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Sample records for fig tree clay

  1. Sm-Nd dating of Fig Tree clay minerals of the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulkeridis, T.; Goldstein, S. L.; Clauer, N.; Kroner, A.; Lowe, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotopic data from carbonate-derived clay minerals of the 3.22-3.25 Ga Fig Tree Group, Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa, form a linear array corresponding to an age of 3102 +/- 64 Ma, making these minerals the oldest dated clays on Earth. The obtained age is 120-160 m.y. younger than the depositional age determined by zircon geochronology. Nd model ages for the clays range from approximately 3.39 to 3.44 Ga and almost cover the age variation of the Barberton greenstone belt rocks, consistent with independent evidence that the clay minerals are derived from material of the belt. The combined isotopic and mineralogical data provide evidence for a cryptic thermal overprint in the sediments of the belt. However, the highest temperature reached by the samples since the time of clay-mineral formation was <300 degrees C, lower than virtually any known early Archean supracrustal sequence.

  2. The occurrence of fig wasps in the fruits of female gynodioecious fig trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Dunn, Derek W.; Hu, Hao-Yuan; Niu, Li-Ming; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Pan, Xian-Li; Feng, Gui; Fu, Yue-Guan; Huang, Da-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fig trees are pollinated by wasp mutualists, whose larvae consume some of the plant's ovaries. Many fig species (350+) are gynodioecious, whereby pollinators generally develop in the figs of 'male' trees and seeds generally in the 'females.' Pollinators usually cannot reproduce in 'female' figs at all because their ovipositors cannot penetrate the long flower styles to gall the ovaries. Many non-pollinating fig wasp (NPFW) species also only reproduce in figs. These wasps can be either phytophagous gallers or parasites of other wasps. The lack of pollinators in female figs may thus constrain or benefit different NPFWs through host absence or relaxed competition. To determine the rates of wasp occurrence and abundance we surveyed 11 dioecious fig species on Hainan Island, China, and performed subsequent experiments with Ficus tinctoria subsp. gibbosa to identify the trophic relationships between NPFWs that enable development in female syconia. We found NPFWs naturally occurring in the females of Ficus auriculata, Ficus hainanensis and F. tinctoria subsp. gibbosa. Because pollinators occurred only in male syconia, when NPFWs also occurred in female syconia, overall there were more wasps in male than in female figs. Species occurrence concurred with experimental data, which showed that at least one phytophagous galler NPFW is essential to enable multiple wasp species to coexist within a female fig. Individuals of galler NPFW species present in both male and female figs of the same fig species were more abundant in females than in males, consistent with relaxed competition due to the absence of pollinator. However, these wasps replaced pollinators on a fewer than one-to-one basis, inferring that other unknown mechanisms prevent the widespread exploitation by wasps of female figs. Because some NPFW species may use the holes chewed by pollinator males to escape from their natal fig, we suggest that dispersal factors could be involved.

  3. Rooting of stem segments from fig tree cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Rayane Barcelos Bisi; Guilherme Locatelli; Caio Morais de Alcântara Barbosa; Rafael Pio; Rodrigo Vieira Balbi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Although Brazil is the largest fig (Ficus carica L.) producer in the Southern Hemisphere, it mainly uses only one cultivar, 'Roxo de Valinhos'. In addition, propagation is almost entirely through hardwood cuttings. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a propagation method that provides more successful rooting of stem segments of fig cultivars for the purpose of expanding the genetic base of the fig tree. The cultivars used were 'Brunswick', 'Calabacita', 'Negro de Bursa...

  4. Seasonality of Leaf and Fig Production in Ficus squamosa, a Fig Tree with Seeds Dispersed by Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pothasin, Pornwiwan; Compton, Stephen G; Wangpakapattanawong, Prasit

    2016-01-01

    ...) need to produce figs year-round to support their short-lived fig wasp pollinators, but this requirement is partially de-coupled in dioecious species, where female trees only develop seeds, not pollinator offspring...

  5. Seasonality of Leaf and Fig Production in Ficus squamosa, a Fig Tree with Seeds Dispersed by Water: e0152380

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pornwiwan Pothasin; Stephen G Compton; Prasit Wangpakapattanawong

    2016-01-01

    ...) need to produce figs year-round to support their short-lived fig wasp pollinators, but this requirement is partially de-coupled in dioecious species, where female trees only develop seeds, not pollinator offspring...

  6. Seasonality of Leaf and Fig Production in Ficus squamosa, a Fig Tree with Seeds Dispersed by Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pothasin, Pornwiwan; Compton, Stephen G; Wangpakapattanawong, Prasit

    2016-01-01

    The phenology of plants reflects selection generated by seasonal climatic factors and interactions with other plants and animals, within constraints imposed by their phylogenetic history. Fig trees (Ficus...

  7. Floral ratios in the figs of Ficus montana span the range from actively to passively pollinated fig trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleman, Nazia; Quinnell, Rupert J.; Compton, Stephen G.

    2014-05-01

    Fig trees (Ficus spp., Moraceae) and their associated obligate pollinator fig wasps (Agaonidae) are partners in what is often a pair-wise species-specific association. Their interaction centres on the unique enclosed inflorescence of Ficus species - the fig. Among dioecious fig tree species, only pollinated ovules in figs on female trees develop into seeds. On male trees, galled ovules support development of the fig wasp offspring that will transport their pollen, but no seeds develop. Some fig wasp species actively collect and disperse pollen, whereas others are typical insect pollinators in that pollen is transferred passively. Active pollination is associated with improved larval survivorship in pollinated figs. Because active pollination is much more efficient, their host figs need to contain far fewer male flowers and across numerous Ficus species anther-ovule ratios are a good predictor of pollination mode. We examined variation in inflorescence size and floral ratios among male figs of the Asian Ficus montana and its consequences for the amounts of pollen that would be available for each pollinator to collect. Inflorescence size (total flower number) was highly variable, and female pollinator offspring production was higher in figs with more female flowers. Pollinator offspring numbers and anther-ovule ratios were also highly variable, and encompassed the range typical of both actively and passively pollinated fig tree species. In combination, this variation resulted in large differences in the extent to which pollinators were competing for access to pollen, with potential fitness consequences for both partners in the mutualism.

  8. Seasonality of Leaf and Fig Production in Ficus squamosa, a Fig Tree with Seeds Dispersed by Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothasin, Pornwiwan; Compton, Stephen G; Wangpakapattanawong, Prasit

    2016-01-01

    The phenology of plants reflects selection generated by seasonal climatic factors and interactions with other plants and animals, within constraints imposed by their phylogenetic history. Fig trees (Ficus) need to produce figs year-round to support their short-lived fig wasp pollinators, but this requirement is partially de-coupled in dioecious species, where female trees only develop seeds, not pollinator offspring. This allows female trees to concentrate seed production at more favorable times of the year. Ficus squamosa is a riparian species whose dispersal is mainly by water, rather than animals. Seeds can float and travel in long distances. We recorded the leaf and reproductive phenology of 174 individuals for three years in Chiang Mai, Northern Thailand. New leaves were produced throughout the year. Fig production occurred year-round, but with large seasonal variations that correlated with temperature and rainfall. Female and male trees initiated maximal fig crops at different times, with production in female trees confined mainly to the rainy season and male figs concentrating fig production in the preceding months, but also often bearing figs continually. Ficus squamosa concentrates seed production by female plants at times when water levels are high, favouring dispersal by water, and asynchronous flowering within male trees allow fig wasps to cycle there, providing them with potential benefits by maintaining pollinators for times when female figs become available to pollinate.

  9. Female figs as traps: Their impact on the dynamics of an experimental fig tree-pollinator-parasitoid community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleman, Nazia; Sait, Steve; Compton, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between fig trees (Ficus) and their pollinating fig wasps (Agaonidae) result in both a highly species-specific nursery mutualism and mutual exploitation. Around half of the 800 or so fig tree species are functionally dioecious. Figs on male plants produce pollen and fig wasp offspring, whereas figs on female plants produce only seeds. Figs on female plants are traps for pollinators. The fig wasps enter the female figs to oviposit, but lose their wings on entry and are then prevented from oviposition by the long styles that characterise the flowers in female figs. Continuation of the mutualism depends on the pollinators' failure to distinguish between male and female figs before entry. Female plants may also have a negative impact on the parasitoid fig wasps that feed on pollinators, if they are also attracted to female figs. We used glasshouse populations of figs (with and without female plants), pollinators and parasitoids to infer the impact of female figs on fig wasp dynamics. Cyclic population fluctuations were present in both species. Female plants appeared to dampen the amplitudes of pollinator population cycles, and parasitoid populations may become less tightly coupled with host populations, but the presence of female figs did not reduce parasitism rates, nor parasitoid and pollinator densities, and only parasitoid sex ratios were affected. Our glasshouse experimental design was likely to favour the impact of female figs on the wasp populations, which suggests that female plants in the field are unlikely to have a major negative impact on their pollinators, despite being a major mortality factor.

  10. Rooting of stem segments from fig tree cultivars

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    Rayane Barcelos Bisi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Brazil is the largest fig (Ficus carica L. producer in the Southern Hemisphere, it mainly uses only one cultivar, ‘Roxo de Valinhos’. In addition, propagation is almost entirely through hardwood cuttings. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a propagation method that provides more successful rooting of stem segments of fig cultivars for the purpose of expanding the genetic base of the fig tree. The cultivars used were ‘Brunswick’, ‘Calabacita’, ‘Negro de Bursa’, ‘Mini Figo’, ‘Lampa Preta’, ‘Lemon’, ‘Troiano’,’ Nazaré’, ‘Três num Prato’, ‘Princesa’, ‘Colo de Dama’, ‘Montes’, ‘Bêbera Branca’, ‘Pingo de Mel’, and ‘Roxo de Valinhos’. The propagation methods used were layering, hardwood cuttings, nodal segments, herbaceous cuttings originating from the removal of sprouts, and herbaceous cuttings obtained during growth. We found that the propagation method influences the rooting of stem segments, and cultivars differ in their rooting potential.

  11. Prevalence and genetic diversity of fig mosaic virus isolates infecting fig tree in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh-Amuz, S; Rakhshandehroo, F; Rezaee, S

    2014-01-01

    Commercial and outdoor fig orchards in four Iranian provinces were surveyed for the incidence of fig mosaic virus (FMV), fig leaf mottle associated virus 2 (FLMaV-2) and fig mild mottle associated virus (FMMaV) from March 2011 to October 2012. A total of 350 asymptomatic and symptomatic fig samples were collected and tested by dot-immunobinding assay (DIBA) for the fig mosaic disease (FMD) using a polyclonal antiserum. According to DIBA results, FMD was present in 73% of the collected symptomatic samples from all visited regions. Samples with positive reactions in DIBA were then analyzed by RT-PCR using with specific primers. PCR results showed that about 14.8% of the FMD-positive samples from three inspected provinces are infected with at least one virus. FMV was the most widely spread virus (14%) followed by FLMaV-2 (1.5%), whereas FMMaV was not found. Phylogenetic analysis of the glycoprotein nucleotide and amino acid sequences of known FMV isolates showed two independent groups with high bootstrap values, with all Iranian isolates distinctly clustered in group I, subgroup IA beside those reported in Turkey. Nucleotide diversity was high within but low between different selected geographic regions and except for Europe, nucleotide distance within geographic regions was low. Statistical analyses indicated a correlation between the genetic structure of the FMV isolates and the geographical origin of isolation. Our analyses suggested that the FMV population is in a state of increase following a bottleneck or founder event in Iran.

  12. Riparian Ficus tree communities: the distribution and abundance of riparian fig trees in northern Thailand.

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    Pornwiwan Pothasin

    Full Text Available Fig trees (Ficus are often ecologically significant keystone species because they sustain populations of the many seed-dispersing animals that feed on their fruits. They are prominent components of riparian zones where they may also contribute to bank stability as well as supporting associated animals. The diversity and distributions of riparian fig trees in deciduous and evergreen forests in Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand were investigated in 2010-2012. To record the diversity and abundance of riparian fig trees, we (1 calculated stem density, species richness, and diversity indices in 20×50 m randomly selected quadrats along four streams and (2 measured the distances of individual trees from four streams to determine if species exhibit distinct distribution patterns within riparian zones. A total of 1169 individuals (from c. 4 ha were recorded in the quadrats, representing 33 Ficus species (13 monoecious and 20 dioecious from six sub-genera and about 70% of all the species recorded from northern Thailand. All 33 species had at least some stems in close proximity to the streams, but they varied in their typical proximity, with F. squamosa Roxb. and F. ischnopoda Miq the most strictly stream-side species. The riparian forests in Northern Thailand support a rich diversity and high density of Ficus species and our results emphasise the importance of fig tree within the broader priorities of riparian area conservation. Plans to maintain or restore properly functioning riparian forests need to take into account their significance.

  13. Riparian Ficus tree communities: the distribution and abundance of riparian fig trees in northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothasin, Pornwiwan; Compton, Stephen G; Wangpakapattanawong, Prasit

    2014-01-01

    Fig trees (Ficus) are often ecologically significant keystone species because they sustain populations of the many seed-dispersing animals that feed on their fruits. They are prominent components of riparian zones where they may also contribute to bank stability as well as supporting associated animals. The diversity and distributions of riparian fig trees in deciduous and evergreen forests in Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand were investigated in 2010-2012. To record the diversity and abundance of riparian fig trees, we (1) calculated stem density, species richness, and diversity indices in 20×50 m randomly selected quadrats along four streams and (2) measured the distances of individual trees from four streams to determine if species exhibit distinct distribution patterns within riparian zones. A total of 1169 individuals (from c. 4 ha) were recorded in the quadrats, representing 33 Ficus species (13 monoecious and 20 dioecious) from six sub-genera and about 70% of all the species recorded from northern Thailand. All 33 species had at least some stems in close proximity to the streams, but they varied in their typical proximity, with F. squamosa Roxb. and F. ischnopoda Miq the most strictly stream-side species. The riparian forests in Northern Thailand support a rich diversity and high density of Ficus species and our results emphasise the importance of fig tree within the broader priorities of riparian area conservation. Plans to maintain or restore properly functioning riparian forests need to take into account their significance.

  14. First Report of the Fig Cyst Nematode, Heterodera fici Kirjanova, on Fig Tree, Ficus carica, in Ontario, Canada.

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    Sun, Fengcheng; Henry, Neil; Yu, Qing

    2017-06-01

    Although fig trees are a popular ornamental fruit tree in subtropical regions, some hardy species, such as Ficus carica, have been grown in the west coast of British Columbia and southern Ontario in Canada. The fig cyst nematode, Heterodera fici Kirjanova, is a pest on fig plants, and the heavy infestation can cause retarded growth and yellowing of leaves (Maqbool et al., 1987). In the spring of 2016, a sample of rhizosphere from a potted fig (F. carica) seedling was submitted to the Nematology Laboratory, Canadian Food Inspection Agency. The sample was collected from a nursery in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada, during an inspection to support export certification. The fig trees in the nursery had been grown in the outside fields during the growing seasons and potted and moved to indoor during the winters for last 3 years. The sample was subjected to a nematode extraction process, including decanting and sieving and misting, and lemon-shaped cysts and second-stage juveniles of Heterodera sp. were recovered from the sample examined. The morphological and molecular analyses of the cysts, vulval cone, and second-stage juveniles from both the roots and the crushed cysts identified the species as Heterodera fici Kirjanova. The cysts were characterized by their dark brown color and lemon shape, as well as distinct necks and vulval cones. The vulval cones were observed having an ambifenestrate fenestra (Fig. 1AFig. 1Photomicrographs of Heterodera fici on fig tree from Ontario, Canada. A, B. Cyst vulval cones with the ambifenestrate fenestra in A) and well-developed underbridge and bullae in B). C-E. The second-stage juveniles from a crushed cyst with the whole body in C), the anterior region in D) and the posterior region in E).), dome-shaped bullae scattered around the underbridge plane (Fig. 1B), well-developed underbridge (Fig. 1B), and coarse zig-zag ridges surrounding the fenestra on the surface. The cyst measurements (n = 3) were length 608.7 ± 91.6 (506

  15. Felling Ficus: The Cultural Status of Fig Trees in a Rural Assamese Community, India

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    H Eden W Cottee-Jones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Scattered fig (Ficus spp. Moraceae trees are critically important for biodiversity conservation in tropical rural landscapes. By providing large fruit crops, they help maintain seed dispersal networks and facilitate forest restoration. The conservation of fig trees scattered across rural landscapes is therefore vital for the preservation of ecosystem services and biodiversity beyond the borders of protected areas. Given the threats to scattered fig trees, it is increasingly important to identify potentially effective local conservation strategies that accommodate existing perceptions of their value. We used ethnographic techniques to assess the attitudes of villagers towards fig trees in the village of Komargoan and its surroundings in Assam, India. As reported for other parts of South Asia, we found fig trees have significant sacred status, which included taboos against cutting them down. However, we discovered mixed and sometimes contradictory understandings of the religious attributes of fig trees, which were sometimes believed to be inhabited by gods or ancestral spirits. The benefits most commonly associated with fig trees by interviewees were their aesthetic beauty, large size, and shade during the daytime heat. When the presence of these trees incurred economic costs, their religious, aesthetic, and practical benefits were not sufficient reasons to prevent people from cutting them down, although often saplings would be planted in another place as compensation. Unexpectedly, figs were only planted by respected members of the community, usually older men, who had sufficient social status. Any conservation strategy aiming to sustain the abundance of figs in rural Assam is more likely to be successful if these cultural views are taken into account.

  16. Living on the edge: Fig tree phenology at the northern range limit of monoecious Ficus in China

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    Zhang, Lu-Shui; Compton, Stephen G.; Xiao, Hui; Lu, Qian; Chen, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Fig trees (Ficus) are a species-rich group of mainly tropical and subtropical plants that are of ecological importance because of the large numbers of vertebrates that utilise their figs for food. Factors limiting their distributions to warmer regions are still poorly understood, but are likely to include factors linked to their specialised pollination biology, because each Ficus species is dependent on one or a small number of host-specific fig wasps (Agaonidae) for pollination. Adult fig wasps are short-lived, but some species are capable of dispersing extremely long distances to pollinate their hosts. Close to its northern range limit we investigated the phenology of Ficus virens, the monoecious fig tree that reaches furthest north in China. Relatively few trees produced any figs, and very few retained figs throughout the winter. Despite this, new crops produced in spring were pollinated, with seasonally migrant pollinators from plants growing further south the most likely pollen vectors. An inability to initiate new crops at low temperatures may limit the distribution of monoecious fig trees to warmer areas.

  17. Selective resource allocation may promote a sex ratio in pollinator fig wasps more beneficial for the host tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao-Tian; Peng, Yan-Qiong; Wen, Xiao-Lan; Jandér, K Charlotte

    2016-10-12

    Mutualisms play a key role in most ecosystems, yet the mechanisms that prevent overexploitation of the mutualistic relationship are still poorly understood. In the mutualism between fig trees and their pollinating wasps both partners depend on each other. Fig trees benefit from female wasps that disperse their pollen, whereas wasps frequently benefit from a higher ratio of male offspring. Here we use manipulative field experiments to address whether host trees (Ficus racemosa) can influence the offspring sex ratio of the pollinator wasp. We controlled wasp matings; virgin wasps can lay only male eggs. We found that virgin foundress wasps had fewer offspring than mated foundresses. This was not caused by virgin wasps having a shorter lifespan, or laying fewer eggs. Instead, male wasp larvae were more likely to die during development. Additionally, male eggs were deposited in flowers of equal style length to those of female eggs, yet emerged from galls with shorter pedicels than those of female wasps. We suggest that male larvae are either allocated less resources by the tree, or are less able to attract resources, during development. If the tree orchestrates this difference it would promote a more female-biased wasp brood, thus increasing the tree's fitness.

  18. Growth substrates and fig nursery tree production Substratos de crescimento e produção de mudas de figo

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    Uğur Şirin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pest attack, disease and soil fatigue have always been a great problem in fig (Ficus carica L. nursery tree production, especially when traditional methods that use soil culture are applied. Therefore, as an alternative method, substrate culture could be a sustainable and favorable propagation method for growing healthy nursery fig trees of high quality. No information is available on substrate use and its effect on nursery fig tree production. The present study was aimed to define a favorable substrate to cultivate nursery fig trees in substrate culture, and to examine the effects of substrates on morphological and biochemical characteristics of the fig trees by growing plants in a high-tunnel. Fig cv. "Sarilop" (Calimyrna cuttings were used in this trial as plant material. Three growth media based on perlite (100%, peat (50% + perlite (50%, and fine sawdust (100% were tested using soil as a control. Plants were grown in trough culture from the day of planting cuttings up to the uproot point of fig nursery trees, during eight months, and they were not transplanted into another medium during the growing period. To observe the effect of substrates on the nursery fig trees, some morphological and biochemical characteristics were determined. The use of peat + perlite and perlite led to increased plant growth and quality of fig nursery trees grown in high-tunnel.O ataque de pragas e de doenças e o esgotamento do solo sempre foram grandes problemas na produçào de mudas de figo (Ficus carica L em estufa, especialmente quando são empregados métodos tradicionais que usam solo como substrato. Por isso o uso de substratos sem solo poderia ser alternativa favorável para obtenção de mudas saudáveis de alta qualidade. Não há informação sobre o uso de substratos e seu efeito sobre a produção de mudas em estufa. No presente estudo procurou-se definir um substrato adequado para obtenção de mudas de figo e examinar os efeitos de substratos sobre

  19. Medico-historical study of "aśvattha" (sacred fig tree).

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    Prasad, P V V; Subhaktha, P K J P; Narayana, Ala; Rao, M Mruthyumjaya

    2006-01-01

    Aśvattha (Ficus religiosa Linn.) is a tree which has got mythological, religious and medicinal importance in Indian culture since ancient times. As per Vedic Index Aśvattha means horse stand, a place or site or an object where or under which horses stand. Aśvattha is also known as Pipal and Bodhidrma. This tree is the oldest depicted tree in India. In Vedic times it was used to make fire by friction and considered sacred. Atharvavĕda associates it with the third heaven. It discusses medicinal properties of Aśvattha along with Soma and Kuştha. Aśvattha is associated with the triad of Gods-Brahma, vişņu and siva. Reference to Aśvattha is found in Rămăyaņa, Mahăbhărata, Bhagavadgĭta, Buddhistic literature, Arthaśăstra, Purănăs, Upanişads etc. non-medical literature also. According to Ayurvĕda it has several synonyms. Most of them symbolize its sacredness. Aśvattha is useful in various ailments like consumption, vomiting, ulcers in oral cavity, burns, gynaecological problems etc. Thus its medico-historical importance, regional nomenclature, morphological features in brief etc. are being presented in this article with few illustrations.

  20. Renovação do carbono-13 em figueiras 'Roxo de Valinhos' Carbon-13 turnover in fig trees 'Roxo de Valinhos'

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    Andréa Carvalho da Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi determinar a taxa de renova��ão do carbono-13 ("turnover", dos diferentes órgãos da figueira 'Roxo de Valinhos'. O experimento foi conduzido no pomar da Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas, FCA/UNESP, Câmpus de Botucatu-SP. Determinou-se previamente, através das trocas gasosas com um medidor aberto portátil de fotossíntese, IRGA, a principal folha fotossinteticamente ativa. Essa folha foi colocada em uma câmara onde ocorreu a injeção do gás enriquecido. O tempo de enriquecimento da folha foi de 30 minutos. Os tratamentos foram constituídos por sete plantas de figueira, que foram retiradas do solo após: 6; 24; 48; 72; 120; 168 e 360 horas do enriquecimento com 13C, e suas partes seccionadas em: gema apical, folha jovem, folhas adultas (fotossinteticamente ativas, brotações laterais, frutos e ramo. Os resultados obtidos permitiram o estabelecimento da sequência de metabolização do carbono-13 nas partições estudadas: Folhas novas > Frutos > Brotações > Folhas Adultas > Gema Apical > Ramo > Folha marcada. Plantas de figueira 'Roxo de Valinhos' apresentam reciclagem do 13C de 24 horas e um tempo de meia-vida de duração do carbono-13 inferior a 11 horas.The aim of this study was to assess carbon-13 turnover in different organs of the fig tree cultivar 'Roxo de Valinhos'. The experiment was carried out in an orchard at School of Agronomical Sciences, FCA/UNESP, Botucatu Campus, São Paulo State, Brazil. The main photosynthetically active leaf was previously determined based on gas exchanges by means of an open portable photosynthesis system, IRGA. That leaf was placed in a chamber where the enriched gas injection occurred. The leaf enrichment time was 30 minutes. Treatments were constituted of seven fig trees harvested of soil after: 6; 24; 48; 72; 120; 168 and 360 hours of enrichment using 13C, and their parts were sectioned into: apical bud, young leaves, adult leaves (photosynthetically active

  1. Substratos no enraizamento de estacas herbáceas de figueira oriundas da desbrota Substrates in the rooting of fig tree herbaceous cuttings originated from the sprouting

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    Rafael Pio

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o presente trabalho teve-se como objetivo verificar o enraizamento de estacas de figueira oriundas da desbrota, por meio da utilização de diferentes substratos. Foram coletadas estacas herbáceas de figueira 'Roxo de valinhos', aproximadamente com 10 cm de comprimento, no momento da desbrota da figueira. As estacas com apenas duas folhas e sem gema apical foram acondicionadas em bandejas de polipropileno, contendo diferentes substratos: casca de pinus®, vermiculita®, fibra de coco®, plantmax®, solo + esterco bovino (1:1 v/v e tropstrato® . Posteriormente, as estacas foram colocadas em casa-de-vegetação, com umidade e temperatura controlada. Após 50 dias, avaliaram-se a porcentagem de estacas enraizadas, brotadas e mortas, número de folhas e raízes emitidas da estaca. Os substratos fibra de coco® e plantmax® promoveram melhores resultados.The present work had the objective to verify the rooting of fig tree cuttings originating from sprouting, through the use of different substrates. Herbaceous cuttings were collected of 'Roxo de valinhos' fig tree with 10 cm of length when the sprouting was happening. The cuttings with two leaves and not of the apical bud to conditioned in polypropylene trays containing different substrates: casca de pinus®, vermiculita®, coconut fiber®, plantmax®, soil + cow mature(1:1 v/v and tropstrato® . The cuttings were placed at greenhouse, under humidity and temperature control. After 50 days, the rooting, sprouting and death cutting percentage, the number of leaves and roots of each cutting were evaluated. The substrates coconut fiber® and plantmax® promoted better results.

  2. Trocas gasosas e ciclo fotossintético da figueira 'Roxo de Valinhos' Gas exchanges and cycle fhotosynthetic in fig tree 'Roxo de Valinhos'

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    Andréa Carvalho da Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho, determinaram-se as trocas gasosas de folhas de figueira 'Roxo de valinhos' e o ciclo fotossintético por meio da relação isotópica 12C/13C. Essas medidas foram realizadas sempre na região mediana das folhas, completamente expandidas e totalmente expostas à radiação solar, no período das 09h00min às 10h30min. As folhas fotossinteticamente ativas da figueira apresentaram área foliar em torno de 160cm², com uma assimilação de 14,38µmol m-2 s-1 de CO2, cujos valores isotópicos médios no ramo 1 e no 2 são -28,98±0,69‰ e -29,28±0,85‰, respectivamente. Com base nos valores da fotossíntese máxima e na discriminação isotópica do 13C, evidenciou-se que a figueira pode ser considerada uma planta do ciclo fotossintético C3.In the present research, it was determined the gas exchange of the 'Roxo de Valinhos' fig tree and the cycle photosynthetic through the isotopic relation 12C/13C. These measures were always carried in the average region of the leaves, completely expanded, entirely displayed to the solar radiation, in the period from 09h00min to 10h30min. The sheets photosynthetic active leaf area had around 160cm², with 14.38 -2 s-1 assimilation CO2, and mean isotopic values in the branch 1 and 2 of -28.98±0.69‰ and -29.28±0,85‰, respectively. Based in the values of the maximum photosynthesis and in the discrimination isotopic of the 13C, the fig tree can be considered a plant which belongs to photosynthetic C3 cycle.

  3. Época de poda da figueira cultivada no estado de São Paulo Pruning time for fig trees in the state of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Rigitano

    1963-01-01

    Full Text Available No Estado de São Paulo as figueiras (Ficus carica L. são anualmente submetidas a um tipo de poda hibernal que consiste na eliminação quase total da copa formada na estação anterior. Com a finalidade de estudar o comportamento de figueiras podadas em diferentes épocas durante o inverno, foi iniciado em 1960, em Campinas, um experimento com cinco épocas de poda no período de 1.° de maio a 1.° de setembro. São apresentados os dados de produção, por tratamento obtidos em 1962 e 1963, relativos ao número e ao pêso de figos, assim como os pesos médios de uma fruta. Os dados de 1963, revelaram diferenças significativas e permitiram várias conclusões. A poda feita em 1.° de agôsto ofereceu os melhores resultados, embora sem diferir significativamente daquela executada em 1.° de julho. Como era esperado, as podas levadas a efeito nas épocas extremas, isto é, em princípios de maio e de setembro, resultaram nas produções mais baixas. Observou-se tendência da obtenção de colheitas mais precoces e figos mais pesados nos tratamentos mais produtivos.With a view to compare the effects on fruit bearing, pruning of fig trees was carried out in Campinas, State of São Paulo, during the dormant season of the plant, at 5 different dates, namely on the 1st day of each of the months of May, June, July, August and September. Pruning was started as soon as the plants became more or less dormant in the fall and was continued until vegetation again appeared at the end of winter. The pruning operation took place for two following years and at the dates mentioned all the new branches were cut back to short stubs. The experimental plot consisted of 30 trees of the variety "Roxo de Valinhos" (San Piero spread apart 7 by 13 feet and was laid out in randomized blocks with 3 replications. The results of this trial can be summarized as follows: a Trees pruned on August 1st gave the highest yield followed by those pruned on July 1st. While the

  4. Propagação da figueira 'Roxo de Valinhos' por alporquia Propagation of the fig tree 'Roxo de Valinhos' by air layering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Daneluz

    2009-03-01

    of the branch associated to different wounds, substrates and concentrations of indolbutyric acid (IBA in the rooting of air layering in 'Roxo de Valinhos' fig tree. In the first experiment, air layering was accomplished in the basal, medium portion and apical of the branches in the beginning of the month of March. In the prepare the air layering, different wounds were accomplished: whole ring (rings of three cm of length, two cuts (parallel cuts of three cm of length and a cm of width, a cut (measuring three cm of length and one cm of width and the witness cut absence. Soon after, it was placed in the place of the treatment, substrate of humidified pinus, wrapped up with transparent plastic and being tied in the extremities, to avoid the humidity loss. After 50 days, the air layering was removed for the evaluation of the percentage of case-hardened and rooted layers and the medium number of roots. Soon after, they were transplanted for bed of sand humidified under nursery constituted of sombrite with 50% of brightness. After 30 days, it was evaluated the percentage of alive, air layering sprouted and the medium number of sprouts. In the second experiment, the air layering was accomplished in the month of April, in the medium portion of the branches, without wound, being applied in the place, different concentrations of IBA (0, 1000, 2000 and 3000 mg L-1 and soon after, they were involved by the following substrate: humidified pinus, humidified sphagnum and the mixture in the proportion 1:1 v/ v. After 60 days, the air layering was removed for the evaluated of the percentage of case-hardened and rooted layers and the medium number of roots. It was concluded that the air layering should be accomplished in the medium portion of the branches, absent of wound, agreements with 1000 mg L-1 of IBA and involved with pinus substrate.

  5. The FIG Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2005-01-01

    What is actually the role of the FIG? Why is it important to be a member? What are the benefits? What is in for me?......What is actually the role of the FIG? Why is it important to be a member? What are the benefits? What is in for me?...

  6. Integrating kaolin clay for ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) management in ornamental tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Invasive ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are an important pest problem at ornamental tree nurseries. Available chemical measures are not completely effective, and due to the length of the beetle dispersal period and product breakdown, repeated treatments can become costly in ...

  7. Ecology of a fig ant-plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Rhett D.

    2014-05-01

    Mutualistic interactions are embedded in networks of interactions that affect the benefits accruing to the mutualistic partners. Figs and their pollinating wasps are engaged in an obligate mutualism in which the fig is dependent on the fig pollinator for pollination services and the pollinator is dependent on fig ovules for brood sites. This mutualism is exploited by non-pollinating fig wasps that utilise the same ovules, but do not provide a pollination service. Most non-pollinating wasps oviposit from outside the inflorescence (syconium), where they are vulnerable to ant predation. Ficus schwarzii is exposed to high densities of non-pollinating wasps, but Philidris sp. ants patrolling the syconia prevent them from ovipositing. Philidris rarely catch wasps, but the fig encourages the patrolling by providing a reward through extra-floral nectaries on the surface of syconia. Moreover, the reward is apparently only produced during the phase when parasitoids are ovipositing. An ant-exclusion experiment demonstrated that, in the absence of ants, syconia were heavily attacked and many aborted as a consequence. Philidris was normally rare on the figs during the receptive phase or at the time of day when wasp offspring are emerging, so predation on pollinators was limited. However, Myrmicaria sp. ants, which only occurred on three trees, preyed substantially on pollinating as well as non-pollinating wasps. F. schwarzii occurs in small clusters of trees and has an exceptionally rapid crop turnover. These factors appear to promote high densities of non-pollinating wasps and, as a consequence, may have led to both a high incidence of ants on trees and increased selective pressure on fig traits that increase the payoffs of the fig-ant interaction for the fig. The fig receives no direct benefit from the reward it provides, but protects pollinating wasps that will disperse its pollen.

  8. Interference Competition and High Temperatures Reduce the Virulence of Fig Wasps and Stabilize a Fig-Wasp Mutualism

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rui-Wu; Ridley, Jo; Sun, Bao-Fa; Zheng, Qi; Dunn, Derek W.; Cook, James; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Ya-ping; Yu, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Fig trees are pollinated by fig wasps, which also oviposit in female flowers. The wasp larvae gall and eat developing seeds. Although fig trees benefit from allowing wasps to oviposit, because the wasp offspring disperse pollen, figs must prevent wasps from ovipositing in all flowers, or seed production would cease, and the mutualism would go extinct. In Ficus racemosa, we find that syconia (‘figs’) that have few foundresses (ovipositing wasps) are underexploited in the summer (few seeds, few...

  9. Analysis of the Importance of Oxides and Clays in Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn Adsorption and Retention with Regression Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Costa, Juan José; Reigosa, Manuel Joaquín; Matías, José María; Fernández-Covelo, Emma

    2017-01-01

    This study determines the influence of the different soil components and of the cation-exchange capacity on the adsorption and retention of different heavy metals: cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc. In order to do so, regression models were created through decision trees and the importance of soil components was assessed. Used variables were: humified organic matter, specific cation-exchange capacity, percentages of sand and silt, proportions of Mn, Fe and Al oxides and hematite, and the proportion of quartz, plagioclase and mica, and the proportions of the different clays: kaolinite, vermiculite, gibbsite and chlorite. The most important components in the obtained models were vermiculite and gibbsite, especially for the adsorption of cadmium and zinc, while clays were less relevant. Oxides are less important than clays, especially for the adsorption of chromium and lead and the retention of chromium, copper and lead. PMID:28072849

  10. Analysis of the Importance of Oxides and Clays in Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn Adsorption and Retention with Regression Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Costa, Juan José; Reigosa, Manuel Joaquín; Matías, José María; Fernández-Covelo, Emma

    2017-01-01

    This study determines the influence of the different soil components and of the cation-exchange capacity on the adsorption and retention of different heavy metals: cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc. In order to do so, regression models were created through decision trees and the importance of soil components was assessed. Used variables were: humified organic matter, specific cation-exchange capacity, percentages of sand and silt, proportions of Mn, Fe and Al oxides and hematite, and the proportion of quartz, plagioclase and mica, and the proportions of the different clays: kaolinite, vermiculite, gibbsite and chlorite. The most important components in the obtained models were vermiculite and gibbsite, especially for the adsorption of cadmium and zinc, while clays were less relevant. Oxides are less important than clays, especially for the adsorption of chromium and lead and the retention of chromium, copper and lead.

  11. Primary arsenic(V) preserved in 3.26 billion-year-old shallow marine cherts of the Fig Tree Group demonstrates a complete Paleoarchean arsenic cycle driven by photosynthetic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, K. D.; Tice, M. M.; Bostick, B. C.

    2016-12-01

    Microbial arsenic (As) redox cycling is hypothesized to have been widespread in oxygen-free Archean environments, yet our understanding of Archean As cycles is hindered by a poor sedimentary record of As. Concentrations of up to 1.6 wt % As were discovered in chert clasts of a fan delta conglomerate sourced from shallow-water coastal environments in the 3.26-3.23 Ga Fig Tree Group of the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. Arsenic is associated at the outcrop-scale with Fe-bearing conglomerate pebbles and underlying banded ferruginous cherts, whereas low-Fe chert clasts, underlying low-Fe banded black and white cherts, bedded barites, and overlying ash deposits lack As. Bulk As and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and 1-100 μm scale μ-X-ray fluorescence mapping were used to determine the abundance, oxidation state, and mineralogy of As in relation to sedimentary textures and bulk Fe mineralogy. Arsenic concentration is strongly linked to lithology: hematite (Fe2O3)-rich pebbles contain higher Fe:As ratios ( 10:1-100:1) than sideritic pebbles with little to no Fe2O3 (Fe:As 1:1-10:1). Arsenopyrite (FeAsS), orpiment (As2S3), As(III), and As(V) line pre-erosional textures and early dewatering structures. Significantly, As(V) is associated with hematite, pyrite, and siderite but not with products of recent oxidative weathering such as goethite. These results are best explained by As(V) adsorption to Fe-oxide phases during deposition or very early diagenesis, prior to silicification. Microbially-mediated SO42- and As(V) reduction led to As2S3 precipitation, known to occur in modern reducing and arsenic-bearing aquifers. Later metamorphic alteration of As2S3 led to partial replacement, likely isomorphously, with FeAsS. The presence of minerals formed during different stages of As(V) reduction associated with early sedimentary textures show that a complete biogeochemical As redox cycle was possible by 3.2 Ga. The As(V)/As(III) pair has a more positive

  12. Efeito do número de ramos produtivos sobre o desenvolvimento da área foliar e produtividade da figueira Effect of the number of productive branches on the leaf area development and fig tree yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Santos Caetano

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o efeito do número de ramos produtivos sobre o desenvolvimento da área foliar e produtividade de figos verdes do cultivar Roxo de Valinhos. O experimento utilizando plantas de seis anos de idade, foi conduzido de novembro de 2002 a abril de 2003 na Pesagro-RJ, em Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ (21º19'23" de latitude sul, 41º19'40" de longitude oeste, altitude de 20 a 30 m e clima tipo Aw Köppen. Os tratamentos consistiram de plantas conduzidas com 16; 20; 24; 28 e 32 ramos. Utilizou-se do delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso e cinco repetições. O IAF aumentou linearmente em função do número de ramos produtivos, enquanto a produtividade mostrou um modelo de resposta quadrática aos tratamentos, provavelmente, limitada pelo sombreamento no interior do dossel que reduz a formação de gemas frutíferas. A maior produtividade observada de figos verdes foi obtida quando as plantas foram conduzidas com 24 ramos, sendo que, neste tratamento, a área foliar média de cada planta foi de 6,2 m².The objective of the present work was to study the effect of number of productive branches on the leaf area development and green fig tree yield of Roxo de Valinhos cultivar. The experiment using six year-old plants was carried out between November/2002 and April/2003 at Pesagro-RJ, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (21º19'23" South latitude, 41º19'40", West longitude, altitude of 20 a 30 m and Aw Koppen climate. The treatments consisted of plants conducted with 16, 20, 24, 28 and 32 productive branches in a randomized block design with five replicates. The LAI incresead linearly in function of productive branches, whereas the yield showed a quadratic response pattern to the treatments, probably, limited by shading in canopy that decrease the fruit bud formation. The highest green fig yield was observed in the treatment which had plants conducted with twenty four branches, where the mean leaf area was 6,2 m².

  13. Produção da figueira submetida a diferentes épocas de poda e irrigação The yield of fig trees as a function of pruning time and irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Leonel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar diferentes épocas de poda, correspondentes aos meses de julho, agosto, setembro e outubro dos anos de 2004/05 e 2005/06, com e sem o uso de irrigação, em figueira 'Roxo de Valinhos', no município de Botucatu-SP. Para atingir tal objetivo, adotou-se o delineamento experimental em parcelas subdivididas, com 5 repetições em blocos, onde as parcelas corresponderam aos tratamentos com e sem irrigação, e as subparcelas foram constituídas pelas podas realizadas nos quatro meses do ano. Foram avaliadas características de produção e alguns atributos de qualidade, que serviram para indicar a necessidade do uso de irrigação. Os resultados obtidos permitiram concluir que, na avaliação do desdobramento da interação entre épocas de poda e irrigação complementar, o mês de agosto, com o uso de irrigação complementar, foi o mais favorável para a realização da poda da figueira, proporcionando as maiores produções médias verificadas no ensaio, tanto no ciclo agrícola de 2004/05 (3.513,8 g planta-1, quanto em 2005/06 (4.110,7 g planta-1. Em condições não-irrigadas, não houve diferença estatística entre os meses de julho, agosto e setembro de 2004/05 e entre julho e agosto de 2005/06.The research had the purpose to determine the effects of pruning time in July, August, September and October of 2004/05 and 2005/06, with and without irrigation, in the fig trees 'Roxo de Valinhos', located in Botucatu/SP/Brazil. The experimental design was in split plots with 5 replications at random in lines, where the plots consisted in the treatments with and without irrigation and the subplots were composed of the pruning accomplished in the four months of the year. It was evaluated the yield and fruits quality. These characteristics could be used to evaluate the irrigation necessity. The August month with irrigation was the best time to the fig trees pruning, enhancing the yield (3.513,8 g plant-1 in 2004

  14. A trophic cascade induced by predatory ants in a fig-fig wasp mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Geng, Xiang-Zong; Ma, Li-Bin; Cook, James M; Wang, Rui-Wu

    2014-09-01

    A trophic cascade occurs when predators directly decrease the densities, or change the behaviour, of herbivores and thus indirectly increase plant productivity. The predator-herbivore-plant context is well known, but some predators attack species beneficial to plants (e.g. pollinators) and/or enemies of herbivores (e.g. parasites), and their role in the dynamics of mutualisms remains largely unexplored. We surveyed the predatory ant species and studied predation by the dominant ant species, the weaver ant Oecophylla smaragdina, associated with the fig tree Ficus racemosa in southwest China. We then tested the effects of weaver ants on the oviposition behaviour of pollinating and non-pollinating fig wasps in an ant-exclusion experiment. The effects of weaver ants on fig wasp community structure and fig seed production were then compared between trees with and without O. smaragdina. Oecophylla smaragdina captured more non-pollinating wasps (Platyneura mayri) than pollinators as the insects arrived to lay eggs. When ants were excluded, more non-pollinators laid eggs into figs and fewer pollinators entered figs. Furthermore, trees with O. smaragdina produced more pollinator offspring and fewer non-pollinator offspring, shifting the community structure significantly. In addition, F. racemosa produced significantly more seeds on trees inhabited by weaver ants. Oecophylla smaragdina predation reverses the dominance of the two commonest wasp species at the egg-laying stage and favours the pollinators. This behavioural pattern is mirrored by wasp offspring production, with pollinators' offspring dominating figs produced by trees inhabited by weaver ants, and offspring of the non-pollinator P. mayri most abundant in figs on trees inhabited by other ants. Overall, our results suggest that predation by weaver ants limits the success of the non-pollinating P. mayri and therefore indirectly benefits the mutualism by increasing the reproductive success of both the

  15. Influência da forma de acondicionamento sob frio na sobrevivência de mudas de figueira Influence of the cold conditioning form on the survival of fig tree seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco César Gonçalves

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available A figueira (Ficus carica L. vem se tornando uma das mais importantes plantas frutíferas cultivadas no sul e sudeste do país. A formação de mudas em viveiros, em comparação com a estaquia direta no campo, vem sendo cada vez mais utilizada. Objetivou-se com este trabalho estudar a influência da forma de acondicionamento sob frio no estabelecimento e sobrevivência de mudas de figueira, cv. Roxo de Valinhos. Propagadas por estaquia, mudas de um ano de idade foram preparadas durante o período de inverno (julho e colocadas para conservação em câmara fria com temperatura de 8°C, divididas em 11 tratamentos, com delineamento inteiramente casualizado, contendo três repetições e 18 mudas por parcela. Os tratamentos consistiram na forma de acondicionamento utilizando-se jornal, saco plástico, areia, serragem, parafina e algumas combinações desses materiais. O tempo de permanência em câmara fria foi de 120 dias. Nesse período, foram avaliados, na instalação do experimento e a cada 30 dias, os teores endógenos de aminoácidos e proteínas. Após esse período, as mudas foram plantadas diretamente no campo, em sulcos espaçados em 1 m e 0,20 cm entre plantas com delineamento em blocos casualizados com três repetições e 14 mudas por parcela. Foi avaliado o crescimento das brotações até 8 meses do plantio e, no final, a porcentagem de estacas brotadas que foram consideradas como plantas estabelecidas. O índice de vingamento atingiu, em média, 97,09% nos melhores tratamentos.The fig tree (Ficus carica L. is becoming one of the most important fruit plants grown in the south and southeast region of the country. The seedlings formation in nursery, compared to those obtained by direct field cut, is being more and more used. The purpose of this work was to study the influence of the cold conditioning form on the survival and establishment of fig seedlings, cv. Roxo de Valinhos. Propagated by cutting, one-year-old seedlings were

  16. Seed and Wasp Production in the Mutualism of Figs and Fig Wasps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Jin-yan; Zhao Nan-xian; Chen Yi-zhu; Jia Xiao-cheng; Deng Yuan; Yu Hui

    2005-01-01

    Figs (Moracea: Ficus) and fig wasps (Hymenoptera: Chlocloids: Agaonideae) depend on each other to complete their reproduction. Monoecious fig species and their pollinating wasps are in conflict over the use of fig ovaries which can either produce one seed or one wasp. From observation on Ficus virens Ait., we showed that female flowers with outer layer of ovaries (near to the wall of syconium) had no significant difference from that with inner and interval layer of ovaries (near to the syconium cavity), in which most seeds and wasps were produced. This meant that fig tree provided the same potential resource for seed and wasps production. Observation indicated that there was usually only one foundress in syconium at female flower phase and no competition pollinators. Measurement of the style length of female flowers and the ovipositor of pollinators indicated that most ovaries could be reached by pollinator's ovipositor. However, at the male flower phase, production of seeds was significantly more than that of wasps including non-pollinating wasps but there was no significant difference between seed and pollinating wasp production when without non-pollinating wasps produced. This result indicated that non-pollinating wasps competed ovaries not with seeds but with pollinating wasps for ovipositing. Bagged experiment showed that the sampling fig species was not self-sterile which was important for figs and wasps to survive bad season. Seed production in self-pollinated figs was not significantly different from total wasps including non-pollinating ones. This might be related with the weaker competition among wasps since bagged figs were not easy to reach by wasps from outside.

  17. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  18. Prevalence and phylogenetic analysis of Fig mosaic virus and Fig badnavirus-1 in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimoradian Mohammadreza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fig mosaic virus (FMV and Fig badnavirus-1 (FBV-1 are two of the most important fig infecting viruses. The incidence and distribution of FBV-1 and FMV were determined by testing in PCR 138 asymptomatic and symptomatic samples. These samples were collected from 60 fig gardens and agricultural fields in three provinces of Iran. The fig infecting viruses FBV-1 and FMV, respectively, were detected in 92 (66.6% and 34 (24.6% samples collected from all the surveyed fields. Overall, 24 out of 138 (17.3% samples showed mixed infections. The sequence analysis of a genomic fragment of 922 nt, comprising the entire ORF-2 and part of the 5’ termini of the ORF-3 of 10 selected FBV-1 Iranian isolates from different provinces, and of the type member from GenBank (Acc. No: JF411989, showed a variation ranging from 1 to 3% at nucleotide level and 1% at the amino acid level. The phylogenetic analysis grouped the FBV-1 isolates into two groups, with the Iranian isolates clustered in two distinct subgroups of group I, according to their geographical origin. In our research, the prevalence and sequence analysis of FBV-1 as the only identified DNA virus infecting fig trees, was studied for the first time in Iran.

  19. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  20. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  1. Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaja, Nawal

    2007-01-01

    This is a thematic lesson plan for young learners about palm trees and the importance of taking care of them. The two part lesson teaches listening, reading and speaking skills. The lesson includes parts of a tree; the modal auxiliary, can; dialogues and a role play activity.

  2. Position-dependent Shoot Production of Two Subtropical Fig Tree Species Following Crown Damage%两种亚热带榕属乔木植冠损伤后的位置依赖性枝发生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾波; 钟章成; 张小萍

    2004-01-01

    三峡库区需要大量植株用于三峡工程所涉及的诸多建设(如铁路、公路、建筑)之后的植被恢复和绿化.由于具有优美树冠和耐瘠薄土壤的能力,榕(Ficus microcarpa L.)和黄桷树(Fvirens Ait.var.sublanceolata(Miq.)Cornor) 在三峡库区作为绿化和行道树木大量栽植.在三峡库区,这两种树种苗木的培育主要通过切枝扦插的方式进行.大量切枝损伤植株植冠并且使叶组织数量减少,对植株生长有很大影响.植株生长与植株的枝发生格局有很大关系,为明确植冠损伤对植株生长的可能影响,对榕和黄桷树植冠损伤后的枝发生进行了研究.实验发现,切枝造成的植冠损伤对榕和黄桷树植株侧枝上的枝发生没有影响,不同损伤强度之间和不同损伤发生时间之间都不存在明显的差异.但是,植冠损伤后,榕和黄桷树植株主茎上的枝发生是位置依赖性的.植冠损伤不影响榕和黄桷树植株损伤处理后新生主茎段和具侧枝主茎段上的枝发生,却促进了损伤处理后裸露主茎段上的枝发生,并且裸露主茎段上枝发生的数量和密度随植冠损伤强度的升高而增大.此外,实验结果表明,秋季植冠损伤植株裸露主茎段上的枝发生要高于春季植冠损伤植株裸露主茎段上的枝发生;在榕和黄桷树的枝发生中,仅有裸露主茎段上增强的枝发生会促进植冠损伤植株对叶组织的生物量投资并有利于受损植株的恢复和生长.%In Three Gorges reservoir region, a great many of trees are needed for vegetation restoration and land greening following the massive constructions (e.g. Construction of roads, highways, buildings) associated with the great dam project at Three Gorges of Yangtze River. Ficus microcarpa L. And F. virens Ait. Var. Sublanceolata (Miq.) Cornor (Moraceae) are chosen and widely planted in this region as ornamental trees and/or shade trees due to their shapely crowns and ability of

  3. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  4. Fragmentation Effects on Diversity of Wasp Community and Its Impact on Fig/Fig Wasp Interaction in Ficus racemosa L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Wu WANG; Cheng-Yun YANG; Gui-Fang ZHAO; Jun-Xing YANG

    2005-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation usually results in alteration of species composition or biological communities. However, little is known about the effect of habitat fragmentation on the fig/fig wasp system.In this study, we compared the structure of a fig wasp community and the interaction between figs and fig wasps of Ficus racemosa L. in a primary forest, a locally fragmented forest and a highly fragmented forest.Our results show that, in the highly fragmented forest, the proportion of pollinator wasps is lower and the proportion of non-pollinator wasps is higher compared with the primary forest and locally fragmented forest. The proportion of fruits without pollinator wasps in mature fruits is also greatly increased in the highly fragmented forest. The proportion of galls in all female flowers increases in the highly fragmented forest, whereas the proportion of viable seeds does not change considerably. The disruption of groups of fig trees results in a decrease in pollinator wasps and even might result in the extinction of pollinator wasps in some extreme cases, which may transform the reciprocal interaction between figs and fig wasps into a parasite/host system. Such an effect may lead to the local extinction of this keystone plant resource of rain forests in the process of evolution, and thereby, may change the structure and function of the tropical rain forest.

  5. Disturbance effects on community structure of Ficus tinctoria fig wasps in Xishuangbanna,China:Implications for the fig/fig wasp mutualism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Juan Ma; Da-Rong Yang; Yan-Qiong Peng

    2009-01-01

    Fig trees are important components of tropical forests,because their fruits are eaten by so many vertebrates,but they depend on pollinating fig wasps to produce mature fruits.Disturbance to habitat structure can have a major impact on insect diversity and composition,potentially reducing fruit yields.We investigated the impact of habitat disturbance on the fig wasp community associated with male figs of Ficus tinctoria in Xishuangbanna,China.The community comprised one pollinator species Liporrhopalum gibbosae and six non-pollinating wasp species:Sycoscapter sp.1,Philotrypesis ravii,Philotrypesis sp.1,Neosycophila omeomorpha,Sycophila sp.1,and Walkerella sp.1.More disturbed areas were characterized by higher temperatures,less shade,and more vehicle noise.The response of the fig wasp community was complex,with no simple relationship between intensity of disturbance and pollinator abundance.However,the sex ratios (proportion of male progeny) of pollinators increased significantly in more disturbed areas.We conclude that potential changes in fig wasp community composition brought about by disturbance,are unpredictable,with unclear consequences for tropical rainforest biodiversity.

  6. Asymmetric or diffusive co-evolution generates meta-populations in fig-fig wasp mutualisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    WANG RuiWu YANG Yan WIGGINS Natasha L

    2014-01-01

    ..." that provide greater benefit to the fig,and fig wasps appear to have diversified their evolutionary strategies in response to discriminative enforcement by figs and competition among different fig wasp species...

  7. Interference competition and high temperatures reduce the virulence of fig wasps and stabilize a fig-wasp mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Wu; Ridley, Jo; Sun, Bao-Fa; Zheng, Qi; Dunn, Derek W; Cook, James; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Yu, Douglas W

    2009-11-12

    Fig trees are pollinated by fig wasps, which also oviposit in female flowers. The wasp larvae gall and eat developing seeds. Although fig trees benefit from allowing wasps to oviposit, because the wasp offspring disperse pollen, figs must prevent wasps from ovipositing in all flowers, or seed production would cease, and the mutualism would go extinct. In Ficus racemosa, we find that syconia ('figs') that have few foundresses (ovipositing wasps) are underexploited in the summer (few seeds, few galls, many empty ovules) and are overexploited in the winter (few seeds, many galls, few empty ovules). Conversely, syconia with many foundresses produce intermediate numbers of galls and seeds, regardless of season. We use experiments to explain these patterns, and thus, to explain how this mutualism is maintained. In the hot summer, wasps suffer short lifespans and therefore fail to oviposit in many flowers. In contrast, cooler temperatures in the winter permit longer wasp lifespans, which in turn allows most flowers to be exploited by the wasps. However, even in winter, only in syconia that happen to have few foundresses are most flowers turned into galls. In syconia with higher numbers of foundresses, interference competition reduces foundress lifespans, which reduces the proportion of flowers that are galled. We further show that syconia encourage the entry of multiple foundresses by delaying ostiole closure. Taken together, these factors allow fig trees to reduce galling in the wasp-benign winter and boost galling (and pollination) in the wasp-stressing summer. Interference competition has been shown to reduce virulence in pathogenic bacteria. Our results show that interference also maintains cooperation in a classic, cooperative symbiosis, thus linking theories of virulence and mutualism. More generally, our results reveal how frequency-dependent population regulation can occur in the fig-wasp mutualism, and how a host species can 'set the rules of the game' to ensure

  8. Interference competition and high temperatures reduce the virulence of fig wasps and stabilize a fig-wasp mutualism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Wu Wang

    Full Text Available Fig trees are pollinated by fig wasps, which also oviposit in female flowers. The wasp larvae gall and eat developing seeds. Although fig trees benefit from allowing wasps to oviposit, because the wasp offspring disperse pollen, figs must prevent wasps from ovipositing in all flowers, or seed production would cease, and the mutualism would go extinct. In Ficus racemosa, we find that syconia ('figs' that have few foundresses (ovipositing wasps are underexploited in the summer (few seeds, few galls, many empty ovules and are overexploited in the winter (few seeds, many galls, few empty ovules. Conversely, syconia with many foundresses produce intermediate numbers of galls and seeds, regardless of season. We use experiments to explain these patterns, and thus, to explain how this mutualism is maintained. In the hot summer, wasps suffer short lifespans and therefore fail to oviposit in many flowers. In contrast, cooler temperatures in the winter permit longer wasp lifespans, which in turn allows most flowers to be exploited by the wasps. However, even in winter, only in syconia that happen to have few foundresses are most flowers turned into galls. In syconia with higher numbers of foundresses, interference competition reduces foundress lifespans, which reduces the proportion of flowers that are galled. We further show that syconia encourage the entry of multiple foundresses by delaying ostiole closure. Taken together, these factors allow fig trees to reduce galling in the wasp-benign winter and boost galling (and pollination in the wasp-stressing summer. Interference competition has been shown to reduce virulence in pathogenic bacteria. Our results show that interference also maintains cooperation in a classic, cooperative symbiosis, thus linking theories of virulence and mutualism. More generally, our results reveal how frequency-dependent population regulation can occur in the fig-wasp mutualism, and how a host species can 'set the rules of the

  9. Occurrence of fig wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) in Ficus caria and F. microcarpa in Hatay, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Doğanlar, Mikdat

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on fig wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea), considering that only 2 fig wasp species, Blastophaga psenes (L.) and Philotrypesis caricae (L.) (new record) are associated with Ficus carica in Turkey. Five fig wasps species, namely Eupristina verticillata Waterston, Walkerella microcarpae Boucek, Odontofroggatia ishii Wiebes, Philotrypesis taiwanensis Chen, and Philotrypesis emeryi Grandi were found on Ficus microcarpa (L.), which is an Asian fig tree, and has been ornamentally ...

  10. Occurrence of fig wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) in Ficus caria and F. microcarpa in Hatay, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Doğanlar, Mikdat

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on fig wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea), considering that only 2 fig wasp species, Blastophaga psenes (L.) and Philotrypesis caricae (L.) (new record) are associated with Ficus carica in Turkey. Five fig wasps species, namely Eupristina verticillata Waterston, Walkerella microcarpae Boucek, Odontofroggatia ishii Wiebes, Philotrypesis taiwanensis Chen, and Philotrypesis emeryi Grandi were found on Ficus microcarpa (L.), which is an Asian fig tree, and has been ornamentally ...

  11. How to be an ant on figs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Anthony; Harrison, Rhett D.; Schatz, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    Mutualistic interactions are open to exploitation by one or other of the partners and a diversity of other organisms, and hence are best understood as being embedded in a complex network of biotic interactions. Figs participate in an obligate mutualism in that figs are dependent on agaonid fig wasps for pollination and the wasps are dependent on fig ovules for brood sites. Ants are common insect predators and abundant in tropical forests. Ants have been recorded on approximately 11% of fig species, including all six subgenera, and often affect the fig-fig pollinator interaction through their predation of either pollinating and parasitic wasps. On monoecious figs, ants are often associated with hemipterans, whereas in dioecious figs ants predominantly prey on fig wasps. A few fig species are true myrmecophytes, with domatia or food rewards for ants, and in at least one species this is linked to predation of parasitic fig wasps. Ants also play a role in dispersal of fig seeds and may be particularly important for hemi-epiphytic species, which require high quality establishment microsites in the canopy. The intersection between the fig-fig pollinator and ant-plant systems promises to provide fertile ground for understanding mutualistic interactions within the context of complex interaction networks.

  12. Urbanized landscapes favored by fig-eating birds increase invasive but not native juvenile strangler fig abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughlin, Trevor; Wheeler, Jessica H; Jankowski, Jill; Lichstein, Jeremy W

    2012-07-01

    Propagule pressure can determine the success or failure of invasive plant range expansion. Range expansion takes place at large spatial scales, often encompassing many types of land cover, yet the effect of landscape context on propagule pressure remains largely unknown. Many studies have reported a positive correlation between invasive plant abundance and human land use; increased propagule pressure in these landscapes may be responsible for this correlation. We tested the hypothesis that increased rates of seed dispersal by fig-eating birds, which are more common in urban habitats, result in an increase in invasive strangler fig abundance in landscapes dominated by human land use. We quantified abundance of an invasive species (Ficus microcarpa) and a native species (F. aurea) of strangler fig in plots spanning the entire range of human land use in South Florida, USA, from urban parking lots to native forest. We then compared models that predicted juvenile fig abundance based on distance to adult fig seed sources and fig-eating bird habitat quality with models that lacked one or both of these terms. The best model for juvenile invasive fig abundance included both distance to adult and fig-eating bird habitat terms, suggesting that landscape effects on invasive fig abundance are mediated by seed-dispersing birds. In contrast, the best model for juvenile native fig abundance included only presence/absence of adults, suggesting that distance from individual adult trees may have less effect on seed limitation for a native species compared to an invasive species undergoing range expansion. However, models for both species included significant effects of adult seed sources, implying that juvenile abundance is limited by seed arrival. This result was corroborated by a seed addition experiment that indicated that both native and invasive strangler figs were strongly seed limited. Understanding how landscape context affects the mechanisms of plant invasion may lead to

  13. Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Henri Epstein

    2016-01-01

    An algebraic formalism, developed with V. Glaser and R. Stora for the study of the generalized retarded functions of quantum field theory, is used to prove a factorization theorem which provides a complete description of the generalized retarded functions associated with any tree graph. Integrating over the variables associated to internal vertices to obtain the perturbative generalized retarded functions for interacting fields arising from such graphs is shown to be possible for a large cate...

  14. Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Henri

    2016-01-01

    An algebraic formalism, developped with V. Glaser and R. Stora for the study of the generalized retarded functions of quantum field theory, is used to prove a factorization theorem which provides a complete description of the generalized retarded functions associated with any tree graph. Integrating over the variables associated to internal vertices to obtain the perturbative generalized retarded functions for interacting fields arising from such graphs is shown to be possible for a large cat...

  15. Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Henri

    2016-01-01

    An algebraic formalism, developped with V.~Glaser and R.~Stora for the study of the generalized retarded functions of quantum field theory, is used to prove a factorization theorem which provides a complete description of the generalized retarded functions associated with any tree graph. Integrating over the variables associated to internal vertices to obtain the perturbative generalized retarded functions for interacting fields arising from such graphs is shown to be possible for a large category of space-times.

  16. Four viruses infecting figs in Western Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Y. ALDHEBIANI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases are compromising fig production in Saudi Arabia and in particular those caused by viruses. RT-PCR assays were conducted on 80 samples collected from four fig-growing provinces in the West Mecca region of Saudi Arabia, including the Fatima, Khulais, Rabigh and Alshifa valleys. Samples consisted of leaf tissues taken from caprifig and common fig trees. The presence of Fig mosaic virus (FMV, Fig leaf mottle-associated virus 1 (FLMaV-1, Fig leaf mottle-associated virus 2 (FLMaV-2 and Fig mild mottle-associated virus (FMMaV was assessed from the samples. RT-PCR results showed that all four viruses were present in the surveyed areas with different proportions of infection. Incidence was 69% of samples, with a peak of 80%, from the Alshifa and Fatima valleys, 60% from Rabigh and 55% from Khulais valley. FLMaV-1 was the prevailing virus (55% of samples, followed by FMV (34%, whereas FLMaV-2 (11% of samples and FMMaV (6% were less common. Most of the mosaic symptoms observed in surveyed fig orchards occurred with the presence of FMV. However, many other symptoms remained unexplained because of the arduous task of determining the involvement of other fig-infecting viruses with mosaic disease. This is the first report of FMMaV and FLMaV-2 in Saudi Arabia, and of FMV and FLMaV-1 in western Saudi Arabia. The virus status of this crop is probably compromised and a sanitation programme is required to produce healthy plant material in Saudi Arabia.

  17. The nutritional levels in leaves and fruits of fig trees as a function of pruning time and irrigation / Teores nutricionais em folhas e frutos de figueira, submetida a épocas de poda e irrigação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Tecchio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluating the nutritional content in leaves and fruits of the fg tree ‘Roxo de Valinhos’, pruned at different periods corresponding to the months of July, August, September and October in the years of 2004 and 2005, with and without the use of irrigation, in the county of Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil. To achieve this objective, the adopted experimental design was in blocks with subdivided plots and 5 replications, in which plots corresponded to treatments with and without irrigation and subplots included prunings done in the above-mentioned four months. The levels of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, B, Cu, Mn and Zn in leaves and fruits were evaluated in the two crop cycles. The results indicated no signifcant differences among macro and micronutrient levels in the leaves subjected to treatments with and without irrigation in the cycle 2004/05, except for cupper which showed higher level with the treatment including irrigation (6 mg kg-1. In the fruits, there was no difference, except for Zn, which also showed the highest levels (28 mg kg-1 with irrigation. In the crop cycle 2005/06, there were differences for N (40 g kg-1 and K (20 g kg-1 in the leaves, where the highest levels were observed with the treatment including irrigation. In the fruits, N had signifcant difference and its highest level was observed without irrigation (21 g kg-1. In relation to the pruning periods, signifcant differences were observed for Ca, Fe and Zn content in the leaves and Ca, K, Mg, S and Zn content in the fruits in the crop cycle 2004/05. In the cycle 2005/06, there were not differences among the levels of the evaluated nutrients in the leaves, and in the fruits there was difference for N, Ca and Cu.O trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar os teores nutricionais foliares e nos frutos de fgueira ‘Roxo de Valinhos’, podada em diferentes épocas, correspondentes aos meses de julho, agosto, setembro e outubro dos anos de 2004 e 2005, com e

  18. Probing the water interactions in clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, D.H. [Lausanne Univ., Lausanne (Switzerland); Fischer, H.E. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Skipper, N.T. [Univ. College, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    Clays, the microscopic mineral fraction of soils, are probably the most important substrate for interactions between water, the mineral world and the biosphere. A knowledge of the structuring of water and hydrated metal ions near clays surfaces is of importance in environmental science, including toxic and radioactive waste disposal, and in the industrial application of clays. The smectite clays, with their large hydrated internal surface areas represent excellent model systems for the interactions of aqueous phases with solid surface. We present the results of neutron diffraction experiments using isotopic substitutions to probe the structure in the aqueous interlayer region of Li-montmorillonite. (authors) 6 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Land use history and population dynamics of free-standing figs in a maturing forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Larissa; Stallard, Robert F.; Kalko, Elisabeth K.V.

    2017-01-01

    Figs (Ficus sp.) are often considered as keystone resources which strongly influence tropical forest ecosystems. We used long-term tree-census data to track the population dynamics of two abundant free-standing fig species, Ficus insipida and F. yoponensis, on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), a 15.6-km2 island in Lake Gatún, Panama. Vegetation cover on BCI consists of a mosaic of old growth (>400 years) and maturing (about 90–150 year old) secondary rainforest. Locations and conditions of fig trees have been mapped and monitored on BCI for more than 35 years (1973–2011), with a focus on the Lutz Catchment area (25 ha). The original distribution of the fig trees shortly after the construction of the Panama Canal was derived from an aerial photograph from 1927 and was compared with previous land use and forest status. The distribution of both fig species (~850 trees) is restricted to secondary forest. Of the original 119 trees observed in Lutz Catchment in 1973, >70% of F. insipida and >90% of F. yoponensis had died by 2011. Observations in other areas on BCI support the trend of declining free-standing figs. We interpret the decline of these figs on BCI as a natural process within a maturing tropical lowland forest. Senescence of the fig trees appears to have been accelerated by severe droughts such as the strong El Niño event in the year 1982/83. Because figs form such an important food resource for frugivores, this shift in resource availability is likely to have cascading effects on frugivore populations.

  20. Fig and mulberry cross-allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiaffa, Maria Filomena; Cataldo, Vito Michele; Tursi, Alfredo; Macchia, Luigi

    2003-11-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to ingestion of figs (Ficus carica) and mulberries (Morus nigra and Morus alba) are considered uncommon and have never been reported as occurring in the same patient. To determine whether hypersensitivity to figs and mulberries can induce cross-allergy. We describe 3 cases of associated fig and mulberry allergy in 3 patients with multiple sensitizations to food allergens (mostly fruit) and airborne allergens. The presence of specific IgE was investigated by skin prick tests and radioallergosorbent tests. The 3 patients had a convincing clinical history of food allergy caused by eating fresh figs, and in all 3 cases clinical and/or laboratory evidence of sensitization to mulberries was also collected. We reason that Ficus and Morus are closely related genera of the Moraceae family and speculate that hypersensitivity to figs and mulberries might be associated as the result of allergen cross-reactivity rather than mere coincidence.

  1. Purification and Characterization of a Proteolytic Enzyme from Fig Latex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lu; QU He-zhi; ZHANG Lei; DU Shan-shan; YANG Shuo; HAO Dong-yun; WANG Xiao-ping

    2008-01-01

    Ficin is an important component of plants in Ficus family such as fig latex. It is of special significance in medicine and industry because it exhibits activity throughout a wide range of temperature and pH values. In this work,we purified a component of ficin from the latex homogeneity of Shandong fig trees, and the properties of the purified ficin were studied. The current findings revealed that heavy metal ions were able to inhibit ficin, while DTT, L-cysteine,and β-ME were found to promote ficin activity. It was also observed that the half life of ficin at 65℃ was longer than 1 h and the Michaelis constant(Km) for casein hydrolyzation was determined to be 1.56 mg/mL. Our study shows that this purified ficin is a cysteine protease.

  2. Co-evolution: New evidence from Xishuangbanna Studies on co-evolution of figs and fig wasps in tropical forests, SW China win world attention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN Ling

    2009-01-01

    @@ Under the torrid summer sun in the deep tropical forest of Xishuangbanna in southwest China's Yunnan Province, Prof. YANG Darong and his young collaborators are busy doing field investigation.They gather around a fig tree and look carefully into its flowers: pear-shaped, hollow, and home to dozens of tiny fig wasps. They record data with notebook and camera,and collect samples for further laboratorial analysis.

  3. Acclimatization and leaf anatomy of micropropagated fig plantlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrystiane Fráguas Chirinéa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The survival of micropropagated plants during and after acclimatization is a limiting process to plant establishment. There is little information on how the anatomy of vegetative organs of Ficus carica can be affected by culture conditions and acclimatization. The present research aimed to study the effects of time on culture medium and substrates during the acclimatization of fig tree plantlets produced in vitro, characterizing some leaf anatomy aspects of plantlets cultured in vitro and of fig trees produced in field. Plantlets previously multiplied in vitro were separated and transferred into Wood Plant Medium (WPM where they were kept for 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 days. Different substrates were tested and studies on leaf anatomy were performed in order to compare among plantlets grown in vitro, plantlets under 20, 40 and 60 days of acclimatization, and field grown plants. Keeping plantlets for 30 days in WPM allowed better development in Plantmax during acclimatization. Field grown plants presented higher number of stomata, greater epicuticular wax thickness and greater leaf tissue production compared to in vitro ones. The leaf tissues of in vitro plantlets show little differentiation and have great stomata number compared with acclimatized plants, which reduce the number of stomata during the acclimatization process.

  4. Figs Are More Than Fallback Foods: The Relationship between Ficus and Cebus in a Tropical Dry Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel A. Parr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In many studies on primate feeding ecology, figs (Ficus spp. are characterized as fallback foods, utilized only when preferred sources of food are unavailable. However, for white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus living in northwestern Costa Rica, figs are a consistently important resource and may increase groupwide energy intake. We investigated whether visits to figs affect ranging and behavioural patterns of capuchins. Although daily range length and average travel speed do not differ on days when fig trees are visited, capuchins spend more time in directed travel and more time stationary on “fig days”. Capuchins also increase time spent foraging for fruit and decrease time spent foraging for invertebrates on days when figs trees are visited. Capuchins experience higher energy intake and lower energy output on “fig” days. Thus, the patterns of foraging for figs support an energy-maximization strategy and constitute an important nutritional resource for capuchins.

  5. Deep mtDNA divergences indicate cryptic species in a fig-pollinating wasp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Joanne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Figs and fig-pollinating wasps are obligate mutualists that have coevolved for ca 90 million years. They have radiated together, but do not show strict cospeciation. In particular, it is now clear that many fig species host two wasp species, so there is more wasp speciation than fig speciation. However, little is known about how fig wasps speciate. Results We studied variation in 71 fig-pollinating wasps from across the large geographic range of Ficus rubiginosa in Australia. All wasps sampled belong to one morphological species (Pleistodontes imperialis, but we found four deep mtDNA clades that differed from each other by 9–17% nucleotides. As these genetic distances exceed those normally found within species and overlap those (10–26% found between morphologically distinct Pleistodontes species, they strongly suggest cryptic fig wasp species. mtDNA clade diversity declines from all four present in Northern Queensland to just one in Sydney, near the southern range limit. However, at most sites multiple clades coexist and can be found in the same tree or even the same fig fruit and there is no evidence for parallel sub-division of the host fig species. Both mtDNA data and sequences from two nuclear genes support the monophyly of the "P. imperialis complex" relative to other Pleistodontes species, suggesting that fig wasp divergence has occurred without any host plant shift. Wasps in clade 3 were infected by a single strain (W1 of Wolbachia bacteria, while those in other clades carried a double infection (W2+W3 of two other strains. Conclusion Our study indicates that cryptic fig-pollinating wasp species have developed on a single host plant species, without the involvement of host plant shifts, or parallel host plant divergence. Despite extensive evidence for coevolution between figs and fig wasps, wasp speciation may not always be linked strongly with fig speciation.

  6. On the loss of the rheological properties of activated montmorilonitic clays; Perda das propriedades reologicas de argilas montmoriloniticas ativadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Avila, Joao Sampaio; Araujo, Raymundo Nonato Vieira de; Araujo, Ney Sa de; Campos, Ediraldo Barros; Nascimento, Reinaldo Ribeiro do [Sergipe Univ., Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    1988-12-31

    A theory is developed associating clay aging to two key factors: reversibility of the cationic exchange reaction (activation reaction) and real humidity content of the clay. Various rheological parameters were studied during the aging process, where clay quality was shown to decrease. Aging effects were verified with clays obtained from an extrusion and a batching reactor. (author) 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Asymmetric or diffusive co-evolution generates meta-populations in fig-fig wasp mutualisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, RuiWu; Yang, Yan; Wiggins, Natasha L

    2014-06-01

    Co-evolutionary theory assumes co-adapted characteristics are a positive response to counter those of another species, whereby co-evolved species reach an evolutionarily stable interaction through bilateral adaptation. However, evidence from the fig-fig wasp mutualistic system implies very different co-evolutionary selection mechanisms, due to the inherent conflict among interacted partners. Fig plants appear to have discriminatively enforced fig wasps to evolve "adaptation characteristics" that provide greater benefit to the fig, and fig wasps appear to have diversified their evolutionary strategies in response to discriminative enforcement by figs and competition among different fig wasp species. In what appears to be an asymmetric interaction, the prosperity of cooperative pollinating wasps should inevitably lead to population increases of parasitic individuals, thus resulting in localized extinctions of pollinating wasps. In response, the sanctioning of parasitic wasps by the fig should lead to a reduction in the parasitic wasp population. The meta-populations created by such asymmetric interactions may result in each population of coevolved species chaotically oscillated, temporally or evolutionarily.

  8. Multiple horizontal transfers of bacteriophage WO and host Wolbachia in fig wasps in a closed community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningxin eWang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Wolbachia-bacteriophage WO is a good model system for studying interactions between bacteria and viruses. Previous surveys of insect hosts have been conducted via sampling from open or semi-open communities; however, no studies have reported the infection patterns of phage WO of insects living in a closed community. Figs and fig wasps form a peculiar closed community in which the Ficus tree provides a compact syconium habitat for a variety of fig wasps. Therefore, in this study, we performed a thorough survey of Wolbachia and bacteriophage WO infection patterns in a total of 1406 individuals from 23 fig wasps species living on three different fig tree species. The infection rates of Wolbachia and phage WO were 82.6% (19/23 and 39.1% (9/23, respectively. Additionally, phage WO from fig wasps showed strong insect host specificity based on orf7 sequences from fig wasps and 21 other insect species. Probably due to the physical barrier of fig syconium, most phage WO from fig wasps form a special clade. Phylogenetic analysis showed the absence of congruence between WO and host Wolbachia, WO and insect host, as well as Wolbachia and fig wasps, suggesting that both Wolbachia and phage WO exchanged frequently and independently within the closed syconium. Thus, the infection pattern of bacteriophage WO from fig wasps appeared quite different from that in other insects living outside, although the effect and the transfer routes of phage WO are unclear, which need to be investigated in the future.

  9. Caracterização física, físico-química, enzimática e de parede celular em diferentes estádios de desenvolvimento da fruta de figueira Physical, chemico-physical, enzymatic and cell wall charazterization during the different development stages of the fig tree fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio A. Gonçalves

    2006-03-01

    diferentes estádios de desenvolvimento dos frutos. Com a maturação dos frutos, houve redução dos principais componentes dos polissacarídeos pécticos (galactose, arabinose e ramnose, enquanto os componentes da fração hemicelulósica (xilose, glucose e manose tenderam a aumentar. A solubilização da celulose e queda nos teores de hemicelulose se deu a partir dos 60 dias, quando o fruto, já na maturidade fisiológica, inicia o processo de amaciamento, em função da solubilização de pectinas, pela maior atividade das enzimas pectinametilesterase e poligalacturonase.With the objective of evaluating the physical, physical-chemical, enzymic and cell wall characterization during the different developmental stages of the fig tree fruits under irrigation in Northern Minas Gerais, the present work was developed during the 2001/2002 cropping cycle in the Unidade de Produção Frutícola da Escola Agrotécnica Federal de Salinas (Fruit Growing Unit of the Federal Agrotechnical School of Salinas (Eafsal, town of Salinas. Plants of two years and a half after transplanting and with twelve well developed primary branches (pernadas = the first strong branches of a tree and 2.5x1.5 m spacing were utilized in this experiment. The design applied was completely randomized with two replicates and a total of 40 marked plants. The data collected were concerning 2001/2002 cropping cycle for the June-pruned plants. Evaluated during the different developmental stages of fig tree fruits activity of the enzimes, chemical composition, physical evaluate, neutral sugars and cell wall components. As polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase activity was decreasing, polygalacturonase activity increased throughout the development of the fruits. The fruits reached harvest point for industry and in natura consumption at 30 and 75 days from the differentiation of the buds in syconium, respectively. A significant increase took place in the contents of total soluble solids, total soluble and reducing sugars

  10. Fitness reduction for uncooperative fig wasps through reduced offspring size: a third component of host sanctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandér, K C; Dafoe, A; Herre, E A

    2016-09-01

    Mutually beneficial interactions between two species-mutualisms-are ancient, diverse, and of fundamental ecological importance. Nonetheless, factors that prevent one partner from reaping the benefits of the interaction without paying the cost are still poorly understood. Fig trees and their unique pollinators, fig wasps, present a powerful model system for studying mutualism stability. Both partners depend completely on each other for reproduction, cooperation levels can be manipulated, and the resulting field-based fitness quantified. Previous work has shown that fig trees can impose two types of host sanctions that reduce the fitness of wasps that do not pollinate: (1) fig abortion, which kills all developing larvae, and (2) reduced number of wasp offspring in figs that are not aborted. Here we demonstrate a third component of host sanctions. Through manipulative field experiments, we show that for four of five studied species, offspring of pollen-free foundresses are only 50-90% the size of offspring of pollinating foundresses. We further show that in all four studied species, smaller wasps are less likely to reach and enter a flowering fig to become foundresses themselves. Therefore, the experimentally determined size reduction of offspring is estimated to cause an additional reduction of up to 80% in fitness for a pollen-free foundress. We determine that the size reduction of pollen-free offspring acts on the level of the entire fig fruit rather than on individual flowers. These results show that estimates of the fitness effect of host sanctions on uncooperative symbionts should consider not only offspring quantity but also offspring quality. We discuss implications beyond the fig tree-fig wasp mutualism.

  11. Climate warming and the potential extinction of fig wasps, the obligate pollinators of figs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevanandam, Nanthinee; Goh, Alexander G R; Corlett, Richard T

    2013-06-23

    Figs (Ficus) have a reciprocally obligate mutualism with tiny, short-lived (1-2 days) fig wasps (Agaonidae). The small size and short life of these pollinators is expected to make them more vulnerable to climate change than their larger and longer-lived hosts. We experimentally tested the thermal tolerances of four species of adult female fig wasp from equatorial Singapore. The results suggest that an increase of 3°C or more above the current temperatures experienced across much of the equatorial tropics would markedly decrease the active adult lifespan of all four species. Fig plants are the centre of an intricate web of specialist and generalist animals. Unless fig wasps can acclimate or adapt to warmer temperatures in time, these responses may disrupt the mutualism, potentially affecting multiple trophic levels.

  12. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  13. Codivergence and multiple host species use by fig wasp populations of the Ficus pollination mutualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLeish Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction between insects and plants takes myriad forms in the generation of spectacular diversity. In this association a species host range is fundamental and often measured using an estimate of phylogenetic concordance between species. Pollinating fig wasps display extreme host species specificity, but the intraspecific variation in empirical accounts of host affiliation has previously been underestimated. In this investigation, lineage delimitation and codiversification tests are used to generate and discuss hypotheses elucidating on pollinating fig wasp associations with Ficus. Results Statistical parsimony and AMOVA revealed deep divergences at the COI locus within several pollinating fig wasp species that persist on the same host Ficus species. Changes in branching patterns estimated using the generalized mixed Yule coalescent test indicated lineage duplication on the same Ficus species. Conversely, Elisabethiella and Alfonsiella fig wasp species are able to reproduce on multiple, but closely related host fig species. Tree reconciliation tests indicate significant codiversification as well as significant incongruence between fig wasp and Ficus phylogenies. Conclusions The findings demonstrate more relaxed pollinating fig wasp host specificity than previously appreciated. Evolutionarily conservative host associations have been tempered by horizontal transfer and lineage duplication among closely related Ficus species. Independent and asynchronistic diversification of pollinating fig wasps is best explained by a combination of both sympatric and allopatric models of speciation. Pollinator host preference constraints permit reproduction on closely related Ficus species, but uncertainty of the frequency and duration of these associations requires better resolution.

  14. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global common clay and shale industry, particularly in the U.S. It claims that common clay and shale is mainly used in the manufacture of heavy clay products like brick, flue tile and sewer pipe. The main producing states in the U.S. include North Carolina, New York and Oklahoma. Among the firms that manufacture clay and shale-based products are Mid America Brick & Structural Clay Products LLC and Boral USA.

  15. Seasonality of Leaf and Fig Production in Ficus squamosa, a Fig Tree with Seeds Dispersed by Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pothasin, Pornwiwan; Compton, Stephen G; Wangpakapattanawong, Prasit

    2016-01-01

    ...]. In tropical regions, climatic variations are less pronounced than elsewhere, leading to different plant responses in relation to climate. Seasons are often marked by differences in rainfall, with life-history events occurring in response to water availability [7]. The timing of biological often responds fluctuations of climate [8-10]. In general,...

  16. Proverbe et expression figée

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cîţu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Les deux types d’énoncés sentencieux abordés dans cette étude ne feront pas l’objet d’une analyse formelle de type structural, se proposant de décrire une éventuelle architecture et des propriétés syntaxiques spécifiques. Il ne s’agira non plus d’une approche stylistique, rhétorique ou pragmatique. En revanche, c’est une vision de sémantique référentielle qui sera projetée sur ce type de séquences, laquelle essaiera de surprendre un trait fondamental et constant des proverbes, qui permet de le distinguer des expressions figées, et dont l’identification est apte aussi de prédire quelles phrases de la langue pourraient accéder au statut des proverbes.

  17. Fig: ure it Out: A Creative Psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Murphy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Sigmund Freud’s contribution to the field of psychology was significant, not because it was flawless but because it challenged conventional views of the time.   In the modern era, an individual’s view of the world is constantly being challenged due, in large part, to insurmountable information made available for public consumption. It’s an unrelenting bombardment of input that has made prominent the rift between facts and beliefs. This inquisitive article is an exploration of that conflict.   By applying Freudian psychology to one of the most confrontational and debatable topics of the 21st century—the environment—Fig: ure It Out reviews our environmental problems from one psychological perspective. Do we define truths by facts or by the way in which we cope with new information? It’s an example of human behaviour within a changing world.

  18. Host pollination mode and mutualist pollinator presence: net effect of internally ovipositing parasite in the fig-wasp mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengping; Peng, Yanqiong; Compton, Stephen G.; Zhao, Yi; Yang, Darong

    2009-04-01

    The Ficus-their specific pollinating fig wasps (Chalcidoidea, Agaonidae) interaction presents a striking example of mutualism. Figs also shelter numerous non-pollinating fig wasps (NPFW) that exploit the fig-pollinator mutualism. Only a few NPFW species can enter figs to oviposit, they do not belong to the pollinating lineage Agaonidae. The internally ovipositing non-agaonid fig wasps can efficiently pollinate the Ficus species that were passively pollinated. However, there is no study to focus on the net effect of these internally ovipositing non-agaonid wasps in actively pollinated Ficus species. By collecting the data of fig wasp community and conducting controlled experiments, our results showed that internally ovipositing Diaziella bizarrea cannot effectively pollinate Ficus glaberrima, an actively pollinated monoecious fig tree. Furthermore, D. bizarrea failed to reproduce if they were introduced into figs without Eupristina sp., the regular pollinator, as all the figs aborted. Furthermore, although D. bizarrea had no effect on seed production in shared figs, it significantly reduced the number of Eupristina sp. progeny emerging from them. Thus, our experimental evidence shows that reproduction in Diaziella depends on the presence of agaonid pollinators, and whether internally ovipositing parasites can act as pollinators depends on the host fig’s pollination mode (active or passive). Overall, this study and others suggest a relatively limited mutualistic role for internally ovipositing fig wasps from non-pollinator (non-Agaonidae) lineages.

  19. Modified clay sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogler, H.S.; Srinivasan, K.R.

    1990-04-10

    This patent describes a clay-based sorbent. It comprises a clay having an external surface and lamellar layers; and cationic surfactant ions having a hydrocarbon portion and a cationic head portion, the cationic surfactant ions being irreversibly bound to the external surface by the hydrocarbon portion. This patent also describes cetylpyridinium-aluminum hydroxy-montmorillonite; the clay-based sorbent wherein the clay is a non-expandable clay; and the clay-based sorbent wherein the cationic surfactant ions are selected from the group consisting of ionized cetylpyridinium chloride and cetylakonium chloride.

  20. Host sanctions and pollinator cheating in the fig tree–fig wasp mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandér, K. Charlotte; Herre, Edward Allen

    2010-01-01

    Theory predicts that mutualisms should be vulnerable to invasion by cheaters, yet mutualistic interactions are both ancient and diverse. What prevents one partner from reaping the benefits of the interaction without paying the costs? Using field experiments and observations, we examined factors affecting mutualism stability in six fig tree–fig wasp species pairs. We experimentally compared the fitness of wasps that did or did not perform their most basic mutualistic service, pollination. We found host sanctions that reduced the fitness of non-pollinating wasps in all derived, actively pollinated fig species (where wasps expend time and energy pollinating), but not in the basal, passively pollinated fig species (where wasps do not). We further screened natural populations of pollinators for wasp individuals that did not carry pollen (‘cheaters’). Pollen-free wasps occurred only in actively pollinating wasp species, and their prevalence was negatively correlated with the sanction strength of their host species. Combined with previous studies, our findings suggest that (i) mutualisms can show coevolutionary dynamics analogous to those of ‘arms races’ in overtly antagonistic interactions; (ii) sanctions are critical for long-term mutualism stability when providing benefits to a host is costly, and (iii) there are general principles that help maintain cooperation both within and among species. PMID:20071379

  1. Biomechanics of substrate boring by fig wasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundanati, Lakshminath; Gundiah, Namrata

    2014-06-01

    Female insects of diverse orders bore into substrates to deposit their eggs. Such insects must overcome several biomechanical challenges to successfully oviposit, which include the selection of suitable substrates through which the ovipositor can penetrate without itself fracturing. In many cases, the insect may also need to steer and manipulate the ovipositor within the substrate to deliver eggs at desired locations before rapidly retracting her ovipositor to avoid predation. In the case of female parasitoid ichneumonid wasps, this process is repeated multiple times during her lifetime, thus testing the ability of the ovipositioning apparatus to endure fracture and fatigue. What specific adaptations does the ovipositioning apparatus of a female ichneumonoid wasp possess to withstand these challenges? We addressed this question using a model system composed of parasitoid and pollinator fig wasps. First, we show that parasitoid ovipositor tips have teeth-like structures, preferentially enriched with zinc, unlike the smooth morphology of pollinator ovipositors. We describe sensillae present on the parasitoid ovipositor tip that are likely to aid in the detection of chemical species and mechanical deformations and sample microenvironments within the substrate. Second, using atomic force microscopy, we show that parasitoid tip regions have a higher modulus compared with regions proximal to the abdomen in parasitoid and pollinator ovipositors. Finally, we use videography to film wasps during substrate boring and analyse buckling of the ovipositor to estimate the forces required for substrate boring. Together, these results allow us to describe the biomechanical principles underlying substrate boring in parasitoid ichneumonid wasps. Such studies may be useful for the biomimetic design of surgical tools and in the use of novel mechanisms to bore through hard substrates.

  2. New occurrence of non-pollinating fig wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) in Ficus microcarpa in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farache, Fernando H A; O, Vanessa T do; Pereira, Rodrigo A S

    2009-01-01

    Ficus microcarpa is an Asian fig tree that is ornamentally cultivated. The specific pollinator, Eupristina verticillata Waterston, and the non-pollinators Walkerella microcarpae Boucek and Philotrypesis emeryi Grandi, have been reported associated to F. microcarpa in Brazil. In here we report for the first time the occurrence of Odontofroggatia ishii Wiebes and Philotrypesis taiwanensis Chen et al in F. microcarpa in Brazil. Our results suggest that P. taiwanensis and O. ishii represent a recent influx of these wasps into Brazil. Considering that approximately 20 fig wasp species are associated with F. microcarpa in its native area, novel occurrences can be reported in the future in Brazil.

  3. Some pollinators are more equal than others: Factors influencing pollen loads and seed set capacity of two actively and passively pollinating fig wasps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellberg, Finn; Suleman, Nazia; Raja, Shazia; Tayou, Abelouahad; Hossaert-McKey, Martine; Compton, Stephen G.

    2014-05-01

    The nursery pollination system of fig trees (Ficus) results in the plants providing resources for pollinator fig wasp larvae as part of their male reproductive investment, with selection determining relative investment into pollinating wasps and the pollen they carry. The small size of Ficus pollen suggests that the quantities of pollen transported by individual wasps often limits male reproductive success. We assessed variation in fig wasp pollen loads and its influence on seed production in actively pollinated (Ficus montana) and passively pollinated (Ficus carica) dioecious fig trees.

  4. New occurrence of non-pollinating fig wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) in Ficus microcarpa in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Farache, Fernando H.A.; Ó,Vanessa T. do; Rodrigo A. S. Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Ficus microcarpa is an Asian fig tree that is ornamentally cultivated. The specific pollinator, Eupristina verticillata Waterston, and the non-pollinators Walkerella microcarpae Bouček and Philotrypesis emeryi Grandi, have been reported associated to F. microcarpa in Brazil. In here we report for the first time the occurrence of Odontofroggatia ishii Wiebes and Philotrypesis taiwanensis Chen et al in F. microcarpa in Brazil. Our results suggest that P. taiwanensis and O. ishii represent ...

  5. PROFITABILTY OF DRIED FIG PRODUCTION: A CASE STUDY OF TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yercan

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Dried fig production has a great important in the western part of Turkey in terms of foreign trade, farmers income and employment. In this paper, dried fig produced by farmers has been analyzed to determine production costs and profitability level. For this, selected farmers had been interviewed to find out return, structure of costs and profitability level. This is an opportunity to make comparison between products and countries. This is also information for decision makers for subsidizing policies. The production costs and the net profit of dried fig was found to be US $ 1,428/hectar and US $ 372/hectar, respectively. Dried fig production was found more profitable comparing with some other dried fruits. Dried fig producers spend a unit of money and earn 1.25 unit of money. Profitability of dried fig was found to be 125%. This is an indicator for the farmers willing to produce dried fig in their convenient conditions.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Epoxy/Clay Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo Jin; Seo, Dong Il; Lee, Jae Rock [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Taejon (Korea); Kim, Dae Su [School of Chemical Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Chongju (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    In this work, one of the smectitic clay, montmorillonite, was organically modified with dodecylammonium chloride to prepare the polymer/clay nanocomposites by melt intercalation. After DGEBA (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A)/clay nanocomposites has been mixed with weight percent of clay, it was synthesized by heating the mixture to the exfoliation temperature at a heating rate of 10 degree C/min. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the silicate interlayer of organically modified clay increased about 8 AA. No significant change in silicate interlayer of nanocomposites was observed with the increased clay content. The silicate interlayer of nanocomposites contained a uniform dispersion of exfoliated clay layers. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) showed that two exothermic processes occurred during the reaction. The lower temperature process was attributed to polymerization of pre-intercalated epoxide on the internal surfaces. Polymerization of the extragallery monomer on the external and internal surfaces of the clay particles occurred at the higher temperature. Thermal stability coefficient was increased with increasing the clay content as indicated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). 30 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Insect responses to host plant provision beyond natural boundaries: latitudinal and altitudinal variation in a Chinese fig wasp community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Compton, Stephen G; Quinnell, Rupert J; Peng, Yan-Qiong; Barwell, Louise; Chen, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Many plants are grown outside their natural ranges. Plantings adjacent to native ranges provide an opportunity to monitor community assembly among associated insects and their parasitoids in novel environments, to determine whether gradients in species richness emerge and to examine their consequences for host plant reproductive success. We recorded the fig wasps (Chalcidoidea) associated with a single plant resource (ovules of Ficus microcarpa) along a 1200 km transect in southwest China that extended for 1000 km beyond the tree's natural northern range margin. The fig wasps included the tree's agaonid pollinator and other species that feed on the ovules or are their parasitoids. Phytophagous fig wasps (12 species) were more numerous than parasitoids (nine species). The proportion of figs occupied by fig wasps declined with increasing latitude, as did the proportion of utilized ovules in occupied figs. Species richness, diversity, and abundance of fig wasps also significantly changed along both latitudinal and altitudinal gradients. Parasitoids declined more steeply with latitude than phytophages. Seed production declined beyond the natural northern range margin, and at high elevation, because pollinator fig wasps became rare or absent. This suggests that pollinator climatic tolerances helped limit the tree's natural distribution, although competition with another species may have excluded pollinators at the highest altitude site. Isolation by distance may prevent colonization of northern sites by some fig wasps and act in combination with direct and host-mediated climatic effects to generate gradients in community composition, with parasitoids inherently more sensitive because of declines in the abundance of potential hosts.

  8. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    OpenAIRE

    Petr Jelínek; Dobosz, Stanisław M.; Jaroslav Beňo

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC), the cis- is...

  9. Aflatoxins, patulin and ergosterol contents of dried figs in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, H; Nas, S

    2006-05-01

    Dried figs of three different categories, palatable, fluorescent, and cull, were investigated for their contents of aflatoxins (B(1), B(2), G(1) and G(2)), patulin, and ergosterol. Samples were obtained from four fig processing plants located in a major fig producing area in the Aegean Region in Turkey. Affinity column clean-up methods were employed for aflatoxins. All aflatoxins, patulin, and ergosterol were determined using high performance liquid chromatography. Palatable figs contaminated with trace amounts of aflatoxins, patulin, and ergosterol, so they posed no risk for the consumer when national and/or international regulatory limits were considered. Fluorescent figs were contaminated with high (117.9-471.9 ppb) aflatoxin levels and cull figs with high patulin (39.3-151.6 ppb) and ergosterol (4.5-18 ppm) levels. The total aflatoxins content was significantly correlated with the patulin content (r(2) = 0.813, p < 0.002) and the ergosterol content (r(2) = 0.920, p < 0.002) only in fluorescent figs. However there was no significant correlation between patulin and ergosterol contents of fluorescent figs. Furthermore, there were no significant correlations between the contents of any two of the three substances in cull figs. This is the first report on the presence of patulin and its co-occurrence with aflatoxin in dried figs.

  10. Effect of moisture content on textural attributes of dried figs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sara; Maftoon-Azad, Neda; Farahnaky, Asgar; Hosseini, Ebrahim; Badii, Fojan

    2014-10-01

    Due to their soft texture consumers prefer moist figs, which has motivated fig processors to increase the production of this product. However, as water enhances the browning reaction rate, moisture content optimisation of moist figs is very important. Processed figs must have suitable texture softness with browning kept to a minimum. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of moisture content on the textural attributes of dried figs. Hardness, compression energy, gradient, gumminess and chewiness of fig samples decreased with moisture content exponentially, whereas the trend of springiness and cohesiveness with change of moisture content was nearly constant. Moreover, in the texture profile analysis plot of rehydrated figs, the presence of negative area is an indication of adhesiveness which was zero in control dried figs. The results of the texture profile analysis tests proved the existence of a critical moisture content of about 18.4%, above which no significant effect of moisture content on textural parameters was found. The glass-rubber transition results from differential scanning calorimeter may explain the different texture profile analysis attributes of dried figs compared with rehydrated figs.

  11. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  12. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  13. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  14. Siderophore sorption to clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Patricia A; Haack, Elizabeth A; Mishra, Bhoopesh

    2009-08-01

    Siderophores are low molecular weight organic ligands exuded by some aerobic organisms and plants to acquire Fe under Fe-limited conditions. The hydroxamate siderophores may sorb to aluminosilicate clays through a variety of mechanisms depending upon the nature of the clay and of the siderophore along with solution conditions such as pH, ionic strength, and presence of metal cations. They may also affect metal binding to clays. Here, we review previous studies of siderophore sorption to aluminosilicate clays; briefly discuss how the techniques of X-ray diffractometry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy may be applied to such studies; review effects of siderophores on metal sorption to clays; and highlight some areas for future research.

  15. Effects of ingestion by neotropical bats on germination parameters of native free-standing and strangler figs (Ficus sp., Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Katrin; Albrecht, Larissa; Kalko, Elisabeth K V

    2010-06-01

    Fruit-eating animals can influence the germination success of seeds through transportation and handling. We experimentally tested the contribution of ingestion by the common fruit-eating bat, Artibeus jamaicensis (Phyllostomidae, Chiroptera), to the percentage and rate of seed germination of figs (Ficus, Moraceae), which are considered keystone species for many frugivores. We collected fruits from three species of native free-standing figs (subgenus Pharmacosycea: F. insipida, F. maxima and F. yoponensis) and three species of native strangler figs (subgenus Urostigma: F. nymphiifolia, F. obtusifolia and F. popenoei) on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. The germination success of seeds removed from fruit pulp either manually or by ingestion was very high (>92%), while seeds that were not removed from fruit pulp were destroyed by fast-growing fungi within a few days. The dynamics of seed germination were not influenced by ingestion, but differed between the two subgenera of figs. In free-standing figs, germination started significantly earlier (5.3 +/- 0.7 days) than in strangler figs (8.6 +/- 1.4 days). Furthermore, strangler seeds were covered with a sticky coating and their seedlings developed cotyledons faster than fine roots, in contrast to free-standing figs that showed the opposite pattern. Our results demonstrate that the germination of fig seeds is positively influenced by passage through the gut of A. jamaicensis. Furthermore, free-standing and strangler figs revealed differences in germination parameters that might be adaptive with respect to the suitability of microsites such as tree fall gaps or host trees for establishment.

  16. Effect of Injecting Hydrogen Peroxide into Heavy Clay Loam Soil on Plant Water Status, NET CO2 Assimilation, Biomass, and Vascular Anatomy of Avocado Trees Efecto de la Inyección de Peróxido de Hidrógeno en Suelo Franco Arcilloso Pesado, sobre el Estado Hídrico, Asimilación Neta de CO2, Biomasa y Anatomía Vascular de Paltos

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In Chile, avocado (Persea americana Mill.) orchards are often located in poorly drained, low-oxygen soils, situation which limits fruit production and quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of injecting soil with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a source of molecular oxygen, on plant water status, net CO2 assimilation, biomass and anatomy of avocado trees set in clay loam soil with water content maintained at field capacity. Three-year-old ‘Hass’ avocado trees were planted...

  17. YIELD OF COMMON FIG FERTIGATED WITH BOVINE BIOFERTILIZER IN THE SEMIARID REGION OF CEARÁ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO LIMEIRA DA SILVA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the productivity of the fig tree the organic fertirrigation cattle under different environmental conditions in Ceará semiarid region. The experiment was conducted in the experimental area of the Teaching Unit, Research and Extension, the IFCE, North Lemon Tree, EC. The experimental design was a randomized complete block design with split plots, with four replications and three plants per plot. The plots consisted of three rooms (full sun - PS; trellis - LT and greenhouse - EST, the subplots, the concentrations of bovine biofertilizer diluted in water in the following concentrations: T0 (0% of biofertilizer + 100% water; T1 (20% biofertilizer 80 +% water; T2 (40% biofertilizer + 60% water, T3 (60% biofertiliante + 40% water and subsubplot, the production cycles. The variables were evaluated: average fruit weight, fruit diameter, number of fruits per plant and yield. The cultivation environments (greenhouse and trellis promote better performance on average mass and diameter of the fruit compared to plants grown in full sun during the production cycles of the fig crop grown in Ceará semiarid region. The bovine biofertilizer in the concentration of 60% promoted the highest mass, diameter, number of fruits per plant and the fig crop yield.

  18. Geographic and taxonomic distribution of a positive interaction: ant-tended homopterans indirectly benefit figs across southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, J Hall; Compton, Stephen G; Zachariades, Costas; Ware, Anthony B; Nefdt, Rory J C; Rashbrook, Vanessa K

    1998-09-01

    Although species pairs and assemblages often occur across geographic regions, ecologists know very little about the outcome of their interactions on such large spatial scales. Here, we assess the geographic distribution and taxonomic diversity of a positive interaction involving ant-tended homopterans and fig trees in the genus Ficus. Previous experimental studies at a few locations in South Africa indicated that Ficus sur indirectly benefited from the presence of a homopteran (Hilda patruelis) because it attracted ants (primarily Pheidole megacephala) that reduced the effects of both pre-dispersal ovule gallers and parasitoids of pollinating wasps. Based on this work, we evaluated three conditions that must be met in order to support the hypothesis that this indirect interaction involves many fig species and occurs throughout much of southern Africa and Madagascar. Data on 429 trees distributed among five countries indicated that 20 of 38 Ficus species, and 46% of all trees sampled, had ants on their figs. Members of the Sycomorus subgenus were significantly more likely to attract ants than those in the Urostigma subgenus, and ant-colonization levels on these species were significantly greater than for Urostigma species. On average, each ant-occupied F.sur tree had 37% of its fig crop colonized by ants, whereas the value was 24% for other Ficus species. H. patruelis was the most common source for attracting ants, although figs were also attacked by a range of other ant-tended homopterans. P. megacephala was significantly more common on figs than other ant species, being present on 58% of sampled trees. Ant densities commonly exceeded 4.5 per fig, which a field experiment indicated was sufficient to provide protection from ovule gallers and parasitoids of pollinators. Forty-nine percent of all colonized F. sur trees sampled had ant densities equal to or greater than 4.5 per fig, whereas this value was 23% for other Ficus species. We conclude that there is

  19. How chimpanzees integrate sensory information to select figs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeakel, Justin D.; Bhat, Uttam; Ramsden, Lawrence; Wrangham, Richard W.; Lucas, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Figs are keystone resources that sustain chimpanzees when preferred fruits are scarce. Many figs retain a green(ish) colour throughout development, a pattern that causes chimpanzees to evaluate edibility on the basis of achromatic accessory cues. Such behaviour is conspicuous because it entails a succession of discrete sensory assessments, including the deliberate palpation of individual figs, a task that requires advanced visuomotor control. These actions are strongly suggestive of domain-specific information processing and decision-making, and they call attention to a potential selective force on the origin of advanced manual prehension and digital dexterity during primate evolution. To explore this concept, we report on the foraging behaviours of chimpanzees and the spectral, chemical and mechanical properties of figs, with cutting tests revealing ease of fracture in the mouth. By integrating the ability of different sensory cues to predict fructose content in a Bayesian updating framework, we quantified the amount of information gained when a chimpanzee successively observes, palpates and bites the green figs of Ficus sansibarica. We found that the cue eliciting ingestion was not colour or size, but fig mechanics (including toughness estimates from wedge tests), which relays higher-quality information on fructose concentrations than colour vision. This result explains why chimpanzees evaluate green figs by palpation and dental incision, actions that could explain the adaptive origins of advanced manual prehension. PMID:27274803

  20. Clay and concrete brick

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, MN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available are manufactured from raw clay as their primary ingredient. However concrete brick has also become a favoured material in recent times. This review will adumbrate the impact of these building materials on energy use and the environment....

  1. Clay goes patchy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kegel, W.K.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    2011-01-01

    Empty liquids and equilibrium gels have so far been only theoretical possibilities, predicted for colloids with patchy interactions. But evidence of both has now been found in Laponite, a widely studied clay.

  2. Clay Cap Test Program for the Mixed Waste Management Facility closure at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, J.W. (Main (Charles T.), Inc., Charlotte, NC (USA))

    1989-01-01

    A 58 acre low-level radioactive waste disposal facility at the Savannah River Site, a Department of Energy facility near Aiken, South Carolina, requires closure with a RCRA clay cap. A three-foot thick can requiring 300,000 cubic yards of local Tertiary Kaolin clay with an in-situ permeability of less than or equal to 1 {times} 10{sup -7} centimeters per second is to be constructed. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab permeability, in-situ permeability, compaction characteristics, representative kaolin clays from the Aiken, SC vicinity. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. ALA Pretreatment Improves Waterlogging Tolerance of Fig Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyan An

    Full Text Available 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, a natural and environmentally friendly plant growth regulator, can improve plant tolerance to various environmental stresses. However, whether ALA can improve plant waterlogging tolerance is unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of ALA pretreatment on the waterlogging-induced damage of fig (Ficus carica Linn. plants, which often suffer from waterlogging stress. ALA pretreatment significantly alleviated stress-induced morphological damage, increased leaf relative water content (RWC, and reduced leaf superoxide anion ([Formula: see text] production rate and malonaldehyde (MDA content in fig leaves, indicating ALA mitigates waterlogging stress of fig plants. We further demonstrated that ALA pretreatment largely promoted leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic electron transfer ability, and photosynthetic performance index, indicating ALA significantly improves plant photosynthetic efficiency under waterlogging stress. Moreover, ALA pretreatment significantly increased activities of leaf superoxide dismutase (SOD and peroxidase (POD, root vigor, and activities of root alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, indicating ALA also significantly improves antioxidant ability and root function of fig plants under waterlogging stress. Taken together, ALA pretreatment improves waterlogging tolerance of fig plants significantly, and the promoted root respiration, leaf photosynthesis, and antioxidant ability may contribute greatly to this improvement. Our data firstly shows that ALA can improve plant waterlogging tolerance.

  4. Woody plant roots fail to penetrate a clay-lined landfill: Managment implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, George R.; Handel, Steven N.

    1995-01-01

    In many locations, regulatory agencies do not permit tree planting above landfills that are sealed with a capping clay, because roots might penetrate the clay barrier and expose landfill contents to leaching. We find, however, no empirical or theoretical basis for this restriction, and instead hypothesize that plant roots of any kind are incapable of penetrating the dense clays used to seal landfills. As a test, we excavated 30 trees and shrubs, of 12 species, growing over a clay-lined municipal sanitary landfill on Staten Island, New York. The landfill had been closed for seven years, and featured a very shallow (10 to 30-cm) soil layer over a 45-cm layer of compacted grey marl (Woodbury series) clay. The test plants had invaded naturally from nearby forests. All plants examined—including trees as tall as 6 m—had extremely shallow root plates, with deformed tap roots that grew entirely above and parallel to the clay layer. Only occasional stubby feeder roots were found in the top 1 cm of clay, and in clay cracks at depths to 6 cm, indicating that the primary impediment to root growth was physical, although both clay and the overlying soil were highly acidic. These results, if confirmed by experimental research should lead to increased options for the end use of many closed sanitary landfills.

  5. Semivariogram models for estimating fig fly population density throughout the year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Paulo Batistella Pasini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to select semivariogram models to estimate the population density of fig fly (Zaprionus indianus; Diptera: Drosophilidae throughout the year, using ordinary kriging. Nineteen monitoring sites were demarcated in an area of 8,200 m2, cropped with six fruit tree species: persimmon, citrus, fig, guava, apple, and peach. During a 24 month period, 106 weekly evaluations were done in these sites. The average number of adult fig flies captured weekly per trap, during each month, was subjected to the circular, spherical, pentaspherical, exponential, Gaussian, rational quadratic, hole effect, K-Bessel, J-Bessel, and stable semivariogram models, using ordinary kriging interpolation. The models with the best fit were selected by cross-validation. Each data set (months has a particular spatial dependence structure, which makes it necessary to define specific models of semivariograms in order to enhance the adjustment to the experimental semivariogram. Therefore, it was not possible to determine a standard semivariogram model; instead, six theoretical models were selected: circular, Gaussian, hole effect, K-Bessel, J-Bessel, and stable.

  6. First results from Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tilvi, V.; Pirzkal, N.; Malhotra, S.

    2016-01-01

    in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with G102 grism on Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6{\\sigma}) in multiple observational position angles (PA), with total integrated Ly{\\alpha} line flux of 1.06+/- 0.12 e10-17erg s-1cm-2. The line flux......-redshift AGN yet found. Thus, this observation from the Hubble Space Telescope clearly demonstrates the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy to study the epoch of reionization....

  7. Efeito de vespas não-polinizadoras sobre o mutualismo Ficus - vespas de figos Effect of non-pollinating fig wasps over fig-fig wasp mutualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa G. Elias

    Full Text Available Relações ecológicas interespecíficas, que resultam em benefício para todos os organismos participantes, são conhecidas como mutualismo. No entanto, tal cooperação abre espaço para o surgimento de estratégias oportunistas (ou de trapaça, representadas por indivíduos parasitas do mutualismo, que recebem o benefício de um dos parceiros sem oferecer nada em troca. A interação figueiras - vespas - de - figo é um sistema adequado para o estudo do mutualismo e de estratégias oportunistas (parasitas de mutualismos. Representantes do gênero Ficus (Moraceae apresentam uma relação mutualística com pequenas vespas polinizadoras (Agaonidae e são explorados por outras espécies de vespas não-polinizadoras. Esse trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o impacto das vespas não-polinizadoras sobre o mutualismo Ficus citrifolia e suas vespas polinizadoras, Pegoscapus tonduzi Grandi, 1919. Para tal, foi comparada a produção de aquênios (função feminina e de fêmeas da espécie polinizadora (função masculina entre amostras de sicônios altamente infestados e pouco infestados por vespas não-polinizadoras, coletadas nos municípios de Londrina (Paraná, Campinas e Ribeirão Preto (São Paulo, Brasil. Nossos resultados apontaram que as vespas não-polinizadoras exercem impacto negativo nos componentes feminino e masculino da planta, sendo maior no masculino. A produção de vespas polinizadoras foi cerca de sete vezes menor nos figos infestados, ao passo que a produção de aquênios foi 1,5 vez menor nesses mesmos figos. Hipóteses sobre a estabilidade do mutualismo na presença das espécies oportunistas são discutidas.Mutualism is the name given to interspecific interactions which result in benefit for all partners involved. However, such cooperation is open to opportunistic strategies: individuals that extract the benefit from the partner, but do not offer any benefit in exchange. The fig-fig wasp interaction is an appropriate case to

  8. Rooting of hardwood cuttings of Roxo de Valinhos fig (Ficus carica L. with different propagation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Antônio Nava

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the substrate, cuttings collection time, the position and the cutting depth, and the propagation environment on rooting of 'Purple Valinhos' fig tree cuttings in Southwestern Paraná, Brazil. Two experiments were carried out at UTFPR, Câmpus Dois Vizinhos, with hardwoods cuttings from Roxo de Valinhos fig tree. The first experiment used a randomized block design, in 3 x 3 x 2 factorial (substrate x environment x collection time, with four replications of 10 cuttings per plot. The cuttings were collected in the first fifteen days of July and August. The substrates were sand, soil and the mixture of these [1:1 (v / v]. The environments used were open sky, tunnel with plastic cover and tunnel with half-shade black net cover. The second experiment used a randomized block design, 2 x 2 x 3 factorial (shoot cutting position x soil cover x shoot cutting depth, with four replications of 12 cuttings per plot. In the factor position, the vertically (0 º inclination and inclined (45 º inclination shoot cuttings were evaluated. Soil cover was tested with mulching plastic cover or not. The tested depths were 1/3, 1/2 and 2/3 in relation to the total length of the shoot cutting. In both experiments, the following were analyzed: rooting and mortality indices, number of leaves and primary shoots, length of the three largest roots per cutting. It was conclude that, the protected environment with plastic cover on sand as substrate must recommended for the rooting of fig estaca, collecting them in the first half of July. The inclination position and cutting depth of the estaca and the substrate coverage with plastic mulching did not influence the results.

  9. Magnificent Clay Murals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2007-01-01

    Each August, third grade artists at Apple Glen Elementary in Bentonville, Arkansas, start the school year planning, creating, and exhibiting a clay relief mural. These mural projects have helped students to acquire not only art knowledge and techniques, but an even more important kind of knowledge: what it means to plan and successfully complete a…

  10. Rattles of Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, Donna

    1983-01-01

    Using the rattles of Native American cultures as inspiration, students used pinching, coiling, and slab and molding techniques to form the bodies of rattles and clay pellets for sound. Surface decoration included glazed and unglazed areas as well as added handles, feathers, and leather. (IS)

  11. Dose mapping of dried figs treated by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polonia, I.; Portugal, L.; Andrade, M. E

    1998-06-01

    The irradiation parameters of two varieties of dried figs were determined in a fixed position. The Dose Uniformity (U=Dmax/Dmin) obtained for Fricke Dosimeter was 1.4 and for YR Gammachrome 1.3. The isodose curves were built using a geostatistical gridding method, the Kriging method.

  12. Aflatoxins in hazelnuts and dried figs: Occurrence and exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabak, Bulent

    2016-11-15

    A total of 300 samples of hazelnuts and dried fig were analysed for the incidence of any aflatoxins (AFs). High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) method was used to quantify the amounts of AFs. The limit of quantification varied from 0.21 to 0.30μgkg(-1). No AFs were detected in shells of the hazelnuts, while six raw hazelnut kernel samples (12%) and five roasted hazelnut kernel samples (8.3%) contained AFs ranging from 0.09 to 11.3μgkg(-1) and from 0.17 to 11.2μgkg(-1), respectively. Sixteen dried fig samples (12.3%) contained AFs ranging from 0.1 to 28.2μgkg(-1) and a mean value of 3.8μgkg(-1). Three hazelnuts and six dried fig samples exceeded the European maximum limits (MLs) of 5 and 2μgkg(-1) for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), respectively. The contribution of hazelnuts to AFs exposure is higher than that of dried figs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 21 CFR 145.131 - Artificially sweetened canned figs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with pectin and may contain any mixture of any edible organic salt or salts and any edible organic acid... prescribed for canned figs by § 145.130. If the packing medium is thickened with pectin, the label shall bear the statement “thickened with pectin”. When any organic salt or acid or any mixture of two or more...

  14. Quality of rooting environments and patterns of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in strangler figs in a Mexican palmetto woodland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Roger; López, Juan C

    2007-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in strangler figs, spore richness, and abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were quantified in epiphytic and ground-rooted trees in a Sabal palmetto woodland that had marked heterogeneity in rooting environments for hemiepiphytic plants. An inoculation experiment was performed to assess whether low spore density could limit mycorrhizal colonization. There was no significant difference in mycorrhizal colonization among Ficus species, but epiphytic plants in nutrient-rich rooting environments had less mycorrhizal colonization than ground-rooted plants in low-nutrient soils. However, richness and abundance of spores was low, and to some extent, this limited the mycorrhizal colonization of strangler figs. Nevertheless, our results suggest intraindividual adjusting levels of root colonization in strangler figs in accordance with mineral availability. Such responses could maximize the cost-benefit balance of arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions throughout the development of strangler figs from epiphytic young plants to ground-rooted trees.

  15. Physical Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of clays mostly depends on its mineral and chemical composition, particle size and pH value. The mutual influence of these parameters is complex. Illite is the most abundant clay mineral in Latvia and usually used in building materials and pottery. The viscosity and plasticity of Latvian clays from several deposits were investigated and correlated with mineral composition, particle size and pH value. Fractionated and crude clay samples were used. The p...

  16. Initial assessment of natural diversity in Mexican fig landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, M T; Mendoza-Castillo, V M; Valadez-Moctezuma, E; Muratalla-Lúa, A

    2013-09-23

    The common fig (Ficus carica L.) was introduced into Mexico by Spanish Franciscan missionaries in the 16th century. It is widely assumed that Mexican figs are the Spanish cultivar Black Mission. We collected and propagated 12 fig plants from six landraces from different states in Central Mexico that represent different climate. All of them were grown in a greenhouse at Universidad Autónoma Chapingo, in the State of Mexico. During the experimental period, the greenhouse had an average temperature and relative humidity of 29.2° ± 5.4°C (SEM) and 78.1 ± 6.7% (SEM), respectively. Morphological characterization was done following a selected set of quantitative and qualitative descriptors established by the IPGRI. DNA analysis was based on a combination of ISSR and RFLP markers. We observed great diversity mainly in fruit weight (28.1-96.2 g), fruit shape (ovoid, pyriform), and neck length (0.97-3.80 cm), which could not be explained by environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity. The Nei and Li/Dice similarity coefficient between landraces was determined by cluster analysis using the UPGMA method. Based on the morphological characterization and DNA fingerprinting data presented in this study, our results showed that after hundreds of years, black figs have adapted to local environmental condition in Central Mexico, yielding at least six clearly distinct landraces that represent valuable and previously undescribed genetic diversity. We also suggested names for those landraces according to their location and established a basis for further agronomic and molecular characterization of fig landraces.

  17. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  18. Enhanced coal and mineral flotation by selective clay agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, D.; Chen, G.L.; Fan, M.M.; Zhou, X.H.; Zhao, C.; Aron, M.; Wright, J. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the performance of clay binding agents for enhancing coal and mineral flotation. Mechanical and column flotation tests were conducted on coal and potash samples. Several process parameters were examined, e.g. impeller rotation speed, binder dosage, slurry solids content, and collector dosage. The results show that the Georgia-Pacific reagents improved flotation efficiency under some process conditions, especially at higher solids percentage and higher impeller rotation speed. 26 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  20. Clay at Nili Fossae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This image of the Nili Fossae region of Mars was compiled from separate images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) and the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), two instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The images were taken at 0730 UTC (2:30 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 4, 2006, near 20.4 degrees north latitude, 78.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36 to 3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. HiRISE's image was taken in three colors, but its much higher resolution shows features as small as 30 centimeters (1 foot) across. CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, discovered that some of the most ancient regions of Mars are rich in clay minerals, formed when water altered the planet's volcanic rocks. From the OMEGA data it was unclear whether the clays formed at the surface during Mars' earliest history of if they formed at depth and were later exposed by impact craters or erosion of the overlying rocks. Clays are an indicator of wet, benign environments possibly suitable for biological processes, making Nili Fossae and comparable regions important targets for both CRISM and HiRISE. In this visualization of the combined data from the two instruments, the CRISM data were used to calculate the strengths of spectral absorption bands due to minerals present in the scene. The two major minerals detected by the instrument are olivine, a mineral characteristic of primitive igneous rocks, and clay. Areas rich in olivine are shown in red, and minerals rich in clay are shown in green. The derived colors were then overlayed on the HiRISE image. The area where the CRISM and HiRISE data overlap is shown at the upper left, and is about 5 kilometers (3 miles) across. The three boxes outlined in blue are enlarged to show how the different minerals in the scene match up with different landforms. In the image at the upper right

  1. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Jelínek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC, the cis- isomerism of bentonite is expected, while two peaks of de-hydroxylation (about 550 and 850 ºC are expected in the trans- one. In this overview, the bentonite structure, the water – bentonite interaction and the swelling behavior of bentonite in connection with the general technological properties of bentonite molding mixture are summarized. Further, various types of methods for determination of bentonite thermostability are discussed, including instrumental analytical methods as well as methods that employ evaluation of various technological properties of bentonite binders and/or bentonite molding mixtures.

  2. Thermostability of montmorillonitic clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petr Jelnek; Stanisaw M.Dobosz; Jaroslav Beo; Katarzyna Major-Gabry

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite is one of the most widespread used clays connected with various applications. In the case of foundry technology, bentonite is primarily used as a binder for mold manufacture. Thermal stability of bentonites is a natural property of clay minerals and it depends on the genesis, source and chemical composition of the clay. This property is also closely connected to bentonite structure. According to DTA analysis if only one peak of dehydroxylation is observed (about 600 ºC), thecis- isomerism of bentonite is expected, while two peaks of de-hydroxylation (about 550 and 850 ºC) are expected in thetrans- one. In this overview, the bentonite structure, the water - bentonite interaction and the sweling behavior of bentonite in connection with the general technological properties of bentonite molding mixture are summarized. Further, various types of methods for determination of bentonite thermostability are discussed, including instrumental analytical methods as wel as methods that employ evaluation of various technological properties of bentonite binders and/or bentonite molding mixtures.

  3. A Study of Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites Consisting of Unmodified Clay and Organo Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Edward

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized from DGEBA resin and montmorillonite clay with an in-situ polymerization. One type of untreated clay and two types of organo clay were used to produce the nanocompsoites. The aims of this study were to examine the nanocomposite structure using different tools and to compare the results between the unmodified clay and modified clays as nanofillers. Although diffractogram in reflection mode did not show any apparent peak of both types of materials, the transmitted XRD (X-Ray Difraction graphs, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter analysis and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope images revealed that the modified clay-epoxy and unmodified clay-epoxy provides different results. Interestingly, the micrographs showed that some of the modified clay layers possessed non-exfoliated layers in the modified clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Clay aggregates and a hackle pattern were found from E-SEM images for both types of nanocomposite materials. It is shown that different tools should be used to determine the nanocomposite structure.

  4. A study on alluvial clays of Darrang and Kamrup district of Assam by x-ray and other physical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharia, Ganeswar

    The first Chapter gives a general introduction about the clays and alluvial clays. In this chapter a broad discussion on the general features of the clays and clay minerals have been explained. A short description on seven different types of clay, the areas of application in the past and present are incorporated. It gives an insight into the important industrial and commercial utility of the alluvial clays or clay. This chapter also deals with the review of previous and present work on clay minerals including home state. The objectives of the present study have been mentioned in the last part of this chapter. The Second chapter deals with the occurrence and formation of the clays. The structural features of the clays have been described with due emphasis on two layered Kaolinite group, three layered Illite and Montmorillonite group, Chlorite group and Vermiculite groups. Profiles of the clays have been described briefly in this chapter. Some causes are mentioned for which the plasticity of the clays developed. A general classification of the clays in relation to the clay mineral study and recommendations of AIPEA is shown in the Table No. 2.5(1) Here, the behaviour of clay minerals in relation to water and foreign Ions in acquons solution are briefly enumerated. A sketch diagram for behaviour of clays in relation to water is shown in Fig. 2.6(1). The third chapter deals with the experimental methodology and the areas of investigation or places from where the samples were collected are shown in Map (Fig. 3.1.) and in Chart 3.1.1. In this chapter the specimen collection process and procedures of preparatory washed and chemically treated samples are described elaborately. Here, the preparation of H+, K + and Mg++ clay, powder clay, pellet slide are mentioned. A general interpretation about the XRD, XRF and FTIR instrument and the procedure of treatments are synthesised. The different perimeters for this study are also mentioned here with their respective units and the

  5. Selective organic synthesis over metal cation-exchanged clay catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateiwa, J.; Uemura, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Results of recent studies conducted by the authors are reviewed on the use, as catalysts, of metal cation-exchanged montmorillonite (M{sup n+}-mont), a modified natural clay with a layer structure, and metal cation-exchanged fluor-tetrasilicic mica (M{sup n+}-TSM), a synthetic clay with a layer structure, for the following organic synthesis: (1) Friedel-Crafts alkylation of phenol with 4-hydroxybutan-2-one to produce 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)butan-2-one (raspberry ketone), (2) rearrangement of alkyl phenyl ethers to corresponding alkylphenols, (3) aromatic alkylation of phenol with aldehydes and ketones to produce corresponding gem-bis(hydroxyphenyl)alkanes (bisphenols) and alkylphenols, respectively, (4) a facile and an almost quantitative substrate-selective acetalization, (5) alkane oxidation with aqueous tert-butyl hydroperoxide, (6) Prins reaction of styrenes with aldehydes using clay as a Bronsted acid, and (7) inter-and intra-molecular carbonyl-ene reaction using clay as a Lewis acid in condition similar to that of Prins reaction. In almost all cases, the clay catalysts could be regenerated and reused several times, after filtration, washing and drying. 42 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Physical-chemical characteristics of figs (Ficus carica) preready to submitted to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lucia C.A.S.; Harder, Marcia N.C.; Arthur, Paula B.; Lima, Roberta B.; Modlo, Debora M.; Arthur, Valter [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiobiologia e Ambiente], e-mail: lcasilva@cena.usp.br, e-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br, e-mail: mnharder@cena.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    Fig (Ficus carica) is the fruit of the fig tree, original of Mediterranean, has fleshy and succulent pulp, besides being sweetened slightly. It is very appreciated for dessert. The immature form (green) can be used for make a sweet home-made. The aim of the present work was irradiate samples of fruits of pre-ready green fig, seeking the increase of the useful shelf-life. The samples were washed, made hygienic and submitted the cooking by a period of 15 minutes, after the cooking they were put in an drainer to expect cooling the fruits and after that process they were wrapped in plastic sack of 15x30cm and sealed in a manual sealing and stored at 8 deg C in a OBD camera for 7 days. Later samples were irradiated with doses of: 0 (control); 1.0 and 2.0 kGy, under a rate of dose of 0.601 kGy/h, in a Gammacell-220 irradiator and stored by 24 hours to 8 deg C in OBD. Each treatment was consisted with 3 repetitions with 10 fruits each. The samples were appraised, immediately after the irradiation, as for the parameters pH, soluble solids content, color peel, color pulp, texture, chlorophyll A, chlorophyll B and total carotenoids. The statistical analysis of the results was accomplished, through outline entirely randomized by test F for variance analysis and when significant compared by Tuckey test. By the obtained results was concluded that there was not significant difference between the treatments and the control. After four days the samples presented microbiological contamination, they went desecrated. (author)

  7. When should fig fruit produce volatiles? Pattern in a ripening process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Renee M.; Ranganathan, Yuvaraj; Krishnan, Anusha; Ghara, Mahua; Pramanik, Gautam

    2011-11-01

    Ripe fruit need to signal their presence to attract dispersal agents. Plants may employ visual and/or olfactory sensory channels to signal the presence of ripe fruit. Visual signals of ripe fruit have been extensively investigated. However, the volatile signatures of ripe fruit that use olfactorily-oriented dispersers have been scarcely investigated. Moreover, as in flowers, where floral scents are produced at times when pollinators are active (diurnal versus nocturnal), whether plants can modulate the olfactory signal to produce fruit odours when dispersers are active in the diel cycle is completely unknown. We investigated day-night differences in fruit odours in two species of figs, Ficus racemosa and Ficus benghalensis. The volatile bouquet of fruit of F. racemosa that are largely dispersed by bats and other mammals was dominated by fatty acid derivatives such as esters. In this species in which the ripe fig phase is very short, and where the figs drop off soon after ripening, there were no differences between day and night in fruit volatile signature. The volatile bouquet of fruit of F. benghalensis that has a long ripening period, however, and that remain attached to the tree for extended periods when ripe, showed an increase in fatty acid derivatives such as esters and of benzenoids such as benzaldehyde at night when they are dispersed by bats, and an elevation of sesquiterpenes during the day when they are dispersed by birds. For the first time we provide data that suggest that the volatile signal produced by fruit can show diel differences based on the activity period of the dispersal agent.

  8. 80 FR 65469 - NESHAP for Brick and Structural Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    ... Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal...; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing. All major sources in these categories must meet...

  9. Papain Induced Occupational Asthma with Kiwi and Fig Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nannan; Yin, Jia; Wen, Liping

    2016-03-01

    Papain is a proteolytic enzyme which is widely used in food industry, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Occupational and non-occupational papain allergies have previously been documented; however, there are limited publications about papain allergy with its relative fruit allergy. Here, we present a case of occupational, IgE-mediated papain allergy with kiwi fruit and fig fruit allergy. A 53-year-old man suffered from rhinitis for several years, with the onset of his symptoms coinciding with the time he started to work at a sausage processing plant where papain is often used as a meat tenderizer. He began to experience symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath and wheezing shortly after starting work 5 years ago. Furthermore, he experienced several episodes of oral itching, and tongue and oropharyngeal angioedema after injestion of kiwi fruit and fig fruit. The patient had a lifelong history of allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, and childhood asthma. Specific IgE was positive to kiwi fruit, papain and chymopapain (2.95 kUA/L, >100 kUA/L, and 95.0 kUA/L, respectively). Similar bands at 10-15 kDa in blotting with papain and kiwi fruit extracts were found. This patient showed a potential association between papain allergy and sensitization to kiwi fruit. We also reviewed 13 patients with papain allergy published in the literature, with 85% (11/13) of the patients sensitized through the respiratory tract, and 40% (4/11) having atopy. Further studies should focus on the determination of cross-reactive allergens between papain and its fruit relatives, and the prevalence of food allergy in patients with papain allergy should be investigated in a relatively large cohort.

  10. The Effect of Compost and the Ripe Fruit Waste of Fig on some Physical Properties of Surface Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zahra dianat maharluei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In arid and semi-arid soils, low organic matter is one of the barriers to achieving optimal performance. The soils with more organic matter have a better structure and are more resistant to erosive factors such as water and wind. Soil organic matter has a particular importance and has significant impact on the stability of soil aggregates, the extension of plant root system, carbon and water cycles and soil resistance to erosion. This substance acts as a cementing agent and plays an important role in soil flocculation and formation of resistant aggregates.Also, the addition of organic matter to the soil increases soil porosity and decreases soil bulk density. Materials and Methods: In this research, the effect of the two types of organic matter (compost and the ripe fruit waste of fig on some soil physical properties was studied. A factorial experiment based on completely randomized design, including the four levels of compost and the ripe fruit waste of fig (0, 1, 2 and 4 by weight % and three soil types (loamy sand, loam and silty clay loam with three replications was carried out. The soil samples were collected from the three territories of Fars Province: loamy sand soil from Shiraz, loamy soil from Maharlu and Silty clay loam soil from Zarghan area. The soil samples were air dried and passed through a 2 mm sieve. The physical properties including the bulk density, particle density, porosity, moisture content and soil crust strength was measured. In this research, the soil texture by hydrometer method, Electrical conductivity of the soil saturated paste extract by electrical conductivity meter, saturated paste pH by pH meter, seedling emergence test, soil crust strength by a pocket penetrometer (HUMBOLDT MFG.CO. bulk density by cylindrical sample and particle density by pycnometer method were measured. The fig fruit treatments were prepared by thoroughly mixing the dried powder of ripe fig fruit passed through a 2 mm sieve (with

  11. Clay resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Maljers, D.; Gessel, S.F. van; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Clay is a common lithology in the Dutch shallow subsurface. It is used in earth constructions such as dikes, and as raw material for the fabricationof bricks, roof tiles etc. We present a new national assessment of Dutch clay resources, as part of a project that provides mineral-occurrenceinformatio

  12. Clay resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Maljers, D.; Gessel, S.F. van; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Clay is a common lithology in the Dutch shallow subsurface. It is used in earth constructions such as dikes, and as raw material for the fabrication of bricks, roof tiles etc. We present a new national assessment of Dutch clay resources, as part of a project that provides mineral-occurrence informat

  13. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p...

  14. Viscous property of dried clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Li-sheng; LI Jian-zhong

    2006-01-01

    One dimensional and triaxial compression tests of air-dried and oven-dried Fujinomori clay and Pisa clay were carried out. Water content is less than 4.5 % and 1.0% for air-dried and oven-dried clay specimens, respectively. In all tests, axial strain rate was changed stepwise many times and drained creep tests were performed several times during monotonic loading at a constant strain rate. Global unloading (and also reloading in some tests) was applied during which creep loading tests were performed several times. Cyclic loading with small stress amplitude and several cycles was also performed to calculate the modulus of elasticity of the clay in tests. Local displacement transducer was used in triaxial compression test to increase measuring accuracy of axial strain. The results show that air-dried and oven-dried clay have noticeable viscous properties; during global unloading, creep deformation changes from positive to negative, i.e. there exist neutral points (zero creep deformation or no creep deformation point) in global unloading part of strain-stress curve; viscous property of Fujinomori clay decreases when water content decreases, i.e. viscous property of air-dried Fujinomori clay is more significant than that of oven-dried Fujinomori clay.

  15. Clay minerals in pollution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateo, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerca sulle Argille, Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Clay minerals are fundamental constituents of life, not only as possible actors in the development of life on the Earth (Cairns-Smith and Hartman, 1986), but mainly because they are essential constituents of soils, the interface between the solid planet and the continental biosphere. Many, many authors have devoted themselves to the study of clays and clay minerals since the publication of the early modern studies by Grim (1953, 1962) and Millot (1964). In those years two very important associations were established in Europe (Association Internationale pour l'Etude des Argiles, AIPEA) and in the USA (Clay Mineral Society, CMS). The importance of these societies is to put together people that work in very different fields (agronomy, geology, geochemistry, industry, etc.), but with a common language (clays), very useful in scientific work. Currently excellent texts are being published, but introductory notes are also available on the web (Schroeder, 1998).

  16. Mineral resource of the Month: Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Clays were one of the first mineral commodities used by people. Clay pottery has been found in archeological sites that are 12,000 years old, and clay figurines have been found in sites that are even older.

  17. Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Relationships in a Tunisian Fig (Ficus carica) Germplasm Collection by Random Amplified Microsatellite Polymorphisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khaled Chatti; Olfa Saddoud; Amel Salhi-Hannachi; Messaoud Mars; Mohamed Marrakchi; Mokhtar Trifi

    2007-01-01

    The random amplified mirosatellite polymorphism method was performed in a set of Tunisian fig landraces using eighteen primer combinations. Atotal of sixty three random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMPO) markers were scored and used either to assess the genetic diversity in these cultivars or to detect cases of mislabeling. Opportunely, data proved that the designed procedure constitutes an attractive and fast method with low costs and prevents radio exposure. As a result, we have identified the primer combinations that are the most efficient to detect genetic polymorphism in this crop. Therefore, the derived unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) dendrogram illustrates the genetic divergence among the landraces studied and exhibits a typically continuous variation. Moreover, no evident correlation between the sexes of trees was observed. In addition, using these markers, discrimination between landraces has been achieved. Thus, random amplified mirosatellite polymorphism is proved to be powerful for characterizing the local fig germplasm.

  18. Viscosity and Plasticity of Latvian Illite Clays

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Due to viscosity and plasticity, clays and clay minerals are used in civil engineering, pottery and also in cosmetics and medicine as thickening agents and emulsion and suspension stabilizers. The rheological properties of clay suspensions are complex. Mostly it is an interaction between mineral composition, clay particle size and pH value and also depends on clay minerals. Clay-water suspension is non-Newtonian fluid showing thixotropic and pseudoplastic properties. Results showed that plast...

  19. Ficus spp. (fig): ethnobotany and potential as anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansky, Ephraim Philip; Paavilainen, Helena M; Pawlus, Alison D; Newman, Robert A

    2008-09-26

    This review explores medieval, ancient and modern sources for ethnopharmacological uses of Ficus (fig) species, specifically for employment against malignant disease and inflammation. The close connection between inflammatory/infectious and cancerous diseases is apparent both from the medieval/ancient merging of these concepts and the modern pharmacological recognition of the initiating and promoting importance of inflammation for cancer growth. Also considered are chemical groups and compounds underlying the anticancer and anti-inflammatory actions, the relationship of fig wasps and fig botany, extraction and storage of fig latex, and traditional methods of preparing fig medicaments including fig lye, fig wine and medicinal poultices.

  20. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  1. Rheological evaluation of clays used for extruded refractory products; Avaliacao reologica de argilas para produtos refratarios extrudados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliosa Neto, Carlos; Diniz, Claudia Villa [Ceramica Safran, Betim, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento; Pandolfelli, Victor Carlos [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    1995-12-31

    This paper correlates the rheological properties of different lots of clays from the same extractive area, with their performances to conceive extruded refractories. So as to explain the different rheological behaviours, physical and chemical evaluation was carried out, in addition to an investigation on the particle mineralogy. The technique and the study of clay viscosimetry proved to be a suitable tool to select and control raw materials for the extrusion process. (author) 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    -type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...... have been tested successfully. At a natural water content of w=40-45% it is possible to establish a homogeneous membrane with hydraulic conductivity k...

  3. A review of WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) repository clays and their relationship to clays of adjacent strata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, J.L.; Kimball, K.M.; Stein, C.L.

    1990-12-01

    The Salado Formation is a thick evaporite sequence located in the Permian Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico. This study focuses on the intense diagenetic alteration that has affected the small amounts of clay, feldspar, and quartz washed into the basin during salt deposition. These changes are of more than academic interest since this formation also houses the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). Site characterization concerns warrant compiling a detailed data base describing the clays in and around the facility horizon. An extensive sampling effort was undertaken to address these programmatic issues as well as to provide additional insight regarding diagenetic mechanisms in the Salado. Seventy-five samples were collected from argillaceous partings in halite at the stratigraphic level of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These were compared with twenty-eight samples from cores of the Vaca Triste member of the Salado, a thin clastic unit at the top of the McNutt potash zone, and with a clay-rich sample from the lower contact of the Culebra Dolomite (in the overlying Rustler Formation). These settings were compared to assess the influence of differences in brine chemistry (i.e., halite and potash facies, normal to hypersaline marine conditions) and sediment composition (clays, sandy silt, dolomitized limestone) on diagenetic processes. 44 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Constitutive model for overconsolidated clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the relationships between the Hvorslev envelope,the current yield sur-face and the reference yield surface,a new constitutive model for overconsolidated clays is proposed. It adopts the unified hardening parameter,to which the potential failure stress ratio and the characteristic state stress ratio are introduced. The model can describe many characteristics of overconsolidated clays,including stress-strain relationships,strain hardening and softening,stress dilatancy,and stress path dependency. Compared with the Cam-clay model,the model only re-quires one additional soil parameter which is the slope of the Hvorslev envelope. Comparisons with data from triaxial drained compression tests for Fujinomori clay show that the proposed model can rationally describe overconsolidated properties. In addition,the model is also used to predict the stress-strain relationship in the isotropic consolidation condition and the stress paths in the undrained triaxial compression tests.

  5. Colloidal gels: Clay goes patchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Willem K.; Lekkerkerker, Henk N. W.

    2011-01-01

    Empty liquids and equilibrium gels have so far been only theoretical possibilities, predicted for colloids with patchy interactions. But evidence of both has now been found in Laponite, a widely studied clay.

  6. Expression and evolutionary divergence of the non-conventional olfactory receptor in four species of fig wasp associated with one species of fig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Jinhua

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interactions of fig wasps and their host figs provide a model for investigating co-evolution. Fig wasps have specialized morphological characters and lifestyles thought to be adaptations to living in the fig's syconium. Although these aspects of natural history are well documented, the genetic mechanism(s underlying these changes remain(s unknown. Fig wasp olfaction is the key to host-specificity. The Or83b gene class, an unusual member of olfactory receptor family, plays a critical role in enabling the function of conventional olfactory receptors. Four Or83b orthologous genes from one pollinator (PFW (Ceratosolen solmsi and three non-pollinator fig wasps (NPFWs (Apocrypta bakeri, Philotrypesis pilosa and Philotrypesis sp. associated with one species of fig (Ficus hispida can be used to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying the fig wasp's adaptation to its host. We made a comparison of spatial tissue-specific expression patterns and substitution rates of one orthologous gene in these fig wasps and sought evidence for selection pressures. Results A newly identified Or83b orthologous gene was named Or2. Expressions of Or2 were restricted to the heads of all wingless male fig wasps, which usually live in the dark cavity of a fig throughout their life cycle. However, expressions were widely detected in the antennae, legs and abdomens of all female fig wasps that fly from one fig to another for oviposition, and secondarily pollination. Weak expression was also observed in the thorax of PFWs. Compared with NPFWs, the Or2 gene in C. solmsi had an elevated rate of substitutions and lower codon usage. Analyses using Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F* tests indicated a non-neutral pattern of nucleotide variation in all fig wasps. Unlike in NPFWs, this non-neutral pattern was also observed for synonymous sites of Or2 within PFWs. Conclusion The sex- and species-specific expression patterns of Or2 genes detected beyond

  7. Porosity Investigation of Kosova's Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Makfire Sadiku; Naim Hasani; Altin Mele

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Acid activated clay minerals are used as catalysts in the desulphurization of crude oil or as catalyst carrier, as drilling mud, as bleaching earth. Approach: The efficiency of the acid activation can be described in two ways. As increase of the surface and as increase of the cumulative pore volume after the activation. Results: In different samples of the clay mineral the activation was done with different sulfuric acid concentrations for two and 3h. Afterwards the specifi...

  8. Clays in radioactive waste disposal

    OpenAIRE

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun; Tang, Anh-Minh

    2010-01-01

    Clays and argillites are considered in some countries as possible host rocks for nuclear waste disposal at great depth. The use of compacted swelling clays as engineered barriers is also considered within the framework of the multi-barrier concept. In relation to these concepts, various research programs have been conducted to assess the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of radioactive waste disposal at great depth. After introducing the concepts of waste isolation developed in Belgium, Fran...

  9. SOCIAL LIFE IN AROUND OF FIG / INCIR ÇEVRESINDE SOSYAL HAYAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Vehbi GÜNAY

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Fig cultivation is an important activity in the NorthEast Aegean region; apart from its economic value fig hasa pronounced mark on the socioculture of the region.Right along with dried figs, figs are used in thefabrication of marmalade, sweeties, biscuit and sweetcake;industry of ethyl alcohol, cosmetic, drug and alsoit’s bagasse is used in the feed industry. Fig cultivation ismade in summer therefore people move another place itis called seasonal migration. In recent years somechanges happened in fig cultivation and some culturalvalues are get lost in this region.

  10. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (2+ solubility.

  11. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction...... is increased with increasing clay content, up to 30%, beyond which the mixture of silt and clay is not liquefied. Sand may become prone to liquefaction with the introduction of clay, contrary to the general perception that this type of sediment is normally liquefaction resistant under waves....

  12. 81 FR 31234 - NESHAP for Brick and Structural Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    ... AGENCY NESHAP for Brick and Structural Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics... Brick and Structural Clay Products (BSCP) Manufacturing and the final NESHAP for Clay Ceramics... No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2013-0290 for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing. All documents in the dockets are listed...

  13. Breakdown of Clays by Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Through Changes in Oxidation State of Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arocena, J. M.; Velde, B.

    2012-04-01

    Organisms are known to play a significant role in the transformation of clay minerals in soils. In our earlier work on canola, barley and alfalfa, we reported that Glomus, an arbuscular mycorrhizae, selectively transformed biotite into 2:1 expanding clays through the oxidation of Fe (II) in biotite to Fe(III). In this presentation, we will share similar results on clay transformations mediated by ectomycorrhizal fungi colonizing the roots of coniferous trees. Clay samples were isolated from rhizosphere soils of sub-alpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) in northern British Columbia (Canada). Chemical and mineralogical properties of these soils had been reported in our earlier paper. In this study, we subjected the clay samples to iron X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (Fe-XANES) at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron facility in Saskatoon (Canada). Our initial results showed relatively higher amounts of Fe (III) than Fe(II) in clays collected from rhizosphere of Piloderma (an ectomycorrhizal fungus) compared to soils influenced by non-Piloderma species and Control (non-rhizosphere soil). Coupled with the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, there seems to be a positive relationship between the relative amounts of Fe(III) and the 2:1 expanding clays. This relationship is consistent with our results on agricultural plants in laboratory experiments on biotites where we suggested that oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) results in the formation of 2:1 expanding clays. In a related data set on chlorite alteration we observed that after dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) treatment, the d-spacing of a slight portion of chloritic expanding clays shifted to higher angles indicating decreased d-spacing towards micaceous clays. The reductive process initiated through the action of the DCB treatment seems to indicate the collapsed of expandable clays upon the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). Initial results from the Fe-XANES and XRD analysis of DCB

  14. How mobile are sorbed cations in clays and clay rocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmi, T; Kosakowski, G

    2011-02-15

    Diffusion of cations and other contaminants through clays is of central interest, because clays and clay rocks are widely considered as barrier materials for waste disposal sites. An intriguing experimental observation has been made in this context: Often, the diffusive flux of cations at trace concentrations is much larger and the retardation smaller than expected based on their sorption coefficients. So-called surface diffusion of sorbed cations has been invoked to explain the observations but remains a controversial issue. Moreover, the corresponding surface diffusion coefficients are largely unknown. Here we show that, by an appropriate scaling, published diffusion data covering a broad range of cations, clays, and chemical conditions can all be modeled satisfactorily by a surface diffusion model. The average mobility of sorbed cations seems to be primarily an intrinsic property of each cation that follows inversely its sorption affinity. With these surface mobilities, cation diffusion coefficients can now be estimated from those of water tracers. In pure clays at low salinities, surface diffusion can reduce the cation retardation by a factor of more than 1000.

  15. Reactivation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Efflux Rescues Abnormal Lysosomal Storage in FIG4-Deficient Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jianlong; Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Yan, Qing; Hamilton, Audra; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Vanoye, Carlos G; Li, Jun

    2015-04-29

    Loss of function of FIG4 leads to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 4J, Yunis-Varon syndrome, or an epilepsy syndrome. FIG4 is a phosphatase with its catalytic specificity toward 5'-phosphate of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate (PI3,5P2). However, the loss of FIG4 decreases PI3,5P2 levels likely due to FIG4's dominant effect in scaffolding a PI3,5P2 synthetic protein complex. At the cellular level, all these diseases share similar pathology with abnormal lysosomal storage and neuronal degeneration. Mice with no FIG4 expression (Fig4(-/-)) recapitulate the pathology in humans with FIG4 deficiency. Using a flow cytometry technique that rapidly quantifies lysosome sizes, we detected an impaired lysosomal fission, but normal fusion, in Fig4(-/-) cells. The fission defect was associated with a robust increase of intralysosomal Ca(2+) in Fig4(-/-) cells, including FIG4-deficient neurons. This finding was consistent with a suppressed Ca(2+) efflux of lysosomes because the endogenous ligand of lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 is PI3,5P2 that is deficient in Fig4(-/-) cells. We reactivated the TRPML1 channels by application of TRPML1 synthetic ligand, ML-SA1. This treatment reduced the intralysosomal Ca(2+) level and rescued abnormal lysosomal storage in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and ex vivo DRGs. Furthermore, we found that the suppressed Ca(2+) efflux in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and Fig4(-/-) mouse brains profoundly downregulated the expression/activity of dynamin-1, a GTPase known to scissor organelle membranes during fission. This downregulation made dynamin-1 unavailable for lysosomal fission. Together, our study revealed a novel mechanism explaining abnormal lysosomal storage in FIG4 deficiency. Synthetic ligands of the TRPML1 may become a potential therapy against diseases with FIG4 deficiency.

  16. Philippine Fig wasps 1. Records and descriptions of Otitesellini (Hymenoptera Chalcidoidea, Torymidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiebes, J.T.

    1974-01-01

    In 1964, by awarding to me that year's proceeds of the "Pieter Langerhuizen Fonds", the Hollandsche Maatschappij der Wetenschappen enabled me to study figs and fig wasps in the Philippines. While several Philippine fig wasps are already known from the papers by Ashmead (1904, 1905), Brown (1906), Ba

  17. Enumerating Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Kucharczyk, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    In this note we discuss trees similar to the Calkin-Wilf tree, a binary tree that enumerates all positive rational numbers in a simple way. The original construction of Calkin and Wilf is reformulated in a more algebraic language, and an elementary application of methods from analytic number theory gives restrictions on possible analogues.

  18. Charm of Purple Clay A private museum in Wuxi is devoted to purple-clay art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Purple-clay art pieces will be on display in a museum opening soon in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province. The museum, named Shuaiyuan Purple Clay Museum, is part of the Shuaiyuan Purple Clay Art Exhibition Center

  19. Assessment of stream quality using biological indices at selected sites in the Red Clay and White Clay Creek basins, Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1981-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andrew G.

    2002-01-01

    In 1970, the Chester County Water Resources Authority (Pennsylvania) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established a longterm water-quality network with the goal of assessing the quality of streams in the county and understanding stream changes in response to urbanization using benthic-macroinvertebrate data (Lium, 1977). This database represents one of the longest continuous water-quality data sets in the country. Benthic macroinvertebrates are aquatic insects, such as mayflies, caddisflies, riffle beetles, and midges, and other invertebrates that live on the stream bottom. Benthic macroinvertebrates are useful in evaluating stream quality because their habitat preference and low motility cause them to be affected directly by substances that enter the aquatic system. By evaluating the diversity and community structure of benthic-macroinvertebrate populations, a determination of stream quality can be made. Between 1981 and 1997, the water-quality network consisted of 43 sites in 5 major basins in Chester County—Delaware, Schuylkill, Brandywine, Big Elk and Octoraro, and Red and White Clay. Benthicmacroinvertebrate, water-chemistry, and habitat data were collected each year in October or November during base-flow conditions (Reif, 1999; 2000). Using these data, Reif (2002) evaluates the overall water-quality condition of Chester County streams. This Fact Sheet summarizes the key findings from Reif (2002) for streams in the Red Clay and White Clay Creek Basins. These streams include East Branch Red Clay Creek (site 26), West Branch Red Clay Creek (site 27), East Branch White Clay Creek (site 28), the Middle Branch White Clay Creek (site 29), and West Branch White Clay Creek (site 30) (fig. 1). This summary includes an analysis of stream conditions on the basis of benthic-macroinvertebrate samples and an analysis of trends in stream conditions for the 17-year study period.

  20. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.;

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  1. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  2. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  3. 80 FR 75817 - NESHAP for Brick and Structural Clay Products Manufacturing; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    ... NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing: Correction AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...; and NESHAP for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing. These amendments make two technical corrections to...

  4. Exon-Primed Intron-Crossing (EPIC Markers for Evolutionary Studies of Ficus and Other Taxa in the Fig Family (Moraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Yao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: The genus Ficus (fig trees comprises ca. 750 species of trees, vines, and stranglers found in tropical forests throughout the world. Fig trees are keystone species in many tropical forests, and their relationship with host-specific wasp pollinators has received much attention, although many questions remain unresolved regarding the levels of host specificity, cospeciation, and the role of hybridization in fig and wasp speciation. We developed exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC markers to obtain phylogenetic resolution needed to address these questions. Methods and Results: Expressed sequence tags (ESTs from F. elastica were compared to Arabidopsis and Populus genomes to locate introns and to design primers in flanking exons. Primer pairs for 80 EPIC markers were tested in samples from divergent clades within Ficus and the outgroup Poulsenia (Moraceae. Conclusions: Thirty-one EPIC markers were successfully sequenced across Ficus, and 29 of the markers also amplified in Poulsenia, indicating broad transferability within Moraceae. All of the EPIC markers were polymorphic and showed levels of polymorphism similar to that of the widely used internal transcribed spacer (ITS.

  5. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Stephenson

    Full Text Available We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  6. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  7. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    resulted in many damaged buildings in Aalborg. To provide sufficient bearing capacity it is therefore necessary either to remove the fill or to construct the building on piles. Both methods imply that the strength of Aalborg Clay is important for the construction. This paper evaluates the strength...... of Aalborg Clay by use of triaxial tests from four different locations. Both the drained strength (c and ϕ) and the undrained strength (cu) are assessed through two different methods: one where the strength is assumed to vary with the effective stress and another where the strength is found to be constant....

  8. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...

  9. Comparing Kriging and Regression Approaches for Mapping Soil Clay Content in a diverse Danish Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2013-01-01

    technique at a given site has always been a major issue in all soil mapping applications. We studied the prediction performance of ordinary kriging (OK), stratified OK (OKst), regression trees (RT), and rule-based regression kriging (RKrr) for digital mapping of soil clay content at 30.4-m grid size using 6...

  10. MixtureTree annotator: a program for automatic colorization and visual annotation of MixtureTree.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chuan Chen

    Full Text Available The MixtureTree Annotator, written in JAVA, allows the user to automatically color any phylogenetic tree in Newick format generated from any phylogeny reconstruction program and output the Nexus file. By providing the ability to automatically color the tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator provides a unique advantage over any other programs which perform a similar function. In addition, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only package that can efficiently annotate the output produced by MixtureTree with mutation information and coalescent time information. In order to visualize the resulting output file, a modified version of FigTree is used. Certain popular methods, which lack good built-in visualization tools, for example, MEGA, Mesquite, PHY-FI, TreeView, treeGraph and Geneious, may give results with human errors due to either manually adding colors to each node or with other limitations, for example only using color based on a number, such as branch length, or by taxonomy. In addition to allowing the user to automatically color any given Newick tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only method that allows the user to automatically annotate the resulting tree created by the MixtureTree program. The MixtureTree Annotator is fast and easy-to-use, while still allowing the user full control over the coloring and annotating process.

  11. MixtureTree annotator: a program for automatic colorization and visual annotation of MixtureTree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Chuan; Ogata, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    The MixtureTree Annotator, written in JAVA, allows the user to automatically color any phylogenetic tree in Newick format generated from any phylogeny reconstruction program and output the Nexus file. By providing the ability to automatically color the tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator provides a unique advantage over any other programs which perform a similar function. In addition, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only package that can efficiently annotate the output produced by MixtureTree with mutation information and coalescent time information. In order to visualize the resulting output file, a modified version of FigTree is used. Certain popular methods, which lack good built-in visualization tools, for example, MEGA, Mesquite, PHY-FI, TreeView, treeGraph and Geneious, may give results with human errors due to either manually adding colors to each node or with other limitations, for example only using color based on a number, such as branch length, or by taxonomy. In addition to allowing the user to automatically color any given Newick tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only method that allows the user to automatically annotate the resulting tree created by the MixtureTree program. The MixtureTree Annotator is fast and easy-to-use, while still allowing the user full control over the coloring and annotating process.

  12. Relative investment in egg load and poison sac in fig wasps: Implications for physiological mechanisms underlying seed and wasp production in figs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Ellen O.; Jandér, K. Charlotte; Peng, Yan-Qiong; Chen, Huan-Huan; Machado, Carlos A.; Arnold, A. Elizabeth; Herre, Edward Allen

    2014-05-01

    Fig pollinating wasps and most non-pollinator wasps apply secretions from their poison sacs into oviposited flowers that appear necessary to the formation of the galls that their developing offspring consume. Thus, both eggs and poison sac secretions appear to be essential for wasp reproduction, but the relative investment in each is unknown. We measured relative investment in poison sac and egg production in pollinating and non-pollinating wasps associated with seven species of monoecious Panamanian figs representing both active and passive pollination syndromes. We then collected similar data for four fig hosts in China, where some wasp species in the genus Eupristina have lost the ability to pollinate ("cheaters"). All wasps examined possessed large poison sacs, and we found a strong positive correlation between poison sac size and absolute egg production. In the Panamanian species, the relative poison sac to egg investment was highest in the externally ovipositing non-pollinator wasps, followed by active pollinators, then by passive pollinators. Further, pollinator wasps of fig species with demonstrated host sanctions against "cheating" wasps showed higher investment in the poison sac than wasps of species without sanctions. In the Chinese samples, relative investment in the poison sac was indistinguishable between pollinators and "cheaters" associated with the same fig species. We suggest that higher relative investment in poison sac across fig wasp species reflects higher relative difficulty in initiating formation of galls and subsequently obtaining resources from the fig. We discuss the implications for the stability of the fig-wasp mutualism, and for the ability of non-pollinators to exploit this mutualism.

  13. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  14. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  15. Biodegradable Pectin/clay Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodegradable, foamlike materials based on renewable pectin and sodium montmorillonite clay were fabricated through a simple, environmentally friendly freeze-drying process. Addition of multivalent cations (Ca2+ and Al3+) resulted in apparent crosslinking of the polymer, and enhancement of aerogel p...

  16. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  17. Distribution of nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes in three pollinator fig wasps associated with Ficus pumila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Min; Compton, Stephen G.; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (NUMTs) are nuclear sequences transferred from mitochondrial genomes. Although widespread, their distribution patterns among populations or closely related species are rarely documented. We amplified and sequenced the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) gene to check for NUMTs in three fig wasp species that pollinate Ficus pumila (Wiebesia sp. 1, 2 and 3) in Southeastern China using direct and cloned sequencing. Unambiguous sequences (332) of 487 bp in length belonging to 33 haplotypes were found by direct sequencing. Their distribution was highly concordant with those of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI). Obvious signs of co-amplification of NUMTs were indicated by their uneven distribution. NUMTs were observed in all individuals of 12 populations of Wiebesia sp. 3, and 13 individuals of three northern populations of Wiebesia sp. 1. Sequencing clones of potential co-amplification products confirmed that they were NUMTs. These NUMTs either clustered as NUMT clades basal to mtDNA Cytb clades (basal NUMTs), or together with Cytb haplotypes. Basal NUMTs had either stop codons or frame-shifting mutations resulting from deletion of a 106 bp fragment. In addition, no third codon or synonymous substitutions were detected within each NUMT clade. The phylogenetic tree indicated that basal NUMTs had been inserted into nuclei before divergence of the three species. No significant pairwise differences were detected in their ratios of third codon substitutions, suggesting that these NUMTs originated from one transfer event, with duplication in the nuclear genome resulting in the coexistence of the 381 bp copy. No significant substitution differences were detected between Cytb haplotypes and NUMTs that clustered with Cytb haplotypes. However, these NUMTs coexisted with Cytb haplotypes in multiple populations, suggesting that these NUMT haplotypes were recently inserted into the nuclear genome. Both basal and recently inserted NUMTs were rare

  18. Context trees

    OpenAIRE

    Ganzinger, Harald; Nieuwenhuis, Robert; Nivela, Pilar

    2001-01-01

    Indexing data structures are well-known to be crucial for the efficiency of the current state-of-the-art theorem provers. Examples are \\emph{discrimination trees}, which are like tries where terms are seen as strings and common prefixes are shared, and \\emph{substitution trees}, where terms keep their tree structure and all common \\emph{contexts} can be shared. Here we describe a new indexing data structure, \\emph{context trees}, where, by means of a limited kind of conte...

  19. Two Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Cochrane, John. H.; Longstaff, Francis A.; Santa-Clara, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    We solve a model with two “Lucas trees.†Each tree has i.i.d. dividend growth. The investor has log utility and consumes the sum of the two trees’ dividends. This model produces interesting asset-pricing dynamics, despite its simple ingredients. Investors want to rebalance their portfolios after any change in value. Since the size of the trees is fixed, however, prices must adjust to offset this desire. As a result, expected returns, excess returns, and return volatility all vary throug...

  20. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain...

  1. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  2. Hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, G.; Visser, P.J.; Vrijling, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay due to the turbulent flow, based on theoretical analysis and experimental results. The undisturbed clay has the unique and complicated characteristics of cohesive force among clay particles, which are highly different from dis

  3. Clay & Children: More than Making Pots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, Ursula

    1997-01-01

    Working with clay enables young children to express, explore, and communicate their feelings and ideas. This resource booklet for early childhood practitioners and it promotes the clay table as a special place for shared discoveries, social interaction, and discussion. The booklet provides a glossary of terms used in clay work, as well as reasons…

  4. Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) vaginal infection of goats: clinical efficacy of fig latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero, Michele; Marinaro, Mariarosaria; Losurdo, Michele; Larocca, Vittorio; Bodnar, Livia; Patruno, Giovanni; Buonavoglia, Canio; Tempesta, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The latex of Ficus carica Linn. (Moraceae) has been shown to interfere with the replication of caprine herpesvirus (CpHV)-1 in vitro. The present study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of vaginal administration of fig latex in goats experimentally infected with CpHV-1. The fig latex reduced the clinical signs of the herpetic disease although it slightly influenced the titres of CpHV-1 shed. Thus, the fig latex maintained a partial efficacy in vivo.

  5. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied.

  6. Measurement of the adsorption of radiocaesium on clays: factors affecting the extrapolation to in situ conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staunton, S.; Roubaud, M. [INRA-ENSAM, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    1994-12-31

    The aim of the study is to identify the factors most likely to cause discrepancies between measured and true Kd values (distribution coefficient) used for the measure of adsorption of radiocaesium on solid particles. Values of a trace amount of caesium 137 have been measured in dilute suspensions containing clay minerals (clay may be used as barrier for radioactive wastes disposal). Parameters such as clay mineralogy, charge compensating cation, ionic strength and pH of the solution, concentration of caesium and presence of a soil extracted fulvic acid, were varied and their effects analyzed. Only the pH has no effect on Kd. The Kd is always a function of the caesium concentration. 3 figs., 49 refs.

  7. 榕-蜂系统中影响传粉榕小蜂繁殖及存活的因素研究%Research on effecting factors for reproduction and survivability of pollinating fig wasps in fig-fig wasps mutualism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张媛; 邓国宾; 李宗波

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between pollinating fig wasps (Agaonidae) and their host fig trees (Ficus) is a striking example of an ob-ligate pollination mutualism .Agaonidae resource is the key factor which hinges fig-fig wasps reproduction .To test the influences of sea-sonal change , length of female phase and foundress age on the wasps offspring numbers , abortion ratio and body length of wasps off-spring, we performed manually-controlling experiments on two important Ficus species distributed in Xishuangbanna , Ficus semicordata and Ficus altissima.The experimental results revealed that seasonal change had no significant influence on wasps offspring numbers and abortion ratio , while it had significant impact on offspring body size .Furthermore , prominent negative influences can be found either a-long with the increase in age of foundress , or with the extension of female phase of figs , such as lower offspring numbers , higher abor-tive percentage and shorter body length of offspring .%榕属植物( Ficus)及其传粉昆虫榕小蜂( Agaonidae )是自然界协同进化的经典模型,榕小蜂资源是实现榕-蜂繁殖衔接的重要因素。对分布在西双版纳地区的两种重要榕属植物:鸡嗉子榕( Ficus semicordata)和高榕( Ficus altissima)进行人工控制性放蜂实验,分别验证季节变化、母代雌蜂年龄、榕果雌花期延长对小蜂后代数量、败育率和后代体长的影响。结果表明:季节变化对小蜂后代数量、败育率无影响,而对小蜂后代体大小有一定影响。而随着母代雌蜂年龄的增加和榕果雌花期的延长,都会对小蜂后代数量产生负面影响,使败育率上升,后代体长变小。这一结果有助于了解榕-蜂系统对互利共生双方繁殖的调节,为进一步研究榕-蜂系统的稳定性提供了依据。

  8. Talking Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, Marvin

    2005-01-01

    Students love outdoor activities and will love them even more when they build confidence in their tree identification and measurement skills. Through these activities, students will learn to identify the major characteristics of trees and discover how the pace--a nonstandard measuring unit--can be used to estimate not only distances but also the…

  9. Fast growing trees and energy grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, R.

    1993-12-31

    According to both the United States Department of Energy and the Department of Natural Resources Canada, the best way to produce biomass plantations is an agro-forestry system in which fast growing trees are used as a windbreak for fields of energy grasses. (TEC). 1 fig.

  10. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consum

  11. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ita, Stacey Leigh [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  12. CRESCIMENTO DE FIGUEIRA SOB DIFERENTES CONDIÇÕES DE CULTIVO FIG TREE GROWTH UNDER DIFFERENT CROP CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Euzébio de Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    A análise de crescimento de plantas pode ser considerada um bom indicativo para a avaliação das bases fisiológicas de produção e da influência exercida por variáveis ambientais, genéticas e agronômicas. Avaliou-se o crescimento da figueira ‘Roxo de Valinhos’, submetida a irrigação e cobertura morta (bagacilho de cana-de-açúcar triturado, em Botucatu (SP. O experimento utilizou blocos casualizados, em esquema fatorial 2x2 (cobertura morta x irrigação, com 4 repetições, sendo cada repetição constituída por 3 plantas, com caracterização dos seguintes tratamentos: T1 - sem irrigação e sem cobertura morta; T2 - sem irrigação e com cobertura morta; T3 - com irrigação e sem cobertura morta; T4 - com irrigação e cobertura morta. Foram realizadas análises destrutivas e não destrutivas, aos 7, 55, 76, 97, 114, 135, 156, 176, 198, 219, 240, 254 e 275 dias após o transplantio, com base nos seguintes parâmetros: diâmetro do ramo e do caule, comprimento do ramo, número de folhas, número de entrenós e número de frutos. Foram particionados os diferentes órgãos da planta, para obtenção da massa seca e fresca das partições isoladas. As medições da área foliar (cm2 foram realizadas com aparelho integrador fotoelétrico. O manejo da irrigação foi realizado com o auxílio da técnica de tensiometria, mantendo o potencial matricial do solo próximo a -30 kPa. O uso de cobertura morta e irrigação favoreceu o desenvolvimento das plantas (diâmetro do caule de 36,60 mm e comprimento do ramo de 1,28 m, e as taxas de crescimento, crescimento relativo e assimilatória líquida da cultura foram de 7 g m-2 dia-1, 0,015 g g-1 dia-1 e 17 g m-2 dia-1, respectivamente. As taxas indicaram que a cobertura morta ofereceu condições hídricas satisfatórias ao rápido estabelecimento das mudas.

    The plant growth analysis can be a good tool to evaluate the yield physiological basis and the influence of environmental, genetic, and agronomic traits. The Ficus carica L. growth, under irrigation and mulch (crushed sugar-cane, was evaluated in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil. The experimental design was randomized blocks, in a 2x2 factorial scheme (mulch x irrigation, with 4 replications and each replication consisting of 3 plants, under the following treatments: T1 - without irrigation or mulch; T2 - without irrigation and with mulch; T3 - with irrigation and without mulch; T4 - with irrigation and mulch. Destructive and non-destructive analysis were carried out at 7, 55, 76, 97, 114, 135, 156, 176, 198, 219, 240, 254, and 275 days after transplanting, based on the following parameters: branch and stem diameter, branch length, and number of leaves, internodes, and fruits. Different plant organs were partitioned to obtain the fresh and dry mass of isolated partitions. The leaf area (cm2 was measured with a photoelectric device and the irrigation management was carried out with the aid of a tensiometer, keeping the soil matric potential close to -30 kPa. The use of mulch and irrigation favored the development of plants (stem diameter of 36.60 mm and branch length of 1.28 m, and the crop growth rate, relative growth rate, and net assimilation rate were respectively 7 g m-2 day-1, 0.015 g g-1 day-1, and 17 g m-2 day-1. These rates showed that the mulch provided satisfactory hydric conditions to a fast establishment of seedlings.

  13. Polyamide 66/Brazilian Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Araújo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyamide 66 (PA66/Brazilian clay nanocomposites were produced via direct melt intercalation. A montmorillonite sample from the Brazilian state of Paraíba was organically modified with esthearildimethylammonium chloride (Praepagen, quaternary ammonium salt and has been tested to be used in polymer nanocomposites. The dispersion analysis and the interlayer spacing of the clay particles in matrix were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Thermal behavior of the obtained systems was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetry (TG, and heat deflection temperature (HDT was reported too. The nanocomposites exhibited a partially exfoliated structure, very interesting HDT values which are higher than those of pure PA66, and good thermal stability.

  14. Seasonal Changes in the Trade-off Among Fig-supported Wasps and Viable Seeds in Figs and Their Evolutionary Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Wu WANG; Jun-Xing YANG; Da-Rong YANG

    2005-01-01

    What the real trade-off is among fig-supported wasps and the viable seeds of figs is heatedly debated in the studies of fig/fig wasp mutualism. In the present study, we collected wasp offspring (galls)and the viable seeds of premature fruits, and determined the foundress number in receptive fruits and all the types of wasps supported by Ficus racemosa L. during both the rainy and dry seasons in Xishuangbanna,China. The data show that the galls were positively correlated with viable seeds (n = 32; r = 0.74; P < 0.001)when the proportion of vacant female flowers (PVFF) was high, in April (68.0%), and were negatively correlated with viable seeds (n = 48; r =- 0.59; P < 0.05) when PVFF were limited (PVFF = 42.6%) during a colder month (January). The mean foundress number per fruit during the colder months is significantly lower than during the warmer months (F5, 603 = 27.9; P < 0.001) and pollinator wasps can live longer during the colder months. During the colder months, the proportions of non-pollinators and wasp offspring are higher than those found during other months, whereas the proportion of viable seeds is not different compared with that of other months. Non-pollinator wasps tend to oviposit the female flowers that have been oviposited by pollinator wasps. The non-pollinators only negatively affect pollinator wasps and there is no obvious negative effect of non-pollinator wasps on viable seeds, so ovipositing by non-pollinator wasps will not result in the extinction of the figs during the process of evolution. The results of the present study indicate that figs can allow less foundresses to be in fruit cavities when PVFF are limited, which provides supporting evidence for the previous assumption that the plants have developed a mechanism to maintain a stable system because of the conflicts between the parties involved.

  15. Hands-on Virtual Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Pihuit, Adeline; Kry, Paul; Cani, Marie-Paule

    2008-01-01

    poster; International audience; This paper presents a new interaction system designed for hands-on 3D shape modeling and deformation through natural hand gestures. Our system is made of a Phantom haptic device coupled with a deformable foam ball that supports pressure sensors. These sensors detect forces exerted by the user's fingertips, and are used to control the configuration of a compliant virtual hand that is modeling soft virtual clay. During interaction, the user is provided both passi...

  16. 76 FR 14320 - Importation of Figs and Pomegranates From Chile Under a Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... allowed. Importation of pomegranates (Punica granatum) from Chile is allowed if the fruit is fumigated... Pomegranate (Punica granatum) and Fig (Ficus carica) from Chile Imported into the Continental United States.... Fresh figs (Ficus carica) and fresh pomegranates (Punica granatum) may be imported into the...

  17. Describing the appearance and flavor profiles of fresh fig (Ficus carica L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ellena S; Hopfer, Helene; Haug, Megan T; Orsi, Jennifer D; Heymann, Hildegarde; Crisosto, Gayle M; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2012-12-01

    Twelve fig cultivars, including cultivars destined for the fresh and dried markets, were harvested from 6 locations and evaluated by a trained panel using descriptive sensory analysis. Instrumental measurements were taken at harvest and also during sensory analysis. Each fresh fig cultivar had a characteristic appearance and flavor sensory profile regardless of the source. The primary flavor attributes used to describe the fig cultivars were "fruity,"melon,"stone fruit,"berry,"citrus,"honey,"green," and "cucumber." Maturity levels significantly affected the chemical composition and sensory profiles of the fig cultivars. Less mature figs had a higher compression force, a thicker outer skin, and higher ratings for "green" and "latex" flavors, firmness, graininess, bitterness, tingling, and seed adhesiveness. Meanwhile, more mature figs had higher soluble solids concentration, and were perceptibly higher in "fruit" flavors, juiciness, stickiness, sliminess, and sweetness. The specific sensory terminology used for fig appearance and flavor profiles will assist with communication between marketers and consumers, which can increase fresh fig consumption.

  18. Wine and vinegar-based attractants for the African fig fly (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The African fig fly (AFF), Zaprionus indianus Gupta (Diptera: Drosophilidae), is an invasive fruit pest that has spread rapidly through much of the eastern United States after first being detected in Florida in 2005. This drosophilid is a primary pest of figs in Brazil, so there were initial concern...

  19. Porosity Investigation of Kosova's Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makfire Sadiku

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Acid activated clay minerals are used as catalysts in the desulphurization of crude oil or as catalyst carrier, as drilling mud, as bleaching earth. Approach: The efficiency of the acid activation can be described in two ways. As increase of the surface and as increase of the cumulative pore volume after the activation. Results: In different samples of the clay mineral the activation was done with different sulfuric acid concentrations for two and 3h. Afterwards the specific surface was measured by means of nitrogen adsorption. All the measured isotherms belong to the pseudo-two kind. After the activation the surface enhanced from around 100-180 m2 g-1. The mesopore distribution is calculated out of the hysteresis between adsorption-desorption isotherms of the nitrogen. Conclusion: It is shown that the activation increases significantly the amount of mesopores which is reflected in the cumulative volume. The macrospore volume of the clay samples were measured by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry for pore sizes up to 320 nm. The volume of the macrospores results to an increase up to two times after the activation. The cumulative volume of all the pores is shown like a good parameter of the efficiency of the acid activation. The measurements were fulfilled in the newly equipped laboratory of the surface characterizations of the Tirana University. These analyses are of big interest for the industry in Albania and Kosove.

  20. Phylogeny and evolution of life-history strategies in the Sycophaginae non-pollinating fig wasps (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farache Fernando HA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pollinating Sycophaginae (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea form small communities within Urostigma and Sycomorus fig trees. The species show differences in galling habits and exhibit apterous, winged or dimorphic males. The large gall inducers oviposit early in syconium development and lay few eggs; the small gall inducers lay more eggs soon after pollination; the ostiolar gall-inducers enter the syconium to oviposit and the cleptoparasites oviposit in galls induced by other fig wasps. The systematics of the group remains unclear and only one phylogeny based on limited sampling has been published to date. Here we present an expanded phylogeny for sycophagine fig wasps including about 1.5 times the number of described species. We sequenced mitochondrial and nuclear markers (4.2 kb on 73 species and 145 individuals and conducted maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. We then used this phylogeny to reconstruct the evolution of Sycophaginae life-history strategies and test if the presence of winged males and small brood size may be correlated. Results The resulting trees are well resolved and strongly supported. With the exception of Apocrytophagus, which is paraphyletic with respect to Sycophaga, all genera are monophyletic. The Sycophaginae are divided into three clades: (i Eukoebelea; (ii Pseudidarnes, Anidarnes and Conidarnes and (iii Apocryptophagus, Sycophaga and Idarnes. The ancestral states for galling habits and male morphology remain ambiguous and our reconstructions show that the two traits are evolutionary labile. Conclusions The three main clades could be considered as tribes and we list some morphological characters that define them. The same biologies re-evolved several times independently, which make Sycophaginae an interesting model to test predictions on what factors will canalize the evolution of a particular biology. The ostiolar gall-inducers are the only monophyletic group. In 15 Myr, they

  1. Phylogenetic trees

    OpenAIRE

    Baños, Hector; Bushek, Nathaniel; Davidson, Ruth; Gross, Elizabeth; Harris, Pamela E.; Krone, Robert; Long, Colby; Stewart, Allen; WALKER, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the package PhylogeneticTrees for Macaulay2 which allows users to compute phylogenetic invariants for group-based tree models. We provide some background information on phylogenetic algebraic geometry and show how the package PhylogeneticTrees can be used to calculate a generating set for a phylogenetic ideal as well as a lower bound for its dimension. Finally, we show how methods within the package can be used to compute a generating set for the join of any two ideals.

  2. Modernity and putty-clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Trichur Kailas

    This dissertation addresses issues arising out of the problems of capital accumulation, productivity growth and 'putty-clay' technology. The concept of economic modernity occupies a central place in the subject-matter studied here in that it expresses both the incessant drive for newness that characterizes economic reality and the persistence of dated techniques that successfully resist replacement. This study examines the way in which an expansive development-theoretic 'putty-clay' framework may be employed to explain the historical processes behind both the avalanche of newness (innovations) and the conservatism of technology in the U.S. economy. The guiding link is the fixity of investments in physical capital equipment over time and space. The dilemma of fixed capital is studied in the context of the constant entrepreneurial search for flexibility and liquidity. The thesis advanced is that a development (Entwicklung)-theoretic 'putty-clay' conceptualization of the economic system adequately addresses the recurring problems of fixity, flexibility, and liquidity, and thereby permits important insights into the enigma surrounding the persistent productivity growth slowdown and 'stagflation' of the late sixties and seventies and the related phenomena of physical 'capital obsolescence' and the financial or 'speculative explosions' of our times. The notion of 'putty-clay' used here is an innovative one in that it departs from the growth-theoretic literature to re-appear as a Schumpeterian theory of modernity modified by a Veblenite view of an economic system directed by the exigencies of the 'machine-process'. The empirical aptitude of a macroeconomic 'putty-clay' model to explain capital obsolescence mediated by the energy 'crises' (supply shocks) of the seventies and eighties is examined in a separate chapter with results that differ markedly from the standard (Berndt and Wood) conclusions for the U.S. economy. The final chapter in the dissertation reverts to the

  3. FigS7.txt

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is an ascii file with georeferencing information containing the data plotted in Figure S7 of the supplemental information manuscript section. This dataset is...

  4. FigS8.txt

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is an ASCII file with georeferencing information containing data plotted in Figure S8 of the supplemental information section of the manuscript. This dataset is...

  5. Game tree algorithms and solution trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); A. de Bruin (Arie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, a theory of game tree algorithms is presented, entirely based upon the concept of solution tree. Two types of solution trees are distinguished: max and min trees. Every game tree algorithm tries to prune nodes as many as possible from the game tree. A cut-off criterion in

  6. Electron Tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Rønde, Heidi S

    2013-01-01

    The photo shows a close-up of a Lichtenberg figure – popularly called an “electron tree” – produced in a cylinder of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Electron trees are created by irradiating a suitable insulating material, in this case PMMA, with an intense high energy electron beam. Upon discharge......, during dielectric breakdown in the material, the electrons generate branching chains of fractures on leaving the PMMA, producing the tree pattern seen. To be able to create electron trees with a clinical linear accelerator, one needs to access the primary electron beam used for photon treatments. We...... appropriated a linac that was being decommissioned in our department and dismantled the head to circumvent the target and ion chambers. This is one of 24 electron trees produced before we had to stop the fun and allow the rest of the accelerator to be disassembled....

  7. Electron Tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Rønde, Heidi S

    2013-01-01

    The photo shows a close-up of a Lichtenberg figure – popularly called an “electron tree” – produced in a cylinder of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Electron trees are created by irradiating a suitable insulating material, in this case PMMA, with an intense high energy electron beam. Upon discharge......, during dielectric breakdown in the material, the electrons generate branching chains of fractures on leaving the PMMA, producing the tree pattern seen. To be able to create electron trees with a clinical linear accelerator, one needs to access the primary electron beam used for photon treatments. We...... appropriated a linac that was being decommissioned in our department and dismantled the head to circumvent the target and ion chambers. This is one of 24 electron trees produced before we had to stop the fun and allow the rest of the accelerator to be disassembled....

  8. Non-invasive detection of aflatoxin-contaminated figs using fluorescence and multispectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Habil; Güneş, Ali; Durmuş, Efkan; Kuşçu, Alper

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural products are prone to aflatoxin (AF)-producing moulds (Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus) during harvesting, drying, processing and also storage. AF is a mycotoxin that may cause liver cancer when consumed in amounts higher than allowed limits. Figs, like other agricultural products, are mostly affected by AF-producing moulds and these moulds usually produce kojic acid together with AF. Kojic acid is a fluorescent compound and exhibiting bright greenish yellow fluorescence (BGYF) under ultraviolet (UV) light. Using this fluorescence property, fig-processing plants manually select and remove the BGYF+ figs to reduce the AF level of the processed figs. Although manual selection is based on subjective criteria and strongly depends on the expertise level of the workers, it is known as the most effective way of removing AF-contaminated samples. However, during manual selection, workers are exposed to UV radiation and this brings skin health problems. In this study, we individually investigated the figs to measure their fluorescence level, surface mould concentration and AF levels and noted a strong correlation between mould concentration and BGYF and AF, and BGYF and surface. In addition to a pairwise correlation, we proposed a machine-vision and machine-learning approach to detect the AF-contaminated figs using their multispectral images under UV light. The figs were classified in two different approaches considering their surface mould and AF level with error rates of 9.38% and 11.98%, respectively.

  9. Competitive exclusion among fig wasps achieved via entrainment of host plant flowering phenology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    Full Text Available Molecular techniques are revealing increasing numbers of morphologically similar but co-existing cryptic species, challenging the niche theory. To understand the co-existence mechanism, we studied phenologies of morphologically similar species of fig wasps that pollinate the creeping fig (F. pumila in eastern China. We compared phenologies of fig wasp emergence and host flowering at sites where one or both pollinators were present. At the site where both pollinators were present, we used sticky traps to capture the emerged fig wasps and identified species identity using mitochondrial DNA COI gene. We also genotyped F. pumila individuals of the three sites using polymorphic microsatellites to detect whether the host populations were differentiated. Male F. pumila produced two major crops annually, with figs receptive in spring and summer. A small partial third crop of receptive figs occurred in the autumn, but few of the second crop figs matured at that time. Hence, few pollinators were available to enter third crop figs and they mostly aborted, resulting in two generations of pollinating wasps each year, plus a partial third generation. Receptive figs were produced on male plants in spring and summer, timed to coincide with the release of short-lived adult pollinators from the same individual plants. Most plants were pollinated by a single species. Plants pollinated by Wiebesia sp. 1 released wasps earlier than those pollinated by Wiebesia sp. 3, with little overlap. Plants occupied by different pollinators were not spatially separated, nor genetically distinct. Our findings show that these differences created mismatches with the flight periods of the other Wiebesia species, largely 'reserving' individual plants for the resident pollinator species. This pre-emptive competitive displacement may prevent long term co-existence of the two pollinators.

  10. Thermal stability of PMMA–clay hybrids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tanushree Choudhury; Nirendra M Misra

    2010-04-01

    Materials with small particle size are being extensively used in composites and hybrid materials. Exfoliated clay–polymer hybrids show enhanced properties. Exfoliation of clay platelets can be affected by selecting dispersing agents. In the present work, clay dispersed by natural dispersant (soap stone powder), cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) dispersed clay and acid clay (amorphous clay) are taken. They are then polymerized with poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) by solution intercalation method. The thermal stability of these different clay–PMMA hybrids have been studied and compared with that of pure PMMA by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The bonding of clay with PMMA has been studied by IR. Morphology of clay–PMMA hybrids has been shown by SEM and XRD which indicate partially exfoliated structure in T606-4 and intercalated structures in T606-6 and T606-2.

  11. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  12. Geotechinical properties of Ariake clay in Saga plain - Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khamehchiyan, M.; Iwao, Y. [Saga Univ., Saga (Japan)

    1994-12-21

    Saga plain, a lowland of less than 5 meters above mean sea level with an area of about 400 square kilometers, lies in north of Ariake Sea (western area of Chikugo river) in Kyushu, Japan. The tidal range of the Ariake Sea is about 6 meters with a mean high water level of 2.89 meters. Therefore, several dikes are constructed to prevent flooding during heavy rainfalls. The thickness of the soft Ariake clay is generally about 10 to 20 meters with a maximum value of 30 meters. It is attempted to discuss the geotechnical properties of Ariake clay up to the depth of 20 meters by using the data of 110 exploratory boreholes drilled in different places of Saga plain. Simple regression analysis is adopted between physical properties such as void ratio, e, natural water content, total unite weight, and consistency limits. Various regression models are developed to estimate unconfined compressive strength, compression index C{sub r}, compression ratio, which is equal to C{sub c}/(1+e) and preconsolidation pressure, from more easily determinable soil index properties. 14 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  14. Ceramic clays from the western part of the Tamnava Tertiary Basin, Serbia: Deposits and clay types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on geological, mineralogical, physical, chemical and technological investigations in the Tamnava Tertiary Basin near Šabac town (western Serbia, deposits of ceramic clays were studied. These ceramic clays are composed of kaolin-illite with a variable content of quartz, feldspars, mica, iron oxides and hydroxides, and organic matter. Four main types of commercial clays were identified: i red-yellow sandy-gravely (brick clays; ii grey-white poor sandy (ceramic clays; iii dark-carbonaceous (ceramic clays; and iv lamellar (“interspersed” fatty, poor sandy (highly aluminous and ferrous clays. Ceramic clays are defined as medium to high plastic with different ranges of sintering temperatures, which makes them suitable for the production of various kinds of materials in the ceramic industry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI-176016

  15. Membrane behavior of clay liner materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jong Beom

    Membrane behavior represents the ability of porous media to restrict the migration of solutes, leading to the existence of chemico-osmosis, or the flow of liquid in response to a chemical concentration gradient. Membrane behavior is an important consideration with respect to clay soils with small pores and interactive electric diffuse double layers associated with individual particles, such as bentonite. The results of recent studies indicate the existence of membrane behavior in bentonite-based hydraulic barriers used in waste containment applications. Thus, measurement of the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior in such clay soils is becoming increasingly important. Accordingly, this research focused on evaluating the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior for three clay-based materials that typically are considered for use as liners for waste containment applications, such as landfills. The three clay-based liner materials included a commercially available geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) consisting of sodium bentonite sandwiched between two geotextiles, a compacted natural clay known locally as Nelson Farm Clay, and compacted NFC amended with 5% (dry wt.) of a sodium bentonite. The study also included the development and evaluation of a new flexible-wall cell for clay membrane testing that was used subsequently to measure the membrane behaviors of the three clay liner materials. The consolidation behavior of the GCL under isotropic states of stress also was evaluated as a preliminary step in the determination of the membrane behavior of the GCL under different effective consolidation stresses.

  16. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Rajamathi; Grace S Thomas; P Vishnu Kamath

    2001-10-01

    Together with hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides, bivalent and trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange properties together with surface basicity making them materials of importance for many modern applications. In this article, we discuss many different ways of making anionic clays and compare and contrast the rich diversity of this class of materials with the better-known cationic clays.

  17. Interpreting Tree Ensembles with inTrees

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Houtao

    2014-01-01

    Tree ensembles such as random forests and boosted trees are accurate but difficult to understand, debug and deploy. In this work, we provide the inTrees (interpretable trees) framework that extracts, measures, prunes and selects rules from a tree ensemble, and calculates frequent variable interactions. An rule-based learner, referred to as the simplified tree ensemble learner (STEL), can also be formed and used for future prediction. The inTrees framework can applied to both classification an...

  18. Five Cases of Phytophotodermatitis Caused by Fig Leaves and Relevant Literature Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jin-hwa Son; ; Hyunju Jin; Hyang-suk You; Woo-haing Shim; Jeong-min Kim; Gun-wook Kim; Hoon-soo Kim; Hyun-chang Ko; Moon-bum Kim; Byung-soo Kim

    2017-01-01

    ...., limes, celery, fig, and wild parsnip) contain furocoumarin compounds (psoralens). It is important for dermatologists to be aware of phytophotodermatitis because it may be misdiagnosed as cellulitis, tinea, or allergic contact dermatitis...

  19. The dynamics of strangling among forest trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kenichi W

    2015-11-01

    Strangler trees germinate and grow on other trees, eventually enveloping and potentially even girdling their hosts. This allows them to mitigate fitness costs otherwise incurred by germinating and competing with other trees on the forest floor, as well as minimize risks associated with host tree-fall. If stranglers can themselves host other strangler trees, they may not even seem to need non-stranglers to persist. Yet despite their high fitness potential, strangler trees neither dominate the communities in which they occur nor is the strategy particularly common outside of figs (genus Ficus). Here we analyze how dynamic interactions between strangling and non-strangling trees can shape the adaptive landscape for strangling mutants and mutant trees that have lost the ability to strangle. We find a threshold which strangler germination rates must exceed for selection to favor the evolution of strangling, regardless of how effectively hemiepiphytic stranglers may subsequently replace their hosts. This condition describes the magnitude of the phenotypic displacement in the ability to germinate on other trees necessary for invasion by a mutant tree that could potentially strangle its host following establishment as an epiphyte. We show how the relative abilities of strangling and non-strangling trees to occupy empty sites can govern whether strangling is an evolutionarily stable strategy, and obtain the conditions for strangler coexistence with non-stranglers. We then elucidate when the evolution of strangling can disrupt stable coexistence between commensal epiphytic ancestors and their non-strangling host trees. This allows us to highlight parallels between the invasion fitness of strangler trees arising from commensalist ancestors, and cases where strangling can arise in concert with the evolution of hemiepiphytism among free-standing ancestors. Finally, we discuss how our results can inform the evolutionary ecology of antagonistic interactions more generally.

  20. Audubon Tree Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    Included are an illustrated student reader, "The Story of Trees," a leaders' guide, and a large tree chart with 37 colored pictures. The student reader reviews several aspects of trees: a definition of a tree; where and how trees grow; flowers, pollination and seed production; how trees make their food; how to recognize trees; seasonal changes;…

  1. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...... successfully. At natural watercontent w = 40 to 45% it is possible to establish a homogeneous membrane with hydraulic conductivity k tests used for establishing swell and deformation properties showed...... to be very dependent on the stress level. It varies from k = E-11 to 2 E-13 m/s at vertical stresses from 5 to 4800 kPa and is clearly related to a reduced effective porosity diminishing with stress. Preliminary diffusion tests indicate a similar influence on the effective diffusion coefficient being much...

  2. Comparisons of host mitochondrial, nuclear and endosymbiont bacterial genes reveal cryptic fig wasp species and the effects of Wolbachia on host mtDNA evolution and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gui

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Figs and fig-pollinating wasp species usually display a highly specific one-to-one association. However, more and more studies have revealed that the "one-to-one" rule has been broken. Co-pollinators have been reported, but we do not yet know how they evolve. They may evolve from insect speciation induced or facilitated by Wolbachia which can manipulate host reproduction and induce reproductive isolation. In addition, Wolbachia can affect host mitochondrial DNA evolution, because of the linkage between Wolbachia and associated mitochondrial haplotypes, and thus confound host phylogeny based on mtDNA. Previous research has shown that fig wasps have the highest incidence of Wolbachia infection in all insect taxa, and Wolbachia may have great influence on fig wasp biology. Therefore, we look forward to understanding the influence of Wolbachia on mitochondrial DNA evolution and speciation in fig wasps. Results We surveyed 76 pollinator wasp specimens from nine Ficus microcarpa trees each growing at a different location in Hainan and Fujian Provinces, China. We found that all wasps were morphologically identified as Eupristina verticillata, but diverged into three clades with 4.22-5.28% mtDNA divergence and 2.29-20.72% nuclear gene divergence. We also found very strong concordance between E. verticillata clades and Wolbachia infection status, and the predicted effects of Wolbachia on both mtDNA diversity and evolution by decreasing mitochondrial haplotypes. Conclusions Our study reveals that the pollinating wasp E. verticillata on F. microcarpa has diverged into three cryptic species, and Wolbachia may have a role in this divergence. The results also indicate that Wolbachia strains infecting E. verticillata have likely resulted in selective sweeps on host mitochondrial DNA.

  3. Painting with Clay Van Gogh Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skophammer, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Vincent Van Gogh's painting "Starry Night" and describes a lesson where fifth- and sixth-grade students created their own version of the artwork. Explains that the students utilized four colors of Permoplast clay, using their hands and fingers as brushes and blending tools and the clay as paint. (CMK)

  4. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  5. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaldoun, A.; Moller, P.; Fall, A.; Wegdam, G.; de Leeuw, B.; Méheust, Y.; Fossum, J.O.; Bonn, D.

    2009-01-01

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay s

  6. Moessbauer Spectra of Clays and Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, F. E.; Wagner, U. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2004-06-15

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical aspects of the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy in studies of clay-based ceramics are described. Moessbauer spectra of pottery clays fired under oxidising, reducing and changing conditions are explained, and the possibilities of using Moessbauer spectra to derive information on the firing temperatures and the kiln atmosphere during firing in antiquity are discussed and illustrated by examples.

  7. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  8. Aspen Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Elaine

    2002-01-01

    Describes a fifth-grade art activity that offers a new approach to creating pictures of Aspen trees. Explains that the students learned about art concepts, such as line and balance, in this lesson. Discusses the process in detail for creating the pictures. (CMK)

  9. Effect of Injecting Hydrogen Peroxide into Heavy Clay Loam Soil on Plant Water Status, NET CO2 Assimilation, Biomass, and Vascular Anatomy of Avocado Trees Efecto de la Inyección de Peróxido de Hidrógeno en Suelo Franco Arcilloso Pesado, sobre el Estado Hídrico, Asimilación Neta de CO2, Biomasa y Anatomía Vascular de Paltos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar M Gil M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In Chile, avocado (Persea americana Mill. orchards are often located in poorly drained, low-oxygen soils, situation which limits fruit production and quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of injecting soil with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as a source of molecular oxygen, on plant water status, net CO2 assimilation, biomass and anatomy of avocado trees set in clay loam soil with water content maintained at field capacity. Three-year-old ‘Hass’ avocado trees were planted outdoors in containers filled with heavy loam clay soil with moisture content sustained at field capacity. Plants were divided into two treatments, (a H2O2 injected into the soil through subsurface drip irrigation and (b soil with no H2O2 added (control. Stem and root vascular anatomical characteristics were determined for plants in each treatment in addition to physical soil characteristics, net CO2 assimilation (A, transpiration (T, stomatal conductance (gs, stem water potential (SWP, shoot and root biomass, water use efficiency (plant biomass per water applied [WUEb]. Injecting H2O2 into the soil significantly increased the biomass of the aerial portions of the plant and WUEb, but had no significant effect on measured A, T, gs, or SWP. Xylem vessel diameter and xylem/phloem ratio tended to be greater for trees in soil injected with H2O2 than for controls. The increased biomass of the aerial portions of plants in treated soil indicates that injecting H2O2 into heavy loam clay soils may be a useful management tool in poorly aerated soil.En Chile, los huertos de palto (Persea americana Mill. se ubican comúnmente en suelos pobremente drenados con bajo contenido de oxígeno, lo que limita producción y calidad de fruta. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el efecto de la inyección de peróxido de hidrógeno (H2O2 al suelo como fuente de O2, sobre el estado hídrico, asimilación de CO2, biomasa y anatomía de paltos en suelo franco arcilloso con

  10. Using digital elevation models as an environmental predictor for soil clay contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) as an environmental predictor for soil clay content (SCC). It was based on the applicability of different DEMs, i.e., SRTM with 90-m resolution and airborne Light Detection...... and Ranging (LIDAR) (in 24- and 90-m resolution), using regression-tree analysis. Ten terrain parameters were generated from these DEMs. These terrain parameters were used along other environmental variables to statistically explain SCC content in Denmark. Results indicated that the SRTM tree model (T1: 90-m...

  11. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundie, P. [Envirotech (Scotland) Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)]|[Environmental Resource Industries Disposal Pty Ltd., Perth (Australia); McLeod, N. [Envirotreat Ltd., Kingswinford (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  12. Permeation properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalendova, A.; Merinska, D.; Gerard, J. F.

    2012-07-01

    The important characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposites are stability, barrier properties and in the case of polyvinyl chloride also plasticizer migration into other materials. Therefore, the permeation properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites are discussed in this paper. The attention was focused to the polyethylene (PE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Natural type of montmorillonite MMTNa+ and modified types of montmorillonite from Southern Clay Products were used as the inorganic phase. As the compounding machine, one screw Buss KO-kneader was employed. The principal aim is to fully exfoliate the clay into polymer matrix and enhanced the permeation properties. Prepared samples were tested for O2 and CO2 permeability. Polymer/clay nanocomposite structure was determined on the base of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy (TEM).

  13. 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues linked to Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete. The main subjects are geology of clays, hydration and performance of blended systems with calcined clays, alkali activated binders, economic and environmental impacts of the use of calcined clays in cement based materials. Topics addressed in this book include the influence of processing on reactivity of calcined clays, influence of clay mineralogy on reactivity, geology of clay deposits, Portland-calcined clay systems, hydration, durability, performance, Portland-calcined clay-limestone systems, hydration, durability, performance, calcined clay-alkali systems, life cycle analysis, economics and environmental impact of use of calcined clays in cement and concrete, and field applications. This book compiles the different contributions of the 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete, which took place in Lausanne, Switzerland, June, 23-25, 2015.The papers present the latest  res...

  14. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  15. Relationship between pollination and cell wall properties in common fig fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, Mehdi; Ginies, Christian; Gaaliche, Badii; Renard, Catherine M G C; Mars, Messaoud

    2014-02-01

    Most botanical types in fig Ficus carica require pollination to fulfil their development and ensure quality onset of the fruit. Cell wall behaviour and composition was followed in fig fruit in response to pollination during maturity. Figs, when ripe, soften drastically and lose of their firmness and cell wall cohesion. Pollination increased peel thickness, flesh thickness, fresh weight and dry matter content of the fruit. Alcohol insoluble solids (AIS), more concentrated in the flesh tissue, were not influenced by the lack of pollination. Concentrations in uronic acids were higher in the AIS of the peel than that of the flesh and differences were significant between pollinated and non-pollinated fruits. Pectin polymers in figs were high methylated (DM>50). The methylation degree (DM) increased more with pollination affecting textural properties of the fig receptacle. The major neutral sugars from the AIS were glucose (Glc) from cellulose followed by arabinose (Ara). No significant changes in neutral sugars content could be allocated to pollination. Pollination is essential in fruit enlargement and softening. Minor changes were determined in the cell wall composition of the fruit at maturity. Fertile seeds resulting from pollination may possibly take place in hormonal activity stimulating many related enzymes of the wall matrix depolymerisation in particular polygalacturonase (PG) and pectin methylesterase (PME). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    OpenAIRE

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO; Samuel Akinlabi OLA; Olumide Oluwapelumi OJURI

    2016-01-01

    The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-...

  17. Unimodular trees versus Einstein trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Enrique; Gonzalez-Martin, Sergio [Universidad Autonoma, Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Martin, Carmelo P. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Departamento de Fisica Teorica I Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    The maximally helicity violating tree-level scattering amplitudes involving three, four or five gravitons are worked out in Unimodular Gravity. They are found to coincide with the corresponding amplitudes in General Relativity. This a remarkable result, insofar as both the propagators and the vertices are quite different in the two theories. (orig.)

  18. Unimodular Trees versus Einstein Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Enrique; Martin, Carmelo P

    2016-01-01

    The maximally helicity violating (MHV) tree level scattering amplitudes involving three, four or five gravitons are worked out in Unimodular Gravity. They are found to coincide with the corresponding amplitudes in General Relativity. This a remarkable result, insofar as both the propagators and the vertices are quite different in both theories.

  19. Unimodular trees versus Einstein trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Enrique; González-Martín, Sergio; Martín, Carmelo P.

    2016-10-01

    The maximally helicity violating tree-level scattering amplitudes involving three, four or five gravitons are worked out in Unimodular Gravity. They are found to coincide with the corresponding amplitudes in General Relativity. This a remarkable result, insofar as both the propagators and the vertices are quite different in the two theories.

  20. Antioxidant Activity of a Mediterranean Food Product: “Fig Syrup”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umile G. Spizzirri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the efficacy of fig syrup, a Mediterranean fig derivative, as a nutraceutical supplement, was demonstrated. Fig syrup is a fruit concentrate used as a common ingredient in the preparation of typical foods, and particularly in cakes. In vitro assays were performed to determine the amount of nutraceutical ingredients, such as phenolic compounds (3.92 mg equivalent of gallic acid per g and flavonoids (0.35 mg equivalent of catechin per g, while HPLC analyses provided specific information about the composition of antioxidants in the syrup. Furthermore, total antioxidant activity, scavenging properties against DPPH and peroxyl radicals, and the anticholinesterase activity, clearly showed the efficacy of the syrup in preventing damage induced by free radicals and, thus, the applicability of this food derivative as a nutraceutical supplement.

  1. Citric and gluconic acid production from fig by Aspergillus niger using solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukas, T

    2000-12-01

    The production of citric and gluconic acids from fig by Aspergillus niger ATCC 10577 in solid-state fermentation was investigated. The maximal citric and gluconic acids concentration (64 and 490 g/kg dry figs, respectively), citric acid yield (8%), and gluconic acid yield (63%) were obtained at a moisture level of 75%, initial pH 7.0, temperature 30 degrees C, and fermentation time in 15 days. However, the highest biomass dry weight (40 g/kg wet substrate) and sugar utilization (90%) were obtained in cultures grown at 35 degrees C. The addition of 6% (w/w) methanol into substrate increased the concentration of citric and gluconic acid from 64 and 490 to 96 and 685 g/kg dry fig, respectively.

  2. Molecular approaches to identify cryptic species and polymorphic species within a complex community of fig wasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hua Xiao

    Full Text Available Cryptic and polymorphic species can complicate traditional taxonomic research and both of these concerns are common in fig wasp communities. Species identification is very difficult, despite great effort and the ecological importance of fig wasps. Herein, we try to identify all chalcidoid wasp species hosted by one species of fig, using both morphological and molecular methods. We compare the efficiency of four different DNA regions and find that ITS2 is highly effective for species identification, while mitochondrial COI and Cytb regions appear less reliable, possibly due to the interference signals from either nuclear copies of mtDNA, i.e. NUMTs, or the effects of Wolbachia infections. The analyses suggest that combining multiple markers is the best choice for inferring species identifications as any one marker may be unsuitable in a given case.

  3. Testing the emergence of New Caledonia: fig wasp mutualism as a case study and a review of evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Cruaud

    Full Text Available While geologists suggest that New Caledonian main island (Grande Terre was submerged until ca 37 Ma, biologists are struck by the presence of supposedly Gondwanan groups on the island. Among these groups are the Oreosycea fig trees (Ficus, Moraceae and their Dolichoris pollinators (Hymenoptera, Agaonidae. These partners are distributed in the Paleotropics and Australasia, suggesting that their presence on New Caledonia could result from Gondwanan vicariance. To test this hypothesis, we obtained mitochondrial and nuclear markers (5.3 kb from 28 species of Dolichoris, used all available sequences for Oreosycea, and conducted phylogenetic and dating analyses with several calibration strategies. All our analyses ruled out a vicariance scenario suggesting instead that New Caledonian colonization by Dolichoris and Oreosycea involved dispersal across islands from Sundaland ca 45.9-32.0 Ma. Our results show that successful long-distance dispersal of obligate mutualists may happen further suggesting that presence of intimate mutualisms on isolated islands should not be used as a priori evidence for vicariance. Comparing our results to a review of all the published age estimates for New Caledonian plant and animal taxa, we showed that support for a vicariant origin of the island biota is still lacking. Finally, as demonstrating a causal relationship between geology and biology requires independent evidence, we argue that a priori assumptions about vicariance or dispersal should not be used to constrain chronograms. This circular reasoning could lead to under or overestimation of age estimates.

  4. THE EFFECT OF CLAY DISPERSION ON THE CRYSTALLIZATION AND MORPHOLOGY OF POLYPROPYLENE/CLAY COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Zhang; Xiao-lin Gao; Ke Wang; Qiang Fu

    2004-01-01

    PP/clay composites with different dispersions, namely, exfoliated dispersion, intercalated dispersion and agglomerates and panicle-like dispersion, were prepared by direct melt intercalation or compounding. The effect of clay dispersion on the crystallization and morphology of PP was investigated via PLM, SAXS and DSC. Experimental results show that exfoliated clay layers are much more efficient than intercalated clay and agglomerates of clay in serving as nucleation agent due to the nano-scale dispersion of clay, resulting in a dramatic decrease in crystal size (lamellar thickness and spherulites) and an increase of crystallization temperature and crystallization rate. On the other hand, a decrease of melting temperature and crystallinity was also observed in PP/clay composites with exfoliated dispersion, due to the strong interaction between PP and clay. Compared with exfoliated clay layers, the intercalated clay layers have a less important effect on the crystallization and crystal morphology. No effect is seen for samples with agglomerates and panicle-like dispersion, in regard to melting temperature, crystallization temperature, crystal thickness and crystallinity.

  5. Comparing methods of estimating strength parameters for fissured clays at Seven Sisters Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, D.P.; Yereniuk, V.A. [Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Some instabilities have been observed at several dyke locations at the Seven Sisters Generating Station, Manitoba since construction in the late 1940s. The foundations of the dykes are fissured plastic clays. Slope stabilizing methods have been proposed by a number of researchers since the late 1970s for estimating strength parameters for fissured plastic clays. This paper reports on four methods which were used for estimating Mohr-Coulomb strength parameters for stability analyses involving nine dyke locations where instability has been reported in the past. Correlation is established between the calculated safety factors and observed performance in an effort to determine the most appropriate method for this site. It was determined that the most appropriate method was that proposed by P.J. Rivard and Y.Lu in the late 1970s. 16 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  6. Some Tests on Heather Field Moraine Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Jacobsen, Moust

    This report deals with oedometer tests on three samples of moraine clay from the Heather Field in the English part of the North Sea. The tests have been carried out in the very unelastic apparatus used in Denmark and with special test procedures differing from the ones used elsewhere. In Denmark...... the English North Sea moraine clays with the corresponding Danish Moraine Clays. The Danish test procedures are explained in details and some comments are given in the hope that they may not be banalities all of them....

  7. Ni clay neoformation on montmorillonite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dähn, R; Scheidegger, A; Manceau, A; Schlegel, M; Baeyens, B; Bradbury, M H

    2001-03-01

    Polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (P-EXAFS) was used to study the sorption mechanism of Ni on the aluminous hydrous silicate montmorillonite at high ionic strength (0.3 M NaClO4), pH 8 and a Ni concentration of 0.66 mM. Highly textured self-supporting clay films were obtained by slowly filtrating a clay suspension after a reaction time of 14 days. P-EXAFS results indicate that sorbed Ni has a Ni clay-like structural environment with the same crystallographic orientation as montmorillonite layers.

  8. Red barons or robber barons? : governance and financing in Russian FIGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.; Gelfer, S.

    1999-01-01

    We study the governance role of Russian Financial-Industrial Groups (FIG) and their impact on financing of investment. We compare member firms of a group with a control set of large firms categorized by dispersed ownership or/and management and employee control. We find that investment is sensitive

  9. Fig wasps from Ficus dzumacensis, with notes on the genus Sycobiella Westwood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiebes, J.T.

    1964-01-01

    A sample of fig wasps from New Caledonia, sent to me by Mr. E. J. H. Corner, contained a species of Blastophaga Gravenhorst (Agaonidae) and a species of Sycobiella Westwood (Torymidae). The insects were reared from the receptacles of Ficus dzumacensis Guillaum. The Blastophaga is of interest because

  10. Trapping African fig fly (Diptera: Drosophilidae) with combinations of vinegar and wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The African fig fly, Zaprionus indianus Gupta (Diptera: Drosophilidae), is an invasive fruit pest that has spread rapidly through much of the eastern United States. Tests were conducted in southern Florida that recorded the response of Z. indianus to baits that included Merlot wine, rice vinegar, et...

  11. Detection of Phytoplasma on Indian Fig (Opuntia ficus-indica Mill in Mexico Central Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gaspar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Indian fig (a species of prickly pear cactus, has been known as Nopal, comprises an approximate area of 100,000 ha, in plantations used for human consumption. “Pyramids” Indian fig area located in the northeastern State of Mexico has been an important Indian-fig area in the country, with 15810 ha, where a phytoplasma has been consistently present in symptomatic plant. Approach: An unknown symptomatology in the Indian fig (prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica Mill was analyzed through grafting and a nested-PCR reaction and graft on healthy plants grown in a greenhouse. Results: The symptoms found, deforming, buds proliferation, thickening and heart-shaping in cladodes, with arrested plant growth and deep yellowing of cladodes, were all attributed to the presence of a phytoplasma given the amplification of a 1200 pb fragment of the 16S rRNA gene using primers R16 F2/R2 and R16F2n/R2 and 80% of phytoplasma transmission efficiency of successful grafts. Conclusion: Although the symptoms observed did not completely match those described for this organism in the region, a 1200 pb fragment was amplified and PCR products restriction analysis leading us to assume that the phytoplasma corresponds to subgroup 16Srll, previously reported for other crops in others world regions.

  12. Development of Fig Gel Candy%无花果凝胶软糖的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶超; 刘毅

    2013-01-01

    Optimization of the best fudge recipe fig gel. Single factor experiment, with different proportions of agar, gelatin, preferably the best gel matrix;the basis of the above experiment, the gel matrix, white sugar, glucose and fig syrup addition level factors, three levels of design , the orthogonal test and the composite score. According to the Composite score, the optimum formula was gel matrix ∶White sugar ∶glucose ∶fig syrup =3 ∶ 35 ∶ 20 ∶ 10. Obtained based on the best recipe fig gel candy was soft, delicate tissue, smooth taste, retaining the unique flavor of the fig and the nutritional value, lay a foundation for the production.%  优选无花果凝胶软糖的最佳配方.采用单因素试验,用不同比例的琼脂、明胶,优选最佳凝胶基质;在上述试验基础上,以凝胶基质、白砂糖、葡萄糖和无花果浆的添加量为因素,设计三个水平,进行正交试验并综合评分.根据综合评分,得出最佳配方,即凝胶基质:白砂糖:葡萄糖:无花果浆=3∶35∶20∶10.根据最佳配方制得的无花果凝胶软糖质地柔软、组织细腻、口感滑润,保留了无花果特有的风味及营养价值,为进一步开发提供实验基础.

  13. Finite Sholander Trees, Trees, and their Betweenness

    CERN Document Server

    Chvátal, Vašek; Schäfer, Philipp Matthias

    2011-01-01

    We provide a proof of Sholander's claim (Trees, lattices, order, and betweenness, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 3, 369-381 (1952)) concerning the representability of collections of so-called segments by trees, which yields a characterization of the interval function of a tree. Furthermore, we streamline Burigana's characterization (Tree representations of betweenness relations defined by intersection and inclusion, Mathematics and Social Sciences 185, 5-36 (2009)) of tree betweenness and provide a relatively short proof.

  14. Mullins' effect in polymer/clay nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville; Klitkou, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Experimental data are reported on polypropylene/clay nanocomposites in uniaxial cyclic tensile tests at room temperature (oscillations between maximum strains and the zero minimum stress with maximum strains increasing monotonically with number of cycles). Observations reveal fading...

  15. Toward Accurate Adsorption Energetics on Clay Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Cox, Stephen J; Hu, Xiao L; Sorella, Sandro; Alfè, Dario; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in nature, and the manner in which they interact with their surroundings has important industrial and environmental implications. Consequently, a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of molecules on clay surfaces is crucial. In this regard computer simulations play an important role, yet the accuracy of widely used empirical force fields (FF) and density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals is often unclear in adsorption systems dominated by weak interactions. Herein we present results from quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for water and methanol adsorption on the prototypical clay kaolinite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time QMC has been used to investigate adsorption at a complex, natural surface such as a clay. As well as being valuable in their own right, the QMC benchmarks obtained provide reference data against which the performance of cheaper DFT methods can be tested. Indeed using various DFT exchange-correlation functionals yields...

  16. Mullins' effect in polymer/clay nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville; Klitkou, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Experimental data are reported on polypropylene/clay nanocomposites in uniaxial cyclic tensile tests at room temperature (oscillations between maximum strains and the zero minimum stress with maximum strains increasing monotonically with number of cycles). Observations reveal fading of ...

  17. The Basics in Pottery: Clay and Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Joan

    1985-01-01

    Art teachers at the middle school or junior high school level usually find themselves in a program teaching ceramics. The most essential tools needed for a ceramics class are discussed. Different kinds of clay are also discussed. (RM)

  18. Interaction of Auramine O with montmorillonite clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Avelardo U.C.; Poli, Alessandra L.; Gessner, Fergus; Neumann, Miguel G. [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 780, 13560-970 São Carlos SP (Brazil); Schmitt Cavalheiro, Carla C., E-mail: carla@iqsc.usp.br [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 780, 13560-970 São Carlos SP (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    The spectroscopic behaviour of Auramine O (AuO) in aqueous suspensions of montmorillonite clays was studied using absorption and static and dynamic fluorescence techniques. The fluorescence of Auramine O increases immediately after mixing the dye solution with the suspension of clay due to its adsorption on the external surface of the clays, which restricts the torsional molecular motion of Auramine. At longer times, the dye molecules migrate into the interlamellar region of the clay particles. Aggregation of the dye molecules can occur in the interlayer region, leading to the decrease of the fluorescence emission. The fluorescence quantum yields (Φ{sub F}) of AuO on the natural montmorillonites SAz-1, SWy-1, Syn-1 and Laponite clays were 0.015, 0.007, 0.016 and 0.017, respectively. These values are higher than the Φ{sub F} of AuO in aqueous solution and are of the same order of magnitude of the Φ{sub F} found for viscous solvents such as n-hexanol and n-heptanol (0.014 and 0.015). Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy studies of adsorbed Auramine on clays revealed multi-exponential decays with components in the 25–36, 219–362 and 1300–1858 ps ranges. The short-lived components can be attributed to species bound to external surface and the longer lifetime is assigned to dye molecules in interlayer spaces interacting strongly with the clay. It seems clear that the binding of Auramine to clays causes a significant reduction of the rate of internal conversion that does involve rotational diffusion, so that the clay will be locked in a conformational geometry unfavourable for internal conversion. -- Highlights: ► Auramine O was dissolved in dispersions of different clays. ► The fluorescence quantum yields were higher than in aqueous solution. ► Decrease of the emission and triexponential decays were observed on SAz-1, LapRDS and SYn-1. ► On Swy-1 the decrease was slower and the decay monoexponential. ► The dye produces aggregates on the internal

  19. 2 nd Mid-European Clay Conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The 2nd Mid-European Clay Conference (MECC'04) was held between 20-24th September 2004, in Miskolc, Hungary. The idea to hold common conferences was accepted by the national clay groups of four neighbouring countries, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and Croatia, during the EUROCLAY Meeting in Cracow, Poland, in 1999. The first conference was held in 2001 at Stará Lesná, in the High Tatra Mts. in Slovakia.

  20. Cobalt sorption in silica-pillared clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, A; Fetter, G; Bosch, P; Bulbulian, S

    2006-01-03

    Silicon pillared samples were prepared following conventional and microwave irradiation methods. The samples were characterized and tested in cobalt sorption. Ethylenediammine was added before cobalt addition to improve the amount of cobalt retained. The amount of cobalt introduced in the original clay in the presence of ethylenediammine was the highest. In calcined pillared clays the cobalt retention with ethylenediammine was lower (ca. 40%). In all cases the presence of ethylenediammine increased twice the amount of cobalt sorption measured for aqueous solutions.

  1. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base) by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the...

  2. Dynamic properties of composite cemented clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡袁强; 梁旭

    2004-01-01

    In this work,the dynamic properties of composite cemented clay under a wide range of strains were studied considering the effect of different mixing ratio and the change of confining pressures through dynamic triaxial test. A simple and practical method to estimate the dynamic elastic modulus and damping ratio is proposed in this paper and a related empirical normalized formula is also presented. The results provide useful guidelines for preliminary estimation of cement requirements to improve the dynamic properties of clays.

  3. Quantifying the effect of squirt flow dispersion from compliant clay porosity in clay bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Compliant porosity in the form of cracks is known to cause significant attenuation and velocity dispersion through pore pressure gradients and consequent relaxation, dubbed squirt flow. Squirt flow from cracks vanish at high confining stress due to crack closing. Studies on clay bearing sandstones......-squirt flow on the bulk modulus of a clay bearing sandstone. The predicted magnitude of the clay-squirt effect on the bulk modulus is compared with experimental data. The clay-squirt effect is found to possibly account for a significant portion of the deviances from Gassmann fluid substitution in claybearing...

  4. On The Thermal Consolidation Of Boom Clay

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2012-01-01

    When a mass of saturated clay is heated, as in the case of host soils surrounding nuclear waste disposals at great depth, the thermal expansion of the constituents generates excess pore pressures. The mass of clay is submitted to gradients of pore pressure and temperature, to hydraulic and thermal flows, and to changes in its mechanical properties. In this work, some of these aspects were experimentally studied in the case of Boom clay, so as to help predicting the response of the soil, in relation with investigations made in the Belgian underground laboratory at Mol. Results of slow heating tests with careful volume change measurements showed that a reasonable prediction of the thermal expansion of the clay-water system was obtained by using the thermal properties of free water. In spite of the density of Boom clay, no significant effect of water adsorption was observed. The thermal consolidation of Boom clay was studied through fast heating tests. A simple analysis shows that the hydraulic and thermal trans...

  5. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  6. Tree rings and radiocarbon calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbetti, M. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). NWG Macintosh Centre for Quaternary Dating

    1999-11-01

    Only a few kinds of trees in Australia and Southeast Asia are known to have growth rings that are both distinct and annual. Those that do are therefore extremely important to climatic and isotope studies. In western Tasmania, extensive work with Huon pine (Lagarostrobos franklinii) has shown that many living trees are more than 1,000 years old, and that their ring widths are sensitive to temperature, rainfall and cloud cover (Buckley et al. 1997). At the Stanley River there is a forest of living (and recently felled) trees which we have sampled and measured. There are also thousands of subfossil Huon pine logs, buried at depths less than 5 metres in an area of floodplain extending over a distance of more than a kilometre with a width of tens of metres. Some of these logs have been buried for 50,000 years or more, but most of them belong to the period between 15,000 years and the present. In previous expeditions in the 1980s and 1990s, we excavated and sampled about 350 logs (Barbetti et al. 1995; Nanson et al. 1995). By measuring the ring-width patterns, and matching them between logs and living trees, we have constructed a tree-ring dated chronology from 571 BC to AD 1992. We have also built a 4254-ring floating chronology (placed by radiocarbon at ca. 3580 to 7830 years ago), and an earlier 1268-ring chronology (ca. 7,580 to 8,850 years ago). There are many individuals, or pairs of logs which match and together span several centuries, at 9,000 years ago and beyond 15 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  7. Effects of Clay on Properties of Polycarboxylate Superplasticizer and Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin; WANG Dongmin

    2015-01-01

    The inlfuence law of clay on mortar lfuidity mixed with polycarboxylate superplasticizer was studied. Several methods of inhibiting clay adsorption of polycarboxylate superplasticizer were discussed. The experimental results show that clay has signiifcant effect on the dispersion of polycarboxylate superplasticizer and montmorillonite clay has more signiifcant impact on mortar lfuidity than other clays. The pH value and the salts of the solution can affect the adsorption of clay to polycarboxylate superplasticizer. The incorporation of a small amount of sodium hydroxide solution, sodium silicate or cationic surfactants can improve the effect of the clay on the dispersion of polycarboxylate superplasticizer.

  8. Applied mineralogy of the constituent clays of the mineral wastes from the coal mines in the Teruel mining zone; Mineralogia aplicada de arcillas constitutivas de esteriles en minas de carbon de la zona minera de Teruel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastida, J.; Lopez Buendia, A.M.; Serrano, J.; De La Torre, J.; Sienes, M. [Univ. Valencia, Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Geologia

    1993-12-31

    The coals of the district of Teruel (NE Spain) presents as mine wastes several industrial minerals and rocks (sands, kaolins, clays, Al-sulfates,...) the mining of which would be interesting. The aim of this work is the mineralogical and ceramic characterisation of these clays. So mineralogical and petrographical data as well as technological data concerning granulometry, chemical analysis and Atteberg index have been used in order to compare these clays with those analysed and typified in previous works and with those actually used as ceramic raw materials in the NE of Teruel. 26 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Study of adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals; Estudio de Adsorcion de Fenentreno en Diferentes Tipos de Arcillas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, M. L.; Escolano, O.; Rodriguez, V.; Diaz, F. J.; Perez, R.; Garcia, S.; Garcia Frutos, F. J.

    2003-07-01

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay mineral also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represent ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs.

  10. Premiminary tests on modified clays for electrolyte contaminated drilling fluids

    OpenAIRE

    den Hamer, Davina; Di Emidio, Gemmina; Bezuijen, Adam; Verastegui Flores, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The quality of a bentonite suspension declines in aggressive systems like brackish or saline pore water. An engineered clay (HYPER clay) was developed for sealing materials with enhanced resistance to aggressive conditions. The modified clay is produced by treating a sodium activated bentonite with a cellulose polymer following the HYPER clay process method. This study investigates the suitability of the modified clay for electrolyte contaminated drilling fluids. Drilling fluids become contam...

  11. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  12. Modular Tree Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Tree automata are traditionally used to study properties of tree languages and tree transformations. In this paper, we consider tree automata as the basis for modular and extensible recursion schemes. We show, using well-known techniques, how to derive from standard tree automata highly modular r...

  13. Simple street tree sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Jeffrey T. Walton; James Baldwin; Jerry. Bond

    2015-01-01

    Information on street trees is critical for management of this important resource. Sampling of street tree populations provides an efficient means to obtain street tree population information. Long-term repeat measures of street tree samples supply additional information on street tree changes and can be used to report damages from catastrophic events. Analyses of...

  14. Modular tree automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Tree automata are traditionally used to study properties of tree languages and tree transformations. In this paper, we consider tree automata as the basis for modular and extensible recursion schemes. We show, using well-known techniques, how to derive from standard tree automata highly modular...

  15. Large-scale diversification without genetic isolation in nematode symbionts of figs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susoy, Vladislav; Herrmann, Matthias; Kanzaki, Natsumi; Kruger, Meike; Nguyen, Chau N; Rödelsperger, Christian; Röseler, Waltraud; Weiler, Christian; Giblin-Davis, Robin M; Ragsdale, Erik J; Sommer, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification is commonly understood to be the divergence of phenotypes accompanying that of lineages. In contrast, alternative phenotypes arising from a single genotype are almost exclusively limited to dimorphism in nature. We report a remarkable case of macroevolutionary-scale diversification without genetic divergence. Upon colonizing the island-like microecosystem of individual figs, symbiotic nematodes of the genus Pristionchus accumulated a polyphenism with up to five discrete adult morphotypes per species. By integrating laboratory and field experiments with extensive genotyping of individuals, including the analysis of 49 genomes from a single species, we show that rapid filling of potential ecological niches is possible without diversifying selection on genotypes. This uncoupling of morphological diversification and speciation in fig-associated nematodes has resulted from a remarkable expansion of discontinuous developmental plasticity.

  16. The impact of onions and figs extracts on Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad AliDabighian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to spread of infectious diseases and increase of bacterial resistance to antibiotics and side effects of chemical drugs which have expiration date, using herbal and organic drugs with faster effectiveness without side effects and limitation are proper replacement. Maceration to extraction was used to conduct this research in four methods using distilled water and alcohol as solvent and finally these extractions was used to measuring halos of blight. Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria were standard and the impact of extractions using impregnating discs on bacteria in Muller-Hinton agar in plate was conducted and their influence compared with required antibiotics and measuring halos of blight were accomplished, which were confirmed by MIC, MBC and FIC. The required extractions from onions and figs obtained by maceration which surveyed as synthetic and single on standard S. pyogenes bacteria and their impact on the tested bacteria in some resulted methods were logical compared to 8 used antibiotics and compared with some antibiotics was more, equal and less. Onions and figs extracts, both singly and specially synthetically by maceration on S. pyogenes bacteria are the causes of lung infections which have antibacterial feature. Onions and figs extracts synthetically with distilled water traditionally and the extant of drench for 10 days is more influential and has big halo of blight than 8 kinds of antibiotics such as gentamicin, neomycin, azithromycin and erythromycin. Also hypothesizes have been offered to explain the mechanism of their antibiotics feature. The FIC parameter result showed that, combination of figs and onions extractions had synergistic effect. Therefore the combinations of the two extractions are more effective.

  17. A role for parasites in stabilising the fig-pollinator mutualism.

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Derek W.; Segar, Simon T; Jo Ridley; Ruth Chan; Crozier, Ross H.; Yu, Douglas W.; Cook, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Mutualisms are interspecific interactions in which both players benefit. Explaining their maintenance is problematic, because cheaters should outcompete cooperative conspecifics, leading to mutualism instability. Monoecious figs (Ficus) are pollinated by host-specific wasps (Agaonidae), whose larvae gall ovules in their “fruits” (syconia). Female pollinating wasps oviposit directly into Ficus ovules from inside the receptive syconium. Across Ficus species, there is a widely documented segrega...

  18. Pollinating fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi adjusts the offspring sex ratio to other foundresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-Yuan Hu; Zhong-Zheng Chen; Zi-Feng Jiang; Da-Wei Huang; Li-Ming Niu; Yue-Guan Fu

    2013-01-01

    Local mate competition theory predicts that offspring sex ratio in pollinating fig wasps is female-biased when there is only one foundress,and increased foundress density results in increased offspring sex ratio.Information of other foundresses and clutch size have been suggested to be the main proximate explanations for sex ratio adjustment under local mate competition.Our focus was to show the mechanism of sex ratio adjustment in a pollinating fig wasp,Ceratosolen solmsi Mayr,an obligate pollinator of the functionally dioecious fig,Ficus hispida Linn.,with controlled experiments in the field.First,we obtained offspring from one pollinator and offspring at different oviposition sequences,and found that offspring sex ratio decreased with clutch size,and pollinators produced most of their male offspring at the start of bouts,followed by mostly females.Second,we found that offspring sex ratio increased with foundress density,and pollinators did adjust their offspring sex ratio to other females in the oviposition patches.We suggest that when oviposition sites are not limited,pollinators will mainly adjust their offspring sex ratio to other foundresses independent of clutch size changes,whereas adjusting clutch size may be used to adjust sex ratio when oviposition sites are limited.

  19. Five Cases of Phytophotodermatitis Caused by Fig Leaves and Relevant Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jin-Hwa; Jin, Hyunju; You, Hyang-Suk; Shim, Woo-Haing; Kim, Jeong-Min; Kim, Gun-Wook; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum

    2017-01-01

    Phytophotodermatitis is a condition caused by sequential exposure to photosensitizing substances present in plants followed by ultraviolet light. Several plants (e.g., limes, celery, fig, and wild parsnip) contain furocoumarin compounds (psoralens). It is important for dermatologists to be aware of phytophotodermatitis because it may be misdiagnosed as cellulitis, tinea, or allergic contact dermatitis. We present five patients with a sharply defined erythematous swollen patch with bullae on both feet. They described soaking their feet in a fig leaves decoction to treat their underlying dermatologic diseases. Within 24 hours, all patients had a burning sensation in their feet, and erythema and edema had developed on the feet dorsa with exception of the portion of the skin covered by the sandals. Histopathologic examinations revealed sub-epithelial blisters with intensive epidermal necrosis. Phytophotodermatitis was ultimately diagnosed and, after several days, the patients' skin lesions began to recover upon treatment with systemic and topical corticosteroids. Unfortunately, since there are no studies providing sufficient evidence on the benefits of fig leaves, they should be used with caution. PMID:28223753

  20. Trade-offs and coexistence: a lottery model applied to fig wasp communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, A Bradley; Abbott, Karen C; Nason, John D

    2014-06-01

    Ecological communities in which organisms complete their life cycles on discrete ephemeral patches are common and often support an unusually large number of species. Explaining this diversity is challenging for communities of ecologically similar species undergoing preemptive competition, where classic coexistence mechanisms may not readily apply. We use nonpollinating fig wasps as a model community characterized by high diversity and preemptive competition to show how subadditive population growth and a trade-off between competitor fecundity and dispersal ability can lead to coexistence. Because nonpollinator species are often closely related, have similar life histories, and compete for the same discrete resources, understanding their coexistence is challenging given competitive exclusion is expected. Empirical observations suggest that nonpollinating fig wasp species may face a trade-off between egg loads and dispersal abilities. We model a lottery in which a species' competitive ability is determined by a trade-off between fecundity and dispersal ability. Variation in interpatch distance between figs generates temporal variability in the relative benefit of fecundity versus dispersal. We show that the temporal storage effect leads to coexistence for a range of biologically realistic parameter values. We further use individual-based modeling to show that when species' traits evolve, coexistence is less likely but trait divergence can result. We discuss the implications of this coexistence mechanism for ephemeral patch systems wherein competition is strongly preemptive.

  1. Removal of boron from aqueous solution by clays and modified clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Senem; Yurdakoç, Mürüvvet; Seki, Yoldaş; Yurdakoç, Kadir

    2006-01-01

    In order to increase the adsorption capacities of bentonite, sepiolite, and illite for the removal of boron form aqueous solution, the clay samples were modified by nonylammonium chloride. Specific surface areas of the samples were determined as a result of N2 adsorption-desorption at 77 K using the BET method. X-ray powder diffraction analysis of the clays and modified clays was used to determine the effects of modifying agents on the layer structure of the clays. The surface characterization of clays and modified clay samples was conducted using the FTIR technique before and after the boron adsorption. For the optimization of the adsorption of boron on clays and modified clays, the effect of pH and ionic strength was examined. The results indicate that adsorption of boron can be achieved by regulating pH values in the range of 8-10 and high ionic strength. In order to find the adsorption characteristics, Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms were applied to the adsorption data. The data were well described by Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms while the fit of Langmuir equation to adsorption data was poor. It was reached that modification of bentonite and illite with nonylammonium chloride increased the adsorption capacity for boron sorption from aqueous solution.

  2. Determining Upper Bounds for the Clay-squirt Effect in Clay Bearing Sandstone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Sonic measurements of saturated bulk moduli of clay bearing sandstones show larger values than expected by Gassmann modelling from dry rock properties. This causes difficulties in extrapolation of laboratory data to different saturants or frequencies. Squirt flow from the clay phase of the rock...

  3. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  4. Clay nanocomposites for use in Li batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Gregory John

    1999-11-01

    Nanocomposites, materials made of more than one component and combined in an ordered manner on the nanometer scale, were synthesized using clay mineral hosts with various types of guests. The guests include polymers such as polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyaniline (PANI), large molecules such as ethylmethyl sulfone, tetramethylene sulfone, and various length alkylamines. Vanadyl groups (VO 2+) were also incorporated with the clays. The otherwise non-swellable mica clay, synthetic Na-fluorophlogopite, was expanded by intercalation of acidic ions such as Cu2+ and Fe3+. As aqueous solutions, these ions caused the stable fluoromica to go from its dehydrated interlayer spacing of 9.8 A to over 14 A. This clay became a host for many other reactions including swelling with alkylamines to over 25 A. However, despite hydrated Cu2+ ions swelling fluorophlogopite, polymeric species such as PEO or PANI could not be inserted. Another clay that was used for formation of nanocomposites came from a procedure for the synthesis of Li-taeniolite, Li(Mg2Li)Si 4O10F2. The clay was synthesized following a high temperature method that led to a non-reactive product. Instead, a novel precursor route was employed that gave a clay product with a single hydration layer. Various chemical analyses gave a formula of Li0.8(Mg 2.2Li0.8)Si4O10(F1.6O 0.4)·H2O. For the purpose of forming nanocomposite electrolytes, ethylmethyl sulfone was synthesized and incorporated into the clay. For comparison of different shaped sulfones, tetramethylene sulfone also was inserted into the layers for electrolytic studies. To make a polymer-clay electrolyte, polyethylene oxide was intercalated into the Li-taeniolite. All of these new electrolyte materials were characterized using impedance spectroscopy for measurement of their conductivity. Syntheses and analyses are thoroughly discussed for all of these materials. Special attention is placed on powder x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric techniques to

  5. Unifying constructal theory of tree roots, canopies and forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, A; Lorente, S; Lee, J

    2008-10-07

    Here, we show that the most basic features of tree and forest architecture can be put on a unifying theoretical basis, which is provided by the constructal law. Key is the integrative approach to understanding the emergence of "designedness" in nature. Trees and forests are viewed as integral components (along with dendritic river basins, aerodynamic raindrops, and atmospheric and oceanic circulation) of the much greater global architecture that facilitates the cyclical flow of water in nature (Fig. 1) and the flow of stresses between wind and ground. Theoretical features derived in this paper are: the tapered shape of the root and longitudinally uniform diameter and density of internal flow tubes, the near-conical shape of tree trunks and branches, the proportionality between tree length and wood mass raised to 1/3, the proportionality between total water mass flow rate and tree length, the proportionality between the tree flow conductance and the tree length scale raised to a power between 1 and 2, the existence of forest floor plans that maximize ground-air flow access, the proportionality between the length scale of the tree and its rank raised to a power between -1 and -1/2, and the inverse proportionality between the tree size and number of trees of the same size. This paper further shows that there exists an optimal ratio of leaf volume divided by total tree volume, trees of the same size must have a larger wood volume fraction in windy climates, and larger trees must pack more wood per unit of tree volume than smaller trees. Comparisons with empirical correlations and formulas based on ad hoc models are provided. This theory predicts classical notions such as Leonardo's rule, Huber's rule, Zipf's distribution, and the Fibonacci sequence. The difference between modeling (description) and theory (prediction) is brought into evidence.

  6. Behavior of compacted clay-concrete interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.R. SHAKIR; Jungao ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Tests of interface between compacted clay and concrete were conducted systematically using interface simple shear test apparatus. The samples, having same dry density with different water content ratio, were prepared.Two types of concrete with different surface roughness, i.e., relatively smooth and relatively rough surface rough-ness, were also prepared. The main objectives of this paper are to show the effect of water content, normal stress and rough surface on the shear stress-shear displacement relationship of clay-concrete interface. The following were concluded in this study: 1) the interface shear sliding dominates the interface shear displacement behavior for both cases of relatively rough and smooth concrete surface except when the clay water content is greater than 16% for the case of rough concrete surface where the shear failure occurs in the body of the clay sample; 2) the results of interface shear strength obtained by direct shear test were different from that of simple shear test for the case of rough concrete surface; 3) two types of interface failure mechanism may change each other with different water content ratio; 4) the interface shear strength increases with increasing water content ratio especially for the case of clay-rough concrete surface interface.

  7. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  8. One-Dimensional Simulation of Clay Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siljan Siljan

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Drying of clay is simulated by a one-dimensional model. The background of the work is to form a better basis for investigation of the drying process in production of clay-based building materials. A model of one-dimensional heat and mass transfer in porous material is used and modified to simulate drying of clay particles. The convective terms are discretized by first-order upwinding, and the diffusive terms are discretized by central differencing. DASSL was used to solve the set of algebraic and differential equations. The different simulations show the effect of permeability, initial moisture content and different boundary conditions. Both drying of a flat plate and a spherical particle are modelled.

  9. Clay Improvement with Burned Olive Waste Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkan Mutman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil is concentrated in the Mediterranean basin countries. Since the olive oil industries are incriminated for a high quantity of pollution, it has become imperative to solve this problem by developing optimized systems for the treatment of olive oil wastes. This study proposes a solution to the problem. Burned olive waste ash is evaluated for using it as clay stabilizer. In a laboratory, bentonite clay is used to improve olive waste ash. Before the laboratory, the olive waste is burned at 550°C in the high temperature oven. The burned olive waste ash was added to bentonite clay with increasing 1% by weight from 1% to 10%. The study consisted of the following tests on samples treated with burned olive waste ash: Atterberg Limits, Standard Proctor Density, and Unconfined Compressive Strength Tests. The test results show promise for this material to be used as stabilizer and to solve many of the problems associated with its accumulation.

  10. Rapid analysis of fungal cultures and dried figs for secondary metabolites by LC/TOF-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senyuva, Hamide Z. [Ankara Test and Analysis Laboratory, Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey, Ankara 06330 (Turkey)], E-mail: hamide.senyuva@tubitak.gov.tr; Gilbert, John [Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom); Oztuerkoglu, Sebnem [Ankara Test and Analysis Laboratory, Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey, Ankara 06330 (Turkey)

    2008-06-09

    A liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) method has been developed for profiling fungal metabolites. The performance of the procedure in terms of mass accuracy, selectivity (specificity) and repeatability was established by spiking aflatoxins, ochratoxins, trichothecenes and other metabolites into blank growth media. After extracting, and carrying out LC/TOF-MS analysis, the standards were correctly identified by searching a specially constructed database of 465 secondary metabolites. To demonstrate the viability of this approach 11 toxigenic and four non-toxigenic fungi from reference collections were grown on various media, for 7-14 days. The method was also applied to two toxigenic fungi, A. flavus (200-138) and A. parasiticus (2999-465) grown on gamma radiation sterilised dried figs, for 7-14 days. The fungal hyphae plus a portion of growth media or portions of dried figs were solvent extracted and analysed by LC/TOF-MS using a rapid resolution microbore LC column. Data processing based on cluster analysis, showed that electrospray ionization (ESI)-TOF-MS could be used to unequivocally identify metabolites in crude extracts. Using the elemental metabolite database, it was demonstrated that from culture collection isolates, anticipated metabolites. The speed and simplicity of the method has meant that levels of these metabolites could be monitored daily in sterilised figs. Over a 14-day period, levels of aflatoxins and kojic acid maximised at 5-6 days, whilst levels of 5-methoxysterigmatocystin remained relatively constant. In addition to the known metabolites expected to be produced by these fungi, roquefortine A, fumagillin, fumigaclavine B, malformins (peptides), aspergillic acid, nigragillin, terrein, terrestric acid and penicillic acid were also identified.

  11. Diel variation in fig volatiles across syconium development: making sense of scents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Renee M; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Ranganathan, Yuvaraj

    2013-05-01

    Plants produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a variety of contexts that include response to abiotic and biotic stresses, attraction of pollinators and parasitoids, and repulsion of herbivores. Some of these VOCs may also exhibit diel variation in emission. In Ficus racemosa, we examined variation in VOCs released by fig syconia throughout syconium development and between day and night. Syconia are globular enclosed inflorescences that serve as developing nurseries for pollinating and parasitic fig wasps. Syconia are attacked by gallers early in their development, serviced by pollinators in mid phase, and are attractive to parasitoids in response to the development of gallers at later stages. VOC bouquets of the different development phases of the syconium were distinctive, as were their day and night VOC profiles. VOCs such as α-muurolene were characteristic of the pollen-receptive diurnal phase, and may serve to attract the diurnally-active pollinating wasps. Diel patterns of release of volatiles could not be correlated with their predicted volatility as determined by Henry's law constants at ambient temperatures. Therefore, factors other than Henry's law constant such as stomatal conductance or VOC synthesis must explain diel variation in VOC emission. A novel use of weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) on the volatilome resulted in seven distinct modules of co-emitted VOCs that could be interpreted on the basis of syconium ecology. Some modules were characterized by the response of fig syconia to early galling by parasitic wasps and consisted largely of green leaf volatiles (GLVs). Other modules, that could be characterized by a combination of syconia response to oviposition and tissue feeding by larvae of herbivorous galler pollinators as well as of parasitized wasps, consisted largely of putative herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs). We demonstrated the usefulness of WGCNA analysis of the volatilome in making sense of the scents

  12. Synthesis and characterization of waterborne polyurethane/organic clay nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zai-feng LI; Sheng-jun WANG; Jin-yan LI

    2008-01-01

    Stable waterborne polyurethane/organic clay latex was synthesized by ultrasonically-assisted mixing with different clay content. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra showed that the interaction between NH and C=O was enhanced with low content organic clay loaded. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results implied that the layered organic clay was exfoliated and the crystallization of the hard domain in the waterborne polyurethane (WPU) matrix was enhanced. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the layered clay was exfoliated by WPU molecule. The tensile test shows that the mechanical prop-erties were improved by loading organic clay and the desired addition was 1 wt.%.

  13. Isolation of microsatellite loci in the pollinating fig wasp of Ficus hispida, Ceratosolen solmsi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yu; Tong-Xin Zhang; Hao-Yuan Hu; Li-Ming Niu; Hui Xiao; Yan-Zhou Zhang; Da-Wei Huang

    2008-01-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated for Ceratosolen solmsi, pollinator of the dioecious Ficus hispida. We developed nine polymorphic microsatellite loci based on the method of polymerase chain reaction isolation of microsatellite arrays (PIMA). Enrichment of genomic libraries was performed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). A subset of 38 positive clones was sequenced; 15 clones showed microsatellite loci. We tested 15 designed primer pairs and nine of them produced polymorphic amplification in 48 individual wasps collected from different fruits of the dioecious host fig Ficus hispida in China. Among the 48 individuals, 49 alleles were obtained at the nine loci. The observed heterozygosity ranged between 0.357 and 0.634.

  14. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaldoun, Asmae; Moller, Peder; Fall, Abdoulaye; Wegdam, Gerard; De Leeuw, Bert; Méheust, Yves; Otto Fossum, Jon; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-30

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay soils. Reproducing landslides on a small scale in the laboratory shows that an additional factor that determines the violence of the slides is the inhomogeneity of the flow. We propose a simple yield stress model capable of reproducing the laboratory landslide data, allowing us to relate landslides to the measured rheology.

  15. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  16. The effect of kauri (Agathis australis) on grain size distribution and clay mineralogy of andesitic soils in the Waitakere Ranges, New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongkind, A.G.; Buurman, P.

    2006-01-01

    Kauri (Agathis australis) is generally associated with intense podzolisation, but little research has been carried out to substantiate this. We studied soil profiles, grain size distribution patterns and clay mineralogy under kauri and broadleaf/tree fern vegetation in the Waitakere Ranges, North Is

  17. Perch-height specific predation on tropical lizard clay models: implications for habitat selection in mainland neotropical lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, John E

    2009-09-01

    Predation has been hypothesized to be a strong selective force structuring communities of tropical lizards. Comparisons of perch height and size-based predation frequencies can provide a unique window into understanding how predation might shape habitat selection and morphological patterns in lizards, especially anoles. Here I use plasticine clay models, placed on the trunks of trees and suspended in the canopy to show that predation frequency on clay models differs primarily according to habitat (canopy vs. trunk-ground), but not according to size. These data are discussed in light of observed lizard abundances in the lowland forests of Costa Rica, and are presented as partial explanation for why fewer lizards are found in tree canopies, and more lizards are found on ground-trunk habitats.

  18. Crystallite size distribution of clay minerals from selected Serbian clay deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The BWA (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique for the measurement of the mean crystallite thickness and thickness distributions of phyllosilicates was applied to a set of kaolin and bentonite minerals. Six samples of kaolinitic clays, one sample of halloysite, and five bentonite samples from selected Serbian deposits were analyzed. These clays are of sedimentary volcano-sedimentary (diagenetic, and hydrothermal origin. Two different types of shape of thickness distribution were found - lognormal, typical for bentonite and halloysite, and polymodal, typical for kaolinite. The mean crystallite thickness (T BWA seams to be influenced by the genetic type of the clay sample.

  19. Effects of shock metamorphism on clay mineralogy: Implications for remote sensing of martian clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, J. R.; Glotch, T. D.; Friedlander, L.; Bish, D. L.; Sharp, T. G.; Dyar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most important discoveries in recent exploration of Mars has been the detection of clay minerals within materials exhumed by meteor impact, which point to ancient subsurface alteration and possible habitable conditions at depth. These "crustal clays" occur within central peaks, ejecta, and uplifted rims of many large craters (Ehlmann et al., Nature 2011). The geologic context of phyllosilicates in these settings suggests that most of these deposits represent clays that formed in the subsurface and were later exhumed by impact, rather than clays that formed as a consequence of impact. Therefore, crustal clays exposed at the surface are likely to have experienced some effects of shock metamorphism and/or thermal alteration related to meteor impact. We are investigating the effects of shock metamorphism on the mineralogy of phyllosilicates in the laboratory. Purified, size-separated clay mineral samples were pressed into pellets to decrease internal porosity and were subsequently shocked using the Flat Plate Accelerator at NASA Johnson Space Center. Five minerals (nontronite, saponite, serpentine, chlorite, and kaolinite) were shocked to six pressure steps (10, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 GPa). The recovered, shocked samples are being analyzed by thermal infrared emission, visible/near-infrared reflectance, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results thus far suggest that shock metamorphism has little effect on the structure or infrared signature of the clay minerals at pressures clay is greatly decreased upon initial shock. At 40 GPa, this feature has lost all internal spectral structure, though a broad absorption in the same region is retained. Lastly, Mossbauer spectroscopy indicates that clays containing ferrous iron are progressively oxidized as a function of shock pressure. In the case of a meteor impact, intense shock pressures are highly localized phenomena although low shock pressures might affect

  20. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-size particles, 21% silt and 27% clay. Analysis of the clay-sized particles and the bulk materials shows: specific gravity of 2.07 and 2.66, liquid limit of 91.0% and 33.0%, plastic limit of 27.5% and 14.3%, plasticity index of 63.5% and 18.7% and a linear shrinkage of 7.9% and 5.4%, for both clay-sized particles and bulk clay respectively. The activity value of the clay material (0.64 suggests the presence of Kaolinite and Ilite; and these were confirmed with X-Ray diffraction on the bulk sample and clay-sized particles. X-Ray diffraction patterns shows distinctive peaks which highlight the dominance of Kaolinite (with 8 peaks in the pottery clay sample for both clay-sized particles and bulk material; while traces of other clay minerals like Illite and Halloysite and rock minerals like Mica, Feldspar and Chrysotile were also found. These results suggest that the clay possesses high viability in the manufacturing of ceramics, refractory bricks, paper, fertilizer and paint. The clay material can be used as a subgrade in road construction, since it possesses low swelling characteristics.

  1. Preservation of different fig cultivars (Ficus carica L.) under modified atmosphere packaging during cold storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, María del Carmen; Serradilla, Manuel Joaquín; Martín, Alberto; López Corrales, Margarita; Pereira, Cristina; Córdoba, María de Guía

    2016-04-01

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the stability of 'Cuello Dama Blanco' (CDB), 'Cuello Dama Negro' (CDN) and 'San Antonio' (SA) figs during post-harvest cold storage was evaluated by using three different films with a diverse number of microperforations (diameter, ø = 100 µm): M10 (16 holes), M30 (five holes) and M50 (three holes). A macroperforated film was used as control (five holes, ø = 9 mm). Gas composition, weight loss, percentage disorder, microbial counts and physico-chemical parameters were monitored during cold storage for 21 days. Furthermore, sensory quality was also evaluated. MAP has allowed the extension of cold storage and distribution time for the three different cultivars of figs, minimising weight loss and delaying pathological disorders related to endosepsis, smut, and souring. Of the three cultivars, the M50 batch (one hole per 50 mm) showed the best efficiency in terms of physico-chemical quality and delay of post-harvest decay, although the M30 batch was also found to be suitable for delaying the post-harvest decay, especially for the CDB cultivar. MAP is a useful tool to extend the storability with optimal quality properties for CDN and SA during 21 days of cold storage and 14-17 days of cold storage for CDB. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Activation of Defense Response Pathways by OGs and Fig22 Elicitors in Arabidopsis Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carine Denoux; Roberta Galletti; Nicole Mammarella; Suresh Gopalan; Danièle Werck; Giulia De Lorenzo; Simone Ferrari; Frederick M. Ausubel; Julia Dewdney

    2008-01-01

    We carried out transcriptional profiling analysis in 10-d-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with oligogalacturonides (OGs), oligosaccharides derived from the plant cell wall, or the bacterial flagellin peptide Fig22, general elicitors of the basal defense response in plants. Although detected by different receptors, both OGs and Flg22 trigger a fast and transient response that is both similar and comprehensive, and characterized by activation of early stages of multiple defense signaling pathways, particularly JA-associated processes. However, the response to Fig22 is stronger in both the number of genes differentially expressed and the amplitude of change. The magnitude of induction of individual genes is in both cases dose-dependent, but, even at very high concentrations, OGs do not induce a response that is as comprehensive as that seen with Flg22. While high doses of either microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) elicit a late response that includes activation of senescence processes, SA-dependent secretory pathway genes and PR1 expression are substantially induced only by Flg22. These results suggest a lower threshold for activation of early responses than for sustained or SA-mediated late defenses. Expression patterns of amino-cyclopropane-carboxylate synthase genes also implicate ethylene biosynthesis in regulation of the late innate immune response.

  3. Electrophoretic Ink Display Prepared by Jelly Fig Pectin/Gelatin Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Ming Chou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A brand new Bio-Electronic ink (Bio-E ink display device was prepared and characterized in this study. Semiconductor material, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc was modified by cationic surfactants, cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC, as the core material, and the shell of capsule was prepared by jelly fig pectin, gelatin and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS. Here, jelly fig pectin was provided as the shell material for the first time. Chemical structure of the modified CuPc was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR. The core-shell microcapsules were achieved by coacervation method in an oil/water (O/W emulsion system. The particle size and morphology of microcapsules were affected by the concentrations of SDS and pH values of the O/W emulsion system. A new microcapsule-based electrophoretic display device was presented. Its image display ability of the microcapsules electrophoretic device was presented as appropriated electric power was applied, and the response time was 0.06 sec under 0.1 V/mm of electric field. Moreover, we found that its image contrast ratio of display device was influenced by the particle sizes of the microcapsules.

  4. Purification and Study of Proteolytic Activity of Ficin Enzyme of Fig (Ficus Carica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mostafaie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Ficin is a member of plant cystein proteases that is abundant in fig. This enzyme has many pharmacological and industrial uses. In the present study, the enzyme was purified by a simple procedure and its proteolytic activity was assayed on several plant and animal proteins. Materials & Methods: Ficin was extracted from unripe fig, precipitated by ammonium sulfate and purified using ion-exchange chromatography on a Carboxymethyl Sepharose column. Proteolytic activities of the purified enzyme were determined in 4 buffering conditions on casein, alpha lactalbumin, beta lactoglobulin and gelatin proteins. Results: Purified enzymes include two bands with molecular mass of 24 and 26 KDa. Re-sults of proteolytic activity showed that ficin can digest casein. It has moderate hydrolytic activity on beta lactoglobulin and gelatin but ficin can not hydrolyze alpha lactalbumin. Conclusion: It seems ficin has selective effects on some proteins so it can be a good candi-date for digestion of casein and making related drugs. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (2:126-132

  5. The mechanism of sex ratio adjustment in a pollinating fig wasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Shazia; Suleman, Nazia; Compton, Stephen G; Moore, Jamie C

    2008-07-22

    Sex ratio strategies in species subject to local mate competition (LMC), and in particular their fit to quantitative theoretical predictions, provide insight into constraints upon adaptation. Pollinating fig wasps are widely used in such studies because their ecology resembles theory assumptions, but the cues used by foundresses to assess potential LMC have not previously been determined. We show that Liporrhopalum tentacularis females (foundresses) use their clutch size as a cue. First, we make use of species ecology (foundresses lay multiple clutches, with second clutches smaller than first) to show that increases in sex ratio in multi-foundress figs occur only when foundresses are oviposition site limited, i.e. that there is no direct response to foundress density. Second, we introduce a novel technique to quantify foundress oviposition sequences and show, consistent with the theoretical predictions concerning clutch size-only strategies, that they produce mainly male offspring at the start of bouts, followed by mostly females interspersed by a few males. We then discuss the implications of our findings for our understanding of the limits of the ability of natural selection to produce 'perfect' organisms, and for our understanding of when different cue use patterns evolve.

  6. Pectin Methyl Esterase Activity Change in Intermediate Moisture Sun-Dried Figs after Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Demirbüker Kavak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate moisture fruits can be obtained by rehydrating dried fruits. Intermediate moisture fruits are suitable for direct consumption compared to dry fruits and can be directly used in the production of various products such as bakery products, dairy products and candies. Aim of this study is to compare the pectin methyl esterase (PME activity of intermediate moisture figs which causes softening of the texture and to compare their microbial stability after 3 months storage period. For this purpose, dried figs were rehydrated in 30 and 80° C water until they reach 30% moisture content. Rehydrated samples were stored for 3 months at +4°C. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the control samples and the samples rehydrated at 80°C according to the total viable counts. At the end of the storage period, results of residual PME activity in control samples was 24.1 μmol COOH min-1g-1, while it was found 17.4 μmol COOH min-1g-1 in samples rehydrated at 80°C. As a result rehydration conducted at 80°C provided 28% reduction in PME activity compared to the control samples rehydrated at 30°C, although it did not affect the microbial load significantly after storage.

  7. Healthy,Happy trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Healthy trees are important to us all. Trees provide shade, beauty, and homes for wildlife. Trees give us products like paper and wood. Trees can give us all this only if they are healthy.They must be well cared for to remain healthy.

  8. Fine-resolution multiscale mapping of clay minerals in Australian soils measured with near infrared spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscarra Rossel, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Clay minerals are the most reactive inorganic components of soils. They help to determine soil properties and largely govern their behaviors and functions. Clay minerals also play important roles in biogeochemical cycling and interact with the environment to affect geomorphic processes such as weathering, erosion and deposition. This paper provides new spatially explicit clay mineralogy information for Australia that will help to improve our understanding of soils and their role in the functioning of landscapes and ecosystems. I measured the abundances of kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Using a model-tree algorithm, I built rule-based models for each mineral at two depths (0-20 cm, 60-80 cm) as a function of predictors that represent the soil-forming factors (climate, parent material, relief, vegetation and time), their processes and the scales at which they vary. The results show that climate, parent material and soil type exert the largest influence on the abundance and spatial distribution of the clay minerals; relief and vegetation have more local effects. I digitally mapped each mineral on a 3 arc-second grid. The maps show the relative abundances and distributions of kaolinite, illite and smectite in Australian soils. Kaolinite occurs in a range of climates but dominates in deeply weathered soils, in soils of higher landscapes and in regions with more rain. Illite is present in varied landscapes and may be representative of colder, more arid climates, but may also be present in warmer and wetter soil environments. Smectite is often an authigenic mineral, formed from the weathering of basalt, but it also occurs on sediments and calcareous substrates. It occurs predominantly in drier climates and in landscapes with low relief. These new clay mineral maps fill a significant gap in the availability of soil mineralogical information. They provide data to for example, assist with research into soil

  9. Chronic Dietary Supplementation of 4% Figs on the Modification of Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer’s Disease Transgenic Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraju Subash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the changes in the plasma Aβ, oxidative stress/antioxidants, and membrane bound enzymes in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Alzheimer’s disease (AD transgenic mice (Tg2576 after dietary supplementation of Omani figs fruits for 15 months along with spatial memory and learning test. AD Tg mice on control diet without figs showed significant impairment in spatial learning ability compared to the wild-type mice on same diet and figs fed Tg mice as well. Significant increase in oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant status were observed in AD Tg mice. 4% figs treated AD Tg mice significantly attenuated oxidative damage, as evident by decreased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls and restoration of antioxidant status. Altered activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na+ K+ ATPase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE in AD Tg mice brain regions and was restored by figs treatment. Further, figs supplementation might be able to decrease the plasma levels of Aβ (1–40, 1–42 significantly in Tg mice suggesting a putative delay in the formation of plaques, which might be due to the presence of high natural antioxidants in figs. But this study warrants further extensive investigation to find a novel lead for a therapeutic target for AD from figs.

  10. 75 FR 6344 - Notice of Availability of Pest Risk Analyses for Importation of Fresh Figs, Pomegranates, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ... of Fresh Figs, Pomegranates, and Baby Kiwi from Chile into the United States AGENCY: Animal and Plant... with respect to fresh baby kiwi fruit grown in Chile. The analyses evaluate the risks associated with the importation into the continental United States of fresh figs, pomegranates, and baby kiwi...

  11. Improvement of soft clays of construction debris by using quicklime and the mechanism of hardening; Nanjakuna kensetsu zando no seisekkai no yoru kairyo to sono mekanizumu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onitsuka, K. [Saga Univ., Saga (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology; Nanri, M.

    1995-08-01

    In areas having vast expanses of soft ground, a large amount of soft clay debris emerges with construction, and to secure the place for disposal becomes a great problem. Particularly, the Ariake clay which is widely distributed along the coast of the Ariake Sea in Kyushu is one of the few soft clays, the development of the technology for using the clay effectively is expected. In particular, because the reduction of water ratio is the first target in processing the Ariake clay having high water ratio, quicklime is mainly used. In this paper, in order to know the properties and the mechanism of the improvement of clays having high water ratio by using quicklime, observations were conducted concerning the physical and chemical properties of the construction debris, the reduction of water ratio caused by the heat evolution and expansion of quicklime and the reaction of quicklime with the silica and alumina elements in the debris, which were considered to having effects on hardening. Moreover, the effect of the amount of addition, the curing period and compaction method on strength properties were discussed. 10 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Clay particle retention in small constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braskerud, B C

    2003-09-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) can be used to mitigate non-point source pollution from arable fields. Previous investigations have shown that the relative soil particle retention in small CWs increases when hydraulic load increases. This paper investigates why this phenomenon occurs, even though common retention models predict the opposite, by studying clay and silt particle retention in two Norwegian CWs. Retention was measured with water flow proportional sampling systems in the inlet and outlet of the wetlands, and the texture of the suspended solids was analyzed. The surface area of the CWs was small compared to the watershed area (approximately 0.07%), giving high average hydraulic loads (1.1 and 2.0 md(-1)). One of the watersheds included only old arable land, whereas the other included areas with disturbed topsoil after artificial land leveling. Clay particle retention was 57% for the CW in the first watershed, and 22% for the CW in the disturbed watershed. The different behavior of the wetlands could be due to differences in aggregate size and stability of the particles entering the wetlands. Results showed that increased hydraulic loads did affect CW retention negatively. However, as runoff increased, soil particles/aggregates with higher sedimentation velocities entered the CWs (e.g., the clay particles behaved as silt particles). Hence, clay particle settling velocity is not constant as assumed in many prediction models. The net result was increased retention.

  13. Calm, Cool, and Comfortable in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Xanthippi Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The author's fourth-grade students had just finished a drawing unit that focused on the human figure. Projects included charcoal gesture drawings and chalk manikin drawings in chiaroscuro. She wanted to integrate a new medium for students to continue their study of the human figure. Since students are always excited to work with clay, making clay…

  14. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  15. Radionuclide transport in clay during climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenborg, A.F.B.; Orlic, B.; Thimus, J.F.; Lange, G.de; Cock, S. de; Leeuw, C.S. de; Veling, E.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch national research programme into the feasibility of retrievable storage of radioactive waste (CORA Programme Phase I; CORA: Comité Opslag Radioactief Afval = Committee on Radioactive Waste Disposal) examined the suitability of Tertiary clay deposts for such storage. Long-term isolation -

  16. Clay Shirky, Internet e il collegio invisibile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Pievatolo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Come Internet sta cambiando il nostro modo di pensare? Fra le 172 risposte presentate da Edge, Clay Shirky ne propone una particolarmente interessante per i ricercatori di professione. Internet, scrive Shirky, ha aumentato straordinariamente la capacità espressiva dell’umanità. Ma che una risorsa divenga abbondante, da scarsa che era, è una sfortuna, almeno per chi su [...

  17. geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of lithomargic clay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    GHANA: IMPLICATIONS FOR POSSIBLE INDUSTRIAL UTILIZATION. F.W.Y. Momade1 ... evaluative analyses, the lithomargic clay types could be exploited in the production of aluminium sulphate ... Two major processes have been reported to be ..... powder diffraction unit. .... for fats and oils used for soap, grease produc-.

  18. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ishaq Ahmad; Ernst-Ulrich Hartge; Joachim Werther; and Reiner Wischnewski

    2014-01-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  19. Geotechnical studies of Jaitapur marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.

    A gravity corer was designed and fabricated for near shore sediment sampling. The corer was operated off Jaitapur, West Coast of India, and 70 cores were obtained. The performance of the corer was quite satisfactory. The core samples were soft clays...

  20. Black Carbon, The Pyrogenic Clay Mineral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most soils contain significant amounts of black carbon, much of which is present as discrete particles admixed with the coarse clay fraction (0.2–2.0 µm e.s.d.) and can be physically separated from the more abundant diffuse biogenic humic materials. Recent evidence has shown that naturally occurring...

  1. Clay Aerogel Supported Palladium Nanoparticles as Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared J. Griebel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly porous, low density palladium nanoparticle/clay aerogel materials have been produced and demonstrated to possess significant catalytic activity for olefin hydrogenation and isomerization reactions at low/ambient pressures. This technology opens up a new route for the production of catalytic materials.

  2. Clay Corner: Recreating Chinese Bronze Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Harriet

    1998-01-01

    Presents a lesson where students make faux Chinese bronze vessels through slab or coil clay construction after they learn about the history, function, and design of these vessels. Utilizes a variety of glaze finishes in order to give the vessels an aged look. Gives detailed guidelines for creating the vessels. (CMK)

  3. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ishaq; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich; Werther, Joachim; Wischnewski, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  4. Examination of effective stress in clay rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Liang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effective stress in indurated clay rock theoretically and experimentally. A stress concept is derived from the analysis of the microstructure and of the pore water in the highly-indurated Callovo-Oxfordian and Opalinus clay rocks, and subsequently validated by various experiments performed on these claystones. The concept suggests that the interparticle or effective stress in a dense clay–water system is transferred through both the adsorbed interparticle pore water in narrow pores and the solid–solid contact between non-clay mineral grains. The experiments show that the adsorbed pore water in the claystones is capable of bearing deviatoric effective stresses up to the failure strength. The applied stresses are for the most part or even totally transferred by the bound pore water, i.e. the swelling pressure in the interparticle bound pore water is almost equivalent to the effective stress. This stress concept provides a reasonable view to the nature of the effective stress in argillaceous rock and forms the fundamental basis for studies of the hydro-mechanical properties and processes in clay formations.

  5. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF THREE GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hydraulic conductivity of three 2.9 m2 (32 sq ft) geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) was measured. Tests were performed on individual sheets of the GCLs, on overlapped pieces of GCLs, and on composite liners consisting of a punctured geomembrane overlying a GCL. Hyd...

  6. Solute transport in cracking clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Ritsema, C.J.; Oostindie, K.; Hamminga, P.

    1996-01-01

    A bromide tracer applied to a cracked clay soil was adsorbed in the soil matrix close to the soil surface. Upon subsequent precipitation, a small part of the bromide dissolved and flowed rapidly through cracks to the subsoil and the groundwater. As a result, the groundwater and the drain discharge

  7. geotechnical characteristics of some southwestern nigeria clays as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their suitability for use as barrier soils in waste disposal sites. ... Permeability, Barrier Soils, Clays, Leachate, Containment, Attenuation. 17 ... disposal facilities involving burial in natural clay ... them the probability of groundwater pollution by.

  8. Quantitative approach on SEM images of microstructure of clay soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施斌; 李生林; M.Tolkachev

    1995-01-01

    The working principles of Videolab Image Processing System (VIPS), the examining methods of orientation of microstructural units of clay soils and analysing results on SEM images of some typical microstructures of clay soils using the VIPS are introduced.

  9. Identification of RAN1 orthologue associated with sex determination through whole genome sequencing analysis in fig (Ficus carica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazuki; Shirasawa, Kenta; Nogata, Hitoshi; Hirata, Chiharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Habu, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Sangwan; Himeno, Shuichi; Kuhara, Satoru; Ikegami, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-25

    With the aim of identifying sex determinants of fig, we generated the first draft genome sequence of fig and conducted the subsequent analyses. Linkage analysis with a high-density genetic map established by a restriction-site associated sequencing technique, and genome-wide association study followed by whole-genome resequencing analysis identified two missense mutations in RESPONSIVE-TO-ANTAGONIST1 (RAN1) orthologue encoding copper-transporting ATPase completely associated with sex phenotypes of investigated figs. This result suggests that RAN1 is a possible sex determinant candidate in the fig genome. The genomic resources and genetic findings obtained in this study can contribute to general understanding of Ficus species and provide an insight into fig's and plant's sex determination system.

  10. Classification and regression trees

    CERN Document Server

    Breiman, Leo; Olshen, Richard A; Stone, Charles J

    1984-01-01

    The methodology used to construct tree structured rules is the focus of this monograph. Unlike many other statistical procedures, which moved from pencil and paper to calculators, this text's use of trees was unthinkable before computers. Both the practical and theoretical sides have been developed in the authors' study of tree methods. Classification and Regression Trees reflects these two sides, covering the use of trees as a data analysis method, and in a more mathematical framework, proving some of their fundamental properties.

  11. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  12. Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay and its recrystallized zeolitic derivatives were used in this study as templating agents for carbon nanostructured materials. The conventional nanocasting process that involves impregnation with furfural alcohol and subsequent chemical vapour...

  13. Glowing clay: Real time tracing using a suite of novel clay based fluorescent tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Robert; Quinton, John; Pates, Jackie; Coogan, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Clay is one of the most mobile fractions of soil due to its small particle size. It is also known to sorb many chemicals, such as nutrients (notably phosphorus), agrochemicals and heavy metals. The movement of clay is therefore linked with the transport and fate of these substances. A novel fluorescent clay tracing suite has been produced, together with an imaging technique. This suite consists of qualitative clay tracers, using rhodamine based fluorophores, and quantitative clay tracers, using metal based fluorophores. Efforts have also been made to allow integration of commercially available tracers, which are silt and sand sized. The clay tracers exploit the high affinity that montmorillonite has for Rhodamine B and Ru(bpy)3. This allows for an extremely thin layer of the fluorophore to be sorbed onto the clay's surface, in much that same way as materials in the natural environment will bind to clay. The tracer that is produced retains key chemical and physical properties of clay, such as size, shape and density. The retention of these micro-properties results in the retention of macro-properties, such as tendency to aggregate and cracking on drying. Imaging techniques have been developed to analyse these tracers. The imaging system uses diffused laser light to excite the tracer and a modified DSLR camera to image the soil surface. The images have been compiled into a time lapse video showing the movement of clay over the course of a rainfall event. This is the first time that the quantitative movement of clay has been recorded over a soil surface in real time. 4D data can be extracted from the images allowing the spatial location and intensity of tracer to be monitored over time, with mm precision and on the timescale of seconds. As the system can also work with a commercial tracer it is possible to investigate the movement of particles of almost any size and over a range of scales from soil box to hillside. This allows users to access this technique without

  14. Transport of inorganic compounds through compacted clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, W.P.

    1989-01-01

    Compacted clay liners are widely utilized as leachate barrier in landfills for waste. The main purpose of this research was to study the transport of inorganic compounds through compacted clay. The subjects of interest included the diffusional migration of chemicals at low flow rates, the effective porosity of fine-grained soils, the transport of solutes in unsaturated clays, and the effect of adsorption processes on the transport of reactive solutes. Two clay soils, kaolinite and Lufkin clay, were used in the laboratory column tests and subjected to constant hydraulic gradients of 1 to 50. Inorganic tracers (Cl{sup {minus}} Br{sup {minus}}, K{sup +}, and Zn{sup 2+}) were added to the permeating water as a step input. Conclusions are: (a) the experimental data from soil specimens subjected to various gradients showed that diffusional transport did affect the migration of the tracers in fine-grained media. At low gradients, hydrodynamic dispersion was almost solely related to molecular diffusion rather than mechanical mixing; (b) the breakthrough curves for kaolinite specimens showed that the ratios of effective porosity to total porosity were 0.25 to 1.0. The effect of low effective porosity on transport of the tracers was much greater than that of diffusion; (c) the soils that were not presoaked before tracers were introduced had lower effective porosity and greater dispersion of solutes that did the presoaked soils; (d) no evidence of the existence of a threshold gradient was observed; and (e) the retardation factors predicted from batch equilibrium tests matched the results from column tests poorly, probably due to hydrodynamic effects or geochemical differences between the two soil/solution systems.

  15. RESEARCH OF SWELLING OF SUZAKH CLAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubetskiy Valeriy Leonidovich

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the course of construction of Sangtudinsky hydropower plant-1 on the River Vakhsh, it was deemed necessary to identify clay swelling properties in the event of alterations of the humidity mode of fructured half-rock soils, or the Suzakh clay, that accommodated tunnel-shaped water outlets within a section that was 75 meters long. The depth of tunnels was about 100 m. Any interaction with swelling soils could lead to destruction of the tunnel lining. Suzakh clays demonstrated the following physical and mechanical properties: density of particles of soil ρ= 2,69 g/cm; soil density ρ = 2.40-2.47 g/cm; porosity of 8.2-10.8 %; ultimate resistance to uniaxial compression = 13.1-31.0 MPa. Water saturated clay samples disintegrated into cloddy fragments; the rate of a longitudinal ultrasonic wave in the area of unaltered soils was equal to = 2500 m/c; repulse coefficient k was equal to 15 MPa/m; solidity coefficient (according to Protodyakonov was equal to 1,5; modulus of deformation in the massif was equal to 0.23 х10 MPa. The author proposed a methodology and designed a pilot set of equipment units designated for the identification of the swelling properties of fractured half-rock soils. Results of the pilot unit operation are presented in the article. Swelling properties are based on the monolith testing results. The programme contemplated a set of experiments held in various limit states on the surface of monoliths. Dependence between the swelling pressure and the swelling deformation in the course of water saturation was identified. The experiment demonstrates that alterations of the humidity mode of free surface Suzakh clays cause the relative deformation of swelling up to 1.1 %, and if the lining is rigid, the swelling pressure can exceed 4 MPa.

  16. Adsorption of vapor-phase VOCs (benzene and toluene) on modified clays and its relation with surface properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Cortes, C.; Gallardo-Velazquez, T.; Arellano-Cardenas, S. [National School of Biological Sciences (Mexico). Biophysics Dept.; Osorio-Revilla, G. [National School of Biological Sciences (Mexico). Biochemical Engineering Dept.

    2008-04-15

    A study was conducted to investigate the potential use of modified clays for the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in air. These VOCs which include toluene and benzene, are among the main air pollutants that represent a human health risk at high concentrations, mostly in indoor environments. In this study, a Mexican bentonite was used to prepare 3 modified clays, notably an organoclay (OC-CPC) by intercalating cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC); an aluminum-pillared clay (Al-PILC); and an inorganic-organic clay (IOC-CPC) prepared from Al-PILC intercalating CPC. Their structures were differentiated by infrared and thermogravimetric analyses, and the interlayer distance was assessed through X-ray diffraction. Toluene and benzene adsorption on OC-CPC was higher than in IOC-CPC and Al-PILC. Natural clay showed no adsorption capacity for these compounds. Comparison of the gas chromatography retention times for non polar and low-polarity compounds (octyne and benzene) in columns packed with OC-CPC and a commercial non polar column (squalene) showed that the OC-CPC possessed a higher organophilic (non polar) nature than squalene. This explains the higher benzene and toluene adsorption capacity of the OC-CPC compared with the other modified clays. It was concluded that organoclays represent a potential alternative for the adsorption of volatile organic compounds such as benzene and toluene present in indoor environments. Since the OC-CPC is hydrophobic by nature, the relative humidity of water vapour in the environment would not affects its adsorption capacity. 27 refs., 5 tabs., 5 figs.

  17. Clays and clay minerals in Bikaner: Sources, environment pollution and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Sharma; Anu, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Environmental pollution can also be caused by minerals which include natural as well as human activities. Rapid urbanization, consumerist life style, anthropogenic deeds are increasing environmental pollution day by day. Fluctuation in our ecosystem or polluted environment leads to many diseases and shows adverse effects on living organisms. The main aim of this paper is to highlight the environmental pollution from clays and clay minerals and their mitigation..

  18. Dendroclimatic reconstruction with time varying predictor subsets of tree indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meko, D. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Tree-ring site chronologies, the predictors for most dendroclimatic reconstructions, are essentially mean-value functions with a time varying sample size (number of trees) and sample composition. Because reconstruction models are calibrated and verified on the most recent, best-replicated part of the chronologies, regression and verification statistics can be misleading as indicators of long-term reconstruction accuracy. A new reconstruction method is described that circumvents the use of site chronologies and instead derives predictor variables from indices of individual trees. Separate regression models are estimated and cross validated for various time segments of the tree-ring record, depending on the trees available at the time. This approach allows the reconstruction to extend to the first year covered by any tree in the network and yields direct evaluation of the change in reconstruction accuracy with tree-ring sample composition. The method includes two regression stages. The first is to separately deconvolve the local climate signal for individual trees, and the second is to weight the deconvolved signals into estimates of the climatic variable to be reconstructed. The method is illustrated in an application of precipitation and tree-ring data for the San Pedro River Basin in southeastern Arizona. Extensions to larger-scale problems and spatial reconstruction are suggested. 17 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Use of clay from kangerlussuaq in the Greenlandic construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmonte, Louise Josefine; Villumsen, Arne; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Clay material from Kangerlussuaq in West Greenland was characterised and its possible use for the production of bricks, expanded clay products and inert filler material was investigated. It was generally found that it was possible to use the clay in all of the above mentioned materials, although,...

  20. Organically modified clays as binders of fumonisins in feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglieri, Andrea; Reyneri, Amedeo; Gennari, Mara; Nègre, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    This study reports an investigation on the ability of organically modified clays to bind mycotoxins, fumonisins B1 (FB1) and B2 (FB2). Organically modified clays are commercia materials prepared from natural clays, generally montmorillonite, by exchanging the inorganic cation with an ammonium organic cation. A screening experiment conducted on 13 organically modified clays and 3 nonmodified clays, used as controls, has confirmed that the presence of an organic cation in the clay interlayer promoted the adsorption of both fumonisins. On the basis of the results of the screening test, four modified clays and a Na-montmorillonite were selected for the determination of the adsorption kinetics and isotherms. On all the tested materials adsorption took place within one hour of contact with fumonisins solutions. Adsorption isotherms have pointed out that the modified clays exhibited a higher adsorptive capacity than the unmodified clay. It was also demonstrated that, notwithstanding the reduced structural difference between FB1 and FB2, they were differently adsorbed on the modified clays. Addition of 2% modified clays to contaminated maize allowed a reduction of more than 70% and 60% of the amount of FB1and FB2 released in solution. Although in vivo experiments are required to confirm the effectiveness of the organically modified clays, these preliminary results suggest that these materials are promising as fumonisins binders.

  1. Strength and Deformation Properties of Tertiary Clay at Moesgaard Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufmann, Kristine Lee; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    The tertiary clay at Moesgaard Museum near Aarhus in the eastern part of Jutland in Denmark is a highly plastic, glacially disturbed nappe of Viborg Clay. The clay is characterised as a swelling soil, which could lead to damaging of the building due to additional heave of the soil. To take...

  2. Instrumental characterization of clay by XRF, XRD and FTIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Preeti Sagar Nayak; B K Singh

    2007-06-01

    Instrumental characterizations of the clay were performed by different techniques such as XRF, XRD and FTIR. XRF shows the chemical compositions of the clay where Al-oxide and silica oxide are present in major quantity whereas XRD confirms the presence of these minerals in clay. FTIR studies show the presence of quartz, alumina, haematite and different mineral matters.

  3. Recovery of Porosity and Permeability for High Plasticity Clays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    Clays, which have been loaded to a high stress level, will under certain conditions keep low porosity and permeability due to the high degree of compression. In some situations it seems that porosity and permeability will recover to a very high extent when the clay is unloaded. This seems...... the clay will expand to an even higher porosity....

  4. Comparative evaluation of clays from Abakaliki Formation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okeey Aghamelu

    varied from 5.9 to 8.0 centipoises for 10 g clay per 350 ml water. Some of these natural .... lignite to clay mud to improve its rheological and filtration properties. ... naturally active bentonitic clays from Wyoming and Texas which are used in the ...

  5. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  6. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trieves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  7. Geological Investigations on Boulder-Clay of E. Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzel, van P.; Overweel, C.J.; Veenstra, H.J.

    1959-01-01

    In this article the results of a study on boulder-clay in the neighbourhood of Winschoten (N.E. Netherlands) are communicated (Chapter I). The underlying sediments of the boulder-clay in this area consist of fine preglacial sands and black clay. In the nuclei of the many drumlins a strongly ice-push

  8. Geological Investigations on Boulder-Clay of E. Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzel, van P.; Overweel, C.J.; Veenstra, H.J.

    1959-01-01

    In this article the results of a study on boulder-clay in the neighbourhood of Winschoten (N.E. Netherlands) are communicated (Chapter I). The underlying sediments of the boulder-clay in this area consist of fine preglacial sands and black clay. In the nuclei of the many drumlins a strongly ice-push

  9. Polymer-clay nanocomposites obtained by solution polymerization of vinyl benzyl triammonium chloride in the presence of advanced functionalized clay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raluca Ianchis; Dan Donescu; Ludmila Otilia Cinteza; Violeta Purcar; Cristina Lavinia Nistor; Critian Petcu; Cristian Andi Nicolae; Raluca Gabor; Silviu Preda

    2014-05-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites were synthesized by solution polymerization method using advanced functionalized clay and vinyl benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride as monomer. First stage consisted in the silylation of a commercial organo-modified clay-Cl 20A using alkoxysilanes with different chain lengths. In the second step, the synthesis and characterization of polymer-nanocomposites were followed. To evaluate the clay functionalization process as well as the final polymer-clay products, thermogravimetric,X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and three test liquid contact angles analyses were used. The loss of ammonium ions from commercial clay, the grafting degree, the lengths and the nature of alkyl chain influence the dispersion of the advanced modified clay into the polymer solution and, furthermore, the properties of the final polymer-clay nanocomposite film.

  10. Detection of aflatoxin and surface mould contaminated figs by using Fourier transform near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmuş, Efkan; Güneş, Ali; Kalkan, Habil

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic metabolites that are mainly produced by members of the Aspergillus section Flavi on many agricultural products. Certain agricultural products such as figs are known to be high risk products for aflatoxin contamination. Aflatoxin contaminated figs may show a bright greenish yellow fluorescence (BGYF) under ultraviolet (UV) light at a wavelength of 365 nm. Traditionally, BGYF positive figs are manually selected by workers. However, manual selection depends on the expertise level of the workers and it may cause them skin-related health problems due to UV radiation. In this study, we propose a non-invasive approach to detect aflatoxin and surface mould contaminated figs by using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) reflectance spectroscopy. A classification accuracy of 100% is achieved for classifying the figs into aflatoxin contaminated/uncontaminated and surface mould contaminated/uncontaminated categories. In addition, a strong correlation has been found between aflatoxin and surface mould. Combined with pattern classification methods, the NIR spectroscopy can be used to detect aflatoxin contaminated figs non-invasively. Furthermore, a positive correlation between surface mould and aflatoxin contamination leads to a promising alternative indicator for the detection of aflatoxin-contaminated figs. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Seismic shake table testing program for hollow clay tile wall evaluation at DOE facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.; Stone, N.E. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Bennett, R.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    A seismic test facility located at the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been refurbished after shutdown since 1985. The facility shake table is being recertified in order to provide seismic testing capability to an extensive multi-year evaluation program of hollow clay tile walls in buildings at the DOE site in Oak Ridge. The program, directed by teh Center for Natural Phenomena Engineering at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., the managing contractor for DOE in Oak Ridge, is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the recertification efforts for the seismic test facility, and results of facility and specimen testing to data are discussed and plans for future testing are reviewed. Features and capabilities of the shake table are presented. The dynamic testing of masonry structures is reviewed, and a hollow clay tile wall testing program is projected based on the shake table capability. 13 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrou Gnanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  13. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  14. Discontinuity networks in mud stones: an apparent contradiction for boom clay at Mol, opalinus clay at Mont Terri, Callovo-Oxfordian silty clay at Bure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M. [Centre de Geologie de l' Ingenieur, 75 - Paris (France); Mazurek, M. [Bern Univ., Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences (Switzerland); Vandenberghe, N. [Katholieke Universiteit (KU), Lab. voor stratigrafie Leuven (Belgium)

    2005-07-01

    The Rupelian Boom Clay at Mol, Belgium, the lower Aalenian Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri Switzerland and the Callovo-Oxfordian silty clay at Bure, France, are currently studied in the framework of deep geological radioactive waste confinement. These three mud-stones are calcareous to variable degrees. They vary from plastic clay at Mol to hard rock at Bure. All three have similar mineralogical constituents, especially with regards to the clay minerals and include mixed layers of illite and montmorillonite. Remarkably, in outcrop sections of massive clay formations and mud-stone in general, it is very common to observe a network of discontinuities resembling the jointing in hard rock. As such jointing clearly would influence underground works it is imperative to examine whether or not the three mud-rock formations under discussion have such a discontinuity network in all their mass. (authors)

  15. Fault-Tree Compiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Fault-Tree Compiler (FTC) program, is software tool used to calculate probability of top event in fault tree. Gates of five different types allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language easy to understand and use. In addition, program supports hierarchical fault-tree definition feature, which simplifies tree-description process and reduces execution time. Set of programs created forming basis for reliability-analysis workstation: SURE, ASSIST, PAWS/STEM, and FTC fault-tree tool (LAR-14586). Written in PASCAL, ANSI-compliant C language, and FORTRAN 77. Other versions available upon request.

  16. Categorizing Ideas about Trees: A Tree of Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisler, Marie; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore whether matrices and MP trees used to produce systematic categories of organisms could be useful to produce categories of ideas in history of science. We study the history of the use of trees in systematics to represent the diversity of life from 1766 to 1991. We apply to those ideas a method inspired from coding homologous parts of organisms. We discretize conceptual parts of ideas, writings and drawings about trees contained in 41 main writings; we detect shared parts among authors and code them into a 91-characters matrix and use a tree representation to show who shares what with whom. In other words, we propose a hierarchical representation of the shared ideas about trees among authors: this produces a “tree of trees.” Then, we categorize schools of tree-representations. Classical schools like “cladists” and “pheneticists” are recovered but others are not: “gradists” are separated into two blocks, one of them being called here “grade theoreticians.” We propose new interesting categories like the “buffonian school,” the “metaphoricians,” and those using “strictly genealogical classifications.” We consider that networks are not useful to represent shared ideas at the present step of the study. A cladogram is made for showing who is sharing what with whom, but also heterobathmy and homoplasy of characters. The present cladogram is not modelling processes of transmission of ideas about trees, and here it is mostly used to test for proximity of ideas of the same age and for categorization. PMID:23950877

  17. Climate-driven tree mortality: insights from the pinon pine die-off in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey A. Hicke; Melanie J. B. Zeppel

    2013-01-01

    The global climate is changing, and a range of negative effects on plants has already been observed and will likely continue into the future. One of the most apparent consequences of climate change is widespread tree mortality (Fig. 1). Extensive tree die-offs resulting from recent climate change have been documented across a range of forest types on all forested...

  18. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  19. Dioxins in primary kaolin and secondary kaolinitic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Martin; Scheeder, Georg; Bernau, Sarah; Dohrmann, Reiner; Germann, Klaus

    2011-01-15

    Since 1996 dioxins have been repeatedly detected worldwide in Tertiary ball clays used as anticaking agent in the production of animal feed and a variety of other applications. The dioxins of these natural clays are very unlikely of anthropogenic source, but no model of dioxin enrichment has been established. A hypothetical model is presented which explains the highly variable dioxin loadings of the Tertiary kaolinitic clays by natural addition during clay-sedimentation. To prove this hypothesis, Tertiary primary nonsedimentary kaolin and sedimentary kaolinitic clays were collected at three profiles in Europe and analyzed for mineralogy, chemistry, organic carbon, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/-furans (PCDD/F). Primary kaolin, kaolinitic, and lignitic clays contained almost no PCDFs. PCDD concentration differed markedly between primary kaolin (3-91 pg/g) and secondary kaolinitic clay (711-45935 pg/g), respectively, lignitic clays (13513-1191120 pg/g). The dioxin loading of secondary kaolinitic and lignitic clays is approximately 10 to a few thousand times higher than in the primary kaolin or recent environmental settings. The dioxin concentrations decrease from octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin to the tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxins and exhibit the "natural formation pattern". No correlation between PCDD/F concentration and bulk composition of clays was found. These findings support the hypothesis of the enrichment of dioxin in clays during sedimentation.

  20. [Mechanisms of removing red tide organisms by organo-clays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xi-Hua; Song, Xiu-Xian; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Kui

    2006-08-01

    We tested the influence of the preparation conditions of the quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) modified clays on their capacities to remove red tide organisms, then discussed the mechanisms of the organo-clays removing red tide organisms. Hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) improved the capacity of clays to flocculate red tide algae, and the HDTMA in metastable state enhanced the toxicity of the clay complexes to algae. The capacities of the organo-clays correlated with the toxicity and the adsorbed amount of the QACs used in clays modification, but as the incubation time was prolonged the stability of the organo-clays was improved and the algal removal efficiencies of the clay complexes decreased. When the adsorbed HDTMA was arranged in different clays in which the spatial resistance was different, there was more HDTMA in metastable state in the three-layer montmorillonite. Because of the homo-ion effect the bivalent or trivalent metal ions induced more HDTMA in metastable state and the corresponding organo-clays had high capacities to remove red tide organisms. When the reaction temperature was 60 degrees C the adsorbed HDTMA was easily arranged on cation exchange sites, if the temperature rose or fell the metastable HDTMA would increase so that the capacity of the clays was improved.

  1. Resin injection in clays with high plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowamooz, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    Regarding the injection process of polyurethane resins in clays with high plasticity, this paper presents the experimental results of the pressuremeter and cone penetration tests before and after injection. A very important increase in pressure limit or in soil resistance can be observed for all the studied depths close to the injection points. An analytical analysis for cylindrical pore cavity expansion in cohesive frictional soils obeying the Mohr-Coulomb criterion was then used to reproduce the pressuremeter tests before and after injection. The model parameters were calibrated by maintaining constant the elasticity parameters as well as the friction angel before and after injection. A significant increase in cohesion was observed because of soil densification after resin expansion. The estimated undrained cohesions, derived from the parameters of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, were also compared with the cone penetration tests. Globally, the model predictions show the efficiency of resin injection in clay soils with high plasticity.

  2. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific.

  3. Clay mineralogy in agrochernozems of western Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papish, I. Ya.; Chizhikova, N. P.; Poznyak, S. P.; Varlamov, E. B.

    2016-10-01

    The mineralogy of clay fractions separated from deep low-humus deep-gleyic loamy typical agrochernozems on loess-like loams of the Upper Bug and Dniester uplands in the Central Russian loess province of Ukraine consists of complex disordered interstratifications with the segregation of mica- and smectite-type layers (hereafter, smectite phase), tri- and dioctahedral hydromicas, kaolinite, and chlorite. The distribution of the clay fraction is uniform. The proportions of the layered silicates vary significantly within the profile: a decrease in the content of the smectite phase and a relative increase in the content of hydromicas up the soil profile are recorded. In the upper horizons, the contents of kaolinite and chlorite increase, and some amounts of fine quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases are observed. This tendency is observed in agrochernozems developed on the both Upper Bug and Dniester uplands. The differences include the larger amounts of quartz, potassium feldspars, and plagioclases in the clay material of the Upper Bug Upland, while the contents of the smectite phase in the soil profiles of the areas considered are similar. An analogous mineral association is noted in podzolized agrochernozems on loess-like deposits in the Cis-Carpathian region of the Southern Russian loess province developed on the Prut-Dniester and Syan-Dniester uplands. The distribution of particle-size fractions and the mineralogy of the clay fraction indicate the lithogenic heterogeneity of the soil-forming substrate. When the drifts change, the mineral association of the soils developed within the loess-like deposits gives place to minerals dominated by individual smectite with some mica-smectite inter stratifications, hydromicas, and chlorite.

  4. Clay/polymer composites: the story

    OpenAIRE

    Fengge Gao

    2004-01-01

    Clay/polymer nanocomposites offer tremendous improvement in a wide range of physical and engineering properties for polymers with low filler loading. This technology can now be applied commercially and has received great attention in recent years. The major development in this field has been carried out over the last one and half decades. The progress, advantages, limitations, and current problems will be discussed in this review. So far, significant progress has been made in the development ...

  5. Role of bentonite clays on cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ufer, Kristian; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención

    2016-04-01

    Bentonites, naturally occurring clays, are produced industrially because of their adsorbent capacity but little is known about their effects on human health. This manuscript reports on the effect of bentonites on cell growth behaviour. Bentonites collected from India (Bent-India), Hungary (Bent-Hungary), Argentina (Bent-Argentina), and Indonesia (Bent-Indonesia) were studied. All four bentonites were screened in-vitro against two human cancer cell lines [U251 (central nervous system, glioblastoma) and SKLU-1 (lung adenocarcinoma)] supplied by the National Cancer Institute (USA). Bentonites induced growth inhibition in the presence of U251 cells, and growth increment in the presence of SKLU-1 cells, showing that interactions between bentonite and cell surfaces were highly specific. The proliferation response for U251 cells was explained because clay surfaces controlled the levels of metabolic growth components, thereby inhibiting the development of high-grade gliomas, particularly primary glioblastomas. On the other hand, the proliferation response for SKLU-1 was explained by an exacerbated growth favoured by swelling, and concomitant accumulation of solutes, and their hydration and transformation via clay-surface mediated reactions.

  6. Cyclic Shearing Deformation Behavior of Saturated Clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The apparatus for static and dynamic universal triaxial and torsional shear soil testing is employed to perform stress-controlled cyclic single-direction torsional shear tests and two-direction coupled shear tests under unconsolidated-undrained conditions. Through a series of tests on saturated clay, the effects of initial shear stress and stress reversal on the clay's strain-stress behavior are examined, and the behavior of pore water pressure is studied. The experimental results indicate that the patterns of stress-strain relations are distinctly influenced by the initial shear stress in the cyclic single-direction shear tests. When the initial shear stress is large and no stress reversal occurs, the predominant deformation behavior is characterized by an accumulative effect. When the initial shear stress is zero and symmetrical cyclic stress occurs, the predominant deformation behavior is characterized by a cyclic effect. The pore water pressure fluctuates around the confining pressure with the increase of cycle number. It seems that the fluctuating amplitude increases with the increase of the cyclic stress. But a buildup of pore water pressure does not occur. The deformations of clay samples under the complex initial and the cyclic coupled stress conditions include the normal deviatoric deformation and horizontal shear deformation, the average deformation and cyclic deformation. A general strain failure criterion taking into account these deformations is recommended and is proved more stable and suitable compared to the strain failure criteria currently used.

  7. Spectromicroscopy of Fe distributions in clay microcrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundl, T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cerasari, S.; Garcia, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Clays are ubiquitous crystalline particles found in nature that are responsible for contributing to a wide range of chemical reactions in soils. The structure of these mineral particles changes when the particle is hydrated ({open_quotes}wet{close_quotes}), from that when it is dry. This makes a study of the microscopic distribution of chemical content of these nanocrystals difficult using standard techniques that require vacuum. In addition to large structural changes, it is likely that chemical changes accompany the drying process. As a result, spectroscopic measurements on dried clay particles may not accurately reflect the actual composition of the material as found in the environment. In this work, the authors extend the use of the ALS Spectromicroscopy Facility STXM to high spectral and spatial resolution studies of transition metal L-edges in environmental materials. The authors are studying mineral particles of montmorillonite, which is an Fe bearing clay which can be prepared with a wide distribution of Fe concentrations, and with Fe occupying different substitutional sites.

  8. Development and characterisation of microsatellite markers for Liporrhopalum tentacularis Grandi, the pollinator fig wasp of Ficus montana Blume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavodna, M.; Arens, P.; Vosman, B.; Van Dijk, P.J.; Van Damme, J.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Microsatellite markers for the pollinator fig wasp Liporrhopalum tentacularis were developed using genomic libraries enriched for di-, tri- and tetranucleotide repeats. A subset of 31 positive clones was sequenced and primers were designed. Eleven primer pairs produced polymorphic amplification prod

  9. Spanning Tree Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Hung Chen

    2012-01-01

    minimum cost spanning tree T in G such that the total weight in T is at most a given bound B. In this paper, we present two polynomial time approximation schemes (PTASs for the constrained minimum spanning tree problem.

  10. Calculation of the debris flow concentration based on clay content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ningsheng; CUI Peng; LIU Zhonggang; WEI Fangqiang

    2003-01-01

    The debris flow clay content has very tremendous influence on its concentration (γC). It is reported that the concentration can be calculated by applying the relative polynomial based on the clay content. Here one polynomial model and one logarithm model to calculate the concentration based on the clay content for both the ordinary debris flow and viscous debris flow are obtained. The result derives from the statistics and analysis of the relationship between the debris flow concentrations and clay content in 45 debris flow sites located in the southwest of China. The models can be applied for the concentration calculation to those debris flows that are impossible to observe. The models are available to calculate the debris flow concentration, the principles of which are in the clay content affecting on the debris flow formation, movement and suspending particle diameter. The mechanism of the relationship of the clay content and concentration is clear and reliable. The debris flow is usually of micro-viscous when the clay content is low (<3%), by analyzing the developing tendency on the basics of the relationship between the clay content and debris flow concentration. Indeed, the less the clay content, the less the concentration for most debris flows. The debris flow tends to become the water rock flow or the hyperconcentrated flow with the clay content decrease. Through statistics it is apt to transform the soil into the viscous debris flow when the clay content of ranges is in 3%-18%. Its concentration increases with the increasing of the clay content when the clay content is between 5% and 10%. But the value decreases with the increasing of the clay content when the clay content is between 10% and 18%. It is apt to transform the soil into the mudflow, when the clay content exceeds 18%. The concentration of the mudflow usually decreases with the increase of the clay content, and this developing tendency reverses to that of the micro-viscous debris flow. There is

  11. Surface Properties and Permeability of Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride)-Clays (PVDF/Clays) Composite Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramono, E.; Ahdiat, M.; Simamora, A.; Pratiwi, W.; Radiman, C. L.; Wahyuningrum, D.

    2017-07-01

    Surface properties are important factors that determine the performance of ultrafiltration membranes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of clay addition on the surface properties and membrane permeability of PVDF (poly-vinylidene fluoride) membranes. Three types of clay with different particle size were used in this study, namely montmorillonite-MMT, bentonite-BNT and cloisite 15A-CLS. The PVDF-clay composite membranes were prepared by phase inversion method using PEG as additive. The hydrophobicity of membrane surface was characterized by contact angle. The membrane permeability was determined by dead- end ultrafiltration with a trans-membrane pressure of 2 bars. In contact angle measurement, water contact angle of composite membranes is higher than PVDF membrane. The addition of clays decreased water flux but increased of Dextran rejection. The PVDF-BNT composite membranes reach highest Dextran rejection value of about 93%. The type and particle size of clay affected the hydrophobicity of membrane surface and determined the resulting membrane structure as well as the membrane performance.

  12. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  13. Making Tree Ensembles Interpretable

    OpenAIRE

    Hara, Satoshi; Hayashi, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Tree ensembles, such as random forest and boosted trees, are renowned for their high prediction performance, whereas their interpretability is critically limited. In this paper, we propose a post processing method that improves the model interpretability of tree ensembles. After learning a complex tree ensembles in a standard way, we approximate it by a simpler model that is interpretable for human. To obtain the simpler model, we derive the EM algorithm minimizing the KL divergence from the ...

  14. Embeddings of Iteration Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, William

    1992-01-01

    This paper, dating from May 1991, contains preliminary (and unpublishable) notes on investigations about iteration trees. They will be of interest only to the specialist. In the first two sections I define notions of support and embeddings for tree iterations, proving for example that every tree iteration is a direct limit of finite tree iterations. This is a generalization to models with extenders of basic ideas of iterated ultrapowers using only ultrapowers. In the final section (which is m...

  15. Biosorption of Ni(II) by Fig Male: Optimization and Modeling Using a Full Factorial Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjene, F; Chergui, A; Trari, M

    2016-06-01

    The fig male (FM) is successfully used as biosorbent for Ni(2+) removal. The maximum removal efficiency (96.6%) is obtained at pH ~ 5 for a concentration of 1.70 mmol L(-1) and catalyst dose of 5 g L(-1) in less than 10 minutes. The Ni(2+) uptake follows a pseudo-second-order kinetic, the rate constants increase with increasing temperature, and an activation energy of 55.48 kJ mol(-1) is found. The thermodynamic parameters indicate a spontaneous endothermic bisorption. The isotherm data are fitted by the Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. The former indicates a maximum Ni(2+) uptake of 0.459 mmol g(-1), which is higher than that of most biosorbents investigated to date. The FTIR spectra reveal the biosorption mechanism between Ni(2+) and FM functional groups. An empirical modeling is performed by using a 2(3) full factorial design, and a regression equation for Ni(2+) biosorption is determined. The biosorbent mass and pH are the most significant parameters affecting the Ni(2+) biosorption.

  16. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective properties of dried fig against oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Abdullah; Celik, Ismail

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect and antioxidant role of dried fig (DF) (Ficus carica L.) against ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Experiment was designed as normal Control, 20% ethanol, 10% DF and 10% DF+20% ethanol groups. The hepatoprotective and antioxidant role of the dried DF supplementation feed against ethanol induced oxidatif stress were evaluated by liver histopathological changes, measuring liver damage serum enzymes (LDSE), antioxidant defense system (ADS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in various tissues of rats following the exposure of experimental for 50days. The biochemical analysis showed a considerable increase the LDSE in the ethanol group as compared to that of control group whereas, decreased in 10% DF+20% ethanol group as compared to that of ethanol group. In addition, the DF supplementation diet restored the ethanol-induced MDA and ADS towards to control. The hepatoprotection of DF is further substantiated by the almost normal histologic findings of liver in 10% DF+20% ethanol group against degenerative changes in ethanol group. The results indicated that the DF could be as important as diet-derived antioxidants and antihepatotoxicity in preventing oxidative damage in the tissues by inhibiting the production of ethanol-induced free radicals and hepatotoxicity in rats.

  17. High-pressure assisted extraction of bioactive compounds from industrial fermented fig by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Elisabete M C; Araújo, Paula; Duarte, Maria F; de Freitas, Victor; Pintado, Manuela; Saraiva, Jorge A

    2017-07-01

    High-pressure assisted extraction was employed to obtain fig by-product derived extracts and its impact was evaluated on antioxidant activity and total phenolic, tannin, and flavonoid. A Box-Behnken design was applied to evaluate the effects of pressure, extraction time and ethanol concentration on extractions and optimal conditions were estimated by response surface methodology. The correlation analysis of the mathematical-regression model indicated that a quadratic polynomial model could be employed to optimize the high pressure extraction of compounds. Only the models developed for total antioxidant activity by DPPH (·) and for total flavonoids presented coefficient determinations lower than 0.95. From response surface plots, pressure, extraction time and ethanol concentration showed independent and interactive effects. The optimal conditions included 600 MPa, an extraction time between 18 and 29 min, depending on the parameter analyzed and a low ethanol concentration (extracts performed at 0.1 MPa. Analysis of variance indicated a high goodness of fit of the models used and the adequacy of response surface methodology for optimizing high pressure extraction.

  18. A role for parasites in stabilising the fig-pollinator mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Derek W; Segar, Simon T; Ridley, Jo; Chan, Ruth; Crozier, Ross H; Yu, Douglas W; Cook, James M

    2008-03-11

    Mutualisms are interspecific interactions in which both players benefit. Explaining their maintenance is problematic, because cheaters should outcompete cooperative conspecifics, leading to mutualism instability. Monoecious figs (Ficus) are pollinated by host-specific wasps (Agaonidae), whose larvae gall ovules in their "fruits" (syconia). Female pollinating wasps oviposit directly into Ficus ovules from inside the receptive syconium. Across Ficus species, there is a widely documented segregation of pollinator galls in inner ovules and seeds in outer ovules. This pattern suggests that wasps avoid, or are prevented from ovipositing into, outer ovules, and this results in mutualism stability. However, the mechanisms preventing wasps from exploiting outer ovules remain unknown. We report that in Ficus rubiginosa, offspring in outer ovules are vulnerable to attack by parasitic wasps that oviposit from outside the syconium. Parasitism risk decreases towards the centre of the syconium, where inner ovules provide enemy-free space for pollinator offspring. We suggest that the resulting gradient in offspring viability is likely to contribute to selection on pollinators to avoid outer ovules, and by forcing wasps to focus on a subset of ovules, reduces their galling rates. This previously unidentified mechanism may therefore contribute to mutualism persistence independent of additional factors that invoke plant defences against pollinator oviposition, or physiological constraints on pollinators that prevent oviposition in all available ovules.

  19. A role for parasites in stabilising the fig-pollinator mutualism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek W Dunn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutualisms are interspecific interactions in which both players benefit. Explaining their maintenance is problematic, because cheaters should outcompete cooperative conspecifics, leading to mutualism instability. Monoecious figs (Ficus are pollinated by host-specific wasps (Agaonidae, whose larvae gall ovules in their "fruits" (syconia. Female pollinating wasps oviposit directly into Ficus ovules from inside the receptive syconium. Across Ficus species, there is a widely documented segregation of pollinator galls in inner ovules and seeds in outer ovules. This pattern suggests that wasps avoid, or are prevented from ovipositing into, outer ovules, and this results in mutualism stability. However, the mechanisms preventing wasps from exploiting outer ovules remain unknown. We report that in Ficus rubiginosa, offspring in outer ovules are vulnerable to attack by parasitic wasps that oviposit from outside the syconium. Parasitism risk decreases towards the centre of the syconium, where inner ovules provide enemy-free space for pollinator offspring. We suggest that the resulting gradient in offspring viability is likely to contribute to selection on pollinators to avoid outer ovules, and by forcing wasps to focus on a subset of ovules, reduces their galling rates. This previously unidentified mechanism may therefore contribute to mutualism persistence independent of additional factors that invoke plant defences against pollinator oviposition, or physiological constraints on pollinators that prevent oviposition in all available ovules.

  20. HDPE/clay hybrids: the effect of clay modified with poly(diphenyl siloxanes) on thermal and rheological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monasterio, Fernanda E.; Carrera, Maria C.; Erdmann, Eleonora; Destefanis, Hugo A., E-mail: ferelenakq@gmail.co [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Inst. de Investigaciones para la Industria Quimica; Pita, Victor J.R.R.; Dias, Marcos L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Profa. Eloisa Mano

    2009-07-01

    Poly(diphenyl siloxanes) (PDPhS) were synthesized in presence of organophilic clay in order to modify its nano structure. Two silane monomers were used: dimethoxydiphenylsilane and dichlorodiphenylsilane. The following characterizations were performed for all clays: XRD, FTIR and TGA/DTG. These siloxane-modified clays were more hydrophobic and had enhanced thermal stability. Solvent extraction was carried out in the siloxane-modified clays and the PDPhS soluble fraction analyzed according the molecular weight via GPC. The presence of free and grafted oligomers on clay surface was identified. The modified clays were added to HDPE by melt processing to obtain HDPE/clay hybrids which exhibited marked differences in the rheological behavior when compared with neat HDPE. (author)

  1. The FIGS (focused identification of germplasm strategy) approach identifies traits related to drought adaptation in Vicia faba genetic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Hamid; Street, Kenneth; Bari, Abdallah; Mackay, Michael; Stoddard, Frederick L

    2013-01-01

    Efficient methods to explore plant agro-biodiversity for climate change adaptive traits are urgently required. The focused identification of germplasm strategy (FIGS) is one such approach. FIGS works on the premise that germplasm is likely to reflect the selection pressures of the environment in which it developed. Environmental parameters describing plant germplasm collection sites are used as selection criteria to improve the probability of uncovering useful variation. This study was designed to test the effectiveness of FIGS to search a large faba bean (Vicia faba L.) collection for traits related to drought adaptation. Two sets of faba bean accessions were created, one from moisture-limited environments, and the other from wetter sites. The two sets were grown under well watered conditions and leaf morpho-physiological traits related to plant water use were measured. Machine-learning algorithms split the accessions into two groups based on the evaluation data and the groups created by this process were compared to the original climate-based FIGS sets. The sets defined by trait data were in almost perfect agreement to the FIGS sets, demonstrating that ecotypic differentiation driven by moisture availability has occurred within the faba bean genepool. Leaflet and canopy temperature as well as relative water content contributed more than other traits to the discrimination between sets, indicating that their utility as drought-tolerance selection criteria for faba bean germplasm. This study supports the assertion that FIGS could be an effective tool to enhance the discovery of new genes for abiotic stress adaptation.

  2. Traditional agroecosystems as conservatories and incubators of cultivated plant varietal diversity: the case of fig (Ficus carica L.) in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional agroecosystems are known to host both large crop species diversity and high within crop genetic diversity. In a context of global change, this diversity may be needed to feed the world. Are these agroecosystems museums (i.e. large core collections) or cradles of diversity? We investigated this question for a clonally propagated plant, fig (Ficus carica), within its native range, in Morocco, but as far away as possible from supposed centers of domestication. Results Fig varieties were locally numerous. They were found to be mainly highly local and corresponded to clones propagated vegetatively. Nevertheless these clones were often sufficiently old to have accumulated somatic mutations for selected traits (fig skin color) and at neutral loci (microsatellite markers). Further the pattern of spatial genetic structure was similar to the pattern expected in natural population for a mutation/drift/migration model at equilibrium, with homogeneous levels of local genetic diversity throughout Moroccan traditional agroecosystems. Conclusions We conclude that traditional agroecosystems constitue active incubators of varietal diversity even for clonally propagated crop species, and even when varieties correspond to clones that are often old. As only female fig is cultivated, wild fig and cultivated fig probably constitute a single evolutionary unit within these traditional agroecosystems. Core collections, however useful, are museums and hence cannot serve the same functions as traditional agroecosystems. PMID:20167055

  3. Traditional agroecosystems as conservatories and incubators of cultivated plant varietal diversity: the case of fig (Ficus carica L. in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoni Sylvain

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional agroecosystems are known to host both large crop species diversity and high within crop genetic diversity. In a context of global change, this diversity may be needed to feed the world. Are these agroecosystems museums (i.e. large core collections or cradles of diversity? We investigated this question for a clonally propagated plant, fig (Ficus carica, within its native range, in Morocco, but as far away as possible from supposed centers of domestication. Results Fig varieties were locally numerous. They were found to be mainly highly local and corresponded to clones propagated vegetatively. Nevertheless these clones were often sufficiently old to have accumulated somatic mutations for selected traits (fig skin color and at neutral loci (microsatellite markers. Further the pattern of spatial genetic structure was similar to the pattern expected in natural population for a mutation/drift/migration model at equilibrium, with homogeneous levels of local genetic diversity throughout Moroccan traditional agroecosystems. Conclusions We conclude that traditional agroecosystems constitue active incubators of varietal diversity even for clonally propagated crop species, and even when varieties correspond to clones that are often old. As only female fig is cultivated, wild fig and cultivated fig probably constitute a single evolutionary unit within these traditional agroecosystems. Core collections, however useful, are museums and hence cannot serve the same functions as traditional agroecosystems.

  4. Traditional agroecosystems as conservatories and incubators of cultivated plant varietal diversity: the case of fig (Ficus carica L.) in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtak, Hafid; Ater, Mohammed; Oukabli, Ahmed; Santoni, Sylvain; Kjellberg, Finn; Khadari, Bouchaib

    2010-02-18

    Traditional agroecosystems are known to host both large crop species diversity and high within crop genetic diversity. In a context of global change, this diversity may be needed to feed the world. Are these agroecosystems museums (i.e. large core collections) or cradles of diversity? We investigated this question for a clonally propagated plant, fig (Ficus carica), within its native range, in Morocco, but as far away as possible from supposed centers of domestication. Fig varieties were locally numerous. They were found to be mainly highly local and corresponded to clones propagated vegetatively. Nevertheless these clones were often sufficiently old to have accumulated somatic mutations for selected traits (fig skin color) and at neutral loci (microsatellite markers). Further the pattern of spatial genetic structure was similar to the pattern expected in natural population for a mutation/drift/migration model at equilibrium, with homogeneous levels of local genetic diversity throughout Moroccan traditional agroecosystems. We conclude that traditional agroecosystems constitue active incubators of varietal diversity even for clonally propagated crop species, and even when varieties correspond to clones that are often old. As only female fig is cultivated, wild fig and cultivated fig probably constitute a single evolutionary unit within these traditional agroecosystems. Core collections, however useful, are museums and hence cannot serve the same functions as traditional agroecosystems.

  5. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jian-Ying; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting ...

  6. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jiong; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting ...

  7. Macro tree transducers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelfriet, Joost; Vogler, Heiko

    1985-01-01

    Macro tree transducers are a combination of top-down tree transducers and macro grammars. They serve as a model for syntax-directed semantics in which context information can be handled. In this paper the formal model of macro tree transducers is studied by investigating typical automata theoretical

  8. Winter Birch Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Debra; Rounds, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Trees are great inspiration for artists. Many art teachers find themselves inspired and maybe somewhat obsessed with the natural beauty and elegance of the lofty tree, and how it changes through the seasons. One such tree that grows in several regions and always looks magnificent, regardless of the time of year, is the birch. In this article, the…

  9. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  10. The Wish Tree Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah DeWitt

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the author's experience in implementing a Wish Tree project in her school in an effort to bring the school community together with a positive art-making experience during a potentially stressful time. The concept of a wish tree is simple: plant a tree; provide tags and pencils for writing wishes; and encourage everyone to…

  11. The Wish Tree Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah DeWitt

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the author's experience in implementing a Wish Tree project in her school in an effort to bring the school community together with a positive art-making experience during a potentially stressful time. The concept of a wish tree is simple: plant a tree; provide tags and pencils for writing wishes; and encourage everyone to…

  12. Macro tree transducers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelfriet, Joost; Vogler, Heiko

    1985-01-01

    Macro tree transducers are a combination of top-down tree transducers and macro grammars. They serve as a model for syntax-directed semantics in which context information can be handled. In this paper the formal model of macro tree transducers is studied by investigating typical automata theoretical

  13. RNA isolation and internal reference gene selection for semi-quantitative RT-PCR of fig(Ficus carica)%无花果RNA的提取和半定量RT-PCR内参基因的优选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊清; 陈立勇; 陈尚武; 张文; 马会勤

    2012-01-01

    本试验以无花果的根、茎、叶、果作为材料,比较了CTAB法和Trizol法对无花果材料RNA的提取效果。以CTAB法提取的不同无花果材料的RNA为模板,反转成cDNA第一链,通过半定量RT-PCR,研究了植物常用内参基因18SrRNA、Actin和Tubulin的表达量变化。结果表明:CTAB法是适合不同无花果材料的RNA提取法;18SrRNA在无花果不同组织中的表达水平较高,且相对稳定,Tubulin在无花果不同组织中相对表达量较低,且相对稳定,是研究无花果不同组织基因表达水平较为适宜的内参基因。%Fig is an ancient fruit tree species with important economic value.Along with the development of fruit tree molecule biology,there are more and more such studies on figs,and one important area is the expression level of functional genes.RNA isolation and internal reference gene selection for semi-quantitative RT-PCR are key steps in gene expression studies.In this paper,fig root,stem,young leaf and young fruit were sampled.RNA isolation methods,i.e.Trizol and CTAB,were compared for their RNA extraction results.RNA quality results indicated that CTAB method had better performance in fig RNA isolation.Using fig RNA extracted with CTAB method from different tissues,after reversing transcription and the gain of the first strand cDNA,we studied the expression of three house-keeping genes to evaluate their feasibility as internal reference for semi-quantitative RT-PCR.Among of these three genes,18S rRNA showed rather high and stable expression level in four different tissues,while Tubulin revealed relatively low but stable expressions.The expression of Actin demonstrated differentiated expression in four different organs.Thus,18S rRNA and Tubulin were suggested as internal references.This study lays the ground for future study of gene expression in fig by semi-quantitative RT-PCR.

  14. REE and (э)Nd of clay fractions in sediments from the eastern Pacific Ocean: Evidence for clay sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jihua; SHI Xuefa; CHEN Lirong; HUANG Yongyang; WANG Yinxi; CUI Yingchun; BU Wenrui

    2005-01-01

    Clay fractions in the non-calcareous surface sediments from the eastern Pacific were analyzed for clay minerals, REE and 143Nd/144Nd. Montmorillonite/illite ratio (M/I ratio), total REE contents ((REE), LREE/HREE ratio and cerium anomaly (бCe) may effectively indicate the genesis of clay minerals. Clay fractions with M/I ratio >1, бCe (0.85, (REE (400 μg/g, LREE/HREE ratio (4, and REE patterns similar to those of pelagic sediments are terrigenous and autogenetic mixed clay fractions and contain more autogenetic montmorillonite. Clay fractions with M/I ratio <1, бCe=0.86 to 1.5, ΣREE=200 to 350 μg/g, LREE/HREE ratio (6 and REE distribution patterns similar to that of China loess are identified as terrigenous clay fraction. The 143Nd/144Nd ratios or (э)Nd values of clay fractions inherit the features of terrigenous sources of clay minerals. Clay fractions are divided into 4 types according to (э)Nd values. Terrigenous clay minerals of type I with the (э)Nd values of -8 to -6 originate mainly from North American fluvial deposits. Those of type II with the (э)Nd values of -9 to -7 are mainly from the East Asia and North American fluvial deposits. Those of type III with (э)Nd values of -6 to -3 could come from the central and eastern Pacific volcanic islands. Those of type IV with (э)Nd values of -13 to -12 may be from East Asia eolian. The terrigenous and autogenetic mixed clay fractions show patchy distributions, indicating that there are volcanic or hot-spot activities in the eastern Pacific plate, while the terrigenous clay fractions cover a large part of the study area, proving that the terrigenous clay minerals are dominant in the eastern Pacific.

  15. Polypropylene–clay composite prepared from Indian bentonite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhuchhanda Sarkar; Kausik Dana; Sankar Ghatak; Amarnath Banerjee

    2008-02-01

    In the present work, a set of experimental polypropylene (PP) clay composites containing pristine bentonite clay of Indian origin has been prepared and then characterized. The polymer clay composites are processed by solution mixing of polypropylene with bentonite clay using a solvent xylene and high speed electric stirrer at a temperature around 130°C and then by compression molding at 170°C. The mechanical properties of PP–clay composites like tensile strength, hardness and impact resistance have been investigated. Microstructural studies were carried out using scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope and the thermal properties were studied using differential scanning calorimeter. Mechanical properties of the prepared composites showed highest reinforcing and toughening effects of the clay filler at a loading of only 5 mass % in PP matrix. Tensile strength was observed to be highest in case of 5 mass % of clay loading and it was more than 14% of that of the neat PP, while toughness increased by more than 80%. Bentonite clay–PP composite (5 mass %) also showed 60% increase in impact energy value. However, no significant change was observed in case of hardness and tensile modulus. Higher percentages of bentonite clay did not further improve the properties with respect to pristine polypropylene. The study of the microstructure of the prepared polymer layered silicate clay composites showed a mixed morphology with multiple stacks of clay layers and tactoids of different thicknesses.

  16. Role of clay as catalyst in Friedel–Craft alkylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tanushree Choudhury; Nirendra M Misra

    2011-10-01

    Solid acids have become increasingly important for many liquid-phase industrial reactions these days. Montmorillonite clays (2:1 clay mineral) have been used as efficient solid acid catalysts for a number of organic and liquid phase reactions and offer several advantages over classic acids. Tailor made catalysts can be prepared from clays by suitably adjusting their acidity and surface area by acid activation. In the present work, preparation, characterization and performance of Pt (II) clays, Cu (II) clays, acid clay, and sol–gel hybrids of Cu (II) clays as solid catalysts in a test Friedel–Craft alkylation reaction of benzyl chloride with toluene using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) are reported. Product formation has been analysed by FTIR spectroscopy. The main objective of this work is to show how clay as a solid catalyst affects reaction rates and activation energies. Acidity and dispersion of solid catalysts are twomain factors which govern a catalysis reaction. Kinetic parameter analysis and XRD studies confirm that acid Pt (II) clay and Pt (II) clay dispersed by natural dispersants aremore effective catalysts. In contrast to the reactions using AlCl3, the experimental conditions are non-polluting and the final work up does not require any aqueous treatment.

  17. Effective Removal of Heavy Metals from Wastewater Using Modified Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mun-Seon; Vijayarangamuthu, K; Han, EunJi; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2016-05-01

    We report an economical and eco-friendly way to remove the heavy metal pollutant using modified clay. The modification of clay was done by calcining the natural clay from Kyushu region in Japan. Further, the removal efficiency for various pH and contact time was evaluated. The morphology of the clays was studied using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The structural and chemical analyses of modified clay were done by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and Energy dispersion analysis (EDAX) to understand the properties related to the removal of heavy metal pollutant. Further, we studied the absorption efficiency of clay for various pH and contacting time using Ni polluted water. The modified clays show better removal efficiency for all pH with different saturation time. The adsorption follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption capacity of modified clay is 1.5 times larger than that of natural clay. The increase in the adsorption efficiency of modified clay was correlated to the increase in hematite phase along with increase in surface area due to surface morphological changes.

  18. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  19. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2017-05-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  20. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner.

  1. Trees in Lhasa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Degyi

    2008-01-01

    Trees are flourishing in Lhasa wherever the history exists. There is such a man. He has already been through cus-toms after his annual trek to Lhasa, which he has been doing for over twenty years in succession to visit his tree.Although he has been making this journey for so long,it is neither to visit friends or family,nor is it his hometown.It is a tree that is tied so profoundly to his heart.When the wind blows fiercely on the bare tree and winter snow falls,he stands be-fore the tree with tears of jo...

  2. Distributed Contour Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Weber, Gunther H.

    2014-03-31

    Topological techniques provide robust tools for data analysis. They are used, for example, for feature extraction, for data de-noising, and for comparison of data sets. This chapter concerns contour trees, a topological descriptor that records the connectivity of the isosurfaces of scalar functions. These trees are fundamental to analysis and visualization of physical phenomena modeled by real-valued measurements. We study the parallel analysis of contour trees. After describing a particular representation of a contour tree, called local{global representation, we illustrate how di erent problems that rely on contour trees can be solved in parallel with minimal communication.

  3. CO2 adsorption isotherm on clay minerals and the CO2 accessibility into the clay interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Rother, Gernot; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale CO2 storage in porous rock formations at 1-3 km depth is seen as a global warming mitigation strategy. In this process, CO2 is separated from the flue gas of coal or gas power plants, compressed, and pumped into porous subsurface reservoirs with overlying caprocks (seals). Good seals are mechanically and chemically stable caprocks with low porosity and permeability. They prevent leakage of buoyant CO2 from the reservoir. Caprocks are generally comprised of thick layers of shale, and thus mainly consist of clay minerals. These clays can be affected by CO2-induced processes, such as swelling or dissolution. The interactions of CO2 with clay minerals in shales are at present poorly understood. Sorption measurements in combination scattering techniques could provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms governing CO2-clay interaction. Volumetric sorption techniques have assessed the sorption of supercritical CO2 onto coal (Gensterblum et al., 2010; Gensterblum et al., 2009), porous silica (Rother et al., 2012a) and clays as a means of exploring the potential of large-scale storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological reservoirs (Busch et al., 2008). On different clay minerals and shales, positive values of excess sorption were measured at gas pressures up to 6 MPa, where the interfacial fluid is assumed to be denser than the bulk fluid. However, zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, which suggests the adsorbed fluid becomes equal to and eventually less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid, or that the clay minerals expand on CO2 charging. Using a combination of neutron diffraction and excess sorption measurements, we recently deduced the interlayer density of scCO2 in Na-montmorillonite clay in its single-layer hydration state (Rother et al., 2012b), and confirmed its low density, as well as the expansion of the basal spacings. We performed neutron diffraction experiments at the FRMII diffractometer on smectite, kaolinite and illite

  4. Growth of a Pine Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, Susan Wells

    2012-01-01

    The growth of a pine tree is examined by preparing "tree cookies" (cross-sectional disks) between whorls of branches. The use of Christmas trees allows the tree cookies to be obtained with inexpensive, commonly available tools. Students use the tree cookies to investigate the annual growth of the tree and how it corresponds to the number of whorls…

  5. Growth of a Pine Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, Susan Wells

    2012-01-01

    The growth of a pine tree is examined by preparing "tree cookies" (cross-sectional disks) between whorls of branches. The use of Christmas trees allows the tree cookies to be obtained with inexpensive, commonly available tools. Students use the tree cookies to investigate the annual growth of the tree and how it corresponds to the number of whorls…

  6. Programming macro tree transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Day, Laurence E.

    2013-01-01

    A tree transducer is a set of mutually recursive functions transforming an input tree into an output tree. Macro tree transducers extend this recursion scheme by allowing each function to be defined in terms of an arbitrary number of accumulation parameters. In this paper, we show how macro tree...... transducers can be concisely represented in Haskell, and demonstrate the benefits of utilising such an approach with a number of examples. In particular, tree transducers afford a modular programming style as they can be easily composed and manipulated. Our Haskell representation generalises the original...... definition of (macro) tree transducers, abolishing a restriction on finite state spaces. However, as we demonstrate, this generalisation does not affect compositionality....

  7. Programming macro tree transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Day, Laurence E.

    2013-01-01

    A tree transducer is a set of mutually recursive functions transforming an input tree into an output tree. Macro tree transducers extend this recursion scheme by allowing each function to be defined in terms of an arbitrary number of accumulation parameters. In this paper, we show how macro tree...... transducers can be concisely represented in Haskell, and demonstrate the benefits of utilising such an approach with a number of examples. In particular, tree transducers afford a modular programming style as they can be easily composed and manipulated. Our Haskell representation generalises the original...... definition of (macro) tree transducers, abolishing a restriction on finite state spaces. However, as we demonstrate, this generalisation does not affect compositionality....

  8. The effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kaam-Peters, Heidy M. E.; Köster, Jürgen; van der Gaast, Sjierk J.; Dekker, Marlèn; de Leeuw, Jan W.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    1998-09-01

    To examine the effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios, the mineral compositions of three sample sets of sedimentary rocks displaying a wide range of diasterane/sterane ratios were analysed quantitatively. Diasterane/sterane ratios do not to correlate with clay content but depend on the amount of clay relative to the amount of organic matter (clay/TOC ratios). This correlation may explain the high diasterane/sterane ratios in crude oils and extracts derived from certain carbonate source rocks. Based on the concentrations of regular and rearranged steroids in the sample sets, it is proposed that diasterenes are partly reduced to diasteranes and partly degraded during diagenesis in a ratio largely determined by the availability of clay minerals. It is suggested that the hydrogen atoms required for reduction of the diasterenes originate from the water in the interlayers of clay minerals.

  9. Tensile mechanical response of polyethylene – clay nanocomposites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report on the microstructural and the mechanical characteristics of high density polyethylene (HDPE-clay nanocomposites, with particular attention to the creep behaviour. The samples were prepared through melt compounding, using two high-density polyethylenes with different melt flow rate (MFR, two different organo-modified clays, and changing the relative amount of a polyethylene grafted with maleic anhydride (PEgMA compatibilizer. The intercalation process is more effective as the matrix melt viscosity decreases (higher MFR, while the clay interlamellar spacing increases as the compatibilizer amount increases. The relative stiffness of the nanocomposites increases with the addition of clay, with a limited enhancement of the relative yield stress. The better intercalation obtained by the addition of the compatibilizer is not accompanied by a concurrent improvement of the tensile mechanical properties. The creep resistance is enhanced by the introduction of clay, with an appreciable dependence on both the polyethylene and the clay type.

  10. Determination of geomagnetic archaeomagnitudes from clay pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, K. P.; Baker, M. E.

    1981-02-01

    Archaeomagnitude determinations of a selection of clay pipes dateable to AD 1645+/-10 as well as studies of pottery samples from the same site and of the same age have been made. Values of the magnitude of the ancient magnetic field (Banc), were obtained from two pottery sherds, two pipe bowls and three pipe stems. The values from the sherds and bowls agree within 2% and compare well with the average value of the magnitude of the magnetic field for the seventeenth century as determined by other archaeomagnetic studies. However, the pipe stems give values of Banc which are significantly less than those from the bowls and pottery. We have not yet been able to explain this and thus we suggest that reliable archaeomagnitude determinations can be made from the bowls of clay pipes but not from the stems. Nevertheless, this result provides a new source of material for investigating variations in the geomagnetic field strength over the past 400 yr. Clay pipes have been manufactured in England since the end of the sixteenth century. In the firing process some pipes were broken and disposed of without ever having been smoked. One such collection, discovered at Rainford, Lancashire, in 1978, consisted of a series of discrete dumps including pipes, kiln debris and a small collection of contemporary used earthenware sherds. The internal consideration of the dumps suggested a very short period of activity and archaeologists (P. Davey, personal communication) ascribe all the material to the period 1645+/-10 yr. With such well-dated material, we set out to check whether or not reliable archaeomagnitudes could be obtained from the pipes.

  11. Uranyl adsorption at clay mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, N.

    2014-07-01

    This first exemplary survey of actinide adsorption at complex clay mineral surfaces, which provided new insights at the atomic level, will be extended to other pertinent adsorbates like neptunyl NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and more complex minerals like iron-substituted phyllosilicates. In this way we will check if the concepts developed so far can be applied more generally, to support the interpretation of upcoming experiments. An essential facet of these studies will be to account also for the dynamical nature of the mineral/water interface by means of exemplary dynamical simulations. (orig.)

  12. Uranyl adsorption at clay mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, N. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Fachgebiet Theoretische Chemie

    2016-11-01

    This first systematic survey of actinide adsorption at complex clay mineral surfaces, which provided new insights at the atomic level, is currently being extended to neptunyl NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and more complex minerals, like iron-substituted phyllosilicates. In this way we examine if the concepts developed so far can be applied more generally to support the interpretation of pertinent experiments. A further facet of these studies is to account also for the dynamic nature of the mineral/water interface by means of exemplary dynamic simulations.

  13. Adsorption Behavior of Plutonium on Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG; Hao-qi; BAO; Liang-jin; SONG; Zhi-xin; WANG; Bo

    2013-01-01

    In this study,the adsorption distribution ratios of Pu in the Longdong clays were measured with batch method under hypoxic conditions,and the influence of the liquid-solid ratio and pH on the adsorption distribution ratio also was discussed.The initial concentration of Pu is about 1×10-10 mol/L,and the solution pH value was adjusted with NaOH or HClO4.The temperature of experiments was(30±

  14. Nano dimensional hybrid organo-clay Langmuir-Blodgett films

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Syed Arshad; Chakraborty, S.; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2014-01-01

    Clay mineral particles are interesting nanosized building blocks due to their high aspect ratio and the chemical properties. The main interest in this nanosized building blocks results essentially from the colloidal size and the permanent structural charge of the particles. Smectites or swelling clay minerals are naturally occurring nanomaterials that can be fully delaminated to elementary clay mineral platelets in dilute aqueous dispersion. This dilute aqueous smectite suspensions are well s...

  15. Clays as dietary supplements for swine: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mohana Devi; Kim, In Ho

    2015-01-01

    Clays are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate molecules composed of alkali and alkaline earth cations along with small amounts of various other elements. The best-known are montmorillonite, smectite, illite, kaolinite, biotite and clinoptilolite. The molecules in these clays are arranged in three-dimensional structures creating internal voids and channels capable of trapping a wide variety of molecules. As a result of this structure, clay minerals are regarded as a simple and effective tool for the prevention of the negative effects of many toxic compounds. Dietary supplementation with clays has been shown to improve weight gain and feed conversion in pigs. Where improvements in performance have been noted, one of the most likely explanations for the improvement is the fact clays increase nutrient digestibility. Clays reduce the speed of passage of feed along the digestive tract which allows more time for digestion. Feeding clays also causes morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa such as an increase in villus height and an increase in the villus height to crypt depth ratio. These changes increase the surface area of the gastrointestinal tract thus increasing nutrient digestibility. Several studies have indicated that feeding clay reduces the incidence, severity and duration of diarrhea in pigs. The mechanism for the reduction in diarrhea is likely due to increases in the numbers of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus and decreases in Clostridia and E. coli in the small intestine of pigs fed clays. In addition, the numbers of pigs born alive and weaned, birth weight and weaning weight have been shown to be higher for sows fed clays. Several studies have indicated that clays can help mitigate the effects of mycotoxins. The aim of the present review is to focus on the various clays which have been given attention in recent research and to discuss their potential to improve pig performance.

  16. Characterization of some clay deposits in South West Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Clay minerals are the most important industrial minerals whose application is dependent on its structure and chemical composition. Mineralogical, chemical compositions, phase constitutions, and microstructural morphology of certain clay minerals from three different deposits in south western Nigeria were investigated using state-of-the-art equipment. These were done with the intention of determining the appropriate application for the clay minerals. It was observed that the major phases in th...

  17. Structure–property relationship of specialty elastomer–clay nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anirban Ganguly; Madhuchhanda Maiti; Anil K Bhowmick

    2008-06-01

    The present work deals with the synthesis of specialty elastomer [fluoroelastomer and poly (styrene--ethylene-co-butylene--styrene (SEBS)]–clay nanocomposites and their structure–property relationship as elucidated from morphology studies by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction and physico-mechanical properties. Due to polarity match, hydrophilic unmodified montmorillonite clay showed enhanced properties in resulting fluoroelastomer nanocomposites, while hydrophobic organo-clay showed best results in SEBS nanocomposites.

  18. Clay: New opportunities for tissue regeneration and biomaterial design

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, Jonathan I.; Oreffo, Richard O.C.

    2013-01-01

    Seminal recent studies that have shed new light on the remarkable properties of clay interactions suggest unexplored opportunities for biomaterial design and regenerative medicine. Here, recent conceptual and technological developments in the science of clay interactions with biomolecules, polymers, and cells are examined, focusing on the implications for tissue engineering and regenerative strategies. Pioneering studies demonstrating the utility of clay for drug-delivery and scaffold design ...

  19. Pattern Avoidance in Ternary Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Gabriel, Nathan; Pudwell, Lara; Tay, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the enumeration of ternary trees (i.e. rooted ordered trees in which each vertex has 0 or 3 children) avoiding a contiguous ternary tree pattern. We begin by finding recurrence relations for several simple tree patterns; then, for more complex trees, we compute generating functions by extending a known algorithm for pattern-avoiding binary trees. Next, we present an alternate one-dimensional notation for trees which we use to find bijections that explain why certain pairs of tree patterns yield the same avoidance generating function. Finally, we compare our bijections to known "replacement rules" for binary trees and generalize these bijections to a larger class of trees.

  20. Derivation of in situ opalinus clay porewater compositions from experimental and geochemical modelling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01

    Many countries are considering argillaceous sedimentary rocks as potential formations for the disposal of high level radioactive waste. One of the main attractions of such formations from a waste management viewpoint are their generally low groundwater flow rates. However, porewater chemistry constitutes an important basic data set for performance assessment studies and the low transmissivities often mean that it is very difficult, or even impossible, to obtain good in situ water samples. This report describes procedures based on physico-chemical characterisation of whole rock samples and geochemical modelling which were developed as an additional tool for determining porewater compositions in low porosity/permeability clay rich systems. The methodology was applied to core samples of opalinus clay within the framework of an international investigation being carried out at Mt. Terri, Canton Jura, Switzerland. The calculated porewater compositions are described and discussed in relation to experimental data from the analyses of borehole seepage water and water samples obtained from squeezing tests. Because the latter two waters were clearly out of the equilibrium, only a comparison based on general aqueous features was attempted. In all three cases the groundwaters were high ionic strength Na-Cl types. The experimentally determined pH values were in the range 7.5-8 whereas for the modelled porewater a value near 6 was calculated. This discrepancy was explained by postulating that the sampled waters lost dissolved CO{sub 2} through out-gassing. (author) 5 figs., 11 tabs., refs.

  1. Nucleocapsid protein from fig mosaic virus forms cytoplasmic agglomerates that are hauled by endoplasmic reticulum streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly throughout the cell, and we

  2. The influence of clay type on reduction of water repellency by applied clays: a review of some West Australian work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKissock, I.; Walker, E. L.; Gilkes, R. J.; Carter, D. J.

    2000-05-01

    In Western Australia water repellency mostly occurs in soils with sandy texture; the severity of water repellency is influenced by very small changes in clay content. Additions of 1-2% clay can prevent water repellency and for some time clay amendments have been used by farmers to overcome water repellency. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of clays in ameliorating water repellency. Clays were assessed for effectiveness in reducing water repellency by mixing with water repellent sands and measuring water drop penetration time (WDPT) on the resultant mixtures. WDPT was measured on the initial mixtures, a wetting and drying cycle was imposed and WDPT measured again. Two sets of clays were assessed: four simple clays containing kaolinite (2) or smectite (2) group minerals and a group of clayey subsoil materials which had been collected by farmers. For the simple clays, clay mineral type was the most significant factor in determining response. Kaolin was much more effective than smectite. Imposition of a wetting and drying cycle greatly reduced water repellency. The dominant exchangeable cation of the clays (sodium or calcium) had little effect on the ability of the clays to reduce water repellency. The factor that was most predictive of the effectiveness of clayey subsoils materials in reducing water repellency was texture: clay content ( r2=0.18) or clay+silt content ( r2=0.23). These properties were more predictive of water repellency values after the wetting and drying cycle treatment ( r2=0.36, r2=0.44). The proportion of the clay fraction that consisted of kaolinite was next most predictive in determining effectiveness which is again indicative of kaolin group minerals being more effective than smectite group minerals. The exchangeable sodium percentage and clay dispersibility had no systematic effect on the ability of these clays to reduce water repellency. These results provide a basis for developing a practical field procedure to enable

  3. A study on the differential thermal analysis of clays and clay minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, P.L.

    1951-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA) as a method of analysing properties of chemical compounds, more especially of clay minerals, developed rapidly, but lack of quantitative interpretations left many problems to be studied. A historical review was presented, showing the purpose of the study.

  4. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eLongo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS, have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals.

  5. Dynamics and Scaling Properties of Fractures in clay-like Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walmann, Thomas

    1998-12-31

    Computer models that can help oil companies predict realistic and physically correct fracture patterns are important. To verify such a model, experiments described in this thesis were undertaken, using wet clay and powder. The main focus was on extensional fractures, but other types of fractures were also studied. High resolution digital images of the fracture patterns were recorded and analyzed using statistical physics and fractal geometry. The characteristic shapes and size distributions of individual fractures and the overall fracture patterns obtained from laboratory model studies were compared to results from aerial photographs of a fracture pattern in a collapsed glacier that had undergone a similar deformation. A new scaling relation (a power-law) between the length of a fracture and the projected area is derived for fractures formed during clay model experiments. This scaling relation is found also in a field study of a fracture pattern in a glacier. The forms of the different distributions that characterizes fractures in clay experiments are discussed. Several characteristic lengths are associated with the laboratory experiments. They are related to the sample size and shape, the model material and the nature of the imposed deformation. The roughness of the fracture traces obtained from powder experiments was found to have a self-affine form. The roughness, or Hurst exponent, was found to have the value 0.73, plus or minus 0.09. A large number of interacting fractures were formed in the systems studied, and under such conditions the fluctuations about the direction perpendicular to the principle strain direction are influenced by neighbouring fractures. As expected, an upper cutoff for the scaling range was observed. But the length at which the crossover from a self-affine shape to a flat shape took place did not depend systematically on any of the experimental parameters or characteristic length scales. The total fracture trace patterns could not be

  6. Epoxy nanocomposites based on high temperature pyridinium-modified clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingxin; Naito, Kimiyoshi; Qi, Ben; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites are generally fabricated by thermal curing or melt compounding at elevated temperatures, however the thermal stability of common alkyl ammonium treated clays is poor and decomposition occurs inevitably during high temperature processing. In this study, we modified clays with an aromatic pyridinium salt. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the onset degradation temperature (Td(onset)) and maximum decomposition temperature (Td(max)) of the pyridinium treatment clays was up to 310 and 457 degrees C respectively implying high thermal stability. The thermal decomposition behaviour of the pyridinium modified clays was discussed. A series of epoxy/clay nanocomposites were synthesized using a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy and diethyltoluene diamine (DETDA). The morphology of epoxy/clay nanocomposites was characterized with wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), and intercalated structures were observed. The storage modulus of epoxy was increased but glass transition temperature was decreased with clay incorporation. The effects of clays on glass transition temperature (Tg) of epoxy were also discussed.

  7. Microbiological characterisation of southern African medicinal and cosmetic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpuchane, Sisai F; Ekosse, Georges-Ivo E; Gashe, Berhanu A; Morobe, Isaac; Coetzee, Stephan H

    2010-02-01

    The effects of traditionally used medicinal and cosmetic clays in southern Africa on selected microorganisms were studied using microbiological media. The clay pH, microchemical composition, kind of associated microorganisms and antimicrobial activity of clays against test microorganisms were determined. The clays contained varying numbers of microorganisms which ranged from 0 up to 105 CFU/g. Clay pH ranged from 2.3-8.9. Neither Escherichia coli, nor other faecal coliforms were detected. Clays of pH value of Clays which were active against test microorganisms had Na(2)O, Al(2)O(3), SiO(2), SO(3), CuO or Cl(2)O as major components. Microbial activity of clays was attributed mainly to low pH but cations such as Cu, Al, S or Cl and various anions might have contributed to the microbicidal effects. No antimicrobial activity was established for many of the clays commonly used in the treatment of common ailments of microbial origin.

  8. Recent advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li Zhi; Zhou, Chun Hui; Wang, Jing; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua; Wang, Hao

    2015-12-28

    Clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels have been proven to have exceptional composition, properties, and applications, and consequently have attracted a significant amount of research effort over the past few years. The objective of this paper is to summarize and evaluate scientific advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels in terms of their specific preparation, formation mechanisms, properties, and applications, and to identify the prevailing challenges and future directions in the field. The state-of-the-art of existing technologies and insights into the exfoliation of layered clay minerals, in particular montmorillonite and LAPONITE®, are discussed first. The formation and structural characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposite hydrogels made from in situ free radical polymerization, supramolecular assembly, and freezing-thawing cycles are then examined. Studies indicate that additional hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, coordination bonds, hydrophobic interaction, and even covalent bonds could occur between the clay mineral nanoplatelets and polymer chains, thereby leading to the formation of unique three-dimensional networks. Accordingly, the hydrogels exhibit exceptional optical and mechanical properties, swelling-deswelling behavior, and stimuli-responsiveness, reflecting the remarkable effects of clay minerals. With the pivotal roles of clay minerals in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels, the nanocomposite hydrogels possess great potential as superabsorbents, drug vehicles, tissue scaffolds, wound dressing, and biosensors. Future studies should lay emphasis on the formation mechanisms with in-depth insights into interfacial interactions, the tactical functionalization of clay minerals and polymers for desired properties, and expanding of their applications.

  9. STUDY OF THERMAL AND ACID STABILITY OF BENTONITE CLAY

    OpenAIRE

    Karna Wijaya; Ani Setyo Pratiwi; Sri Sudiono; Emi Nurahmi

    2010-01-01

    The thermal and acid stability of the bentonite clays (Na- and Ca-bentonite) have been tested. The thermal stability testing has been carried out by heating 5 gram of the clays  for five hours at 200, 300 and 500 °C respectively, meanwhile acid stability testing was performed by immersing 5 gram clays into 100 mL sulphuric acid 1M, 2M and 3M for 24 hours. The tested clays, then were characterized by means of X-Ray difractometry and IR-spectroscopy methods. The characterization results showed ...

  10. Relationship between elastic moduli and pore radius in clay aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Available experimental data on elastic velocities of clay-air mixtures and clay-brine mixtures as a function of porosity are re-interpreted. Pore radius as calculated from porosity and specific surface measured by BET seems to be the factor controlling stiffness of these un-cemented sediments....... For each of the two pore fluids: air or brine smectitic clay and kaolinitic clay seem to have similar power law relationships between a given elastic modulus and pore radius. These results indicate that pore radius and thus permeability of shale in the depth interval of mechanical compaction may...

  11. Using Modeling Clay to Model the Rock Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    During this interactive exploration, students will be guided through the rock cycle using modeling clay as a medium. Each student will be given a ball of red clay and a ball of yellow clay. The instructor will introduce students to igneous rocks as they use their red clay to create a volcano. Students will then learn about weathering and erosion as they break their yellow ball of clay into smaller and smaller pieces that they will round into spheres. The "sand" created from the yellow clay gets accumulated and lithified (via gentle compression by the students) to form a sandstone. This sandstone then becomes covered by a lava flow, created by smashing the red clay volcanoes. The process of metamorphism is introduced as students gently cover their sandstone using the lava flow. This also serves a segue for a discussion about the various types of metamorphism beginning with contact metamorphism. Metamorphic grade is discussed as increased pressure further alters the sedimentary rock and lava flow. Ultimately a migmatite is formed by mixing the red and yellow clay together. Finally, they clays become so intermingled that a new larger orange ball is created, beginning the rock cycle anew with an igneous melt. This activity is engaging and effective with students of all ages. Intended as a fun, light-hearted approach to introducing rocks in an undergraduate earth science class, this can be effectively customized for use in an elementary, middle, or high school classroom.

  12. Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Libo Hao; Qiaoqiao Wei; Yuyan Zhao; Zilong Lu; Xinyun Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Determination of types and amounts for clay minerals in soil are important in environmental, agricultural, and geological investigations. Many reliable methods have been established to identify clay mineral types. However, no reliable method for quantitative analysis of clay minerals has been established so far. In this study, an attempt was made to propose an optimization method for the quantitative determination of clay minerals in soil based on bulk chemical composition data. The fundamental principles and processes of the calculation are elucidated. Some samples were used for reliability verification of the method and the results prove the simplicity and efficacy of the approach.

  13. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  14. Prions, Radionuclides and Clays: Impact of clay interlayer "acidity" on toxic compound speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, L.; Hureau, C.; Sobolev, O.; Cuello, G.; Chapron, Y.

    2007-05-01

    The physical and chemical processes that are the basis of contaminant retardation in clay rich medium, such as soil or nuclear waste repository, have been studied at the molecular level by a combination of molecular dynamics (MD), electron paramagnetic spectroscopy (EPR) and neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS). The speciation of contaminants such as Sm, a radionuclide analogue, and Cu, bound to Prion protein (PrP), has been studied upon adsorption in clay interlayers. We used as molecular probe the P5-Cu(II) complex, where the P5 pentapeptide(92-96 PrP residues) represents one of the five Cu(II) binding site present in PrP, the key protein involved in diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In both cases, the pH of the interlayer has been inferred from the metal ion coordination, here used as a molecular reporter. In circum neutral pH waters, samarium is present as Sm(OH)3° species and should not be adsorbed in clay interlayer by "cation exchange" unless its hydrolysis is altered. Samarium NDIS results indicate that whether the number of oxygen nearest neighbours varies only from 8.5 to 7, as Sm penetrates the interlayer, the number of hydrogen nearest neighbours drops from 12 to 6. The high affinity of clay for Sm shows that a change in Sm hydrolysis occurs in the clay interlayer, but is directly followed by the formation of a surface complex with montmorillonite siloxane plane functional groups which prevents the determination of a "local pH". Conversely, has been found to be a much more sensitive interlayer water pH probe. and this peptide domain is involved in the misfolding of the protein,a transconformation which may lead to the pathogenic PrPSc form. We have therefore studied by EPR spectroscopy the adsorption of Cu(II)-P5 complexes on montmorillonite, and found the clay to have a large and selective adsorption capacity for the various [Cu(P5)H-n](2-n)+ complexes where n is the number of deprotonated amido function

  15. COI and ITS2 sequences delimit species, reveal cryptic taxa and host specificity of fig-associated Sycophila (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Zhou, Xin; Feng, Gui; Hu, Haoyuan; Niu, Liming; Hebert, Paul D N; Huang, Dawei

    2010-01-01

    Although the genus Sycophila has broad host preferences, some species are specifically associated with figs as nonpollinator wasps. Because of their sexual dimorphism, morphological plasticity, cryptic mating behaviour and poorly known biology, species identifications are often uncertain. It is particularly difficult to match conspecific females and males. In this study, we employed two molecular markers, mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS2, to identify Sycophila from six Chinese fig species. Morphological studies revealed 25 female and male morphs, while sequence results for both genes were consistent in supporting the presence of 15 species, of which 13 were host specialists and two used dual hosts. A single species of Sycophila was respectively found on four fig species, but six species were isolated from Ficus benjamina and a same number was reared from Ficus microcarpa. Sequence results revealed three male morphs in one species and detected two species that were overlooked by morphological analysis.

  16. Population Genetic Analyses of the Fungal Pathogen Colletotrichum fructicola on Tea-Oil Trees in China

    OpenAIRE

    He Li; Guo-Ying Zhou; Jun-Ang Liu; Jianping Xu

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Colletotrichum fructicola is found in all five continents and is capable of causing severe diseases in a number of economically important plants such as avocado, fig, cocoa, pear, and tea-oil trees. However, almost nothing is known about its patterns of genetic variation and epidemiology on any of its host plant species. Here we analyzed 167 isolates of C. fructicola obtained from the leaves of tea-oil tree Camellia oleifera at 15 plantations in seven Chinese provinces....

  17. Is export orientation a major motivator for the adoption of food safety systems in the Turkish dried fig firms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferit Cobanoglu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Food safety management systems (FSMSs and the scrutinisation of the food safety practices that are intended for adoption on the firm level both offer strategic value to the dried fig sector. This study aims to prove the hypothesis that export orientation is a major motivating force for the adoption of food safety systems in the Turkish dried fig firms. Data were obtained from 91 dried fig firms located in Aydin, Turkey. Interviews were carried out with firms’ managers/owners using a face-to-face questionnaire designed from May to August of 2010. While 36.3 percent of the interviewed firms had adopted one or more systems, the rest had no certification. A binomial logistic econometric model was employed. The parameters that influenced this decision included contractual agreements with other firms, implementation of good practices by the dried fig farmers, export orientation and cost-benefit ratio. Interestingly, the rest of the indicators employed had no statistically significant effect on adoption behaviour. This paper focusses on the export orientation parameter directly in order to test the validity of the main research hypothesis. The estimated marginal effect suggests that when dried fig firms are export-oriented, the probability that these firms will adopt food safety systems goes up by 39.5 percent. This rate was the first range observed among all the marginal probability values obtained and thus verified the hypothesis that export orientation is a major motivator for the adoption of food safety systems in the Turkish dried fig firms.

  18. The FIGS (focused identification of germplasm strategy approach identifies traits related to drought adaptation in Vicia faba genetic resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Khazaei

    Full Text Available Efficient methods to explore plant agro-biodiversity for climate change adaptive traits are urgently required. The focused identification of germplasm strategy (FIGS is one such approach. FIGS works on the premise that germplasm is likely to reflect the selection pressures of the environment in which it developed. Environmental parameters describing plant germplasm collection sites are used as selection criteria to improve the probability of uncovering useful variation. This study was designed to test the effectiveness of FIGS to search a large faba bean (Vicia faba L. collection for traits related to drought adaptation. Two sets of faba bean accessions were created, one from moisture-limited environments, and the other from wetter sites. The two sets were grown under well watered conditions and leaf morpho-physiological traits related to plant water use were measured. Machine-learning algorithms split the accessions into two groups based on the evaluation data and the groups created by this process were compared to the original climate-based FIGS sets. The sets defined by trait data were in almost perfect agreement to the FIGS sets, demonstrating that ecotypic differentiation driven by moisture availability has occurred within the faba bean genepool. Leaflet and canopy temperature as well as relative water content contributed more than other traits to the discrimination between sets, indicating that their utility as drought-tolerance selection criteria for faba bean germplasm. This study supports the assertion that FIGS could be an effective tool to enhance the discovery of new genes for abiotic stress adaptation.

  19. Genetic interaction between MTMR2 and FIG4 phospholipid phosphatases involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Vaccari

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT type 4B1 neuropathy with myelin outfoldings is caused by loss of MTMR2 (Myotubularin-related 2 in humans, and we created a faithful mouse model of the disease. MTMR2 dephosphorylates both PtdIns3P and PtdIns(3,5P(2, thereby regulating membrane trafficking. However, the function of MTMR2 and the role of the MTMR2 phospholipid phosphatase activity in vivo in the nerve still remain to be assessed. Mutations in FIG4 are associated with CMT4J neuropathy characterized by both axonal and myelin damage in peripheral nerve. Loss of Fig4 function in the plt (pale tremor mouse produces spongiform degeneration of the brain and peripheral neuropathy. Since FIG4 has a role in generation of PtdIns(3,5P(2 and MTMR2 catalyzes its dephosphorylation, these two phosphatases might be expected to have opposite effects in the control of PtdIns(3,5P(2 homeostasis and their mutations might have compensatory effects in vivo. To explore the role of the MTMR2 phospholipid phosphatase activity in vivo, we generated and characterized the Mtmr2/Fig4 double null mutant mice. Here we provide strong evidence that Mtmr2 and Fig4 functionally interact in both Schwann cells and neurons, and we reveal for the first time a role of Mtmr2 in neurons in vivo. Our results also suggest that imbalance of PtdIns(3,5P(2 is at the basis of altered longitudinal myelin growth and of myelin outfolding formation. Reduction of Fig4 by null heterozygosity and downregulation of PIKfyve both rescue Mtmr2-null myelin outfoldings in vivo and in vitro.

  20. Genetic Interaction between MTMR2 and FIG4 Phospholipid Phosphatases Involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, Ilaria; Dina, Giorgia; Tronchère, Hélène; Kaufman, Emily; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Cerri, Federica; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Payrastre, Bernard; Quattrini, Angelo; Weisman, Lois S.; Meisler, Miriam H.; Bolino, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 4B1 neuropathy with myelin outfoldings is caused by loss of MTMR2 (Myotubularin-related 2) in humans, and we created a faithful mouse model of the disease. MTMR2 dephosphorylates both PtdIns3P and PtdIns(3,5)P 2, thereby regulating membrane trafficking. However, the function of MTMR2 and the role of the MTMR2 phospholipid phosphatase activity in vivo in the nerve still remain to be assessed. Mutations in FIG4 are associated with CMT4J neuropathy characterized by both axonal and myelin damage in peripheral nerve. Loss of Fig4 function in the plt (pale tremor) mouse produces spongiform degeneration of the brain and peripheral neuropathy. Since FIG4 has a role in generation of PtdIns(3,5)P 2 and MTMR2 catalyzes its dephosphorylation, these two phosphatases might be expected to have opposite effects in the control of PtdIns(3,5)P 2 homeostasis and their mutations might have compensatory effects in vivo. To explore the role of the MTMR2 phospholipid phosphatase activity in vivo, we generated and characterized the Mtmr2/Fig4 double null mutant mice. Here we provide strong evidence that Mtmr2 and Fig4 functionally interact in both Schwann cells and neurons, and we reveal for the first time a role of Mtmr2 in neurons in vivo. Our results also suggest that imbalance of PtdIns(3,5)P 2 is at the basis of altered longitudinal myelin growth and of myelin outfolding formation. Reduction of Fig4 by null heterozygosity and downregulation of PIKfyve both rescue Mtmr2-null myelin outfoldings in vivo and in vitro. PMID:22028665

  1. Can clays ensure nuclear waste repositories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaoui, A; Sekkal, W

    2015-03-06

    Research on argillite as a possible host rock for nuclear waste disposal is still an open subject since many issues need to be clarified. In the Underground Research Laboratories constructed for this purpose, a damaged zone around the excavation has been systematically observed and characterized by the appearance of micro-fissures. We analyse here -at nanoscale level- the calcite/clay assembly, the main constituents of argillite, under storage conditions and show the fragility of the montmorillonite with respect to calcite. Under anisotropic stress, we have observed a shear deformation of the assembly with the presence of broken bonds in the clay mineral, localised in the octahedral rather than the tetrahedral layers. The stress/strain curve leads to a failure strength point at 18.5 MPa. The obtained in-plane response of the assembly to perpendicular deformation is characterized by smaller perpendicular moduli Ez = 48.28 GPa compared to larger in-plane moduli Ex = 141.39 GPa and Ey = 134.02 GPa. Our calculations indicate the instability of the assembly without water molecules at the interface in addition to an important shear deformation.

  2. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. OLUFOWOBI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the results, the soil sample obtained corresponded to Group A-6 soils identified as ‘fair to poor’ soil type in terms of use as drainage and subgrade material. This justified stabilisation of the soil. Thereafter, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR and direct shear tests were carried out on the soil with and without the addition of the powdered glass. The results showed improvement in the maximum dry density values on addition of the powdered glass and with corresponding gradual increase up to 5% glass powder content after which it started to decrease at 10% and 15% powdered glass content. The highest CBR values of 14.90% and 112.91% were obtained at 5% glass powder content and 5mm penetration for both the unsoaked and soaked treated samples respectively. The maximum cohesion and angle of internal friction values of 17.0 and 15.0 respectively were obtained at 10% glass powder content.

  3. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, D.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Koerner, R.M. [Geosynthetic Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bonaparte, R. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project.

  4. Thermal conductivity of unsaturated clay-rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jougnot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parameters used to describe the electrical conductivity of a porous material can be used to describe also its thermal conductivity. A new relationship is developed to connect the thermal conductivity of an unsaturated porous material to the thermal conductivity of the different phases of the composite, and two electrical parameters called the first and second Archie's exponents. A good agreement is obtained between the new model and thermal conductivity measurements performed using packs of glass beads and core samples of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rocks at different saturations of the water phase. We showed that the three model parameters optimised to fit the new model against experimental data (namely the thermal conductivity of the solid phase and the two Archie's exponents are consistent with independent estimates. We also observed that the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock was mainly due to the anisotropy of the thermal conductivity of the solid phase.

  5. An improved damaging model for structured clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜岩; 雷华阳; 郑刚; 徐舜华

    2008-01-01

    An improved damaging model formulated within the framework of bounding surface for structured clays was proposed. The model was intended to describe the effects of structure degradation due to geotechnical loading. The predictive capability of the model was compared with those of triaxial compression test on Tianjin soft clays. The results show that, by incorporating a new damage function into the model, the reduction of elastic bulk and shear modulus with elastic deformations and the reduction of plastic bulk modulus and shear modulus with plastic deformations are able to be appreciable. Before the axial strain reaches 15%, the axial strain computed from the model is smaller than that from the test under the drained condition. Under the undrained condition, after the axial strain reaches 1%, the axial strain increases quickly because of the complete loss of structure and stiffness; and the result computed from the model is nearly equal to that from the model without the incorporation of the damage function due to less plastic strain under undrained condition test.

  6. Bayesian Rose Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Charles; Heller, Katherine A

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical structure is ubiquitous in data across many domains. There are many hier- archical clustering methods, frequently used by domain experts, which strive to discover this structure. However, most of these meth- ods limit discoverable hierarchies to those with binary branching structure. This lim- itation, while computationally convenient, is often undesirable. In this paper we ex- plore a Bayesian hierarchical clustering algo- rithm that can produce trees with arbitrary branching structure at each node, known as rose trees. We interpret these trees as mixtures over partitions of a data set, and use a computationally efficient, greedy ag- glomerative algorithm to find the rose trees which have high marginal likelihood given the data. Lastly, we perform experiments which demonstrate that rose trees are better models of data than the typical binary trees returned by other hierarchical clustering algorithms.

  7. The valuative tree

    CERN Document Server

    Favre, Charles

    2004-01-01

    This volume is devoted to a beautiful object, called the valuative tree and designed as a powerful tool for the study of singularities in two complex dimensions. Its intricate yet manageable structure can be analyzed by both algebraic and geometric means. Many types of singularities, including those of curves, ideals, and plurisubharmonic functions, can be encoded in terms of positive measures on the valuative tree. The construction of these measures uses a natural tree Laplace operator of independent interest.

  8. Comparison of galled trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Gabriel; Llabrés, Mercè; Rosselló, Francesc; Valiente, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Galled trees, directed acyclic graphs that model evolutionary histories with isolated hybridization events, have become very popular due to both their biological significance and the existence of polynomial-time algorithms for their reconstruction. In this paper, we establish to which extent several distance measures for the comparison of evolutionary networks are metrics for galled trees, and hence, when they can be safely used to evaluate galled tree reconstruction methods.

  9. Cattle manure fertilization increases fig yield Adubação com esterco de curral na produção da figueira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Leonel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization using organic compounds is complementary to chemical fertilization, being essential to integrated fruit production. Reports on fig tree (Ficus carica L. organic fertilization and mineral nutrition are worldwide scarce, especially in Brazil. This experiment aimed to evaluate the effects of cattle manure fertilization on the yield and productivity of the fig tree 'Roxo de Valinhos' in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil, during the 2002/03, 2003/04, 2004/05 and 2005/06 crop cycles. Plants aged one, two, three and four year olds received the following cattle manure treatments: control (no fertilizer, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, 125% and 150% of the recommended N level for this crop. The evaluated variables were: fruit number, weight and mean diameter, plant yield and productivity. The application of cattle manure increased productivity, yield and fruit number, slightly affecting fruit dimensions. After four years of cattle manure application, the best results were obtained with 76 to 124% of the N level recommended for the fig crop.A adubação com compostos orgânicos é complementar à adubação química e especialmente necessária para a produção integrada de frutas. Trabalhos de pesquisa com adubação orgânica e nutrição mineral da figueira (Ficus carica L. são escassos em todo o mundo e particularmente, no Brasil. O experimento teve como objetivo avaliar os efeitos da adubação orgânica com esterco de curral na produção e produtividade da figueira 'Roxo de Valinhos' em Botucatu-SP, nos ciclos de produção de 2002/03, 2003/04, 2004/05 e 2005/06. As plantas com idade de um, dois, três e quatro anos receberam os tratamentos com doses de esterco de curral correspondentes a: testemunha (sem adubação, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, 125% e 150% da dose recomendada de N para a cultura. As variáveis avaliadas foram número, peso e diâmetro médio dos frutos, produção por planta e produtividade. A aplicação de esterco de curral

  10. A theory of game trees, based on solution trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); A. de Bruin (Arie); A. Plaat (Aske)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper a complete theory of game tree algorithms is presented, entirely based upon the notion of a solution tree. Two types of solution trees are distinguished: max and min solution trees respectively. We show that most game tree algorithms construct a superposition of a max and a

  11. A theory of game trees, based on solution trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); A. de Bruin (Arie); A. Plaat (Aske)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper a complete theory of game tree algorithms is presented, entirely based upon the notion of a solution tree. Two types of solution trees are distinguished: max and min solution trees respectively. We show that most game tree algorithms construct a superposition of a max and a

  12. The FIGS (Focused Identification of Germplasm Strategy) Approach Identifies Traits Related to Drought Adaptation in Vicia faba Genetic Resources: e63107

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamid Khazaei; Kenneth Street; Abdallah Bari; Michael Mackay; Frederick L Stoddard

    2013-01-01

    .... The focused identification of germplasm strategy (FIGS) is one such approach. FIGS works on the premise that germplasm is likely to reflect the selection pressures of the environment in which it developed...

  13. D2-tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Sioutas, Spyros; Pantazos, Kostas;

    2015-01-01

    We present a new overlay, called the Deterministic Decentralized tree (D2-tree). The D2-tree compares favorably to other overlays for the following reasons: (a) it provides matching and better complexities, which are deterministic for the supported operations; (b) the management of nodes (peers......-balancing scheme of elements into nodes is deterministic and general enough to be applied to other hierarchical tree-based overlays. This load-balancing mechanism is based on an innovative lazy weight-balancing mechanism, which is interesting in its own right....

  14. Symmetric M-tree

    CERN Document Server

    Sexton, Alan P

    2010-01-01

    The M-tree is a paged, dynamically balanced metric access method that responds gracefully to the insertion of new objects. To date, no algorithm has been published for the corresponding Delete operation. We believe this to be non-trivial because of the design of the M-tree's Insert algorithm. We propose a modification to Insert that overcomes this problem and give the corresponding Delete algorithm. The performance of the tree is comparable to the M-tree and offers additional benefits in terms of supported operations, which we briefly discuss.

  15. A parallel buffer tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitchinava, Nodar; Zeh, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    We present the parallel buffer tree, a parallel external memory (PEM) data structure for batched search problems. This data structure is a non-trivial extension of Arge's sequential buffer tree to a private-cache multiprocessor environment and reduces the number of I/O operations by the number...... of available processor cores compared to its sequential counterpart, thereby taking full advantage of multicore parallelism. The parallel buffer tree is a search tree data structure that supports the batched parallel processing of a sequence of N insertions, deletions, membership queries, and range queries...

  16. Toxicological evaluation of clay minerals and derived nanocomposites: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Pichardo, Silvia; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Angeles

    2015-04-01

    Clays and clay minerals are widely used in many facets of our society. This review addresses the main clays of each phyllosilicate groups, namely, kaolinite, montmorillonite (Mt) and sepiolite, placing special emphasis on Mt and kaolinite, which are the clays that are more frequently used in food packaging, one of the applications that are currently exhibiting higher development. The improvements in the composite materials obtained from clays and polymeric matrices are remarkable and well known, but the potential toxicological effects of unmodified or modified clay minerals and derived nanocomposites are currently being investigated with increased interest. In this sense, this work focused on a review of the published reports related to the analysis of the toxicological profile of commercial and novel modified clays and derived nanocomposites. An exhaustive review of the main in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, antimicrobial activity assessments, and the human and environmental impacts of clays and derived nanocomposites was performed. From the analysis of the scientific literature different conclusions can be derived. Thus, in vitro studies suggest that clays in general induce cytotoxicity (with dependence on the clay, concentration, experimental system, etc.) with different underlying mechanisms such as necrosis/apoptosis, oxidative stress or genotoxicity. However, most of in vivo experiments performed in rodents showed no clear evidences of systemic toxicity even at doses of 5000mg/kg. Regarding to humans, pulmonary exposure is the most frequent, and although clays are usually mixed with other minerals, they have been reported to induce pneumoconiosis per se. Oral exposure is also common both intentionally and unintentionally. Although they do not show a high toxicity through this pathway, toxic effects could be induced due to the increased or reduced exposure to mineral elements. Finally, there are few studies about the effects of clay minerals on

  17. Impact-Induced Clay Mineral Formation and Distribution on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Craig, P. I.

    2015-01-01

    Clay minerals have been identified in the central peaks and ejecta blankets of impact craters on Mars. Several studies have suggested these clay minerals formed as a result of impact induced hydrothermalism either during Mars' Noachian era or more recently by the melting of subsurface ice. Examples of post-impact clay formation is found in several locations on Earth such as the Mjolnir and Woodleigh Impact Structures. Additionally, a recent study has suggested the clay minerals observed on Ceres are the result of impact-induced hydrothermal processes. Such processes may have occurred on Mars, possibly during the Noachian. Distinguishing between clay minerals formed preor post-impact can be accomplished by studying their IR spectra. In fact, showed that the IR spectra of clay minerals is greatly affected at longer wavelengths (i.e. mid-IR, 5-25 micron) by impact-induced shock deformation while the near-IR spectra (1.0-2.5 micron) remains relatively unchanged. This explains the discrepancy between NIR and MIR observations of clay minerals in martian impact craters noted. Thus, it allows us to determine whether a clay mineral formed from impact-induced hydrothermalism or were pre-existing and were altered by the impact. Here we study the role of impacts on the formation and distribution of clay minerals on Mars via a fully 3-D Monte Carlo cratering model, including impact- melt production using results from modern hydrocode simulations. We identify regions that are conducive to clay formation and the location of clay minerals post-bombardment.

  18. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  19. [Mechanism of tritium persistence in porous media like clay minerals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Jie; Wang, Jin-Sheng; Teng, Yan-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Ni

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of tritium persistence in clay minerals, three types of clay soils (montmorillonite, kaolinite and illite) and tritiated water were used in this study to conduct the tritium sorption tests and the other related tests. Firstly, the ingredients, metal elements and heat properties of clay minerals were studied with some instrumental analysis methods, such as ICP and TG. Secondly, with a specially designed fractionation and condensation experiment, the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in the clay minerals separated from the tritium sorption tests were fractionated for investigating the tritium distributions in the different types of adsorptive waters. Thirdly, the location and configuration of tritium adsorbed into the structure of clay minerals were studied with infrared spectrometry (IR) tests. And finally, the forces and mechanisms for driving tritium into the clay minerals were analyzed on the basis of the isotope effect of tritium and the above tests. Following conclusions have been reached: (1) The main reason for tritium persistence in clay minerals is the entrance of tritium into the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in clay minerals. The percentage of tritium distributed in these three types of adsorptive water are in the range of 13.65% - 38.71%, 0.32% - 5.96%, 1.28% - 4.37% of the total tritium used in the corresponding test, respectively. The percentages are different for different types of clay minerals. (2) Tritium adsorbed onto clay minerals are existed in the forms of the tritiated hydroxyl radical (OT) and the tritiated water molecule (HTO). Tritium mainly exists in tritiated water molecule for adsorbed water and interlayer water, and in tritiated hydroxyl radical for structural water. (3) The forces and effects driving tritium into the clay minerals may include molecular dispersion, electric charge sorption, isotope exchange and tritium isotope effect.

  20. Water Retention Curves of Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Romero, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    The water retention curve of Opalinus clay samples was determined under different conditions: total and matric suction, stress or no-stress conditions, wetting and drying paths. Through the fitting of these results to the van Genuchten expression the P parameter, related to the air entry value (AEV), was obtained. The AEV is the suction value above which air is able to enter the pores of the sample, and consequently, above which 2-phase flow can take place in the soil pore structure. The samples used in this research came from two different boreholes, BHT-1 and BHG-D1, but the behaviour of them did not depend on their location, what was probably due to the fact that both were drilled in the shay facies of the Opalinus clay. There was not a distinct difference between the results obtained under total or matric suctions. In the drying paths, both the water contents and the degrees of saturation tended to be higher when total suction was applied, however the reverse trend was observed for the water contents reached in wetting paths. As well, no clear difference was observed in the water retention curves obtained in odometers under matric and total suctions, what points to the osmotic component of suction in Opalinus clay not being significant. Overall, the water contents were lower and the degrees of saturation higher when suction was applied under vertical stress, what would indicate that the water retention capacity was lower under 8 MPa vertical stress than under free volume conditions. This vertical stress value is slightly higher than the maximum in situ stress. Also, the samples showed hysteresis according to the expected behaviour, i.e. the water contents for a given suction were higher during a drying path than during a wetting path. The P values obtained were between 6 and 34 MPa, and tended to be higher for the samples tested under stress, in drying paths and when total suction was used. The air entry value calculated from the mercury intrusion porosimetry

  1. In vitro sensitivity of fig plantlets to gamma rays; Sensitividade in vitro de brotacoes de figueira a radiacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ester Alice [Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuaria de Minas Gerais (EPAMIG), Uberaba, MG (Brazil). Centro Tecnologico Triangulo e Alto Paranaiba], e-mail: ester@epamig.br; Pasqual, Moacir [Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Agricultura; Tulmann Neto, Augusto [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Melhoramento de Plantas

    2009-07-15

    Fig breeding programs through conventional methods are rare in many countries, e.g. Brazil, since the wasp Blastophaga psenes, which is responsible for the natural pollination, is not present. For these cases a low cost alternative for the breeding program is the induction of physical mutagenesis by radiation. The sensitivity of fig explant buds of different sizes to gamma radiation were evaluated. Fig plantlets 'Roxo de Valinhos' already established in vitro were classified by size in 2.5 to 4.5 cm, 5 to 9 7 cm and 8 to 10 cm long, and irradiated with: 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy doses. After irradiation each plantlet was cut in pieces containing one-bud and transferred to WPM culture medium, according to the bud position: medium and apical. Explants were grown in a growth room for 90 days when, explant mortality, root formation, height of aerial part, number of buds and plantlet weight were evaluated. Doses of up to 50 Gy do not cause plantlet death and that doses larger than 30 Gy inhibit root formation. Therefore, the 30 Gy dose may be recommended for the irradiation of fig plantlets larger than 2.5 cm. (author)

  2. Direct Electrochemistry of Myoglobin in DDAB-Clay Composite Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ordered films were made by casting a mixture of aqueous dispersions of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB)-clay composite and myoglobin (Mb) solution on pyrolytic graphite (PG) electrodes.The Mb-DDAB-clay film electrodes showed stable and reversible cyclic voltammetric responses in buffers and can catalyze the reduction of trichloroacetic acid (TCA).

  3. Engineering property test of kaolin clay contaminated by diesel oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志彬; 刘松玉; 蔡奕

    2015-01-01

    Engineering property of kaolin clay contaminated by diesel oil was studied through a series of laboratory experiments. Oil contents (mass fraction) of 4%, 8%, 12%, 16% and 20% were selected to represent different contamination degrees, and the soil specimens were manually prepared through mixing and static compaction method. Initial water content and dry density of the test kaolin clay were controlled at 10% and 1.58 g/cm3, respectively. Test results indicate that since part of the diesel oil will be released from soil by evaporation, the real water content should be derived through calibration of the quasi water content obtained by traditional test method. As contamination degree of the kaolin clay increases, both liquid limit and plastic limit decrease, but there’s only a slight increase for plasticity index. Swelling pressure of contaminated kaolin clay under confined condition will be lowered when oil-content gets higher. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of the oil-contaminated kaolin clay is influenced by not only oil content but also curing period. Increase of contamination degree will continually lower UCS of the kaolin clay specimen. In addition, electrical resistivity of the contaminated kaolin clay with given water content decreases with the increase of oil content. However, soil resistivity is in good relationship with oil content and UCS. Finally, oil content of 8% is found to be a critical value for engineering property of kaolin clay to transit from water-dominated towards oil-dominated characteristics.

  4. Clay and Magnetite Formation at Yellowknife Bay, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2014-09-01

    Sheepbed mudstone contains a clay-magnetite assemblage formed by dissolution of approximately 70% amorphous phase, 20% olivine, 10% host rock mixture, by a pore fluid at moderate W/R ratio. The clay is similar to Lafayette's ferric saponite and gel.

  5. Morphology and melt rheology of nylon 11/clay nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Xiaofeng; Yang, Jun; Zhu, Lianchao; Wang, Biao; Sun, Guangping; Lv, Pengfei; Phang, In Yee; Liu, Tianxi

    2006-01-01

    Nylon 11 (PA11)/clay nanocomposites have been prepared by melt-blending, followed by melt-extrusion through a capillary. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the exfoliated clay morphology is dominant for low nanofiller content, while the intercalated one is prevailing for high filler loading

  6. Centrifuge modelling of rigid piles in soft clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, R.T.; Poder, M.; Truong, P.

    2016-01-01

    of this study is to employ centrifuge modelling in order to derive experimental p-y curves for rigid piles embedded in over-consolidated soft clay. A kaolin clay sample was prepared and pre-consolidated by applying a constant pressure at the soil surface, while different over-consolidation ratios were achieved...

  7. Clay mineral distribution on the Kerala continental shelf and slope

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    Seventy-five sediment samples collected from the Kerala continental shelf and slope during the 17th and 71st Cruises of @iRV gaveshani@@ were analysed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral cntent. The distribution of total clay (< 4~k fraction...

  8. The effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kaam-Peters, H.M.E. van; Koster, J.; Gaast, S. J. van der; Dekker, M.H.A.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1998-01-01

    To examine the effect of clay minerals on diasterane/sterane ratios, the mineral compositions of three sample sets of sedimentary rocks displaying a wide range of diasterane/sterane ratios were analysed quantitatively. Diasterane/sterane ratios do not to correlate with clay content but depend on the

  9. Calcination of kaolinite clay particles for cement production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kaolinite rich clay particles calcined under certain conditions can attain favorable pozzolanic properties and can be used to substitute part of the CO2 intensive clinker in cement production. To better guide calcination of a clay material, a transient one-dimensional single particle model...

  10. Clay Minerals as Solid Acids and Their Catalytic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses catalytic properties of clays, attributed to acidity of the clay surface. The formation of carbonium ions on montmorillonite is used as a demonstration of the presence of surface acidity, the enhanced dissociation of water molecules when polarized by cations, and the way the surface can interact with organic substances. (Author/JN)

  11. Alteration of swelling clay minerals by acid activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steudel, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Fischer, H.R.; Weidler, P.G.; Emmerich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk material of six dioctahedral and two trioctahedral swellable clay minerals was leached in H2SO4 and HCl at concentrations of 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 M at 80 °C for several hours. Alteration of the clay mineral structures was dependent on the individual character of each mineral (chemical

  12. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. van der Spek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and cut through by fissures. The hydraulic conductivity of the clay layers is negligible compared to the silt layers. It is conceptualized that fissures form a hydraulic connection between the colluvium and the varved clays. Groundwater recharge flows through the colluvium into the fissures where water is exchanged horizontally between the fissure and the silt layers of the varved clays. Groundwater flow in the colluvium is simulated with the Boussinesq equation while flow in the silt layers of the varved clays is simulated with the Richards' equation. Longitudinal outflow from the fissure is simulated with a linear-reservoir model. Scattered data of relatively short monitoring periods is available for several landslides in the region. A good similarity between observed and simulated heads is obtained, especially when considering the lack of important physical parameters such as the fissure width and the distance between the monitoring point and the fissure. A simulation for the period 1959–2004 showed some correlation between peaks in the simulated heads and the recorded occurrence of landslides while the bottom of the varved clays remained saturated during the entire simulation period.

  13. Learning of Cross-Sectional Anatomy Using Clay Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Young; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    We incorporated clay modeling into gross anatomy and neuro-anatomy courses to help students understand cross-sectional anatomy. By making clay models, cutting them and comparing cut surfaces to CT and MR images, students learned how cross-sectional two-dimensional images were created from three-dimensional structure of human organs. Most students…

  14. Alteration of swelling clay minerals by acid activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steudel, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Fischer, H.R.; Weidler, P.G.; Emmerich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk material of six dioctahedral and two trioctahedral swellable clay minerals was leached in H2SO4 and HCl at concentrations of 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 M at 80 °C for several hours. Alteration of the clay mineral structures was dependent on the individual character of each mineral (chemical composit

  15. Experimental research on unloading properties of clay under high stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jin-rong; CUI Guang-xin; QIN Yong; ZHOU Guo-qing

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical properties of clay under high stress are quite different from those under low stress. It is necessary to investi-gate unloading properties of clay under high stress for the design and construction of deep underground engineering projects. A series of experiments were conducted to investigate the unloading properties of clay under high confining pressures by using a SKA-1 high pressure consolidation instrument designed by us. The stress versus strain relationship and the way that K0 values of clay change during the loading-unloading process were discovered. The results show that there are clear differences in the state of stress and deformation behavior of the clay along different unloading paths.

  16. Charge Properties and Clay Mineral Composition of Tianbao Mountains Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEJI-ZHENG; LIXUE-YUAN; 等

    1992-01-01

    The clay mineral association,oxides of clay fraction and surface charge properties of 7 soils,which are developed from granite,located at different altitudesof the Tianbao Mountains were studied.Results indicate that with the increase in altitude,1) the weathering process and desilicification of soil clay minerals became weaker,whereas the leaching depotassication and the formation process of hydroxy-aluminum interlayer got stronger;2)the contents of amorphous and complex aluminum and iron,and the activity of aluminum and iron oxides for soil clay fraction increased;and 3) the amount of variable negarive charge,anion exchange capacity and the values of PZC and PZNC also increased.The activity of aluminum and iron oxides,the accumulation of aluminum,and surface charge characteristics and their relation to clay oxides of the vertical zone soils were observed and recorded.

  17. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Andra organised an International Symposium on the use of Natural and Engineered Clay-based Barriers for the Containment of Radioactive Waste hold at the Congress Centre of Tours, France, in March 2005. The symposium provided an opportunity to take stock of the potential properties of the clay-based materials present in engineered or natural barriers in order to meet the containment specifications of a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. It was intended for specialists working in the various disciplines involved with clays and clay based minerals, as well as scientists from agencies and organisations dealing with investigations on the disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. The themes of the Symposium included geology, geochemistry, transfers of materials, alteration processes, geomechanics, as well as the recent developments regarding the characterisation of clays, as well as experiments in surface and underground laboratories. The symposium consisted of plenary sessions, parallel specialized sessions and poster sessions. (author)

  18. Boom clay borehole water, home of a diverse bacterial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouters, Katinka; Moors, Hugo; Leys, Natalie [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    For over two decades, Boom Clay has been studied in the framework of geological disposal of nuclear waste thereby mainly addressing its geochemical properties. Today, also the microbiological properties and the possibility of microbes interacting with radionuclides or repository components including the waste form, in a host formation like Boom Clay are considered [2,3]. In the past, a reference composition for synthetic Boom Clay pore water (BCPW) was derived, based on interstitial water sampled from different layers within the Boom clay [1]. Similarly, the primary aim of this microbiological study was to determine the core BCPW bacterial community and identify representative water samples for future microbial directed lab experiments. In this respect, BCPW was sampled from different Boom Clay layers using the Morpheus piezometer and subsequently analysed by microscopy and molecular techniques, in search for overall shared and abundant micro-organisms. (authors)

  19. Mud peeling and horizontal crack formation in drying clays

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2011-03-01

    Mud peeling is a common phenomenon whereby horizontal cracks propagate parallel to the surface of a drying clay. Differential stresses then cause the layer of clay above the crack to curl up to form a mud peel. By treating the clay as a poroelastic solid, we analyze the peeling phenomenon and show that it is caused by the gradient in tensile stress at the surface of the clay, analogously to the spalling of thermoelastic materials. For a constant water evaporation rate at the clay surface we derive equations for the depth of peeling and the time of peeling as functions of the evaporation rate. Our model predicts a simple relationship between the radius of curvature of a mud peel and the depth of peeling. The model predictions are in agreement with the available experimental data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Late Precambrian oxygenation; inception of the clay mineral factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Martin; Droser, Mary; Mayer, Lawrence M; Pevear, David; Mrofka, David

    2006-03-10

    An enigmatic stepwise increase in oxygen in the late Precambrian is widely considered a prerequisite for the expansion of animal life. Accumulation of oxygen requires organic matter burial in sediments, which is largely controlled by the sheltering or preservational effects of detrital clay minerals in modern marine continental margin depocenters. Here, we show mineralogical and geochemical evidence for an increase in clay mineral deposition in the Neoproterozoic that immediately predated the first metazoans. Today most clay minerals originate in biologically active soils, so initial expansion of a primitive land biota would greatly enhance production of pedogenic clay minerals (the "clay mineral factory"), leading to increased marine burial of organic carbon via mineral surface preservation.

  1. Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of polymer/clay nanocomposites has been invented in an attempt to develop transparent, lightweight, durable materials for a variety of aerospace applications. As their name suggests, polymer/ clay nanocomposites comprise organic/ inorganic hybrid polymer matrices containing platelet-shaped clay particles that have sizes of the order of a few nanometers thick and several hundred nanometers long. Partly because of their high aspect ratios and high surface areas, the clay particles, if properly dispersed in the polymer matrix at a loading level of 1 to 5 weight percent, impart unique combinations of physical and chemical properties that make these nanocomposites attractive for making films and coatings for a variety of industrial applications. Relative to the unmodified polymer, the polymer/ clay nanocomposites may exhibit improvements in strength, modulus, and toughness; tear, radiation, and fire resistance; and lower thermal expansion and permeability to gases while retaining a high degree of optical transparency.

  2. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-07-19

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation.

  3. Probing nanodispersions of clays for reactive foaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, G; Lindsay, Chris I; Arunagirinathan, M A; Macosko, Christopher W

    2009-09-01

    Nanodispersions of clays in polyurethane components have been prepared. Nanoclays (both natural and organically modified) of various aspect ratios are used. The fillers are dispersed separately in polyurethane components, viz., polyol and polyisocyanate. The nanodispersions are characterized by the combined use of solution rheology, X-ray scattering, cryo-electron microscopy, and IR spectroscopy. Reactive foaming of these nanodispersions is carried out to make polyurethane nanocomposite foams. The status of the dispersion of fillers in components and in foams has been compared to investigate the effect of the foaming process in exfoliation. Interpretation of the results from different characterization techniques describes the state of the dispersion of fillers in components and in foam. The rheological and physicochemical behaviors of nanodispersions are shown to have a significant influence on the properties of nanocomposite foams.

  4. Luminescent hybrid materials based on laponite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanrong; Li, Man; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-08-11

    The spectroscopic behavior of ionic Eu(3+) or Tb(3+) complexes of an aromatic carboxyl-functionalized organic salt as well as those of the hybrid materials derived from adsorption of the ionic complexes on Laponite clay are reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns suggest that the complexes are mainly adsorbed on the outer surfaces of the Laponite disks rather than intercalated within the interlayer spaces. Photophysical data showed that the energy-transfer efficiency from the ligand to Eu(3+) ions in the hybrid material is increased remarkably with respect to the corresponding ionic complex. The hybrid material containing the Eu(3+) complex shows bright red emission from the prominent (5) D0 →(7) F2 transition of Eu(3+) ions, and that containing the Tb(3+) complex exhibits bright green emission due to the dominant (5) D4 →(7) F5 transition of Tb(3+) ions.

  5. STABILISATION OF SILTY CLAY SOIL USING CHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAMADHER T. ABOOD

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different chloride compounds including (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 on the engineering properties of silty clay soil. Various amounts of salts (2%, 4%, and 8% were added to the soil to study the effect of salts on the compaction characteristics, consistency limits and compressive strength. The main findings of this study were that the increase in the percentage of each of the chloride compounds increased the maximum dry density and decrease the optimum moisture content. The liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index decreased with the increase in salt content. The unconfinedcompressive strength increased as the salt content increased.

  6. The tree BVOC index

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.R. Simpson; E.G. McPherson

    2011-01-01

    Urban trees can produce a number of benefits, among them improved air quality. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted by some species are ozone precursors. Modifying future tree planting to favor lower-emitting species can reduce these emissions and aid air management districts in meeting federally mandated emissions reductions for these compounds. Changes...

  7. Matching Subsequences in Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2009-01-01

    Given two rooted, labeled trees P and T the tree path subsequence problem is to determine which paths in P are subsequences of which paths in T. Here a path begins at the root and ends at a leaf. In this paper we propose this problem as a useful query primitive for XML data, and provide new...

  8. Structural Equation Model Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

  9. Tree biology and dendrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle

    1996-01-01

    Dendrochemistry, the interpretation of elemental analysis of dated tree rings, can provide a temporal record of environmental change. Using the dendrochemical record requires an understanding of tree biology. In this review, we pose four questions concerning assumptions that underlie recent dendrochemical research: 1) Does the chemical composition of the wood directly...

  10. Tree nut oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major tree nuts include almonds, Brazil nuts, cashew nuts, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachio nuts, and walnuts. Tree nut oils are appreciated in food applications because of their flavors and are generally more expensive than other gourmet oils. Research during the last de...

  11. Antifungal activity of streptomycetes isolated bentonite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Shirobokov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the biological activity of streptomycetes, isolated from Ukrainian bentonite clay. Methods. For identification of the investigated microorganisms there were used generally accepted methods for study of morpho-cultural and biochemical properties and sequencing of 16Ѕ rRNA producer. Antagonistic activity of the strain was determined by agar diffusion and agar block method using gram-positive, gram-negative microorganisms and fungi. Results. Research of autochthonous flora from bentonite clay of Ukrainian various deposits proved the existence of stable politaxonomic prokaryotic-eukaryotic consortia there. It was particularly interesting that the isolated microorganisms had demonstrated clearly expressed antagonistic properties against fungi. During bacteriological investigation this bacterial culture was identified like representative of the genus Streptomyces. Bentonite streptomycetes, named as Streptomyces SVP-71, inagar mediums (agar block method inhibited the growth of fungi (yeast and mold; zones of growth retardation constituted of 11-36 mm, and did not affect the growth of bacteria. There were investigated the inhibitory effects of supernatant culture fluid, ethanol and butanol extracts of biomass streptomycetes on museum and clinical strains of fungi that are pathogenic for humans (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. utilis, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. kefir, S. glabrata, C. lusitaniae, Aspergillus niger, Mucor pusillus, Fusarium sporotrichioides. It has been shown that research antifungal factor had 100% of inhibitory effect against all fungi used in experiments in vitro. In parallel, it was found that alcohol extracts hadn’t influence to the growth of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria absolutely. It was shown that the cultural fluid supernatant and alcoholic extracts of biomass had the same antagonistic effect, but with different manifestation. This evidenced about identity of antifungal substances

  12. Heteroaggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with natural clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labille, Jérôme; Harns, Carrie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Brant, Jonathan

    2015-06-02

    To better understand and predict the fate of engineered nanoparticles in the water column, we assessed the heteroaggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles with a smectite clay as analogues for natural colloids. Heteroaggregation was evaluated as a function of water salinity (10(-3) and 10(-1) M NaCl), pH (5 and 8), and selected nanoparticle concentration (0-4 mg/L). Time-resolved laser diffraction was used, coupled to an aggregation model, to identify the key mechanisms and variables that drive the heteroaggregation of the nanoparticles with colloids. Our data show that, at a relevant concentration, nanoparticle behavior is mainly driven by heteroaggregation with colloids, while homoaggregation remains negligible. The affinity of TiO2 nanoparticles for clay is driven by electrostatic interactions. Opposite surface charges and/or high ionic strength favored the formation of primary heteroaggregates via the attachment of nanoparticles to the clay. The initial shape and dispersion state of the clay as well as the nanoparticle/clay concentration ratio also affected the nature of the heteroaggregation mechanism. With dispersed clay platelets (10(-3) M NaCl), secondary heteroaggregation driven by bridging nanoparticles occurred at a nanoparticle/clay number ratio of greater than 0.5. In 10(-1) M NaCl, the clay was preaggregated into larger and more spherical units. This favored secondary heteroaggregation at lower nanoparticle concentration that correlated to the nanoparticle/clay surface area ratio. In this latter case, a nanoparticle to clay sticking efficiency could be determined.

  13. Fractal dimensions of flocs between clay particles and HAB organisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongliang; YU Zhiming; CAO Xihua; SONG Xiuxian

    2011-01-01

    The impact of harmful algal blooms (HABs) on public health and related economics have been increasing in many coastal regions of the world. Sedimentation of algal cells through flocculation with clay particles is a promising strategy for controlling HABs. Previous studies found that removal efficiency (RE) was influenced by many factors, including clay type and concentration, algal growth stage,and physiological aspects of HAB cells. To estimate the effect of morphological characteristics of the aggregates on HAB cell removal, fractal dimensions were measured and the RE of three species of HAB organism, Heterosigma akashiwo, Alexandrium tamarense, and Skeletonema costatum, by original clay and modified clay, was determined. For all HAB species, the modified clay had a higher RE than original clay.For the original clay, the two-dimensional fractal dimension (D2) was 1.92 and three-dimensional fractal dimension (D3) 2.81, while for the modified clay, D2 was 1.84 and D3 was 2.50. The addition of polyaluminum chloride (PACI) lead to a decrease of the repulsive barrier between clay particles, and resulted in lower D2 and D3. Due to the decrease of D3, and the increase of the effective sticking coefficient,the flocculation rate between modified clay particles and HAB organisms increased, and thus resulted in a high RE. The fractal dimensions of flocs differed in HAB species with different cell morphologies. For example, Alexandrium tamarense cells are ellipsoidal, and the D3 and D2 of flocs were the highest, while for Skeletonema costatum, which has filamentous cells, the D3 and D2 of flocs were the lowest.

  14. Tree Coring as a Complement to Soil Gas Screening to Locate PCE and TCE Source Zones and Hot Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Trapp, Stefan; Rehne Jensen, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    ) or trichloroethylene (TCE) to evaluate their ability to locate source zones and contaminant hot spots. One test site represented a relatively homogeneous sandy soil and aquifer, and the second a more heterogeneous geology with both sandy and less permeable clay till layers overlying a chalk aquifer. Tree cores from...

  15. Coded Splitting Tree Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to multiple access control called coded splitting tree protocol. The approach builds on the known tree splitting protocols, code structure and successive interference cancellation (SIC). Several instances of the tree splitting protocol are initiated, each...... instance is terminated prematurely and subsequently iterated. The combined set of leaves from all the tree instances can then be viewed as a graph code, which is decodable using belief propagation. The main design problem is determining the order of splitting, which enables successful decoding as early...... as possible. Evaluations show that the proposed protocol provides considerable gains over the standard tree splitting protocol applying SIC. The improvement comes at the expense of an increased feedback and receiver complexity....

  16. Number of winter rainy days reconstructed from southwestern tree rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhouse, C. [NOAA Paleoclimatology Program, Boulder, CO (United States); Meko, D. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to explore the usefulness of tree-ring data for quantifying the temporal variability of winter rainy-day frequency over the past three centuries in the southwestern United States. The climatological variable, number of rainy days, has not previously been used in dendroclimatic reconstructions. It is reasonable to expect that the number of rainy days might be more strongly related than total precipitation to seasonally aggregated moisture conditions sensed by trees, especially in areas where rainfall from infrequent, heavy storms may run off before much moisture is absorbed into the soil. This study uses a network of tree-ring chronologies with a common time period 1702-1983 to reconstruct number of winter rainy days for a sub-region within the Southwest. The variance in the rainy day record explained by the tree-ring chronologies exceeds the 60% variance commonly yielded from arid-site trees in western North America. Calibration and verification statistics are highly significant, and a comparison with an independent gauge record helps validate the reconstruction. Conceptually and by the objective criterion of percent variance explained, number of rainy days appears, for this region, to be superior to total winter precipitation as a climatic variable for tree-ring reconstruction. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Microbe-Clay Mineral Reactions and Characterization Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H.; Zhang, G.; Ji, S.; Jaisi, D.; Kim, J.

    2008-12-01

    Clays and clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks. They play an important role in environmental processes such as nutrient cycling, plant growth, contaminant migration, organic matter maturation, and petroleum production. The changes in the oxidation state of the structural iron in clay minerals, in part, control their physical and chemical properties in natural environments, such as clay particle flocculation, dispersion, swelling, hydraulic conductivity, surface area, cation and anion exchange capacity, and reactivity towards organic and inorganic contaminants. The structural ferric iron [Fe(III)] in clay minerals can be reduced either chemically or biologically. Many different chemical reductants have been tried, but the most commonly used agent is dithionite. Biological reductants are bacteria, including dissimilatory iron reducing prokaryotes (DIRP) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). A wide variety of DIRP have been used to reduce ferric iron in clay minerals, including mesophilic, thermophilic, and hyperthermophilic prokaryotes. Multiple clay minerals have been used for microbial reduction studies, including smectite, nontronite (iron-rich smectite variety), illite, illite/smectite, chlorite, and their various mixtures. All these clay minerals are reducible by microorganisms under various conditions with smectite (nontronite) being the most reducible. The reduction extent and rate of ferric iron in clay minerals are measured by wet chemistry, and the reduced clay mineral products are typically characterized with chemical methods, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based techniques (such as EXAFS). Microbially reduced smectites (nontronites) have been found to be reactive in reducing a variety of organic and inorganic contaminants. Degradable organic contaminants include pesticides

  18. Reversibility of soil forming clay mineral reactions induced by plant - clay interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, P.; Velde, B.

    2012-04-01

    Recent data based upon observations of field experiments and laboratory experiments suggest that changes in phyllosilicate mineralogy, as seen by X-ray diffraction analysis, which is induced by plant action can be reversed in relatively short periods of time. Changes from diagenetic or metamorphic mineral structures (illite and chlorite) to those found in soils (mixed layered minerals in the smectite, hydroxy-interlayer mineral and illites) observed in Delaware Bay salt marsh sediments in periods of tens of years and observed under different biologic (mycorhize) actions in coniferous forests in the soil environment can be found to be reversed under other natural conditions. Reversal of this process (chloritisation of smectitic minerals in soils) has been observed in natural situations over a period of just 14 years under sequoia gigantia. Formation of smectite minerals from illite (potassic mica-like minerals) has been observed to occur under intensive agriculture conditions over periods of 80 years or so under intensive zea mais production. Laboratory experiments using rye grass show that this same process can be accomplished to a somewhat lesser extent after one growing season. However experiments using alfalfa for 30 year growing periods show that much of the illite content of a soil can be reconstituted or even increased. Observations on experiments using zea mais under various fertilizer and mycorhize treatments indicate that within a single growing season potassium can be extracted from the clay (illite layers) but at the end of the season the potassium can be restored to the clay structures and more replaced that extracted. Hence it is clear that the change in clay mineralogy normally considered to be irreversible, illite to smectite or chlorite to smectite observed in soils, is a reversible process where plant systems control the soil chemistry and the soil mineralogy. The changes in clay mineralogy concern mostly the chemical composition of the interlayer

  19. Biogeomorphic and pedogenic impact of trees in three soil regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Łukasz; Šamonil, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    results from the first site at Turbacz (fir tree stump) indicate some significant differences with higher amount of Cox, clay and C-THS (carbon content in total humus substances), pHH2O and Fe in the control soil profile as compared to stump soil profiles. Content of various chemical indicators were more homogenous between soil profiles at the second microsite (beech). There were significant differences between soil regions for the following chemical properties: N (nitrogen) (AP vs. EP), Cox (oxidized carbon) (AP vs. EP), C-HA (carbon content in humic acids) (AP vs. HC), C-FA (carbon content in fulvic acids) (AP vs. EP), Fed (crystalline forms of iron) (AP and EP vs. HC).

  20. Phylogenetic trees in bioinformatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, Tom L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Genetic data is often used to infer evolutionary relationships among a collection of viruses, bacteria, animal or plant species, or other operational taxonomic units (OTU). A phylogenetic tree depicts such relationships and provides a visual representation of the estimated branching order of the OTUs. Tree estimation is unique for several reasons, including: the types of data used to represent each OTU; the use ofprobabilistic nucleotide substitution models; the inference goals involving both tree topology and branch length, and the huge number of possible trees for a given sample of a very modest number of OTUs, which implies that fmding the best tree(s) to describe the genetic data for each OTU is computationally demanding. Bioinformatics is too large a field to review here. We focus on that aspect of bioinformatics that includes study of similarities in genetic data from multiple OTUs. Although research questions are diverse, a common underlying challenge is to estimate the evolutionary history of the OTUs. Therefore, this paper reviews the role of phylogenetic tree estimation in bioinformatics, available methods and software, and identifies areas for additional research and development.