filament evolution. If the flux emergence appears nearby the barbs, it is highly likely that the emerging flux and the filament magnetic fields will cancel, which may lead to the eruption of the filament. The comparison of the two events shows that the emergence of a small AR may still not be enough to disrupt the stability of a filament system, and the actual eruption only occurs after the flux cancellation sets in.

  1. Automatic Detect and Trace of Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Chen, P. F.; Tang, Yu-hua; Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang

    We developed a series of methods to automatically detect and trace solar filaments in solar Hα images. The programs are able to not only recognize filaments and determine their properties, such as the position, the area and other relevant parameters, but also to trace the daily evolution of the filaments. For solar full disk Hα images, the method consists of three parts: first, preprocessing is applied to correct the original images; second, the Canny edge-detection method is used to detect the filaments; third, filament properties are recognized through the morphological operators. For each Hα filament and its barb features, we introduced the unweighted undirected graph concept and adopted Dijkstra shortest-path algorithm to recognize the filament spine; then, using polarity inversion line shift method for measuring the polarities in both sides of the filament to determine the filament axis chirality; finally, employing connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculating the angle between each barb and spine to indicate the barb chirality. Our algorithms are applied to the observations from varied observatories, including the Optical & Near Infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET) in Nanjing University, Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) and Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The programs are demonstrated to be effective and efficient. We used our method to automatically process and analyze 3470 images obtained by MLSO from January 1998 to December 2009, and a butterfly diagram of filaments is obtained. It shows that the latitudinal migration of solar filaments has three trends in the Solar Cycle 23: The drift velocity was fast from 1998 to the solar maximum; after the solar maximum, it became relatively slow and after 2006, the migration became divergent, signifying the solar minimum. About 60% filaments with the latitudes larger than 50 degree migrate towards the Polar Regions with relatively high velocities, and the latitudinal migrating

  2. Lifetime of titanium filament at constant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.S.; Lanni, C.

    1981-01-01

    Titanium Sublimation Pump (TSP) represents the most efficient and the least expensive method to produce Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) in storage rings. In ISABELLE, a proton storage accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, for example, TSP provides a pumping speed for hydrogen of > 2 x 10 6 l/s. Due to the finite life of titanium filaments, new filaments have to be switched in before the end of filament burn out, to ensure smooth operation of the accelerator. Therefore, several operational modes that can be used to activate the TSP were studied. The constant current mode is a convenient way of maintaining constant evaporating rate by increasing the power input while the filament diameter decreases as titanium evaporates. The filaments used in this experiment were standard Varian 916-0024 filaments made of Ti 85%, Mo 15% alloy. During their lifetime at a constant current of 48 amperes, the evaporation rate rose to a maximum at about 10% of their life and then flattened out to a constant value, 0.25 g/hr. The maximum evaporation rate occurs coincidently with the recrystallization of 74% Ti 26% Mo 2 from microstructure crystalline at higher titanium concentration to macrostructure crystalline at lower titanium concentration. As the macrocrystal grows, the slip plane develops at the grain boundary resulting in high resistance at the slip plane which will eventually cause the filament burn out due to local heating

  3. Filaments in simulations of molecular cloud formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Gilberto C.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Morelia Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-08-20

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse soon becomes nearly pressureless, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in the cloud and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalling gas. Correspondingly, the velocity along the filament exhibits a hierarchy of jumps at the locations of the clumps. Two prominent filaments in the simulation have lengths ∼15 pc and masses ∼600 M {sub ☉} above density n ∼ 10{sup 3} cm{sup –3} (∼2 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} at n > 50 cm{sup –3}). The density profile exhibits a central flattened core of size ∼0.3 pc and an envelope that decays as r {sup –2.5} in reasonable agreement with observations. Accretion onto the filament reaches a maximum linear density rate of ∼30 M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} pc{sup –1}.

  4. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scannapieco, Evan [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253, but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  5. Elastic scattering phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackintosh, R.S. [The Open University, School of Physical Sciences, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    We argue that, in many situations, fits to elastic scattering data that were historically, and frequently still are, considered ''good'', are not justifiably so describable. Information about the dynamics of nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering is lost when elastic scattering phenomenology is insufficiently ambitious. It is argued that in many situations, an alternative approach is appropriate for the phenomenology of nuclear elastic scattering of nucleons and other light nuclei. The approach affords an appropriate means of evaluating folding models, one that fully exploits available empirical data. It is particularly applicable for nucleons and other light ions. (orig.)

  6. Current filamentation in high-current diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, A.V.; Kuksov, P.V.; Fanchenko, S.D.; Shuvaev, V.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental data are reported on the filamentation of a high-current relativistic electron beam in the Kal'mar-1 relativistic-electron-beam source. A possible mechanism for this filamentation is studied theoretically. It is shown that the experimental results on the number of filaments into which the relativistic electron beam breaks up can be explained on the basis of an azimuthal nonuniformity of the current. This nonuniformity develops in the plasma near the cathode as the result of a Rayleigh--Taylor electron instability

  7. Elastic magnetic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sick, I.

    1985-01-01

    The paper surveys the field of elastic magnetic electron scattering. Magnetic scattering as a configuration analyzer; magnetic form factors of high multipole order; absolute spectroscopic factors; and non-nucleonic constituents; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  8. Statistical mechanics of elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, JH

    2012-01-01

    Advanced, self-contained treatment illustrates general principles and elastic behavior of solids. Topics include thermoelastic behavior of crystalline and polymeric solids, interatomic force laws, behavior of solids, and thermally activated processes. 1983 edition.

  9. Mastering ElasticSearch

    CERN Document Server

    Kuc, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    A practical tutorial that covers the difficult design, implementation, and management of search solutions.Mastering ElasticSearch is aimed at to intermediate users who want to extend their knowledge about ElasticSearch. The topics that are described in the book are detailed, but we assume that you already know the basics, like the query DSL or data indexing. Advanced users will also find this book useful, as the examples are getting deep into the internals where it is needed.

  10. Deflation of elastic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilliet, Catherine; Quemeneur, François; Marmottant, Philippe; Imhof, Arnout; Pépin-Donat, Brigitte; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2010-03-01

    The deflation of elastic spherical surfaces has been numerically investigated, and show very different types of deformations according the range of elastic parameters, some of them being quantitatively explained through simple calculations. This allows to retrieve various shapes observed on hollow shells (from colloidal to centimeter scale), on lipid vesicles, or on some biological objects. The extension of this process to other geometries allows to modelize vegetal objects such as the ultrafast trap of carnivorous plants.

  11. Two-step solar filament eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.

    2018-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are closely related to eruptive filaments and usually are the continuation of the same eruptive process into the upper corona. There are failed filament eruptions when a filament decelerates and stops at some greater height in the corona. Sometimes the filament after several hours starts to rise again and develops into the successful eruption with a CME formation. We propose a simple model for the interpretation of such two-step eruptions in terms of equilibrium of a flux rope in a two-scale ambient magnetic field. The eruption is caused by a slow decrease of the holding magnetic field. The presence of two critical heights for the initiation of the flux-rope vertical instability allows the flux rope to stay after the first jump some time in a metastable equilibrium near the second critical height. If the decrease of the ambient field continues, the next eruption step follows.

  12. Intense EM filamentation in relativistic hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qiang-Lin [Department of Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji' an, Jiangxi 343009 (China); Chen, Zhong-Ping [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Mahajan, Swadesh M., E-mail: mahajan@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences, Shiv Nadar University, Uttar Pradesh 201314 (India)

    2017-03-03

    Highlights: • Breaking up of an intense EM pulse into filaments is a spectacular demonstration of the nonlinear wave-plasma interaction. • Filaments are spectacularly sharper, highly extended and longer lived at relativistic temperatures. • EM energy concentration can trigger new nonlinear phenomena with absolute consequences for high energy density matter. - Abstract: Through 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we demonstrate that the nature of filamentation of a high intensity electromagnetic (EM) pulse propagating in an underdense plasma, is profoundly affected at relativistically high temperatures. The “relativistic” filaments are sharper, are dramatically extended (along the direction of propagation), and live much longer than their lower temperature counterparts. The thermally boosted electron inertia is invoked to understand this very interesting and powerful phenomenon.

  13. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Middelveen MJ; Stricker RB

    2016-01-01

    Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B Stricker International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they resu...

  14. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchel Alioscha-Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale. Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in

  15. Can we determine the filament chirality by the filament footpoint location or the barb-bearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang; Fang, Cheng; Chen, Peng-Fei; Cao, Wen-Da

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the concept of an unweighted undirected graph and adopt the Dijkstra shortest path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with Hα filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) Hα archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have left-bearing (right-bearing) barbs and positive (negative) magnetic helicity, respectively. The tested results demonstrate that our method is efficient and effective in detecting the bearing of filament barbs. It is demonstrated that the conventionally believed one-to-one correspondence between filament chirality and barb bearing is not valid. The correct detection of the filament axis chirality should be done by combining both imaging morphology and magnetic field observations.

  16. Can we determine the filament chirality by the filament footpoint location or the barb-bearing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang; Fang, Cheng; Chen, Peng-Fei; Cao, Wen-Da

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the concept of an unweighted undirected graph and adopt the Dijkstra shortest path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with Hα filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) Hα archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have left-bearing (right-bearing) barbs and positive (negative) magnetic helicity, respectively. The tested results demonstrate that our method is efficient and effective in detecting the bearing of filament barbs. It is demonstrated that the conventionally believed one-to-one correspondence between filament chirality and barb bearing is not valid. The correct detection of the filament axis chirality should be done by combining both imaging morphology and magnetic field observations. (paper)

  17. Dynamics of contracting surfactant-covered filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pritish; Thete, Sumeet; Xu, Qi; Basaran, Osman

    2013-11-01

    When drops are produced from a nozzle, a thin liquid thread connects the primary drop that is about to form to the rest of the liquid in the nozzle. Often, the thread becomes disconnected from both the primary drop and the remnant liquid mass hanging from the nozzle and thereby gives rise to a free filament. Due to surface tension, the free filament then contracts or recoils. During recoil, the filament can either contract into a single satellite droplet or break up into several small satellites. Such satellite droplets are undesirable in applications where they can, for example, cause misting in a manufacturing environment and mar product quality in ink-jet printing. In many applications, the filaments are coated with a monolayer of surfactant. In this work, we study the dynamics of contraction of slender filaments of a Newtonian fluid that are covered with a monolayer of surfactant when the surrounding fluid is a passive gas. Taking advantage of the fact that the filaments are long and slender, we use a 1D-slender-jet approximation of the governing system of equations consisting of the Navier-Stokes system and the convection-diffusion equation for surfactant transport. We solve the 1D system of equations by a finite element based numerical method.

  18. Evidence for Mixed Helicity in Erupting Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglach, K.; Wang, Y.-M.; Kliem, B.

    2009-09-01

    Erupting filaments are sometimes observed to undergo a rotation about the vertical direction as they rise. This rotation of the filament axis is generally interpreted as a conversion of twist into writhe in a kink-unstable magnetic flux rope. Consistent with this interpretation, the rotation is usually found to be clockwise (as viewed from above) if the post-eruption arcade has right-handed helicity, but counterclockwise if it has left-handed helicity. Here, we describe two non-active-region filament events recorded with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in which the sense of rotation appears to be opposite to that expected from the helicity of the post-event arcade. Based on these observations, we suggest that the rotation of the filament axis is, in general, determined by the net helicity of the erupting system, and that the axially aligned core of the filament can have the opposite helicity sign to the surrounding field. In most cases, the surrounding field provides the main contribution to the net helicity. In the events reported here, however, the helicity associated with the filament "barbs" is opposite in sign to and dominates that of the overlying arcade.

  19. Prokaryotic cytoskeletons: protein filaments organizing small cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, James; Löwe, Jan

    2018-04-01

    Most, if not all, bacterial and archaeal cells contain at least one protein filament system. Although these filament systems in some cases form structures that are very similar to eukaryotic cytoskeletons, the term 'prokaryotic cytoskeletons' is used to refer to many different kinds of protein filaments. Cytoskeletons achieve their functions through polymerization of protein monomers and the resulting ability to access length scales larger than the size of the monomer. Prokaryotic cytoskeletons are involved in many fundamental aspects of prokaryotic cell biology and have important roles in cell shape determination, cell division and nonchromosomal DNA segregation. Some of the filament-forming proteins have been classified into a small number of conserved protein families, for example, the almost ubiquitous tubulin and actin superfamilies. To understand what makes filaments special and how the cytoskeletons they form enable cells to perform essential functions, the structure and function of cytoskeletal molecules and their filaments have been investigated in diverse bacteria and archaea. In this Review, we bring these data together to highlight the diverse ways that linear protein polymers can be used to organize other molecules and structures in bacteria and archaea.

  20. Complete Structure of an Epithelial Keratin Dimer: Implications for Intermediate Filament Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Bray

    Full Text Available Keratins are cytoskeletal proteins that hierarchically arrange into filaments, starting with the dimer sub-unit. They are integral to the structural support of cells, in skin, hair and nails. In skin, keratin is thought to play a critical role in conferring the barrier properties and elasticity of skin. In general, the keratin dimer is broadly described by a tri-domain structure: a head, a central rod and a tail. As yet, no atomistic-scale picture of the entire dimer structure exists; this information is pivotal for establishing molecular-level connections between structure and function in intermediate filament proteins. The roles of the head and tail domains in facilitating keratin filament assembly and function remain as open questions. To address these, we report results of molecular dynamics simulations of the entire epithelial human K1/K10 keratin dimer. Our findings comprise: (1 the first three-dimensional structural models of the complete dimer unit, comprising of the head, rod and tail domains; (2 new insights into the chirality of the rod-domain twist gained from analysis of the full domain structure; (3 evidence for tri-subdomain partitioning in the head and tail domains; and, (4 identification of the residue characteristics that mediate non-covalent contact between the chains in the dimer. Our findings are immediately applicable to other epithelial keratins, such as K8/K18 and K5/K14, and to intermediate filament proteins in general.

  1. Entropic potential field formed for a linear-motor protein near a filament: Statistical-mechanical analyses using simple models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Yoshidome, Takashi; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2010-07-01

    We report a new progress in elucidating the mechanism of the unidirectional movement of a linear-motor protein (e.g., myosin) along a filament (e.g., F-actin). The basic concept emphasized here is that a potential field is entropically formed for the protein on the filament immersed in solvent due to the effect of the translational displacement of solvent molecules. The entropic potential field is strongly dependent on geometric features of the protein and the filament, their overall shapes as well as details of the polyatomic structures. The features and the corresponding field are judiciously adjusted by the binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to the protein, hydrolysis of ATP into adenosine diphosphate (ADP)+Pi, and release of Pi and ADP. As the first step, we propose the following physical picture: The potential field formed along the filament for the protein without the binding of ATP or ADP+Pi to it is largely different from that for the protein with the binding, and the directed movement is realized by repeated switches from one of the fields to the other. To illustrate the picture, we analyze the spatial distribution of the entropic potential between a large solute and a large body using the three-dimensional integral equation theory. The solute is modeled as a large hard sphere. Two model filaments are considered as the body: model 1 is a set of one-dimensionally connected large hard spheres and model 2 is a double helical structure formed by two sets of connected large hard spheres. The solute and the filament are immersed in small hard spheres forming the solvent. The major findings are as follows. The solute is strongly confined within a narrow space in contact with the filament. Within the space there are locations with sharply deep local potential minima along the filament, and the distance between two adjacent locations is equal to the diameter of the large spheres constituting the filament. The potential minima form a ringlike domain in model 1

  2. Orthodontic elastic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A K

    1976-04-01

    Latex elastics and synthetic elastomers have certain similarities and differences. In the fracture tests the latex elastics showed a greater amount of loss in strength than plastic elastomers when stretched over a 21 day period. There is a great variability, as much as 50%, in the tensile strength of the plastic materials taken from the same batch and stretched under the same conditions. The Ormco Power Chain was more resilient than the Unitek AlastiK chain. The Unitek AlastiKs had more force and stretched less. The force decay of synthetic elastomers, stretched over a specific length and time, exhibited a great loss in force. This loss could be as great as 73% during the first day. The decay of force continued at a slower rate during the rest of the 21 day period. Unitek AlastiK C2 double links, when stretched 17 millimeters, had a higher initial force averaging 641 grams (22.5 ounces) than the Ormco Power Chain which averages 342 grams (12.0 ounces). In one day the force was reduced to 171 grams (6.0 ounces) for both materials. The elastic materials within the same batch showed a great variation in the modulus of elasticity under different test conditions. The approximate force generated when stretched dry, within the elastic limit, was 22 grams per millimeter for 3/16 inches heavy latex elastics. The Unitek AlastiK C2 gave a force of 89 grams per millimeter, while the Ormco Power Chain had a value of 46 grams per millimeter. The modulus of elasticity of all of the materials was much lower after immersion in the water bath. The force decay under constant force application to latex, elastic, polymer chains, and tied loops showed that the greatest amount of force decay occurred during the first three hours in the water bath. The forces remained relatively the same throughout the rest of the test period. The elastic materials undergo permanent deformation in shape. The synthetic elastomers exhibited plastic deformation when the elastomers were stretched 17

  3. Nonlinear elastic waves in materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rushchitsky, Jeremiah J

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the book is a coherent treatment of the theory of propagation in materials of nonlinearly elastic waves of displacements, which corresponds to one modern line of development of the nonlinear theory of elastic waves. The book is divided on five basic parts: the necessary information on waves and materials; the necessary information on nonlinear theory of elasticity and elastic materials; analysis of one-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – longitudinal, vertically and horizontally polarized transverse plane nonlinear elastic waves of displacement; analysis of one-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – cylindrical and torsional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement; analysis of two-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – Rayleigh and Love nonlinear elastic surface waves. The book is addressed first of all to people working in solid mechanics – from the students at an advanced undergraduate and graduate level to the scientists, professional...

  4. Human muscle LIM protein dimerizes along the actin cytoskeleton and cross-links actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Céline; Moreau, Flora; Moes, Michèle; Luthold, Carole; Dieterle, Monika; Goretti, Emeline; Neumann, Katrin; Steinmetz, André; Thomas, Clément

    2014-08-01

    The muscle LIM protein (MLP) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein playing important roles in the regulation of myocyte remodeling and adaptation to hypertrophic stimuli. Missense mutations in human MLP or its ablation in transgenic mice promotes cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The exact function(s) of MLP in the cytoplasmic compartment and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that MLP autonomously binds to, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments (AFs) independently of calcium and pH. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have shown how MLP cross-links actin filaments into both unipolar and mixed-polarity bundles. Quantitative analysis of the actin cytoskeleton configuration confirmed that MLP substantially promotes actin bundling in live myoblasts. In addition, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays revealed MLP self-association. Remarkably, BiFC complexes mostly localize along actin filament-rich structures, such as stress fibers and sarcomeres, supporting a functional link between MLP self-association and actin cross-linking. Finally, we have demonstrated that MLP self-associates through its N-terminal LIM domain, whereas it binds to AFs through its C-terminal LIM domain. Together our data support that MLP contributes to the maintenance of cardiomyocyte cytoarchitecture by a mechanism involving its self-association and actin filament cross-linking. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Hydrodynamic and elastic interactions of sedimenting flexible fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiel-Jezewska, Maria L.; Bukowicki, Marek

    2017-11-01

    Dynamics of flexible micro and nano filaments in fluids is intensively investigated in many laboratories, with a perspective of numerous applications in biology, medicine or modern technology. In the literature, different theoretical models of elastic interactions between flexible fiber segments are applied. The task of this work is to examine the impact of a chosen elastic model on the dynamics of fibers settling in a viscous fluid under low Reynolds number. To this goal, we construct two trumbbells, each made of three beads connected by springs and with a bending resistance, and we describe hydrodynamic interactions of the beads in terms of the Rotne-Prager mobility tensors. Using the harmonic bending potential, and coupling it to the spring potential by the Young's modulus, we find simple benchmark solutions: stable stationary configurations of a single elastic trumbbell and a fast horizontal attraction of two elastic trumbbells towards a periodic long-lasting orbit. We show that for sufficiently large bending angles, other models of bending interactions can lead to qualitatively and quantitatively different spurious effects. We also demonstrate examples of essential differences between the dynamics of elastic dumbbells and trumbbells. This work was supported in part by Narodowe Centrum Nauki under Grant No. 2014/15/B/ST8/04359.

  6. Transition of Femtosecond-Filament-Solid Interactions from Single to Multiple Filament Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrodzki, P J; Burger, M; Jovanovic, I

    2017-10-06

    High-peak-power fs-laser filaments offer unique characteristics attractive to remote sensing via techniques such as remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (R-LIBS). The dynamics of several ablation mechanisms following the interaction between a filament and a solid determines the emission strength and reproducibility of target plasma, which is of relevance for R-LIBS applications. We investigate the space- and time-resolved dynamics of ionic and atomic emission from copper as well as the surrounding atmosphere in order to understand limitations of fs-filament-ablation for standoff energy delivery. Furthermore, we probe the shock front produced from filament-target interaction using time-resolved shadowgraphy and infer laser-material coupling efficiencies for both single and multiple filament regimes through analysis of shock expansion with the Sedov model for point detonation. The results provide insight into plasma structure for the range of peak powers up to 30 times the critical power for filamentation P cr . Despite the stochastic nucleation of multiple filaments at peak-powers greater than 16 P cr , emission of ionic and neutral species increases with pump beam intensity, and short-lived nitrogen emission originating from the ambient is consistently observed. Ultimately, results suggest favorable scaling of emission intensity from target species on the laser pump energy, furthering the prospects for use of filament-solid interactions for remote sensing.

  7. Elastic constants of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  8. Elastic membranes in confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J B; Miksis, M J; Davis, S H

    2016-07-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and coiled DNA, have fine internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically 'confined' by another object. Here, the two-dimensional shape of an elastic membrane in a 'confining' box is studied by introducing a repulsive confinement pressure that prevents the membrane from intersecting the wall. The stage is set by contrasting confined and unconfined solutions. Continuation methods are then used to compute response diagrams, from which we identify the particular membrane mechanics that generate mitochondria-like shapes. Large confinement pressures yield complex response diagrams with secondary bifurcations and multiple turning points where modal identities may change. Regions in parameter space where such behaviour occurs are then mapped. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Shells on elastic foundations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Y.C.; Kedia, K.K.

    1977-01-01

    No realistic analytical work in the area of Shells on Elastic Foundations has been reported in the literature. Various foundation models have been proposed by several authors. These models involve one or more than one parameters to characterise the foundation medium. Some of these models cannot be used to derive the basic equations governing the behaviour of shells on elastic foundations. In the present work, starting from an elastic continuum hypothesis, a mathematical model for foundation has been derived in curvilinear orthogonal coordinates by the help of principle of virtual displacements, treating one of the virtual displacements as known to satisfy certain given conditions at its edge surfaces. In this model, several foundation parameters can be considered and it can also be used for layered medium of both finite and infinite thickness. (Auth.)

  10. Elastic anisotropy of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropy index seeks to quantify how directionally dependent the properties of a system are. In this article, the focus is on quantifying the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. Previous elastic anisotropy indices are reviewed and their shortcomings discussed. A new scalar log-Euclidean anisotropy measure AL is proposed, which overcomes these deficiencies. It is based on a distance measure in a log-Euclidean space applied to fourth-rank elastic tensors. AL is an absolute measure of anisotropy where the limiting case of perfect isotropy yields zero. It is a universal measure of anisotropy applicable to all crystalline materials. Specific examples of strong anisotropy are highlighted. A supplementary material provides an anisotropy table giving the values of AL for 2,176 crystallite compounds.

  11. Role of multiple filaments in self-accelerating actions of laser filamentation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuze; Nie, Jinsong; Sun, Ke

    2017-11-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of multiple filaments in self-accelerating actions by using corrected accelerating parabolic beams (CAPBs) are numerically investigated. By increasing the number of main lobes, the curved filaments can be elongated, leading to a longer displacement. The replenished energy originating from curved multiple filaments (MFs) that constructively interfere with the central one plays a crucial role in the phenomenon. At the bifurcation position, a beam pattern in which secondary lobes tightly follow the main lobes is formed, which is beneficial for the accelerating action of MFs. A new curved filament is generated due to the merging of side-curved MFs, and its accelerating strength decreases gradually with further propagation. Moreover, a special spatiotemporal profile that enhances the possibility of acceleration is also formed. The use of the accelerating beam with the appropriate amount of main lobes provides a new approach to elongate curved filaments.

  12. The Selective Autophagy Receptor p62 Forms a Flexible Filamentous Helical Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Ciuffa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The scaffold protein p62/SQSTM1 is involved in protein turnover and signaling and is commonly found in dense protein bodies in eukaryotic cells. In autophagy, p62 acts as a selective autophagy receptor that recognizes and shuttles ubiquitinated proteins to the autophagosome for degradation. The structural organization of p62 in cellular bodies and the interplay of these assemblies with ubiquitin and the autophagic marker LC3 remain to be elucidated. Here, we present a cryo-EM structural analysis of p62. Together with structures of assemblies from the PB1 domain, we show that p62 is organized in flexible polymers with the PB1 domain constituting a helical scaffold. Filamentous p62 is capable of binding LC3 and addition of long ubiquitin chains induces disassembly and shortening of filaments. These studies explain how p62 assemblies provide a large molecular scaffold for the nascent autophagosome and reveal how they can bind ubiquitinated cargo.

  13. Actin binding proteins and spermiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mruk, Dolores D

    2011-01-01

    Drebrin E, an actin-binding protein lacking intrinsic activity in the regulation of actin dynamics (e.g., polymerization, capping, nucleation, branching, cross-linking, bundling and severing), is known to recruit actin regulatory proteins to a specific cellular site. Herein, we critically evaluate recent findings in the field which illustrate that drebrin E works together with two other actin-binding proteins, namely Arp3 (actin-related protein 3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex that simultaneously controls actin nucleation for polymerization and branching of actin filaments) and Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 that controls capping of the barbed ends of actin filaments, as well as actin filament bundling) to regulate the homeostasis of F-actin filament bundles at the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific atypical adherens junction (AJ) in the seminiferous epithelium. This is mediated by the strict temporal and spatial expression of these three actin-binding proteins at the apical and basal ES at the Sertoli cell-spermatid (step 8–19) and Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface, respectively, during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. In this Commentary, we put forth a possible model by which drebrin E may be acting as a platform upon which proteins (e.g., Arp3) that are needed to alter the conformation of actin filament bundles at the ES can be recruited to the site, thus facilitating changes in cell shape and cell position in the epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. In short, drebrin E may be acting as a “logistic” distribution center to manage different regulatory proteins at the apical ES, thereby regulating the dynamics of actin filament bundles and modulating the plasticity of the apical ES. This would allow adhesion to be altered continuously throughout the epithelial cycle to accommodate spermatid movement in the seminiferous epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. We also

  14. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L.A.

    1978-07-01

    The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to crack stability in brittle structures is now well understood and widely applied. However, in many structural materials, crack propagation is accompanied by considerable crack-tip plasticity which invalidates the use of LEFM. Thus, present day research in fracture mechanics is aimed at developing parameters for predicting crack propagation under elastic-plastic conditions. These include critical crack-opening-displacement methods, the J integral and R-curve techniques. This report provides an introduction to these concepts and gives some examples of their applications. (author)

  15. ElasticSearch server

    CERN Document Server

    Rogozinski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    This book is a detailed, practical, hands-on guide packed with real-life scenarios and examples which will show you how to implement an ElasticSearch search engine on your own websites.If you are a web developer or a user who wants to learn more about ElasticSearch, then this is the book for you. You do not need to know anything about ElastiSeach, Java, or Apache Lucene in order to use this book, though basic knowledge about databases and queries is required.

  16. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun

    2011-06-26

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  17. The law of elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cesare Masin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight-a cognitive law analogous to Hooke¿s law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined either in series or in parallel. This total elongation was longer for serial than for parallel springs, and increased proportionally to the number of serial springs and inversely proportionally to the number of parallel springs. The results suggest that participants integrated load weight with imagined elasticity rather than with spring length.

  18. An elastic second skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.; Anderson, R. Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  19. Filamentous Influenza Virus Enters Cells via Macropinocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Jeremy S.; Leser, George P.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus is pleiomorphic, producing both spherical (100-nm-diameter) and filamentous (100-nm by 20-μm) virions. While the spherical virions are known to enter host cells through exploitation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the entry pathway for filamentous virions has not been determined, though the existence of an alternative, non-clathrin-, non-caveolin-mediated entry pathway for influenza virus has been known for many years. In this study, we confirm recent results showing that influenza virus utilizes macropinocytosis as an alternate entry pathway. Furthermore, we find that filamentous influenza viruses use macropinocytosis as the primary entry mechanism. Virions enter cells as intact filaments within macropinosomes and are trafficked to the acidic late-endosomal compartment. Low pH triggers a conformational change in the M2 ion channel protein, altering membrane curvature and leading to a fragmentation of the filamentous virions. This fragmentation may enable more-efficient fusion between the viral and endosomal membranes. PMID:22875971

  20. Environmental bias and elastic curves on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guven, Jemal; María Valencia, Dulce; Vázquez-Montejo, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of an elastic curve bound to a surface will reflect the geometry of its environment. This may occur in an obvious way: the curve may deform freely along directions tangent to the surface, but not along the surface normal. However, even if the energy itself is symmetric in the curve's geodesic and normal curvatures, which control these modes, very distinct roles are played by the two. If the elastic curve binds preferentially on one side, or is itself assembled on the surface, not only would one expect the bending moduli associated with the two modes to differ, binding along specific directions, reflected in spontaneous values of these curvatures, may be favored. The shape equations describing the equilibrium states of a surface curve described by an elastic energy accommodating environmental factors will be identified by adapting the method of Lagrange multipliers to the Darboux frame associated with the curve. The forces transmitted to the surface along the surface normal will be determined. Features associated with a number of different energies, both of physical relevance and of mathematical interest, are described. The conservation laws associated with trajectories on surface geometries exhibiting continuous symmetries are also examined. (paper)

  1. Modified Filamentous Bacteriophage as a Scaffold for Carbon Nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szot-Karpińska, Katarzyna; Golec, Piotr; Leśniewski, Adam; Pałys, Barbara; Marken, Frank; Niedziółka-Jönsson, Joanna; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Łoś, Marcin

    2016-12-21

    With the advent of nanotechnology, carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanofibers (CNF) have aroused substantial interest in various research fields, including energy storage and sensing. Further improvement of their properties might be achieved via the application of viral particles such as bacteriophages. In this report, we present a filamentous M13 bacteriophage with a point mutation in gene VII (pVII-mutant-M13) that selectively binds to the carbon nanofibers to form 3D structures. The phage-display technique was utilized for the selection of the pVII-mutant-M13 phage from the phage display peptide library. The properties of this phage make it a prospective candidate for a scaffold material for CNFs. The results for binding of CNF by mutant phage were compared with those for maternal bacteriophage (pVII-M13). The efficiency of binding between pVII-mutant-M13 and CNF is about 2 orders of magnitude higher compared to that of the pVII-M13. Binding affinity between pVII-mutant-M13 and CNF was also characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the specificity of the interaction of the phage pVII-mutant-M13 and the CNF; the binding occurs via the phage's ending, where the mutated pVII protein is located. No similar behavior has been observed for other carbon nanomaterials such as graphite, reduced graphene oxide, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Infrared spectra confirmed differences in the interaction with CNF between the pVII-mutant-M13 and the pVII-M13. Basing on conducted research, we hypothesize that the interactions are noncovalent in nature, with π-π interactions playing the dominant role. Herein, the new bioconjugate material is introduced.

  2. Withaferin a alters intermediate filament organization, cell shape and behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Grin

    Full Text Available Withaferin A (WFA is a steroidal lactone present in Withania somnifera which has been shown in vitro to bind to the intermediate filament protein, vimentin. Based upon its affinity for vimentin, it has been proposed that WFA can be used as an anti-tumor agent to target metastatic cells which up-regulate vimentin expression. We show that WFA treatment of human fibroblasts rapidly reorganizes vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF into a perinuclear aggregate. This reorganization is dose dependent and is accompanied by a change in cell shape, decreased motility and an increase in vimentin phosphorylation at serine-38. Furthermore, vimentin lacking cysteine-328, the proposed WFA binding site, remains sensitive to WFA demonstrating that this site is not required for its cellular effects. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, viscometry, electron microscopy and sedimentation assays we show that WFA has no effect on VIF assembly in vitro. Furthermore, WFA is not specific for vimentin as it disrupts the cellular organization and induces perinuclear aggregates of several other IF networks comprised of peripherin, neurofilament-triplet protein, and keratin. In cells co-expressing keratin IF and VIF, the former are significantly less sensitive to WFA with respect to inducing perinuclear aggregates. The organization of microtubules and actin/microfilaments is also affected by WFA. Microtubules become wavier and sparser and the number of stress fibers appears to increase. Following 24 hrs of exposure to doses of WFA that alter VIF organization and motility, cells undergo apoptosis. Lower doses of the drug do not kill cells but cause them to senesce. In light of our findings that WFA affects multiple IF systems, which are expressed in many tissues of the body, caution is warranted in its use as an anti-cancer agent, since it may have debilitating organism-wide effects.

  3. The Bipolar Filaments Formed by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 SSB/Recombination Protein (ICP8) Suggest a Mechanism for DNA Annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhov, A.M.; Simon, M.; Sen, A.; Yu, X.; Griffith, J. D.; Egelman, E. H.

    2009-02-20

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 encodes a multifunctional protein, ICP8, which serves both as a single-strand binding protein and as a recombinase, catalyzing reactions involved in replication and recombination of the viral genome. In the presence of divalent ions and at low temperature, previous electron microscopic studies showed that ICP8 will form long left-handed helical filaments. Here, electron microscopic image reconstruction reveals that the filaments are bipolar, with an asymmetric unit containing two subunits of ICP8 that constitute a symmetrical dimer. This organization of the filament has been confirmed using scanning transmission electron microscopy. The pitch of the filaments is {approx} 250 {angstrom}, with {approx} 6.2 dimers per turn. Docking of a crystal structure of ICP8 into the reconstructed filament shows that the C-terminal domain of ICP8, attached to the body of the subunit by a flexible linker containing {approx} 10 residues, is packed into a pocket in the body of a neighboring subunit in the crystal in a similar manner as in the filament. However, the interactions between the large N-terminal domains are quite different in the filament from that observed in the crystal. A previously proposed model for ICP8 binding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), based upon the crystal structure, leads to a model for a continuous strand of ssDNA near the filament axis. The bipolar nature of the ICP8 filaments means that a second strand of ssDNA would be running through this filament in the opposite orientation, and this provides a potential mechanism for how ICP8 anneals complementary ssDNA into double-stranded DNA, where each strand runs in opposite directions.

  4. Heterologous expression of cellobiohydrolases in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Peter S.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2015-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases are among the most important enzymes functioning in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose, significantly contributing to the efficient biorefining of recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels and bio-based products. Filamentous fungi are recognized as both well...... into valuable products. However, due to low cellobiohydrolase activities, certain fungi might be deficient with regard to enzymes of value for cellulose conversion, and improving cellobiohydrolase expression in filamentous fungi has proven to be challenging. In this review, we examine the effects of altering...... promoters, signal peptides, culture conditions and host post-translational modifications. For heterologous cellobiohydrolase production in filamentous fungi to become an industrially feasible process, the construction of site-integrating plasmids, development of protease-deficient strains and glycosylation...

  5. The Law of Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Alberto; Masin, Sergio Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight--a cognitive law analogous to Hooke's law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined…

  6. Heterologous gene expression in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoyun; Schmitz, George; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are critical to production of many commercial enzymes and organic compounds. Fungal-based systems have several advantages over bacterial-based systems for protein production because high-level secretion of enzymes is a common trait of their decomposer lifestyle. Furthermore, in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins of eukaryotic origin, the filamentous fungi become the vehicle of choice due to critical processes shared in gene expression with other eukaryotic organisms. The complexity and relative dearth of understanding of the physiology of filamentous fungi, compared to bacteria, have hindered rapid development of these organisms as highly efficient factories for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review, we highlight several of the known benefits and challenges in using filamentous fungi (particularly Aspergillus spp., Trichoderma reesei, and Neurospora crassa) for the production of proteins, especially heterologous, nonfungal enzymes. We review various techniques commonly employed in recombinant protein production in the filamentous fungi, including transformation methods, selection of gene regulatory elements such as promoters, protein secretion factors such as the signal peptide, and optimization of coding sequence. We provide insights into current models of host genomic defenses such as repeat-induced point mutation and quelling. Furthermore, we examine the regulatory effects of transcript sequences, including introns and untranslated regions, pre-mRNA (messenger RNA) processing, transcript transport, and mRNA stability. We anticipate that this review will become a resource for researchers who aim at advancing the use of these fascinating organisms as protein production factories, for both academic and industrial purposes, and also for scientists with general interest in the biology of the filamentous fungi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure of Flexible Filamentous Plant Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C.; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C.; Havens, Wendy M.; Ghabrial, Said A.; Wall, Joseph S.; Stubbs, Gerald (IIT); (BU-M); (Vanderbilt); (Kentucky); (BNL)

    2008-10-23

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  8. Actin dynamics and the elasticity of cytoskeletal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The structural integrity of a cell depends on its cytoskeleton, which includes an actin network. This network is transient and depends upon the continual polymerization and depolymerization of actin. The degradation of an actin network, and a corresponding reduction in cell stiffness, can indicate the presence of disease. Numerical simulations will be invaluable for understanding the physics of these systems and the correlation between actin dynamics and elasticity. Here we develop a model that is capable of generating actin network structures. In particular, we develop a model of actin dynamics which considers the polymerization, depolymerization, nucleation, severing, and capping of actin filaments. The structures obtained are then fed directly into a mechanical model. This allows us to qualitatively assess the effects of changing various parameters associated with actin dynamics on the elasticity of the material.

  9. Interaction of Two Filaments in a Long Filament Channel Associated with Twin Coronal Mass Ejections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, 264209 Weihai (China); Zhang, Qingmin [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yang, Kai, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 210023 Nanjing (China)

    2017-02-20

    Using the high-quality observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory , we present the interaction of two filaments (F1 and F2) in a long filament channel associated with twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2016 January 26. Before the eruption, a sequence of rapid cancellation and emergence of the magnetic flux has been observed, which likely triggered the ascending of the west filament (F1). The east footpoints of rising F1 moved toward the east far end of the filament channel, accompanied by post-eruption loops and flare ribbons. This likely indicated a large-scale eruption involving the long filament channel, which resulted from the interaction between F1 and the east filament (F2). Some bright plasma flew over F2, and F2 stayed at rest during the eruption, likely due to the confinement of its overlying lower magnetic field. Interestingly, the impulsive F1 pushed its overlying magnetic arcades to form the first CME, and F1 finally evolved into the second CME after the collision with the nearby coronal hole. We suggest that the interaction of F1 and the overlying magnetic field of F2 led to the merging reconnection that forms a longer eruptive filament loop. Our results also provide a possible picture of the origin of twin CMEs and show that the large-scale magnetic topology of the coronal hole is important for the eventual propagation direction of CMEs.

  10. Non-linear elastic deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Ogden, R W

    1997-01-01

    Classic in the field covers application of theory of finite elasticity to solution of boundary-value problems, analysis of mechanical properties of solid materials capable of large elastic deformations. Problems. References.

  11. High-resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shangwei; Su, Yingna; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan [5001 Riverwood Avenue, Sarasota, FL 34231 (United States); Sun, Xudong, E-mail: ynsu@pmo.ac.cn [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2017-07-20

    We investigate two sympathetic filament eruptions observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope on 2015 October 15. The full picture of the eruptions is obtained from the corresponding Solar Dynamics Observatory ( SDO )/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations. The two filaments start from active region NOAA 12434 in the north and end in one large quiescent filament channel in the south. The left filament erupts first, followed by the right filament eruption about 10 minutes later. Clear twist structure and rotating motion are observed in both filaments during the eruption. Both eruptions failed, since the filaments first rise up, then flow toward the south and merge into the southern large quiescent filament. We also observe repeated activations of mini filaments below the right filament after its eruption. Using magnetic field models constructed based on SDO /HMI magnetograms via the flux rope insertion method, we find that the left filament eruption is likely to be triggered by kink instability, while the weakening of overlying magnetic fields due to magnetic reconnection at an X-point between the two filament systems might play an important role in the onset of the right filament eruption.

  12. Designing interactively with elastic splines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Fisker, Ann-Sofie

    2018-01-01

    We present an algorithm for designing interactively with C1 elastic splines. The idea is to design the elastic spline using a C1 cubic polynomial spline where each polynomial segment is so close to satisfying the Euler-Lagrange equation for elastic curves that the visual difference becomes neglig...... negligible. Using a database of cubic Bézier curves we are able to interactively modify the cubic spline such that it remains visually close to an elastic spline....

  13. Arabidopsis actin-depolymerizing factor7 severs actin filaments and regulates actin cable turnover to promote normal pollen tube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiyan; Xie, Yurong; Jiang, Yuxiang; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2013-09-01

    Actin filaments are often arranged into higher-order structures, such as the longitudinal actin cables that generate the reverse fountain cytoplasmic streaming pattern present in pollen tubes. While several actin binding proteins have been implicated in the generation of these cables, the mechanisms that regulate their dynamic turnover remain largely unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana actin-depolymerizing factor7 (ADF7) is required for turnover of longitudinal actin cables. In vitro biochemical analyses revealed that ADF7 is a typical ADF that prefers ADP-G-actin over ATP-G-actin. ADF7 inhibits nucleotide exchange on actin and severs filaments, but its filament severing and depolymerizing activities are less potent than those of the vegetative ADF1. ADF7 primarily decorates longitudinal actin cables in the shanks of pollen tubes. Consistent with this localization pattern, the severing frequency and depolymerization rate of filaments significantly decreased, while their maximum lifetime significantly increased, in adf7 pollen tube shanks. Furthermore, an ADF7-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion with defective severing activity but normal G-actin binding activity could not complement adf7, providing compelling evidence that the severing activity of ADF7 is vital for its in vivo functions. These observations suggest that ADF7 evolved to promote turnover of longitudinal actin cables by severing actin filaments in pollen tubes.

  14. Elasticity and physico-chemical properties during drinking water biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yumiko; Polyakov, Pavel; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine; Francius, Grégory

    2011-08-01

    Atomic force microscope techniques and multi-staining fluorescence microscopy were employed to study the steps in drinking water biofilm formation. During the formation of a conditioning layer, surface hydrophobic forces increased and the range of characteristic hydrophobic forces diversified with time, becoming progressively complex in macromolecular composition, which in return triggered irreversible cellular adhesion. AFM visualization of 1 to 8 week drinking water biofilms showed a spatially discontinuous and heterogeneous distribution comprising an extensive network of filamentous fungi in which biofilm aggregates were embedded. The elastic modulus of 40-day-old biofilms ranged from 200 to 9000 kPa, and the biofilm deposits with a height >0.5 μm had an elastic modulus water biofilms were composed of a soft top layer and a basal layer with significantly higher elastic modulus values falling in the range of fungal elasticity.

  15. Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments. Pavel Ambrož, Astronomical Institute of the Acad. Sci. of the Czech Republic, CZ-25165. Ondrejov, The Czech Republic. e-mail: pambroz@asu.cas.cz. Alfred Schroll, Kanzelhöehe Solar Observatory of the University of Graz, A-9521 Treffen,. Austria. e-mail: schroll@solobskh.ac.at.

  16. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  17. Modelling the morphology of filamentous microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1996-01-01

    The rapid development in image analysis techniques has made it possible to study the growth kinetics of filamentous microorganisms in more detail than previously, However, owing to the many different processes that influence the morphology it is important to apply mathematical models to extract...

  18. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  19. The exo-metabolome in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Ulf; Andersen, Birgitte; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are a diverse group of eukaryotic microorganisms that have a significant impact on human life as spoilers of food and feed by degradation and toxin production. They are also most useful as a source of bulk and fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. This chapter focuses on the exo...

  20. Evolution of genetic systems in filamentous ascomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    A great variety of genetic systems exist in filamentous ascomycetes. The transmission of genetic material does not only occur by (sexual or asexual) reproduction, but it can also follow vegetative fusion of different strains. In this thesis the evolution of this variability is studied,

  1. Featured Image: A Filament Forms and Erupts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    This dynamic image of active region NOAA 12241 was captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in December 2014. Observations of this region from a number of observatories and instruments recently presented by Jincheng Wang (University of Chinese Academy of Sciences) and collaborators reveal details about the formation and eruption of a long solar filament. Wang and collaborators show that the right part of the filament formed by magnetic reconnection between two bundles of magnetic field lines, while the left part formed as a result of shearing motion. When these two parts interacted, the filament erupted. You can read more about the teams results in the article linked below. Also, check out this awesome video of the filament formation and eruption, again by SDO/AIA:http://cdn.iopscience.com/images/0004-637X/839/2/128/Full/apjaa6bf3f1_video.mp4CitationJincheng Wang et al 2017 ApJ 839 128. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa6bf3

  2. Unraveling Intermediate Filaments : The super resolution solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahidiazar, L.

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate Filaments (IFs) carry out major functions in cells. Several diseases have been associated with malfunctioning IFs in the cells and among them are certain sub types of cancer. To determine the structure and organization of IFs, we have used Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM)

  3. Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    The 'seeing' dependent contrast of the Hα pictures is the source of uncertainties during the measurements on ... Results of measurements and conclusions. Heliographic position of the filaments is measured on the full disc Hα pictures taken ... consecutive magnetic synoptic charts. Two arrays of corresponding velocities are ...

  4. Mapping the filaments in NGC 1275

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Aracely Susan; Rich, Jeffrey; Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS)

    2018-01-01

    The giant elliptical brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at the centers of many massive clusters are often surrounded by drawn-out forms of gaseous material. It is believed that this gaseous material is gas condensing from the intracluster medium (ICM) in a “cooling flow,” and it can directly impact the growth of the BCG. The galaxy NGC 1275 is one of the closest giant elliptical BCGs and lies at the center of the Perseus cluster. NGC 1275 has large filaments that are thought to be associated with a cooling flow, but they may also be affected by its AGN. To investigate the relationship between the AGN and the cooling flow we have mapped the filaments around NGC 1275 with the Cosmic Web Imager, an image-slicing integral field spectrograph at Palomar Observatories. We employ standard emission-line ratio diagnostics to determine the source of ionizing radiation. We use our analysis to investigate whether the formation of the extended filaments is a result of gas from the ICM collapsing onto the galaxy as it cools or if it is possible that the filaments are a result of the cluster’s interaction with the outflow driven by the AGN.

  5. On viscoelastic instability in polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    1999-01-01

    The 3D Lagrangian Integral Method is used to simulate the effects of surface tension on the viscoelastic end-plate instability, occuring in the rapid extension of some polymeric filaments between parallel plates. It is shovn that the surface tension delays the onset of the instability. Furthermore...

  6. Elasticity in Elastics-An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisetty, Supradeep Kumar; Nimagadda, Chakrapani; Begam, Madhoom Ponnachi; Nalamotu, Raghuveer; Srivastav, Trilok; Gs, Shwetha

    2014-04-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement results from application of forces to teeth. Elastics in orthodontics have been used both intra-orally and extra- orally to a great effect. Their use, combined with good patient co-operation provides the clinician with the ability to correct both anteroposterior and vertical discrepancies. Force decay over a period of time is a major problem in the clinical usage of latex elastics and synthetic elastomers. This loss of force makes it difficult for the clinician to determine the actual force transmitted to the dentition. It's the intent of the clinician to maintain optimal force values over desired period of time. The majority of the orthodontic elastics on the market are latex elastics. Since the early 1990s, synthetic products have been offered in the market for latex-sensitive patients and are sold as nonlatex elastics. There is limited information on the risk that latex elastics may pose to patients. Some have estimated that 0.12-6% of the general population and 6.2% of dental professionals have hypersensitivity to latex protein. There are some reported cases of adverse reactions to latex in the orthodontic population but these are very limited to date. Although the risk is not yet clear, it would still be inadvisable to prescribe latex elastics to a patient with a known latex allergy. To compare the in-vitro performance of latex and non latex elastics. Samples of 0.25 inch, latex and non latex elastics (light, medium, heavy elastics) were obtained from three manufacturers (Forestadent, GAC, Glenroe) and a sample size of ten elastics per group was tested. The properties tested included cross sectional area, internal diameter, initial force generated by the elastics, breaking force and the force relaxation for the different types of elastics. Force relaxation testing involved stretching the elastics to three times marketed internal diameter (19.05 mm) and measuring force level at intervals over a period of 48 hours. The data were

  7. Exploring the elasticity and adhesion behavior of cardiac fibroblasts by atomic force microscopy indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codan, B.; Del Favero, G. [Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste (Italy); Martinelli, V. [Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste (Italy); International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste (Italy); Long, C.S.; Mestroni, L. [University of Colorado Cardiovascular Institute, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Sbaizero, O., E-mail: sbaizero@units.it [Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    AFM was used to collect the whole force–deformation cell curves. They provide both the elasticity and adhesion behavior of mouse primary cardiac fibroblasts. To confirm the hypothesis that a link exists between the membrane receptors and the cytoskeletal filaments causing therefore changing in both elasticity and adhesion behavior, actin-destabilizing Cytochalsin D was administrated to the fibroblasts. From immunofluorescence observation and AFM loading/unloading curves, cytoskeletal reorganization as well as a change in the elasticity and adhesion was indeed observed. Elasticity of control fibroblasts is three times higher than that for fibroblasts treated with 0.5 μM Cytochalasin. Moreover, AFM loading–unloading curves clearly show the different mechanical behavior of the two different cells analyzed: (i) for control cells the AFM cantilever rises during the dwell time while cells with Cytochalasin fail to show such an active resistance; (ii) the maximum force to deform control cells is quite higher and as far as adhesion is concern (iii) the maximum separation force, detachment area and the detachment process time are much larger for control compared to the Cytochalasin treated cells. Therefore, alterations in the cytoskeleton suggest that a link must exist between the membrane receptors and the cytoskeletal filaments beneath the cellular surface and inhibition of actin polymerization has effects on the whole cell mechanical behavior as well as adhesion. - Highlights: • The whole AFM force–deformation cell curves were analyzed. • They provide information on both the elasticity and adhesion behavior. • Actin-destabilizing Cytochalasin D was administrated to the fibroblasts. • Change in elasticity and adhesion was ascribed to cytoskeletal reorganization. • A link exists between the membrane receptors and the cytoskeletal filaments.

  8. Determination of Operation Condition and Product Dimension Accuracy Optimization of Filament Deposition Modelling on Layer Manufacturing Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slamet Widyanto

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Layer manufacturing process has proven as a process that can produce a high complexity mechanical part. Now, Improvement of LM methods continuously conduct that is aimed to increase precessions and efficiency of these processes. Pressure filament deposition modelling is a form of layer manufacturing process that is designed to produce a plastic part with controlling its semisolid phase. In this research, the equipment of filament depositor is designed and tested to make the product filament deposition. With operation condition observation, the optimal temperature and pressure of deposition process was determined. These experiments used PVC as crystalline material and  polypropylene as amorphous material. To optimize this process, the tensile strength and density test were conducted. The shape of tensile test specimens is based on ASTM 638 standard and made in 3 orientations deposition path, namely: in 0 degree, 45 degree and 90 degree from load force axis. To found the most accurate dimension, controlling the time delay, temperature of build part, feeding speed and variation deposition path was conducted. The results of experiments show that the filament deposition method can only be applied for amorphous material in which it has a semisolid phase. From the tensile strength test, the binding strength among filaments is 0.5 kg/mm2, 20% of the tensile strength of filament. And the density of a sample product, which used the filament diameter of 0.8 mm, is 0.7668 g/cm3. Accuracy of product dimension can be increased by: controlling time delay in location where the motion orientation of hopper filament is changed and controlling temperature of build part surface.

  9. Structure of human Rad51 protein filament from molecular modeling and site-specific linear dichroism spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Reymer, A.

    2009-07-08

    To get mechanistic insight into the DNA strand-exchange reaction of homologous recombination, we solved a filament structure of a human Rad51 protein, combining molecular modeling with experimental data. We build our structure on reported structures for central and N-terminal parts of pure (uncomplexed) Rad51 protein by aid of linear dichroism spectroscopy, providing angular orientations of substituted tyrosine residues of Rad51-dsDNA filaments in solution. The structure, validated by comparison with an electron microscopy density map and results from mutation analysis, is proposed to represent an active solution structure of the nucleo-protein complex. An inhomogeneously stretched double-stranded DNA fitted into the filament emphasizes the strategic positioning of 2 putative DNA-binding loops in a way that allows us speculate about their possibly distinct roles in nucleo-protein filament assembly and DNA strand-exchange reaction. The model suggests that the extension of a single-stranded DNA molecule upon binding of Rad51 is ensured by intercalation of Tyr-232 of the L1 loop, which might act as a docking tool, aligning protein monomers along the DNA strand upon filament assembly. Arg-235, also sitting on L1, is in the right position to make electrostatic contact with the phosphate backbone of the other DNA strand. The L2 loop position and its more ordered compact conformation makes us propose that this loop has another role, as a binding site for an incoming double-stranded DNA. Our filament structure and spectroscopic approach open the possibility of analyzing details along the multistep path of the strand-exchange reaction.

  10. Introduction to linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Phillip L

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to Linear Elasticity, 3rd Edition, provides an applications-oriented grounding in the tensor-based theory of elasticity for students in mechanical, civil, aeronautical, and biomedical engineering, as well as materials and earth science. The book is distinct from the traditional text aimed at graduate students in solid mechanics by introducing the subject at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. The author's presentation allows students to apply the basic notions of stress analysis and move on to advanced work in continuum mechanics, plasticity, plate and shell theory, composite materials, viscoelasticity and finite method analysis. This book also:  Emphasizes tensor-based approach while still distilling down to explicit notation Provides introduction to theory of plates, theory of shells, wave propagation, viscoelasticity and plasticity accessible to advanced undergraduate students Appropriate for courses following emerging trend of teaching solid mechan...

  11. An elastic second skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Gilchrest, Barbara A; Anderson, R Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  12. Harmful impact of filamentous algae (Spirogyra sp.) on juvenile crayfish

    OpenAIRE

    Ulikowski Dariusz; Chybowski Łucjan; Traczuk Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of filamentous algae on the growth and survival of juvenile narrow-clawed crayfish, Astacus leptodactylus (Esch.), in rearing basins. Three stocking variants were used: A - basins with a layer of filamentous algae without imitation mineral substrate; B - basins with a layer of filamentous algae with imitation mineral substrate; C - basins without filamentous algae but with mineral substrate. The crayfish were reared from June 12 to October 10 ...

  13. Standing waves in a counter-rotating vortex filament pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Azpeitia, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    The distance among two counter-rotating vortex filaments satisfies a beam-type of equation according to the model derived in [15]. This equation has an explicit solution where two straight filaments travel with constant speed at a constant distance. The boundary condition of the filaments is 2π-periodic. Using the distance of the filaments as bifurcating parameter, an infinite number of branches of periodic standing waves bifurcate from this initial configuration with constant rational frequency along each branch.

  14. Graphene-based filament material for thermal ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shick, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Siegfried, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-19

    The use of graphene oxide materials for thermal ionization mass spectrometry analysis of plutonium and uranium has been investigated. Filament made from graphene oxide slurries have been 3-D printed. A method for attaching these filaments to commercial thermal ionization post assemblies has been devised. Resistive heating of the graphene based filaments under high vacuum showed stable operation in excess of 4 hours. Plutonium ion production has been observed in an initial set of filaments spiked with the Pu 128 Certified Reference Material.

  15. Coupling of two non-processive myosin 5c dimers enables processive stepping along actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Laura K; Furuta, Ken'ya; Bao, Jianjun; Urbanowski, Monica K; Kojima, Hiroaki; White, Howard D; Sakamoto, Takeshi

    2014-05-09

    Myosin 5c (Myo5c) is a low duty ratio, non-processive motor unable to move continuously along actin filaments though it is believed to participate in secretory vesicle trafficking in vertebrate cells. Here, we measured the ATPase kinetics of Myo5c dimers and tested the possibility that the coupling of two Myo5c molecules enables processive movement. Steady-state ATPase activity and ADP dissociation kinetics demonstrated that a dimer of Myo5c-HMM (double-headed heavy meromyosin 5c) has a 6-fold lower Km for actin filaments than Myo5c-S1 (single-headed myosin 5c subfragment-1), indicating that the two heads of Myo5c-HMM increase F-actin-binding affinity. Nanometer-precision tracking analyses showed that two Myo5c-HMM dimers linked with each other via a DNA scaffold and moved processively along actin filaments. Moreover, the distance between the Myo5c molecules on the DNA scaffold is an important factor for the processive movement. Individual Myo5c molecules in two-dimer complexes move stochastically in 30-36 nm steps. These results demonstrate that two dimers of Myo5c molecules on a DNA scaffold increased the probability of rebinding to F-actin and enabled processive steps along actin filaments, which could be used for collective cargo transport in cells.

  16. Exploring the Secretomes of Microbes and Microbial Communities Using Filamentous Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana eGagic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial surface and secreted proteins (the secretome contain a large number of proteins that interact with other microbes, host and/or environment. These proteins are exported by the coordinated activities of the protein secretion machinery present in the cell. A group of phage, called filamentous phage, have the ability to hijack the cellular protein secretion machinery in order to amplify and assemble via a secretion-like process. This ability has been harnessed in the use of filamentous phage of Escherichia coli in biotechnology applications, including screening large libraries of variants for binding to bait of interest, from tissues in vivo to pure proteins or even inorganic substrates. In this review we discuss the roles of secretome proteins in pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria and corresponding secretion pathways. We describe the basics of phage display technology and its variants applied to discovery of bacterial proteins that have functions of interest for bacterial colonization and pathogenesis, through filamentous phage display library screening. Published literature also shows that phage display is suitable for secretome protein display as a tool for identification immunogenic peptides and can be used for discovery of vaccine candidates. Secretome selection aided by next-generation sequence analysis can also be used for selective display of the secretome at a microbial community scale, the latter revealing the richness of secretome functions of interest and surprising versatility in filamentous phage display of secretome proteins from large number of Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria and archaea.

  17. Actin cytoskeleton contributes to the elastic modulus of embryonic tendon during early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Nathan R; von Flotow, Friedrich; Tochka, Zachary L; Hockaday, Laura A; Marturano, Joseph E; Thibodeau, Jeffrey J; Kuo, Catherine K

    2015-06-01

    Tendon injuries are common and heal poorly. Strategies to regenerate or replace injured tendons are challenged by an incomplete understanding of normal tendon development. Our previous study showed that embryonic tendon elastic modulus increases as a function of developmental stage. Inhibition of enzymatic collagen crosslink formation abrogated increases in tendon elastic modulus at late developmental stages, but did not affect increases in elastic modulus of early stage embryonic tendons. Here, we aimed to identify potential contributors to the mechanical properties of these early stage embryonic tendons. We characterized tendon progenitor cells in early stage embryonic tendons, and the influence of actin cytoskeleton disruption on tissue elastic modulus. Cells were closely packed in embryonic tendons, and did not change in density during early development. We observed an organized network of actin filaments that seemed contiguous between adjacent cells. The actin filaments exhibited a crimp pattern with a period and amplitude that matched the crimp of collagen fibers at each developmental stage. Chemical disruption of the actin cytoskeleton decreased tendon tissue elastic modulus, measured by atomic force microscopy. Our results demonstrate that early developmental stage embryonic tendons possess a well organized actin cytoskeleton network that contributes significantly to tendon tissue mechanical properties. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Fabrication of Polylactide Nanocomposite Filament Using Melt Extrusion and Filament Characterization for 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shrenik Kumar

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology uses thermoplastic filament for layer by layer fabrication of objects. To make functional objects with desired properties, composite filaments are required in the FDM. In this thesis, less expensive mesoporous Nano carbon (NC) and carbon nanotube (CNT) infused in Polylactide (PLA) thermoplastic filaments were fabricated to improve the electrical properties and maintain sufficient strength for 3D printing. Solution blending was used for nanocomposite fabrication and melt extrusion was employed to make cylindrical filaments. Mechanical and electrical properties of 1 to 20 wt% of NC and 1 to 3 wt% of CNT filaments were investigated and significant improvement of conductivity (3.76 S/m) and sufficient yield strength (35MPa) were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images exhibited uniform dispersion of nanoparticles in polymer matrix and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results showed no significant changes in the glass transition temperature (Tg) for all the compositions. Perspective uses of this filament are for fabrication of electrical wires in 3D printed robots, drones, prosthetics, orthotics and others.

  19. Effects of various kinetic rates of FtsZ filaments on bacterial cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zi; Liu, Zhuan; Guo, Kunkun; Ding, Lina

    2015-12-21

    Cell morphodynamics during bacterial cytokinesis are theoretically explored by a combination of phase field model for rod-shaped cells and a kinetic description for FtsZ ring maintenance. The division times and cell shapes have been generally decided by the competition between the constriction forces generated by FtsZ rings and the curvature elastic energy for cells. The dependences of cell morphodynamics during bacterial cytokinesis on various kinetic rates of FtsZ filaments are focused in the present study. It is found that the obtained results with the experimental parameters are well comparable to the observed results physiologically. Likewise, the quasi-steady states for FtsZ rings are found to be well consistent with the theoretical results derived from the kinetic description of FtsZ rings. In addition, morphological phase diagram is presented as functions of the membrane associate rate for both short FtsZ filaments and free FtsZ monomers, and the depolymerization rate of GDP-bound FtsZ monomers at the tip of filaments within the ring. Our results would provide a better understanding of the details of in vivo kinetics, including the kinetic rates within FtsZ rings.

  20. Elastic properties of Gum Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Shigeru; Furuta, Tadahiko; Hwang, Junghwan; Nishino, Kazuaki; Saito, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction measurements under tensile loading and dynamic mechanical analysis were performed to investigate the mechanisms of elastic deformation in Gum Metal. Tensile stress-strain curves for Gum Metal indicate that cold working substantially decreases the elastic modulus while increasing the yield strength, thereby confirming nonlinearity in the elastic range. The gradient of each curve decreased continuously to about one-third its original value near the elastic limit. As a result of this decrease in elastic modulus and nonlinearity, elastic deformability reaches 2.5% after cold working. Superelasticity is attributed to stress-induced martensitic transformations, although the large elastic deformation in Gum Metal is not accompanied by a phase transformation

  1. Modes of Aero-Breakup with Visco-Elastic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chee-Loon; Theofanous, Theo G.

    2008-07-01

    We use Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) at 15 nanosecond exposures to resolve the fine structure of interfacial instabilities and their evolutions (complete, to final particle-cloud formation) in supersonic aero-breakup of visco-elastic liquid drops. With fixed elasticity (3.8% aPTBP), the key parameter is the Weber (We) number, and the behavior can be summarized as follows: (a) initial loss of stability is at We˜6ṡ103; breakup, gradual and sporadic, occurs from the ends of long filamentous structures stretched out of the drop equatorial region in a tentacle-like fashion; (b) a second transition is at We˜4ṡ104; within a similar overall pattern the breakup process is greatly intensified; detachments occur in a rather coherent, rupture-like fashion, thus limiting the growth of the "root" filaments which become much thinner and more numerous. This mode of breakup remains effective, but further intensifies, as the We increases to ˜1.6ṡ105, reached in the present work. With our distributed visualization system we are able to capture in a statistically comprehensive manner the resulting clouds (i.e. conserving mass), and we demonstrate this capability by showing a sample particle-size distribution at near the second transition (We = 3.7ṡ104).

  2. Synthesis and functionalization of coiled carbon filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikita, Muneaki

    Coiled carbon filaments have one of the most attractive three-dimensional forms in carbon materials due to their helical morphologies. Because of their shape and carbon structure, they exhibit excellent mechanical and electrical properties such as superelasticity, low Young's modulus, relatively high electrical conductivity, and good electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption. Therefore, they are good candidates as fillers in composite materials for tactile sensor and electromagnetic interference shielding. In medical areas of interests, coiled carbon filaments can be used as micro and nano heaters or trigger for thermotherapy and biosensors using EM wave exposure because absorbed EM waves by coiled carbon filaments are converted into heat. Although various shapes of coiled carbon filaments have been discovered, optimum synthesis conditions and growth mechanisms of coiled carbon filaments are poorly understood. The study of growth kinetics is significant not only to analyze catalyst activity but also to establish the growth mechanisms of coiled carbon filaments. The establishment of growth mechanisms would be useful for determining optimum synthesis conditions and maximizing the quantity of carbon filaments synthesized for a given application. In the first study, tip grown single helical carbon filaments or carbon nanocoils (CNCs) were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition method using tin-iron-oxide (Sn-Fe-O) xerogel film catalyst. The Sn-Fe-O catalyst was prepared by a low-cost sol-gel method using stannous acetate and ferric acetate as precursors. The growth kinetics of CNCs were monitored by a thermogravimetric analyzer, and the experimental result was correlated using a one-dimensional kinetic model, corresponding to one-dimensional tip growth. In the second study, bidirectionally grown double helical filaments or carbon microcoils (CMCs) were synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition method. CMCs obtained at two reaction temperatures were compared. CMCs

  3. Protein-Nanocrystal Conjugates Support a Single Filament Polymerization Model in R1 Plasmid Segregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charina L.; Claridge, Shelley A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-07-15

    To ensure inheritance by daughter cells, many low-copy number bacterial plasmids, including the R1 drug-resistance plasmid, encode their own DNA segregation systems. The par operon of plasmid R1 directs construction of a simple spindle structure that converts free energy of polymerization of an actin-like protein, ParM, into work required to move sister plasmids to opposite poles of rod-shaped cells. The structures of individual components have been solved, but little is known about the ultrastructure of the R1 spindle. To determine the number of ParM filaments in a minimal R1 spindle, we used DNA-gold nanocrystal conjugates as mimics of the R1 plasmid. Wefound that each end of a single polar ParM filament binds to a single ParR/parC-gold complex, consistent with the idea that ParM filaments bind in the hollow core of the ParR/parC ring complex. Our results further suggest that multifilament spindles observed in vivo are associated with clusters of plasmidssegregating as a unit.

  4. Fabrication of PLA Filaments and its Printable Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhou, Jianping; Ma, Yuming; Wang, Jie; Xu, Jie

    2017-12-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a typical 3D printing technology and preparation of qualified filaments is the basis. In order to prepare polylactic acid (PLA) filaments suitable for personalized FDM 3D printing, this article investigated the effect of factors such as extrusion temperature and screw speed on the diameter, surface roughness and ultimate tensile stress of the obtained PLA filaments. The optimal process parameters for fabrication of qualified filaments were determined. Further, the printable performance of the obtained PLA filaments for 3D objects was preliminarily explored.

  5. Form finding in elastic gridshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Changyeob; Sageman-Furnas, Andrew O.; Jawed, Mohammad K.; Reis, Pedro M.

    2018-01-01

    Elastic gridshells comprise an initially planar network of elastic rods that are actuated into a shell-like structure by loading their extremities. The resulting actuated form derives from the elastic buckling of the rods subjected to inextensibility. We study elastic gridshells with a focus on the rational design of the final shapes. Our precision desktop experiments exhibit complex geometries, even from seemingly simple initial configurations and actuation processes. The numerical simulations capture this nonintuitive behavior with excellent quantitative agreement, allowing for an exploration of parameter space that reveals multistable states. We then turn to the theory of smooth Chebyshev nets to address the inverse design of hemispherical elastic gridshells. The results suggest that rod inextensibility, not elastic response, dictates the zeroth-order shape of an actuated elastic gridshell. As it turns out, this is the shape of a common household strainer. Therefore, the geometry of Chebyshev nets can be further used to understand elastic gridshells. In particular, we introduce a way to quantify the intrinsic shape of the empty, but enclosed regions, which we then use to rationalize the nonlocal deformation of elastic gridshells to point loading. This justifies the observed difficulty in form finding. Nevertheless, we close with an exploration of concatenating multiple elastic gridshell building blocks.

  6. Filament-producing mutants of influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1 virus have higher neuraminidase activities than the spherical wild-type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Seladi-Schulman

    Full Text Available Influenza virus exhibits two morphologies - spherical and filamentous. Strains that have been grown extensively in laboratory substrates are comprised predominantly of spherical virions while clinical or low passage isolates produce a mixture of spheres and filamentous virions of varying lengths. The filamentous morphology can be lost upon continued passage in embryonated chicken eggs, a common laboratory substrate for influenza viruses. The fact that the filamentous morphology is maintained in nature but lost in favor of a spherical morphology in ovo suggests that filaments confer a selective advantage within the infected host that is not necessary for growth in laboratory substrates. Indeed, we have recently shown that filament-producing variant viruses are selected upon passage of the spherical laboratory strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1 [PR8] in guinea pigs. Toward determining the nature of the selective advantage conferred by filaments, we sought to identify functional differences between spherical and filamentous particles. We compared the wild-type PR8 virus to two previously characterized recombinant PR8 viruses in which single point mutations within M1 confer a filamentous morphology. Our results indicate that these filamentous PR8 mutants have higher neuraminidase activities than the spherical PR8 virus. Conversely, no differences were observed in HAU:PFU or HAU:RNA ratios, binding avidity, sensitivity to immune serum in hemagglutination inhibition assays, or virion stability at elevated temperatures. Based on these results, we propose that the pleomorphic nature of influenza virus particles is important for the optimization of neuraminidase functions in vivo.

  7. SWAYING THREADS OF A SOLAR FILAMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.; Engvold, O.; Langangen, Oe.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. H. M.; Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Oliver, R.

    2009-01-01

    From recent high-resolution observations obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope in La Palma, we detect swaying motions of individual filament threads in the plane of the sky. The oscillatory characters of these motions are comparable with oscillatory Doppler signals obtained from corresponding filament threads. Simultaneous recordings of motions in the line of sight and in the plane of the sky give information about the orientation of the oscillatory plane. These oscillations are interpreted in the context of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. Kink MHD waves supported by the thread body are proposed as an explanation of the observed thread oscillations. On the basis of this interpretation and by means of seismological arguments, we give an estimation of the thread Alfven speed and magnetic field strength by means of seismological arguments.

  8. Helicity and Filament Channels? The Straight Twist!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and most puzzling features of the coronal magnetic field is that it appears to have smooth magnetic structure with little evidence for non-potentiality except at special locations, photospheric polarity inversions lines where the non-potentiality is observed as a filament channel. This characteristic feature of the closed-field corona is highly unexpected given that photospheric motions continuously tangle its magnetic field. Although reconnection can eliminate some of the injected structure, it cannot destroy the helicity, which should build up to produce observable complexity. We propose that an inverse cascade process transports the injected helicity from the interior of closed flux regions to their boundaries, polarity inversion lines, creating filament channels. We describe how the helicity is injected and transported and calculate the relevant rates. We argue that one process, helicity transport, can explain both the observed lack and presence of structure in the coronal magnetic field.

  9. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2016-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii , Borrelia miyamotoi , and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined.

  10. Statistical study of solar filaments since 1919

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboudarham, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Science board of Paris Observatory funded the data capture of tables associated with Meudon synoptic maps of Solar activity, which were published for observations ranging from 1919 to 1992. The EU HELIO project developed automatic recognition codes, especially concerning filaments based on observations between 1996 en 2014 (and soon, up to now). We plan to fill the gap between the two catalogues in the short term. But it is already possible to study filaments behavior over quite long periods of time. We present here the first series of results obtained from this analysis which give some clue about the way Solar activity behaves in various parts of the cycle, and about the way if depends on the hemisphere where activity occurs. This information could then be correlated with events catalogues (e.g. flares, CMEs, …) in order to link those phenomena with concrete Solar activity.

  11. Actin organization and dynamics in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berepiki, Adokiye; Lichius, Alexander; Read, Nick D

    2011-11-02

    Growth and morphogenesis of filamentous fungi is underpinned by dynamic reorganization and polarization of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin has crucial roles in exocytosis, endocytosis, organelle movement and cytokinesis in fungi, and these processes are coupled to the production of distinct higher-order structures (actin patches, cables and rings) that generate forces or serve as tracks for intracellular transport. New approaches for imaging actin in living cells are revealing important similarities and differences in actin architecture and organization within the fungal kingdom, and have yielded key insights into cell polarity, tip growth and long-distance intracellular transport. In this Review, we discuss the contribution that recent live-cell imaging and mutational studies have made to our understanding of the dynamics and regulation of actin in filamentous fungi.

  12. Laser filamentation mathematical methods and models

    CERN Document Server

    Lorin, Emmanuel; Moloney, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on the nonlinear theoretical and mathematical problems associated with ultrafast intense laser pulse propagation in gases and in particular, in air. With the aim of understanding the physics of filamentation in gases, solids, the atmosphere, and even biological tissue, specialists in nonlinear optics and filamentation from both physics and mathematics attempt to rigorously derive and analyze relevant non-perturbative models. Modern laser technology allows the generation of ultrafast (few cycle) laser pulses, with intensities exceeding the internal electric field in atoms and molecules (E=5x109 V/cm or intensity I = 3.5 x 1016 Watts/cm2 ). The interaction of such pulses with atoms and molecules leads to new, highly nonlinear nonperturbative regimes, where new physical phenomena, such as High Harmonic Generation (HHG), occur, and from which the shortest (attosecond - the natural time scale of the electron) pulses have been created. One of the major experimental discoveries in this nonlinear...

  13. Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunker, Rita; Røy, Hans; Kamp, Anja

    2011-01-01

    The large sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., live on the oxidation of sulfide with oxygen or nitrate, but avoid high concentrations of both sulfide and oxygen. As gliding filaments, they rely on reversals in the gliding direction to find their preferred environment, the oxygen–sulfide interface. We...... observed the chemotactic patterns of single filaments in a transparent agar medium and scored their reversals and the glided distances between reversals. Filaments within the preferred microenvironment glided distances shorter than their own length between reversals that anchored them in their position...... as a microbial mat. Filaments in the oxic region above the mat or in the sulfidic, anoxic region below the mat glided distances longer than the filament length between reversals. This reversal behavior resulted in a diffusion-like spreading of the filaments. A numerical model of such gliding filaments...

  14. Elastic and viscoplastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebensohn, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review crystal elasticity and plasticity-based self-consistent theories and apply them to the determination of the effective response of polycrystalline aggregates. These mean-field formulations, which enable the prediction of the mechanical behaviour of polycrystalline aggregates based on the heterogeneous and/or directional properties of their constituent single crystal grains and phases, are ideal tools to establish relationships between microstructure and properties of these materials, ubiquitous among fuels and structural materials for nuclear systems. (author)

  15. Mathematical foundations of elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, Jerrold E

    1994-01-01

    This advanced-level study approaches mathematical foundations of three-dimensional elasticity using modern differential geometry and functional analysis. It is directed to mathematicians, engineers and physicists who wish to see this classical subject in a modern setting with examples of newer mathematical contributions. Prerequisites include a solid background in advanced calculus and the basics of geometry and functional analysis.The first two chapters cover the background geometry ― developed as needed ― and use this discussion to obtain the basic results on kinematics and dynamics of con

  16. Series Elastic Actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    7.2 Planetary rover 75 7.3 Biped Robot 76 8 Conclusions 77 8.1 Review of Thesis 77 8.2 Further Work 77 List of Figures 1-1 Schematic of...have only four degrees of freedom, and a simple gripper. 75 76 CHAPTER 7. APPLICATIONS Figure 7-1: Photograph of robot arm 7.3 Biped Robot ...Another group at MIT is building a biped walking robot using series elastic actuators. The design of the actuators differs in that instead of using a

  17. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  18. Filamented plasmas in laser ablation of solids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davies, J.R.; Fajardo, M.; Kozlová, Michaela; Mocek, Tomáš; Polan, Jiří; Rus, Bedřich

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2009), 035013/1-035013/12 ISSN 0741-3335 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 12843 - TUIXS Grant - others:FCT(PT) POCI/FIS/59563/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : magneto-hydrodynamic modelling * perturbation * filaments * x-ray * plasma Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.409, year: 2009

  19. The Magnetic Structure of Filament Barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jongchul; Moon, Yong-Jae; Park, Young-Deuk

    2005-06-01

    There is a controversy about how features protruding laterally from filaments, called barbs, are magnetically structured. On 2004 August 3, we observed a filament that had well-developed barbs. The observations were performed using the 10 inch refractor of the Big Bear Solar Observatory. A fast camera was employed to capture images at five different wavelengths of the Hα line and successively record them on the basis of frame selection. The terminating points of the barbs were clearly discernable in the Hα images without any ambiguity. The comparison of the Hα images with the magnetograms taken by SOHO MDI revealed that the termination occurred above the minor polarity inversion line dividing the magnetic elements of the major polarity and those of the minor polarity. There is also evidence that the flux cancellation proceeded on the polarity inversion line. Our results together with similar other recent observations support the idea that filament barbs are cool matter suspended in local dips of magnetic field lines, formed by magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere.

  20. Tracer filamentation at an unstable ocean front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yen Chia; Mahadevan, Amala; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Yecko, Philip

    2017-11-01

    A front, where two bodies of ocean water with different physical properties meet, can become unstable and lead to a flow with high strain rate and vorticity. Phytoplankton and other oceanic tracers are stirred into filaments by such flow fields, as can often be seen in satellite imagery. The stretching and folding of a tracer by a two-dimensional flow field has been well studied. In the ocean, however, the vertical shear of horizontal velocity is typically two orders of magnitude larger than the horizontal velocity gradient. Theoretical calculations show that vertical shear alters the way in which horizontal strain affects the tracer, resulting in thin, sloping structures in the tracer field. Using a non-hydrostatic ocean model of an unstable ocean front, we simulate tracer filamentation to identify the effect of vertical shear on the deformation of the tracer. In a complementary laboratory experiment, we generate a simple, vertically sheared strain flow and use dye and particle image velocimetry to quantify the filamentary structures in terms of the strain and shear. We identify how vertical shear alters the tracer filaments and infer how the evolution of tracers in the ocean will differ from the idealized two-dimensional paradigm. Support of NSF DMS-1418956 is acknowledged.

  1. Magnetization Modeling of Twisted Superconducting Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Satiramatekul, T; Devred, Arnaud; Leroy, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new Finite Element numerical method to analyze the coupling between twisted filaments in a superconducting multifilament composite wire. To avoid the large number of elements required by a 3D code, the proposed method makes use of the energy balance principle in a 2D code. The relationship between superconductor critical current density and local magnetic flux density is implemented in the program for the Bean and modified Kim models. The modeled wire is made up of six filaments twisted together and embedded in a lowresistivity matrix. Computations of magnetization cycle and of the electric field pattern have been performed for various twist pitch values in the case of a pure copper matrix. The results confirm that the maximum magnetization depends on the matrix conductivity, the superconductor critical current density, the applied field frequency, and the filament twist pitch. The simulations also lead to a practical criterion for wire design that can be used to assess whether or not th...

  2. Contribution of elastic tissues to the mechanics and energetics of muscle function during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Muscle force production occurs within an environment of tissues that exhibit spring-like behavior, and this elasticity is a critical determinant of muscle performance during locomotion. Muscle force and power output both depend on the speed of contraction, as described by the isotonic force-velocity curve. By influencing the speed of contractile elements, elastic structures can have a profound effect on muscle force, power and work. In very rapid movements, elastic mechanisms can amplify muscle power by storing the work of muscle contraction slowly and releasing it rapidly. When energy must be dissipated rapidly, such as in landing from a jump, energy stored rapidly in elastic elements can be released more slowly to stretch muscle contractile elements, reducing the power input to muscle and possibly protecting it from damage. Elastic mechanisms identified so far rely primarily on in-series tendons, but many structures within muscles exhibit spring-like properties. Actomyosin cross-bridges, actin and myosin filaments, titin, and the connective tissue scaffolding of the extracellular matrix all have the potential to store and recover elastic energy during muscle contraction. The potential contribution of these elements can be assessed from their stiffness and estimates of the strain they undergo during muscle function. Such calculations provide boundaries for the possible roles these springs might play in locomotion, and may help to direct future studies of the uses of elastic elements in muscle. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. On the fragmentation of filaments in a molecular cloud simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chira, R.-A.; Kainulainen, J.; Ibáñez-Mejía, J. C.; Henning, Th.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The fragmentation of filaments in molecular clouds has attracted a lot of attention recently as there seems to be a close relation between the evolution of filaments and star formation. The study of the fragmentation process has been motivated by simple analytical models. However, only a few comprehensive studies have analysed the evolution of filaments using numerical simulations where the filaments form self-consistently as part of large-scale molecular cloud evolution. Aim. We address the early evolution of parsec-scale filaments that form within individual clouds. In particular, we focus on three questions: How do the line masses of filaments evolve? How and when do the filaments fragment? How does the fragmentation relate to the line masses of the filaments? Methods: We examine three simulated molecular clouds formed in kiloparsec-scale numerical simulations performed with the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic code. The simulations model a self-gravitating, magnetised, stratified, supernova-driven interstellar medium, including photoelectric heating and radiative cooling. We follow the evolution of the clouds for 6 Myr from the time self-gravity starts to act. We identify filaments using the DisPerSe algorithm, and compare the results to other filament-finding algorithms. We determine the properties of the identified filaments and compare them with the predictions of analytic filament stability models. Results: The average line masses of the identified filaments, as well as the fraction of mass in filamentary structures, increases fairly continuously after the onset of self-gravity. The filaments show fragmentation starting relatively early: the first fragments appear when the line masses lie well below the critical line mass of Ostriker's isolated hydrostatic equilibrium solution ( 16 M⊙ pc-1), commonly used as a fragmentation criterion. The average line masses of filaments identified in three-dimensional volume density cubes

  4. Design guidance for elastic followup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naugle, F.V.

    1983-01-01

    The basic mechanism of elastic followup is discussed in relation to piping design. It is shown how mechanistic insight gained from solutions for a two-bar problem can be used to identify dominant design parameters and to determine appropriate modifications where elastic followup is a potential problem. It is generally recognized that quantitative criteria are needed for elastic followup in the creep range where badly unbalanced lines can pose potential problems. Approaches for criteria development are discussed.

  5. Elastic emission polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  6. Heavy ion elastic scatterings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermaz, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Diffraction and refraction play an important role in particle elastic scattering. The optical model treats correctly and simultaneously both phenomena but without disentangling them. Semi-classical discussions in terms of trajectories emphasize the refractive aspect due to the real part of the optical potential. The separation due to to R.C. Fuller of the quantal cross section into two components coming from opposite side of the target nucleus allows to understand better the refractive phenomenon and the origin of the observed oscillations in the elastic scattering angular distributions. We shall see that the real part of the potential is responsible of a Coulomb and a nuclear rainbow which allows to determine better the nuclear potential in the interior region near the nuclear surface since the volume absorption eliminates any effect of the real part of the potential for the internal partial scattering waves. Resonance phenomena seen in heavy ion scattering will be discussed in terms of optical model potential and Regge pole analysis. Compound nucleus resonances or quasi-molecular states can be indeed the more correct and fundamental alternative

  7. Multisoliton solutions, completely elastic collisions and non-elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss the nature of solitonsolutions before and after their interactions, and present their fusion (non-elastic) and elastic collisions of the soliton solutions. ... Department of Mathematics, Pabna University of Science and Technology, Pabna 6600, Bangladesh; School of Mathematics and Physics, University of ...

  8. Chirality of Intermediate Filaments and Magnetic Helicity of Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Chae, J.

    2009-05-01

    Filaments that form either between or around active regions (ARs) are called intermediate filaments. Even though there have been many theoretical studies, the origin of the chirality of filaments is still unknown. We investigated how intermediate filaments are related to their associated ARs, especially from the point of view of magnetic helicity and the orientation of polarity inversion lines (PILs). The chirality of filaments has been determined based on the orientations of barbs observed in the full-disk Hα images taken at Big Bear Solar Observatory during the rising phase of solar cycle 23. The sign of magnetic helicity of ARs has been determined using S/inverse-S shaped sigmoids from Yohkoh SXT images. As a result, we have found a good correlation between the chirality of filaments and the magnetic helicity sign of ARs. Among 45 filaments, 42 filaments have shown the same sign as helicity sign of nearby ARs. It has been also confirmed that the role of both the orientation and the relative direction of PILs to ARs in determining the chirality of filaments is not significant, against a theoretical prediction. These results suggest that the chirality of intermediate filaments may originate from magnetic helicity of their associated ARs.

  9. Measuring Filament Orientation: A New Quantitative, Local Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, C.-E.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052 (Australia); Dawson, J. R. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Novak, G. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Fissel, L. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA, 22903 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The relative orientation between filamentary structures in molecular clouds and the ambient magnetic field provides insight into filament formation and stability. To calculate the relative orientation, a measurement of filament orientation is first required. We propose a new method to calculate the orientation of the one-pixel-wide filament skeleton that is output by filament identification algorithms such as filfinder. We derive the local filament orientation from the direction of the intensity gradient in the skeleton image using the Sobel filter and a few simple post-processing steps. We call this the “Sobel-gradient method.” The resulting filament orientation map can be compared quantitatively on a local scale with the magnetic field orientation map to then find the relative orientation of the filament with respect to the magnetic field at each point along the filament. It can also be used for constructing radial profiles for filament width fitting. The proposed method facilitates automation in analyses of filament skeletons, which is imperative in this era of “big data.”.

  10. Questions about elastic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Jüri

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the modelling of mechanical waves by asking the right questions about them and trying to find suitable answers. The questions follow the analytical sequence from elementary understandings to complicated cases, following a step-by-step path towards increased knowledge. The focus is on waves in elastic solids, although some examples also concern non-conservative cases for the sake of completeness. Special attention is paid to the understanding of the influence of microstructure, nonlinearity and internal variables in continua. With the help of many mathematical models for describing waves, physical phenomena concerning wave dispersion, nonlinear effects, emergence of solitary waves, scales and hierarchies of waves as well as the governing physical parameters are analysed. Also, the energy balance in waves and non-conservative models with energy influx are discussed. Finally, all answers are interwoven into the canvas of complexity.

  11. The filamentous phages fd and IF1 use different mechanisms to infect Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Stefan H; Jakob, Roman P; Weininger, Ulrich; Balbach, Jochen; Dobbek, Holger; Schmid, Franz X

    2011-01-28

    The filamentous phage fd uses its gene 3 protein (G3P) to target Escherichia coli cells in a two-step process. First, the N2 domain of G3P attaches to an F pilus, and then the N1 domain binds to TolA-C. N1 and N2 are tightly associated, rendering the phage robust but noninfectious because the binding site for TolA-C is buried at the domain interface. Binding of N2 to the F pilus initiates partial unfolding, domain disassembly, and prolyl cis-to-trans isomerization in the hinge between N1 and N2. This activates the phage, and trans-Pro213 maintains this state long enough for N1 to reach TolA-C. Phage IF1 targets I pili, and its G3P contains also an N1 domain and an N2 domain. The pilus-binding N2 domains of the phages IF1 and fd are unrelated, and the N1 domains share a 31% sequence identity. We show that N2 of phage IF1 mediates binding to the I pilus, and that N1 targets TolA. Crystallographic and NMR analyses of the complex between N1 and TolA-C indicate that phage IF1 interacts with the same site on TolA-C as phage fd. In IF1-G3P, N1 and N2 are independently folding units, however, and the TolA binding site on N1 is permanently accessible. Activation by unfolding and prolyl isomerization, as in the case of phage fd, is not observed. In IF1-G3P, the absence of stabilizing domain interactions is compensated for by a strong increase in the stabilities of the individual domains. Apparently, these closely related filamentous phages evolved different mechanisms to reconcile robustness with high infectivity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preferential binding of lysozyme to elastic fibres in pulmonary emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    Shteyngart, B.; Chaiwiriyakul, S.; Wong, J.; Cantor, J.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Lysozyme is increased in inflammatory reactions and is a component of the extracellular matrix, but its possible role in lung diseases such as emphysema and interstitial fibrosis has not been investigated.
METHODS—To characterise differences in lysozyme content among normal, emphysematous, and fibrotic human lungs, tissue sections obtained from necropsy specimens were immunostained with rabbit polyclonal anti-human lysozyme antibody using the labelled streptavi...

  13. Approximation by planar elastic curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Gravesen, Jens; Nørbjerg, Toke Bjerge

    2016-01-01

    We give an algorithm for approximating a given plane curve segment by a planar elastic curve. The method depends on an analytic representation of the space of elastic curve segments, together with a geometric method for obtaining a good initial guess for the approximating curve. A gradient-driven...

  14. Nonlinear Elasticity of Doped Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2016-0206 NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS Mark Dykman and Kirill Moskovtsev Michigan State University...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-1-7600 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...vibration amplitude. 15. SUBJECT TERMS semiconductors , microresonators, microelectromechanical 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  15. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  16. The THMIS-MTR observation of a active region filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, W. G.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.

    We present some THMIS-MTR observations of a active region filament on September 4, 2002. The full stokes parameters of the filament were obtained in Hα, CaII 8542 and FeI 6302. By use of the data with high spatial resolution(0.44" per pixel), we probed the fine structure of the filament and gave out the parameters at the barbs' endpoints, including intensity, velocity and longitudinal magnetic field. Comparing the quiescent filament which we have discussed before, we find that: 1)The velocities of the barbs' endpoints are much bigger in the active region filament, the values are more than one thousand meters per second. 2)The barbs' endpoints terminate at the low logitudinal magnetic field in the active region filament, too.

  17. A filament supported by different magnetic field configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y.; Schmieder, B.; Démoulin, P.; Wiegelmann, T.; Aulanier, G.; Török, T.; Bommier, V.

    2011-08-01

    A nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolation of vector magnetogram data obtained by THEMIS/MTR on 2005 May 27 suggests the simultaneous existence of different magnetic configurations within one active region filament: one part of the filament is supported by field line dips within a flux rope, while the other part is located in dips within an arcade structure. Although the axial field chirality (dextral) and the magnetic helicity (negative) are the same along the whole filament, the chiralities of the filament barbs at different sections are opposite, i.e., right-bearing in the flux rope part and left-bearing in the arcade part. This argues against past suggestions that different barb chiralities imply different signs of helicity of the underlying magnetic field. This new finding about the chirality of filaments will be useful to associate eruptive filaments and magnetic cloud using the helicity parameter in the Space Weather Science.

  18. The Interaction of Arp2/3 Complex with Actin: Nucleation, High Affinity Pointed End Capping, and Formation of Branching Networks of Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, R. Dyche; Heuser, John A.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    1998-05-01

    The Arp2/3 complex is a stable assembly of seven protein subunits including two actin-related proteins (Arp2 and Arp3) and five novel proteins. Previous work showed that this complex binds to the sides of actin filaments and is concentrated at the leading edges of motile cells. Here, we show that Arp2/3 complex purified from Acanthamoeba caps the pointed ends of actin filaments with high affinity. Arp2/3 complex inhibits both monomer addition and dissociation at the pointed ends of actin filaments with apparent nanomolar affinity and increases the critical concentration for polymerization at the pointed end from 0.6 to 1.0 μ M. The high affinity of Arp2/3 complex for pointed ends and its abundance in amoebae suggest that in vivo all actin filament pointed ends are capped by Arp2/3 complex. Arp2/3 complex also nucleates formation of actin filaments that elongate only from their barbed ends. From kinetic analysis, the nucleation mechanism appears to involve stabilization of polymerization intermediates (probably actin dimers). In electron micrographs of quick-frozen, deep-etched samples, we see Arp2/3 bound to sides and pointed ends of actin filaments and examples of Arp2/3 complex attaching pointed ends of filaments to sides of other filaments. In these cases, the angle of attachment is a remarkably constant 70 ± 7 degrees. From these in vitro biochemical properties, we propose a model for how Arp2/3 complex controls the assembly of a branching network of actin filaments at the leading edge of motile cells.

  19. Reduced filamentation in high power semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in fields ranging from material processing to medicine. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that high optical power densities cause damage to the laser facet and thus require large apertures. This, in turn, results in spatio......-temporal instabilities such as filamentation which degrades spatial coherence and brightness. We first evaluate performance of existing designs with a “top-hat” shaped transverse current density profile. The unstable nature of highly excited semiconductor material results in a run-away process where small modulations...

  20. Filament winding cylinders. I - Process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    A model was developed which describes the filament winding process of composite cylinders. The model relates the significant process variables such as winding speed, fiber tension, and applied temperature to the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of the composite cylinder and the mandrel. Based on the model, a user friendly code was written which can be used to calculate (1) the temperature in the cylinder and the mandrel, (2) the degree of cure and viscosity in the cylinder, (3) the fiber tensions and fiber positions, (4) the stresses and strains in the cylinder and in the mandrel, and (5) the void diameters in the cylinder.

  1. Blocky inversion of multichannel elastic impedance for elastic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozayan, Davoud Karami; Gholami, Ali; Siahkoohi, Hamid Reza

    2018-04-01

    Petrophysical description of reservoirs requires proper knowledge of elastic parameters like P- and S-wave velocities (Vp and Vs) and density (ρ), which can be retrieved from pre-stack seismic data using the concept of elastic impedance (EI). We propose an inversion algorithm which recovers elastic parameters from pre-stack seismic data in two sequential steps. In the first step, using the multichannel blind seismic inversion method (exploited recently for recovering acoustic impedance from post-stack seismic data), high-resolution blocky EI models are obtained directly from partial angle-stacks. Using an efficient total-variation (TV) regularization, each angle-stack is inverted independently in a multichannel form without prior knowledge of the corresponding wavelet. The second step involves inversion of the resulting EI models for elastic parameters. Mathematically, under some assumptions, the EI's are linearly described by the elastic parameters in the logarithm domain. Thus a linear weighted least squares inversion is employed to perform this step. Accuracy of the concept of elastic impedance in predicting reflection coefficients at low and high angles of incidence is compared with that of exact Zoeppritz elastic impedance and the role of low frequency content in the problem is discussed. The performance of the proposed inversion method is tested using synthetic 2D data sets obtained from the Marmousi model and also 2D field data sets. The results confirm the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method for inversion of pre-stack seismic data.

  2. Multiple filamentation generated by focusing femtosecond laser with axicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Gao, Hui; Zeng, Bin; Xu, Shengqi; Liu, Weiwei; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Mu, Guoguang

    2012-03-01

    Multiple filamentation has been observed when focusing a femtosecond laser pulse into a methanol solution with an axicon. It is found that multiple long filaments are located on the central spot and ring structures of the quasi-Bessel beam created by the axicon. Since the quasi-Bessel profile is determined by the axicon properties, the axicon has been suggested as a simple optics to control multiple filaments. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  3. Observations of the Growth of an Active Region Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo

    2017-04-01

    We present observations of the growth of an active region filament caused by magnetic interactions among the filament and its adjacent superpenumbral filament (SF) and dark thread-like structures (T). Multistep reconnections are identified during the whole growing process. Magnetic flux convergence and cancellation occurring at the positive footpoint region of the filament is the first step reconnection, which resulted in the filament bifurcating into two sets of intertwined threads. One set anchored in situ, while the other set moved toward and interacted with the SF and part of T. This indicates the second step reconnection, which gave rise to the disappearance of the SF and the formation of a long thread-like structure that connects the far ends of the filament and T. The long thread-like structure further interacted with the T and then separated into two parts, representing the third step reconnection. Finally, another similar long thread-like structure, which intertwined with the fixed filament threads, appeared. Hαobservations show that this twisted structure is a longer sinistral filament. Based on the observed photospheric vector magnetograms, we performed a non-linear force-free field extrapolation to reconstruct the magnetic fields above the photosphere and found that the coronal magnetic field lines associated with the filament consists of two twisted flux ropes winding around each other. These results suggest that magnetic interactions among filaments and their adjacent SFs and T could lead to the growth of the filaments, and the filament is probably supported in a flux rope.

  4. Native bare zone assemblage nucleates myosin filament assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, R; Peters, L K

    1982-11-15

    Native myosin filaments from rabbit psoas muscle are always 1.5 micrometer long. The regulated assembly of these filaments is generally considered to occur by an initial antiparallel and subsequent parallel aggregation of identical myosin subunits. In this schema myosin filament length is controlled by either a self-assembly or a Vernier process. We present evidence which refines these ideas. Namely, that the intact myosin bare zone assemblage nucleates myosin filament assembly. This suggestion is based on the following experimental evidence. (1) A native bare zone assemblage about 0.3 micrometer long can be formed by dialysis of native myosin filaments to either a pH 8 or a 0.2 M-KCl solution. (2) Upon dialysis back to 0.1 M-KCl, bare zone assemblages and distal myosin molecules recombine to form 1.5 micrometer long bipolar filaments. (3) The bare zone assemblage can be separated from the distal myosin molecules by column chromatography in 0.2 M-KCl. Upon dialysis of the fractionated subsets back to 0.1 M-KCl, the bare zone assemblage retains its length of about 0.3 micrometer. However, the distal molecules reassemble to form filaments about 5 micrometers long. (4) Filaments are formed from mixes of the isolated subsets. The lengths of these filaments vary with the amount of distal myosin present. (5) When native filaments, isolated bare zone assemblages or distal myosin molecules are moved sequentially to 0.6 M-KCl and then to 0.1 M-KCl, the final filament lengths are all about 5 micrometers. The capacity of the bare zone assemblage to nucleate filament assembly may be due to the bare zone myosin molecules, the associated M band components or both.

  5. Dynamic Regulation of Sarcomeric Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2010-01-01

    In striated muscle, the actin cytoskeleton is differentiated into myofibrils. Actin and myosin filaments are organized in sarcomeres and specialized for producing contractile forces. Regular arrangement of actin filaments with uniform length and polarity is critical for the contractile function. However, the mechanisms of assembly and maintenance of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle are not completely understood. Live imaging of actin in striated muscle has revealed that actin sub...

  6. Electrostatics Control Actin Filament Nucleation and Elongation Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H.; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L.; Lamb, Don C.; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment. PMID:23486468

  7. Electrostatics control actin filament nucleation and elongation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L; Lamb, Don C; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-04-26

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment.

  8. Mechanistic Insights Into Filamentous Phage Integration In Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhabatosh eDas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of acute diarrhoeal disease cholera, harbors large numbers of lysogenic filamentous phages, contribute significantly to the host pathogenesis and provide fitness factors to the pathogen that help the bacterium to survive in natural environment. Most of the vibriophage genomes are not equipped with integrase and thus exploit two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, for lysogenic conversion. Integration is site-specific and it occurs at dimer resolution site (dif of either one or both chromosomes of V. cholerae. Each dif sequence contains two recombinase-binding sequences flanking a central region. The integration follows a sequential strand exchanges between dif and attP sites within a DNA-protein complex consisting of one pair of each recombinase and two DNA fragments. During entire process of recombination, both the DNA components and recombinases of the synaptic complex keep transiently interconnected. Within the context of synaptic complex, both of the actuated enzymes mediate cleavage of phosphodiester bonds. First cleavage generates a phosphotyrosyl-linked recombinase-DNA complex at the recombinase binding sequence and free 5’-hydroxyl end at the first base of the central region. Following the cleavage, the exposed bases with 5’-hydroxyl ends of the central region of dif and attP sites melt from their complementary strands and react with the recombinase-DNA phosphotyrosyl linkage of their recombining partner. Subsequent ligation between dif and attP strands requires complementary base pair interactions at the site of phosphodiester bond formation. Integration mechanism is mostly influenced by the compatibility of dif and attP sequences. dif sites are highly conserved across bacterial phyla. Different phage genomes have different attP sequences; therefore they rely on different mechanisms for integration. Here, I review our current understanding of integration mechanisms used by the

  9. Modeling Vertical Plasma Flows in Solar Filament Barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Speeds of observed flows in quiescent solar filaments are typically much less than the local Alfvén speed. This is why the flows in filament barbs can be modeled by perturbing a local magnetostatic solution describing the balance between the Lorentz force, gravity, and gas pressure in a barb. Similarly, large-scale filament flows can be treated as adiabatically slow deformations of a force-free magnetic equilibrium that describes the global structure of a filament. This approach reconciles current theoretical models with the puzzling observational result that some of the flows appear to be neither aligned with the magnetic field nor controlled by gravity.

  10. Filament shape versus coronal potential magnetic field structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filament shape in projection on disc depends on the structure of the coronal magnetic field. We calculate the position of polarity inversion lines (PILs) of coronal potential magnetic field at different heights above the photosphere, which compose the magnetic neutral surface, and compare with them the distribution of the filament material in Hα chromospheric images. We found that the most of the filament material is enclosed between two PILs, one at a lower height close to the chromosphere and one at a higher level, which can be considered as a height of the filament spine. Observations of the same filament on the limb by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft confirm that the height of the spine is really very close to the value obtained from the PIL and filament border matching. Such matching can be used for filament height estimations in on-disc observations. Filament barbs are housed within protruding sections of the low-level PIL. On the base of simple model, we show that the similarity of the neutral surfaces in potential and non-potential fields with the same sub-photospheric sources is the reason for the found tendency for the filament material to gather near the potential-field neutral surface.

  11. Statistical Study of the Magnetic Field Orientation in Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Sakurai, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    We have carried out a statistical study of the average orientation of the magnetic field in solar filaments with respect to their axes for more than 400 samples, based on data taken with daily full-Sun, full-Stokes spectropolarimetric observations using the He I 1083.0 nm line. The major part of the samples are the filaments in the quiet areas, but those in the active areas are included as well. The average orientation of the magnetic field in filaments shows a systematic property depending on the hemisphere; the direction of the magnetic field in filaments in the northern (southern) hemisphere mostly deviates clockwise (counterclockwise) from their axes, which run along the magnetic polarity inversion line. The deviation angles of the magnetic field from the axes are concentrated between 10° and 30°. This hemispheric pattern is consistent with that revealed for chirality of filament barbs, filament channels, and for other solar features found to possess chirality. For some filaments, it was confirmed that their magnetic field direction is locally parallel to their structure seen in Hα images. Our results for the first time confirmed this hemispheric pattern with the direct observation of the magnetic field in filaments. Interestingly, the filaments which show the opposite magnetic field deviation to the hemispheric pattern, are in many cases found above the polarity inversion line whose ambient photospheric magnetic field has the polarity alignment being opposite to that of active regions following the Hale–Nicholson law.

  12. Spatial evolution of laser filaments in turbulent air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Tao; Zhu, Shiping; Zhou, Shengling; He, Yan

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the spatial evolution properties of laser filament clusters in turbulent air were evaluated using numerical simulations. Various statistical parameters were calculated, such as the percolation probability, filling factor, and average cluster size. The results indicate that turbulence-induced multi-filamentation can be described as a new phase transition universality class. In addition, during this process, the relationship between the average cluster size and filling factor could be fit by a power function. Our results are valuable for applications involving filamentation that can be influenced by the geometrical features of multiple filaments.

  13. Numerical simulation of laser filamentation in underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lichun; Chen Zhihua; Tu Qinfen

    2000-01-01

    Developing process of filamentation and effect of characteristic parameters in underdense plasma have been studied using numerical simulation method. Production and development of two-dimensional cylinder filamentation instability were presented clearly. The results indicate incidence laser intensity and plasma background density are important factors affecting convergent intensity. At the same time, it was showed that different laser wavelength or different electron background density could affect filamentation process. The results are consistent with theory and experiments of alien reports. It can provide reference for restraining filamentation

  14. MATERIAL SUPPLY AND MAGNETIC CONFIGURATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, P.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.; Yang, K.; Hao, Q. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Cao, Wenda, E-mail: fangc@nju.edu.cn [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    It is important to study the fine structures of solar filaments with high-resolution observations, since it can help us understand the magnetic and thermal structures of the filaments and their dynamics. In this paper, we study a newly formed filament located inside the active region NOAA 11762, which was observed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory from 16:40:19 UT to 17:07:58 UT on 2013 June 5. As revealed by the H α filtergrams, cool material is seen to be injected into the filament spine with a speed of 5–10 km s{sup -1}. At the source of the injection, brightenings are identified in the chromosphere, which are accompanied by magnetic cancellation in the photosphere, implying the importance of magnetic reconnection in replenishing the filament with plasmas from the lower atmosphere. Counter-streamings are detected near one endpoint of the filament, with the plane-of-the-sky speed being 7–9 km s{sup -1} in the H α red-wing filtergrams and 9–25 km s{sup -1} in the blue-wing filtergrams. The observations are indicative that this active region filament is supported by a sheared arcade without magnetic dips, and the counter-streamings are due to unidirectional flows with alternative directions, rather than due to the longitudinal oscillations of filament threads as in many other filaments.

  15. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobegalov, Georgii, E-mail: george.pobegalov@nanobio.spbstu.ru [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Baitin, Dmitrii [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Khodorkovskii, Mikhail [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. - Highlights: • We investigate Deinococcus radiodurans RecA interactions with long double-stranded DNA at the single-molecule level. • At physiological pH D. radiodurans RecA forms nucleoprotein filaments significantly faster relative to Escherichia coli RecA. • D. radiodurans RecA-dsDNA nucleoprotein filaments are more flexible and slightly shorter compared to those of E. coli RecA.

  16. Role of architecture in the elastic response of semiflexible polymer and fiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heussinger, Claus; Frey, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    We study the elasticity of cross-linked networks of thermally fluctuating stiff polymers. As compared to their purely mechanical counterparts, it is shown that these thermal networks have a qualitatively different elastic response. By accounting for the entropic origin of the single-polymer elasticity, the networks acquire a strong susceptibility to polydispersity and structural randomness that is completely absent in athermal models. In extensive numerical studies we systematically vary the architecture of the networks and identify a wealth of phenomena that clearly show the strong dependence of the emergent macroscopic moduli on the underlying mesoscopic network structure. In particular, we highlight the importance of the polymer length, which to a large extent controls the elastic response of the network, surprisingly, even in parameter regions where it does not enter the macroscopic moduli explicitly. Understanding these subtle effects is only possible by going beyond the conventional approach that considers the response of typical polymer segments only. Instead, we propose to describe the elasticity in terms of a typical polymer filament and the spatial distribution of cross-links along its backbone. We provide theoretical scaling arguments to relate the observed macroscopic elasticity to the physical mechanisms on the microscopic and mesoscopic scales.

  17. Electromechanical vortex filaments during cardiac fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, J.; Chebbok, M.; Richter, C.; Schröder-Schetelig, J.; Bittihn, P.; Stein, S.; Uzelac, I.; Fenton, F. H.; Hasenfuß, G.; Gilmour, R. F., Jr.; Luther, S.

    2018-03-01

    The self-organized dynamics of vortex-like rotating waves, which are also known as scroll waves, are the basis of the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns in many excitable chemical and biological systems. In the heart, filament-like phase singularities that are associated with three-dimensional scroll waves are considered to be the organizing centres of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms that underlie the onset, maintenance and control of electromechanical turbulence in the heart are inherently three-dimensional phenomena. However, it has not previously been possible to visualize the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of scroll waves inside cardiac tissues. Here we show that three-dimensional mechanical scroll waves and filament-like phase singularities can be observed deep inside the contracting heart wall using high-resolution four-dimensional ultrasound-based strain imaging. We found that mechanical phase singularities co-exist with electrical phase singularities during cardiac fibrillation. We investigated the dynamics of electrical and mechanical phase singularities by simultaneously measuring the membrane potential, intracellular calcium concentration and mechanical contractions of the heart. We show that cardiac fibrillation can be characterized using the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of mechanical phase singularities, which arise inside the fibrillating contracting ventricular wall. We demonstrate that electrical and mechanical phase singularities show complex interactions and we characterize their dynamics in terms of trajectories, topological charge and lifetime. We anticipate that our findings will provide novel perspectives for non-invasive diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications.

  18. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Middelveen MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B Stricker International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Morgellons disease (MD is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii, Borrelia miyamotoi, and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined. Keywords: Morgellons disease, dermatitis, Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, spirochetes

  19. Intermediate filament mechanics in vitro and in the cell: From coiled coils to filaments, fibers and networks

    OpenAIRE

    Köster, Sarah; Weitz, David; Goldman, Robert D.; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate filament proteins form filaments, fibers and networks both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of metazoan cells. Their general structural building plan accommodates highly varying amino acid sequences to yield extended dimeric α-helical coiled coils of highly conserved design. These “rod” particles are the basic building blocks of intrinsically flexible, filamentous structures that are able to resist high mechanical stresses, i.e. bending and stretching to a considerable degree, bo...

  20. bessel functions for axisymmetric elasticity problems of the elastic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    . ) ( ) r. (. ) ( ). The governing partial differential equation for axisymmetric elasticity problems are the strain- displacement equations, the differential equations of equilibrium and the material constitutive laws, subject to the displacement and ...

  1. The Closed State of the Thin Filament Is Not Occupied in Fully Activated Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershitsky, Sergey Y; Koubassova, Natalia A; Ferenczi, Michael A; Kopylova, Galina V; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Tsaturyan, Andrey K

    2017-04-11

    Muscle contraction is powered by actin-myosin interaction controlled by Ca 2+ via the regulatory proteins troponin (Tn) and tropomyosin (Tpm), which are associated with actin filaments. Tpm forms coiled-coil dimers, which assemble into a helical strand that runs along the whole ∼1 μm length of a thin filament. In the absence of Ca 2+ , Tn that is tightly bound to Tpm binds actin and holds the Tpm strand in the blocked, or B, state, where Tpm shields actin from the binding of myosin heads. Ca 2+ binding to Tn releases the Tpm from actin so that it moves azimuthally around the filament axis to a closed, or C, state, where actin is partially available for weak binding of myosin heads. Upon transition of the weak actin-myosin bond into a strong, stereo-specific complex, the myosin heads push Tpm strand to the open, or O, state allowing myosin binding sites on several neighboring actin monomers to become open for myosin binding. We used low-angle x-ray diffraction at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility to check whether the O- to C-state transition in fully activated fibers of fast skeletal muscle of the rabbit occurs during transition from isometric contraction to shortening under low load. No decrease in the intensity of the second actin layer line at reciprocal radii in the range of 0.15-0.275 nm -1 was observed during shortening suggesting that an azimuthal Tpm movement from the O- to C-state does not occur, although during shortening muscle stiffness is reduced compared to the isometric state, and the intensities of other actin layer lines demonstrate a ∼2-fold decrease in the fraction of myosin heads strongly bound to actin. The data show that a small fraction of actin-bound myosin heads is sufficient for supporting the O-state and, therefore the C-state is not occupied in fully activated skeletal muscle that produces mechanical work at low load. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Strain fluctuations and elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that the elastic strain fluctuations are a direct measure of elastic compliances in a general anisotropic medium; depending on the ensemble in which the fluctuation is measured either the isothermal or the adiabatic compliances are obtained. These fluctuations can now be calculated in a constant enthalpy and pressure, and hence, constant entropy, ensemble due to recent develpments in the molecular dynamics techniques. A calculation for a Ni single crystal under uniform uniaxial 100 tensile or compressive load is presented as an illustration of the relationships derived between various strain fluctuations and the elastic modulii. The Born stability criteria and the behavior of strain fluctuations are shown to be related.

  3. High energy elastic hadron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearnly, T.A.

    1986-04-01

    The paper deals with the WA7 experiment at the CERN super proton synchrotron (SPS). The elastic differential cross sections of pion-proton, kaon-proton, antiproton-proton, and proton-proton at lower SPS energies over a wide range of momentum transfer were measured. Some theoretical models in the light of the experimental results are reviewed, and a comprehensive impact parameter analysis of antiproton-proton elastic scattering over a wide energy range is presented. A nucleon valence core model for high energy proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is described

  4. Fused Filament Fabrication of Prosthetic Components for Trans-Humeral Upper Limb Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, Steven M.

    Presented below is the design and fabrication of prosthetic components consisting of an attachment, tactile sensing, and actuator systems with Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) technique. The attachment system is a thermoplastic osseointegrated upper limb prosthesis for average adult trans-humeral amputation with mechanical properties greater than upper limb skeletal bone. The prosthetic designed has: a one-step surgical process, large cavities for bone tissue ingrowth, uses a material that has an elastic modulus less than skeletal bone, and can be fabricated on one system. FFF osseointegration screw is an improvement upon the current two-part osseointegrated prosthetics that are composed of a fixture and abutment. The current prosthetic design requires two invasive surgeries for implantation and are made of titanium, which has an elastic modulus greater than bone. An elastic modulus greater than bone causes stress shielding and overtime can cause loosening of the prosthetic. The tactile sensor is a thermoplastic piezo-resistive sensor for daily activities for a prosthetic's feedback system. The tactile sensor is manufactured from a low elastic modulus composite comprising of a compressible thermoplastic elastomer and conductive carbon. Carbon is in graphite form and added in high filler ratios. The printed sensors were compared to sensors that were fabricated in a gravity mold to highlight the difference in FFF sensors to molded sensors. The 3D printed tactile sensor has a thickness and feel similar to human skin, has a simple fabrication technique, can detect forces needed for daily activities, and can be manufactured in to user specific geometries. Lastly, a biomimicking skeletal muscle actuator for prosthetics was developed. The actuator developed is manufactured with Fuse Filament Fabrication using a shape memory polymer composite that has non-linear contractile and passive forces, contractile forces and strains comparable to mammalian skeletal muscle, reaction

  5. Multi-subunit proteins on the surface of filamentous phage: methodologies for displaying antibody (Fab) heavy and light chains.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogenboom, H R; Griffiths, A D; Johnson, K S; Chiswell, D J; Hudson, P; Winter, G

    1991-01-01

    The display of proteins on the surface of phage offers a powerful means of selecting for rare genes encoding proteins with binding activities. Recently we found that antibody heavy and light chain variable (V) domains fused as a single polypeptide chain to a minor coat protein of filamentous phage fd, could be enriched by successive rounds of phage growth and panning with antigen. This allows the selection of antigen-binding domains directly from diverse libraries of V-genes. Now we show that...

  6. Astronomical optics and elasticity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaitre, Gerard Rene

    2008-01-01

    Astronomical Optics and Elasticity Theory provides a very thorough and comprehensive account of what is known in this field. After an extensive introduction to optics and elasticity, the book discusses variable curvature and multimode deformable mirrors, as well as, in depth, active optics, its theory and applications. Further, optical design utilizing the Schmidt concept and various types of Schmidt correctors, as well as the elasticity theory of thin plates and shells are elaborated upon. Several active optics methods are developed for obtaining aberration corrected diffraction gratings. Further, a weakly conical shell theory of elasticity is elaborated for the aspherization of grazing incidence telescope mirrors. The very didactic and fairly easy-to-read presentation of the topic will enable PhD students and young researchers to actively participate in challenging astronomical optics and instrumentation projects.

  7. Uniqueness theorems in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Knops, Robin John

    1971-01-01

    The classical result for uniqueness in elasticity theory is due to Kirchhoff. It states that the standard mixed boundary value problem for a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic material in equilibrium and occupying a bounded three-dimensional region of space possesses at most one solution in the classical sense, provided the Lame and shear moduli, A and J1 respectively, obey the inequalities (3 A + 2 J1) > 0 and J1>O. In linear elastodynamics the analogous result, due to Neumann, is that the initial-mixed boundary value problem possesses at most one solution provided the elastic moduli satisfy the same set of inequalities as in Kirchhoffs theorem. Most standard textbooks on the linear theory of elasticity mention only these two classical criteria for uniqueness and neglect altogether the abundant literature which has appeared since the original publications of Kirchhoff. To remedy this deficiency it seems appropriate to attempt a coherent description ofthe various contributions made to the study of uniquenes...

  8. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, Thomas C T; Liu, Lucie X; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2017-01-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes. (topical review)

  9. Application of digital holography to filament size analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semin, N.V.; Poelma, C.; Drost, S.; Westerweel, J.

    2010-01-01

    The potential of in-line digital holography to locate and measure the size and position of filaments, i.e. thin wire-like objects, distributed throughout a thick volume has been investigated. In this paper two approaches are introduced to study filaments of varying diameter. (1) It is shown

  10. Fully filamentized HTS coated conductor via striation and selective electroplating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Majkic, Goran [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Selvamanickam, Venkat, E-mail: selva@uh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Fully-filamentized coated conductor with 13-fold reduction in ac losses. ► Selective electroplating for filamentization of thick copper stabilizer. ► A twofold decrease in ac loss by filamentization of copper stabilizer. ► Absence of appreciable coupling loss contribution from electroplating. -- Abstract: A simple, cost-effective method involving top-down mechanical scribing, oxidation and bottom-up electroplating has been successfully developed to fabricate fully filamentized HTS coated conductors. The copper stabilizer layer is selectively electroplated on the superconducting filaments while the striations remain copper-free due to the formation of a resistive oxide layer in between filaments by oxidation of the striated grooves at elevated temperature in oxygen atmosphere. Magnetization AC loss measurements, performed in a frequency range of 45–500 Hz at 77 K, confirmed the expected N-fold reduction in AC loss of the filamentized tapes with no significant degradation in critical current beyond that due to the material removal from the striations (N – number of filaments). A considerable reduction in coupling AC loss was observed after high temperature annealing/oxidation of the striated tapes. Furthermore, a significant reduction in eddy current loss was achieved with selective copper electroplating, as evidenced by analyzing the field and frequency dependence of magnetization AC loss, as well as by comparing the AC loss performance of striated samples to that of non-striated samples after electroplating of copper stabilizer.

  11. Fully filamentized HTS coated conductor via striation and selective electroplating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Majkic, Goran; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fully-filamentized coated conductor with 13-fold reduction in ac losses. ► Selective electroplating for filamentization of thick copper stabilizer. ► A twofold decrease in ac loss by filamentization of copper stabilizer. ► Absence of appreciable coupling loss contribution from electroplating. -- Abstract: A simple, cost-effective method involving top-down mechanical scribing, oxidation and bottom-up electroplating has been successfully developed to fabricate fully filamentized HTS coated conductors. The copper stabilizer layer is selectively electroplated on the superconducting filaments while the striations remain copper-free due to the formation of a resistive oxide layer in between filaments by oxidation of the striated grooves at elevated temperature in oxygen atmosphere. Magnetization AC loss measurements, performed in a frequency range of 45–500 Hz at 77 K, confirmed the expected N-fold reduction in AC loss of the filamentized tapes with no significant degradation in critical current beyond that due to the material removal from the striations (N – number of filaments). A considerable reduction in coupling AC loss was observed after high temperature annealing/oxidation of the striated tapes. Furthermore, a significant reduction in eddy current loss was achieved with selective copper electroplating, as evidenced by analyzing the field and frequency dependence of magnetization AC loss, as well as by comparing the AC loss performance of striated samples to that of non-striated samples after electroplating of copper stabilizer

  12. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of SDSS galaxies in filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Bernard J.T.; Weygaert, Rien van de; Arag´on-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the distribution of the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This would indicate that the action of large scale tidal torques effected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic

  13. Method for simultaneously coating a plurality of filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P.A.; Pochan, P.D.; Siegal, M.P.; Dominguez, F.

    1995-07-11

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for coating materials, and the products and compositions produced thereby. Substances, such as diamond or diamond-like carbon, are deposited onto materials, such as a filament or a plurality of filaments simultaneously, using one or more cylindrical, inductively coupled, resonator plasma reactors. 3 figs.

  14. Cellulase activity of filamentous fungi induced by rice husk | Oliveros ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cellulase activity of filamentous fungi induced by rice husk. DF Oliveros, N Guarnizo, EM Perea, WM Arango. Abstract. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of different filamentous fungi to degrade cellulose in rice husk pre-treated with steam explosion or alkaline hydrolysis. A preliminary test performed ...

  15. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  16. Design and Optimization of Filament Wound Composite Pressure Vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zu, L.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important issues for the design of filament-wound pressure vessels reflects on the determination of the most efficient meridian profiles and related fiber architectures, leading to optimal structural performance. To better understand the design and optimization of filament-wound

  17. THE APPARATUS FOR ALIGNMENT OF THE PHOTOMETRIC LAMP FILAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dlugunovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During photometric measurements involving the use of photometric lamps it is necessary that the filament of lamp takes a strictly predetermined position with respect to the photodetector and the optical axis of the photometric setup. The errors in positioning of alignment filament with respect to the optical axis of the measuring system lead to increase the uncertainty of measurement of the photometric characteristics of the light sources. A typical method for alignment of filament of photometric lamps is based on the use a diopter tubes (telescopes. Using this method, the mounting of filament to the required position is carried out by successive approximations, which requires special concentration and a lot of time. The aim of this work is to develop an apparatus for alignment which allows simultaneous alignment of the filament of lamps in two mutually perpendicular planes. The method and apparatus for alignment of the photometric lamp filament during measurements of the photometric characteristics of light sources based on two digital video cameras is described in this paper. The apparatus allows to simultaneously displaying the image of lamps filament on the computer screen in two mutually perpendicular planes. The apparatus eliminates a large number of functional units requiring elementwise alignment and reduces the time required to carry out the alignment. The apparatus also provides the imaging of lamps filament with opaque coated on the bulb. The apparatus is used at the National standard of light intensity and illuminance units of the Republic of Belarus. 

  18. Substrate, focal adhesions, and actin filaments: a mechanical unit with a weak spot for mechanosensitive proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchenbuechler, David; Born, Simone; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Houben, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Mechanosensing is a vital prerequisite for dynamic remodeling of focal adhesions and cytoskeletal structures upon substrate deformation. For example, tissue formation, directed cell orientation or cell differentiation are regulated by such mechanosensing processes. Focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton are believed to be involved in these processes, but where mechanosensing molecules are located and how elastic substrate, focal adhesions and the cytoskeleton couple with each other upon substrate deformation still remains obscure. To approach these questions we have developed a sensitive method to apply defined spatially decaying deformation fields to cells cultivated on ultrasoft elastic substrates and to accurately quantify the resulting displacements of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesions, as well as the substrate. Displacement fields were recorded in live cell microscopy by tracking either signals from fluorescent proteins or marker particles in the substrate. As model cell type we used myofibroblasts. These cells are characterized by highly stable adhesion and force generating structures but are still able to detect mechanical signals with high sensitivity. We found a rigid connection between substrate and focal adhesions. Furthermore, stress fibers were found to be barely extendable almost over their whole lengths. Plastic deformation took place only at the very ends of actin filaments close to focal adhesions. As a result, this area became elongated without extension of existing actin filaments by polymerization. Both ends of the stress fibers were mechanically coupled with detectable plastic deformations on either site. Interestingly, traction force dependent substrate deformation fields remained mostly unaffected even when stress fiber elongations were released. These data argue for a location of mechanosensing proteins at the ends of actin stress fibers and describe, except for these domains, the whole system to be relatively rigid for tensile

  19. Coexistence of elastic fibers with hyaluronic acid in the human urethral sphincter complex: a histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-ichi; Shibata, Shunichi; Morizane, Shuichi; Honda, Masashi; Isoyama, Tadahiro; Sejima, Takehiro; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2013-10-01

    To promote the prevention and treatment of urethral sphincteric dysfunction, we examined the distribution of elastic fibers around the urethral sphincter complex and the histological localization of hyaluronic acid in relation to elastic fiber architecture. Using elastica-Masson staining as well as biotinated hyaluronic acid binding protein, we examined specimens of the urethral sphincter complex obtained from 14 elderly Japanese cadavers, including 10 men and 4 women. As a control, we also observed other striated muscles in male cadavers. Elastic fibers were densely distributed throughout the submucosal and smooth muscle layers along the entire length of the male urethra, including the prostatic urethra. The levator ani fascia and rhabdosphincter also contained abundant elastic fibers. An intramuscular elastic net was seen in the rhabdosphincter but not in other striated muscles. Strong staining for hyaluronic acid was evident in the submucosa and smooth muscle sphincter of the urethra but not in the levator ani fascia or rhabdosphincter, suggesting that elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid might interact at the former sites. Gender related differences in the distribution of elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid were noted with a much lower density of elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid staining in women than in men. Urethral sites where elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid coexist could be targeted for the prevention and treatment of urethral sphincteric insufficiency. These findings should improve our understanding of the human urethral sphincter complex. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nucleotide cofactor-dependent structural change of Xenopus laevis Rad51 protein filament detected by small-angle neutron scattering measurements in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellouze, C.; Kim, H.-K.; Maeshima, K.

    1997-01-01

    of RecA. Upon ATP binding under high-salt conditions (600 mM NaCl), the helical pitch of XRad51.1 filament was increased from 8 to 10 nm and the cross-sectional diameter decreased from 7 to 6 nm. The pitch sizes of XRad51.1 are similar to, though slightly larger than, those of RecA filament under......Rad51 protein, a eukaryotic homologue of RecA protein, forms a filamentous complex with DNA and catalyzes homologous recombination. We have analyzed the structure of Xenopus Rad51 protein (XRad51.1) in solution by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements showed that XRad51.1 forms...... a helical filament independently of DNA. The sizes of the cross-sectional and helical pitch of the filament could be determined, respectively, from a Guinier plot and the position of the subsidiary maximum of SANS data. We observed that the helical structure is modified by nucleotide binding as in the case...

  1. Ca2+ improves organization of single-stranded DNA bases in human Rad51 filament, explaining stimulatory effect on gene recombination.

    KAUST Repository

    Fornander, Louise H

    2012-02-22

    Human RAD51 protein (HsRad51) catalyses the DNA strand exchange reaction for homologous recombination. To clarify the molecular mechanism of the reaction in vitro being more effective in the presence of Ca(2+) than of Mg(2+), we have investigated the effect of these ions on the structure of HsRad51 filament complexes with single- and double-stranded DNA, the reaction intermediates. Flow linear dichroism spectroscopy shows that the two ionic conditions induce significantly different structures in the HsRad51/single-stranded DNA complex, while the HsRad51/double-stranded DNA complex does not demonstrate this ionic dependence. In the HsRad51/single-stranded DNA filament, the primary intermediate of the strand exchange reaction, ATP/Ca(2+) induces an ordered conformation of DNA, with preferentially perpendicular orientation of nucleobases relative to the filament axis, while the presence of ATP/Mg(2+), ADP/Mg(2+) or ADP/Ca(2+) does not. A high strand exchange activity is observed for the filament formed with ATP/Ca(2+), whereas the other filaments exhibit lower activity. Molecular modelling suggests that the structural variation is caused by the divalent cation interfering with the L2 loop close to the DNA-binding site. It is proposed that the larger Ca(2+) stabilizes the loop conformation and thereby the protein-DNA interaction. A tight binding of DNA, with bases perpendicularly oriented, could facilitate strand exchange.

  2. A magnetosome chain viewed as a bio-elastic magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyra, Ariel G; Zarragoicoechea, Guillermo J; Kuz, Victor A

    2016-05-14

    In light of the coarse-grained Monte Carlo numerical simulation method, the magnetosome chain stability of magnetotactic bacteria is analysed and discussed. This discrete chain of magnetic nanoparticles, encapsulated in a lipid membrane and flanked by filaments, orients bacteria in the geomagnetic field as a compass needle. Each magnetosome is a magnetite or greigite nanocrystal encapsulated in a soft lipid shell. This structure is modelled by a hard core with a magnetic dipole embedded and a cloud of electric dipoles which are able to move and rotate over the magnetic spherical core. In the present paper, some of the many possibilities of the model by varying the control parameters of the system are explored. Magnetic particles arrange in long linear clusters when the coating is removed. However, linear but twisted chains of magnetic particles emerge when there are electric dipoles in the coating shell. A unique linear and straight chain is not observed in any 3D numerical simulation; this result is in agreement with a real living system of bacteria in a geomagnetic field when proteins that form the filament are absent. Finally, the stability and magnetization of a magnetosome chain of 30 beads in one dimension set up are discussed resembling a real chain. The results suggest that a magnetosome chain not only orients bacteria but also should be considered as a potential storage of elastic energy.

  3. Integrodifferential relations in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Kostin, Georgy V

    2012-01-01

    This work treats the elasticity of deformed bodies, including the resulting interior stresses and displacements.It also takes into account that some of constitutive relations can be considered in a weak form. To discuss this problem properly, the method of integrodifferential relations is used, and an advanced numerical technique for stress-strain analysis is presented and evaluated using various discretization techniques. The methods presented in this book are of importance for almost all elasticity problems in materials science and mechanical engineering.

  4. Automated image analysis for quantification of filamentous bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, M.; Rosenvinge, F. S.; Spillum, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics of the beta-lactam group are able to alter the shape of the bacterial cell wall, e.g. filamentation or a spheroplast formation. Early determination of antimicrobial susceptibility may be complicated by filamentation of bacteria as this can be falsely interpreted as growth...... displaying different resistant profiles and differences in filamentation kinetics were used to study a novel image analysis algorithm to quantify length of bacteria and bacterial filamentation. A total of 12 beta-lactam antibiotics or beta-lactam-beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations were analyzed...... in systems relying on colorimetry or turbidometry (such as Vitek-2, Phoenix, MicroScan WalkAway). The objective was to examine an automated image analysis algorithm for quantification of filamentous bacteria using the 3D digital microscopy imaging system, oCelloScope. Results: Three E. coli strains...

  5. Bursting of filaments in the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratton, F.T.L.

    1976-01-01

    Photographs of the current sheath of (low energy) plasma focus show a disruption of the filaments. This phenomenon is interpreted as a vortex breakdown. Physical parameters which support this hypothesis are obtained from measurements, from the theoretical thickness of the current sheath given by Nardi and from some models of the plasma flow. The widening of a vortex due to axial velocity increase is analyzed by means of magnetohydrodynamic collinear models. The main results are: (1) the existence of a limit separating supercritical from subcritical regimes (their character changes with the ratio between kinetic and magnetic energy); (2) the existence of flow regimes where the vortex radius remains approximately constant for moderate increments of the external velocity; (3) the structure of the vortex may change substantially for a sufficiently large increment of the external velocity, even in subcritical states; (4) the possibility that a burst of the vortex may occur when the external velocity suffers a slowdown

  6. Methods for genetic transformation of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Tang, Yu; Lin, Jun; Cai, Weiwen

    2017-10-03

    Filamentous fungi have been of great interest because of their excellent ability as cell factories to manufacture useful products for human beings. The development of genetic transformation techniques is a precondition that enables scientists to target and modify genes efficiently and may reveal the function of target genes. The method to deliver foreign nucleic acid into cells is the sticking point for fungal genome modification. Up to date, there are some general methods of genetic transformation for fungi, including protoplast-mediated transformation, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, electroporation, biolistic method and shock-wave-mediated transformation. This article reviews basic protocols and principles of these transformation methods, as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

  7. Engineering of filamentous bacteriophage for protein sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasino, Michael

    Methods of high throughput, sensitive and cost effective quantification of proteins enables personalized medicine by allowing healthcare professionals to better monitor patient condition and response to treatment. My doctoral research has attempted to advance these methods through the use of filamentous bacteriophage (phage). These bacterial viruses are particularly amenable to both genetic and chemical engineering and can be produced efficiently in large amounts. Here, I discuss several strategies for modifying phage for use in protein sensing assays. These include the expression of bio-orthogonal conjugation handles on the phage coat, the incorporation of specific recognition sequences within the phage genome, and the creation of antibody-phage conjugates via a photo-crosslinking non-canonical amino acid. The physical and chemical characterization of these engineered phage and the results of their use in modified protein sensing assays will be presented.

  8. Filament wound data base development, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, R. Scott; Braddock, William F.

    1985-01-01

    The objective was to update the present Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) baseline reentry aerodynamic data base and to develop a new reentry data base for the filament wound case SRB along with individual protuberance increments. Lockheed's procedures for performing these tasks are discussed. Free fall of the SRBs after separation from the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle is completely uncontrolled. However, the SRBs must decelerate to a velocity and attitude that is suitable for parachute deployment. To determine the SRB reentry trajectory parameters, including the rate of deceleration and attitude history during free-fall, engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center are using a six-degree-of-freedom computer program to predict dynamic behavior. Static stability aerodynamic coefficients are part of the information required for input into this computer program. Lockheed analyzed the existing reentry aerodynamic data tape (Data Tape 5) for the current steel case SRB. This analysis resulted in the development of Data Tape 7.

  9. Validation of the filament winding process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calius, Emilo P.; Springer, George S.; Wilson, Brian A.; Hanson, R. Scott

    1987-01-01

    Tests were performed toward validating the WIND model developed previously for simulating the filament winding of composite cylinders. In these tests two 24 in. long, 8 in. diam and 0.285 in. thick cylinders, made of IM-6G fibers and HBRF-55 resin, were wound at + or - 45 deg angle on steel mandrels. The temperatures on the inner and outer surfaces and inside the composite cylinders were recorded during oven cure. The temperatures inside the cylinders were also calculated by the WIND model. The measured and calculated temperatures were then compared. In addition, the degree of cure and resin viscosity distributions inside the cylinders were calculated for the conditions which existed in the tests.

  10. Natural Fiber Filament Wound Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ansari Suriyati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent development, natural fibers have attracted the interest of engineers, researchers, professionals and scientists all over the world as an alternative reinforcement for fiber reinforced polymer composites. This is due to its superior properties such as high specific strength, low weight, low cost, fairly good mechanical properties, non-abrasive, eco-friendly and bio-degradable characteristics. In this point of view, natural fiber-polymer composites (NFPCs are becoming increasingly utilized in a wide variety of applications because they represent an ecological and inexpensive alternative to conventional petroleum-derived materials. On the other hand, considerable amounts of organic waste and residue from the industrial and agricultural processes are still underutilized as low-value energy sources. This is a comprehensive review discussing about natural fiber reinforced composite produced by filament winding technique.

  11. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung; Teixeira, Paula S.; Zapata, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 μm continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 × 2.'0 (0.88 × 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H 2 mass between 0.3-5.7 M ☉ and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (n H 2 ≥10 6 cm –3 ), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of ≈17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud (≈35 pc), large-scale clumps (≈1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps (≈0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  12. RADIATION SPECTRAL SYNTHESIS OF RELATIVISTIC FILAMENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Haugboelle, Troels; Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Nordlund, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Radiation from many astrophysical sources, e.g., gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei, is believed to arise from relativistically shocked collisionless plasmas. Such sources often exhibit highly transient spectra evolving rapidly compared with source lifetimes. Radiation emitted from these sources is typically associated with nonlinear plasma physics, complex field topologies, and non-thermal particle distributions. In such circumstances, a standard synchrotron paradigm may fail to produce accurate conclusions regarding the underlying physics. Simulating spectral emission and spectral evolution numerically in various relativistic shock scenarios is then the only viable method to determine the detailed physical origin of the emitted spectra. In this Letter, we present synthetic radiation spectra representing the early stage development of the filamentation (streaming) instability of an initially unmagnetized plasma, which is relevant for both collisionless shock formation and reconnection dynamics in relativistic astrophysical outflows as well as for laboratory astrophysics experiments. Results were obtained using a highly efficient in situ diagnostics method, based on detailed particle-in-cell modeling of collisionless plasmas. The synthetic spectra obtained here are compared with those predicted by a semi-analytical model for jitter radiation from the filamentation instability, the latter including self-consistent generated field topologies and particle distributions obtained from the simulations reported upon here. Spectra exhibit dependence on the presence-or the absence-of an inert plasma constituent, when comparing baryonic plasmas (i.e., containing protons) with pair plasmas. The results also illustrate that considerable care should be taken when using lower-dimensional models to obtain information about the astrophysical phenomena generating observed spectra.

  13. FBH1 helicase disrupts RAD51 filaments in vitro and modulates homologous recombination in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simandlova, Jitka; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Payne, Miranda J

    2013-01-01

    Efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks and interstrand cross-links requires the homologous recombination (HR) pathway, a potentially error-free process that utilizes a homologous sequence as a repair template. A key player in HR is RAD51, the eukaryotic ortholog of bacterial RecA protein. RAD....... Using a combination of molecular genetic, biochemical, and single-molecule biophysical techniques, we provide mechanistic insight into the mode of action of the FBH1 helicase as a regulator of RAD51-dependent HR in mammalian cells. We show that FBH1 binds directly to RAD51 and is able to disrupt RAD51...... filaments on DNA through its ssDNA translocase function. Consistent with this, a mutant mouse embryonic stem cell line with a deletion in the FBH1 helicase domain fails to limit RAD51 chromatin association and shows hyper-recombination. Our data are consistent with FBH1 restraining RAD51 DNA binding under...

  14. Temperature dependence of elastic properties of paratellurite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestrova, I.M.; Pisarevskii, Y.V.; Senyushenkov, P.A.; Krupny, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    New data are presented on the temperature dependence of the elastic wave velocities, elastic stiffness constants, and thermal expansion of paratellurite. It is shown that the external pressure appreciably influences the elastic properties of TeO 2 , especially the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus connected with the crystal soft mode. (author)

  15. A monoclonal antibody marker for the exclusion-zone filaments of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhivers, Mélanie; Landrein, Nicolas; Decossas, Marion; Robinson, Derrick R

    2008-07-10

    Trypanosoma brucei is a haemoflagellate pathogen of man, wild animals and domesticated livestock in central and southern Africa. In all life cycle stages this parasite has a single mitochondrion that contains a uniquely organised genome that is condensed into a flat disk-like structure called the kinetoplast. The kinetoplast is essential for insect form procyclic cells and therefore is a potential drug target. The kinetoplast is unique in nature because it consists of novel structural proteins and thousands of circular, interlocking, DNA molecules (kDNA). Secondly, kDNA replication is critically timed to coincide with nuclear S phase and new flagellum biogenesis. Thirdly, the kinetoplast is physically attached to the flagellum basal bodies via a structure called the tripartite attachment complex (TAC). The TAC consists of unilateral filaments (within the mitochondrion matrix), differentiated mitochondrial membranes and exclusion-zone filaments that extend from the distal end of the basal bodies. To date only one protein, p166, has been identified to be a component of the TAC. In the work presented here we provide data based on a novel EM technique developed to label and characterise cytoskeleton structures in permeabilised cells without extraction of mitochondrion membranes. We use this protocol to provide data on a new monoclonal antibody reagent (Mab 22) and illustrate the precise localisation of basal body-mitochondrial linker proteins. Mab 22 binds to these linker proteins (exclusion-zone filaments) and provides a new tool for the characterisation of cytoskeleton mediated kinetoplast segregation. The antigen(s) recognised by Mab 22 are cytoskeletal, insensitive to extraction by high concentrations of non-ionic detergent, extend from the proximal region of basal bodies and bind to the outer mitochondrial membrane. This protein(s) is the first component of the TAC exclusion-zone fibres to be identified. Mab 22 will therefore be important in characterising TAC

  16. A monoclonal antibody marker for the exclusion-zone filaments of Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decossas Marion

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei is a haemoflagellate pathogen of man, wild animals and domesticated livestock in central and southern Africa. In all life cycle stages this parasite has a single mitochondrion that contains a uniquely organised genome that is condensed into a flat disk-like structure called the kinetoplast. The kinetoplast is essential for insect form procyclic cells and therefore is a potential drug target. The kinetoplast is unique in nature because it consists of novel structural proteins and thousands of circular, interlocking, DNA molecules (kDNA. Secondly, kDNA replication is critically timed to coincide with nuclear S phase and new flagellum biogenesis. Thirdly, the kinetoplast is physically attached to the flagellum basal bodies via a structure called the tripartite attachment complex (TAC. The TAC consists of unilateral filaments (within the mitochondrion matrix, differentiated mitochondrial membranes and exclusion-zone filaments that extend from the distal end of the basal bodies. To date only one protein, p166, has been identified to be a component of the TAC. Results In the work presented here we provide data based on a novel EM technique developed to label and characterise cytoskeleton structures in permeabilised cells without extraction of mitochondrion membranes. We use this protocol to provide data on a new monoclonal antibody reagent (Mab 22 and illustrate the precise localisation of basal body-mitochondrial linker proteins. Mab 22 binds to these linker proteins (exclusion-zone filaments and provides a new tool for the characterisation of cytoskeleton mediated kinetoplast segregation. Conclusion The antigen(s recognised by Mab 22 are cytoskeletal, insensitive to extraction by high concentrations of non-ionic detergent, extend from the proximal region of basal bodies and bind to the outer mitochondrial membrane. This protein(s is the first component of the TAC exclusion-zone fibres to be identified. Mab 22

  17. Nucleotides increase the internal flexibility of filaments of dephosphorylated Acanthamoeba myosin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redowicz, M J; Korn, E D; Rau, D C

    1996-05-24

    The actin-activated Mg(2+)-ATPase activity of Acanthamoeba myosin II minifilaments is dependent both on Mg2+ concentration and on the state of phosphorylation of three serine sites at the C-terminal end of the heavy chains. Previous electric birefringence experiments on minifilaments showed a large dependence of signal amplitude on the phosphorylation state and Mg2+ concentration, consistent with large changes in filament flexibility. These observations suggested that minifilament stiffness was important for function. We now report that the binding of nucleotides to dephosphorylated minifilaments at Mg2+ concentrations needed for optimal activity increases the flexibility by about 10-fold, as inferred from the birefringence signal amplitude increase. An increase in flexibility with nucleotide binding is not observed for dephosphorylated minifilaments at lower Mg2+ concentrations or for phosphorylated minifilaments at any Mg2+ concentrations examined. The relaxation times for minifilament rotations that are sensitive to the conformation myosin heads are also observed to depend on phosphorylation, Mg2+ concentration, and nucleotide binding. These latter experiments indicate that the actin-activated Mg2+ concentration, and nucleotide binding. These latter experiments indicate that the actin-activated Mg(2+)-ATPase activity of Acanthamoeba myosin II correlates with both changes in myosin head conformation and the ability of minifilaments to cycle between stiff and flexible conformations coupled to nucleotide binding and release.

  18. Differential expression of elastic fibre components in intrinsically aged skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Abigail K; Sherratt, Michael J; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Watson, Rachel E B

    2012-02-01

    Intrinsic ageing of the skin is a subtle process resulting in some degree of skin laxity. The dermal elastic fibre network imbues skin with the capacity to recoil and loss of this property contributes to an aged, wrinkled appearance. Whilst elastic fibres have a complex, composite structure which allows them to fulfil multiple roles, the effects of intrinsic ageing on their discrete molecular components has not previously been explored. In this study, we have used a microarray-based approach to perform a novel survey of the changes in gene expression that occur in components of cutaneous elastic fibres as a result of intrinsic ageing. Age-related changes in gene expression were validated at the mRNA and protein levels using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunostaining, respectively. The microarray revealed that the majority of elastic fibre network components were unchanged with age. However, three differentially expressed genes were identified: latent TGFβ-binding protein (LTBP)-2 which was up-regulated with age (fold change +1.58, P = 0.041); LTBP3 (fold change -1.67, P = 0.025) and the lysyl oxidase-like enzyme (LOXL1, fold change -1.47, P = 0.008) which were both down-regulated with age. Although the changes in gene expression for LTBP3 were not confirmed by either qPCR or immunostaining, the expression and tissue deposition of both LTBP2 and LOXL1 were significantly enhanced in intrinsically aged skin. Whilst the functional implications of these altered expression profiles remains to be elucidated, LTBP2 and LOXL1 are thought to play important roles in controlling and maintaining elastic fibre deposition, assembly and structure via binding to fibulin-5. Consequently, any age-related perturbations in the expression of these components may have important consequences on remodelling of the extracellular matrix and hence on the mechanical properties of intrinsically aged skin.

  19. Isolation and characterization of Candida albicans morphological mutants derepressed for the formation of filamentous hypha-type structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, C.; Pomes, R.; Nombela, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several Candida albicans morphological mutants were obtained by a procedure based on a combined treatment with nitrous acid plus UV irradiation and a double-enrichment step to increase the proportion of mutants growing as long filamentous structures. Altered cell morphogenesis in these mutants correlated with an altered colonial phenotype. Two of these mutants, C. albicans NEL102 and NEL103, were selected and characterized. Mutant blastoconidia initiated budding but eventually gave rise to filamentous hypha-type formations. These filaments were long and septate, and they branched very regularly at positions near septa. Calcofluor white (which is known to bind chitin-rich areas) stained septa, branching zones, and filament tips very intensely, as observed under the fluorescence microscope. Wild-type hybrids were obtained by fusing protoplasts of strain NEL102 with B14, another morphological mutant previously described as being permanently pseudomycelial, indicating that genetic determinants responsible for the two altered phenotypes are different. The mutants characterized in this work seemed to sequentially express the morphogenic characteristics of C. albicans, from blastoconidia to hyphae, in the absence of any inducer. Further characterization of these strains could be relevant to gain understanding of the genetic control of dimorphism in this species

  20. Electrostatic interactions between the Bni1p Formin FH2 domain and actin influence actin filament nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph L; Courtemanche, Naomi; Parton, Daniel L; McCullagh, Martin; Pollard, Thomas D; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-01-06

    Formins catalyze nucleation and growth of actin filaments. Here, we study the structure and interactions of actin with the FH2 domain of budding yeast formin Bni1p. We built an all-atom model of the formin dimer on an Oda actin filament 7-mer and studied structural relaxation and interprotein interactions by molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations produced a refined model for the FH2 dimer associated with the barbed end of the filament and showed electrostatic interactions between the formin knob and actin target-binding cleft. Mutations of two formin residues contributing to these interactions (R1423N, K1467L, or both) reduced the interaction energies between the proteins, and in coarse-grained simulations, the formin lost more interprotein contacts with an actin dimer than with an actin 7-mer. Biochemical experiments confirmed a strong influence of these mutations on Bni1p-mediated actin filament nucleation, but not elongation, suggesting that different interactions contribute to these two functions of formins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Growth on elastic silicone substrate elicits a partial myogenic response in periodontal ligament derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pelaez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of cellular differentiation and phenotypic maintenance can be influenced by stimuli from a variety of different factors. One commonly overlooked factor is the mechanical properties of the growth substrate in which stem cells are maintained or differentiated down various lineages. Here we explored the effect that growth on an elastic silicone substrate had on the myogenic expression and cytoskeletal morphology of periodontal ligament derived stem cells. Cells were grown on either collagen I coated tissue culture polystyrene plates or collagen I coated elastic silicone membranes for a period of 4 days without further induction from soluble factors in the culture media. Following the 4-day growth, gene expression and immunohistochemical analysis for key cardiomyogenic markers was performed along with a morphological assessment of cytoskeletal organization. Results show that cells grown on the elastic substrate significantly upregulate key markers associated with contractile activity in muscle tissues. Namely, the myosin light chain polypeptides 2 and 7, as well as the myosin heavy chain polypeptide 7 genes underwent a statistically significant upregulation in the cells grown on elastic silicone membranes. Similarly, the cells on the softer elastic substrate stained positive for both sarcomeric actin and cardiac troponin t proteins following just 4 days of growth on the softer material. Cytoskeletal analysis showed that substrate stiffness had a marked effect on the organization and distribution of filamentous actin fibers within the cell body. Growth on silicone membranes produced flatter and shorter cellular morphologies with filamentous actin fibers projecting anisotropically throughout the cell body. These results demonstrate how crucial the mechanical properties of the growth substrate of cells can be on the ultimate cellular phenotype. These observations highlight the need to further optimize differentiation protocols to enhance

  2. Effect of cobratoxin binding on the normal mode vibration within acetylcholine binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaccini, Edward J; Lindahl, Erik; Sixma, Titia; Trudell, James R

    2008-04-01

    Recent crystal structures of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) have revealed surprisingly small structural alterations upon ligand binding. Here we investigate the extent to which ligand binding may affect receptor dynamics. AChBP is a homologue of the extracellular component of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs). We have previously used an elastic network normal-mode analysis to propose a gating mechanism for the LGICs and to suggest the effects of various ligands on such motions. However, the difficulties with elastic network methods lie in their inability to account for the modest effects of a small ligand or mutation on ion channel motion. Here, we report the successful application of an elastic network normal mode technique to measure the effects of large ligand binding on receptor dynamics. The present calculations demonstrate a clear alteration in the native symmetric motions of a protein due to the presence of large protein cobratoxin ligands. In particular, normal-mode analysis revealed that cobratoxin binding to this protein significantly dampened the axially symmetric motion of the AChBP that may be associated with channel gating in the full nAChR. The results suggest that alterations in receptor dynamics could be a general feature of ligand binding.

  3. Monitoring the elasticity changes of HeLa cells during mitosis by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ningcheng; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Jinshu; Ding, Xuemei; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin

    2016-10-01

    Cell mitosis plays a crucial role in cell life activity, which is one of the important phases in cell division cycle. During the mitosis, the cytoskeleton micro-structure of the cell changed and the biomechanical properties of the cell may vary depending upon different mitosis stages. In this study, the elasticity property of HeLa cells during mitosis was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Also, the actin filaments in different mitosis stages of the cells were observed by confocal imaging. Our results show that the cell in anaphase is stiffer than that in metaphase and telophase. Furthermore, lots of actin filaments gathered in cells' center area in anaphase, which contributes to the rigidity of the cell in this phase. Our findings demonstrate that the nano-biomechanics of living cells could provide a new index for characterizing cell physiological states.

  4. Harmful impact of filamentous algae (Spirogyra sp. on juvenile crayfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulikowski Dariusz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the impact of filamentous algae on the growth and survival of juvenile narrow-clawed crayfish, Astacus leptodactylus (Esch., in rearing basins. Three stocking variants were used: A - basins with a layer of filamentous algae without imitation mineral substrate; B - basins with a layer of filamentous algae with imitation mineral substrate; C - basins without filamentous algae but with mineral substrate. The crayfish were reared from June 12 to October 10 under natural thermal conditions and fed a commercial feed. The results indicated that the presence of the filamentous algae did not have a statistically significant impact on the growth of the juvenile crayfish (P > 0.05. The presence of the filamentous algae had a strong negative impact on juvenile crayfish survival and stock biomass (P < 0.05. The layer of gravel and small stones that imitated the mineral substrate of natural aquatic basins somewhat neutralized the disadvantageous impact the filamentous algae had on the crayfish.

  5. Footpoint detection and mass-motion in chromospheric filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Aparna; Hardersen, P. S.; Martin, S. F.

    2013-07-01

    A quiescent region on the Sun containing three filaments is used to study the properties of mass motion. This study determines if the footpoints or end-points of the filaments are the locations from where mass gets injected into the filaments. Several hypotheses have been put forth in the past to determine how a filament acquires mass. Trapping of coronal mass in the filament channel due to condensation (Martin, 1996) and injection of mass into the filaments during magnetic reconnection (Priest, et al., 1995) are some of the speculations. This study looks for indications for injection of mass via chromospheric footpoints. The data consists of blue (Hα-0.5 Å) and red (Hα+0.5 Å) wing high resolution Hα images of the W29N37 region of the Sun taken on Oct 30, 2010, from 1200 - 1600 UT. The Dutch Open Telescope was used to obtain the data. The images are aligned and animated to see Doppler motion in the fibrils. Smaller fibrils merge to form longer ones; barbs appear and disappear in one of the long filaments and is seen moving along the length of the filament. A region with no typical filament-like absorption feature is observed to be continuously receiving mass. Fibrils appear to be converging from opposite sides along what appears to be a neutral line; mass motion is seen in these fibrils as well. An eruption occurs in a region of fibrils lumped together at the end of the first hour (1300 UT) followed by plage brightening at 1430 UT near one of the filament regions. Helioviewer (Panasenco, et al., 2011) is used for aligning the images; GIMP is used for precision alignment and animation. Each frame in the sequence is studied carefully to note changes in the filament regions. The footpoints of the filaments are determined by the changes observed in the position of the filament ‘legs’ in each frame. Variations in the magnetic polarity corresponding to changes observed in the chromosphere are analyzed using HMI magnetograms. Bright and dark points on the

  6. Microwave structure of quiescent solar filaments at high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution very low altitude maps of a quiescent filament at three frequencies are presented. The spatial resolution (approx. 15'' at 1.45 GHz, approx. 6'' at 4.9 GHz, and approx. 2'' at 15 GHz) is several times better than previously attained. At each frequency, the filament appears as a depression in the quiet Sun background. The depression is measurably wider and longer in extent than the corresponding H alpha filament at 1.45 GHz and 4.9 GHz, indicating that the depression is due in large part to a deficit in coronal density associated with the filament channel. In contrast, the shape of the radio depression at 15 CHz closely matches that of the H alpha filament. In addition, the 15 GHz map shows enhanced emission along both sides of the radio depression. A similar enhancement is seen in an observation of a second filament 4 days later, which suggests that the enhancement is a general feature of filaments. Possible causes of the enhanced emission are explored

  7. Appraisal of elastic follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Elastic computations are widely used in structural analysis, and their results are used when material behaviour is non elastic. The current practice is the partition of the computed stress between primary and secondary stress. The basic characteristic of primary stress is that it is not self limiting. On the contrary the basic characteristic of a secondary stress is that it is self limiting, and failure from one application of the stress is not to be expected. It must be emphasized that self limitation is not sufficient and that it is also necessary that strains are small enough to avoid any material disorder. Unfortunately, elastic computations do not give real strain distribution and computed strain in highly stressed areas can be magnified under conditions of plastic temperature is high enough, an undesirable amount of creep occurs in areas of reduced strength and failure can happen. In creep range, to avoid elastic follow up, the most important part of elastically computed stress is considered as primary. This practice is over conservative, and the aim of this paper is to provide indications to choise what fraction of a self limiting stress can be considered as secondary. (orig./GL)

  8. A study of short wave instability on vortex filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong Yun [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The numerical stability and accuracy of the vortex method are studied. The effect of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver and of the time step on the numerical stability is analyzed. Various ODE solvers are compared and a best performer is chosen. A new constraint on the time step based on numerical stability is proposed and verified in numerical simulations. It is shown through numerical examples that empirical rules for selecting the spatial discretization obtained in simple test problems may not be extended to more general problems. The thin tube vortex filament method is applied to the problem of Widnall's instability on vortex rings. Numerical results different from previous calculations are presented and the source of the discrepancies is explained. The long time behavior of the unstable mode on thin vortex rings is simulated and analyzed. The short wave instability on vortex filaments is investigated both theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the short wave instability always occurs on co-rotating vortex filaments of fixed core structure. Furthermore when they are close to each other, vortex filaments produce short wave unstable modes which lead to wild stretching and folding. However, when the inter-filament distance is large in comparison with the core size of the filaments, unstable modes are bounded by a small fraction of the core size and the vortex filaments do not create hairpins nor wild stretching. These findings may explain the smooth behavior of the superfluid vortices. The formation of hairpin structures on numerical vortex filaments is investigated. It is shown that the formation of hairpin structures is independent of the ODE solver, of the time step and of other numerical parameters. The hairpin structures are primarily caused by short wave instability on co-rotating vortex filaments.

  9. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Teixeira, Paula S. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180, Wien (Austria); Zapata, Luis A., E-mail: satoko_t@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia, Michoacan 58090 (Mexico)

    2013-01-20

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 {mu}m continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 Multiplication-Sign 2.'0 (0.88 Multiplication-Sign 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H{sub 2} mass between 0.3-5.7 M {sub Sun} and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (n{sub H{sub 2}}{>=}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of Almost-Equal-To 17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud ( Almost-Equal-To 35 pc), large-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  10. Postbuckling of magneto-electro-elastic CNT-MT composite nanotubes resting on a nonlinear elastic medium in a non-uniform thermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, M.; Shamsi, M.; Saidi, A. R.

    2018-03-01

    As a first endeavor, the effect of nonlinear elastic foundation on the postbuckling behavior of smart magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) composite nanotubes is investigated. The composite nanotube is affected by a non-uniform thermal environment. A typical MEE composite nanotube consists of microtubules (MTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a MEE cylindrical nanoshell for smart control. It is assumed that the nanoscale layers of the system are coupled by a polymer matrix or filament network depending on the application. In addition to thermal loads, magneto-electro-mechanical loads are applied to the composite nanostructure. Length scale effects are taken into account using the nonlocal elasticity theory. The principle of virtual work and von Karman's relations are used to derive the nonlinear governing differential equations of MEE CNT-MT nanotubes. Using Galerkin's method, nonlinear critical buckling loads are determined. Various types of non-uniform temperature distribution in the radial direction are considered. Finally, the effects of various parameters such as the nonlinear constant of elastic medium, thermal loading factor and small scale coefficient on the postbuckling of MEE CNT-MT nanotubes are studied.

  11. Spherically symmetric elasticity in relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carot, J [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Cra Valldemossa pk 7.5, E-07122 Palma (Spain); Brito, I; Vaz, E G L R, E-mail: jcarot@uib.ca, E-mail: ireneb@mct.uminho.p, E-mail: evaz@mct.uminho.p

    2010-05-01

    The relativistic theory of elasticity is reviewed within the spherically symmetric context with a view towards the modelling of star interiors possessing elastic properties such as the ones expected in neutron stars. Emphasis is placed on generality in the main sections of the paper, and the results are then applied to specific examples. Along the way, a few general results for spacetimes admitting isometries are deduced, and their consequences are fully exploited in the case of spherical symmetry relating them next to the the case in which the material content of the spacetime is some elastic material. This paper extends and generalizes the pioneering work by Magli and Kijowski [1], Magli [2] and [3], and complements, in a sense, that by Karlovini and Samuelsson in their interesting series of papers [4], [5] and [6].

  12. Investor response to consumer elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenaa Jensen, Stine; Meibom, Peter; Ravn, H.F.; Straarup, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    In the Nordic electricity system there is considerable uncertainty with respect to the long-term development in production capacity. The process towards liberalisation of the electricity sector started in a situation with a large reserve margin, but this margin is gradually vanishing. Since the potential investors in new production capacity are unaccustomed with investments under the new regime it is unknown if and when investments will take place. The electricity price is the key market signal to potential investors. The price is settled as a balance between supply and demand, and it is generally assumed that the demand side has an important role in this, and increasingly so. However, since consumers have not earlier had the incentive to respond to electricity prices, no reliable estimate of demand elasticity is known. The purpose of the present study is to analyse the role of electricity demand elasticity for investments in new electricity production capacity. Electricity price scenarios generated with a partial equilibrium model (Balmorel) are combined with a model of investment decisions. In this, various scenarios concerning the development in the demand elasticity are used. The simulated investment decisions are taken in a stochastic, dynamic setting, where a key point is the timing of the investment decision in relation to the gathering of new information relative to the stochastic elements. Based on this, the consequences of the development in consumer price elasticity for investments in a base load and a peak load plant are investigated. The main result of the analysis is that peak load investments can be made unprofitable by the development in consumer price elasticity, such that an investor will tend to wait with his peak load investment, until the development in consumer price elasticity has been revealed. (au)

  13. Complex variable methods in elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    England, A H

    2003-01-01

    The plane strain and generalized plane stress boundary value problems of linear elasticity are the focus of this graduate-level text, which formulates and solves these problems by employing complex variable theory. The text presents detailed descriptions of the three basic methods that rely on series representation, Cauchy integral representation, and the solution via continuation. Its five-part treatment covers functions of a complex variable, the basic equations of two-dimensional elasticity, plane and half-plane problems, regions with circular boundaries, and regions with curvilinear bounda

  14. Water hammer in elastic pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, J.; Tiselj, I.

    2002-01-01

    One dimensional two-fluid six-equation model of two-phase flow, that can be found in computer codes like RELAP5, TRAC, and CATHARE, was upgraded with additional terms, which enable modelling of the pressure waves in elastic pipes. It is known that pipe elasticity reduces the propagation velocity of the shock and other pressure waves in the piping systems. Equations that include the pipe elasticty terms are used in WAHA code, which is being developed within the WAHALoads project of 5't'h EU research program.(author)

  15. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago

  16. ELASTIC AND SAFETY CLUTCH WITH RADIAL TAPERED ROLLER AND METALLIC ELASTIC ELEMENTS AXIALLY ARRANGED

    OpenAIRE

    STROE Ioan

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a new type of clutch named `Elastic and Safety Clutch` that can accomplish the functions of the elastic and those of the safety clutches, but it is not a combined clutch. The proposed clutch is an elastic and safety clutch with metallic intermediate elements. The paper presents the elastic and safety clutch with radial tapered roller and metallic elastic elements axially arranged. The design and verification computing relations of the elastic and safety...

  17. Linear viscoelastic characterization from filament stretching rheometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    Traditionally, linear viscoelasticity is measured using small amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Due to experimental difficulties, shear flows are predominately confined to the linear and mildly nonlinear regime. On the other hand, extensional flows have proven more practical in measuring viscoela......Traditionally, linear viscoelasticity is measured using small amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Due to experimental difficulties, shear flows are predominately confined to the linear and mildly nonlinear regime. On the other hand, extensional flows have proven more practical in measuring...... viscoelasticity well into the nonlinear regime. Therefore at present, complete rheological characterization of a material requires two apparatuses: a shear and an extensional rheometer. This work is focused on developing a linear viscoelastic protocol for the filament stretching rheometer (FSR) in order...... to measure both linear and nonlinear dynamics on a single apparatus. With a software modification to the FSR motor control, we show that linear viscoelasticity can be measured via small amplitude squeeze flow (SASF). Squeeze flow is a combination of both shear and extensional flow applied by axially...

  18. Screening of epoxy systems for high performance filament winding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, T. T.; Jessop, E. S.; Penn, L.

    1975-01-01

    Several promising epoxy systems for high performance filament winding applications are described. Viscosities, gel times, and cast resin tensile behavior are given, as well as heat deflection under load and water absorption measurements.

  19. Biofilms from a Brazilian water distribution system include filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, V M; Oliveira, H M B; Santos, C; Paterson, R R M; Gusmão, N B; Lima, N

    2013-03-01

    Filamentous fungi in drinking water can block water pipes, can cause organoleptic biodeterioration, and are a source of pathogens. There are increasing reports of the involvement of the organisms in biofilms. This present study describes a sampling device that can be inserted directly into pipes within water distribution systems, allowing biofilm formation in situ. Calcofluor White M2R staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization with morphological analyses using epifluorescent microscopy were used to analyse biofilms for filamentous fungi, permitting direct observation of the fungi. DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) was applied to detect bacteria. Filamentous fungi were detected in biofilms after 6 months on coupons exposed to raw water, decanted water and at the entrance of the water distribution system. Algae, yeast, and bacteria were also observed. The role of filamentous fungi requires further investigations.

  20. Health Risks Associated with Exposure to Filamentous Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbuta, Mary Augustina; Mwanza, Mulunda

    2017-01-01

    Filamentous fungi occur widely in the environment, contaminating soil, air, food and other substrates. Due to their wide distribution, they have medical and economic implications. Regardless of their use as a source of antibiotics, vitamins and raw materials for various industrially important chemicals, most fungi and filamentous fungi produce metabolites associated with a range of health risks, both in humans and in animals. The association of filamentous fungi and their metabolites to different negative health conditions in humans and animals, has contributed to the importance of investigating different health risks induced by this family of heterotrophs. This review aims to discuss health risks associated with commonly occurring filamentous fungal species which belong to genera Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium, as well as evaluating their pathogenicity and mycotoxic properties. PMID:28677641

  1. Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal by filamentous bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: activated sludge, denitrification, glycogen accumulating organisms, filamentous bacteria, phosphorus removal. Introduction. Biological nutrient removal (BNR) has gained attention over chemical nutrient removal because of the high cost of the chemi- cal process and the large sludge volumes produced.

  2. Method for preparing metallated filament-wound structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George R.

    1979-01-01

    Metallated graphite filament-wound structures are prepared by coating a continuous multi-filament carbon yarn with a metal carbide, impregnating the carbide coated yarn with a polymerizable carbon precursor, winding the resulting filament about a mandrel, partially curing the impregnation in air, subjecting the wound composite to heat and pressure to cure the carbon precursor, and thereafter heating the composite in a sizing die at a pressure loading of at least 1000 psi for graphitizing the carbonaceous material in the composite. The carbide in the composite coalesces into rod-like shapes which are disposed in an end-to-end relationship parallel with the filaments to provide resistance to erosion in abrasive laden atmospheres.

  3. Positrusion Filament Recycling System for ISS, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Positrusion ISS Recycler enables recycling of scrap and waste plastics into high-quality filament for 3D printers to enable sustainable in-situ manufacturing on...

  4. UHECR acceleration in dark matter filaments of cosmological structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, M. A.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-04-01

    A mechanism for proton acceleration to ~ 1021 eV is suggested. It may operate in accretion flows onto thin dark matter filaments of cosmic structure formation. The flow compresses the ambient magnetic field to strongly increase and align it with the filament. Particles begin the acceleration by E × B drift with the accretion flow. The energy gain in the drift regime is limited by the conservation of the adiabatic invariant p⊥2/B(r). Upon approaching the filament, the drift turns into the gyro-motion around the filament so that the particle moves parallel to the azimuthal electric field. In this `betatron' regime the acceleration speeds up to rapidly reach the electrodynamic limit cpmax = eBR for an accelerator with magnetic field B and the orbit radius R (Larmor radius). The periodic orbit becomes unstable and the particle slings out of the filament to the region of a weak (uncompressed) magnetic field, which terminates the acceleration. To escape the filament, accelerated particles must have gyro-radii comparable with the filament radius. Therefore, the mechanism requires pre-acceleration that is likely to occur in large scale shocks upstream or nearby the filament accretion flow. Previous studies identify such shocks as efficient proton accelerators, with a firm upper limit ~ 1019.5 eV placed by the catastrophic photo-pion losses. The present mechanism combines explosive energy gain in its final (betatron) phase with prompt particle release from the region of strong magnetic field. It is this combination that allows protons to overcome both the photo-pion and the synchrotron-Compton losses and therefore attain energy ~ 1021 eV. A customary requirement on accelerator power to reach a given Emax, which is placed by the accelerator energy dissipation proptoEmax2/Z0 due to the finite vacuum impedance Z0, is circumvented by the cyclic operation of the accelerator.

  5. Impact of Submesoscale Processes on Dynamics of Phytoplankton Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-12

    RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 29-04-2015 Journal Article Impact of submesoscale processes on dynamics of phytoplankton ...in contrast to the earlier summer time, when the ASC mixes phytoplankton much deeper to the area below of the euphotic depth, and chlorophyll a...filaments are 3 -4 times weaker. coastal processes; upwelling, submesoscale processes, phytoplankton filaments Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified UU 13 Igor Shulman (228) 688-5646 Reset

  6. Interaction of cytochalasin D with actin filaments in the presence of ADP and ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, M F; Criquet, P; Pantaloni, D; Korn, E D

    1986-02-15

    Cytochalasin D strongly inhibits the faster components in the reactions of actin filament depolymerization and elongation in the presence of 10 mM Tris-Cl-, pH 7.8, 0.2 mM dithiothreitol, 1 mM MgCl2, 0.1 mM CaCl2, and 0.2 mM ATP or ADP. Assuming an exclusive and total capping of the barbed end by the drug, the kinetic parameters derived at saturation by cytochalasin D refer to the pointed end and are 10-15-fold lower than at the barbed end. In ATP, the critical concentration increases with cytochalasin D up to 12-fold its value when both ends are free; as a result of the lowering of the free energy of nucleation by cytochalasin D, short oligomers of F-actin exist just above and below the critical concentration. Cytochalasin D interacts strongly with the barbed ends independently of the ADP-G-actin concentration (K = 0.5 nM-1). In contrast, the affinity of cytochalasin D decreases cooperatively with increasing ATP-G-actin concentration. These data are equally well accounted for by two different models: either cytochalasin D binds very poorly to ATP-capped filament ends whose proportion increases with actin concentration, or cytochalasin D binds equally well to ATP-ends and ADP-ends and also binds to actin dimers in ATP but not in ADP. A linear actin concentration dependence of the rate of growth was found at the pointed end, consistent with the virtual absence of an ATP cap at that end.

  7. The architecture and fine structure of gill filaments in the brown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Special attention was paid to filament architecture, ennervation of filaments, number and type of cells populating filament epithelia and variations in epithelial cell morphology and cilia ultrastructure. Filament shape was maintained by thickened chi-tln and strategically placed smooth myocytes. The epithelium was populated ...

  8. Nonlinear theory of elastic shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Junior, J.A.

    1979-08-01

    Nonlinear theory of elastic shells is developed which incorporates both geometric and physical nonlinearities and which does not make use of the well known Love-Kirchhoff hypothesis. The resulting equations are formulated in tensorial notation and are reduced to the ones of common use when simplifying assumptions encountered in the especific litterature are taken. (Author) [pt

  9. Duration of an Elastic Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding…

  10. Unconventional actin conformations localize on intermediate filaments in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Unconventional actin conformations colocalize with vimentin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. → These conformations are detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 ('lower dimer') and 2G2 ('nuclear actin'), but not C4 (monomeric actin). → Mitotic unconventional actin cables are independent of filamentous actin or microtubules. → Unconventional actin colocalizes with vimentin on a nocodazole-induced perinuclear dense mass of cables. -- Abstract: Different structural conformations of actin have been identified in cells and shown to reside in distinct subcellular locations of cells. In this report, we describe the localization of actin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. Actin was detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 and 2G2, but not with the anti-actin antibody C4. Actin contained in this structure is independent of microtubules and actin filaments, and colocalizes with vimentin. Taking advantage of intermediate filament collapse into a perinuclear dense mass of cables when microtubules are depolymerized, we were able to relocalize actin to such structures. We hypothesize that phosphorylation of intermediate filaments at mitosis entry triggers the recruitment of different actin conformations to mitotic intermediate filaments. Storage and partition of the nuclear actin and antiparallel 'lower dimer' actin conformations between daughter cells possibly contribute to gene transcription and transient actin filament dynamics at G1 entry.

  11. Treadmilling of actin filaments via Brownian dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kunkun; Shillcock, Julian; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-10-01

    Actin polymerization is coupled to the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). Therefore, each protomer within an actin filament can attain three different nucleotide states corresponding to bound ATP, ADP/Pi, and ADP. These protomer states form spatial patterns on the growing (or shrinking) filaments. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, the growth behavior of long filaments is studied, together with the associated protomer patterns, as a function of ATP-actin monomer concentration, CT, within the surrounding solution. For concentrations close to the critical concentration CT=CT,cr, the filaments undergo treadmilling, i.e., they grow at the barbed and shrink at the pointed end, which leads to directed translational motion of the whole filament. The corresponding nonequilibrium states are characterized by several global fluxes and by spatial density and flux profiles along the filaments. We focus on a certain set of transition rates as deduced from in vitro experiments and find that the associated treadmilling (or turnover) rate is about 0.08 monomers per second.

  12. The Weak Lensing Masses of Filaments between Luminous Red Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Seth D.; Hudson, Michael J.

    2017-07-01

    In the standard model of non-linear structure formation, a cosmic web of dark-matter-dominated filaments connects dark matter haloes. In this paper, we stack the weak lensing signal of an ensemble of filaments between groups and clusters of galaxies. Specifically, we detect the weak lensing signal, using CFHTLenS galaxy ellipticities, from stacked filaments between Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-III/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey luminous red galaxies (LRGs). As a control, we compare the physical LRG pairs with projected LRG pairs that are more widely separated in redshift space. We detect the excess filament mass density in the projected pairs at the 5σ level, finding a mass of (1.6 ± 0.3) × 1013 M⊙ for a stacked filament region 7.1 h-1 Mpc long and 2.5 h-1 Mpc wide. This filament signal is compared with a model based on the three-point galaxy-galaxy-convergence correlation function, as developed in Clampitt et al., yielding reasonable agreement.

  13. Design and optimize of 3-axis filament winding machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanjin, Ma; Rejab, M. R. M.; Idris, M. S.; Bachtiar, B.; Siregar, J. P.; Harith, M. N.

    2017-10-01

    Filament winding technique is developed as the primary process for composite cylindrical structures fabrication at low cost. Fibres are wound on a rotating mandrel by a filament winding machine where resin impregnated fibres pass through a pay-out eye. This paper aims to develop and optimize a 3-axis, lightweight, practical, efficient, portable filament winding machine to satisfy the customer demand, which can fabricate pipes and round shape cylinders with resins. There are 3 main units on the 3-axis filament winding machine, which are the rotary unit, the delivery unit and control system unit. Comparison with previous existing filament winding machines in the factory, it has 3 degrees of freedom and can fabricate more complex shape specimens based on the mandrel shape and particular control system. The machine has been designed and fabricated on 3 axes movements with control system. The x-axis is for movement of the carriage, the y-axis is the rotation of mandrel and the z-axis is the movement of the pay-out eye. Cylindrical specimens with different dimensions and winding angles were produced. 3-axis automated filament winding machine has been successfully designed with simple control system.

  14. The electric toothbrush: analysis of filaments under stereomicroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checchi, L; Farina, E; Felice, P; Montevecchi, M

    2004-08-01

    The use of manual and electric toothbrushes has a fundamental role in primary prevention in oral hygiene. However, aggressive use of the toothbrush, especially those with non-rounded filaments, can result in lesions in both soft and hard oral tissue. Without doubt, the electric toothbrush is a useful aid for the patient, and it is therefore interesting to evaluate not only its effectiveness in plaque removal, but also the relationship between morphology of filaments and incidence of muco-gingival pathologies. The aim of this research was to evaluate various forms of bristles of electric toothbrushes under a stereomicroscope vision. Brushes tested included two samples of toothbrushes from six different types. Tufts from the same position on the toothbrush head were removed and examined under stereomicroscope. In this study the percentage of rounded filaments that is considered acceptable and non-traumatic was evaluated according to the Silverstone and Featherstone classification. Morphological analysis of electric toothbrush filaments revealed a low percentage of rounded filaments. In only four of 12 electric toothbrushes tested there were more than 50% of the filaments rounded in appearance.

  15. Effect of Filament Fineness on Composite Yarn Residual Torque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarıoğlu Esin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yarn residual torque or twist liveliness occurs when the twist is imparted to spin the fibers during yarn formation. It causes yarn snarling, which is an undesirable property and can lead the problems for further processes such as weaving and knitting. It affects the spirality of knitted fabrics and skewness of woven fabrics. Generally, yarn residual torque depends on yarn twist, yarn linear density, and fiber properties used. Composite yarns are widely produced to exploit two yarns with different properties such on optimum way at the same time and these yarns can be produced by wrapping sheath fibers around filament core fiber with a certain twist. In this study, the effect of filament fineness used as core component of composite yarn on residual torque was analyzed. Thus, the false twist textured polyester filament yarns with different filament fineness were used to produce composite yarns with different yarn count. The variance analysis was performed to determine the significance of twist liveliness of filament yarns and yarn count on yarn twist liveliness. Results showed that there is a statistically significant differences at significance level of α=0.05 between filament fineness and yarn residual torque of composite yarns.

  16. Optical and electrical properties of a spiral LED filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Zou, Jun; Yang, Bobo; Li, Wenbo; Li, Yang; Shi, Mingming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Canyun; Wang, Fengchao; Lin, Yujie

    2018-02-01

    This paper introduces a new type of spiral white light-emitting diodes (WLED) filament with high luminous efficiency and uniform optical performance. The optical and thermal properties of the flexible filament were investigated at different stretching heights, namely 0, 1, 2, and 3 cm. The results indicated that the filament showed the best optical characteristics at the stretching height of 2 cm, because of good heat dissipation. In addition, the radiation temperature of the filament was inversely proportional to the output luminous flux. The reliability of the filament at a stretching height of 2 cm was also evaluated after 1000 h of use. The result demonstrated that the luminous flux decay of the bulb was only 0.85%. The flexible spiral WLED filament exhibiting high luminous flux and good reliability could be adapted to promote industrial development in the near future. Project supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 51302171), the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (CN) (No. 14500503300), the Shanghai Municipal Alliance Program (No. Lm201547), the Shanghai Cooperative Project (No. ShanghaiCXY-2013-61), and the Jiashan County Technology Program (No. 20141316).

  17. Elastic positron-cadmium scattering at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.

    2010-01-01

    The elastic and annihilation cross sections for positron-cadmium scattering are reported up to the positronium-formation threshold (at 2.2 eV). The low-energy phase shifts for the elastic scattering of positrons from cadmium were derived from the bound and pseudostate energies of a very large basis configuration-interaction calculation of the e + -Cd system. The s-wave binding energy is estimated to be 126±42 meV, with a scattering length of A scat =(14.2±2.1)a 0 , while the threshold annihilation parameter, Z eff , was 93.9±26.5. The p-wave phase shift exhibits a weak shape resonance that results in a peak Z eff of 91±17 at a collision energy of about 490±50 meV.

  18. Experimental study of infrared filaments under different initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirell, Daniel Joseph

    In 1964, four years after the first working laser was constructed, long skinny damage tracks and fluorescence trails were seen inside of certain transparent media that were excited by intense light pulses [1]. What was so remarkable about these features was the narrowness of the spatial profile and their long propagation length in the beam in concert with the very high intensity of the light that would be necessary to produce them. A purely linear model of light propagation through such media was insufficient to explain the results of these experiments and hence a new area of nonlinear optics, latex coined filamentation (to describe the length, slimness, and intensity of the light field), was born. Filament studies begin with a medium that has a nonlinear index of refraction, n¯2, that interacts with an intense beam of light so as to cause it to self-focus. The n¯2 of liquid and solid transparent media is much higher than the n¯ 2 of gases and therefore a much higher intensity of laser source would need to be invented to begin the study of filaments in air. With the advent of the Ti-Sapphire Kerr-lens modelocked laser [2], working in combination with the development of the chirped pulse amplifier system in the mid-1990's, light intensities sufficient to produce filaments in air was realized. Since that time much experimental and theoretical work has been done to better understand some of the additional complexities that arise specifically in the filamentation of light in air using several different wavelengths (UV to IR) and pulsewidths (femto- to pico-seconds). Many theoretical models exist each with a different emphasis on the various physical mechanisms that may produce the features experimentally observed in filaments. The experimental work has sought to give the theoretician better data on some of the properties of filaments such as the: (a) spatial and temporal structure of the beam and of the produced plasma (that arises due to the high intensity light

  19. Heart transplantation and arterial elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colvin-Adams M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monica Colvin-Adams,1 Nonyelum Harcourt,1 Robert LeDuc,2 Ganesh Raveendran,1 Yassir Sonbol,3 Robert Wilson,1 Daniel Duprez11Cardiovascular Division, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Division of Biostatistics University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Cardiovascular Division, St Luke's Hospital System, Sugar Land, TX, USAObjective: Arterial elasticity is a functional biomarker that has predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in nontransplant populations. There is little information regarding arterial elasticity in heart transplant recipients. This study aimed to characterize small (SAE and large (LAE artery elasticity in heart transplant recipients in comparison with an asymptomatic population free of overt cardiovascular disease. A second goal was to identify demographic and clinical factors associated with arterial elasticity in this unique population.Methods: Arterial pulse waveform was registered noninvasively at the radial artery in 71 heart transplant recipients between 2008 and 2010. SAEs and LAEs were derived from diastolic pulse contour analysis. Comparisons were made to a healthy cohort of 1,808 participants selected from our prevention clinic database. Multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate associations between risk factors and SAE and LAE within the heart transplant recipients.Results: LAE and SAE were significantly lower in heart transplant recipients than in the normal cohort (P <0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively. Female sex and history of ischemic cardiomyopathy were significantly associated with reduced LAE and SAE. Older age and the presence of moderate cardiac allograft vasculopathy were also significantly associated with reduced SAE. Transplant duration was associated with increased SAE.Conclusion: Heart transplants are associated with peripheral endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness, as demonstrated by a significant reduction in SAE and LAE when compared with a

  20. Filamented plasmas in laser ablation of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. R.; Fajardo, M.; Kozlová, M.; Mocek, T.; Polan, J.; Rus, B.

    2009-03-01

    We report results from laser-solid experiments at PALS using an x-ray laser probe with a pulse length of 0.1 ns and a wavelength of 21.2 nm. A laser with a pulse length of 0.3 ns, a peak intensity of up to 5 × 1013 W cm-2 and a wavelength of 1.3 µm was focused to a 0.15 mm wide line on 3 mm long zinc and 1 mm long iron targets and the probe was passed along the length of the plasma formed. The results show plasma 'hairs', or filaments, appearing only below the critical density, 0.1 ns before the peak of the laser pulse. The plasma around the critical density was clearly imaged and remained uniform. Magneto-hydrodynamic modelling indicates that this is caused by a magnetic field that diffuses from the critical surface, where it is generated, leading to a magnetic pressure comparable to the plasma pressure below the critical density. A dispersion relation is derived for density perturbations perpendicular to a temperature gradient in the presence of an existing magnetic field, which shows that such perturbations always grow, with the growth rate being the greatest for small wavelength perturbations and at low densities. These results indicate that the hair-like structures should be a typical feature of laser ablated plasmas below the critical density following significant plasma expansion, in agreement with numerous experimental results. The implications for x-ray lasers and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  1. Self-assembly of designed supramolecular magnetic filaments of different shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, E.V. [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Rozhkov, D.A., E-mail: d.a.rozhkov@gmail.com [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sanchez, P.A. [University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8, Vienna (Austria); Kantorovich, S.S. [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-06-01

    In the present work we study via molecular dynamics simulations filaments of ring and linear shape. Filaments are made of magnetic nanoparticles, possessing a point dipole in their centres. Particles in filaments are crosslinked in a particular way, so that the deviation of the neighbouring dipoles from the head-to-tail orientation is penalised by the bond. We show how the conformation of a single chain and ring filament changes on cooling for different lengths. We also study filament pairs, by fixing filaments at a certain distance and analysing the impact of inter-filament interaction on the equilibrium configurations. Our study opens a perspective to investigate the dispersions of filaments, both theoretically and numerically, by using effective potentials. - Highlights: • Single filament study. • Magnetic particles crosslinked in chains and rings. • Magnetic filament interactions.

  2. Giant quiescent solar filament observed with high-resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: An extremely large filament was studied in various layers of the solar atmosphere. The inferred physical parameters and the morphological aspects are compared with smaller quiescent filaments. Methods: A giant quiet-Sun filament was observed with the high-resolution Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain, on 2011 November 15. A mosaic of spectra (ten maps of 100″ × 182″) was recorded simultaneously in the chromospheric absorption lines Hα and Na I D2. Physical parameters of the filament plasma were derived using cloud model (CM) inversions and line core fits. The spectra were complemented with full-disk filtergrams (He I λ10830 Å, Hα, and Ca II K) of the Chromospheric Telescope (ChroTel) and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Results: The filament had extremely large linear dimensions (~817 arcsec), which corresponds to about 658 Mm along a great circle on the solar surface. A total amount of 175119 Hα contrast profiles were inverted using the CM approach. The inferred mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity, Doppler width, and source function were similar to previous works of smaller quiescent filaments. However, the derived optical thickness was higher. LOS velocity trends inferred from the Hα line core fits were in accord but weaker than those obtained with CM inversions. Signatures of counter-streaming flows were detected in the filament. The largest brightening conglomerates in the line core of Na I D2 coincided well with small-scale magnetic fields as seen by HMI. Mixed magnetic polarities were detected close to the ends of barbs. The computation of photospheric horizontal flows based on HMI magnetograms revealed flow kernels with a size of 5-8 Mm and velocities of 0.30-0.45 km s-1 at the ends of the filament. Conclusions: The physical properties of extremely large filaments are similar to their smaller counterparts, except for the optical thickness, which in

  3. Elastic least-squares reverse time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Zongcai

    2016-09-06

    Elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) is used to invert synthetic particle-velocity data and crosswell pressure field data. The migration images consist of both the P- and Svelocity perturbation images. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data illustrate the advantages of elastic LSRTM over elastic reverse time migration (RTM). In addition, elastic LSRTM images are better focused and have better reflector continuity than do the acoustic LSRTM images.

  4. On Elasticity Measurement in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elasticity is the foundation of cloud performance and can be considered as a great advantage and a key benefit of cloud computing. However, there is no clear, concise, and formal definition of elasticity measurement, and thus no effective approach to elasticity quantification has been developed so far. Existing work on elasticity lack of solid and technical way of defining elasticity measurement and definitions of elasticity metrics have not been accurate enough to capture the essence of elasticity measurement. In this paper, we present a new definition of elasticity measurement and propose a quantifying and measuring method using a continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC model, which is easy to use for precise calculation of elasticity value of a cloud computing platform. Our numerical results demonstrate the basic parameters affecting elasticity as measured by the proposed measurement approach. Furthermore, our simulation and experimental results validate that the proposed measurement approach is not only correct but also robust and is effective in computing and comparing the elasticity of cloud platforms. Our research in this paper makes significant contribution to quantitative measurement of elasticity in cloud computing.

  5. Thermodynamic parameters of elasticity and electrical conductivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thermodynamic parameters (change in free energy of elasticity, DGe; change in enthalpy of elasticity, DHe; and change in entropy of elasticity, DSe) and the electrical conductivity of natural rubber composites reinforced separately with some agricultural wastes have been determined. Results show that the reinforced ...

  6. The Price Elasticity of Residential Energy Use,

    Science.gov (United States)

    household energy- consumption behavior : The difference between the own-price elasticity of total consumption and that of saturation is a measure of the responsiveness of ’conservation’ to price....estimates of the own-price elasticities of total consumption but almost surely will produce erroneous estimates of the cross-price elasticities. As regards

  7. short communication thermodynamic parameters of elasticity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    ABSTRACT. The thermodynamic parameters (change in free energy of elasticity, AGe; change in enthalpy of elasticity, AHe; and change in entropy of elasticity, ASe) and the electrical conductivity of natural rubber composites reinforced separately with some agricultural wastes have been determined. Results show that the ...

  8. Large-amplitude Longitudinal Oscillations in a Solar Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Li, T.; Zheng, R. S.; Su, Y. N.; Ji, H. S.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations of a filament observed on 2015 May 3. Located next to active region 12335, the sigmoidal filament was observed by the ground-based Hα telescopes from the Global Oscillation Network Group and by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The filament oscillations were most probably triggered by the magnetic reconnection in the filament channel, which is characterized by the bidirectional flows, brightenings in EUV and soft X-ray, and magnetic cancellation in the photosphere. The directions of oscillations have angles of 4°-36° with respect to the filament axis. The whole filament did not oscillate in phase as a rigid body. Meanwhile, the oscillation periods (3100-4400 s) have a spatial dependence, implying that the curvature radii (R) of the magnetic dips are different at different positions. The values of R are estimated to be 69.4-133.9 Mm, and the minimum transverse magnetic field of the dips is estimated to be 15 G. The amplitudes of S5-S8 grew with time, while the amplitudes of S9-S14 damped with time. The oscillation amplitudes range from a few to ten Mm, and the maximum velocity can reach 30 km s-1. Interestingly, the filament experienced mass drainage southward at a speed of ˜27 km s-1. The oscillations continued after the mass drainage and lasted for more than 11 hr. After the mass drainage, the oscillation phases did not change much. The periods of S5-S8 decreased, while the periods of S9-S14 increased. The amplitudes of S5-S8 damped with time, while the amplitudes of S9-S14 grew. Most of the damping (growing) ratios are between -9 and 14. We offer a schematic cartoon to explain the complex behaviors of oscillations by introducing thread-thread interaction.

  9. Closely spaced fine filament multifilamentary NbTi strands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, E.; Liu, H.; Seuntjens, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    A series of papers showing the advantages of close spacing and matrix alloying for the development of high J c , fine filament, NbTi materials which have low electrical coupling have appeared in the last seven years. In order to achieve the highest J c 's, it has been shown that close spacing has many advantages. This, however, leads to proximity coupling which has to be overcome by the addition of alloying elements to the matrix between the filaments. Of the three alloying materials normally used for this purpose, Ni, Si, and Mn, the most effective is Mn, which operates by a spin flip scattering mechanism whereas Ni and Si produce decoupling by less effective resistive scattering. Ni and Si, however, harden the matrix more than does the small amount of Mn, [0.5wt%], which has been used in most of the past work on the reduction of proximity coupling. This hardening allows the filaments to be separated to a greater extent than is possible in the case of a pure copper matrix without a significant increase in filament sausaging and a resultant J c decrease. Silicon also has one additional advantage over the other alloying elements in that it reduces the formation of compounds on the surface of the filaments, thus it may obviate the necessity for a Nb barrier layer and thus allow an even greater increase in J c . In this paper the authors explore further some of the effects of the addition of manganese and/or silicon to the matrix between the filaments in an effort to optimize properties at the smaller filament sizes

  10. Bismuth(III) volatilization and immobilization by filamentous fungus Aspergillus clavatus during aerobic incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriová, Katarína; Urík, Martin; Bujdoš, Marek; Matúš, Peter

    2015-02-01

    As with many metals, bismuth can be accumulated or transformed by microorganisms. These interactions affect microbial consortia and bismuth environmental behaviour, mobility, and toxicity. Recent research focused specifically on bismuth anaerobic transformation by bacteria and archaea has inspired the evaluation of the mutual interactions between bismuth and filamentous fungi as presented in this article. The Aspergillus clavatus fungus proved resistant to adverse effects from bismuth contamination in culture medium with up to a concentration of 195 µmol L(-1) during static 15- and 30-day cultivation. The examined resistance mechanism includes biosorption to the fungal surface and biovolatilization. Pelletized fungal biomass has shown high affinity for dissolved bismuth(III). Bismuth biosorption was rapid, reaching equilibrium after 50 min with a 0.35 mmol g(-1) maximum sorption capacity as calculated from the Langmuir isotherm. A. clavatus accumulated ≤70 µmol g(-1) of bismuth after 30 days. Preceding isotherm study implications that most accumulated bismuth binds to cell wall suggests that biosorption is the main detoxification mechanism. Accumulated bismuth was also partly volatilized (≤1 µmol) or sequestrated in the cytosol or vacuoles. Concurrently, ≤1.6 µmol of bismuth remaining in solution was precipitated by fungal activity. These observations indicate that complex mutual interactions between bismuth and filamentous fungi are environmentally significant regarding bismuth mobility and transformation.

  11. Elastic response of graphene nanodomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sascha; Stradi, Daniele; Gnecco, Enrico; Barja, Sara; Kawai, Shigeki; Díaz, Cristina; Alcamí, Manuel; Martín, Fernando; Vázquez de Parga, Amadeo Lopez; Miranda, Rodolfo; Glatzel, Thilo; Meyer, Ernst

    2013-04-23

    The mechanical behavior of a periodically buckled graphene membrane has been investigated by noncontact atomic force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. When a graphene monolayer is grown on Ru(0001), a regular arrangement of 0.075 nm high nanodomes forming a honeycomb lattice with 3 nm periodicity forms spontaneously. This structure responds in a perfectly reversible way to relative normal displacements up to 0.12 nm. Indeed, the elasticity of the nanodomes is proven by realistic DFT calculations, with an estimated normal stiffness k∼40 N/m. Our observations extend previous results on macroscopic graphene samples and confirm that the elastic behavior of this material is maintained down to nanometer length scales, which is important for the development of new high-frequency (terahertz) electromechanical devices.

  12. Elasticity of Long Distance Travelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard

    2011-01-01

    With data from the Danish expenditure survey for 12 years 1996 through 2007, this study analyses household expenditures for long distance travelling. Household expenditures are examined at two levels of aggregation having the general expenditures on transportation and leisure relative to five other...... aggregated commodities at the highest level, and the specific expenditures on plane tickets and travel packages at the lowest level. The Almost Ideal Demand System is applied to determine the relationship between expenditures on transportation and leisure and all other purchased non-durables within...... packages has higher income elasticity of demand than plane tickets but also higher than transportation and leisure in general. The findings within price sensitiveness are not as sufficient estimated, but the model results indicate that travel packages is far more price elastic than plane tickets which...

  13. Transient waves in visco-elastic media

    CERN Document Server

    Ricker, Norman

    1977-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 10: Transient Waves in Visco-Elastic Media deals with the propagation of transient elastic disturbances in visco-elastic media. More specifically, it explores the visco-elastic behavior of a medium, whether gaseous, liquid, or solid, for very-small-amplitude disturbances. This volume provides a historical overview of the theory of the propagation of elastic waves in solid bodies, along with seismic prospecting and the nature of seismograms. It also discusses the seismic experiments, the behavior of waves propagated in accordance with the Stokes wave

  14. Elastic scattering at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspar, Jan; Deile, M

    The seemingly simple elastic scattering of protons still presents a challenge for the theory. In this thesis we discuss the elastic scattering from theoretical as well as experimental point of view. In the theory part, we present several models and their predictions for the LHC. We also discuss the Coulomb-hadronic interference, where we present a new eikonal calculation to all orders of alpha, the fine-structure constant. In the experimental part we introduce the TOTEM experiment which is dedicated, among other subjects, to the measurement of the elastic scattering at the LHC. This measurement is performed primarily with the Roman Pot (RP) detectors - movable beam-pipe insertions hundreds of meters from the interaction point, that can detect protons scattered to very small angles. We discuss some aspects of the RP simulation and reconstruction software. A central point is devoted to the techniques of RP alignment - determining the RP sensor positions relative to each other and to the beam. At the end we pres...

  15. Biomimetic heterogenous elastic tissue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kai Jen; Dixon, Simon; Hale, Luke Richard; Darbyshire, Arnold; Martin, Daniel; de Mel, Achala

    2017-01-01

    There is an unmet need for artificial tissue to address current limitations with donor organs and problems with donor site morbidity. Despite the success with sophisticated tissue engineering endeavours, which employ cells as building blocks, they are limited to dedicated labs suitable for cell culture, with associated high costs and long tissue maturation times before available for clinical use. Direct 3D printing presents rapid, bespoke, acellular solutions for skull and bone repair or replacement, and can potentially address the need for elastic tissue, which is a major constituent of smooth muscle, cartilage, ligaments and connective tissue that support organs. Thermoplastic polyurethanes are one of the most versatile elastomeric polymers. Their segmented block copolymeric nature, comprising of hard and soft segments allows for an almost limitless potential to control physical properties and mechanical behaviour. Here we show direct 3D printing of biocompatible thermoplastic polyurethanes with Fused Deposition Modelling, with a view to presenting cell independent in-situ tissue substitutes. This method can expeditiously and economically produce heterogenous, biomimetic elastic tissue substitutes with controlled porosity to potentially facilitate vascularisation. The flexibility of this application is shown here with tubular constructs as exemplars. We demonstrate how these 3D printed constructs can be post-processed to incorporate bioactive molecules. This efficacious strategy, when combined with the privileges of digital healthcare, can be used to produce bespoke elastic tissue substitutes in-situ, independent of extensive cell culture and may be developed as a point-of-care therapy approach.

  16. Magnetic Fields in the Massive Dense Cores of the DR21 Filament: Weakly Magnetized Cores in a Strongly Magnetized Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Tao-Chung; Lai, Shih-Ping [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Qizhou; Girart, Josep M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023 (China); Liu, Hauyu B., E-mail: chingtaochung@gmail.com [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    We present Submillimeter Array 880 μ m dust polarization observations of six massive dense cores in the DR21 filament. The dust polarization shows complex magnetic field structures in the massive dense cores with sizes of 0.1 pc, in contrast to the ordered magnetic fields of the parsec-scale filament. The major axes of the massive dense cores appear to be aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic fields of the filament, indicating that the parsec-scale magnetic fields play an important role in the formation of the massive dense cores. However, the correlation between the major axes of the cores and the magnetic fields of the cores is less significant, suggesting that during the core formation, the magnetic fields below 0.1 pc scales become less important than the magnetic fields above 0.1 pc scales in supporting a core against gravity. Our analysis of the angular dispersion functions of the observed polarization segments yields a plane-of-sky magnetic field strength of 0.4–1.7 mG for the massive dense cores. We estimate the kinematic, magnetic, and gravitational virial parameters of the filament and the cores. The virial parameters show that the gravitational energy in the filament dominates magnetic and kinematic energies, while the kinematic energy dominates in the cores. Our work suggests that although magnetic fields may play an important role in a collapsing filament, the kinematics arising from gravitational collapse must become more important than magnetic fields during the evolution from filaments to massive dense cores.

  17. A comparison study of a solar active-region eruptive filament and a neighboring non-eruptive filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Chao-Wei; Feng, Xue-Shang; Wu, Shi-Tsan; Hu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Solar active region (AR) 11283 is a very magnetically complex region and it has produced many eruptions. However, there exists a non-eruptive filament in the plage region just next to an eruptive one in the AR, which gives us an opportunity to perform a comparison analysis of these two filaments. The coronal magnetic field extrapolated using our CESE–MHD–NLFFF code reveals that two magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) exist in the same extrapolation box supporting these two filaments, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic field shows that the eruptive MFR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) cospatial very well with a pre-eruptive EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for coronal sigmoids. The magnetic dips of the non-eruptive MFRs match Hα observation of the non-eruptive filament strikingly well, which strongly supports the MFR-dip model for filaments. Compared with the non-eruptive MFR/filament (with a length of about 200 Mm), the eruptive MFR/filament is much smaller (with a length of about 20 Mm), but it contains most of the magnetic free energy in the extrapolation box and holds a much higher free energy density than the non-eruptive one. Both the MFRs are weakly twisted and cannot trigger kink instability. The AR eruptive MFR is unstable because its axis reaches above a critical height for torus instability, at which the overlying closed arcades can no longer confine the MFR stably. On the contrary, the quiescent MFR is very firmly held by its overlying field, as its axis apex is far below the torus-instability threshold height. Overall, this comparison investigation supports that an MFR can exist prior to eruption and the ideal MHD instability can trigger an MFR eruption. (paper)

  18. A comparison study of a solar active-region eruptive filament and a neighboring non-eruptive filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao-Wei; Wu, Shi-Tsan; Feng, Xue-Shang; Hu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Solar active region (AR) 11283 is a very magnetically complex region and it has produced many eruptions. However, there exists a non-eruptive filament in the plage region just next to an eruptive one in the AR, which gives us an opportunity to perform a comparison analysis of these two filaments. The coronal magnetic field extrapolated using our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code reveals that two magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) exist in the same extrapolation box supporting these two filaments, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic field shows that the eruptive MFR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) cospatial very well with a pre-eruptive EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for coronal sigmoids. The magnetic dips of the non-eruptive MFRs match Hα observation of the non-eruptive filament strikingly well, which strongly supports the MFR-dip model for filaments. Compared with the non-eruptive MFR/filament (with a length of about 200 Mm), the eruptive MFR/filament is much smaller (with a length of about 20 Mm), but it contains most of the magnetic free energy in the extrapolation box and holds a much higher free energy density than the non-eruptive one. Both the MFRs are weakly twisted and cannot trigger kink instability. The AR eruptive MFR is unstable because its axis reaches above a critical height for torus instability, at which the overlying closed arcades can no longer confine the MFR stably. On the contrary, the quiescent MFR is very firmly held by its overlying field, as its axis apex is far below the torus-instability threshold height. Overall, this comparison investigation supports that an MFR can exist prior to eruption and the ideal MHD instability can trigger an MFR eruption.

  19. Rapid Formation and Disappearance of a Filament Barb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand D.; Srivastava, Nandita; Mathew, Shibu K.; Martin, Sara F.

    2013-11-01

    We present observations of an activated quiescent filament obtained in Hα from the high-resolution Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on 20 August 2010. The filament developed a barb in 10 min, which disappeared within the next 35 min. A data set from the DOT spanning 2 h was used to analyse this event. Line-of-sight velocity maps were constructed from the Doppler images, which reveal flows in filament spine during this period. Photospheric magnetograms were used from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to determine the changes in magnetic flux in the region surrounding the barb location. The analysis shows flows in the filament spine towards the barb location preceding its formation, and flows in the barb towards the spine during its disappearance. Magnetograms reveal patches of minority polarity flux close to the end of the barb at its greatest elongation. The flows in the spine and barbs are along numerous threads that compose these typical filament structures. The flows are consistent with field-aligned threads and demonstrate that the replacement time of the mass in barbs, and by inference, in the spine is very rapid.

  20. High-Resolution Observations of a Filament showing Activated Barb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand; Martin, Sara F.; Mathew, Shibu; Srivastava, Nandita

    2012-07-01

    Analysis of a filament showing an activated barb using observations from the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on 2010 August 20 are presented. The DOT takes Doppler images in Hα, among other wavelengths, in a region about 110 × 110 arcsec^{2} in area, at a cadence of 30~seconds. The offline image restoration technique of speckle reconstruction is applied to obtain diffraction limited images. The filament developed a new barb in 10~minutes, which disappeared within the next 35~minutes. Such a rapid formation and disappearance of a filament barb is unusual, and has not been reported earlier. Line-of-sight velocity maps were constructed from the Doppler images of the target filament. We observe flows in the filament spine towards the barb location prior to its formation, and flows in the barb towards the spine during its disappearance. Photospheric magnetograms from Heliospheric Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, at a cadence of 45~seconds, were used to determine the changes in magnetic flux in the region surrounding the barb location. The variation of magnetic flux in this duration supports the view that barbs are rooted in minor magnetic polarity. Our analysis shows that barbs can be short-lived and formation and disappearance of the barb was associated with cancellation of magnetic flux.

  1. Morphological indictors of the chirality of solar filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B. P.

    2017-10-01

    There is no doubt that the structural features of filaments reflect properties of their magnetic fields, such as chirality and helicity. However, the interpretation of some morphological features can lead to incorrect conclusions when the observing time is limited and the spatial resolution is insufficiently high. In spite of the relative constancy of their overall shapes, filaments are dynamical formations with inhomogeneities moving along the threads making them up. Therefore, it is possible to observe material concentrated not only in magnetic traps, but also along curved arcs. Difficulties often arise in determining the chirality of filaments with anomalous "barbs"; i.e., those whose jagged side is located on the opposite side of the axis compared to most ("normal") filaments. A simple model is used to show that anomalous barbs can exist in an ordinary magnetic flux rope, with the threads of its fine structure oriented nearly perpendicular to its length. A careful analysis of images with the maximum available spatial resolution and with information about temporal dynamics, together with comparisons with observations in various spectral lines, can enable a correct determination of the chirality of filaments.

  2. Ack kinase regulates CTP synthase filaments during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strochlic, Todd I; Stavrides, Kevin P; Thomas, Sam V; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; O'Reilly, Alana M; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    The enzyme CTP synthase (CTPS) dynamically assembles into macromolecular filaments in bacteria, yeast, Drosophila, and mammalian cells, but the role of this morphological reorganization in regulating CTPS activity is controversial. During Drosophila oogenesis, CTPS filaments are transiently apparent in ovarian germline cells during a period of intense genomic endoreplication and stockpiling of ribosomal RNA. Here, we demonstrate that CTPS filaments are catalytically active and that their assembly is regulated by the non-receptor tyrosine kinase DAck, the Drosophila homologue of mammalian Ack1 (activated cdc42-associated kinase 1), which we find also localizes to CTPS filaments. Egg chambers from flies deficient in DAck or lacking DAck catalytic activity exhibit disrupted CTPS filament architecture and morphological defects that correlate with reduced fertility. Furthermore, ovaries from these flies exhibit reduced levels of total RNA, suggesting that DAck may regulate CTP synthase activity. These findings highlight an unexpected function for DAck and provide insight into a novel pathway for the developmental control of an essential metabolic pathway governing nucleotide biosynthesis. © 2014 The Authors.

  3. Studies of the laser filament instability in a semicollisional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, P.; Labaune, C.; Weber, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Bonnaud, G.; Riazuelo, G.; Walraet, F.

    2003-01-01

    The stability and nonlinear evolution of a laser filament in an underdense, semicollisional plasma are studied with a simulation code accounting for the ponderomotive and thermal effects together with the nonlocal electron transport. It is found that the filament is stable at low intensities, where the trapped laser power is below the self-focusing threshold. For larger powers, the filament is unstable with respect to bending. This instability, though predicted in theory (the m=1 mode), has not been seen so far in monospeckle modelling probably because of simulation symmetry. In our simulations an artificial noise source has been implemented in order to make nonsymmetric features appear. The instability leads to a complete breakup of the filament which reconstructs itself after some time and the process then repeats itself. Due to the filament instability the plasma sets in a regime of self-supported oscillations and results in temporal modulation and angular spreading of transmitted light. The numerical simulations are compared with theoretical predictions and experimental observations of speckle dynamics in the interaction of a randomized laser beam with preformed plasmas

  4. Swinholide A is a microfilament disrupting marine toxin that stabilizes actin dimers and severs actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubb, M R; Spector, I; Bershadsky, A D; Korn, E D

    1995-02-24

    Swinholide A, isolated from the marien sponge Theonella swinhoei, is a 44-carbon ring dimeric dilactone macrolide with a 2-fold axis of symmetry. Recent studies have elucidated its unusual structure and shown that it has potent cytotoxic activity. We now report that swinholide A disrupts the actin cytoskeleton of cells grown in culture, sequesters actin dimers in vitro in both polymerizing and non-polymerizing buffers with a binding stoichiometry of one swinholide A molecule per actin dimer, and rapidly severs F-actin in vitro with high cooperativity. These unique properties are sufficient to explain the cytotoxicity of swinholide A. They also suggest that swinholide A might be a model for studies of the mechanism of action of F-actin severing proteins and be therapeutically useful in conditions where filamentous actin contributes to pathologically high viscosities.

  5. Coupling of carboxylic groups onto the surface of polystyrene parts during fused filament fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Philipp; Schubert, Oliver; Simon, Frank; Schlenstedt, Kornelia

    2017-11-01

    A method for the fabrication of polystyrene parts, modified with carboxylic groups during Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), is being introduced. This method is based on the application of a thin layer of a reactive polymer carrying carboxylic groups on a substrate surface. A polystyrene film is printed on top of this layer. During contact between the hot melt and the reactive layer, a Friedel-Crafts type acylation using a green catalyst takes place, which attaches the reactive polymer to the polystyrene surface. The modified surface is homogeneous, hydrophilic and able to bind copper ions. The method could be used to fabricate unique parts of polystyrene with tailored surface functionalisation. It could be applied for laboratory use, e.g. for the manufacture of lab-on-a-chip devices.

  6. Elastic fibres in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Andrew K; Simpson, Andreja; Steer, Ruth; Cain, Stuart A; Kielty, Cay M

    2013-08-20

    Elastic fibres are insoluble components of the extracellular matrix of dynamic connective tissues such as skin, arteries, lungs and ligaments. They are laid down during development, and comprise a cross-linked elastin core within a template of fibrillin-based microfibrils. Their function is to endow tissues with the property of elastic recoil, and they also regulate the bioavailability of transforming growth factor β. Severe heritable elastic fibre diseases are caused by mutations in elastic fibre components; for example, mutations in elastin cause supravalvular aortic stenosis and autosomal dominant cutis laxa, mutations in fibrillin-1 cause Marfan syndrome and Weill-Marchesani syndrome, and mutations in fibulins-4 and -5 cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa. Acquired elastic fibre defects include dermal elastosis, whereas inflammatory damage to fibres contributes to pathologies such as pulmonary emphysema and vascular disease. This review outlines the latest understanding of the composition and assembly of elastic fibres, and describes elastic fibre diseases and current therapeutic approaches.

  7. Motivation and compliance with intraoral elastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeroo, Helen J; Cunningham, Susan J; Newton, Jonathon Timothy; Travess, Helen C

    2014-07-01

    Intraoral elastics are commonly used in orthodontics and require regular changing to be effective. Unfortunately, poor compliance with elastics is often encountered, especially in adolescents. Intention for an action and its implementation can be improved using "if-then" plans that spell out when, where, and how a set goal, such as elastic wear, can be put into action. Our aim was to determine the effect of if-then plans on compliance with elastics. To identify common barriers to compliance with recommendations concerning elastic wear, semistructured interviews were carried out with 14 adolescent orthodontic patients wearing intraoral elastics full time. Emerging themes were used to develop if-then plans to improve compliance with elastic wear. A prospective pilot study assessed the effectiveness of if-then planning aimed at overcoming the identified barriers on compliance with elastic wear. Twelve participants were randomized equally into study and control groups; the study group received information about if-then planning. The participants were asked to collect used elastics, and counts of these were used to assess compliance. A wide range of motivational and volitional factors were described by the interviewed participants, including the perceived benefits of elastics, cues to remember, pain, eating, social situations, sports, loss of elastics, and breakages. Compliance with elastic wear was highly variable among patients. The study group returned more used elastics, suggesting increased compliance, but the difference was not significant. The use of if-then plans might improve compliance with elastic wear when compared with routine clinical instructions. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Filamentous hydrous ferric oxide biosignatures in a pipeline carrying acid mine drainage at Iron Mountain Mine, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amy J.; Alpers, Charles N.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Campbell, Kate M.

    2017-01-01

    A pipeline carrying acidic mine effluent at Iron Mountain, CA, developed Fe(III)-rich precipitate caused by oxidation of Fe(II)aq. The native microbial community in the pipe included filamentous microbes. The pipe scale consisted of microbial filaments, and schwertmannite (ferric oxyhydroxysulfate, FOHS) mineral spheres and filaments. FOHS filaments contained central lumina with diameters similar to those of microbial filaments. FOHS filament geometry, the geochemical environment, and the presence of filamentous microbes suggest that FOHS filaments are mineralized microbial filaments. This formation of textural biosignatures provides the basis for a conceptual model for the development and preservation of biosignatures in other environments.

  9. The Transmembrane Morphogenesis Protein gp1 of Filamentous Phages Contains Walker A and Walker B Motifs Essential for Phage Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Loh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to lytic phages, filamentous phages are assembled in the inner membrane and secreted across the bacterial envelope without killing the host. For assembly and extrusion of the phage across the host cell wall, filamentous phages code for membrane-embedded morphogenesis proteins. In the outer membrane of Escherichia coli, the protein gp4 forms a pore-like structure, while gp1 and gp11 form a complex in the inner membrane of the host. By comparing sequences with other filamentous phages, we identified putative Walker A and B motifs in gp1 with a conserved lysine in the Walker A motif (K14, and a glutamic and aspartic acid in the Walker B motif (D88, E89. In this work we demonstrate that both, Walker A and Walker B, are essential for phage production. The crucial role of these key residues suggests that gp1 might be a molecular motor driving phage assembly. We further identified essential residues for the function of the assembly complex. Mutations in three out of six cysteine residues abolish phage production. Similarly, two out of six conserved glycine residues are crucial for gp1 function. We hypothesise that the residues represent molecular hinges allowing domain movement for nucleotide binding and phage assembly.

  10. The Transmembrane Morphogenesis Protein gp1 of Filamentous Phages Contains Walker A and Walker B Motifs Essential for Phage Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Belinda; Haase, Maximilian; Mueller, Lukas; Kuhn, Andreas; Leptihn, Sebastian

    2017-04-09

    In contrast to lytic phages, filamentous phages are assembled in the inner membrane and secreted across the bacterial envelope without killing the host. For assembly and extrusion of the phage across the host cell wall, filamentous phages code for membrane-embedded morphogenesis proteins. In the outer membrane of Escherichia coli, the protein gp4 forms a pore-like structure, while gp1 and gp11 form a complex in the inner membrane of the host. By comparing sequences with other filamentous phages, we identified putative Walker A and B motifs in gp1 with a conserved lysine in the Walker A motif (K14), and a glutamic and aspartic acid in the Walker B motif (D88, E89). In this work we demonstrate that both, Walker A and Walker B, are essential for phage production. The crucial role of these key residues suggests that gp1 might be a molecular motor driving phage assembly. We further identified essential residues for the function of the assembly complex. Mutations in three out of six cysteine residues abolish phage production. Similarly, two out of six conserved glycine residues are crucial for gp1 function. We hypothesise that the residues represent molecular hinges allowing domain movement for nucleotide binding and phage assembly.

  11. The formation and disappearance of filament barbs observed by SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Leping; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Employing six-day (August 16-21, 2010) SDO/AIA observations, we systematically investigate the formation and disappearance of 58 barbs of a northern (~N60) polar crown filament. Three different ways of barb formation are discovered, including (1) the convergence of surrounding moving materials (55.2%), (2) the flows of materials from the filament (37.9%), and (3) the material injections from neighboring brightening regions (6.9%). We also find three different types of barb disappearance, involving: (i) the bi-lateral movements (44.8%), and (ii) the outflowing (27.6%) of barb material resulting in the barb disappearance, as well as (iii) the barb disappearance associated with neighboring brightenings (27.6%). We propose that barbs exchange materials with the filament, surrounding atmosphere, and nearby brightening regions, causing the barb formation and disappearance.

  12. Trivalent Cation Induced Bundle Formation of Filamentous fd Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriophages are filamentous polyelectrolyte viral rods infecting only bacteria. In this study, we investigate the bundle formation of fd phages with trivalent cations having different ionic radii (Al(3+) , La(3+) and Y(3+) ) at various phage and counterion concentrations, and at varying bundling times. Aggregated phage bundles were detected at relatively low trivalent counterion concentrations (1 mM). Although 10 mM and 100 mM Y(3+) and La(3+) treatments formed larger and more intertwined phage bundles, Al(3+) and Fe(3+) treatments lead to the formation of networking filaments. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses confirmed the presence of C, N and O peaks on densely packed phage bundles. Immunofluorescence labelling and ELISA analyses with anti-p8 antibodies showed the presence of phage filaments after bundling. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Vortex Filaments in Grids for Scalable, Fine Smoke Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhang; Weixin, Si; Yinling, Qian; Hanqiu, Sun; Jing, Qin; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Vortex modeling can produce attractive visual effects of dynamic fluids, which are widely applicable for dynamic media, computer games, special effects, and virtual reality systems. However, it is challenging to effectively simulate intensive and fine detailed fluids such as smoke with fast increasing vortex filaments and smoke particles. The authors propose a novel vortex filaments in grids scheme in which the uniform grids dynamically bridge the vortex filaments and smoke particles for scalable, fine smoke simulation with macroscopic vortex structures. Using the vortex model, their approach supports the trade-off between simulation speed and scale of details. After computing the whole velocity, external control can be easily exerted on the embedded grid to guide the vortex-based smoke motion. The experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of using the proposed scheme for a visually plausible smoke simulation with macroscopic vortex structures.

  14. Filamentation instability of large-amplitude Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S.P.; Whang, M.H.; Lee, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    An instability that leads to the filamentation of large-amplitude Alfven waves and gives rise to purely growing density and magnetic field fluctuations is studied. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived, from which the threshold conditions and the growth rates of the instability are analyzed quantitatively for applications to the solar wind plasma. We have examined their dependence on the filamentation spectrum, the plasma β, and the pump frequency and intensity for both right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized Alfven waves. The excitation of filamentation instability for certain cases of interest is discussed and compared with that of the parametric decay and modulation instability. The relevance of the proposed instability with some observations is discussed. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  15. Effect of filament supports on emissive probe measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Howes, C. T.; Horányi, M.; Robertson, S.

    2013-01-01

    We have constructed an emissive probe with a thin tungsten filament spot-welded across two nickel wires insulated with ceramic paint. We show that the ceramic supports covering the nickel wires have a large effect on the potential measurements in low-density plasmas. It is found that the potential measured by the emissive probe is more negative than the potential derived from a Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve when the plasma density is so low that the emitting filament remains immersed in the sheaths of the ceramic supports. The length of the filament L needs to be larger than about 2 Debye lengths (L > 2λ De ) in order to avoid the influence of the ceramic supports and to achieve reliable plasma potential measurements using emissive probes.

  16. Filaments Data Since 1919: A Basis for Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboudarham, J.; Renié, C.

    2016-04-01

    From 1919 to 2002, Paris-Meudon Observatory published synoptic maps of the Solar activity. Together with maps, tables were provided, containing some information concerning at least filaments. The board of Paris Observatory funded a data capture program concerning the 680 000 basic informations available in those tables. On the other hand, in the frame of the FP7 European project HELIO, a Heliophysics Feature Catalogue (HFC) has been developed, which contains also filaments data from 1996 up to now. We now pool all these data in order to give access to a filaments database for nearly a century of observations. This allows to make statistical studies of those Solar features, and try to correlate them with other information such as sunspot number. We present here the data available for this long period of time.

  17. Filament Discharge Phenomena in Fingerprint Acquisition by Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Ming; Xu Weijun; Liu Qiang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dielectric barrier discharge fingerprint acquisition technique is introduced. The filament discharge phenomena were observed in the process of fingerprint acquisition. The filament discharge reduced the quality of fingerprint images. Obviously, it was necessary to eliminate streamer discharges in order to get good fingerprint images. The streamer discharge was considered to be the cause of the filament discharge in the experiment. The relationship between the critical electric field and the discharge gap was calculated with the Raether's model of streamer discharge. The calculated results and our experiment proved that it would be difficult for the streamer discharge to occur when the discharge gap was narrow. With a narrow discharge gap, the discharge was homogeneous, and the fingerprint images were clear and large in area. The images obtained in the experiment are very suitable for fingerprint identification as they contain more information

  18. Dynamically generated patterns in dense suspensions of active filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathyusha, K. R.; Henkes, Silke; Sknepnek, Rastko

    2018-02-01

    We use Langevin dynamics simulations to study dynamical behavior of a dense planar layer of active semiflexible filaments. Using the strength of active force and the thermal persistence length as parameters, we map a detailed phase diagram and identify several nonequilibrium phases in this system. In addition to a slowly flowing melt phase, we observe that, for sufficiently high activity, collective flow accompanied by signatures of local polar and nematic order appears in the system. This state is also characterized by strong density fluctuations. Furthermore, we identify an activity-driven crossover from this state of coherently flowing bundles of filaments to a phase with no global flow, formed by individual filaments coiled into rotating spirals. This suggests a mechanism where the system responds to activity by changing the shape of active agents, an effect with no analog in systems of active particles without internal degrees of freedom.

  19. XUV laser-plasma source based on solid Ar filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peth, Christian; Kalinin, Anton; Barkusky, Frank; Mann, Klaus; Toennies, J Peter; Rusin, Lev Yu

    2007-10-01

    We present a laser driven soft x-ray source based on a novel solid argon filament. The continuously flowing micron-sized filament (diameter approximately 56 microm, flow speed approximately 5 mms) was used as a laser target in order to generate a plasma source of high brightness in the "water window" (2.2-4.4 nm) spectral range. The emission properties of the source were characterized in detail with respect to crucial parameters such as positional and energy stability using an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sensitive pinhole camera and an XUV spectrometer. The results are compared with an argon plasma based on a gas puff target operated under the same experimental conditions showing an increase of the brilliance by a factor of 84. By changing the capillary geometry from a constant diameter to a convergent shape the flow speed of the filament was significantly increased up to 250 mms, facilitating the operation at higher repetition rates.

  20. On the association of magnetic clouds with disappearing filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.M.; Hildner, E.

    1986-01-01

    We present evidence that an interplanetary magnetic cloud preceding an interaction region, observed at earth January 24, 1974, is associated with the eruptive filament or disparition brusque (DB) near central meridian on January 18. The DB also was associated with a long-decay soft X ray transient (LDE) and a long-duration gradual-rise-and-fall (GRF) radio burst. To assess whether magnetic clouds are generally associated with DBs, we present results from statistical testing of the relation of 33 magnetic clouds (and 33 control samples without magnetic clouds) to disappearing filaments near central meridian (approx. 99% confidence. There is a suggestion that clouds following shocks, probably launched at times of solar flares, are not as strongly associated with disappearing filaments as are clouds launched less violently

  1. Ultra small angle neutron scattering from superconducting filament structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amenitsch, H.

    1999-01-01

    With a perfect crystal camera, ultra small-angle scattering measurements were performed to investigate the internal diffusion process of tin inside a superconducting multi-filament wire caused by a temperature treatment. Commercially available Nb 3 Sn superconducting multi-filament wires were treated at 700 C with varying ageing times up to 144 h. A theoretical model taking into account the geometrical form, the size distribution, the interference term and the multiple scattering has been developed to understand and to describe the small angle diffraction pattern. Additionally, the diffusion of H and D into the filament wires was used to vary the scattering length density inside the wires. The results show a direct relationship between the different technological treatments and the characteristic small-angle scattering parameters, like Guinier radius and small-angle scattering probability. (orig.) [de

  2. Self-Structured Conductive Filament Nanoheater for Chalcogenide Phase Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Byoung Kuk; Byun, Myunghwan; Kim, Seungjun; Lee, Keon Jae

    2015-06-23

    Ge2Sb2Te5-based phase-change memories (PCMs), which undergo fast and reversible switching between amorphous and crystalline structural transformation, are being utilized for nonvolatile data storage. However, a critical obstacle is the high programming current of the PCM cell, resulting from the limited pattern size of the optical lithography-based heater. Here, we suggest a facile and scalable strategy of utilizing self-structured conductive filament (CF) nanoheaters for Joule heating of chalcogenide materials. This CF nanoheater can replace the lithographical-patterned conventional resistor-type heater. The sub-10 nm contact area between the CF and the phase-change material achieves significant reduction of the reset current. In particular, the PCM cell with a single Ni filament nanoheater can be operated at an ultralow writing current of 20 μA. Finally, phase-transition behaviors through filament-type nanoheaters were directly observed by using transmission electron microscopy.

  3. Chemical Strategies for the Covalent Modification of Filamentous Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Francis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically filamentous bacteriophage have been known to be the workhorse of phage display due to their ability to link genotype to phenotype. More recently, the filamentous phage scaffold has proved to be powerful outside the realms of phage display technology in fields such as molecular imaging, cancer research and materials and vaccine development. The ability of the virion to serve as a platform for a variety of applications heavily relies on the functionalization of the phage coat proteins with a wide variety of functionalities. Genetic modification of the coat proteins has been the most widely used strategy for functionalizing the virion; however complementary chemical modification strategies can help to diversify the range of materials that can be developed. This review emphasizes the recent advances that have been made in the chemical modification of filamentous phage as well as some of the challenges that are involved functionalizing the virion.

  4. The versatility of hot-filament activated chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Lothar; Hoefer, Markus; Kroeger, Roland

    2006-01-01

    In the field of activated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polycrystalline diamond films, hot-filament activation (HF-CVD) is widely used for applications where large deposition areas are needed or three-dimensional substrates have to be coated. We have developed processes for the deposition of conductive, boron-doped diamond films as well as for tribological crystalline diamond coatings on deposition areas up to 50 cm x 100 cm. Such multi-filament processes are used to produce diamond electrodes for advanced electrochemical processes or large batches of diamond-coated tools and parts, respectively. These processes demonstrate the high degree of uniformity and reproducibility of hot-filament CVD. The usability of hot-filament CVD for diamond deposition on three-dimensional substrates is well known for CVD diamond shaft tools. We also develop interior diamond coatings for drawing dies, nozzles, and thread guides. Hot-filament CVD also enables the deposition of diamond film modifications with tailored properties. In order to adjust the surface topography to specific applications, we apply processes for smooth, fine-grained or textured diamond films for cutting tools and tribological applications. Rough diamond is employed for grinding applications. Multilayers of fine-grained and coarse-grained diamond have been developed, showing increased shock resistance due to reduced crack propagation. Hot-filament CVD is also used for in situ deposition of carbide coatings and diamond-carbide composites, and the deposition of non-diamond, silicon-based films. These coatings are suitable as diffusion barriers and are also applied for adhesion and stress engineering and for semiconductor applications, respectively

  5. [Clinical significance of positive sputum culture for filamentous fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Chun; Liu, Zheng-Yin; Xu, Ying-Chun; Wang, Ai-Xia

    2010-01-26

    To investigate the clinical significance of positive sputum culture for filamentous fungi. The medical data of 140 patients positive for filamentous fungi in sputum culture at Peking Union Medical College Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Based on the diagnostic criteria by European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group, invasive pulmonary fungal infection (IPFI) was diagnosed. The clinical characteristics of cases with and without IPFI were analyzed respectively. Among all 140 cases positive for filamentous fungi in sputum culture, only 22 cases could be diagnosed as IPFI. Two of 22 IPFI cases were confirmed by post-operative pathology, 1 case was confirmed by positive blood culture for filamentous fungi and the remaining 19 cases were diagnosed clinically according to the nature of hosts, characteristics of pulmonary infections and microbiological evidence (positive sputum culture for filamentous fungi, 2 - 5 times for each case). Most of etiological fungi in IPFI patients belonged to Aspergillus. And the identity of isolated fungal strain was mostly one strain for each patient. In IPFI group, patients who had been treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics (100%), steroids (13, 59.1%) or immunosuppressant (7, 31.8%) or who had pulmonary X-ray imaging changes (100%), primary diseases (21, 95.5%), hypoalbuminemia (18, 81.8%) or hemoptysis (10, 45.5%), were significantly more than those in non-IPFI group (66.9%, 34.7%, 18.6%, 79.7%, 72.0%, 45.8% and 4.2% respectively; P significance of positive sputum culture for filamentous fungi are associated with the times of positive culture, the number and species of isolated fungal strains. Meanwhile it is important to determine whether there is IPFI according to the nature and clinical characteristics of patients.

  6. Dual-frequency terahertz emission from splitting filaments induced by lens tilting in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhelin; Chen, Yanping; Yang, Liu; Yuan, Xiaohui; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Xu, Jianqiu; Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Zhengming

    2014-01-01

    Dual-frequency terahertz radiation from air-plasma filaments produced with two-color lasers in air has been demonstrated experimentally. When a focusing lens is tilted for a few degrees, it is shown that the laser filament evolves from a single one to two sub-filaments. Two independent terahertz sources emitted from the sub-filaments with different frequencies and polarizations are identified, where the frequency of terahertz waves from the trailing sub-filament is higher than that from the leading sub-filament.

  7. Development and manufacture of ultra-fine NbTi filament wires at ALSTHOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, G.K.; Laumond, Y.; Sabrie, J.L.; Dubots, P.

    1986-01-01

    Ultra-fine NbTi filament wires have been developed and manufactured by ALSTHOM. It is now possible to produce industrial copper -copper-nickel matrix wires with 0.6 mu m NbTi filaments for use in 50 / 60 Hz machines. Smaller filaments with diameters down to 0.08 mu m have been obtained with 254 100 filament wire samples. Studies are now being carried out on copper matrix conductors to reduce the filament diameter. The first results show that it is possible to obtain submicron filaments even in copper matrix wires

  8. Water quenching of a filament heated to high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, G.; Boulin, A.; Gros D'Aillon, L.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to precise the type of heat transfer which takes place when a filament heated to high temperature is plunged into water. The originality of this study resides in the high temperature and in the study of pressure effects. A scale analysis allows to distinguish between two extreme cases: the strong under-cooling where the main part of the heat lost by the filament is used to heat the water, and the weak under-cooling where the main part of the heat is used to vaporize water. A correlation is proposed for the first case. (J.S.)

  9. Strength analysis of filament-wound composite tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasović Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this work is focused on strength analysis of filament-wound composite tubes made of E glass/polyester under internal pressure. The primary attention of this investigation is to develop a reliable computation procedure for stress, displacement and initial failure analysis of layered composite tubes. For that purpose we have combined the finite element method (FEM with corresponding initial failure criterions. In addition, finite element analyses using commercial code, MSC/NASTRAN, were performed to predict the behavior of filament wound structures. Computation results are compared with experiments. Good agreement between computation and experimental results are obtained.

  10. Wave propagation in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Jan

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids is of interest in many branches of the physical scienses and engineering. This book aims to present an account of the theory of wave propagation in elastic solids. The material is arranged to present an exposition of the basic concepts of mechanical wave propagation within a one-dimensional setting and a discussion of formal aspects of elastodynamic theory in three dimensions, followed by chapters expounding on typical wave propagation phenomena, such as radiation, reflection, refraction, propagation in waveguides, and diffraction. The treat

  11. Avalanche dynamics of elastic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Slowly driven elastic interfaces, such as domain walls in dirty magnets, contact lines wetting a nonhomogeneous substrate, or cracks in brittle disordered material proceed via intermittent motion, called avalanches. Here we develop a field-theoretic treatment to calculate, from first principles, the space-time statistics of instantaneous velocities within an avalanche. For elastic interfaces at (or above) their (internal) upper critical dimension d≥d(uc) (d(uc)=2,4 respectively for long-ranged and short-ranged elasticity) we show that the field theory for the center of mass reduces to the motion of a point particle in a random-force landscape, which is itself a random walk [Alessandro, Beatrice, Bertotti, and Montorsi (ABBM) model]. Furthermore, the full spatial dependence of the velocity correlations is described by the Brownian-force model (BFM) where each point of the interface sees an independent Brownian-force landscape. Both ABBM and BFM can be solved exactly in any dimension d (for monotonous driving) by summing tree graphs, equivalent to solving a (nonlinear) instanton equation. We focus on the limit of slow uniform driving. This tree approximation is the mean-field theory (MFT) for realistic interfaces in short-ranged disorder, up to the renormalization of two parameters at d=d(uc). We calculate a number of observables of direct experimental interest: Both for the center of mass, and for a given Fourier mode q, we obtain various correlations and probability distribution functions (PDF's) of the velocity inside an avalanche, as well as the avalanche shape and its fluctuations (second shape). Within MFT we find that velocity correlations at nonzero q are asymmetric under time reversal. Next we calculate, beyond MFT, i.e., including loop corrections, the one-time PDF of the center-of-mass velocity u[over ·] for dimension delasticity) and a=1-4/9(2-d)+... (long-ranged elasticity). We show how the dynamical theory recovers the avalanche-size distribution

  12. Material variability in elastic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riou, B.; Sperandio, M.; Guinovart, J.

    1997-01-01

    The structures of Fast Reactors (FRs) are subjected to high temperatures and their design is checked mainly against elastic rules. The aim of this paper is to study the influence of uncertainties in material properties on creep-fatigue assessment according to the elastic route of the RCC-MR code, so as to evaluate the subsequent margins. This work has been conducted by FRAMATOME, in cooperation with GEC, NNC and SIEMENS, in the frame of the activities of the Working Group on Codes and standards of DG XI/C (Nuclear Safety of Installations). The material considered is the 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel (RCC-MR 1S type material). The work is divided into two phases: the first one consists of the identification of the scatterband of material properties used in the elastic creep-fatigue assessment route of the RCC-MR code and the second of the study of the influence of the scatter on the results of elastic calculations and creep-fatigue assessment, with the aim to evaluate the difference in lifetime as a function of the set of material properties used and the relative importance of each material property. The latter will be based on one example of application typical of FRs structure. The example chosen consists of a plate to shell junction subjected to a thermal transient. Calculations are carried out using design material properties, mean material properties and properties leading to minimum and maximum life duration. Results of creep-fatigue analyses with material properties leading to minimum life duration are shown to be similar to those with design material properties, giving results of the same order to magnitude. Results with mean material properties and properties leading to maximum life duration exhibit significant margins compared to design analyses. Sensitivity analyses carried out on the basis of the maximum and minimum material property values show that properties which are the most significant for creep-fatigue assessment are the S r curves, the K s

  13. Elastic properties of spherically anisotropic piezoelectric composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    En-Bo, Wei; Guo-Qing, Gu; Ying-Ming, Poon

    2010-01-01

    Effective elastic properties of spherically anisotropic piezoelectric composites, whose spherically anisotropic piezoelectric inclusions are embedded in an infinite non-piezoelectric matrix, are theoretically investigated. Analytical solutions for the elastic displacements and the electric potentials under a uniform external strain are derived exactly. Taking into account of the coupling effects of elasticity, permittivity and piezoelectricity, the formula is derived for estimating the effective elastic properties based on the average field theory in the dilute limit. An elastic response mechanism is revealed, in which the effective elastic properties increase as inclusion piezoelectric properties increase and inclusion dielectric properties decrease. Moreover, a piezoelectric response mechanism, of which the effective piezoelectric response vanishes due to the symmetry of spherically anisotropic composite, is also disclosed. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  14. Surface elastic properties in silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Claudio; Giordano, Stefano; Colombo, Luciano

    2017-09-01

    The elastic behavior of the external surface of a solid body plays a key role in nanomechanical phenomena. While bulk elasticity enjoys the benefits of a robust theoretical understanding, many surface elasticity features remain unexplored: some of them are here addressed by blending together continuum elasticity and atomistic simulations. A suitable readdressing of the surface elasticity theory allows to write the balance equations in arbitrary curvilinear coordinates and to investigate the dependence of the surface elastic parameters on the mean and Gaussian curvatures of the surface. In particular, we predict the radial strain induced by surface effects in spherical and cylindrical silicon nanoparticles and provide evidence that the surface parameters are nearly independent of curvatures and, therefore, of the surface conformation.

  15. Effect of 17β-estradiol on the elasticity of MCF-7 cells by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen

    2016-10-01

    Estrogen plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer, and it promotes proliferation, invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells. In this paper, we investigated the effect of estrogen on the elasticity of breast cancer cells. 17β-estradiol, one of the most active estrogens in the human body was applied to MCF-7 living cells and the elasticity of breast cancer cells was measured by atomic force microscopy. The force spectroscopy was performed on the center of the cell and the Hertz model was used to calculate the elasticity modulus. Furthermore, the confocal fluorescence imaging was taken to observe the effect of 17β-estradiol on the actin distribution in the cells. The results show that the elasticity of the cells decreases rapidly after the addition of 17β-estradiol, which indicates that the cells appear softer for 17β-estradiol's treatment. From the confocal imaging, it can be observed that the actin filament rearranged for 17β-estradiol's treatment, which may lead to the alteration of the cell elasticity. Our findings may deepen our understanding on the rapid effect of 17β-estradiol to MCF-7 cells.

  16. Cell Elasticity Is Regulated by the Tropomyosin Isoform Composition of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Iman; Heu, Celine; Cheng, Hong; Freittag, Hannah; Desouza, Melissa; Stehn, Justine R.; Bryce, Nicole S.; Whan, Renee M.; Hardeman, Edna C.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm), in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin) pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments. PMID:25978408

  17. Cell elasticity is regulated by the tropomyosin isoform composition of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Jalilian

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm, in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments.

  18. Elasticities of Turkish Exports and Imports

    OpenAIRE

    Ayla Ogus; Niloufer Sohrabji

    2009-01-01

    The Turkish current account has been exploding in the last few years leading to concerns of a crisis. One of the primary factors identified in the rising deficits is the appreciating lira. In addition, income elasticity of exports and imports can also shed light on continuing trade deficits. In this paper we analyze exchange rate and income elasticity of Turkish imports and exports. We find a significant gap between domestic and foreign income elasticities (for exports and imports respectivel...

  19. Elastic properties of graphite and interstitial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayasse, J.-B.

    1977-01-01

    The graphite elastic constants C 33 and C 44 , reflecting the interaction of the graphitic planes, were experimentally measured as a function of irradiation and temperature. A model of non-central strength atomic interaction was established to explain the experimental results obtained. This model is valid at zero temperature. The temperature dependence of the elastic properties was analyzed. The influence of the elastic property variations on the specific heat of the lattice at very low temperature was investigated [fr

  20. Elegent -- an elastic event generator

    CERN Document Server

    Kašpar, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Although elastic scattering of nucleons may look like a simple process, it presents a long-lasting challenge for theory. Due to missing hard energy scale, the perturbative QCD can not be applied. Instead, many phenomenological/theoretical models have emerged. In this paper we present a unified implementation of some of the most prominent models in a C++ library, moreover extended to account for effects of the electromagnetic interaction. The library is complemented with a number of utilities. For instance, programs to sample many distributions of interest in four-momentum transfer squared, t, impact parameter, b, and collision energy sqrt(s). These distributions at ISR, SppS, RHIC, Tevatron and LHC energies are available for download from the project web site. Both in the form of ROOT files and PDF figures providing comparisons among the models. The package includes also a tool for Monte-Carlo generation of elastic scattering events, which can easily be embedded in any other program framework.

  1. Continuum mechanics elasticity, plasticity, viscoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Dill, Ellis H

    2006-01-01

    FUNDAMENTALS OF CONTINUUM MECHANICSMaterial ModelsClassical Space-TimeMaterial BodiesStrainRate of StrainCurvilinear Coordinate SystemsConservation of MassBalance of MomentumBalance of EnergyConstitutive EquationsThermodynamic DissipationObjectivity: Invariance for Rigid MotionsColeman-Mizel ModelFluid MechanicsProblems for Chapter 1BibliographyNONLINEAR ELASTICITYThermoelasticityMaterial SymmetriesIsotropic MaterialsIncompressible MaterialsConjugate Measures of Stress and StrainSome Symmetry GroupsRate Formulations for Elastic MaterialsEnergy PrinciplesGeometry of Small DeformationsLinear ElasticitySpecial Constitutive Models for Isotropic MaterialsMechanical Restrictions on the Constitutive RelationsProblems for Chapter 2BibliographyLINEAR ELASTICITYBasic EquationsPlane StrainPlane StressProperties of SolutionsPotential EnergySpecial Matrix NotationThe Finite Element Method of SolutionGeneral Equations for an Assembly of ElementsFinite Element Analysis for Large DeformationsProblems for Chapter 3Bibliograph...

  2. Hummingbird tongues are elastic micropumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Guevara, Alejandro; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Rubega, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Pumping is a vital natural process, imitated by humans for thousands of years. We demonstrate that a hitherto undocumented mechanism of fluid transport pumps nectar onto the hummingbird tongue. Using high-speed cameras, we filmed the tongue–fluid interaction in 18 hummingbird species, from seven of the nine main hummingbird clades. During the offloading of the nectar inside the bill, hummingbirds compress their tongues upon extrusion; the compressed tongue remains flattened until it contacts the nectar. After contact with the nectar surface, the tongue reshapes filling entirely with nectar; we did not observe the formation of menisci required for the operation of capillarity during this process. We show that the tongue works as an elastic micropump; fluid at the tip is driven into the tongue's grooves by forces resulting from re-expansion of a collapsed section. This work falsifies the long-standing idea that capillarity is an important force filling hummingbird tongue grooves during nectar feeding. The expansive filling mechanism we report in this paper recruits elastic recovery properties of the groove walls to load nectar into the tongue an order of magnitude faster than capillarity could. Such fast filling allows hummingbirds to extract nectar at higher rates than predicted by capillarity-based foraging models, in agreement with their fast licking rates. PMID:26290074

  3. Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses of different wavelengths in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-17

    Jan 17, 2017 ... Hence, many researchers choose a noble gas such as argon as the propagating medium [21–25]. In this paper, we adopt incident laser pulses hav- ing three different wavelengths to study the filament in argon. The content is organized as follows: Section 2 introduces the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for.

  4. Monetary value of the impacts of filamentous green algae on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents estimates of the monetary value of the impact of eutrophication (algae) on commercial agriculture in two different catchments in South Africa. A production function approach is applied to estimate the monetary value of the impact of filamentous green algae on commercial agriculture in the Dwars River, ...

  5. Thermal Resonator Experiments Using A Magnetized Electron Temperature Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbashewski, Scott; Sydora, Richard; van Compernolle, Bart; Poulos, Matt; Morales, George

    2017-10-01

    We present results from basic heat transport experiments of a magnetized electron temperature filament that behaves as a thermal resonator. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device at UCLA. A CeB6 cathode injects low energy electrons along a magnetic field into the center of a pre-existing plasma forming a hot electron filament embedded in a colder plasma. Previous work reported that the filament exhibits spontaneous excitation of thermal waves and temperature gradient driven drift-Alfvén waves that enhance cross-field transport. We have added to the cathode bias a series of low amplitude pulse trains tuned to the thermal resonance of the filament that externally excite thermal waves. Langmuir probe measurements allow for the determination of the phase velocity and radial decay length of the thermal mode. These results are used to compute the axial and transverse thermal conductivities of the magnetized plasma and compare with those given by classical theory. Agreement of the axial conductivity provides a measurement of electron temperature; deviation of the transverse conductivity suggests anomalous transport or non-uniform excitation. Work Supported by NSERC, Canada and NSF-DOE, USA.

  6. Dynamical origin of non-thermal states in galactic filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cintio, Pierfrancesco; Gupta, Shamik; Casetti, Lapo

    2018-03-01

    Observations strongly suggest that filaments in galactic molecular clouds are in a non-thermal state. As a simple model of a filament, we study a two-dimensional system of self-gravitating point particles by means of numerical simulations of the dynamics, with various methods: direct N-body integration of the equations of motion, particle-in-cell simulations, and a recently developed numerical scheme that includes multiparticle collisions in a particle-in-cell approach. Studying the collapse of Gaussian overdensities, we find that after the damping of virial oscillations the system settles in a non-thermal steady state whose radial density profile is similar to the observed ones, thus suggesting a dynamical origin of the non-thermal states observed in real filaments. Moreover, for sufficiently cold collapses, the density profiles are anticorrelated with the kinetic temperature, i.e. exhibit temperature inversion, again a feature that has been found in some observations of filaments. The same happens in the state reached after a strong perturbation of an initially isothermal cylinder. Finally, we discuss our results in the light of recent findings in other contexts (including non-astrophysical ones) and argue that the same kind of non-thermal states may be observed in any physical system with long-range interactions.

  7. Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunker, Rita; Røy, Hans; Kamp, Anja

    2011-01-01

    The large sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., live on the oxidation of sulfide with oxygen or nitrate, but avoid high concentrations of both sulfide and oxygen. As gliding filaments, they rely on reversals in the gliding direction to find their preferred environment, the oxygen–sulfide interface.We ...... Beggiatoa accumulate high nitrate concentrations in internal vacuoles as an alternative electron acceptor to oxygen....

  8. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in

  9. Measurement of Reversed Extension Flow using the Filament Stretch Rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Nielsen, Jens Kromann

    2008-01-01

    ). The latter is applicable on highly extensible elastomers, whereas in LAOE measurements on liquids (including polymer melts) the LAOE flow needs to be imposed upon a constant strain rate uniaxial elongation. The used Filament Stretching Rheometer allows measurements on polymeric fluids (including polymeric...... melts) from room temperature until 200 degrees C....

  10. Filament identification and dominance of Eikelboom Type 0092 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order of prevalence, the five most common dominant filament species in 96 activated sludge samples were: Eikelboom Type 0092, Eikelboom Type 1851, nocardioforms, Microthrix parvicella and Eikelboom Type 021N. In order to compile a statistically significant database, it is recommended that an extensive nationwide ...

  11. A model of filamentous cyanobacteria leading to reticulate pattern formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamulonis, C.; Kaandorp, J.

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena, has been shown to produce reticulate patterns that are thought to be the result of its gliding motility. Similar fossilized structures found in the geological record constitute some of the earliest signs of life on Earth. It is difficult to tie these

  12. Sensitivity of RF-driven Plasma Filaments to Trace Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin, M. J.; Czarnocki, C. J.; Czarnocki, K.; Zweben, S. J.; Zwicker, A.

    2011-10-01

    Filamentary structures have been observed in many types of plasma discharges in both natural (e.g. lightning) and industrial systems (e.g. dielectric barrier discharges). Recent progress has been made in characterizing these structures, though various aspects of their essential physics remain unclear. A common example of this phenomenon can be found within a toy plasma globe (or plasma ball), wherein a primarily neon gas mixture near atmospheric pressure clearly and aesthetically displays filamentation. Recent work has provided the first characterization of these plasma globe filaments [Campanell et al., Physics of Plasmas 2010], where it was noticed that discharges of pure gases tend not to produce filaments. We have extended this initial work to investigate in greater detail the dependence of trace gases on filamentation within a primarily Neon discharge. Our preliminary results using a custom globe apparatus will be presented, along with some discussion of voltage dependencies. Newly supported by the NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering.

  13. Organic acid production in Aspergillus niger and other filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odoni, Dorett I.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to increase the understanding of organic acid production in Aspergillus niger and other filamentous fungi, with the ultimate purpose to improve A. niger as biotechnological production host. In Chapter 1, the use of microbial cell-factories for the

  14. Propulsion by passive filaments and active flagella near boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2010-10-01

    Confinement and wall effects are known to affect the kinematics and propulsive characteristics of swimming microorganisms. When a solid body is dragged through a viscous fluid at constant velocity, the presence of a wall increases fluid drag, and thus the net force required to maintain speed has to increase. In contrast, recent optical trapping experiments have revealed that the propulsive force generated by human spermatozoa is decreased by the presence of boundaries. Here, we use a series of simple models to analytically elucidate the propulsive effects of a solid boundary on passively actuated filaments and model flagella. For passive flexible filaments actuated periodically at one end, the presence of the wall is shown to increase the propulsive forces generated by the filaments in the case of displacement-driven actuation, while it decreases the force in the case of force-driven actuation. In the case of active filaments as models for eukaryotic flagella, we demonstrate that the manner in which a solid wall affects propulsion cannot be known a priori, but is instead a nontrivial function of the flagellum frequency, wavelength, its material characteristics, the manner in which the molecular motors self-organize to produce oscillations (prescribed activity model or self-organized axonemal beating model), and the boundary conditions applied experimentally to the tethered flagellum. In particular, we show that in some cases, the increase in fluid friction induced by the wall can lead to a change in the waveform expressed by the flagella, which results in a decrease in their propulsive force.

  15. Filament growth and resistive switching in hafnium oxide memristive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkmann, Sven; Kaiser, Jan; Wenger, Christian; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2018-03-30

    We report on the resistive switching in TiN/Ti/HfO 2 /TiN memristive devices. A resistive switching model for the device is proposed, taking into account important experimental and theoretical findings. The proposed switching model is validated using 2D and 3D kinetic Monte Carlo simulation models. The models are consistently coupled to the electric field and different current transport mechanisms as direct tunneling, trap assisted tunneling (TAT), ohmic transport, and transport through a quantum point contact (QPC) have been considered. We find that the numerical results are in excellent agreement with experimentally obtained data. Important device parameters, which are difficult or impossible to measure in experiments, are calculated. This includes the shape of the conductive filament, width of filament constriction, current density, and temperature distribution. To obtain insights in the operation of the device, consecutive cycles have been simulated. Furthermore, the switching kinetic for the forming and set process for different applied voltages is investigated. Finally, the influence of an annealing process on the filament growth, especially on the filament growth direction, is discussed.

  16. Tesla coil discharges guided by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    OpenAIRE

    Brelet, Yohann; Houard, Aurélien; Arantchouk, Leonid; Forestier, Benjamin; Liu, Yi; Prade, Bernard; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A Tesla coil generator was designed to produce high voltage pulses oscillating at 100 kHz synchronisable with a nanosecond temporal jitter. Using this compact high voltage generator, we demonstrate reproducible meter long discharges in air at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Triggering and guiding of the discharges are performed in air by femtosecond laser filaments.

  17. Filamentous phage associated with recent pandemic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    OpenAIRE

    Iida, T.; Hattori, A.; Tagomori, K.; Nasu, H.; Naim, R.; Honda, T.

    2001-01-01

    A group of pandemic strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus has recently appeared in Asia and North America. We demonstrate that a filamentous phage is specifically associated with the pandemic V. parahaemolyticus strains. An open reading frame unique to the phage is a useful genetic marker to identify these strains.

  18. Calorie restriction in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Slakhorst, S Marijke; Koopmanschap, A Bertha; Ikink, Gerjon J; Debets, Alfons J M; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    Calorie restriction (CR) is a regimen of reduced food intake that, although the underlying mechanism is unknown, in many organisms leads to life span extension. Podospora anserina is one of the few known ageing filamentous fungi and the ageing process and concomitant degeneration of mitochondria

  19. Spin alignment of dark matter haloes in filaments and walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, M. A.; Weygaert, R. van de; Jones, B. J. T.; Hulst, T. van der

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter haloes are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host

  20. Spin alignment of dark matter halos in filaments and walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; van der Hulst, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter halos are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host structures. The

  1. Filamentous fungi as cell factories for heterologous protein production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, P.J.; Biezen, N. van; Conesa, A.; Albers, A.; Mangnus, J.; Hondel, C. van den

    2002-01-01

    Filamentous fungi have been used as sources of metabolites and enzymes for centuries. For about two decades, molecular genetic tools have enabled us to use these organisms to express extra copies of both endogenous and exogenous genes. This review of current practice reveals that molecular tools

  2. Solar Tornadoes Triggered by Interaction between Filaments and EUV Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Suli [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yan, Xiaoli [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Xue, Jianchao, E-mail: hdchen@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-05-20

    We investigate the formations and evolutions of two successive solar tornadoes in/near AR 12297 during 2015 March 19–20. Recurrent EUV jets close to two filaments were detected along a large-scale coronal loop prior to the appearances of the tornadoes. Under the disturbances from the activities, the filaments continually ascended and finally interacted with the loops tracked by the jets. Subsequently, the structures of the filaments and the loop were merged together, probably via magnetic reconnections, and formed tornado-like structures with a long spiral arm. Our observations suggest that solar tornadoes can be triggered by the interaction between filaments and nearby coronal jets, which has rarely been reported before. At the earlier development phase of the first tornado, about 30 small-scale sub-jets appeared in the tornado’s arm, accompanied by local EUV brightenings. They have an ejection direction approximately vertical to the axis of the arm and a typical maximum speed of ∼280 km s{sup −1}. During the ruinations of the two tornadoes, fast plasma outflows from the strong EUV brightenings inside tornadoes are observed, in company with the untangling or unwinding of the highly twisted tornado structures. These observational features indicate that self reconnections probably occurred between the tangled magnetic fields of the tornadoes and resulted in the rapid disintegrations and disappearances of the tornadoes. According to the reconnection theory, we also derive the field strength of the tornado core to be ∼8 G.

  3. Solar Tornadoes Triggered by Interaction between Filaments and EUV Jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Suli; Yan, Xiaoli; Xue, Jianchao

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the formations and evolutions of two successive solar tornadoes in/near AR 12297 during 2015 March 19–20. Recurrent EUV jets close to two filaments were detected along a large-scale coronal loop prior to the appearances of the tornadoes. Under the disturbances from the activities, the filaments continually ascended and finally interacted with the loops tracked by the jets. Subsequently, the structures of the filaments and the loop were merged together, probably via magnetic reconnections, and formed tornado-like structures with a long spiral arm. Our observations suggest that solar tornadoes can be triggered by the interaction between filaments and nearby coronal jets, which has rarely been reported before. At the earlier development phase of the first tornado, about 30 small-scale sub-jets appeared in the tornado’s arm, accompanied by local EUV brightenings. They have an ejection direction approximately vertical to the axis of the arm and a typical maximum speed of ∼280 km s −1 . During the ruinations of the two tornadoes, fast plasma outflows from the strong EUV brightenings inside tornadoes are observed, in company with the untangling or unwinding of the highly twisted tornado structures. These observational features indicate that self reconnections probably occurred between the tangled magnetic fields of the tornadoes and resulted in the rapid disintegrations and disappearances of the tornadoes. According to the reconnection theory, we also derive the field strength of the tornado core to be ∼8 G.

  4. Solar Tornadoes Triggered by Interaction between Filaments and EUV Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Suli; Yan, Xiaoli; Xue, Jianchao

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the formations and evolutions of two successive solar tornadoes in/near AR 12297 during 2015 March 19-20. Recurrent EUV jets close to two filaments were detected along a large-scale coronal loop prior to the appearances of the tornadoes. Under the disturbances from the activities, the filaments continually ascended and finally interacted with the loops tracked by the jets. Subsequently, the structures of the filaments and the loop were merged together, probably via magnetic reconnections, and formed tornado-like structures with a long spiral arm. Our observations suggest that solar tornadoes can be triggered by the interaction between filaments and nearby coronal jets, which has rarely been reported before. At the earlier development phase of the first tornado, about 30 small-scale sub-jets appeared in the tornado’s arm, accompanied by local EUV brightenings. They have an ejection direction approximately vertical to the axis of the arm and a typical maximum speed of ˜280 km s-1. During the ruinations of the two tornadoes, fast plasma outflows from the strong EUV brightenings inside tornadoes are observed, in company with the untangling or unwinding of the highly twisted tornado structures. These observational features indicate that self reconnections probably occurred between the tangled magnetic fields of the tornadoes and resulted in the rapid disintegrations and disappearances of the tornadoes. According to the reconnection theory, we also derive the field strength of the tornado core to be ˜8 G.

  5. Filamentation of diamond nanoparticles treated in underwater corona discharge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirásek, Vít; Lukeš, Petr; Kozak, Halyna; Artemenko, Anna; Člupek, Martin; Čermák, Jan; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kromka, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2016), 2352-2360 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01687S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14011 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : nanodiamonds * pulsed streamer corona discharge * filamentation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  6. Protein secretion in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, Xavier Oswin

    2008-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are multicellular eukaryotic organisms, which represent a separate taxonomic group organisms within the fungal kingdom, apart from the yeasts. These fungi always need a substrate to grow on, this can be living or dead material. Fungi possess the capacity to secrete high levels of

  7. Transportation of Nanoscale Cargoes by Myosin Propelled Actin Filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persson, Malin; Gullberg, Maria; Tolf, Conny; Lindberg, A. Michael; Mansson, Alf; Kocer, Armagan

    2013-01-01

    Myosin II propelled actin filaments move ten times faster than kinesin driven microtubules and are thus attractive candidates as cargo-transporting shuttles in motor driven lab-on-a-chip devices. In addition, actomyosin-based transportation of nanoparticles is useful in various fundamental studies.

  8. Evaluation of filamentous green algae as feedstocks for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yonggang; Cui, Binjie; Wang, Hui; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-11-01

    Compared with unicellular microalgae, filamentous algae have high resistance to grazer-predation and low-cost recovery in large-scale production. Green algae, as the most diverse group of algae, included numerous filamentous genera and species. In this study, records of filamentous genera and species in green algae were firstly censused and classified. Then, seven filamentous strains subordinated in different genera were cultivated in bubbled-column to investigate their growth rate and energy molecular (lipid and starch) capacity. Four strains including Stigeoclonium sp., Oedogonium nodulosum, Hormidium sp. and Zygnema extenue were screened out due to their robust growth. And they all could accumulate triacylglycerols and starch in their biomass, but with different capacity. After nitrogen starvation, Hormidium sp. and Oedogonium nodulosum respectively exhibited high capacity of lipid (45.38% in dry weight) and starch (46.19% in dry weight) accumulation, which could be of high potential as feedstocks for biodiesel and bioethanol production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Viruses: incredible nanomachines. New advances with filamentous phages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemminga, M.A.; Vos, W.L.; Nazarov, P.V.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Wolfs, C.J.A.M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Stopar, D.

    2010-01-01

    During recent decades, bacteriophages have been at the cutting edge of new developments in molecular biology, biophysics, and, more recently, bionanotechnology. In particular filamentous viruses, for example bacteriophage M13, have a virion architecture that enables precision building of ordered and

  10. Isolation and cultivation of filamentous bacteria implicated in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Filamentous bacteria have long been associated with activated sludge bulking and foaming and are known to be the main cause of this problem. Chemical control methods such as chlorination and the use of hydrogen peroxide have been, and still are, used to cure bulking and foaming but are only effective as interim ...

  11. Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal by filamentous bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological phosphorus removal has gained attention because the condition of wastewater is manipulated in order to facilitate nutrient removal by the microbial communities in the wastewater. It has been reported that filamentous bacteria are capable of removing P at a similar or higher rate to that of heterotrophic bacteria.

  12. Decidable and undecidable arithmetic functions in actin filament networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is very sensitive to its environment, and reacts to stimuli with appropriate motions. Both the sensory and motor stages of these reactions are explained by hydrodynamic processes, based on fluid dynamics, with the participation of actin filament networks. This paper is devoted to actin filament networks as a computational medium. The point is that actin filaments, with contributions from many other proteins like myosin, are sensitive to extracellular stimuli (attractants as well as repellents), and appear and disappear at different places in the cell to change aspects of the cell structure—e.g. its shape. By assembling and disassembling actin filaments, some unicellular organisms, like Amoeba proteus, can move in response to various stimuli. As a result, these organisms can be considered a simple reversible logic gate—extracellular signals being its inputs and motions its outputs. In this way, we can implement various logic gates on amoeboid behaviours. These networks can embody arithmetic functions within p-adic valued logic. Furthermore, within these networks we can define the so-called diagonalization for deducing undecidable arithmetic functions.

  13. Nonlinear Loading-Rate-Dependent Force Response of Individual Vimentin Intermediate Filaments to Applied Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Block, Johanna; Witt, Hannes; Candelli, Andrea; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Janshoff, Andreas; Koester, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells are to a great extent determined by the cytoskeleton, a composite network of different filamentous proteins. Among these, intermediate filaments (IFs) are exceptional in their molecular architecture and mechanical properties. Here we directly record

  14. A Study of Low Density, High Strength High Modulus Filaments and Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexander, J

    1966-01-01

    ...) Multilaminar composites consisting of alternate layers of metal and ceramic. In order to fabricate the filament composites, continuous boron, and batch boron carbide, and silicon carbide filaments were synthesized at GTC...

  15. Local strain exerted on Nb3Sn filaments in an ITER strand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osamura, Kozo; Machiya, Shutaro; Harjo, Stefanus; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Cheggour, Najib; Nijhuis, Arend

    2015-01-01

    As part of an international project to benchmark facilities for measuring the strain dependence of critical current in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Nb 3 Sn strands, direct measurement of local strain exerted on Nb 3 Sn filaments was attempted at cryogenic temperature by means of a pulsed neutron technique. The lattice axial strain increased linearly with a slope close to unity against applied strain, while the thermal axial strain was −0.22% at 8.5 K. As a result, the force-free strain was evaluated to be 0.22–0.23%. This key parameter should provide an accurate estimate of the peak location of critical current versus applied strain. The lattice transverse strain decreased linearly as a function of applied strain with a slope of 0.33–0.34. The lattice strains of the Nb and Cu components were also measured and their behavior was analyzed by computing diffraction elastic moduli based on micromechanics theories. The stress–strain curve calculated according to the rule of mixtures described quite well the macroscopic curve measured for the present ITER Nb 3 Sn strand. (paper)

  16. Large-amplitude Longitudinal Oscillations in a Solar Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Su, Y. N.; Ji, H. S. [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, T. [CAS Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing 100012 (China); Zheng, R. S., E-mail: zhangqm@pmo.ac.cn [Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2017-06-10

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations of a filament observed on 2015 May 3. Located next to active region 12335, the sigmoidal filament was observed by the ground-based H α telescopes from the Global Oscillation Network Group and by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory . The filament oscillations were most probably triggered by the magnetic reconnection in the filament channel, which is characterized by the bidirectional flows, brightenings in EUV and soft X-ray, and magnetic cancellation in the photosphere. The directions of oscillations have angles of 4°–36° with respect to the filament axis. The whole filament did not oscillate in phase as a rigid body. Meanwhile, the oscillation periods (3100–4400 s) have a spatial dependence, implying that the curvature radii ( R ) of the magnetic dips are different at different positions. The values of R are estimated to be 69.4–133.9 Mm, and the minimum transverse magnetic field of the dips is estimated to be 15 G. The amplitudes of S5-S8 grew with time, while the amplitudes of S9-S14 damped with time. The oscillation amplitudes range from a few to ten Mm, and the maximum velocity can reach 30 km s{sup −1}. Interestingly, the filament experienced mass drainage southward at a speed of ∼27 km s{sup −1}. The oscillations continued after the mass drainage and lasted for more than 11 hr. After the mass drainage, the oscillation phases did not change much. The periods of S5-S8 decreased, while the periods of S9-S14 increased. The amplitudes of S5-S8 damped with time, while the amplitudes of S9-S14 grew. Most of the damping (growing) ratios are between −9 and 14. We offer a schematic cartoon to explain the complex behaviors of oscillations by introducing thread-thread interaction.

  17. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoda, Hiroki; Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Katayama, Eisaku; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Haruo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. → We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. → We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. → The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. → The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  18. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoda, Hiroki [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganeishi, Tokyo184-8588 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganeishi, Tokyo184-8588 (Japan); Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Katayama, Eisaku [Graduate School of Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki [Department of Biosciences, School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Utsunomiya, Tochigiken 320-8551 (Japan); Akimoto, Tsuyoshi [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Sugi, Haruo, E-mail: sugi@kyf.biglobe.ne.jp [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. {yields} We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. {yields} We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. {yields} The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. {yields} The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  19. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PALLADIN’S ACTIN BINDING DOMAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Moriah R.; Dixon, Richard D.S.; Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Murphy, Grant S.; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Beam, Matthew T.; Srinath, Pavan; Patel, Julie; Mohiuddin, Jahan; Otey, Carol A.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the NMR structure of the actin-binding domain contained in the cell adhesion protein palladin. Previously we demonstrated that one of the immunoglobulin domains of palladin (Ig3) is both necessary and sufficient for direct F-actin binding in vitro. In this study, we identify two basic patches on opposite faces of Ig3 that are critical for actin binding and crosslinking. Sedimentation equilibrium assays indicate that the Ig3 domain of palladin does not self-associate. These combined data are consistent with an actin crosslinking mechanism that involves concurrent attachment of two actin filaments by a single palladin molecule by an electrostatic mechanism. Palladin mutations that disrupt actin binding show altered cellular distributions and morphology of actin in cells, revealing a functional requirement for the interaction between palladin and actin in vivo. PMID:23806659

  20. Elastic moduli and elastic anisotropy of cold sprayed metallic coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seiner, Hanuš; Cizek, J.; Sedlák, Petr; Huang, R.; Cupera, J.; Dlouhý, I.; Landa, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, April (2016), s. 342-347 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13616S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-35890S Grant - others:NETME Centre Plus - národní program udržitelnosti(CZ) LO1202 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : kinetic spray * CGDS * elastic properties * metals and alloys * deposition * resonant ultrasound spectroscopy Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0257897216301165/1-s2.0-S0257897216301165-main.pdf?_tid=1083617a-017f-11e6-92e7-00000aacb361&acdnat=1460555773_2e80d3df20843f3af649bf3ac71c8844

  1. Storage and recovery of elastic potential energy powers ballistic prey capture in toads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, A Kristopher; Monroy, Jenna A; Pilarski, Jason Q; Zepnewski, Eric D; Pierotti, David J; Nishikawa, Kiisa C

    2006-07-01

    Ballistic tongue projection in toads is a remarkably fast and powerful movement. The goals of this study were to: (1) quantify in vivo power output and activity of the depressor mandibulae muscles that are responsible for ballistic mouth opening, which powers tongue projection; (2) quantify the elastic properties of the depressor mandibulae muscles and their series connective tissues using in situ muscle stimulation and force-lever studies; and (3) develop and test an elastic recoil model, based on the observed elastic properties of the depressor mandibulae muscles and series connective tissues, that accounts for displacement, velocity, acceleration and power output during ballistic mouth opening in toads. The results demonstrate that the depressor mandibulae muscles of toads are active for up to 250 ms prior to mouth opening. During this time, strains of up to 21.4% muscle resting length (ML) develop in the muscles and series connective tissues. At maximum isometric force, series connective tissues develop strains up to 14% ML, and the muscle itself develops strains up to 17.5% ML. When the mouth opens rapidly, the peak instantaneous power output of the depressor mandibulae muscles and series connective tissues can reach 9600 W kg(-1). The results suggest that: (1) elastic recoil of muscle itself can contribute significantly to the power of ballistic movements; (2) strain in series elastic elements of the depressor mandibulae muscle is too large to be borne entirely by the cross bridges and the actin-myosin filament lattice; and (3) central nervous control of ballistic tongue projection in toads likely requires the specification of relatively few parameters.

  2. UV/IR Filaments for High Resolution Novel Spectroscopic Interrogation of Plumes on Nuclear Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-16-66 UV/ IR filaments for high resolution novel spectroscopic...by the factor to get the U.S. customary unit. UV/ IR filaments for high resolution novel spectroscopic Interrogation of Plumes on nuclear materials...10 5.1 UV filaments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 5.2 IR filaments

  3. Tissue elasticity regulated tumor gene expression: implication for diagnostic biomarkers of primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long T Vu

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment consists of both physical and chemical factors. Tissue elasticity is one physical factor contributing to the microenvironment of tumor cells. To test the importance of tissue elasticity in cell culture, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET stem cells were cultured on soft polyacrylamide (PAA hydrogel plates that mimics the elasticity of brain tissue compared with PNET on standard polystyrene (PS plates. We report the molecular profiles of PNET grown on either PAA or PS.A whole-genome microarray profile of transcriptional expression between the two culture conditions was performed as a way to probe effects of substrate on cell behavior in culture. The results showed more genes downregulated on PAA compared to PS. This led us to propose microRNA (miRNA silencing as a potential mechanism for downregulation. Bioinformatic analysis predicted a greater number of miRNA binding sites from the 3' UTR of downregulated genes and identified as specific miRNA binding sites that were enriched when cells were grown on PAA-this supports the hypothesis that tissue elasticity plays a role in influencing miRNA expression. Thus, Dicer was examined to determine if miRNA processing was affected by tissue elasticity. Dicer genes were downregulated on PAA and had multiple predicted miRNA binding sites in its 3' UTR that matched the miRNA binding sites found enriched on PAA. Many differentially regulated genes were found to be present on PS but downregulated on PAA were mapped onto intron sequences. This suggests expression of alternative polyadenylation sites within intron regions that provide alternative 3' UTRs and alternative miRNA binding sites. This results in tissue specific transcriptional downregulation of mRNA in humans by miRNA. We propose a mechanism, driven by the physical characteristics of the microenvironment by which downregulation of genes occur. We found that tissue elasticity-mediated cytokines (TGFβ2 and TNFα signaling

  4. Antagonistic interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Sarah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and filamentous cyanobacteria. Here, interactions between the filamentous heterotrophic bacteria Fibrella aestuarina (strain BUZ 2 and Fibrisoma limi (BUZ 3 with an axenic strain of the autotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum (SAG 25.82 were studied in mixed cultures under nutrient rich (carbon source present in medium and poor (carbon source absent in medium conditions. Findings F. aestuarina BUZ 2 significantly reduced the cyanobacterial population whereas F. limi BUZ 3 did not. Physical contact between heterotrophs and autotroph was observed and the cyanobacterial cells showed some level of damage and lysis. Therefore, either contact lysis or entrapment with production of extracellular compounds in close vicinity of host cells could be considered as potential modes of action. The supernatants from pure heterotrophic cultures did not have an effect on Nostoc cultures. However, supernatant from mixed cultures of BUZ 2 and Nostoc had a negative effect on cyanobacterial growth, indicating that the lytic compounds were only produced in the presence of Nostoc. The growth and survival of tested heterotrophs was enhanced by the presence of Nostoc or its metabolites, suggesting that the heterotrophs could utilize the autotrophs and its products as a nutrient source. However, the autotroph could withstand and out-compete the heterotrophs under nutrient poor conditions. Conclusions Our results suggest that the nutrients in cultivation media, which boost or reduce the number of heterotrophs, were the important factor influencing the outcome of the interplay between filamentous heterotrophs and autotrophs. For better understanding of these interactions, additional research is needed. In particular, it is necessary to elucidate the mode of action for lysis by heterotrophs, and the possible defense mechanisms of the autotrophs.

  5. Filamentous fungi: the indeterminate lifestyle and microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, D A; Paschke, M W

    2004-04-01

    The filamentous fungi have dynamic and variable hyphal structures within which cytoplasm can be moved, synthesized, and degraded, in response to changes in environmental conditions, resource availability, and resource distribution. Their study has gone through several phases. In the first phase, direct observation was emphasized without undue concern for interior structures or in the presence of cytoplasm. By the mid-1970s, single biochemical proxies (ergosterol, marker fatty acids, chitin derivatives, etc.) were being used increasingly. The use of these surrogate single measurements continues, in spite of their inability to provide information on the physical structure of the filamentous fungi. Molecular approaches also are being used, primarily through the use of bulk nucleic acid extraction and cloning. Because the sources of the nucleic acids used in such studies usually are not known, taxonomic and phylogenetic information derived by this approach cannot be linked to specific fungal structures. Recently, a greater emphasis has been placed on assessing physical aspects of indeterminate fungal growth, involving the assessment of cytoplasm-filled and evacuated (empty) hyphae. Both of these parameters are important for describing filamentous fungal growth and function. The use of phase contrast microscopy and varied general stains, as well as fluorogenic substrates with observation by epifluorescence microscopy, has made it possible to provide estimates of cytoplasm-filled hyphal lengths. Using this approach, it has been possible to evaluate the responses of the indeterminate fungal community to changes in environmental conditions, including soil management. It is now possible to obtain molecular information from individual bacteria and fungal structures (hyphae, spores, fruiting bodies) recovered from environments, making it possible to link individual fungal structures with their taxonomic and phylogenetic information. In addition, this information can be

  6. Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) interacts with neurofilament L and inhibits its filament association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Hana [Laboratory of Molecular Brain Science, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8521 (Japan); Katoh, Tsuyoshi [Department of Biochemistry, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, 078-8510 (Japan); Nakagawa, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro [Laboratory of Molecular Brain Science, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8521 (Japan); Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu [Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagawa University, Kagawa, 761-0795 (Japan); Taniguchi, Takanobu [Department of Biochemistry, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, 078-8510 (Japan); Hirano, Tetsuo; Yamazaki, Takeshi [Laboratory of Molecular Brain Science, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8521 (Japan); Ishida, Atsuhiko, E-mail: aishida@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Brain Science, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8521 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP/PPM1F) is a Ser/Thr phosphatase that belongs to the PPM family. Growing evidence suggests that PPM phosphatases including CaMKP act as a complex with other proteins to regulate cellular functions. In this study, using the two-dimensional far-western blotting technique with digoxigenin-labeled CaMKP as a probe, in conjunction with peptide mass fingerprinting analysis, we identified neurofilament L (NFL) as a CaMKP-binding protein in a Triton-insoluble fraction of rat brain. We confirmed binding of fluorescein-labeled CaMKP (F-CaMKP) to NFL in solution by fluorescence polarization. The analysis showed that the dissociation constant of F-CaMKP for NFL is 73 ± 17 nM (n = 3). Co-immunoprecipitation assay using a cytosolic fraction of NGF-differentiated PC12 cells showed that endogenous CaMKP and NFL form a complex in cells. Furthermore, the effect of CaMKP on self-assembly of NFL was examined. Electron microscopy revealed that CaMKP markedly prevented NFL from forming large filamentous aggregates, suggesting that CaMKP-binding to NFL inhibits its filament association. These findings may provide new insights into a novel mechanism for regulating network formation of neurofilaments during neuronal differentiation. - Highlights: • NFL was identified as a CaMKP-binding protein in an insoluble fraction of rat brain. • CaMKP bound to NFL in solution with a K{sub d} value of 73 ± 17 nM. • A CaMKP-NFL complex was found in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. • CaMKP-binding to NFL inhibited its filament association. • CaMKP may regulate network formation of neurofilaments in neurons.

  7. Effect of ammonia on Ta filaments in the hot wire CVD process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Oliphant, C.J.; Bakker, R.; Houweling, Z.S.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    The exposure of Ta filaments to a pure NH3 ambient in a hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) reactor affects the resistance of the wires. For filament temperatures below 1950 °C the resistance increases over time, which is probably caused by in-diffusion of N atoms. Using the filaments in a

  8. Enhancement of peak intensity in a filament core with spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Bin; Chu Wei; Li Guihua; Zhang Haisu; Ni Jielei [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao Hui; Liu Weiwei [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin, 300071 (China); Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chin, See Leang [Center for Optics, Photonics and Laser (COPL) and Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate that the peak intensity in the filament core, which is inherently limited by the intensity clamping effect during femtosecond laser filamentation, can be significantly enhanced using spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses. In addition, the filament length obtained by spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses is {approx}25 times shorter than that obtained by a conventional focusing scheme, resulting in improved high spatial resolution.

  9. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; van de Weijgaert, Marinus; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This indicates the fact that the action of large-scale tidal torques affected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic filaments. To this

  10. Ultrashort laser pulse filamentation from spontaneous X-Wave formation in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccio, Daniele; Averchi, Alessandro; Lotti, Antonio; Di Trapani, Paolo; Couairon, Arnaud; Papazoglou, Dimitris; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2008-02-04

    The description of ultrashort laser pulse filamentation in condensed media as a spontaneous formation of X waves is shown to apply also to filaments generated in air. Within this framework, a simple explanation is brought for several features of the filament such as the subdiffractive propagation and the energy flux from the weakly localized tails of the X-waves to the intense core.

  11. Impact of matric potential and pore size distribution on growth dynamics of filamentous and non-filamentous soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, A.B.; Vos, M.; De Boer, W.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to

  12. Impact of Matric Potential and Pore Size Distribution on Growth Dynamics of Filamentous and Non-Filamentous Soil Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, A.B.; Vos, de M.; Boer, de W.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to

  13. Quasi-experimental taxation elasticities of US gasoline demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Taxation elasticities provide inputs in public policy aimed at raising revenues. Using the quasi-experimental method, this paper calculates gasoline taxation elasticities for the USA over 1952-86. The medium (mean) elasticity over this period is found to be -0.075 (-0.122). However, the elasticity following the oil shock of 1973 is found to be statistically different from the pre-shock elasticity. Reasons for this change in elasticity are discussed. The implication of this analysis is that tax policies based on price elasticities, rather than on tax elasticities, might be using an inappropriate elasticity estimate and consequently misinterpreting the government's ability to raise tax revenues. (author)

  14. Optimization Of Elastic Bridge Trusses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignas Rimkus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the problems of optimizing elastic bridgetrusses, which is a tool for seeking the establishment of theminimum volume (mass of construction and optimization of thecross-section area and height as well as the structure of the truss.It has been formulated as a nonlinear discrete mathematical programmingproblem. The upper band of the truss works not onlyfor compression but also for bending. The cross-sections of theelements are designed from rolled steel sections. Mathematicalmodels are prepared by using the finite element method and complyingwith requirements for the strength, stiffness and stabilityof the structure. The formulated problems are solved referringto an iterative process and applying the mathematical softwarepackage “MATLAB” along with routine “fmincon”. The ratio ofbuckling is corrected in every case of iteration. Requirementsfor cross-section assortment (discretion are fulfilled employingthe branch and bound method.

  15. Mathematical methods for elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Constanda, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models of deformation of elastic plates are used by applied mathematicians and engineers in connection with a wide range of practical applications, from microchip production to the construction of skyscrapers and aircraft. This book employs two important analytic techniques to solve the fundamental boundary value problems for the theory of plates with transverse shear deformation, which offers a more complete picture of the physical process of bending than Kirchhoff’s classical one.   The first method transfers the ellipticity of the governing system to the boundary, leading to singular integral equations on the contour of the domain. These equations, established on the basis of the properties of suitable layer potentials, are then solved in spaces of smooth (Hölder continuous and Hölder continuously differentiable) functions.   The second technique rewrites the differential system in terms of complex variables and fully integrates it, expressing the solution as a combination of complex ana...

  16. Wrinkling of Pressurized Elastic Shells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, Dominic

    2011-10-01

    We study the formation of localized structures formed by the point loading of an internally pressurized elastic shell. While unpressurized shells (such as a ping-pong ball) buckle into polygonal structures, we show that pressurized shells are subject to a wrinkling instability. We study wrinkling in depth, presenting scaling laws for the critical indentation at which wrinkling occurs and the number of wrinkles formed in terms of the internal pressurization and material properties of the shell. These results are validated by numerical simulations. We show that the evolution of the wrinkle length with increasing indentation can be understood for highly pressurized shells from membrane theory. These results suggest that the position and number of wrinkles may be used in combination to give simple methods for the estimation of the mechanical properties of highly pressurized shells. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  17. Multidiscipline simulation of elastic manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Rølvåg

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to multidiscipline simulation of elastic robot manipulators in FEDEM. All developments presented in this paper are based on the formulations in FEDEM, a simulation system developed by the authors which combines finite element, mechanism and control analysis. In order to establish this general simulation system as an efficient multidiscipline robot design tool a robot control system including a high level robot programming language, interpolation algorithms, path generation algorithms, forward and inverse kinematics, control systems, gear and transmission models are implemented. These new features provide a high level of integration between traditionally separate design disciplines from the very beginning of the design and optimization process. Several simulations have shown that high fidelity mathematical models can be derived and used as a basis for dynamic analysis and controller design in FEDEM.

  18. Investigation of the elastic modulus, tensile and flexural strength of five skull simulant materials for impact testing of a forensic skin/skull/brain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Waddell, J Neil; Chun Li, Kai; Tong, Darryl; Brunton, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Conducting in vitro research for forensic, impact and injury simulation modelling generally involves the use of a skull simulant with mechanical properties similar to those found in the human skull. For this study epoxy resin, fibre filled epoxy resin, 3D-printing filaments (PETG, PLA) and self-cure acrylic denture base resin were used to fabricate the specimens (n=20 per material group), according to ISO 527-2 IBB and ISO20795-1. Tensile and flexural testing in a universal testing machine was used to measure their tensile/flexural elastic modulus and strength. The results showed that the epoxy resin and fibre filled epoxy resin had similar tensile elastic moduli (no statistical significant difference) with lower values observed for the other materials. The fibre filled epoxy resin had a considerably higher flexural elastic modulus and strength, possibly attributed to the presence of fibres. Of the simulants tested, epoxy resin had an elastic modulus and flexural strength close to that of mean human skull values reported in the literature, and thus can be considered as a suitable skull simulant for a skin/skull/brain model for lower impact forces that do not exceed the fracture stress. For higher impact forces a 3D printing filament (PLA) may be a more suitable skull simulant material, due to its closer match to fracture stresses found in human skull bone. Influencing factors were also anisotropy, heterogeneity and viscoelasticity of human skull bone and simulant specimens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Wave propagation in elastic layers with damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Sergey; Darula, Radoslav

    2016-01-01

    The conventional concepts of a loss factor and complex-valued elastic moduli are used to study wave attenuation in a visco-elastic layer. The hierarchy of reduced-order models is employed to assess attenuation levels in various situations. For the forcing problem, the attenuation levels are found...

  20. 7 CFR 29.6013 - Elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elasticity. 29.6013 Section 29.6013 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6013 Elasticity. The flexible, springy nature of the tobacco leaf to...

  1. Eringen's theory of Nonlocal Elasticity (cont…)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eringen's theory of Nonlocal Elasticity (cont…) Integro-Partial differential equations of the above linear nonlocal elasticity have been proposed leading to singular partial differential equations of a special class of ... The scale coefficient in the modeling will lead to small-scale effect on the response of structures in nano-size.

  2. Solitary waves on nonlinear elastic rods. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Lomdahl, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic waves on elastic rods with circular cross section are governed by improved Boussinesq equations when transverse motion and nonlinearity in the elastic medium are taken into account. Solitary wave solutions to these equations have been found. The present paper treats the interaction between...

  3. Elastic least-squares reverse time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Zongcai

    2017-03-08

    We use elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) to invert for the reflectivity images of P- and S-wave impedances. Elastic LSRTMsolves the linearized elastic-wave equations for forward modeling and the adjoint equations for backpropagating the residual wavefield at each iteration. Numerical tests on synthetic data and field data reveal the advantages of elastic LSRTM over elastic reverse time migration (RTM) and acoustic LSRTM. For our examples, the elastic LSRTM images have better resolution and amplitude balancing, fewer artifacts, and less crosstalk compared with the elastic RTM images. The images are also better focused and have better reflector continuity for steeply dipping events compared to the acoustic LSRTM images. Similar to conventional leastsquares migration, elastic LSRTM also requires an accurate estimation of the P- and S-wave migration velocity models. However, the problem remains that, when there are moderate errors in the velocity model and strong multiples, LSRTMwill produce migration noise stronger than that seen in the RTM images.

  4. Plane strain problem in microstretch elastic solid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    stress, couple stress and first moment, which are also shown graphically. The results of micropolar elasticity are deduced as a special case from the present formulation. Keywords. Eigenvalue; microstretch elastic solid; two-dimensional plane problem; integral transform; impulsive force. 1. Introduction. It is well known that ...

  5. Modelling the elastic properties of cellulose nanopaper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mao, Rui; Goutianos, Stergios; Tu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The elastic modulus of cellulose nanopaper was predicted using a two-dimensional (2D) micromechanical fibrous network model. The elastic modulus predicted by the network model was 12 GPa, which is well within the range of experimental data for cellulose nanopapers. The stress state in the network...

  6. Elasticity of a quantum monolayer solid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    1992-01-01

    A perturbation-theory formulation of the zero-temperature elastic constants is used to verify symmetry relations for a (monolayer) triangluar lattice. A generalization of the Cauchy relation between the two elastic constants of the triangular lattice with central-pair-potential interactions...

  7. Deformation of filamentous Escherichia coli cells in a microfluidic device: a new technique to study cell mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Caspi

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of bacterial cells are determined by their stress-bearing elements. The size of typical bacterial cells, and the fact that different time and length scales govern their behavior, necessitate special experimental techniques in order to probe their mechanical properties under various spatiotemporal conditions. Here, we present such an experimental technique to study cell mechanics using hydrodynamic forces in a microfluidic device. We demonstrate the application of this technique by calculating the flexural rigidity of non-growing Escherichia coli cells. In addition, we compare the deformation of filamentous cells under growing and non-growing conditions during the deformation process. We show that, at low forces, the force needed to deform growing cells to the same extent as non-growing cells is approximately two times smaller. Following previous works, we interpret these results as the outcome of the difference between the elastic response of non-growing cells and the plastic-elastic response of growing cells. Finally, we observe some heterogeneity in the response of individual cells to the applied force. We suggest that this results from the individuality of different bacterial cells.

  8. Reappraising elastic thickness variation at oceanic trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bry, Madeleine; White, Nicky

    2007-08-01

    We reassess the variation of elastic thickness as a function of lithospheric plate age using a global database of bathymetric and free-air gravity profiles which are perpendicular to oceanic trenches. As in many previous studies, our starting point is the well-known floating elastic plate model. In order to remove the influence of short-wavelength features not associated with lithospheric bending, adjacent profiles from 10-Myr bins have been stacked together to construct average profiles with standard deviations. Each average profile was then inverted in a two-stage procedure. First, singular value decomposition was used to determine two unknown flexural parameters, together with a regional slope and offset, for any given elastic thickness. This procedure was repeated for a range of elastic thicknesses. Second, residual misfit was plotted as a function of elastic thickness, and the global minimum was identified. This two-stage procedure makes no prior assumptions about magnitude of the load, size of the bending moment, or whether the elastic plate is broken/continuous. We obtained excellent fits between theory and observation for both bathymetric and gravity profiles from lithosphere with an age range of 0-150 Ma. The shape of the residual misfit function indicates the degree of confidence we have in our elastic thickness estimates. The lower limit of elastic thickness is usually well determined but upper limits are often poorly constrained. Inverse modeling was carried out using a range of profile lengths (250-300, 500, and 700 km). In general, our estimates show no consistent increase of elastic thickness as a function of plate age. This surprising result is consistent with recent reassessments of elastic thickness beneath seamounts and implies either that elastic thickness is independent of plate age or that elastic thickness cannot be measured with sufficient accuracy to reveal such a relationship. Modeling of short free-air gravity profiles (250-300 km) does

  9. Defining Elastic Fiber Interactions by Molecular Fishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Stuart A.; McGovern, Amanda; Small, Elaine; Ward, Lyle J.; Baldock, Clair; Shuttleworth, Adrian; Kielty, Cay M.

    2009-01-01

    Deciphering interacting networks of the extracellular matrix is a major challenge. We describe an affinity purification and mass spectrometry strategy that has provided new insights into the molecular interactions of elastic fibers, essential extracellular assemblies that provide elastic recoil in dynamic tissues. Using cell culture models, we defined primary and secondary elastic fiber interaction networks by identifying molecular interactions with the elastic fiber molecules fibrillin-1, MAGP-1, fibulin-5, and lysyl oxidase. The sensitivity and validity of our method was confirmed by identification of known interactions with the bait proteins. Our study revealed novel extracellular protein interactions with elastic fiber molecules and delineated secondary interacting networks with fibronectin and heparan sulfate-associated molecules. This strategy is a novel approach to define the macromolecular interactions that sustain complex extracellular matrix assemblies and to gain insights into how they are integrated into their surrounding matrix. PMID:19755719

  10. Three-dimensional manipulation of femtosecond filament direction with an air bubble in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Qiannan; Yao, Jinping; Ni, Jielei; Cheng, Ya

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally reported a simple, novel method to manipulate the directions of femtosecond filaments in three-dimensional (3D) space taking advantage of an air bubble in water. When the air bubble is introduced to the path of filaments, it will change the propagation direction of filaments by reflection or refraction, acting as a curved mirror with a high damage threshold. In this way, we successfully realized 3D manipulation of the directions of both filaments and supercontinuum emission over a wide range of solid angles only by finely adjusting the position of the air bubble with respect to the filament. (paper)

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Syntactic Foams: Part 1: Development, Properties, and Recycling Potential of Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish Kumar; Patil, Balu; Hoffmann, Niklas; Saltonstall, Brooks; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Gupta, Nikhil

    2018-01-01

    This work focuses on developing filaments of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and their hollow particle-filled syntactic foams for commercial three-dimensional (3D) printers based on fused filament fabrication technology. Hollow fly-ash cenospheres were blended by 40 wt.% in a HDPE matrix to produce syntactic foam (HDPE40) filaments. Further, the recycling potential was studied by pelletizing the filaments again to extrude twice (2×) and three times (3×). The filaments were tensile tested at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1, and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. HDPE40 filaments show an increasing trend in modulus and strength with the strain rate. Higher density and modulus were noticed for 2× filaments compared to 1× filaments because of the crushing of some cenospheres in the extrusion cycle. However, 2× and 3× filament densities are nearly the same, showing potential for recycling them. The filaments show better properties than the same materials processed by conventional injection molding. Micro-CT scans show a uniform dispersion of cenospheres in all filaments.

  12. Additive Manufacturing of Syntactic Foams: Part 1: Development, Properties, and Recycling Potential of Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish Kumar; Patil, Balu; Hoffmann, Niklas; Saltonstall, Brooks; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Gupta, Nikhil

    2018-03-01

    This work focuses on developing filaments of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and their hollow particle-filled syntactic foams for commercial three-dimensional (3D) printers based on fused filament fabrication technology. Hollow fly-ash cenospheres were blended by 40 wt.% in a HDPE matrix to produce syntactic foam (HDPE40) filaments. Further, the recycling potential was studied by pelletizing the filaments again to extrude twice (2×) and three times (3×). The filaments were tensile tested at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1, and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. HDPE40 filaments show an increasing trend in modulus and strength with the strain rate. Higher density and modulus were noticed for 2× filaments compared to 1× filaments because of the crushing of some cenospheres in the extrusion cycle. However, 2× and 3× filament densities are nearly the same, showing potential for recycling them. The filaments show better properties than the same materials processed by conventional injection molding. Micro-CT scans show a uniform dispersion of cenospheres in all filaments.

  13. [Treatment of polluted urban river water using filamentous green algae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xia; Li, Xiao-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Filamentous green algae dominated treatment system was set up to remove contaminants from polluted urban river water under lab conditions. Experiments show that TP is decreased up to 50%, associated with 72% removal of TSS. The removal efficiencies of soluble species, PO4(3-) and NH4(+)-N, are up to 90% and 85% respectively. Under heavily polluted conditions (TP > 3.0 mg x L(-1), TN > 22.0 mg x L(-1)), the average removal efficiencies of TP and TN are 89% and 45% respectively, while under light polluted conditions (TP filamentous green algae is increased significantly (38.78%), and at the same time a large number of unicellular Chlorophytes and Cyanophytes species are occurred on the interior wall surface of experimental fertility. The maximum biomass occurs at the highest concentration of DO.

  14. Rapid microfabrication of transparent materials using filamented femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkus, S.; Gaižauskas, E.; Paipulas, D.; Viburys, Ž.; Kaškelyė, D.; Barkauskas, M.; Alesenkov, A.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2014-01-01

    Microfabrication of transparent materials using femtosecond laser pulses has showed good potential towards industrial application. Maintaining pulse energies exceeding the critical self-focusing threshold by more than 100-fold produced filaments that were used for micromachining purposes. This article demonstrates two different micromachining techniques using femtosecond filaments generated in different transparent media (water and glass). The stated micromachining techniques are cutting and welding of transparent samples. In addition, cutting and drilling experiments were backed by theoretical modelling giving a deeper insight into the whole process. We demonstrate cut-out holes in soda-lime glass having thickness up to 1 mm and aspect ratios close to 20, moreover, the fabrication time is of the order of tens of seconds, in addition, grooves and holes were fabricated in hardened 1.1 mm thick glass (Corning Gorilla glass). Glass welding was made possible and welded samples were achieved after several seconds of laser fabrication.

  15. Prokaryotic DNA segregation by an actin-like filament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Löwe, Jan

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for prokaryotic DNA segregation are largely unknown. The partitioning locus (par) encoded by the Escherichia coli plasmid R1 actively segregates its replicon to daughter cells. We show here that the ParM ATPase encoded by par forms dynamic actin-like filaments...... was ATP dependent, and depolymerization of ParM filaments required nucleotide hydrolysis. Our in vivo and in vitro results indicate that ParM polymerization generates the force required for directional movement of plasmids to opposite cell poles and that the ParR-parC complex functions as a nucleation...... point for ParM polymerization. Hence, we provide evidence for a simple prokaryotic analogue of the eukaryotic mitotic spindle apparatus....

  16. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    The fungal kingdom encompasses a diverse group of organisms some of which have a great impact on human lives, either as domesticated benefactors or as human and crop pathogens. Using the filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii and its close relative Eremothecium cymbalariae as model organisms, this th...... of molecular tools for E. cymbalariae to enable a faster and more efficient approach for genetic comparisons between Eremothecium genus fungi.......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...

  17. An Early Cretaceous heterodontosaurid dinosaur with filamentous integumentary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Ting; You, Hai-Lu; Xu, Xing; Dong, Zhi-Ming

    2009-03-19

    Ornithischia is one of the two major groups of dinosaurs, with heterodontosauridae as one of its major clades. Heterodontosauridae is characterized by small, gracile bodies and a problematic phylogenetic position. Recent phylogenetic work indicates that it represents the most basal group of all well-known ornithischians. Previous heterodontosaurid records are mainly from the Early Jurassic period (205-190 million years ago) of Africa. Here we report a new heterodontosaurid, Tianyulong confuciusi gen. et sp. nov., from the Early Cretaceous period (144-99 million years ago) of western Liaoning Province, China. Tianyulong extends the geographical distribution of heterodontosaurids to Asia and confirms the clade's previously questionable temporal range extension into the Early Cretaceous period. More surprisingly, Tianyulong bears long, singular and unbranched filamentous integumentary (outer skin) structures. This represents the first confirmed report, to our knowledge, of filamentous integumentary structures in an ornithischian dinosaur.

  18. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-01-01

    capacity. One of the major bottlenecks in the development of new strains into viable industrial hosts is the alteration of the metabolism towards optimal production. Genome-scale models promise a reduction in the time needed for metabolic engineering by predicting the most potent targets in silico before...... testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique...... metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi....

  19. Regulated 15-V, 7500-A, neutral-beam filament supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reass, W.

    1977-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) designed a cost-effective, regulated 15-V, 7500-A filament supply for use with the High-Voltage Test Stand , a major ERDA developmental neutral-beam test facility. The filament supply can float to 200 kV and can provide pulse widths up to 30 s. Powered by a 24-V, 0.5-TJ battery bank, it avoids the use of expensive isolation transformers and induction voltage regulators (IVR's). Battery output is regulated by a water-cooled resistor-contactor combination in which contactors are closed in sequential format to create a staircase current waveform. A fine-tuning network tunes in-between the ''steps'' for regulation to less than 0.5 percent. The regulator is digitally controlled except for the sense amplifiers, which are optically coupled to the digital controller. All ground telemetry uses optical links to minimize effects of rfi and emi noise in the data channels

  20. New empirical generalizations on the determinants of price elasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmolt, THA; Van Heerde, HJ; Pieters, RGM

    The importance of pricing decisions for firms has fueled an extensive stream of research on price elasticities. In an influential meta-analytical study, Tellis (1988) summarized price elasticity research findings until 1986. However, empirical generalizations on price elasticity require