WorldWideScience

Sample records for fields program overview

  1. Urban Dispersion Program Overview and MID05 Field Study Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-07-31

    The Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) was a 4-year project (2004–2007) funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security with additional support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also contributed to UDP through funding a human-exposure component of the New York City (NYC) field studies in addition to supporting an EPA scientist in conducting modeling studies of NYC. The primary goal of UDP was to improve the scientific understanding of the flow and diffusion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of NYC. The overall UDP project manager and lead scientist was Dr. Jerry Allwine of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. UDP had several accomplishments that included conducting two tracer and meteorological field studies in Midtown Manhattan.

  2. Human Reliability Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  3. Acquisition Support Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    Principles of Effective Acquisition © 2006 by Carnegie Mellon University page 31 Summary The SEI, through the Acquisition Support Program , works directly...2006 by Carnegie Mellon University page 1 Acquisition Support Program Overview Brian Gallagher Director, Acquisition Support Program 9 March, 2006...MAR 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Acquisition Support Program Overview 5a. CONTRACT

  4. BMDO photovoltaics program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caveny, Leonard H.; Allen, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    This is an overview of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) Photovoltaic Program. Areas discussed are: (1) BMDO advanced Solar Array program; (2) Brilliant Eyes type satellites; (3) Electric propulsion; (4) Contractor Solar arrays; (5) Iofee Concentrator and Cell development; (6) Entech linear mini-dome concentrator; and (7) Flight test update/plans.

  5. LANL HED Programs Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flippo, Kirk Adler [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-04-23

    The Powerpoint presentation provides an overview of High-Energy Density (HED) Physis, ICF and Burning Plasma research programs at Los Alamos National Lab. in New Mexico. Work in nuclear diagnostics is also presented, along with a summary of collaborations and upcoming projects.

  6. NREL biofuels program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielenz, J.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The NREL Biofuels Program has been developing technology for conversion of biomass to transportation fuels with support from DOE Office of Transportation Technologies Biofuels System Program. This support has gone to both the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and over 100 subcontractors in universities and industry. This overview will outline the value of the Biofuels development program to the Nation, the current status of the technology development, and what research areas still need further support and progress for the development of a biofuels industry in the US.

  7. Federal Energy Management Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-08-05

    Brochure offers an overview of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), which provides agencies and organizations with the information, tools, and assistance they need to achieve their energy-related requirements and goals through specialized initiatives.

  8. Overview of the Mexican-American cooperative program at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, M. J.; Zelwer, R.

    1982-09-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is coordinating the US technical activities being carried out at Cerro Prieto under a five-year agreement between the US Department of Energy and the Comission Federal de Electricidad de Mexico. This agreement, signed in July 1977, is expected to expire in July 1982. Efforts are being made to continue some of the research beyond the formal termination of the agreement. A description of the program, which involves studies of geology, geophysics, hydrodynamics, subsidence, geothermal wells and reservoirs, and aquifers, is discussed.

  9. Overview of communications programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the communications program is to advance critical areas of enabling and enhancing communication technologies that support commercial needs, science, and exploration missions for the 1990's and beyond. The technology program consists of research and technology development in the following areas: RF technology; digital technology; optical communications; mobile communications; and systems integration, test, and evaluation.

  10. 2007 Biomass Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Biomass Program is actively working with public and private partners to meet production and technology needs. With the corn ethanol market growing steadily, researchers are unlocking the potential of non-food biomass sources, such as switchgrass and forest and agricultural residues. In this way, the Program is helping to ensure that cost-effective technologies will be ready to support production goals for advanced biofuels.

  11. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  12. Better Plants Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program is a voluntary partnership initiative to drive significant energy efficiency improvement across energy intensive companies and organizations. 157 leading manufacturers and public water and wastewater treatment utilities are partnering with DOE through Better Plants to improve energy efficiency, slash carbon emissions, and cut energy costs.

  13. Geothermal energy program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained within the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost-effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy - the heat of the Earth - is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40 percent of the total U.S. energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma (the four types of geothermal energy), still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

  14. Overview of the Year-One Field Program Phase of the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX) 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, D.; Macgorman, D.; Schuur, T.; Straka, J.; Rison, B.; Hamlin, T.; Krehbiel, P.; Bruning, E.

    2003-12-01

    Recent research has raised several issues that have significant implications for understanding storm electrification and lightning. The scientific purpose of TELEX is to test and revise hypotheses concerning the inter-relationships among the wind field, microphysical characteristics, electrical structure, and lightning of isolated severe storms and of large storm systems (called mesoscale convective systems, MCSs). We conducted the first-year's field program of TELEX in central Oklahoma, 11 May-6 June. This was the initial spring field deployment for several new observing systems operating in central Oklahoma: a 10-cm wavelength polarimetric Doppler radar, a lightning mapping array (LMA), and a new mobile lab for storm intercept and coordination of mobile ballooning of electric field meters and data acquisition. Also, the electric field meter was substantially upgraded (both mechanically and electronically) to provide higher resolution data, including more accurate determination of instrument orientation using a three-axis flux gate magnetometer arrangement and a two-axis accelerometer. The improvements allow more accurate determination of the electric field vector, and thus inferred charge structure, in context of the three-dimensional structures of storm parameters and lightning. Presented in this paper are examples from among the seven storm-intercept missions during which fourteen balloon soundings were obtained with instrumented balloons carrying a radiosonde and electric field meter. Owing to a scarcity of isolated deep convection in the target area during the program, the flights are mostly from nighttime multicellular storms and MCSs. Electric fields ranging above 100 kV/m were measured.

  15. Overview of the 2003 and 2004 Field Program Phases of the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Schuur, T. J.; Bruning, E. C.; Weiss, S. A.; Straka, J.; Rison, W.; Hamlin, T.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Biggerstaff, M.; Apostololakopoulos, I.

    2004-12-01

    The scientific purpose of TELEX is to test and revise hypotheses concerning the inter-relationships among the wind field, microphysical characteristics, electrical structure, and lightning of isolated nonsevere and severe storms and mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). We conducted the field program of TELEX in central Oklahoma, 11 May-6 June 2003 and 9 May-20 June 2004. At the beginning of the 2003 field program, several new and upgraded observing systems were operating in central Oklahoma: the polarimetric part of the KOUN 11-cm wavelength Doppler radar, the Oklahoma three-dimensional Lightning Mapping Array (OK-LMA), and a mobile laboratory for storm intercept and mobile ballooning with up to four balloon soundings being possible simultaneously. Furthermore, the balloon-borne electric field meter was substantially upgraded the second year (both mechanically and electronically) to provide higher resolution data, including more accurate determination of instrument orientation to increase the resolution of three-dimensional electric field vectors in context of the three-dimensional structures of storm parameters and lightning. Presented in this paper are examples from both years in which instrumented balloons carrying a radiosonde and electric field meter obtained soundings. Other sensors were sometimes added to the instrument train by visiting researchers. In 2003, fourteen flights were made during seven missions. Owing to a scarcity of isolated deep convection in central Oklahoma during the 2003 program, the flights were mostly in nighttime multicellular storms and MCSs. In 2004, thirty-six flights were made during 13 ballooning missions. Soundings were made through nonsevere and severe storms and mesoscale convective systems. Several flights recorded data on both ascent and descent through the storm. Electric fields ranging above 150 kV/m were measured.

  16. Commercial Crew Development Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program is designed to stimulate efforts within the private sector that will aid in the development and demonstration of safe, reliable, and cost-effective space transportation capabilities. With the goal of delivery cargo and eventually crew to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and the International Space Station (ISS) the program is designed to foster the development of new spacecraft and launch vehicles in the commercial sector. Through Space Act Agreements (SAAs) in 2011 NASA provided $50M of funding to four partners; Blue Origin, The Boeing Company, Sierra Nevada Corporation, and SpaceX. Additional, NASA has signed two unfunded SAAs with ATK and United Space Alliance. This paper will give a brief summary of these SAAs. Additionally, a brief overview will be provided of the released version of the Commercial Crew Development Program plans and requirements documents.

  17. Radioisotope Power Systems Program: A Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamley, John A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program continues to plan, mature research in energy conversion, and partners with the Department of Energy (DOE) to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet potential future mission needs. Recent programs responsibilities include providing investment recommendations to NASA stakeholders on emerging thermoelectric and Stirling energy conversion technologies and insight on NASA investments at DOE in readying a generator for the Mars 2020 mission. This presentation provides an overview of the RPS Program content and status and the approach used to maintain the readiness of RPS to support potential future NASA missions.

  18. Photovoltaic Energy Program overview: Fiscal year 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This is the 1994 overview for the Photovoltaic (PV) Energy Program. The topics of this overview include cooperative research projects to improve PV systems and develop precommercial prototypes of new PV products, expanding understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing the formation and performance of PV materials, and helping US industry enhance its leadership position in the PV market.

  19. Overview of the Project Prometheus Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, G. M.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will give an overview of the Project Prometheus Program (PPP, formerly the Nuclear Systems Initiative, NSI) and the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Project (a component of PPP), a mission to the three icy Galilean moons of Jupiter.

  20. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Overview 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Overview 2008, including market overview and federal role, program vision, mission, design and structure, and goals and multi-year targets.

  1. Adult Literacy Programs: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Anabel P.

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the broad array of adult literacy program alternatives currently available. These include government-funded adult education programs, such as Adult Basic Education and Even Start, volunteer programs such as Laubach Literacy Action and Literacy Volunteers of America, business and industry sponsored programs, community-based…

  2. The ESCOMPTE program: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, B.; Durand, P.; Cachier, H.; Drobinski, Ph.; Fréjafon, E.; Kottmeier, C.; Perros, P. E.; Peuch, V.-H.; Ponche, J.-L.; Robin, D.; Saı̈d, F.; Toupance, G.; Wortham, H.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the "Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphérique et de Transport d'Emissions" (ESCOMPTE) program is presented. The ESCOMPTE program is used to produce a relevant set of data for testing and evaluating regional pollution models. It includes high-resolution (in space and time) atmospheric emission inventories and field experiments, and covers an area of 120×120 km, centered over the Marseilles-Berre area in the southeast of France during Summer 2001. This region presents a high occurrence of photochemical pollution events, which result from numerous industrial and urban sources of primary pollutants. From the dynamical characteristics of the area, sea-breeze circulation and channeling effects due to terrain features highly influence the location of the pollutant plumes. ESCOMPTE will provide a highly documented framework for dynamics and chemistry studies. Campaign strategies and experimental set up are described. During the planning phase, existing modeling results helped defining the experimental design. The campaign involved surface measurement networks, remote sensing, ship-borne, balloon-borne, and airplane measurements. Mean standard meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes, ozone, ozone precursors, photochemically active trace gases, and aerosols were measured. Five intensive observation periods (IOPs) were documented using a wide spectrum of instruments, involving aircraft (7) (one of them equipped with a Doppler lidar, the others for in situ meteorological and chemical measurements), constant volume balloons (33), ozone lidars (5), wind profilers (15 sodars and radars), Doppler scanning lidar (1), radiosonde systems (at 4 locations), instrumented ships (2). In addition to the air quality networks from environmental agencies, 15 supplementary ground stations equipped for chemistry and/or meteorology and/or surface flux measurements, were operational. All instruments were calibrated and compared during a

  3. Overview of Field Experience - Degradation Rates & Lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Dirk; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    The way a PV module fails may depend not only on its design and the materials used in its construction, but also on the weather it experiences, the way it is mounted, and the quality control during its manufacture. This presentation gives an overview of Field Experience - what degradation rates and what lifetimes are being observed in various regions.

  4. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview - Peer Review Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliken, JoAnn [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-06-06

    This Geothermal Technologies Program presentation was delivered on June 6, 2011 at a Program Peer Review meeting. It contains annual budget, Recovery Act, funding opportunities, upcoming program activities, and more.

  5. Overview of DOE space nuclear propulsion programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of Department of Energy space nuclear propulsion programs is presented in outline and graphic form. DOE's role in the development and safety assurance of space nuclear propulsion is addressed. Testing issues and facilities are discussed along with development needs and recent research activities.

  6. Air Force Phillips Laboratory Battery Program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Shaun

    1992-01-01

    Battery development and testing efforts at Phillips Laboratory fall into three main categories: nickel hydrogen, sodium sulfur, and solid state batteries. Nickel hydrogen work is broken down into a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Life Test Program, a LEO Pulse Test Program, and a Hydrogen Embrittlement Investigation. Sodium sulfur work is broken down into a Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) Battery Flight Test and a Hot Launch Evaluation. Solid state polymer battery work consists of a GEO Battery Development Program, a Pulse Power Battery Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR), and an in-house evaluation of current generation laboratory cells. An overview of the program is presented.

  7. Space Propulsion Technology Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The topics presented are covered in viewgraph form. Focused program elements are: (1) transportation systems, which include earth-to-orbit propulsion, commercial vehicle propulsion, auxiliary propulsion, advanced cryogenic engines, cryogenic fluid systems, nuclear thermal propulsion, and nuclear electric propulsion; (2) space platforms, which include spacecraft on-board propulsion, and station keeping propulsion; and (3) technology flight experiments, which include cryogenic orbital N2 experiment (CONE), SEPS flight experiment, and cryogenic orbital H2 experiment (COHE).

  8. A topaz international program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Frank V.; Wyant, Francis J.; Mulder, Daniel; McCarson, T. D.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai Nikolaevich

    1995-01-01

    Five years ago, during the 8th Symposium on Space Nuclear Power Systems, in Albuquerque, NM, Academician Nikolai Nikolaevich Ponomarev-Stepnoi, First Deputy Director of the Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, proposed the sale of the Soviety Union's TOPAZ II technology to the United States. This proposal, made at great personal risk, was initially viewed with much skepticism by most Americans attending that conference since the Cold War was still in full swing. There were, however, a few visionaries, some would say fanatics, that set about to make this sale possible. Even these visionaries did not anticipate the collapse of the Soviet Union or the subsequent efforts by the U.S. and other Western powers to help the Newly Independent States transition to a market economy. Little did these visionaries know that the formation of the ``TOPAZ II Program,'' using former military space power technology of the Soviet Union, would become the preeminent example of technology cooperation between two former adversaries. A unique teaming arrangement formed in New Mexico, called the New Mexico Strategic Alliance and consisting of the Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, the University of New Mexico, and Los Alamos Nationalo Laboratory, was a key ingredient in making this program a success. A brief summary of some of the highlights of this technology partnership is given to explain how international patnerships of this type can enable commercialization and technology transfer.

  9. Biological effects of electric fields: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.; Phillips, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    An overview of the literature suggests tha electric-field exposure is an environmental agent/influence of relatively low potential toxicity to biological systems. Generally, many of the biological effects which have been reported are quite subtle and differences between exposed and unexposed subjects may be masked by normal biological variations. However, several recent reports indicate possibly more serious consequences from chronic exposure, emphasizing the need for more research in epidemiology and laboratory experiments. This paper presents a cursory overview of investigations on the biological consequences of exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields. Three important topics are discussed, including: 1) the general methodology of exposure experiments, including those elements which are critical for definitive studies in biological systems; 2) a brief discussion of epidemiological and clinical studies conducted to date; and 3) a somewhat more extensive examination of animal experiments representing major areas of investigation (behavior, biological rhythms, nervous and endocrine systems, bone growth and repair, cardiovascular system and blood chemistry, immunology, reproduction, growth and development mortality and pathology, cellular and membrane studies, and mutagenesis). A discussion of current concepts, possible mechanisms and future directions of research is presented. 110 references.

  10. 40 CFR 63.90 - Program overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... appropriate. For accidental release prevention programs, the criteria of § 63.95 must be met in addition to... prevention requirements, noticing, field inspections, entry, sampling, or accidental release prevention... validated according to EPA Method 301 (Part 63, Appendix A) to demonstrate that it provides equal or...

  11. The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    Utility battery energy storage allows a utility or customer to store electrical energy for dispatch at a time when its use is more economical, strategic, or efficient. The UBS program sponsors systems analyses, technology development of subsystems and systems integration, laboratory and field evaluation, and industry outreach. Achievements and planned activities in each area are discussed.

  12. NASA Space Cryocooler Programs: A 2003 Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.; Boyle, R. F.; Kittel, P.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical cryocoolers represent a significant enabling technology for NASA's Earth and Space Science missions. An overview is presented of ongoing cryocooler activities within NASA in support of current flight projects, near-term flight instruments, and long-term technology development. NASA programs in Earth and space science observe a wide range of phenomena, from crop dynamics to stellar birth. Many of the instruments require cryogenic refrigeration to improve dynamic range, extend wavelength coverage, and enable the use of advanced detectors. Although, the largest utilization of coolers over the last decade has been for instruments operating at medium to high cryogenic temperatures (55 to 150 K), reflecting the relative maturity of the technology at these temperatures, important new developments are now focusing at the lower temperature range from 4 to 20 K in support of studies of the origin of the universe and the search for planets around distant stars. NASA's development of a 20K cryocooler for the European Planck spacecraft and its new Advanced Cryocooler Technology Development Program (ACTDP) for 6-18 K coolers are examples of the thrust to provide low temperature cooling for this class of missions.

  13. Overview Of Federal And State Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Frank J.

    1981-01-01

    Energy audits are a major component of a number of Federal and State energy conservation programs. To various degrees, these programs provide an opportunity for the application of infrared remote sensing (thermography) to the conduct of these audits. The following programs are reviewed and an indication given of how each might make use of infrared as an audit tool: o Residential Conservation Service Program o Schools and Hospitals Program o Federal Energy Management Program o State Energy Grants Program o Weatherization Assistance Program o Energy Extension Service Program o Industrial Energy Conservation Program

  14. Overview of the RFX fusion science program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Adamek, J.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Alfier, A.; Angioni, C.; Antoni, V.; Apolloni, L.; Auriemma, F.; Barana, O.; Barison, S.; Baruzzo, M.; Bettini, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Boozer, A. H.; Brombin, M.; Brotankova, J.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavinato, M.; Chacon, L.; Chitarin, G.; Cooper, W. A.; Dal Bello, S.; Dalla Palma, M.; Delogu, R.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Masi, G.; Dong, J. Q.; Drevlak, M.; Escande, D. F.; Fantini, F.; Fassina, A.; Fellin, F.; Ferro, A.; Fiameni, S.; Fiorentin, A.; Franz, P.; Gaio, E.; Garbet, X.; Gazza, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Grando, L.; Guo, S. C.; Hirano, Y.; Hirshman, S. P.; Ide, S.; Igochine, V.; In, Y.; Innocente, P.; Kiyama, S.; Liu, S. F.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lòpez Bruna, D.; Lorenzini, R.; Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martini, S.; Matsunaga, G.; Martines, E.; Mazzitelli, G.; McCollam, K.; Menmuir, S.; Milani, F.; Momo, B.; Moresco, M.; Munaretto, S.; Novello, L.; Okabayashi, M.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pavei, M.; Perverezev, G. V.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, L.; Pizzimenti, A.; Pomaro, N.; Pomphrey, N.; Predebon, I.; Puiatti, M. E.; Rigato, V.; Rizzolo, A.; Rostagni, G.; Rubinacci, G.; Ruzzon, A.; Sakakita, H.; Sanchez, R.; Sarff, J. S.; Sattin, F.; Scaggion, A.; Scarin, P.; Schneider, W.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Spong, D. A.; Spizzo, G.; Takechi, M.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Toigo, V.; Valisa, M.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.; Villone, F.; Wang, Z.; White, R. B.; Yadikin, D.; Zaccaria, P.; Zamengo, A.; Zanca, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zollino, G.; Zuin, M.

    2011-09-01

    This paper summarizes the main achievements of the RFX fusion science program in the period between the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conferences. RFX-mod is the largest reversed field pinch in the world, equipped with a system of 192 coils for active control of MHD stability. The discovery and understanding of helical states with electron internal transport barriers and core electron temperature >1.5 keV significantly advances the perspectives of the configuration. Optimized experiments with plasma current up to 1.8 MA have been realized, confirming positive scaling. The first evidence of edge transport barriers is presented. Progress has been made also in the control of first-wall properties and of density profiles, with initial first-wall lithization experiments. Micro-turbulence mechanisms such as ion temperature gradient and micro-tearing are discussed in the framework of understanding gradient-driven transport in low magnetic chaos helical regimes. Both tearing mode and resistive wall mode active control have been optimized and experimental data have been used to benchmark numerical codes. The RFX programme also provides important results for the fusion community and in particular for tokamaks and stellarators on feedback control of MHD stability and on three-dimensional physics. On the latter topic, the result of the application of stellarator codes to describe three-dimensional reversed field pinch physics will be presented.

  15. IOT Overview: Wide-Field Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, F. J.

    The Wide Field Imager (WFI) instrument at La Silla has been the workhorse of wide-field imaging instruments at ESO for several years. In this contribution I will summarize the issues relating to its productivity for the community both in terms of the quality and quantity of data that has come out of it. Although only surveys of limited scope have been completed using WFI, it is ESO's stepping-stone to the new generation of survey telescopes.

  16. Human Genome Program Report. Part 1, Overview and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  17. Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  18. Photovoltaic Energy Program overview, fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Photovoltaic Energy Program fosters the widespread acceptance of photovoltaic (PV) technology and accelerates commercial use of US PV products. The Program is founded on a collaborative strategy involving industry, the research and development community, potential users, utilities, and state and federal agencies. There are three main Program elements: Systems Engineering and Applications, Technology Development, and Research and Development.

  19. Program Review Rating Scales: Introduction and Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    "Safe and Sound: An Educational Leader's Guide to Evidence-Based Social and Emotional Learning Programs" introduces the concepts of SEL and comprehensive approaches to SEL, describes the value of such programming to the essential academic mission of schools, and suggests how to approach implementing such programming. This packet contains the…

  20. The 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF12): Observational Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Koekemoer, Anton M; McLure, Ross J; Dunlop, James S; Robertson, Brant E; Ono, Yoshiaki; Schenker, Matthew A; Ouchi, Masami; Bowler, Rebecca A A; Rogers, Alexander B; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Schneider, Evan; Charlot, Stephane; Stark, Daniel P; Furlanetto, Steven R; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V; Targett, T

    2012-01-01

    We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128-orbit Cycle 19 \\HST\\ program aimed at extending previous WFC3/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at $z$$\\,\\gtrsim\\,$8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at $z$$\\,\\sim\\,7\\,-\\,$8, facilitate the construction of new samples of $z$$\\,\\sim\\,9\\,-\\,$10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to $z$$\\,\\sim\\,$12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset, to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky currently achievable. In this paper we present the observational overview of the pr...

  1. Photovoltaic Energy Program Overview Fiscal Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    Significant activities in the National Photovoltaic Program are reported for each of the three main program elements. In Research and Development, advances in thin-film materials and crystalline silicon materials are described. The Technology Development report describes activities in photovoltaic manufacturing technology, industrial expansion, module and array development, and testing photovoltaic system components. Systems Engineering and Applications projects described include projects with government agencies, projects with utilities, documentation of performance for international applications, and product certification.

  2. Nasa's Planetary Geologic Mapping Program: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    NASA's Planetary Science Division supports the geologic mapping of planetary surfaces through a distinct organizational structure and a series of research and analysis (R&A) funding programs. Cartography and geologic mapping issues for NASA's planetary science programs are overseen by the Mapping and Planetary Spatial Infrastructure Team (MAPSIT), which is an assessment group for cartography similar to the Mars Exploration Program Assessment Group (MEPAG) for Mars exploration. MAPSIT's Steering Committee includes specialists in geological mapping, who make up the Geologic Mapping Subcommittee (GEMS). I am the GEMS Chair, and with a group of 3-4 community mappers we advise the U.S. Geological Survey Planetary Geologic Mapping Coordinator (Dr. James Skinner) and develop policy and procedures to aid the planetary geologic mapping community. GEMS meets twice a year, at the Annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in March, and at the Annual Planetary Mappers' Meeting in June (attendance is required by all NASA-funded geologic mappers). Funding programs under NASA's current R&A structure to propose geological mapping projects include Mars Data Analysis (Mars), Lunar Data Analysis (Moon), Discovery Data Analysis (Mercury, Vesta, Ceres), Cassini Data Analysis (Saturn moons), Solar System Workings (Venus or Jupiter moons), and the Planetary Data Archiving, Restoration, and Tools (PDART) program. Current NASA policy requires all funded geologic mapping projects to be done digitally using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software. In this presentation we will discuss details on how geologic mapping is done consistent with current NASA policy and USGS guidelines.

  3. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems Program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esbeck, D.W. [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in partnership with industry, has set new performance standards for industrial gas turbines through the creation of the Industrial Advanced Turbine System Program. Their leadership will lead to the development of an optimized, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly gas turbine power systems in this size class (3-to-20 MW). The DOE has already created a positive effect by encouraging gas turbine system manufacturers to reassess their product and technology plans using the new higher standards as the benchmark. Solar Turbines has been a leader in the industrial gas turbine business, and is delighted to have joined with the DOE in developing the goals and vision for this program. We welcome the opportunity to help the national goals of energy conservation and environmental enhancement. The results of this program should lead to the U.S. based gas turbine industry maintaining its international leadership and the creation of highly paid domestic jobs.

  4. Overview of NRC PRA research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, M.A.; Drouin, M.T.; Ramey-Smith, A.M.; VanderMolen, M.T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The NRC`s research program in probabilistic risk analysis includes a set of closely-related elements, from basic research to regulatory applications. The elements of this program are as follows: (1) Development and demonstration of methods and advanced models and tools for use by the NRC staff and others performing risk assessments; (2) Support to agency staff on risk analysis and statistics issues; (3) Reviews of risk assessments submitted by licensees in support of regulatory applications, including the IPEs and IPEEEs. Each of these elements is discussed in the paper, providing highlights of work within an element, and, where appropriate, describing important support and feedback mechanisms among elements.

  5. 24 CFR 3286.5 - Overview of installation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... authorized by the Act to oversee the system established by the regulations in this part, as the Secretary... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Overview of installation program. 3286.5 Section 3286.5 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  6. Geothermal Program Overview: Fiscal Years 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-11-01

    Geothermal energy represents the largest U.S. energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. This overview looks at the basic science behind the various geothermal technologies and provides information on DOE Geothermal Energy Program activities and accomplishments.

  7. Data systems and computer science programs: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul H.; Hunter, Paul

    1991-01-01

    An external review of the Integrated Technology Plan for the Civil Space Program is presented. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: onboard memory and storage technology; advanced flight computers; special purpose flight processors; onboard networking and testbeds; information archive, access, and retrieval; visualization; neural networks; software engineering; and flight control and operations.

  8. Track & Field: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    One of five guidelines in the Sports Skills Instructional Program, the booklet addresses ways to teach track and field to mentally retarded persons. The approach is designed to use volunteers as instructors. An overview considers such topics as clothing, equipment, and field preparation. The long term goal of acquiring basic fundamental skills,…

  9. Navy SBIR/STTR Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    Innova <ve  Research  Program   –  2.6...3%  of  RDT&E  in  FY2012,  rising  to  .45%  for  FY2016   •  Programs  Fund   Innova <ve,  High  Tech  Research  with... innova <ve  R&D  that  meets  a  DoN  Need   –  Transi<on  that  technology  to  a  DoN  plaeorm/  system   • 

  10. An overview of the SAFSIM computer program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, D.

    1993-01-01

    SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow SIMulator) is a FORTRAN computer program that provides engineering simulations of user-specified flow networks at the system level. It includes fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and reactor dynamics capabilities. SAFSIM provides sufficient versatility to allow the simulation of almost any flow system, from a backyard sprinkler system to a clustered nuclear reactor propulsion system. In addition to versatility, speed and robustness are primary goals of SAFSIM development. The current capabilities of SAFSIM are summarized and some sample applications are presented. It is applied here to a nuclear thermal propulsion system and nuclear rocket engine test facility.

  11. Overview of Sandia's electric vehicle battery program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. P.

    1993-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is actively involved in several projects which are part of an overall Electric Vehicle Battery Program. Part of this effort is funded by the United States Department of Energy/Office of Transportation Technologies (DOE/OTT) and the remainder is funded through the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). DOE/OTT supported activities include research and development of zinc/air and sodium/sulfur battery technologies as well as double layer capacitor (DLC) R&D. Projects in the USABC funded work include lithium/polymer electrolyte (LPE) R&D, sodium/sulfur activities and battery test and evaluation.

  12. Efficient separations and processing crosscutting program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdes, K.D. [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Harness, J.L. [Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kuhn, W.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Science and Technology (formerly the Office of Technology Development), as part of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) in November 1989. EM manages remediation of all DOE sites and wastes from current operations. The goal of the EM program is to minimize risks to human health, safety, and the environment and to bring all DOE sites into compliance with federal, state, and local regulations by the year 2019. The Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) is charged with developing and implementing new technologies that are safer, faster, more effective, and less expensive than current methods. To focus resources and address opportunities, EM-50 has targeted four major remediation and waste management problem areas within the DOE complex for action based on risk, prevalence, or need for technology development to meet environmental requirements and regulations. Other areas may be added or current areas further partitioned to ensure that research technology development programs remain focused on EM`s most pressing remediation and waste management needs. These major problem areas, called Focus Areas are: high-level waste tank remediation; mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal; subsurface contaminants; and facility transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition.

  13. Overview of the Heavy Ion Fusion Program

    CERN Document Server

    Celata, C M

    2000-01-01

    The world Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program for inertial fusion energy is looking toward the development and commissioning of several new experiments. Recent and planned upgrades of the facilities at GSI, in Russia, and in Japan greatly enhance the ability to study energy deposition in hot dense matter. Worldwide target design developments have focused on non-ignition targets for nearterm experiments and designs which, while lowering the energy required for ignition, tighten accelerator requirements. The U.S program is transitioning between scaled beam dynamics experiments and high current experiments with power-plant-driver-scale beams. Current effort is aimed at preparation for the next-step large facility, the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE)-- an induction linac accelerating multiple beams to a few hundred MeV, then focusing to deliver tens of kilojoules to a target. The goal is to study heavy ion energy deposition, and to test all of the components and physics needed for an engineering test of a power p...

  14. An Overview of the Chinese UCG Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulan Li

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Coal is the dominant source of energy in China, but about 50% of the coal resource is left underground unmined. Because of this, the "long-tunnel, large section, two-stage" Underground Coal Gasification (UCG technology has been put forward, and the UCG model platform has been built. Simulation tests are underway and some gasification parameters have been obtained. Five field trials have been completed, which have produced gas with a heating value of about 4.18MJ/m3. Gas containing more than 40% hydrogen and a heating value above 8.36MJ/m3 is produced at two-stage gasification.

  15. An Overview of NASA's Intelligent Systems Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Daniel E.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA and the Computer Science Research community are poised to enter a critical era. An era in which - it seems - that each needs the other. Market forces, driven by the immediate economic viability of computer science research results, place Computer Science in a relatively novel position. These forces impact how research is done, and could, in worst case, drive the field away from significant innovation opting instead for incremental advances that result in greater stability in the market place. NASA, however, requires significant advances in computer science research in order to accomplish the exploration and science agenda it has set out for itself. NASA may indeed be poised to advance computer science research in this century much the way it advanced aero-based research in the last.

  16. Overview of NASA's Microgravity Materials Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, James Patton; Grugel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The NASA microgravity materials program is dedicated to conducting microgravity experiments and related modeling efforts that will help us understand the processes associated with the formation of materials. This knowledge will help improve ground based industrial production of such materials. The currently funded investigations include research on the distribution of dopants and formation of defects in semiconductors, transitions between columnar and dendritic grain morphology, coarsening of phase boundaries, competition between thermally and kinetically favored phases, and the formation of glassy vs. crystalline material. NASA microgravity materials science investigators are selected for funding either through a proposal in response to a NASA Research Announcement or by participation in a team proposing to a foreign agency research announcement. In the latter case, a US investigator participating in a successful proposal to a foreign agency can then apply to NASA for funding of an unsolicited proposal. The program relies on cooperation with other aerospace partners from around the world. The ISS facilities used for these investigations are provided primarily by partnering with foreign agencies and in most cases the US investigators are working as a part of a larger team studying a specific area of materials science. The following facilities are to be utilized for the initial investigations. The ESA provided Low Gradient Facility and the Solidification and Quench Inserts to the Materials Research Rack/Materials Science Laboratory are to be used primarily for creating bulk samples that are directionally solidified or quenched from a high temperature melt. The CNES provided DECLIC facility is used to observe morphological development in transparent materials. The ESA provided Electro-Magnetic Levitator (EML) is designed to levitate, melt and then cool samples in order to study nucleation behavior. The facility provides conditions in which nucleation of the solid is

  17. Overview of NASA's Microgravity Materials Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, James Patton

    2012-01-01

    The microgravity materials program was nearly eliminated in the middle of the aughts due to budget constraints. Hardware developments were eliminated. Some investigators with experiments that could be performed using ISS partner hardware received continued funding. Partnerships were established between US investigators and ESA science teams for several investigations. ESA conducted peer reviews on the proposals of various science teams as part of an ESA AO process. Assuming he or she was part of a science team that was selected by the ESA process, a US investigator would submit a proposal to NASA for grant funding to support their part of the science team effort. In a similar manner, a US materials investigator (Dr. Rohit Trivedi) is working as a part of a CNES selected science team. As funding began to increase another seven materials investigators were selected in 2010 through an NRA mechanism to perform research related to development of Materials Science Research Rack investigations. One of these has since been converted to a Glovebox investigation.

  18. Mars Exploration Rover thermal test program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauken, Michael T.; Kinsella, Gary; Novak, Keith; Tsuyuki, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, two Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) landed on the surface of Mars to begin their mission as robotic geologists. A year prior to these historic landings, both rovers and the spacecraft that delivered them to Mars, were completing a series of environmental tests in facilities at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This paper describes the test program undertaken to validate the thermal design and verify the workmanship integrity of both rovers and the spacecraft. The spacecraft, which contained the rover within the aeroshell, were tested in a 7.5 m diameter thermal vacuum chamber. Thermal balance was performed for the near earth (hot case) condition and for the near Mars (cold case) condition. A solar simulator was used to provide the solar boundary condition on the solar array. IR lamps were used to simulate the solar heat load on the aeroshell for the off-sun attitudes experienced by the spacecraft during its cruise to Mars. Each rover was tested separately in a 3.0 m diameter thermal vacuum chamber over conditions simulating the warmest and coldest expected Mars diurnal temperature cycles. The environmental tests were conducted in a quiescent nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 8 to 10 Torr. In addition to thermal balance testing, the science instruments on board the rovers were tested successfully in the extreme environmental conditions anticipated for the mission. A solar simulator was not used in these tests.

  19. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for Fiscal Year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    This documents presents a programmatic overview and program element plan summaries for conceptual design and assessment; physics; computation and modeling; system engineering science and technology; electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components; chemistry and materials; special nuclear materials, tritium, and explosives.

  20. Los Alamos safeguards program overview and NDA in safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keepin, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos safeguards program has developed, tested, and implemented a broad range of passive and active nondestructive analysis (NDA) instruments (based on gamma and x-ray detection and neutron counting) that are now widely employed in safeguarding nuclear materials of all forms. Here very briefly, the major categories of gamma ray and neutron based NDA techniques, give some representative examples of NDA instruments currently in use, and cite a few notable instances of state-of-the-art NDA technique development. Historical aspects and a broad overview of the safeguards program are also presented.

  1. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. An overview of the concept and its diamagnetic, high beta magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp confinement scheme will be given. The analytical model of the major loss mechanisms and predicted performance will be discussed, along with the major physics challenges. Key features of an operational CFR reactor will be highlighted. The proposed developmental path following the current experimental efforts will be presented. ©2015 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  2. 76 FR 5789 - Teaching American History Grant Program; Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... Teaching American History Grant Program; Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; Teaching American History Grant Program; Notice Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal Year (FY... of Announcement I. Funding Opportunity Description Purpose of Program: The Teaching American History...

  3. Environmental effects monitoring at the Terra Nova offshore oil development (Newfoundland, Canada): Program design and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlois, Elisabeth M.; Tracy, Ellen; Janes, G. Gregory; Crowley, Roger D.; Wells, Trudy A.; Williams, Urban P.; Paine, Michael D.; Mathieu, Anne; Kilgour, Bruce W.

    2014-12-01

    An environmental effects monitoring (EEM) program was developed by Suncor (formerly Petro-Canada) in 1997/98 to assess effects of the Terra Nova offshore oil and gas development on the receiving environment. The Terra Nova Field is located on the Grand Banks approximately 350 km southeast of Newfoundland (Canada), at approximately 100 m water depth. The EEM program was developed with guidance from experts in government, academia and elsewhere, and with input from the public. The EEM program proposed by Suncor was accepted by Canadian regulatory agencies and the program was implemented in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010, with pre-development sampling in 1997. The program continues to be implemented every two years. EEM includes an assessment of alterations in sediment quality through examination of changes in sediment chemistry, particle size, toxicity and benthic invertebrate community structure. A second component of the program examines potential effects on two species of commercial fishing interest: Iceland scallop (Chlamys islandica) and American plaice (Hippoglossoides platessoides). Chemical body burden for these two species is examined and taste tests are performed to assess the presence of taint in edible tissues. Effects on American plaice bioindicators are also examined. A final component of the program assesses potential effects of the Terra Nova development on water quality and examines water column chemistry, chlorophyll concentration and physical properties. The papers presented in this collection focus on effects of drill cuttings and drilling muds on the seafloor environment and, as such, report results on sediment quality and bioaccumulation of drilling mud components in Iceland scallop and American plaice. This paper provides information on drilling discharges, an overview of the physical oceanography at the Terra Nova Field, and an overview of the field program designed to assess environmental effects of drilling at Terra Nova.

  4. U.S. DOE indirect coal liquefaction program: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, J.; Schmetz, E.; Winslow, J.; Tischer, R. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Srivastava, R.

    1997-12-31

    Coal is the most abundant domestic energy resource in the United States. The Fossil Energy Organization within the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been supporting a coal liquefaction program to develop improved technologies to convert coal to clean and cost-effective liquid fuels to complement the dwindling supply of domestic petroleum crude. The goal of this program is to produce coal liquids that are competitive with crude at $20 to $25 per barrel. Indirect and direct liquefaction routes are the two technologies being pursued under the DOE coal liquefaction program. This paper will give an overview of the DOE indirect liquefaction program. More detailed discussions will be given to the F-T diesel and DME fuels which have shown great promises as clean burning alternative diesel fuels. The authors also will briefly discuss the economics of indirect liquefaction and the hurdles and opportunities for the early commercial deployment of these technologies. Discussions will be preceded by two brief reviews on the liquid versus gas phase reactors and the natural gas versus coal based indirect liquefaction.

  5. The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Label, Kenneth A.; Sampson, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the NEPP Program. The NEPP Mission is to provide guidance to NASA for the selection and application of microelectronics technologies; Improve understanding of the risks related to the use of these technologies in the space environment; Ensure that appropriate research is performed to meet NASA mission assurance needs. NEPP's Goals are to provide customers with appropriate and cost-effective risk knowledge to aid in: Selection and application of microelectronics technologies; Improved understanding of risks related to the use of these technologies in the space environment; Appropriate evaluations to meet NASA mission assurance needs; Guidelines for test and application of parts technologies in space; Assurance infrastructure and support for technologies in use by NASA space systems.

  6. Overview of the NRL DPF program: Experiment and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A. S.; Jackson, S. L.; Angus, J. R.; Giuliani, J. L.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Schumer, J. W.; Mosher, D.

    2016-10-01

    Charged particle acceleration in imploding plasmas is an important phenomenon which occurs in various natural and laboratory plasmas. A new research project at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been started to investigate this phenomenon both experimentally-in a dense plasma focus (DPF) device-and theoretically using analytical and computational modeling. The DPF will be driven by the high-inductance (607 nH) Hawk pulsed-power generator, with a rise time of 1.2 μs and a peak current of 665 kA. In this poster we present an overview of the research project, and some preliminary results from fluid simulations of the m = 0 instability in an idealized DPF pinch. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  7. Research in corporate communication: An overview of an emerging field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.M. van Riel (Cees)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractVan Riel provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines.

  8. Research in corporate communication: An overview of an emerging field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.M. van Riel (Cees)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractVan Riel provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines.

  9. Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Technology Development Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, B. Thai; Clampin, M.; Werneth, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Office was established in FY11 and resides at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The office serves as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters for PCOS Program related matters. We present an overview of the Program’s technology management activities and the Program’s technology development portfolio. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology needs and the Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations. This process improves the transparency and relevance of technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and leverages the technology investments of external organizations by defining a need and a customer. Goals for the PCOS Program envisioned by the National Research Council’s (NRC) “New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics” (NWNH) Decadal Survey report include science missions and technology development for dark energy, gravitational waves, X-ray, and inflation probe science.

  10. Overview of the Hemostasis Research Program: Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    advanced to treat such an injury in the field. The hypothesis was that a hemostatic material could be infused into a closed body cavity by a trocar ...Research Program of the US Army Medical Research and Material Command is to reduce the morbidity and mortality resulting from injuries on the

  11. An overview of solution methods for multi-objective mixed integer linear programming programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Allan; Stidsen, Thomas Riis

    Multiple objective mixed integer linear programming (MOMIP) problems are notoriously hard to solve to optimality, i.e. finding the complete set of non-dominated solutions. We will give an overview of existing methods. Among those are interactive methods, the two phases method and enumeration...... methods. In particular we will discuss the existing branch and bound approaches for solving multiple objective integer programming problems. Despite the fact that branch and bound methods has been applied successfully to integer programming problems with one criterion only a few attempts has been made...

  12. An overview of solution methods for multi-objective mixed integer linear programming programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Allan; Stidsen, Thomas Riis

    Multiple objective mixed integer linear programming (MOMIP) problems are notoriously hard to solve to optimality, i.e. finding the complete set of non-dominated solutions. We will give an overview of existing methods. Among those are interactive methods, the two phases method and enumeration...... methods. In particular we will discuss the existing branch and bound approaches for solving multiple objective integer programming problems. Despite the fact that branch and bound methods has been applied successfully to integer programming problems with one criterion only a few attempts has been made...

  13. Brazilian Air Force aircraft structural integrity program: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto W. S. Mello Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of the activities developed by the Structural Integrity Group at the Institute of Aeronautics and Space - IAE, Brazil, as well as the status of ongoing work related to the life extension program for aircraft operated by the Brazilian Air Force BAF. The first BAF-operated airplane to undergo a DTA-based life extension was the F-5 fighter, in the mid 1990s. From 1998 to 2001, BAF worked on a life extension project for the BAF AT- 26 Xavante trainer. All analysis and tests were performed at IAE. The fatigue critical locations (FCLs were presumed based upon structural design and maintenance data and also from exchange of technical information with other users of the airplane around the world. Following that work, BAF started in 2002 the extension of the operational life of the BAF T-25 “Universal”. The T-25 is the basic training airplane used by AFA - The Brazilian Air Force Academy. This airplane was also designed under the “safe-life” concept. As the T-25 fleet approached its service life limit, the Brazilian Air Force was questioning whether it could be kept in flight safely. The answer came through an extensive Damage Tolerance Analysis (DTA program, briefly described in this paper. The current work on aircraft structural integrity is being performed for the BAF F-5 E/F that underwent an avionics and weapons system upgrade. Along with the increase in weight, new configurations and mission profiles were established. Again, a DTA program was proposed to be carried out in order to establish the reliability of the upgraded F-5 fleet. As a result of all the work described, the BAF has not reported any accident due to structural failure on aircraft submitted to Damage Tolerance Analysis.

  14. Marshall Island radioassay quality assurance program an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrado, C.L.; Hamilton, T.F.; Kehl, S.R.; Robison, W.L.; Stoker, A.C.

    1998-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed an extensive quality assurance program to provide high quality data and assessments in support of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Program. Our quality assurance objectives begin with the premise of providing integrated and cost-effective program support (to meet wide-ranging programmatic needs, scientific peer review, litigation defense, and build public confidence) and continue through from design and implementation of large-scale field programs, sampling and sample preparation, radiometric and chemical analyses, documentation of quality assurance/quality control practices, exposure assessments, and dose/risk assessments until publication. The basic structure of our radioassay quality assurance/quality control program can be divided into four essential elements; (1) sample and data integrity control; (2) instrument validation and calibration; (3) method performance testing, validation, development and documentation; and (4) periodic peer review and on-site assessments. While our quality assurance objectives are tailored towards a single research program and the evaluation of major exposure pathways/critical radionuclides pertinent to the Marshall Islands, we have attempted to develop quality assurance practices that are consistent with proposed criteria designed for laboratory accre

  15. Overview of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Environmental Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgave, John C.; Man, Kin F.; Hoffman, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) program. The engineering objectives of the program are to create a Mobile Science Laboratory capable of one Mars Year surface operational lifetime (670 Martian sols = 687 Earth days). It will be able to land and operation over wide range of latitudes, altitudes and seasons It must have controlled propulsive landing and demonstrate improved landing precision via guided entry The general science objectives are to perform science that will focus on Mars habitability, perform next generation analytical laboratory science investigations, perform remote sensing/contact investigations and carry a suite of environmental monitoring instruments. Specific scientific objectives of the MSL are: (1) Characterization of geological features, contributing to deciphering geological history and the processes that have modified rocks and regolith, including the role of water. (2) Determination of the mineralogy and chemical composition (including an inventory of elements such as C, H, N, O, P, S, etc. known to be building blocks for life) of surface and near-surface materials. (3) Determination of energy sources that could be used to sustain biological processes. (4) Characterization of organic compounds and potential biomarkers in representative regolith, rocks, and ices. (5) Determination the stable isotopic and noble gas composition of the present-day bulk atmosphere. (6) Identification potential bio-signatures (chemical, textural, isotopic) in rocks and regolith. (7) Characterization of the broad spectrum of surface radiation, including galactic cosmic radiation, solar proton events, and secondary neutrons. (8) Characterization of the local environment, including basic meteorology, the state and cycling of water and C02, and the near-surface distribution of hydrogen. Several views of the planned MSL and the rover are shown. The MSL environmental program is to: (1) Ensure the flight hardware design is

  16. USSOCOM TCCC CASEVAC Set Program A Retrospective and Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpin, John

    2012-01-01

    The United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) Casualty Evacuation (CASEVAC) Set Program was initiated in 2006 as a three-step effort. The initial effort was to develop an improved Individual First Aid Kit (IFAK); this was followed by the development of a Medic bag and culminated with the CASEVAC Set. The intent of the Program is both standardizing the medical load out across SOF components and expanding the skill set of Special Operations Forces (SOF) medical practitioners by providing equipment and training outside the normal parameters of many units. Even though the Set is currently being fielded to a variety of units, there are still personnel unaware of the Set and its capabilities. The goal of this article is to increase awareness of the existence of the program and to promote thought/discussion regarding the expansion of the capabilities of the Advanced Tactical Practitioner (ATP) beyond traditional medical skills. This program is best understood by first looking back to where it originated, and then examining where it is at present. 2012.

  17. Research in corporate communication: An overview of an emerging field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.M. van Riel (Cees)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThis commentary is intended as an amendment to Argenti's (1996) viewpoint, published in Volume 10, Issue 1, of Management Communication Quarterly. Van Riel provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature

  18. Research in corporate communication: An overview of an emerging field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.M. van Riel (Cees)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThis commentary is intended as an amendment to Argenti's (1996) viewpoint, published in Volume 10, Issue 1, of Management Communication Quarterly. Van Riel provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature

  19. Research in Corporate Communication: An Overview of an Emerging Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Cees B. M.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines. Gives three key concepts in such research: corporate identity, corporate reputation, and orchestration of communication. Advocates an interdisciplinary approach…

  20. An Overview of Fifth-Year Teacher Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Edith

    A series of model five-year teacher education programs are described. Two main types of programs are included--state-initiated programs and university-based fifth-year programs. An analysis and description of of the following programs is presented: (1) Florida Performance Program Management System--Beginning Teacher Program; (2) Kentucky…

  1. An Overview of the Evidence on Bullying Prevention and Intervention Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mishna, Faye

    2008-01-01

    ... of experiencing problems that may persist into adulthood. The aim of this article is to provide a brief overview of key points and issues regarding the current state of anti-bullying prevention and intervention programs...

  2. NRL Satellite Support for DYNAMO Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NRL Satellite Support for DYNAMO Field Program Jeffrey...Jeff.Hawkins@nrlmry.navy.mil Document Number: N0001412WX20870 LONG-TERM GOALS To provide the ONR-sponsored DYNAMO field program with a...the Indian Ocean. OBJECTIVES Develop a NRL-MRY near real-time web page that enables DYNAMO field program participants to view the evolving

  3. Spitzer ultra faint survey program (surfs up). I. An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradač, Maruša; Huang, Kuang-Han; Cain, Benjamin; Hall, Nicholas; Lubin, Lori [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Ryan, Russell; Casertano, Stefano [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lemaux, Brian C. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Schrabback, Tim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf Dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Allen, Steve; Von der Linden, Anja [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Gladders, Mike [The University of Chicago, The Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 933 East 56th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Treu, Tommaso, E-mail: marusa@physics.ucdavis.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program is a joint Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope Exploration Science program using 10 galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to study z ≳ 7 galaxies at intrinsically lower luminosities, enabled by gravitational lensing, than blank field surveys of the same exposure time. Our main goal is to measure stellar masses and ages of these galaxies, which are the most likely sources of the ionizing photons that drive reionization. Accurate knowledge of the star formation density and star formation history at this epoch is necessary to determine whether these galaxies indeed reionized the universe. Determination of the stellar masses and ages requires measuring rest-frame optical light, which only Spitzer can probe for sources at z ≳ 7, for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. Our program consists of 550 hr of Spitzer/IRAC imaging covering 10 galaxy clusters with very well-known mass distributions, making them extremely precise cosmic telescopes. We combine our data with archival observations to obtain mosaics with ∼30 hr exposure time in both 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm in the central 4' × 4' field and ∼15 hr in the flanking fields. This results in 3σ sensitivity limits of ∼26.6 and ∼26.2 AB magnitudes for the central field in the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. To illustrate the survey strategy and characteristics we introduce the sample, present the details of the data reduction and demonstrate that these data are sufficient for in-depth studies of z ≳ 7 sources (using a z = 9.5 galaxy behind MACS J1149.5+2223 as an example). For the first cluster of the survey (the Bullet Cluster) we have released all high-level data mosaics and IRAC empirical point-spread function models. In the future we plan to release these data products for the entire survey.

  4. Program For Displaying Computed Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, Kam W.

    1995-01-01

    EM-ANIMATE computer program specialized visualization displays and animates output data on near fields and surface currents computed by electromagnetic-field program - in particular MOM3D (LAR-15074). Program based on windows and contains user-friendly, graphical interface for setting viewing options, selecting cases, manipulating files, and like. Written in FORTRAN 77. EM-ANIMATE also available as part of package, COS-10048, includes MOM3D, IRIS program computing near-field and surface-current solutions of electromagnetic-field equations.

  5. Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines, Quarterly Report: 3rd Quarter, Issue No.2, July-September 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinal. J.; Tu, P.

    2001-05-16

    This newsletter provides a brief overview of the Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines conducted out of the NWTC and a description of current activities. The newsletter also contains case studies of current projects.

  6. Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines: Quarterly Report for October-December 2000; 4th Quarter, Iss. No.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinal, J.

    2001-07-03

    This newsletter provides a brief overview of the Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines conducted out of the NWTC and a description of current activities. The newsletter also contains case studies of current projects.

  7. Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines: Quarterly Report for January-March 2001; 1st Quarter, Issue No.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, T.; Cardinal, J.

    2001-10-30

    This newsletter provides a brief overview of the Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines conducted out of the NWTC and a description of current activities. The newsletter also contains case studies of current projects.

  8. LATTICEEASY A Program for Lattice Simulations of Scalar Fields in an Expanding Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G; Tkachev, Igor; Felder, Gary

    2008-01-01

    We describe a C++ program that we have written and made available for calculating the evolution of interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. The program is particularly useful for the study of reheating and thermalization after inflation. The program and its full documentation are available on the Web at http://physics.stanford.edu/gfelder/latticeeasy. In this paper we provide a brief overview of what the program does and what it is useful for.

  9. An Overview of Quality Programs that Support Transition-Aged Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kalinyak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a concise overview of several programs that deliver services to transition-aged youth, ages 14–29. Included are family support, the Assisting Unaccompanied Children and Youth program, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration services, the wraparound approach, intensive home-based treatment, multisystemic therapy, foster care, independent living, mentoring, the Steps to Success program, the Jump on Board for Success program, the Options program, the Positive Action program, the Transition to Success model, and the Transition to Independence Program. Primary focus is placed upon the usefulness of each of the programs in facilitating successful outcomes for transition-aged youth.

  10. Overview of an Advanced Hypersonic Structural Concept Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Craig A.; Hudson, Larry D.; Piazza, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of hypersonics M&S advanced structural concepts development and experimental methods. The discussion on concepts development includes the background, task objectives, test plan, and current status of the C/SiC Ruddervator Subcomponent Test Article (RSTA). The discussion of experimental methods examines instrumentation needs, sensors of interest, and examples of ongoing efforts in the development of extreme environment sensors.

  11. An overview of field-specific designs of microbial EOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, E.P.; Bala, G.A.; Fox, S.L.; Jackson, J.D.; Thomas, C.P. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The selection and design of an MEOR process for application in a specific field involves geological, reservoir, and biological characterization. Microbially mediated oil recovery mechanisms (bigenic gas, biopolymers, and biosurfactants) are defined by the types of microorganisms used. The engineering and biological character of a given reservoir must be understood to correctly select a microbial system to enhance oil recovery. This paper discusses the methods used to evaluate three fields with distinct characteristics and production problems for the applicability of MEOR would not be applicable in two of the three fields considered. The development of a microbial oil recovery process for the third field appeared promising. Development of a bacterial consortium capable of producing the desired metabolites was initiated, and field isolates were characterized.

  12. The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program: Overview and Update FY15 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Sampson, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) program, and its subset the NASA Electronic Parts Assurance Group (NEPAG), are NASA's point-of-contacts for reliability and radiation tolerance of electrical, electronic, and electromechanical (EEE) parts and their packages. This presentation includes a Fiscal Year 2015 program overview.

  13. Encendiendo una Llama. Bilingual Gifted and Talented Program: Overview, Identification of Students, and Instructional Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartford Public Schools, CT.

    Three pamphlets describe facets of "Encendiendo Una Llama," a Hartford (Connecticut) demonstration program for bilingual gifted and talented students. An overview pamphlet summarizes key aspects of the model program: identification procedures, instructional services, teacher training, parent involvement, evidence of effectiveness, implementation…

  14. Human Research Program Science Management: Overview of Research and Development Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of research and development activities of NASA's Human Research Science Management Program is presented. The topics include: 1) Human Research Program Goals; 2) Elements and Projects within HRP; 3) Development and Maintenance of Priorities; 4) Acquisition and Evaluation of Research and Technology Proposals; and 5) Annual Reviews

  15. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Isotope Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carty, J.

    2004-10-05

    This presentation provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Isotopes Program. The charter of the Isotope Programs covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials, and related isotope services.

  16. 76 FR 14379 - Advanced Placement Incentive Program; Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Overview...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... Advanced Placement Incentive Program; Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Overview Information... Advanced Placement Programs is from section 1705(c) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965... Secondary Education may change the maximum amount through a notice published in the Federal...

  17. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. SHPPS 2006 was designed to answer the following questions: (1) What are the characteristics of each school health program component at the state,…

  18. Overview of the GASP project; Field applications and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarshar, M.M.; Lovie, P.M. (Goodfellow Lovie Associates (GB))

    1992-03-01

    This paper reports that the aim of the Goodfellow Assocs. subsea production (GASP) project was to develop a subsea production system for use in the development of marginal oil fields. The project was divided into three phases that culminated in testing a prototype system in a dry dock. The GASP system enables manifolding of products, separation of gas from produced liquids, and transportation of gas and liquids, and transportation of gas and liquids through separate lines. The produced liquids are pumped with a single-phase pumping system that is highly modularized for ease of installation and retrieval of key components. GASP is suitable for deepwater application and development of marginal fields far from the host platform. The economics were assessed with probabilistic methods to weigh the uncertainties. Developing marginal fields with the GASP system looks attractive, offering a development cost of $2.50 to $5.50 per barrel in many typical instances.

  19. The upcoming field of theranostic nanomedicine: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Priyanka; Patravale, Vandana

    2012-12-01

    Nanocarriers have drastically changed the face of health care by making a mark in diverse arenas of diagnosis, drug delivery, and gene delivery to name a few. The recent feat in nanotechnology has been the birth of nanotheranostics which aims at blending both therapeutic and diagnostic functions within a single nanoscaffold. The field of theranostic nanomedicine is a result of fruitful advances in fields of material science, imaging modalities, formulation development, and molecular biology. Theranostic nanomedicine that was at first developed for enhancing the quality of treatment meted out to cancer patients has now been explored even in atherosclerosis and infections, albeit to a lower extent. The review summarizes various types of nanocarriers that have been explored with one or sometimes multiple imaging modalities for an array of applications ranging from drug delivery and gene delivery to photosensitizing agent delivery for photodynamic therapy. The article also highlights the few but significant developments made in the field of theranostic nanomedicine for atherosclerosis and infections. In conclusion, theranostic nanomedicine is a rapidly growing field. However, there are a few problems that need to be addressed before theranostic nanocarriers carve a niche for themselves in the clinic.

  20. NASA’S PLANETARY GEOLOGIC MAPPING PROGRAM: OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA’s Planetary Science Division supports the geologic mapping of planetary surfaces through a distinct organizational structure and a series of research and analysis (R&A) funding programs. Cartography and geologic mapping issues for NASA’s planetary science programs are overseen by the Mapping and Planetary Spatial Infrastructure Team (MAPSIT), which is an assessment group for cartography similar to the Mars Exploration Program Assessment Group (MEPAG) for Mars exploration. MAPSIT...

  1. Overview of the Axial Field Spectrometer in the ISR tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A view of the Axial Field Spectrometer – the last large experiment at the ISR. The horizontal top and vertical outer arrays of the uranium-scintillator hadron calorimeter are clear to be seen, with the blue cylindrical pole piece of the magnet just visible. The pipes that are visible in front of the pole piece are cryogenic feed pipes for the superconducting low-beta quadrupoles.

  2. (abstract) JPL Cryocooler Development and Test Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Many near-term and future space-instrument programs within NASA and the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) depend on the successful development of long-life, low-vibration space cryocoolers. The most demanding near-term programs include a number of science instruments selected for NASA's Earth Observing System (Eos) program, and a number of space reconnaissance instruments associated with the BMDO's Brilliant Eyes program; both of these programs require delivery of similar types of flight coolers in the next few years. To help ensure the success of these cooler commitments, JPL has implemented an extensive cryocooler program in support of the NASA/JPL AIRS project, the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AFPL), and the Air Force Space and Missiles Systems Division (SMC). This program is directed at assisting industry in developing advanced cryocoolers that successfully address the broad array of complex performance requirements needed for NASA and BMDO long-life space instruments. The JPL cryocooler program includes extensive characterization and life testing of industry-developed cryocoolers, development and flight testing of advanced sorption cooler systems for detector cooling to 10 K , development of mechanical cryocooler enhancement technologies, and flight tests of advanced low-vibration Stirling-cooler systems.

  3. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory/University of California lighting program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, S.

    1981-12-01

    The objective of the Lighting Program is to assist and work in concert with the lighting community (composed of manufacturers, designers, and users) to achieve a more efficient lighting economy. To implement its objectives, the Lighting Program has been divided into three major categories: technical engineering, buildings applications, and human impacts (impacts on health and vision). The technical program aims to undertake research and development projects that are both long-range and high-risk and which the lighting industry has little interest in pursuing on its own, but from which significant benefits could accrue to both the public and the industry. The building applications program studies the effects that introducing daylighting in commercial buildings has on lighting and cooling electrical energy requirements as well as on peak demand. This program also examines optimization strategies for integrating energy-efficient design, lighting hardware, daylighting, and overall building energy requirements. The impacts program examines relationships between the user and the physical lighting environment, in particular how new energy-efficient technologies relate to human productivity and health. These efforts are interdisciplinary, involving engineering, optometry, and medicine. The program facilities are described and the personnel in the program is identified.

  4. Overview of Four Prescription Monitoring/Review Programs in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D Furlan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prescription monitoring or review programs collect information about prescription and dispensing of controlled substances for the purposes of monitoring, analysis and education. In Canada, it is the responsibility of the provincial institutions to organize, maintain and run such programs.

  5. Overview and Summary: School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Laura; Brener, Nancy D.; Wechsler, Howell

    2007-01-01

    Background: The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) 2006 is the largest, most comprehensive assessment of school health programs in the United States ever conducted. Methods: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducts SHPPS every 6 years. In 2006, computer-assisted telephone interviews or self-administered mail…

  6. 40 CFR 1065.15 - Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overview of procedures for laboratory and field testing. 1065.15 Section 1065.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Applicability and General Provisions §...

  7. Field Operations Program Activities Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. Francfort; D. V. O' Hara; L. A. Slezak

    1999-05-01

    The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

  8. NASA RPS Program Overview: A Focus on RPS Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamley, John A.; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Sandifer, Carl E., II; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program is to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet the needs of the missions. To meet this goal, the RPS Program, working closely with the Department of Energy, performs mission and system studies (such as the recently released Nuclear Power Assessment Study), assesses the readiness of promising technologies to infuse in future generators, assesses the sustainment of key RPS capabilities and knowledge, forecasts and tracks the Programs budgetary needs, and disseminates current information about RPS to the community of potential users. This process has been refined and used to determine the current content of the RPS Programs portfolio. This portfolio currently includes an effort to mature advanced thermoelectric technology for possible integration into an enhanced Multi-Mission Radioisotope Generator (eMMRTG), sustainment and production of the currently deployed MMRTG, and technology investments that could lead to a future Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). This paper describes the program planning processes that have been used, the currently available MMRTG, and one of the potential future systems, the eMMRTG.

  9. An overview of the KORUS-AQ field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, L.; Ahn, J.; Park, J.; Hong, J.; Hong, Y.; Song, C. K.; Kim, S. K.; Park, R.; Kim, J.; Lefer, B. L.; Crawford, J. H.; Al-Saadi, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Korea peninsular is under the influence of the largest emission source in East Asia in addition to local emissions, complicating effective pollution control by government. An international air quality field campaign in Korea, KORUS-AQ, was conducted during 6 weeks between May-June 2016, which was led by the National Institute of Environmental Research (NIER) of Korea and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States. The KORUS-AQ focused on the air quality of SMA with the aim of characterizing chemical evolution, improving emission inventories, assessing trans-boundary contribution and validating satellite application. 133 research teams from 80 organizations in both Korea and U.S.A were involved in KORUS-AQ with 3 research aircrafts, 2 research vessels and 16 ground sites constituting multi-platform observations framework. KORUS-AQ campaign also served the preparation for the future launch of geostationary satellite instruments; GEMS (Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer), TEMPO(Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) and Sentinel-4 which will provide real-time air quality (e.g. O3, NO2, SO2, HCHO, AOD, etc.) data enabling us better understanding of air quality in globe.

  10. Overview of the solar dynamic ground test demonstration program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the availability of SD technologies in a simulated space environment at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) vacuum facility. An aerospace industry/ government team is working together to design, fabricate, build, and test a complete SD system. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A description of the SD system includes key design features of the system, subsystems, and components as reported at the Critical Design Review (CDR).

  11. Overview of the EPA quality system for environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Formalized quality assurance program requirements for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been established for more than a decade. During this period, the environmental issues and concerns addressed by the EPA have changed. Many issues, such as ozone depletion and global climate warming, have become international concerns among the world environmental community. Other issues, such as hazardous waste cleanup and clean air, remain a focus of national environmental concerns. As the environmental issues of the 1980`s evolved, the traditional quality assurance (QA) program was transformed through the use of quality management principles into a Quality System to help managers meet the needs of the 1990`s and beyond.

  12. High-level waste immobilization program: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, W.R.

    1979-09-01

    The High-Level Waste Immobilization Program is providing technology to allow safe, affordable immobilization and disposal of nuclear waste. Waste forms and processes are being developed on a schedule consistent with national needs for immobilization of high-level wastes stored at Savannah River, Hanford, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and West Valley, New York. This technology is directly applicable to high-level wastes from potential reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The program is removing one more obstacle previously seen as a potential restriction on the use and further development of nuclear power, and is thus meeting a critical technological need within the national objective of energy independence.

  13. The Escompte Programme: An Overview of The Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, P.; Cros, B.; Peuch, V. H.; Kottmeier, C.; Saïd, F.; Perros, P.; Robin, D.

    The ESCOMPTE programme (http://medias.obs-mip.fr/escompte) is embedded in a long-term strategy whose aim is the improvement of air quality. In order to be able to take preventive measures to reduce the size and the effects of pollution events, we need to dispose of efficient tools of prediction of these events. Such tools, yet to be developed or improved, are, on the one hand, the inventory of the various pollu- tion sources (fixed and mobile), and, on the other hand, mathematical models able to accurately simulate the dynamical (diffusion and transport) and chemical (reactions) processes under which the various solid, liquid and gaseous species will evolve. The main objective of the ESCOMPTE programme is to gather a data set of some pollution events, involving the emissions of primary pollutants, as well as atmospheric dynam- ics and chemistry. This data set, acquired at the surface and in the lower troposphere, in a region located South-East of France, between June 4th and July 16th, 2001, will serve as a reference for qualifying the CTMs of atmospheric pollution, from local- to regional-scale. A 120km*120km area, around the "Marseille-Berre" site, in the South-eastern of France, has been selected to host the ESCOMPTE field campaign. This region presents a high occurrence of photochemical pollution, because it is one of the most sunny re- gions of France, with anticyclonic conditions prevailing during summer ; it involves the urbanized area of Marseille city (more than one million people), and the "Fos- Berre" industrial area (oil refineries, power plants, E), both being considerable sources of various pollutants ; it presents terrain characteristics (land-sea-breeze circulations ; numerous hills and mountain chains up to more than thousand meters high) acting as dynamical forcings on the transport of pollutants. Although the core domain of ESCOMPTE is a 100km*100km box, a hierarchy of chemistry and/or transport models is involved in the programme, and is able do

  14. Geometric Modeling Applications Interface Program (GMAP). Volume 1. Executive Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Z . Code) 10. SOURCE OF FUNDING NOS. PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) GEOMETRIC...342f CI FTR560240OOlU September 1989 SECTION 2 SCOPE OF GMAP GMAP focused on the generacion , control, and exchange of computer information to replace

  15. Biomass Power: Program overview fiscal years 1993--1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Biomass Power Program and industry are developing technologies to expand the use of biomass that include methods of feedstock production and the equipment to convert feedstocks into electric power or process heat. With the help of advanced biomass power technologies and new feedstock supply systems, as much as 50,000 megawatts (MW) of biomass power capacity will be in place by the year 2010. The Biomass Power Program supports the development of three technologies -- gasification, pyrolysis, and direct combustion -- from the laboratory bench scale to the prototype commercial scale. Gasification equipment produces biogas that is burned in high-efficiency turbine-generators developed for the electric power industry. Pyrolysis processes produce oils from renewable biomass that burn like petroleum to generate electricity. In direct combustion technology, power plants today burn bulk biomass directly to generate electricity. Improving the direct combustion technology of these plants increases efficiency and reduces emissions. In addition to developing these three technologies, the Biomass Power Program supports joint ventures to plan and construct facilities that demonstrate the benefits of biomass power. The program is supporting joint ventures to conduct 10 case studies of dedicated feedstock supply systems.

  16. Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program's goal is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communication technologies

  17. Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program: Program Overview and Philadelphia Project Highlight (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-01-01

    Case Study with WIPP program overview, information regarding eligibility, and successes from Pennsylvania's Commission on Economic Opportunity (CEO) that demonstrate innovative approaches that maximize the benefit of the program. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recently launched the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) to accelerate innovations in whole-house weatherization and advance DOE's goal of increasing the energy efficiency and health and safety of homes of low-income families. Since 2010, WIPP has helped weatherization service providers as well as new and nontraditional partners leverage non-federal financial resources to supplement federal grants, saving taxpayer money. WIPP complements the Weatherization Assistance program (WAP), which operates nation-wide, in U.S. territories and in three Native American tribes. 16 grantees are implementing weatherization innovation projects using experimental approaches to find new and better ways to weatherize homes. They are using approaches such as: (1) Financial tools - by understanding a diverse range of financing mechanisms, grantees can maximize the impact of the federal grant dollars while providing high-quality work and benefits to eligible low-income clients; (2) Green and healthy homes - in addition to helping families reduce their energy costs, grantees can protect their health and safety. Two WIPP projects (Connecticut and Maryland) will augment standard weatherization services with a comprehensive green and healthy homes approach; (3) New technologies and techniques - following the model of continuous improvement in weatherization, WIPP grantees will continue to use new and better technologies and techniques to improve the quality of work; (4) Residential energy behavior change - Two grantees are rigorously testing home energy monitors (HEMs) that display energy used in kilowatt-hours, allowing residents to monitor and reduce their

  18. Technical Risk Identification at Program Inception Product Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-08

    james.t.farrell@boeing.com Boeing Tracy Fiedler tracy.m.fiedler@raytheon.com Raytheon Brad Fields fields.brad@orbital.com Orbital Sherri Fike sfike...rocket.com Rocket Michael Sampson michael.j.sampson@nasa.gov NASA Victor Sank victor.j.sank@nasa.gov NASA Don Sawyer don.sawyer@avnet.com AVNET Fred ...Grumman Ghislain Turgeon ghislain.turgeon@sslmda.com SSL Deborah Valley deborah.valley@ll.mit.edu MIT Fred Van Milligen fvanmilligen@jdsu.com JDSU

  19. Field: A Program for Simulating Ultrasound Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1997-01-01

    A program for the simulation of ultrasound systems is presented.It is based on the Tupholme-Stepanishen method, and is fastbecause of the use of a far-field approximation. Any kind oftransducer geometry and excitation can be simulated, and bothpulse-echo and continuous wave fields can be calculated...... for bothtransmit and pulse-echo. Dynamic apodization and focusing arehandled through time lines, and different focusingschemes can be simulated. The versatility of the program isensured by interfacing it to Matlab. All routines are calleddirectly from Matlab, and all Matlab features can be used. Thismakes...

  20. Dartmouth College Earth Sciences Mobile Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E. E.; Osterberg, E. C.; Dade, W. B.; Sonder, L. J.; Renshaw, C. E.; Kelly, M. A.; Hawley, R. L.; Chipman, J. W.; Mikucki, J.; Posmentier, E. S.; Moore, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    For the last 50 years the Department of Earth Sciences at Dartmouth College has offered a term-long, undergraduate field program, informally called "the Stretch". A student typically enrolls during fall quarter of his or her junior year soon after choosing a major or minor. The program thus provides valuable field context for courses that a student will take during the remainder of his or her undergraduate career. Unlike many traditional field camps that focus on one particular region, the Stretch is a mobile program that currently travels through Western North America, from the Canadian Rockies to the Grand Canyon. The program spans two and a half months, during which time undergraduates, graduate TAs, and faculty live, work, and learn collaboratively. Dartmouth College faculty members sequentially teach individual 1- to 2-week segments that focus on their interests and expertise; currently, there are a total of eight segments led by eleven faculty members. Consequently, topics are diverse and include economic geology, geobiology, geomorphology, glaciology, glacial geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, paleontology, stratigraphy, structure and tectonics, and volcanology. The field localities are equally varied, including the alpine glaciers of western Alberta, the national parks of Montana, Wyoming and Utah, the eastern Sierra Nevada, the southern Great Basin, and highlight such classic geological field locales as Sheep Mountain in Wyoming's Bighorn Basin, Death Valley, and the Grand Canyon. Overall, the program aims to: 1) give students a broad perspective on the timing and nature of the processes that resulted in the landscape and underlying geology of western North America; and 2) introduce students to a wide variety of geological environments, field techniques, and research equipment. Students emerge from the program with wide-ranging exposure to active research questions as well as a working knowledge of core field skills in the earth sciences. Stretch students

  1. Overview of the Intelligent Manufacturing Systems (IMS) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, A. [Canadian IMS Secretraiat, Ottawa, (Canada); Adjemian, A. [European Commission, DG-RTD, Brussels (Belgium)

    2001-07-01

    According to its proponents, the Intelligent Manufacturing System is a highly efficient, global production system, designed as the first decisive step in ensuring that society will continue to flourish materially and spiritually. It is the gateway to advanced manufacturing and processing technologies, represented by a project-based, industry-led, government-endorsed program of cooperative research, carried out in seven industrially advanced regions of the world (Australia, Canada, Europe, Japan, Switzerland, USA, Korea). Currently, there are projects worth about $250 million in progress involving 200+ companies and 200+ research institutions. The benefits of IMS sponsorship, and the type of projects carried on as part of the program (e.g. projects dealing with total product life cycle issues, process issues, strategy/planning /design tools, human/organisation/social issues, virtual/extended enterprise issues) are discussed.

  2. Geothermal program overview: Fiscal years 1993--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The DOE Geothermal Energy Program is involved in three main areas of research: finding and tapping the resource; power generation; and direct use of geothermal energy. This publication summarizes research accomplishments for FY 1993 and 1994 for the following: geophysical and geochemical technologies; slimhole drilling for exploration; resource assessment; lost circulation control; rock penetration mechanics; instrumentation; Geothermal Drilling Organization; reservoir analysis; brine injection; hot dry rock; The Geysers; Geothermal Technology Organization; heat cycle research; advanced heat rejection; materials development; and advanced brine chemistry.

  3. Overview of recent activities in the Heat Cycle Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Heat Cycle Research Program, which is being conducted for the Department of Energy, has as its objective the development of the technology for effecting the improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. To meet this objective, the program has as one of its goals to improve the performance of geothermal binary cycles to levels approaching the practicable thermodynamic maximum. In pursuit of this goal, tests are being conducted at the Heat Cycle Research Facility located at the DOE Geothermal Test Facility, East Mesa, California. The current testing involves the investigation of binary power cycle performance utilizing mixtures of non-adjacent hydrocarbons as the working fluids, with supercritical vaporization and in-tube condensation of the working fluid. In addition to the present test program, preparations are being made to investigate the binary cycle performance improvements which can be achieved by allowing supersaturated vapor expansions in the turbine. These efforts are anticipated to verify that through the utilization of these advanced power cycle concepts and allowing the supersaturated turbine expansions, improvements of up to 28% in the net geofluid effectiveness (net watt hours plant output per pound of geofluid) over conventional binary power plants can be achieved. Results presented for the recent testing, including those tests examining the performance of the countercurrent condenser at different tube inclinations, support the assumptions used in projected performance improvements. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Shellside flow-induced tube vibration in typical heat exchanger configurations: overview of a research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J.M.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive research program is being conducted to develop the necessary criteria to assist designers and operators of shell-and-tube heat exchangers to avoid detrimental flow-induced tube vibration. This paper presents an overview of the insights gained from shellside water-flow testing on a horizontal, industrial-sized test exchanger that can be configured in many ways using interchangeable tube bundles and replaceable nozzles. Nearly 50 different configurations have been tested representing various combinations of triangular, square, rotated-triangular, and rotated-square tubefield layouts; odd and even numbers of crosspasses; and both single- and double-segmental baffles with different cut sizes and orientations. The results are generally consistent with analytical relationships that predict tube vibration response by the combined reinforcing effect of the vibration mode shape and flow velocity distribution. An understanding of the vibration and instability performance is facilitated by recognizing that the excitation is induced by three separate, though sometimes interacting, flow conditions. These are the crossflows that generate ''classic'' fluidelastic instabilities in the interior of the tube bundle, the entrance and exit bundle flow from and into the shell nozzles, and the localized high velocity bypass and leakage stream flows. The implications to design and/or possible field remedies to avoid vibration problems are discussed. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  5. An overview of the NASA textile composites program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center is conducting and sponsoring research to explore the benefits of textile reinforced composites for civil transport aircraft primary structures. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate the potential of affordable textile reinforced composite materials to meet design properties and damage tolerance requirements of advanced aircraft structures. In addition to in-house research, the program includes major participation by the aircraft industry and aerospace textile companies. The major program elements include development of textile preforms, processing science, mechanics of materials, experimental characterization of materials, and development and evaluation of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. The NASA Langley in-house research is focused on science-based understanding of resin transfer molding (RTM), development of powder-coated towpreg processes, analysis methodology, and development of a performance database on textile reinforced composites. The focus of the textile industry participation is on development of multidirectional, damage-tolerant preforms, and the aircraft industry participation is in the areas of innovative design concepts, cost-effective fabrication, and testing of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. Textile processes such as 3-D weaving, 2-D and 3-D braiding, and knitting/stitching are being compared with conventional laminated tape processes for improved damage tolerance. Through-the-thickness reinforcements offer significant damage tolerance improvements. However, these gains must be weighed against potential loss in in-plane properties such as strength and stiffness. Analytical trade studies are underway to establish design guidelines for the application of textile material forms to meet specific loading requirements. Fabrication and testing of large structural components are required to establish the full potential of textile

  6. Gasoline toxicology: overview of regulatory and product stewardship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Derek; Jaques, Andrew; Walker, J C; Estreicher, Herb

    2014-11-01

    Significant efforts have been made to characterize the toxicological properties of gasoline. There have been both mandatory and voluntary toxicology testing programs to generate hazard characterization data for gasoline, the refinery process streams used to blend gasoline, and individual chemical constituents found in gasoline. The Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) is the primary tool for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate gasoline and this supplement presents the results of the Section 211(b) Alternative Tier 2 studies required for CAA Fuel and Fuel Additive registration. Gasoline blending streams have also been evaluated by EPA under the voluntary High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program through which the petroleum industry provide data on over 80 refinery streams used in gasoline. Product stewardship efforts by companies and associations such as the American Petroleum Institute (API), Conservation of Clean Air and Water Europe (CONCAWE), and the Petroleum Product Stewardship Council (PPSC) have contributed a significant amount of hazard characterization data on gasoline and related substances. The hazard of gasoline and anticipated exposure to gasoline vapor has been well characterized for risk assessment purposes.

  7. Human Research Program Advanced Exercise Concepts (AEC) Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perusek, Gail; Lewandowski, Beth; Nall, Marsha; Norsk, Peter; Linnehan, Rick; Baumann, David

    2015-01-01

    Exercise countermeasures provide benefits that are crucial for successful human spaceflight, to mitigate the spaceflight physiological deconditioning which occurs during exposure to microgravity. The NASA Human Research Program (HRP) within the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) is managing next generation Advanced Exercise Concepts (AEC) requirements development and candidate technology maturation to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7 (ground prototyping and flight demonstration) for all exploration mission profiles from Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Exploration Missions (up to 21 day duration) to Mars Transit (up to 1000 day duration) missions. These validated and optimized exercise countermeasures systems will be provided to the ISS Program and MPCV Program for subsequent flight development and operations. The International Space Station (ISS) currently has three major pieces of operational exercise countermeasures hardware: the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), the second-generation (T2) treadmill, and the cycle ergometer with vibration isolation system (CEVIS). This suite of exercise countermeasures hardware serves as a benchmark and is a vast improvement over previous generations of countermeasures hardware, providing both aerobic and resistive exercise for the crew. However, vehicle and resource constraints for future exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit will require that the exercise countermeasures hardware mass, volume, and power be minimized, while preserving the current ISS capabilities or even enhancing these exercise capabilities directed at mission specific physiological functional performance and medical standards requirements. Further, mission-specific considerations such as preservation of sensorimotor function, autonomous and adaptable operation, integration with medical data systems, rehabilitation, and in-flight monitoring and feedback are being developed for integration with the exercise

  8. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment: design studies based on superconducting and hybrid toroidal field coils. Design overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A. (ed.)

    1984-10-01

    This document is a design overview that describes the scoping studies and preconceptual design effort performed in FY 1983 on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) class of device. These studies focussed on devices with all-superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and on devices with superconducting TF coils supplemented with copper TF coil inserts located in the bore of the TF coils in the shield region. Each class of device is designed to satisfy the mission of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn. Typical design parameters are: major radius = 3.75 m, minor radius = 1.0 m, field on axis = 4.5 T, plasma current = 7.0 MA. These designs relay on lower hybrid (LHRH) current rampup and heating to ignition using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF). A pumped limiter has been assumed for impurity control. The present document is a design overview; a more detailed design description is contained in a companion document.

  9. Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6 percent of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the U.S. public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99 percent of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98 percent. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future U.S. energy markets.

  10. Overview of the superconducting undulator development program at ANKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalbuoni, S., E-mail: sara.casalbuoni@kit.edu; Cecilia, A.; Gerstl, S.; Glamann, N.; Grau, A.; Holubek, T.; Meuter, C.; Saez de Jauregui, D.; Voutta, R. [ANKA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Boffo, C.; Gerhard, Th.; Turenne, M.; Walter, W. [Babcock Noell GmbH, Alfred Nobel Str. 20, 97080 Würzburg (Germany)

    2016-07-27

    Superconducting undulators (SCUs) have the potential to reach higher brilliance and flux with respect to the state of the art permanent magnet insertion devices. ANKA is collaborating with the industrial partner Babcock Noell GmbH (BNG) to realize NbTi conduction cooled planar devices for low emittance light sources, and is developing the instrumentation to characterize the magnetic field properties and to measure the beam heat load to a cold bore needed for the cryogenic design of SCUs. We present here: the most recent results obtained within the ANKA-BNG collaboration, the progress achieved in the development of the instrumentation, and the in house studies on the application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) tape to the SCU technology.

  11. NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems Program Overview - A Focus on RPS Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamley, John A.; McCallum, Peter W.; Sandifer, Carl E., II; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program is to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet potential future mission needs. To meet this goal, the RPS Program manages investments in RPS technologies and RPS system development, working closely with the Department of Energy. This paper provides an overview of the RPS Program content and status, its collaborations with potential RPS users, and the approach employed to maintain the readiness of RPS to support future NASA mission concepts.

  12. Overview of computerized dietary assessment programs for research and practice in nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Yasmine C; Tapsell, Linda C

    2005-01-01

    Computerized dietary assessment programs are often used for nutrition education research and practice. This article provides an informal overview of 29 dietary assessment programs mentioned in the literature covered by MEDLINE from 1996 to 2003, along with the components and capabilities of these programs derived from additional sources as needed. According to the literature, the advantages of using computers for dietary assessment include standardization of the questioning sequence, fast and easy processing, immediate results, and increased flexibility. The disadvantages include the need for typing skills and computer literacy, as well as potential bias in the responses if an interviewer is required.

  13. An Overview of the US DCLL ITER TBM Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C. P. C. [General Atomics, San Diego; Abdou, M [University of California, Los Angeles; Dagher, M [University of California, Los Angeles; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Kurtz, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Malang, Siegfried [Consultant; Marriott, Edward [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Merrill, Brad [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Messadek, K [University of California, Los Angeles; Morley, N.B. [University of California, Los Angeles; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Sawan, M. [University of Wisconsin; Sharafat, S [University of California, Los Angeles; Smolentsev, Sergey [University of California, Los Angeles; Sze, Dai-Kai [University of California, San Diego; Willms, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ying, Alice [University of California, Los Angeles; Youssef, M Z [University of California, Los Angeles

    2010-01-01

    Under the US Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology program, we selected the Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) concept as our primary Test Blanket Module (TBM) for testing in ITER. The DCLL blanket concept has the potential to be a high-performance DEMO blanket design with a projected thermal efficiency of >40%. Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAF/M) steel is used as the structural material. Helium is used to cool the first wall and blanket structure, and the self-cooled Pb-17Li breeder is circulated for power conversion and for tritium extraction. A SiC-based flow channel insert (FCI) is used as an electrical insulator for magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop reduction from the circulating Pb-17Li and as a thermal insulator to separate the high-temperature Pb-17Li ({approx}650-700 C) from the RAF/M structure, which has a corrosion temperature limit of {approx}480 C. The RAF/M material must also operate at temperatures above 350 C but less than 550 C. We are continuing the development of the mechanical design and performing neutronics, structural and thermal hydraulics analyses of the DCLL TBM module. Prototypical FCI structures were fabricated and further attention was paid to MHD effects and the design of the inboard blanket for DEMO. We are also making progress on related R&D needs to address key areas. This paper is a summary report on the progress and results of recent DCLL TBM development activities.

  14. An overview of the US DCLL ITER-TBM program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C., E-mail: wongc@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, P.O. Box, 85608, San Diego, CA, 92186-5608 (United States); Abdou, M.; Dagher, M. [University of California-Los Angeles, CA (United States); Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kurtz, R.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Malang, S. [Fusion Nuclear Technology Consulting, Linkenheim (Germany); Marriott, E.P. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Merrill, B.J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Messadek, K.; Morley, N.B. [University of California-Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sawan, M.E. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sharafat, S.; Smolentsev, S. [University of California-Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sze, D.K. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Willms, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ying, A.; Youssef, M.Z. [University of California-Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Under the US Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology program, we selected the Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) concept as our primary Test Blanket Module (TBM) for testing in ITER. The DCLL blanket concept has the potential to be a high-performance DEMO blanket design with a projected thermal efficiency of >40%. Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAF/M) steel is used as the structural material. Helium is used to cool the first wall and blanket structure, and the self-cooled Pb-17Li breeder is circulated for power conversion and for tritium extraction. A SiC-based flow channel insert (FCI) is used as an electrical insulator for magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop reduction from the circulating Pb-17Li and as a thermal insulator to separate the high-temperature Pb-17Li ({approx}650-700 deg. C) from the RAF/M structure, which has a corrosion temperature limit of {approx}480 deg. C. The RAF/M material must also operate at temperatures above 350 deg. C but less than 550 deg. C. We are continuing the development of the mechanical design and performing neutronics, structural and thermal hydraulics analyses of the DCLL TBM module. Prototypical FCI structures were fabricated and further attention was paid to MHD effects and the design of the inboard blanket for DEMO. We are also making progress on related R and D needs to address key areas. This paper is a summary report on the progress and results of recent DCLL TBM development activities.

  15. Overview of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannister, R.L.; Bevc, F.P.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse`s experience with land based gas turbines started in 1945 with the development of a 2000 hp gas turbine-generator set that consisted of a single reduction gear, compressor, 12 combustors and turbine. A thermal efficiency of 18% was obtained. By 1954, Westinghouse had developed a 15 MW unit (with a regenerator and intercooler) that was designed for a full-load simple cycle efficiency of 29%. As the initial step in the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, Westinghouse has already developed a 230 MW gas turbine that has a simple cycle efficiency of 38.5% without the use of regeneration and intercooler concepts. In 1967, Westinghouse developed its first gas turbine combined cycle, a synergistic combination of the Brayton and the Rankine cycles. In a combined cycle the heat rejected by the higher temperature topping cycle is recovered in the lower temperature bottoming cycle to produce additional power from the energy initially released by the fuel. In this first Westinghouse combined cycle, a 1450{degrees}F burner outlet temperature gas turbine, rated at 25 MW, supplied exhaust heat which was used in a boiler to furnish steam to drive an 85 MW steam turbine. This plant achieved an annual average efficiency of 39.6%.

  16. An overview of the Nuclear Materials Focus Area research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROBERSON,GARY D.; POLANSKY,GARY F.; OSBORNE,KEN K.; RANDALL,VIRGINIA

    2000-02-25

    The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) is responsible for providing comprehensive needs identification, integration of technology research and development activities, and technology deployment for stabilization, packaging, and interim storage of surplus nuclear materials within the DOE complex. The NMFA was chartered in April 1999 by the Office of Science and Technology (OST), an organizational component of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). OST manages a national program to conduct basic and applied research, and technology development, demonstration, and deployment assistance that is essential to completing a timely and cost-effective cleanup of the DOE nuclear weapons complex. DOE/EM provides environmental research results, as well as cleanup technologies and systems, to meet high-priority end-user needs, reduce EM's major cost centers and technological risks, and accelerate technology deployments. The NMFA represents the segment of EM that focuses on technological solutions for re-using, transforming, and disposing excess nuclear materials and is jointly managed by the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office and the DOE Idaho Operations Office.

  17. NASA F-16XL supersonic laminar flow control program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of the NASA supersonic laminar flow control program are provided. Successful application of laminar flow control to a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) offers significant benefits in reductions of take-off gross weight, mission fuel burn, cruise drag, structural temperatures, engine size, emissions, and sonic boom. The ultimate economic success of the proposed HSCT may depend on the successful adaption of laminar flow control, which offers the single most significant potential improvements in lift drag ratio (L/D) of all the aerodynamic technologies under consideration. The F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Control (SLFC) Experiment was conceived based on the encouraging results of in-house and NASA supported industry studies to determine if laminar flow control is feasible for the HSCT. The primary objective is to achieve extensive laminar flow (50-60 percent chord) on a highly swept supersonic wing. Data obtained from the flight test will be used to validate existing Euler and Navier Stokes aerodynamic codes and transition prediction boundary layer stability codes. These validated codes and developed design methodology will be delivered to industry for their use in designing supersonic laminar flow control wings. Results from this experiment will establish preliminary suction system design criteria enabling industry to better size the suction system and develop improved estimates of system weight, fuel volume loss due to wing ducting, turbocompressor power requirements, etc. so that benefits and penalties can be more accurately assessed.

  18. 2003 Biology and Biotechnology Research Program Overview and Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prange, C

    2003-03-01

    LLNL conducts multidisciplinary bioscience to fill national needs. Our primary roles are to: develop knowledge and tools which enhance national security, including biological, chemical and nuclear capabilities, and energy and environmental security; develop understanding of genetic and biochemical processes to enhance disease prevention, detection and treatment; develop unique biochemical measurement and computational modeling capabilities which enable understanding of biological processes; and develop technology and tools which enhance healthcare. We execute our roles through integrated multidisciplinary programs that apply our competencies in: microbial and mammalian genomics--the characterization of DNA, the genes it encodes, their regulation and function and their role in living systems; protein function and biochemistry - the structure, function, and interaction of proteins and other molecules involved in the integrated biochemical function of the processes of life; computational modeling and understanding of biochemical systems--the application of high-speed computing technology to simulate and visualize complex, integrated biological processes; bioinformatics--databasing, networking, and analysis of biological data; and bioinstrumentation--the application of physical and engineering technologies to novel biological and biochemical measurements, laboratory automation, medical device development, and healthcare technologies. We leverage the Laboratory's exceptional capabilities in the physical, computational, chemical, environmental and engineering sciences. We partner with industry and universities to utilize their state-of-the art technology and science and to make our capabilities and discoveries available to the broader research community.

  19. An Overview of Recent PISCES Program PMI Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, George; Doerner, Russell; Abe, Shota; Baldwin, Matthew; Barton, Joseph; Chen, Renkun; Gosselin, Jordan; Hollmann, Eric; Nishijima, Daisuke; Simmonds, Michael; Wang, Yong; Yu, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    The PISCES Program is focused on fundamental PMI studies of Be and W-based solid plasma facing components under steady-state and transient conditions. We will show results from studies in W, Be and mixed W-Be material systems. Topics of investigation include formation of near-surface nanobubbles from He plasma ion implantation, growth of W-fuzz from these bubbles in steady-state and transient conditions, D retention in Be and W and development of a D-retention model for both H/D isotope exchange and displacement damage experiments. Initial studies of PMI in displacement damaged W are also presented, showing the effect of damage and exposure temperature on D retention, D diffusion, W thermal conductivity. Be-based results include morphology evolution under high plasma flux exposure, Be erosion mechanisms, and retention in Be-based materials. Future plans and connections to fusion energy system requirements will be discussed. This work supported by grant DE-FG02-07ER54912.

  20. Laboratory support of drug abuse control programs: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, W J

    1977-01-01

    Labeling an individual a drug abuser has serious sociologic and legal implications that only laboratory testing can effectively allay. A proper specimen (both qualitatively and quantitatively) must be obtained for analysis. Positive identification of specimen with subject is of paramount importance. The problems of specimen substitution--other people's urine, tap water, apple juice--directly impinge here, as does the possibility of drug degradation by heat, light, and microbial attack and of drug adsorption by the container and urinary sediment. Confirmation of postives indicated by screening tests (thin layer chromatography and immunoassays) by gas chromatography and/or ultraviolet spectrophotometry is, in most situations, mandatory. An effective quality control program is an absolute requirement. Even under ideal circumstances, laboratory results can sometimes wrongly indicate the abuse of drugs; and conversely, drug abuse can take place without detection by the laboratory. As in any clinical situation, laboratory tests are only a part (albeit an important one) of the entire evaluation of the individual involved.

  1. Overview of multilayer ceramic actuator program at C-MET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, N.; Kumar, V.; Dayas, K. R.; Rao, I. C.

    2003-10-01

    One of the major programs being undertaken in our unit is, development of actuator materials and conversion of these materials into multilayer actuator devices. In order to achieve this objective, development of piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials are also being attempted. A simple and novel chemical precipitation route has been adopted for the synthesis of nano-actuator materials. Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) powder, free of agglomerates, phase pure, good chemical homogeneity and of 50 - 75 nm size has been synthesized. Synthesis of nano Ba(Sn,Ti)O3 which shows linear, nearly hysteresis free strain curve is also discussed. Phase pure electrostrictive Lead Magnesium Niobate-Lead Titanate (PMN-PT) powder with a dielectric constant of 25,000 and a Tc of 38°C was prepared through double-step process. C-MET has state of the art facility for multilayer (ML) ceramic processing. These Nano-PZT powders have been converted into 50 micron green tapes through tape casting technique. Characteristics of these synthesized materials and the fabrication of ML actuators there from are presented.

  2. An overview of the CILBO spectral observation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudawska, R.; Zender, J.; Koschny, D.

    2016-01-01

    The video equipment can be easily adopted with a spectral grating to obtain spectral information from meteors. Therefore, in recent years spectroscopic observations of meteors have become quite popular. The Meteor Research Group (MRG) of the European Space Agency has been working on upgrating the analysis of meteor spectra as well, operating image-intensified camera with objective grating (ICC8). ICC8 is located on Tenerife station of the double-station camera setup CILBO (Canary Island Long-Baseline Observatory). The pipeline software processes data with the standard calibration procedure (dark current, flat field, lens distortion corrections). While using the position of a meteor recorded by ICC7 camera (zero order), the position of the 1st order spectrum as a function of wavelength is computed Moreover, thanks to the double meteor observations carried by ICC7 (Tenerife) and ICC9 (La Palma), trajectory of a meteor and its orbit is determined. Which merged with simultaneously measurement of meteor spectrum from ICC8, allow us to identify the source of the meteoroid. Here, we report on preliminary results from a sample of meteor spectra collected by CILBO-ICC8 camera since 2012.

  3. An overview of the US DCLL ITER-TBM program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C. P. C.; Abdou, M.; Dagher, M.; Katoh, Y.; Kurtz, R. J.; Malang, S.; Marriott, E. P.; Merrill, B. J.; Messadek, K.; Morley, N. B.; Sawan, M. E.; Sharafat, S.; Smolentsev, S.; Sze, D. K.; Willms, S.; Ying, A.; Youssef, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    Under the US Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology program, we selected the Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) concept as our primary Test Blanket Module (TBM) for testing in ITER. The DCLL blanket concept has the potential to be a high-performance DEMO blanket design with a projected thermal efficiency of >40%. Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAF/M) steel is used as the structural material. Helium is used to cool the first wall and blanket structure, and the self-cooled Pb-17Li breeder is circulated for power conversion and for tritium extraction. A SiC-based flow channel insert (FCI) is used as an electrical insulator for magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop reduction from the circulating Pb-17Li and as a thermal insulator to separate the high-temperature Pb-17Li (~650–700 °C) from the RAF/M structure, which has a corrosion temperature limit of ~480 °C. The RAF/M material must also operate at temperatures above 350 °C but less than 550 °C. We are continuing the development of the mechanical design and performing neutronics, structural and thermal hydraulics analyses of the DCLL TBM module. Prototypical FCI structures were fabricated and further attention was paid to MHD effects and the design of the inboard blanket for DEMO. We are also making progress on related R&D needs to address key areas. Finally, this paper is a summary report on the progress and results of recent DCLL TBM development activities.

  4. Overview of the Alcator C-MOD Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Scott, A. Bader, M. Bakhtiari, N. Basse, W. Beck, T. Biewer, S. Bernabei, P. Bonoli, et al.

    2007-11-13

    Recent research on the high-field, high-density diverted Alcator C-MOD tokamak has focussed on the plasma physics and plasma engineering required for ITER and for attractive fusion reactors. Experimental campaigns over the past two years have focused on understanding the physical mechanisms that affect the plasma performance realized with all-molybdenum walls versus walls with low-Z coatings. RF sheath rectification along flux tubes that intersect the RF antenna is found to be a major cause of localized boron erosion and impurity generation. Initial lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments (PLH < 900 kW) have demonstrated fully noninductive current drive at Ιρ ~ 1.0 MA with good efficiency, Ιdrive = 0.4PLH/neoR (MA,MW,1020m-3,m). Disruption mitigation via massive gas-jet impurity puffing has proven successful at high plasma pressure, indicating this technique has promise for implementation on ITER. Pressure gradients in the near SOL of Ohmic L-mode plasmas are observed to scale consistently as Ι 2(over)ρ, and show a significant dependence on X-point topology. Modeling of H-mode edge fueling indicates high self-screening to neutrals in the pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL), and reproduces experimental density pedestal response to changes in neutral source. Detailed measurements of the temperature and density profiles in the near sol and fast framing movies of the turbulent structures provide improved understanding of the mechanisms that control transport in the edge region.

  5. TERRAPOWER, LLC TRAVELING WAVE REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVEL HEJZLAR

    2013-11-01

    burden. This paper describes the origins and current status of the TWR development program at TerraPower, LLC. Some of the areas covered include the key TWR design challenges and brief descriptions of TWR-Prototype (TWR-P reactor. Selected information on the TWR-P core designs are also provided in the areas of neutronic, thermal hydraulic and fuel performance. The TWR-P plant design is also described in such areas as; system design descriptions, mechanical design, and safety performance.

  6. An Overview of the NASA Aeronautics Test Program Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD), however an overarching strategy for management of these national assets was needed. Therefore, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006 NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD Test Resources Management Center (TRMC), stewards of the DoD test and evaluation infrastructure. Since then, approximately seventy percent of the ATP budget has been directed to underpin fixed and variable costs of facility operations within its portfolio and the balance towards strategic investments in its test facilities, including maintenance and capability upgrades. Also, a strong guiding coalition was established through the National Partnership for Aeronautics Testing (NPAT), with governance by the senior leadership of NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) and the DoD's TRMC. As part of its strategic planning, ATP has performed or participated in many studies and analyses, including assessments of major NASA and DoD aeronautics test capabilities, test facility condition evaluations and market research. The ATP strategy has also benefitted from unpublished RAND research and analysis by Ant n et al. (2009). Together, these various studies, reports and assessments serve as a foundation for a new, five year strategic plan that will guide ATP through FY 2014. Our vision for the future is a balanced

  7. The 4th Release of GOCE Gravity Field Models - Overview and Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Thomas; Rummel, Reiner

    2013-04-01

    New GOCE gravity field models based on about 2 years of completely reprocessed gradiometer data have been recently released to the user community. They were obtained based on different processing strategies and reflect the state-of-the-art of GOCE gravity field models. With the improved gravity gradients resulting from a number of updates implemented in the level 1B processor and with the additional data set the performance of the resulting GOCE based models could be significantly improved as compared to the previous solutions. The paper provides an overview of the available GOCE models and presents the results of their validation by different means.

  8. Overview of the Alcator C-Mod program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, M.; Andelin, D.; Basse, N.; Bernabei, S.; Bonoli, P.; Böse, B.; Boswell, C.; Bravenec, R.; Carreras, B.; Cziegler, I.; Edlund, E.; Ernst, D.; Fasoli, C.; Ferrara, M.; Fiore, C.; Granetz, R.; Grulke, O.; Hender, T.; Hosea, J.; Howell, D. H.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Hutchinson, I.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Irby, J.; La Bombard, B.; La Haye, R.; Lin, L.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Liptac, J.; Lisgo, S.; Lynn, A.; Marmar, E.; Marr, K.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; McDermott, R.; Mossessian, D.; Parisot, A.; Parker, R.; Phillips, C.; Phillips, P.; Porkolab, M.; Redi, M.; Rice, J.; Rowan, W.; Sampsell, M.; Schilling, G.; Scott, S.; Scoville, J. T.; Smick, N.; Snipes, J.; Stangeby, P.; Tang, V.; Terry, J.; Ulrickson, M.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D.; Wilson, J.; Wright, J.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Youngblood, B.; Yuh, H.; Zhurovich, K.; Zweben, S.

    2005-10-01

    Research on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has emphasized RF heating, self-generated flows, momentum transport, scrape-off layer (SOL) turbulence and transport and the physics of transport barrier transitions, stability and control. The machine operates with PRF up to 6 MW corresponding to power densities on the antenna of 10 MW m-2. Analysis of rotation profile evolution, produced in the absence of external drive, allows transport of angular momentum in the plasma core to be computed and compared between various operating regimes. Momentum is clearly seen diffusing and convecting from the plasma edge on time scales similar to the energy confinement time and much faster than neo-classical transport. SOL turbulence and transport have been studied with fast scanning electrostatic probes situated at several poloidal locations and with gas puff imaging. Strong poloidal asymmetries are found in profiles and fluctuations, confirming the essential ballooning character of the turbulence and transport. Plasma topology has a dominant effect on the magnitude and direction of both core rotation and SOL flows. The correlation of self-generated plasma flows and topology has led to a novel explanation for the dependence of the H-mode power threshold on the ∇B drift direction. Research into internal transport barriers has focused on control of the barrier strength and location. The foot of the barrier could be moved to larger minor radius by lowering q or BT. The barriers, which are produced in C-Mod by off-axis RF heating, can be weakened by the application of on-axis power. Gyro-kinetic simulations suggest that the control mechanism is due to the temperature dependence of trapped electron modes which are destabilized by the large density gradients. A set of non-axisymmetric coils was installed allowing intrinsic error fields to be measured and compensated. These also enabled the determination of the mode locking threshold and, by comparison with data from other machines, provided

  9. The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program: NEPP Overview - Automotive Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Sampson, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The results of NASAs studies into the appropriateness of using U.S. Automotive electronic parts in NASA spaceflight systems will be presented. The first part of the presentation provides an overview of the United States Automotive Electronics Council's AECQ standardization program, the second part provides a summary of the results of NASA's procurement and testing experiences and other lessons learned along with preliminary test results.

  10. Overview 2010 of ARL Program on Network Science for Human Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    IN FRACTAL PHYSIOLOGY       OVERVIEW 2010 OF ARL PROGRAM ON NETWORK SCIENCE FOR HUMAN DECISION MAKING   Bruce J West Journal Name: Frontiers in...2:76. doi:10.3389/fphys.2011.00076 Article URL: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/Abstract.aspx?s=454& name= fractal %20physiology&ART_DOI=10.3389...functions: transportation, electrical power, food distribution, finance , and health care to name a few. The 1 2 interoperability of these networks

  11. Mobilizing communities: an overview of the Community Coalition Partnership Programs for the Prevention of Teen Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassell, Carol; Santelli, John; Gilbert, Brenda Colley; Dalmat, Michael; Mezoff, Jane; Schauer, Mary

    2005-09-01

    The Community Coalition Partnership Programs for the Prevention of Teen Pregnancy (CCPP) was a seven-year (1995-2002) demonstration program funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Reproductive Health conducted in 13 U.S cities. The purpose of the CCPP was to demonstrate whether community partners could mobilize and organize community resources in support of comprehensive, effective, and sustainable programs for the prevention of initial and subsequent pregnancies. This article provides a descriptive overview of the program origins, intentions, and efforts over its planning and implementation phases, including specific program requirements, needs and assets assessments, intervention focus, CDC support for evaluation efforts, implementation challenges, and ideas for translation and dissemination. CDC hopes that the experiences gained from this effort lead to a greater understanding of how to mobilize community coalitions as an intervention to prevent teen pregnancy and address other public health needs.

  12. Engineering drawing field verification program. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulk, P.F.

    1994-10-12

    Safe, efficient operation of waste tank farm facilities is dependent in part upon the availability of accurate, up-to-date plant drawings. Accurate plant drawings are also required in support of facility upgrades and future engineering remediation projects. This supporting document establishes the procedure for performing a visual field verification of engineering drawings, the degree of visual observation being performed and documenting the results. A copy of the drawing attesting to the degree of visual observation will be paginated into the released Engineering Change Notice (ECN) documenting the field verification for future retrieval and reference. All waste tank farm essential and support drawings within the scope of this program will be converted from manual to computer aided drafting (CAD) drawings. A permanent reference to the field verification status will be placed along the right border of the CAD-converted drawing, referencing the revision level, at which the visual verification was performed and documented.

  13. Overview of ORNL/NRC programs addressing durability of concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1994-06-01

    The role of reinforced concrete relative to its applications as either safety-related structures in nuclear power or engineered barriers of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities is described. Factors that can affect the long-term durability of reinforced concrete are identified. Overviews are presented of the Structural Aging Program, which is addressing the aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants, and the Permeability Test Methods and Data Program, which is identifying pertinent data and information for use in performance assessments of engineered barriers for low-level radioactive waste disposal.

  14. Cooperative field test program for wind systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  15. Overview of nuclear education and outreach program among Malaysian school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar, Haizum Ruzanna; Masngut, Nasaai; Yusof, Mohd Hafizal; Ngadiron, Norzehan; Adnan, Habibah

    2017-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of nuclear education and outreach program conducted by Agensi Nuklear Malaysia (Nuklear Malaysia) throughout its operation and establishment. Since its foundation in 1972, Nuklear Malaysia has been the pioneer and is competent in the application of nuclear science and technology. Today, Nuklear Malaysia has ventured and eventually contributed into the development of various socio-economic sectors which include but not limited to medical, industry, manufacturing, agriculture, health, radiation safety and environment. This paper accentuates on the history of education and outreach program by Nuklear Malaysia, which include its timeline and evolution; as well as a brief on education and outreach program management, involvement of knowledge management as part of its approach and later the future of Nuklear Malaysia education and outreach program.

  16. Overview of the Full-scale Radiological Dispersal Device Field Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Anna Rae; Erhardt, Lorne; Lebel, Luke; Duke, M John M; Jones, Trevor; White, Dan; Quayle, Debora

    2016-05-01

    In 2012, Defence Research and Development Canada, in partnership with a number of other Canadian and International organizations, led a series of three field trials designed to simulate a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD). These trials, known as the Full-Scale RDD (FSRDD) Field Trials, involved the explosive dispersal of a short-lived radioactive tracer ((140)La, t1/2 = 40.293 h). The FSRDD Field Trials required a significant effort in their planning, preparation, and execution to ensure that they were carried out in a safe, efficient manner and that the scientific goals of the trials were met. The discussion presented here details the planning and execution of the trials, outlines the relevant radiation safety aspects, provides a summary of the source term and atmospheric conditions for the three dispersal events, and provides an overview of the measurements that were made to track the plumes and deposition patterns.

  17. Psychology of development of moral reasoning: Problem-oriented overview of the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirić Jovan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available First and foremost, this paper provides a short historical reminder of the emergence of the field of psychology of development of moral reasoning. In the second part of the paper, the author offers a problem-oriented overview of the field, that is, one possible classification of particular groups of problems for empirical research. This overview does not only point out to the problems that were more and that were less studied (e.g.. evaluative moral judgment and reasoning, distinguishing between moral and extra-moral rules and norms and to those that were relatively neglected (i.e. understanding moral situations, but also to the problems that psychologists did not even recognize as research problems. Such are the problems of development of moral concepts, meaning of moral words etc. Finally, the author also points out to the fact that this classification could be taken as one way to define the field, that is, the way to determine the boundaries of its subject of studying.

  18. Overview for geologic field-trip guides to volcanoes of the Cascades Arc in northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, L. J. Patrick; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Grove, Timothy L.; Clynne, Michael A.; Christiansen, Robert L.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Ryan-Davis, Juliet

    2017-08-15

    The California Cascades field trip is a loop beginning and ending in Portland, Oregon. The route of day 1 goes eastward across the Cascades just south of Mount Hood, travels south along the east side of the Cascades for an overview of the central Oregon volcanoes (including Three Sisters and Newberry Volcano), and ends at Klamath Falls, Oregon. Day 2 and much of day 3 focus on Medicine Lake Volcano. The latter part of day 3 consists of a drive south across the Pit River into the Hat Creek Valley and then clockwise around Lassen Volcanic Center to the town of Chester, California. Day 4 goes from south to north across Lassen Volcanic Center, ending at Burney, California. Day 5 and the first part of day 6 follow a clockwise route around Mount Shasta. The trip returns to Portland on the latter part of day 6, west of the Cascades through the Klamath Mountains and the Willamette Valley. Each of the three sections of this guidebook addresses one of the major volcanic regions: Lassen Volcanic Center (a volcanic field that spans the volcanic arc), Mount Shasta (a fore-arc stratocone), and Medicine Lake Volcano (a rear-arc, shield-shaped edifice). Each section of the guide provides (1) an overview of the extensive field and laboratory studies, (2) an introduction to the literature, and (3) directions to the most important and accessible field localities. The field-trip sections contain far more stops than can possibly be visited in the actual 6-day 2017 IAVCEI excursion from Portland. We have included extra stops in order to provide a field-trip guide that will have lasting utility for those who may have more time or may want to emphasize one particular volcanic area.

  19. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence detector for ATHENA X-IFU: a program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macculi, C.; Argan, A.; D'Andrea, M.; Lotti, S.; Laurenza, M.; Piro, L.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Torrioli, G.; Fiorini, M.; Molendi, S.; Uslenghi, M.; Mineo, T.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Cavazzuti, E.

    2016-07-01

    The ATHENA observatory is the second large-class ESA mission, in the context of the Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025, scheduled to be launched on 2028 at L2 orbit. One of the two on-board instruments is the X-IFU (X-ray Integral Field Unit): it is a TES-based kilo-pixels order array able to perform simultaneous high-grade energy spectroscopy (2.5 eV at 6 keV) and imaging over the 5 arcmin FoV. The X-IFU sensitivity is degraded by the particles background which is induced by primary protons of both solar and Cosmic Rays origin, and secondary electrons. The studies performed by Geant4 simulations depict a scenario where it is mandatory the use of reduction techniques that combine an active anticoincidence detector and a passive electron shielding to reduce the background expected in L2 orbit down to the goal level of 0.005 cts/cm2/s/keV, so enabling the characterization of faint or diffuse sources (e.g. WHIM or Galaxy cluster outskirts). From the detector point of view this is possible by adopting a Cryogenic AntiCoincidence (CryoAC) placed within a proper optimized environment surrounding the X-IFU TES array. It is a 4-pixels detector made of wide area Silicon absorbers sensed by Ir TESes, and put at a distance < 1 mm below the TES-array. On October 2015 the X-IFU Phase A program has been kicked-off, and about the CryoAC is at present foreseen on early 2017 the delivery of the DM1 (Demonstration Model 1) to the FPA development team for integration, which is made of 1 pixel "bridgessuspended" that will address the final design of the CryoAC. Both the background studies and the detector development work is on-going to provide confident results about the expected residual background at the TES-array level, and the single pixel design to produce a detector for testing activity on 2016/2017. Here we will provide an overview of the CryoAC program, discussing some details about the background assessment having impact on the CryoAC design, the last single pixel characterization

  20. The Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mack, Jennifer; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Borncamp, David; Khandrika, Harish G.; Lucas, Ray A.; Martlin, Catherine; Porterfield, Blair; Sunnquist, Ben; Anderson, Jay; Avila, Roberto J.; Barker, Elizabeth A.; Grogin, Norman A.; Gunning, Heather C.; Hilbert, Bryan; Ogaz, Sara; Robberto, Massimo; Sembach, Kenneth; Flanagan, Kathryn; Mountain, Matt

    2017-08-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields program is a large Director's Discretionary program of 840 orbits, to obtain ultra-deep observations of six strong lensing clusters of galaxies, together with parallel deep blank fields, making use of the strong lensing amplification by these clusters of distant background galaxies to detect the faintest galaxies currently observable in the high-redshift universe. The entire program has now completed successfully for all 6 clusters, namely Abell 2744, Abell S1063, Abell 370, MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0717.5+3745 and MACS J1149.5+2223,. Each of these was observed over two epochs, to a total depth of 140 orbits on the main cluster and an associated parallel field, obtaining images in ACS (F435W, F606W, F814W) and WFC3/IR (F105W, F125W, F140W, F160W) on both the main cluster and the parallel field in all cases. Full sets of high-level science products have been generated for all these clusters by the team at STScI, including cumulative-depth data releases during each epoch, as well as full-depth releases after the completion of each epoch. These products include all the full-depth distortion-corrected drizzled mosaics and associated products for each cluster, which are science-ready to facilitate the construction of lensing models as well as enabling a wide range of other science projects. Many improvements beyond default calibration for ACS and WFC3/IR are implemented in these data products, including corrections for persistence, time-variable sky, and low-level dark current residuals, as well as improvements in astrometric alignment to achieve milliarcsecond-level accuracy. The full set of resulting high-level science products and mosaics are publicly delivered to the community via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to enable the widest scientific use of these data, as well as ensuring a public legacy dataset of the highest possible quality that is of lasting value to the entire community.

  1. Agent oriented programming: An overview of the framework and summary of recent research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoham, Yoav

    1993-01-01

    This is a short overview of the agent-oriented programming (AOP) framework. AOP can be viewed as an specialization of object-oriented programming. The state of an agent consists of components called beliefs, choices, capabilities, commitments, and possibly others; for this reason the state of an agent is called its mental state. The mental state of agents is captured formally in an extension of standard epistemic logics: beside temporalizing the knowledge and belief operators, AOP introduces operators for commitment, choice and capability. Agents are controlled by agent programs, which include primitives for communicating with other agents. In the spirit of speech-act theory, each communication primitive is of a certain type: informing, requesting, offering, etc. This document describes these features in more detail and summarizes recent results and ongoing AOP-related work.

  2. Water scaling in the North Sea oil and gas fields and scale prediction: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, M.

    1996-12-31

    Water-scaling is a common and major production chemistry problem in the North Sea oil and gas fields and scale prediction has been an important means to assess the potential and extent of scale deposition. This paper presents an overview of sulphate and carbonate scaling problems in the North Sea and a review of several widely used and commercially available scale prediction software. In the paper, the water chemistries and scale types and severities are discussed relative of the geographical distribution of the fields in the North Sea. The theories behind scale prediction are then briefly described. Five scale or geochemical models are presented and various definitions of saturation index are compared and correlated. Views are the expressed on how to predict scale precipitation under some extreme conditions such as that encountered in HPHT reservoirs. 15 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. The Cluster Magnetic Field Investigation: overview of in-flight performance and initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Balogh

    Full Text Available The accurate measurement of the magnetic field along the orbits of the four Cluster spacecraft is a primary objective of the mission. The magnetic field is a key constituent of the plasma in and around the magnetosphere, and it plays an active role in all physical processes that define the structure and dynamics of magnetospheric phenomena on all scales. With the four-point measurements on Cluster, it has become possible to study the three-dimensional aspects of space plasma phenomena on scales commeasurable with the size of the spacecraft constellation, and to distinguish temporal and spatial dependences of small-scale processes. We present an overview of the instrumentation used to measure the magnetic field on the four Cluster spacecraft and an overview the performance of the operational modes used in flight. We also report on the results of the preliminary in-orbit calibration of the magnetometers; these results show that all components of the magnetic field are measured with an accuracy approaching 0.1 nT. Further data analysis is expected to bring an even more accurate determination of the calibration parameters. Several examples of the capabilities of the investigation are presented from the commissioning phase of the mission, and from the different regions visited by the spacecraft to date: the tail current sheet, the dusk side magnetopause and magnetosheath, the bow shock and the cusp. We also describe the data processing flow and the implementation of data distribution to other Cluster investigations and to the scientific community in general.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (instruments and techniques – magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics – space plasma physics (shock waves

  4. A brief overview of NASA Langley's research program in formal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    An overview of NASA Langley's research program in formal methods is presented. The major goal of this work is to bring formal methods technology to a sufficiently mature level for use by the United States aerospace industry. Towards this goal, work is underway to design and formally verify a fault-tolerant computing platform suitable for advanced flight control applications. Also, several direct technology transfer efforts have been initiated that apply formal methods to critical subsystems of real aerospace computer systems. The research team consists of six NASA civil servants and contractors from Boeing Military Aircraft Company, Computational Logic Inc., Odyssey Research Associates, SRI International, University of California at Davis, and Vigyan Inc.

  5. An overview of U.S. predoctoral dental implant programs and their directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwacz, Christopher A; Avila-Ortiz, Gustavo; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Tamegnon, Monelle; Hoogeveen, Kaitlin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of current predoctoral implant programs in the United States, including curricular characteristics and clinical practices regarding implant therapy education and program directors' characteristics. An electronic survey was sent to predoctoral implant program directors of all 64 accredited U.S. dental schools; 52 of the 60 eligible programs responded, for a response rate of 87%. The responding program directors were primarily affiliated with either prosthodontics departments (44%) or restorative dentistry departments (40%). Structurally, 80.8% of the responding schools integrate their implant programs into the third year of the curriculum. Clinical implant therapy exercises reported were simulation exercises without direct patient care (90.4% of responding schools) and direct patient care under supervision (94.2%). The most frequently taught restorative modalities are posterior single-tooth implant crown (96.2%), mandibular implant-retained overdenture (88.5%), and anterior implant-supported single crown (61.5%). A majority (74.5%) of responding programs utilize analog surgical guide planning, while 25.5% reported use of digital guided surgery planning software. All schools in the Northwest and 66.7% in the South Central regions utilize custom abutments as the primary abutment design, while a majority of schools in the North Central (62.5%), Northeast (53.8%), Southwest (66.7%), and Southeast (80%) regions use stock abutments (p=0.02). Regional differences were significant with regard to fixation modality, with all the Northwest programs using screw retention and 90% of Southeast and 87.5% of North Central programs using cement retention (p=0.002). This study demonstrated that while institutions share program director and curricular similarities, clinical practices and modalities vary significantly by region.

  6. CLUSTEREASY:A Program for Simulating Scalar Field Evolution on Parallel Computers

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, Gary N

    2007-01-01

    We describe a new, parallel programming version of the scalar field simulation program LATTICEEASY. The new C++ program, CLUSTEREASY, can simulate arbitrary scalar field models on distributed-memory clusters. The speed and memory requirements scale well with the number of processors. As with the serial version of LATTICEEASY, CLUSTEREASY can run simulations in one, two, or three dimensions, with or without expansion of the universe, with customizable parameters and output. The program and its full documentation are available on the LATTICEEASY website at http://www.science.smith.edu/departments/Physics/fstaff/gfelder/latticeeasy/. In this paper we provide a brief overview of what CLUSTEREASY does and the ways in which it does and doesn't differ from the serial version of LATTICEEASY.

  7. What`s new in federal energy management: FEMP program overview. SAVEnergy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The SAVEnergy Program provides direct assistance to Federal agencies in identifying and implementing energy efficiency and water conservation measures. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) and Executive Order 12902 require that Federal agencies reduce the energy consumed in Federal buildings. The Executive Order increases the goal to a 30% reduction, compared with 1985, by 2005. In addition, agencies are required, to the maximum extent possible, to install all energy and water conservation measures with paybacks of less than 10 years. To help meet these goals, the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy management Program (FEMP) recently initiated the SAVEnergy Program. The SAVEnergy approach has three key elements: The Action Plan with recommended conservation actions and complete proposals on how the agency can implement them; The Action Team to implement the SAVEnergy Action Plan; The FEMPTracks database to evaluate the SAVEnergy Program (and all other FEMP programs) and record progress toward conservation goals.

  8. After the Visit: An Overview of Government and Community Programs Supporting Children with Medical Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kaitlyn B

    2017-05-04

    The optimal care of children with medical complexity (CMC) requires involvement from a network of professionals that includes physicians, nurses, ancillary service providers, and educators. Pediatric health care providers typically have early and frequent contact with the families of CMC. Therefore, they are in a unique position to connect families to developmental, educational, and psychosocial supports. This article reviews important government and community programs that support CMC living in the United States. It outlines the educational rights of children with disabilities and offers practical tips for collaborating with Early Intervention and the public school system. The article also provides an overview of financial assistance programs, respite care services, and support groups that are beneficial to CMC and their families.

  9. After the Visit: An Overview of Government and Community Programs Supporting Children with Medical Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlyn B. Olson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The optimal care of children with medical complexity (CMC requires involvement from a network of professionals that includes physicians, nurses, ancillary service providers, and educators. Pediatric health care providers typically have early and frequent contact with the families of CMC. Therefore, they are in a unique position to connect families to developmental, educational, and psychosocial supports. This article reviews important government and community programs that support CMC living in the United States. It outlines the educational rights of children with disabilities and offers practical tips for collaborating with Early Intervention and the public school system. The article also provides an overview of financial assistance programs, respite care services, and support groups that are beneficial to CMC and their families.

  10. An overview of measurement comparisons from the INTEX-B/MILAGRO airborne field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Kleb

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available As part of the NASA's INTEX-B mission, the NASA DC-8 and NSF C-130 conducted three wing-tip to wing-tip comparison flights. The intercomparison flights sampled a variety of atmospheric conditions (polluted urban, non-polluted, marine boundary layer, clean and polluted free troposphere. These comparisons form a basis to establish data consistency, but also should also be viewed as a continuation of efforts aiming to better understand and reduce measurement differences as identified in earlier field intercomparison exercises. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of 140 intercomparisons of data collected during INTEX-B. For interpretation and most effective use of these results, the reader is strongly urged to consult with the instrument principle investigator.

  11. Overview of long-term field experiments in Germany - metadata visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muqit Zoarder, Md Abdul; Heinrich, Uwe; Svoboda, Nikolai; Grosse, Meike; Hierold, Wilfried

    2017-04-01

    BonaRes ("soil as a sustainable resource for the bioeconomy") is conducting to collect data and metadata of agricultural long-term field experiments (LTFE) of Germany. It is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) under the umbrella of the National Research Strategy BioEconomy 2030. BonaRes consists of ten interdisciplinary research project consortia and the 'BonaRes - Centre for Soil Research'. BonaRes Data Centre is responsible for collecting all LTFE data and regarding metadata into an enterprise database upon higher level of security and visualization of the data and metadata through data portal. In the frame of the BonaRes project, we are compiling an overview of long-term field experiments in Germany that is based on a literature review, the results of the online survey and direct contacts with LTFE operators. Information about research topic, contact person, website, experiment setup and analyzed parameters are collected. Based on the collected LTFE data, an enterprise geodatabase is developed and a GIS-based web-information system about LTFE in Germany is also settled. Various aspects of the LTFE, like experiment type, land-use type, agricultural category and duration of experiment, are presented in thematic maps. This information system is dynamically linked to the database, which means changes in the data directly affect the presentation. An easy data searching option using LTFE name, -location or -operators and the dynamic layer selection ensure a user-friendly web application. Dispersion and visualization of the overlapping LTFE points on the overview map are also challenging and we make it automatized at very zoom level which is also a consistent part of this application. The application provides both, spatial location and meta-information of LTFEs, which is backed-up by an enterprise geodatabase, GIS server for hosting map services and Java script API for web application development.

  12. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURRELL,HK

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, they have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) they have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {ge} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. The authors have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiated power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  13. The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Climate Change Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearns, L. O.

    2012-12-01

    The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) is an international program that is serving the climate scenario needs of the United States, Canada, and northern Mexico. We are systematically investigating the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and producing high resolution climate change scenarios using multiple regional climate models (RCMs) and multiple global model responses by nesting the RCMs within atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with a medium-high emissions scenario, over a domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The project also includes a validation component through nesting the participating RCMs within the NCEP reanalysis R2. The basic spatial resolution of the RCM simulations is 50 km. This program includes six different RCMs that have been used in various intercomparison programs in Europe and the United States. Four different AOGCMs provide boundary conditions to drive the RCMS for 30 years in the current climate and 30 years for the mid 21st century. The resulting climate model simulations form the basis for multiple high resolution climate scenarios that can be used in climate change impacts and adaptation assessments over North America. All 12 sets of current and future simulations have been completed. Measures of uncertainty across the multiple simulations are being developed by geophysical statisticians. In this overview talk, results from the various climate change experiments for various subregions, along with measures of uncertainty, will be presented

  14. The DOE Office of Environmental Management International Collaboration Program Overview: Interactions, Agreements, and Future Direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, James C.; Fox, Kevin M.; Jannik, Gerald T.; Farfan, Eduardo B.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Roach, Jay; Aloy, A. S.; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Lopukh, D. B.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Han, Ana M.

    2010-02-10

    As the lead U.S. agency for the environmental cleanup, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) carries out international activities in support of U.S. policies and objectives regarding accelerated risk reduction and remediation of the environmental legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. To achieve this, EM pursues collaborations with foreign government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to assist in identifying technologies and promote international collaborations that leverage resources and link international experience and expertise. An initiative of the International Program is to link international experience and expertise to the technical needs of the overall EM mission and to foster further collaboration with international partners to promote those needs. This paper will provide an overview of the current international program and how it plans to leverage existing, and when necessary, new international partnerships to support the overall EM cleanup mission. In addition it will examine the future vision of the international program to promote the EM mission through a focus on transformational solutions, science, and technology development.

  15. NAGT-USGS Cooperative Summer Field Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Thomas E.; Hanshaw, Penelope M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the National Association of Geology Teachers and the United States Geological Survey's Cooperative Summer Field Training Program. Reviews its origins, eligibility requirements, nomination and selection criteria, and includes summaries of participant evaluation of the 1985 program. (ML)

  16. A brief overview of the history of veterinary field services in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Gideon K

    2014-11-14

    The historical evolution of veterinary services in South Africa is closely linked to the colonial history of the past and the eventual political formation of the Union of South Africa in 1910, as well as the establishment of a fully democratic South Africa in 1994. The majority of the early pioneering veterinarians had close links to military activities and were originally mostly of British origin. The appointment of the first colonial chief veterinary officers occurred in the late 1800s. These appointments were dictated by the need to combat devastating animal diseases, such as rinderpest and African horse sickness, mainly because they affected draught oxen (used for travel) and horses (used in combat). Veterinary field services was established in 1962 as a separate functional entity within government services when M.C. Lambrechts became Director of Veterinary Services of South Africa. In the context of this article, veterinary field services refers to that sphere of veterinary service delivery conducted by government-appointed or seconded veterinarians applying disease control and prevention, as required by animal health legislation. Paging through the history of veterinary field services in South Africa confirms that the problems faced by the veterinary services of today were just as real during the times of our pioneers. The pioneers of veterinary services transformed unknown animal diseases into textbook descriptions still used today and also demonstrated the important link to, and use of, the observations made by farmers, as well as the need for continued basic and applied research on animal diseases. This article provided a brief overview of the evolution of veterinary field services and the important role played by pioneers over the last two centuries to make South Africa relatively free and safe from the most important trade-sensitive and economically important animal diseases.

  17. A brief overview of the history of veterinary field services in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon K. Brückner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The historical evolution of veterinary services in South Africa is closely linked to the colonial history of the past and the eventual political formation of the Union of South Africa in 1910, as well as the establishment of a fully democratic South Africa in 1994. The majority of the early pioneering veterinarians had close links to military activities and were originally mostly of British origin. The appointment of the first colonial chief veterinary officers occurred in the late 1800s. These appointments were dictated by the need to combat devastating animal diseases, such as rinderpest and African horse sickness, mainly because they affected draught oxen (used for travel and horses (used in combat. Veterinary field services was established in 1962 as a separate functional entity within government services when M.C. Lambrechts became Director of Veterinary Services of South Africa. In the context of this article, veterinary field services refers to that sphere of veterinary service delivery conducted by government-appointed or seconded veterinarians applying disease control and prevention, as required by animal health legislation. Paging through the history of veterinary field services in South Africa confirms that the problems faced by the veterinary services of today were just as real during the times of our pioneers. The pioneers of veterinary services transformed unknown animal diseases into textbook descriptions still used today and also demonstrated the important link to, and use of, the observations made by farmers, as well as the need for continued basic and applied research on animal diseases. This article provided a brief overview of the evolution of veterinary field services and the important role played by pioneers over the last two centuries to make South Africa relatively free and safe from the most important trade-sensitive and economically important animal diseases.

  18. Early Childhood Caries and the Impact of Current U.S. Medicaid Program: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussma Ahmed Bugis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric dental caries is the most common chronic disease among children. Above 40% of the U.S. children aged 2–11 years have dental caries; more than 50% of them come from low-income families. Under dental services of the Medicaid program, children enrolled in Medicaid must receive preventive dental services. However, only 1/5 of them utilize preventive dental services. The purpose of this overview is to measure the impact of Medicaid dental benefits on reducing oral health disparities among Medicaid-eligible children. This paper explains the importance of preventive dental care, children at high risk of dental caries, Medicaid dental benefits, utilization of dental preventive services by Medicaid-eligible children, dental utilization influencing factors, and outcome evaluation of Medicaid in preventing dental caries among children. In conclusion, despite the recent increase of children enrolled in Medicaid, utilizing preventive dental care is still a real challenge that faces Medicaid.

  19. Telecommunications, navigation and information management concept overview for the Space Exploration Initiative program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jerome A.; Stephens, Elaine; Barton, Gregg

    1991-01-01

    An overview is provided of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) concepts for telecommunications, information systems, and navigation (TISN), and engineering and architecture issues are discussed. The SEI program data system is reviewed to identify mission TISN interfaces, and reference TISN concepts are described for nominal, degraded, and mission-critical data services. The infrastructures reviewed include telecommunications for robotics support, autonomous navigation without earth-based support, and information networks for tracking and data acquisition. Four options for TISN support architectures are examined which relate to unique SEI exploration strategies. Detailed support estimates are given for: (1) a manned stay on Mars; (2) permanent lunar and Martian settlements; short-duration missions; and (4) systematic exploration of the moon and Mars.

  20. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. A. McCarthy; D. L. Williams; R. Reister

    2012-05-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is focused on the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. It encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper gives an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables.

  1. Large-scale overview of the summer monsoon over West Africa during the AMMA field experiment in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Janicot

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis program is dedicated to providing a better understanding of the West African monsoon and its influence on the physical, chemical and biological environment regionally and globally, as well as relating variability of this monsoon system to issues of health, water resources, food security and demography for West African nations. Within this framework, an intensive field campaign took place during the summer of 2006 to better document specific processes and weather systems at various key stages of this monsoon season. This campaign was embedded within a longer observation period that documented the annual cycle of surface and atmospheric conditions between 2005 and 2007. The present paper provides a large and regional scale overview of the 2006 summer monsoon season, that includes consideration of of the convective activity, mean atmospheric circulation and synoptic/intraseasonal weather systems, oceanic and land surface conditions, continental hydrology, dust concentration and ozone distribution. The 2006 African summer monsoon was a near-normal rainy season except for a large-scale rainfall excess north of 15° N. This monsoon season was also characterized by a 10-day delayed onset compared to climatology, with convection becoming developed only after 10 July. This onset delay impacted the continental hydrology, soil moisture and vegetation dynamics as well as dust emission. More details of some less-well-known atmospheric features in the African monsoon at intraseasonal and synoptic scales are provided in order to promote future research in these areas.

  2. Large-scale overview of the summer monsoon over West Africa during the AMMA field experiment in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicot, S.; Thorncroft, C. D.; Ali, A.; Asencio, N.; Berry, G.; Bock, O.; Bourles, B.; Caniaux, G.; Chauvin, F.; Deme, A.; Kergoat, L.; Lafore, J.-P.; Lavaysse, C.; Lebel, T.; Marticorena, B.; Mounier, F.; Nedelec, P.; Redelsperger, J.-L.; Ravegnani, F.; Reeves, C. E.; Roca, R.; de Rosnay, P.; Schlager, H.; Sultan, B.; Tomasini, M.; Ulanovsky, A.; Acmad Forecasters Team

    2008-09-01

    The AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) program is dedicated to providing a better understanding of the West African monsoon and its influence on the physical, chemical and biological environment regionally and globally, as well as relating variability of this monsoon system to issues of health, water resources, food security and demography for West African nations. Within this framework, an intensive field campaign took place during the summer of 2006 to better document specific processes and weather systems at various key stages of this monsoon season. This campaign was embedded within a longer observation period that documented the annual cycle of surface and atmospheric conditions between 2005 and 2007. The present paper provides a large and regional scale overview of the 2006 summer monsoon season, that includes consideration of of the convective activity, mean atmospheric circulation and synoptic/intraseasonal weather systems, oceanic and land surface conditions, continental hydrology, dust concentration and ozone distribution. The 2006 African summer monsoon was a near-normal rainy season except for a large-scale rainfall excess north of 15° N. This monsoon season was also characterized by a 10-day delayed onset compared to climatology, with convection becoming developed only after 10 July. This onset delay impacted the continental hydrology, soil moisture and vegetation dynamics as well as dust emission. More details of some less-well-known atmospheric features in the African monsoon at intraseasonal and synoptic scales are provided in order to promote future research in these areas.

  3. Overview of the Field Phase of the NASA Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP)Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Zipser, Edward; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Kakar, Ramesh; Halverson Jeffery; Rogers, Robert; Black, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes experiment is sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to investigate characteristics of tropical cyclone genesis, rapid intensification and rainfall using a three-pronged approach that emphasizes satellite information, suborbital observations and numerical model simulations. Research goals include demonstration and assessment of new technology, improvements to numerical model parameterizations, and advancements in data assimilation techniques. The field phase of the experiment was based in Costa Rica during July 2005. A fully instrumented NASA ER-2 high altitude airplane was deployed with Doppler radar, passive microwave instrumentation, lightning and electric field sensors and an airborne simulator of visible and infrared satellite sensors. Other assets brought to TCSP were a low flying uninhabited aerial vehicle, and a surface-based radiosonde network. In partnership with the Intensity Forecasting Experiment of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Hurricane Research Division, two NOAA P-3 aircraft instrumented with radar, passive microwave, microphysical, and dropsonde instrumentation were also deployed to Costa Rica. The field phase of TCSP was conducted in Costa Rica to take advantage of the geographically compact tropical cyclone genesis region of the Eastern Pacific Ocean near Central America. However, the unusual 2005 hurricane season provided numerous opportunities to sample tropical cyclone development and intensification in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico as well. Development of Hurricane Dennis and Tropical Storm Gert were each investigated over several days in addition to Hurricane Emily as it was close to Saffir-Simpson Category 5 intensity. An overview of the characteristics of these storms along with the pregenesis environment of Tropical Storm Eugene in the Eastern Pacific will be presented.

  4. 75 FR 49484 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Jacob K. Javits Fellowship Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... education. The selected fields in the arts are: Creative writing, music performance, music theory, music...: September 30, 2010. Deadline for Transmittal of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA... purpose of the Jacob K. Javits (JKJ) Fellowship Program is to award fellowships to eligible students...

  5. The National Shipbuilding Research Program, Proceedings of the REAPS Technical Symposium Paper No. 1: Ship Production Committee Panel Overviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    consensus specification, we experienced sematical problems. Avondale Shipyards, Inc. requested Mr. Richard Muther , President of Richard Muther and...1978, Mr. Richard Muther addressed the panel. His primary objective was definition which would do away with the sematical problems. Mr. Richard Muther’s...COMMITTEE PANEL OVERVIEWS SP-1 - SHIPYARD FACILITIES AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS Richard A. Price Program Manager Maritime Administration Research and

  6. Overview of the DACCIWA ground-based field campaign in southern West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohou, Fabienne; Kalthoff, Norbert; Brooks, Barbara; Jegede, Gbenga; Adler, Bianca; Ajao, Adewale; Ayoola, Muritala; Babić, Karmen; Bessardon, Geoffrey; Delon, Claire; Dione, Cheikh; Handwerker, Jan; Jambert, Corinne; Kohler, Martin; Lothon, Marie; Pedruzo-Bagazgoitia, Xabier; Smith, Victoria; Sunmonu, Lukman; Wieser, Andreas; Derrien, Solène

    2017-04-01

    During June and July 2016, a ground-based field campaign took place in southern West Africa within the framework of the Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) project. In the investigated region, extended low-level stratus clouds form very frequently during night-time and persist long into the following day influencing the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer and, hence, the regional climate. The motivation for the measurements was to identify the meteorological controls on the whole process chain from the formation of nocturnal stratus clouds, via the daytime transition to convective clouds and the formation of deep precipitating clouds. During the measurement period, extensive remote sensing and in-situ measurements were performed at three supersites in Kumasi (Ghana), Savè (Benin) and Ile-Ife (Nigeria). The gathered observations included the energy-balance components at the Earth's surface, the mean and turbulent conditions in the nocturnal and daytime ABL as well as the de- and entrainment processes between the ABL and the free troposphere. The meteorological measurements were supplemented by aerosol and air-chemistry observations. We will give an overview of the conducted measurements including instrument availability and strategy during intensive observation periods.

  7. An Overview of Measurement Comparisons from the INTEX-B/MILAGRO Airborne Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleb, Mary M.; Chen, Gao; Crawford, James H.; Flocke, Frank M.; Brown, Clyde C.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the NASA's INTEX-B mission, the NASA DC-8 and NSF C-130 conducted three wing-tip to wing-tip comparison flights. The intercomparison flights sampled a variety of atmospheric conditions (polluted urban, non-polluted, marine boundary layer, clean and polluted free troposphere). These comparisons form a basis to establish data consistency, but also should also be viewed as a continuation of efforts aiming to better understand and reduce measurement differences as identified in earlier field intercomparison exercises. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of 140 intercomparisons of data collected as well as a record of the measurement consistency demonstrated during INTEX-B. It is the primary goal to provide necessary information for the future research to determine if the observations from different INTEX-B platforms/instrument are consistent within the PI reported uncertainties and used in integrated analysis. This paper may also contribute to the formulation strategy for future instrument developments. For interpretation and most effective use of these results, the reader is strongly urged to consult with the instrument principle investigator.

  8. 2005 Graduate Programs in Physics, Astronomy, and Related Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institute Of Physics

    This comprehensive compendium provides information on nearly every U.S. doctoral program in physics and astronomy, plus data on most major master's programs in these fields. Information on many major Canadian programs is also included. In addition, the Graduate Programs directory lists a substantial number of related-field departments, including materials science, electrical and nuclear engineering, meteorology, medical and chemical physics, geophysics, and oceanography. This twenty-ninth annual edition contains information valuable to students planning graduate study and faculty advisors, including each program's research expenditures and sources of support.

  9. The NOAA El Niño Rapid Response Field Campaign: Implementation Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, J. R.; Dole, R. M.; Webb, R. S.; Barnet, C. D.; Barsugli, J. J.; Cifelli, R.; Compo, G. P.; Cox, C. J.; Darby, L. S.; Fairall, C. W.; Hartten, L. M.; Hoell, A.; Hoerling, M. P.; Intrieri, J. M.; Iraci, L. T.; Johnston, P. J.; Kiladis, G. N.; Konopleva-Akish, E.; Newman, M.; Ryoo, J. M.; Smith, C. A.; White, A. B.; Wick, G. A.; Wolfe, D. E.; Wolter, K.

    2016-12-01

    The NOAA El Niño Rapid Response (ENRR) field campaign gathered unprecedented observations at the heart of the recent strong El Niño in January to March 2016. Despite extremely limited lead times, NOAA mounted a complex field response in a remote part of the world in four months for a campaign that usually takes two or three years to plan. Deploying multiple research aircraft, a NOAA oceangoing vessel, and with observations from Kiritimati, the field campaign was designed to examine the tropical-extratropical response to convection triggered by the warm El Niño ocean conditions in the central and eastern tropical Pacific proceeding high-impact weather events expected to occur downstream in the continental U.S. This presentation provides a detailed overview of the implementation of the ENRR field campaign. The NOAA Gulfstream IV research aircraft completed 22 successful science flights, releasing over 625 dropsondes in the central tropical Pacific to examine the thermodynamic, wind, and precipitation environments around large-scale convection located between the equator and 5°N south of Hawaii. To add spatial and temporal sampling, radiosonde balloons were launched twice daily from Kiritimati in the central tropical Pacific and up to 8 times daily from the NOAA Ronald H. Brown research vessel in the data-sparse eastern tropical Pacific. The ENRR sampling strategy was complemented by additional research flights with the NASA Global Hawk (GH), two U.S. Air Force Weather Reconnaissance C-130Js, and the NASA Ames-led Alpha Jet. To link atmospheric processes observed by the G-IV in the tropics with downstream weather events at midlatitudes, NOAA led three long-endurance flights with the GH in the eastern Pacific as part of the Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology (SHOUT) project. The final series of G-IV flights captured the cascade of dynamical processes between the tropics and precipitation along the U.S. West Coast over a week-long period in early

  10. The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP): Overview of Climate Change Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovsky, M. S.; Mearns, L. O.

    2012-04-01

    NARCCAP is an international program that is serving the climate scenario needs of the United States, Canada, and northern Mexico. We are systematically investigating the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and producing high resolution climate change scenarios using six different regional climate models (RCMs ) and multiple global model responses to a future emission scenario, by nesting the RCMs within four atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with the A2 SRES scenario, over a domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The project also includes a validation component through nesting the participating RCMs within NCEP reanalyses. The spatial resolution of the RCM simulations is 50 km. This program includes RCMs that participated in the European PRUDENCE program (HadRM3 and RegCM), the Canadian regional climate model (CRCM) as well as the NCEP regional spectral model (RSM), the NCAR/PSU MM5, and NCAR WRF. AOGCMs include the Hadley Centre HadCM3, NCAR CCSM, the Canadian CGCM3 and the GFDL model. Insufficient funding was available to simulate all 24 combinations of RCMs and AOGCMs. Thus, we used a balanced fractional factorial statistical design to reduce the number of combinations of RCM-AOGCM pairs to twelve. High resolution (50 km) global time-slice experiments based on the GFDL atmospheric model and the NCAR atmospheric model (CAM3) have also been produced and will be compared with the simulations of the regional models. The geographic domain was regionalized into 29 subregions based on common climatological features, and summary climate change statistics for each of the subregions have been produced. In this overview talk, results from the RCM climate change simulations for select subregions of North America will be presented.

  11. A four-part working bibliography of neuroethics: part 1: overview and reviews – defining and describing the field and its practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroethics entails investigations of neurocognitive mechanisms of morality and ethics; and studies and address of the ethical issues spawned by the use of neuroscience and its technologies to investigate cognition, emotion and actions. These two principal emphases, or what have been called “traditions” of neuroethics both mirror traditional bioethical discussions (such as debates about the safety of technological and pharmaceutical advances and ethical implications of new scientific and technological discoveries), and engage discourse about neuroscientific investigations of (proto-moral and moral) cognition, emotions and behaviors, and what such findings may mean for human beliefs and conduct - from the individual to the political levels. Given the growth, range, and rapid maturation of the field of neuroethics we provide an iterative, four-part document that affords a repository of international papers, books, and chapters that address the field in overview, and present discussion(s) of more particular aspects and topics of neuroethics. This first installment lists reviews and overviews of the discipline, and broad summaries of basic developments and issues of the field. Methods To systematically survey the neuroethics literature, searches were performed by accessing 11 databases, 8 additional literature depositories, and 4 individual journal searches using indexing language for National Library of Medicine (NLM) Medical Subject Heading databases. Searches and assurance against overlapping coverage were conducted using the RefWorks citation management program. Results Overview, review and reflections upon the history and multicultural perspectives of neuroethics were obtained and relevant listings from international journals, books, and book chapters are provided. Part I will be followed by three installments that will address a): the neuroscience of morality and ethics, including discussions of free will, and personal autonomy; b)

  12. A Regional Public Health Field Placement Program: making an IMPACT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Lisa C; Hites, Lisle; Jenkins, Crystal; Chauvin, Sheila W; Rucks, Andrew C; Ginter, Peter M

    2014-03-01

    Beginning in 2010, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, made provisions in its Public Health Training Center cooperative agreements for field placements. This article describes best practices and lessons learned establishing and managing the South Central Public Health Partnership's Interns and Mentors Program for ACTion (IMPACT) Field Placement Program, which was initially funded through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Centers for Public Health Preparedness Cooperative agreement in 2002. The IMPACT program is based on a six-step process that has been developed and refined over its 10-year history: (a) identifying field placement opportunities, (b) marketing field experience opportunities to students, (c) selecting students seeking field experience opportunities, (d) placing students with practice partners, students with practice partners, (e) evaluating student progress toward field experience objectives, and (f) evaluating the program. This article describes the program's structure and processes, delineates the roles of its academic and practice partners, discusses evidence of its effectiveness, and describes lessons learned from its decade-long history. Hopefully, this information will facilitate the establishment, management and evaluation of internship and field placement programs in other Public Health Training Centers and academic public health programs.

  13. Fundamental Aeronautics Program: Overview of Propulsion Work in the Supersonic Cruise Efficiency Technical Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, part of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program, contains a number of technical challenge areas which include sonic boom community response, airport noise, high altitude emissions, cruise efficiency, light weight durable engines/airframes, and integrated multi-discipline system design. This presentation provides an overview of the current (2012) activities in the supersonic cruise efficiency technical challenge, and is focused specifically on propulsion technologies. The intent is to develop and validate high-performance supersonic inlet and nozzle technologies. Additional work is planned for design and analysis tools for highly-integrated low-noise, low-boom applications. If successful, the payoffs include improved technologies and tools for optimized propulsion systems, propulsion technologies for a minimized sonic boom signature, and a balanced approach to meeting efficiency and community noise goals. In this propulsion area, the work is divided into advanced supersonic inlet concepts, advanced supersonic nozzle concepts, low fidelity computational tool development, high fidelity computational tools, and improved sensors and measurement capability. The current work in each area is summarized.

  14. Fundamental Aeronautics Program: Overview of Project Work in Supersonic Cruise Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, part of NASA?s Fundamental Aeronautics Program, contains a number of technical challenge areas which include sonic boom community response, airport noise, high altitude emissions, cruise efficiency, light weight durable engines/airframes, and integrated multi-discipline system design. This presentation provides an overview of the current (2011) activities in the supersonic cruise efficiency technical challenge, and is focused specifically on propulsion technologies. The intent is to develop and validate high-performance supersonic inlet and nozzle technologies. Additional work is planned for design and analysis tools for highly-integrated low-noise, low-boom applications. If successful, the payoffs include improved technologies and tools for optimized propulsion systems, propulsion technologies for a minimized sonic boom signature, and a balanced approach to meeting efficiency and community noise goals. In this propulsion area, the work is divided into advanced supersonic inlet concepts, advanced supersonic nozzle concepts, low fidelity computational tool development, high fidelity computational tools, and improved sensors and measurement capability. The current work in each area is summarized.

  15. The CAM Education Program of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Nancy J; Chesney, Margaret A

    2007-10-01

    The authors provide a historical context and overview of the experience of education projects at 14 health professions schools in the United States and the American Medical Students Association that were funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health in cohorts of five per year in 2000, 2001, and 2002-2003. These 15 projects were designed to incorporate CAM information into the curricula of conventional health professions schools. A longer-term goal was to accelerate the integration of CAM and conventional medicine. The overall program started in 2000 at a time when discussions about the definition, goals, and value of integrative medicine were already well underway. The efforts specific to each project, as well as the shared challenges, accomplishments, and collaborative efforts of all 15 projects, can provide guidance for the education of conventional health care providers about CAM in an integrative medicine environment. Challenging issues that must be faced include (1) the need to develop successful strategies to incorporate information about CAM into already dense health professions school curricula, (2) the need for conventional health professionals to have authoritative resources to provide their patients information about risks and benefits of CAM practices, and (3) the need to identify appropriate roles for CAM practitioners in educating conventional health professionals about CAM therapies. The authors discuss these issues and others and present some recommendations.

  16. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Overview and Technical Protocol (Version 1.1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Na; Goel, Supriya; Makhmalbaf, Atefe

    2013-08-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a voluntary national scoring system for commercial buildings to help building owners and managers assess a building’s energy-related systems independent of operations. The goal of the score is to facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency improvements of commercial buildings. The system, known as the Commercial Building Energy Asset Score, will allow building owners and managers to compare their building infrastructure against peers and track building upgrades over time. The system will also help other building stakeholders (e.g., building investors, tenants, financiers, and appraisers) understand the relative efficiency of different buildings in a way that is independent from operations and occupancy. This report outlines the technical protocol used to generate the energy asset score, explains the scoring methodology, and provides additional details regarding the energy asset scoring tool. The alternative methods that were considered prior to developing the current approach are described in the Program Overview and Technical Protocol Version 1.0.

  17. Fuel cell program - Overview reports 2007; Programm Brennstoffzellen inkl. Wasserstoff - Ueberblicksberichte der BFE-Programmleiter 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzzi, A.; Spirig, M.

    2008-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the overview reports made by SFOE Heads of Program on work done in 2007. Projects reported on in the natural gas-fired fuel cell area include the EU-project REAL-SFOC, the long-term testing of anode-supported SOFC stacks, intermediate-temperature fuel cells based on proton conducting electrolytes, the interdisciplinary ONEBAT project and lifetime-enhancement of SOFC stacks for CHP applications. In the polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) area, projects concerning proton-conducting polymer membranes, factors limiting the lifetime of fuel cell membranes, a new highly active oxygen reduction electrode for PEM fuel cell and zinc/air battery applications, the enhancement of PEFC durability and reliability, model-based investigation of PEFC performance, and local gas analysis of PE fuel cells are briefly reported on. Long-term research activities in the hydrogen technology area reported on include those concerning the photo-chemical conversion and storage of solar energy and the storage of hydrogen in metallic and complex hydrides. Further projects reported on include those concerning the physical aspects of hydrides for system integration and safety and new, complex metal hydrides. Swiss national and international co-ordination is reviewed in the areas of fuel cell technology and hydrogen technology. Work done in several projects run within the framework of the IEA's Advanced Fuel Cells Program is reviewed. Several pilot and demonstration (P and D) projects are also reported on in the natural-gas SOFC and PEFC areas. Comments on the 2007 results and a review of work to be done in 2008, along with a list of R, D, P and D projects, complete the report.

  18. Overview of space power electronic's technology under the CSTI High Capacity Power Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    The Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) is a NASA Program targeted at the development of specific technologies in the areas of transportation, operations and science. Each of these three areas consists of major elements and one of the operation's elements is the High Capacity Power element. The goal of this element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA initiatives. The High Capacity Power element is broken down into several subelements that includes energy conversion in the areas of the free piston Stirling power converter and thermoelectrics, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental compatibility and system's lifetime. A recent overview of the CSTI High capacity Power element and a description of each of the program's subelements is given by Winter (1989). The goals of the Power Management subelement are twofold. The first is to develop, test, and demonstrate high temperature, radiation-resistant power and control components and circuits that will be needed in the Power Conditioning, Control and Transmission (PCCT) subsystem of a space nuclear power system. The results obtained under this goal will also be applicable to the instrumentation and control subsystem of a space nuclear reactor. These components and circuits must perform reliably for lifetimes of 7-10 years. The second goal is to develop analytical models for use in computer simulations of candidate PCCT subsystems. Circuits which will be required for a specific PCCT subsystem will be designed and built to demonstrate their performance and, also, to validate the analytical models and simulations. The tasks under the Power Management subelement will now be described in terms of objectives, approach and present status of work.

  19. Overview of space power electronic's technology under the CSTI High Capacity Power Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    1994-01-01

    The Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) is a NASA Program targeted at the development of specific technologies in the areas of transportation, operations and science. Each of these three areas consists of major elements and one of the operation's elements is the High Capacity Power element. The goal of this element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA initiatives. The High Capacity Power element is broken down into several subelements that includes energy conversion in the areas of the free piston Stirling power converter and thermoelectrics, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental compatibility and system's lifetime. A recent overview of the CSTI High capacity Power element and a description of each of the program's subelements is given by Winter (1989). The goals of the Power Management subelement are twofold. The first is to develop, test, and demonstrate high temperature, radiation-resistant power and control components and circuits that will be needed in the Power Conditioning, Control and Transmission (PCCT) subsystem of a space nuclear power system. The results obtained under this goal will also be applicable to the instrumentation and control subsystem of a space nuclear reactor. These components and circuits must perform reliably for lifetimes of 7-10 years. The second goal is to develop analytical models for use in computer simulations of candidate PCCT subsystems. Circuits which will be required for a specific PCCT subsystem will be designed and built to demonstrate their performance and, also, to validate the analytical models and simulations. The tasks under the Power Management subelement will now be described in terms of objectives, approach and present status of work.

  20. A Collaborative Field-Based Urban Teacher Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a 12-month, field-based, alternative teacher preparation program for individuals holding baccalaureate degrees in areas outside education who want master's degrees in early childhood education. The program involves collaboration between the State Department of Education, the Early Childhood Department of an urban university, and four…

  1. A Collaborative Field-Based Urban Teacher Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a 12-month, field-based, alternative teacher preparation program for individuals holding baccalaureate degrees in areas outside education who want master's degrees in early childhood education. The program involves collaboration between the State Department of Education, the Early Childhood Department of an urban university, and four…

  2. Target Salt 2025: A Global Overview of National Programs to Encourage the Food Industry to Reduce Salt in Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqui Webster; Kathy Trieu; Elizabeth Dunford; Corinna Hawkes

    2014-01-01

    Reducing population salt intake has been identified as a priority intervention to reduce non-communicable diseases. Member States of the World Health Organization have agreed to a global target of a 30% reduction in salt intake by 2025. In countries where most salt consumed is from processed foods, programs to engage the food industry to reduce salt in products are being developed. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of national initiatives to encourage the food industry to reduce sa...

  3. Alternative response technology program for the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortez, Michael J.; Rowe, Hunter G. [BP - Gulf Coast Restoration (United States)], email: michael.cortez@bp.com

    2011-07-01

    The innovative approach utilized by the Alternative Response Technology (ART) Program for the MC252 Deepwater Horizon response in the Gulf of Mexico during 2010 was presented in this paper. The ART program is authorized by the Unified Area Command. This paper focuses on the spill response technologies that were implemented offshore, near shore and on-shore, and covers technologies related to booming, skimming, separation, sand cleaning, surveillance and detection. A process was designed and implemented for capturing ideas real time, which leveraged the public's ingenuity and entrepreneurial spirit. About 120,000 individual ideas were submitted by the public globally from more than 100 countries. About 40,000 of these ideas were related to addressing the spill response. There are about 100 new technologies related to spill response that were formally evaluated and/or field tested, and approximately 25 of those tested were successfully implemented across the spill response area.

  4. Cancer Prevention Interdisciplinary Education Program at Purdue University: Overview and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, Dorothy; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Adedokun, Omolola; Childress, Amy; Parker, Loran Carleton; Burgess, Wilella; Nagel, Julie; Knapp, Deborah W.; Lelievre, Sophie; Agnew, Christopher R.; Shields, Cleveland; Leary, James; Adams, Robin; Jensen, Jakob D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention is a broad field that crosses many disciplines; therefore, educational efforts to enhance cancer prevention research focused on interdisciplinary approaches to the field are greatly needed. In order to hasten progress in cancer prevention research, the Cancer Prevention Internship Program (CPIP) at Purdue University was designed to develop and test an interdisciplinary curriculum for undergraduate and graduate students. The hypothesis was that course curriculum specific to introducing interdisciplinary concepts in cancer prevention would increase student interest in and ability to pursue advanced educational opportunities (e.g., graduate school, medical school). Preliminary results from the evaluation of the first year which included 10 undergraduate and 5 graduate students suggested that participation in CPIP is a positive professional development experience, leading to a significant increase in understanding of interdisciplinary research in cancer prevention. In its first year, the CPIP project has created a successful model for interdisciplinary education in cancer prevention research. PMID:21533583

  5. Overview and current status of DOE/UPVG`s TEAM-UP Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hester, S.

    1995-11-01

    An overview is given of the Utility Photovoltaic Group. The mission is to accelerate the use of small-scale and large scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of the electric utilities and their customers.

  6. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation: field programming using density and viscosity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocková, Jana; Chmelík, Josef

    2006-06-23

    In previous papers, several approaches to programming of the resulting force field in GFFF were described and investigated. The experiments were dealing with flow-velocity and channel thickness, i.e. factors influencing hydrodynamic lift forces (HLF). The potential of density and viscosity of carrier liquid for field programming was predicted and demonstrated by preliminary experiments. This work is devoted to experimental verification of the influence of carrier liquid density and viscosity. Several carrier liquid density and simultaneously viscosity gradients using water-methanol mixtures are in this work implemented in the separation of a model silica mixture. Working with the water-methanol gradients, one is not able to separate the influence of density from the contribution of viscosity. However, we found experimental conditions to show the isolated effect of carrier liquid density (two water-methanol mixtures of equal viscosity differing in their densities). In order to demonstrate the isolated effect of viscosity, we implemented in this work a new system of (hydroxypropyl)methyl cellulose (HPMC) carrier liquids. Three different HPMC compositions enabled to vary the viscosity more than two times at almost constant density. With increasing carrier liquid viscosity, the focusing and elevating trend was clearly pronounced for 5 and 10 microm silica particles. By the isolated effect of increased viscosity, the centre of the 10 microm particle zone was elevated to the streamline at 16% of the channel height. These experiments have shown that the influence of carrier liquid viscosity on HLF should be taken into account even at higher levels above the channel bottom, i.e. beyond the near-wall region. Further, it is shown that higher value of carrier liquid viscosity improves the separation of the model mixture in terms of time and resolution.

  7. Toxicity characterization of environmental chemicals by the US National Toxicology Program: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Rajendra S; Bucher, John R; Wolfe, Mary; Portier, Christopher

    2003-08-01

    The US National Toxicology Program (NTP) is an interagency program whose mission is to evaluate agents of public health concern by developing and applying the tools of modern toxicology and molecular biology. Chemicals substances or physical agents selected for toxicology and carcinogenesis evaluations by the NTP are usually studied in a series of subacute (14-day exposure), subchronic (90-day exposure) and chronic (2-year exposure) studies in rodents. The NTP has published more than 500 reports of the findings and conclusions from its toxicology and carcinogenesis studies. In more specialized studies, the NTP also evaluates adverse effects on the structure and function of the immune, reproductive, nervous, and respiratory systems. The program attempts to evaluate and appropriately incorporate new technologies to improve the way we study the toxicity of chemicals. For example, the program has extensively evaluated several transgenic mouse models for their potential use as short-term cancer screens and has been a full participant in an international effort to examine their usefulness in pharmaceutical registration. Toxicogenomics, an emerging scientific field that examines the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in response to chemical exposure, holds promise for future application to better understand the underlying mechanisms of chemical toxicity. A number of public health issues being addressed by the NTP are not only of national importance but also have global impact, such as the potential for endocrine disruptors to influence development and carcinogenesis and the safety of herbal medicines and dietary supplements. The program participates in the preparation of national and international toxicity testing guidelines and the findings from NTP studies are widely used for risk assessments by international organizations and federal agencies. The NTP maintains databases that contain toxicity, and health and safety information on a large number of

  8. OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURRELL,KH

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OVERVIEW OF RECENT EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM THE DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK PROGRAM. The DIII-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, the authors have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: (1) the authors have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; (2) using this rotational stabilization, they have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {le} 10 for 4 {tau}{sub E} limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; (3) using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, they have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased {beta}{sub T} by 60%; (4) they have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; (5) they have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; (6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and (7) they have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 {tau}{sub E}) at the same fusion gain parameter of {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {approx} 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q{sub 95} = 4.2. They have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: (1) they have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 {tau}{sub E}) with constant density and constant radiation power; (2) they have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet

  9. U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litynski, J.; Plasynski, S.; Spangler, L.; Finley, R.; Steadman, E.; Ball, D.; Nemeth, K.J.; McPherson, B.; Myer, L.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a nationwide network of seven regional partnerships to help determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change. The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) are tasked with determining the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for carbon capture, transport, and storage in their areas of the country and parts of Canada. The seven partnerships include more than 350 state agencies, universities, national laboratories, private companies, and environmental organizations, spanning 42 states, two Indian nations, and four Canadian provinces. The Regional Partnerships initiative is being implemented in three phases: ???Characterization Phase (2003-2005): The objective was to collect data on CO2 sources and sinks and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon sequestration field tests and deployments. The completion of this Phase was marked by release of the Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada-Version 1 which included a common methodology for capacity assessment and reported over 3,000GT of storage capacity in saline formations, depleted oil and gas fields, and coal seams.???Validation Phase (2005-2009): The objective is to plan and implement small-scale (1??million tons of CO2) Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects, which will demonstrate that large volumes of CO2 can be injected safely, permanently, and economically into geologic formations representative of large storage capacity. Even though the RCSP Program is being implemented in three phases, it should be viewed as an integrated whole, with many of the goals and objectives transitioning from one phase to the next. Accomplishments and results from the Characterization Phase have helped to refine goals and activities in the Validation and Deployment Phases. The RCSP Program encourages and requires open information sharing among

  10. Geriatric Nursing Master’s Degree Program Overviews in Iran: Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Valizadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ​The increasing number of elderly in recent years has led to great changes in the country's healthcare system. One of these changes is developing geriatric nursing master degree. This paper, with non-systematic approach, presents an evaluation of geriatric nursing graduate program in Iran. According to the results, mission and curriculum of the course are written in details. The number of faculties and students is rising every year. It seems that “the teacher shortage” and “determining the accurate and appropriate job status” for graduates are the main challenges. Given the young nature of the field, it is strongly recommended to reassess after some years.

  11. U.S. field testing programs and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicks, G.G.

    2000-06-09

    The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

  12. Overview of the 2006-2008 JOGMEC/NRCan/Aurora Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Dallimore, S. R.

    2008-12-01

    During the winters of 2007 and 2008 the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC) and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), with Aurora Research Institute as the operator, carried out an on-shore gas hydrate production test program at the Mallik site, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada. The prime objective of the program was to verify the feasibility of depressurization technique by drawing down the formation pressure across a 12m perforated gas hydrate bearing section. This project was the second full scale production test at this site following the 2002 Japex/JNOC/GSC et al Mallik research program in which seven participants organizatinos from five countries undertook a thermal test using hot water circulation Field work in 2007 was devoted to establishing a production test well, installing monitoring devices outside of casing, conducting base line geophysical studies and undertaking a short test to gain practical experience prior to longer term testing planned for 2008 . Hydrate-dissociated gas was produced to surface by depressurization achieved by lowering the fluid level with a dowhole pump. However, the operation was terminated 60 hours after the start of the pumping mainly due to sand production problems. In spite of the short period (12.5 hours of ellapsed pumping time), at least 830m3 of the gas was produced and accumulated in the borehole. Sand screens were installed across the perforated interval at the bottom hole for the 2008 program to overcome operational problems encountered in 2007 and achieve sustainable gas production. Stable bottom hole flowing pressures were successfully achieved during a 6 day test with continuous pump operation. Sustained gas production was achieved with rates between 2000- 4000m3/day and cummulative gas volume in the surface of approximately 13,000m3. Temperature and pressure data measured at the bottom hole and gas and water production rates gave positive evidence for the high efficiency of gas

  13. Overview of the RFX-mod contribution to the international Fusion Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiatti, M. E.; Dal Bello, S.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Antoni, V.; Auriemma, F.; Barbisan, M.; Barbui, T.; Baruzzo, M.; Battistella, M.; Belli, F.; Bettini, P.; Bigi, M.; Bilel, R.; Boldrin, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Brombin, M.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cester, D.; Chacon, L.; Chapman, B. E.; Chitarin, G.; Ciaccio, G.; Cooper, W. A.; Dalla Palma, M.; Deambrosis, S.; Delogu, R.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Masi, G.; Dong, J. Q.; Escande, D. F.; Esposito, B.; Fassina, A.; Fellin, F.; Ferro, A.; Finotti, C.; Franz, P.; Frassinetti, L.; Furno Palumbo, M.; Gaio, E.; Ghezzi, F.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Gonzales, W. A.; Grando, L.; Guo, S. C.; Hanson, J. D.; Hirshman, S. P.; Innocente, P.; Jackson, J. L.; Kiyama, S.; Komm, M.; Laguardia, L.; Li, C.; Liu, S. F.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lorenzini, R.; Luce, T. C.; Luchetta, A.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marchiori, G.; Marconato, N.; Marocco, D.; Marcuzzi, D.; Martines, E.; Martini, S.; Matsunaga, G.; Mazzitelli, G.; Miorin, E.; Momo, B.; Moresco, M.; Okabayashi, M.; Olofsson, E.; Paccagnella, R.; Patel, N.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pigatto, L.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Piron, L.; Predebon, I.; Rea, C.; Recchia, M.; Rigato, V.; Rizzolo, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Rostagni, G.; Ruset, C.; Ruzzon, A.; Sajò-Bohus, L.; Sakakita, H.; Sanchez, R.; Sarff, J. S.; Sartori, E.; Sattin, F.; Scaggion, A.; Scarin, P.; Schmitz, O.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Spong, D. A.; Spizzo, G.; Stevanato, L.; Takechi, M.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Trevisan, G. L.; Urso, G.; Valente, M.; Valisa, M.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.; Viesti, G.; Villone, F.; Vincenzi, P.; Visona', N.; Wang, Z. R.; White, R. B.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Xu, X. Y.; Yanovskiy, V.; Zamengo, A.; Zanca, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zuin, M.

    2015-10-01

    The RFX-mod device is operated both as a reversed field pinch (RFP), where advanced regimes featuring helical shape develop, and as a tokamak. Due to its flexibility, RFX-mod is contributing to the solution of key issues in the roadmap to ITER and DEMO, including MHD instability control, internal transport barriers, edge transport and turbulence, isotopic effect, high density limit and three-dimensional (3D) non-linear MHD modelling. This paper reports recent advancements in the understanding of the self-organized helical states, featuring a strong electron transport barrier, in the RFP configuration; the physical mechanism driving the residual transport at the barrier has been investigated. Following the first experiments with deuterium as the filling gas, new results concerning the isotope effect in the RFP are discussed. Studies on the high density limit show that in the RFP it is related to a toroidal particle accumulation due to the onset of a convective cell. In the tokamak configuration, q(a) regimes down to q(a) = 1.2 have been pioneered, with (2,1) tearing mode (TM) mitigated and (2,1) resistive wall mode (RWM) stabilized: the control of such modes can be obtained both by poloidal and radial sensors. Progress has been made in the avoidance of disruptions due to the (2,1) TM by applying q(a) control, and on the general issue of error field control. The effect of externally applied 3D fields on plasma flow and edge turbulence, sawtooth control and runaway electron decorrelation has been analysed. The experimental program is supported by substantial theoretical activity: 3D non-linear visco-resistive MHD and non-local transport modelling have been advanced; RWMs have been studied by a toroidal MHD kinetic hybrid stability code.

  14. Trends in Canadian faculties of education: An overview of graduate programs, curricular offerings, exit requirements, and modes of delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Abreu Ellis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This research investigated universities registered with the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC whose primary instructional language was English. A content analysis was performed on university web pages related to the following content: (a frequency of graduate programs being offered, (b types of degrees being offered, (c frequency and variation of program of study offerings, (d variation of exit requirements, and (e modalities of course delivery. This research provides an overview and analysis of graduate level programs, more precisely Masters and Doctorate degrees, offered through faculties of education in Canada. An understanding of the findings of this research may benefit Canadian university administrative bodies in providing a source in which they may compare findings with their current offerings and programming. Prospective students of graduate programs in education may also benefit from the information provided in this study when choosing a program of study by ameliorating their knowledge of current programs, curriculum offerings, and modes of course delivery being offered by faculties of education in Canada.

  15. Social Work Program. Field Placement Manual for Social Work Field Placement I, Social Work Field Placement II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Howard J.; And Others

    This document is a manual for a social work field placement program. The social work field placement is described as a learning experience designed to translate the students' interests, interpersonal abilities, and academic knowledge and theory into the capability of enabling others to solve problems. Expectations of skills to be learned in the…

  16. Overview Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, John

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview presentation of the 2000 NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) Review and Planning Meeting. Topics include: 1) a background of the program; 2) 1999 Industry Feedback; 3) FY00 Status, including resource distribution and major accomplishments; 4) FY01 Major Milestones; and 5) Future direction for the program. Specifically, simulation environment/production software and NPSS CORBA Security Development are discussed.

  17. Nanotechnologies in agriculture and food - an overview of different fields of application, risk assessment and public perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobe, Antje; Rissanen, Mikko E

    2012-12-01

    Nanomaterials in agriculture and food are key issues of public and regulatory interest. Over the past ten years, patents for nanotechnological applications in the field of food and agriculture have become abundant. Uncertainty prevails however regarding their current development status and presence in the consumer market. Thus, the discussion on nanotechnologies in the food sector with its specific public perception of benefits and risks and the patterns of communication are becoming similar to the debate on genetically modified organisms. The food industry's silence in communication increased mistrust of consumer organisations and policy makers. The article discusses the background of the current regulatory debates, starting with the EU recommendation for defining nanomaterials, provides an overview of possible fields of application in agriculture and food industries and discusses risk assessment and the public debate on benefits and risks. Communicative recommendations are directed at researchers, the food industry and regulators in order to increase trust both in stakeholders, risk management and regulatory processes.

  18. FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCP METHOD - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) pentachlorophenol (PCP) method uses a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a megabore capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) and electron capture detector (ECD) to identify and quantify PCP. The FASP PCP method is design...

  19. Overview of the Cassini In-Situ Observations of Auroral Field-Aligned Currents During the 2013 Saturn Aurora Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, E. J.; Badman, S. V.; Cowley, S. W.; Dougherty, M. K.; Gurnett, D. A.; Jinks, S.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nichols, J. D.; Provan, G.; Pryor, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Saturn Aurora Campaign 2013 is a coordinated effort to provide a clearer understanding of Saturn's auroral emissions at multiple wavelengths in the upper atmosphere, and their associated magnetospheric signatures and dynamics. Structures such as Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) are known to play a significant role in the modulation of Saturn's auroral emissions via abrupt changes in the dynamic pressure associated with forward shocks at the start of the CIR compression regions. Recent observations from the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn have also taught us that the 'magnetosphere oscillations' observed in magnetic field perturbations in the northern and southern hemispheres, which are associated with the SKR modulations in each hemisphere, also significantly modulate the magnetosphere and auroral emissions. Here we present an overview of the in situ magnetosphere measurements during the campaign, along with an overview of the solar wind conditions upstream of Saturn inferred from the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) emissions. We will discuss evidence of the high-latitude field-aligned currents and plasma boundaries (e.g. the open-closed field line (or related) boundary) from the magnetic field data, plasma signatures and/or auroral hiss observations (using the Cassini magnetometer-MAG, the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument-MIMI, and the Radio Plasma Wave Science-RPWS instruments respectively). We will attempt to characterise the morphology and variability (e.g. co-latitude, intensity) of the current system(s) from both the knowledge of the northern or southern magnetosphere oscillation phase (according to the location of the spacecraft) and the inferred solar wind conditions. We will compare these results with available IR/UV auroral images from the campaign.

  20. THE DOE OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM: OVERVIEW OF TECHNICAL TASKS AND RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Fox, K.; Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2009-12-08

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Engineering and Technology is responsible for implementing EM's International Cooperative Program. Over the past 15 years, collaborative work has been conducted through this program with researchers in Russia, Ukraine, France, United Kingdom and Republic of Korea. Currently, work is being conducted with researchers in Russia and Ukraine. Efforts aimed at evaluating and advancing technologies to support U.S. high-level waste (HLW) vitrification initiatives are being conducted in collaboration with Russian researchers. Work at Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) is targeted at improving the throughput of current vitrification processes by increasing melting rate. These efforts are specifically targeted at challenging waste types identified at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford Site. The objectives of current efforts at SIA Radon are to gain insight into vitrification process limits for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) technology. Previous demonstration testing has shown that the CCIM offers the potential for dramatic increases in waste loading and waste throughput. However, little information is known regarding operational limits that could affect long-term, efficient CCIM operations. Collaborative work with the Russian Electrotechnical University (ETU) 'LETI' is aimed at advancing CCIM process monitoring, process control and design. The goal is to further mature the CCIM technology and to establish it as a viable HLW vitrification technology. The greater than two year effort conducted with the International Radioecology Laboratory in the Ukraine recently completed. The objectives of this study were: to assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ); and to provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

  1. The DOE Office of Environmental Management International Cooperative Program: Overview of Technical Tasks and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, James C.; Fox, Kevin M.; Jannik, Gerald T.; Farfan, Eduardo B.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Roach, Jay; Aloy, A. S.; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Lopukh, D. B.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Han, Ana M.

    2010-01-22

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Engineering and Technology is responsible for implementing EM’s International Cooperative Program. Over the past 15 years, collaborative work has been conducted through this program with researchers in Russia, Ukraine, France, United Kingdom and Republic of Korea. Currently, work is being conducted with researchers in Russia and Ukraine. Efforts aimed at evaluating and advancing technologies to support U.S. high-level waste (HLW) vitrification initiatives are being conducted in collaboration with Russian researchers. Work at Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) is targeted at improving the throughput of current vitrification processes by increasing melting rate. These efforts are specifically targeted at challenging waste types identified at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford Site. The objectives of current efforts at SIA Radon are to gain insight into vitrification process limits for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) technology. Previous demonstration testing has shown that the CCIM offers the potential for dramatic increases in waste loading and waste throughput. However, little information is known regarding operational limits that could affect long-term, efficient CCIM operations. Collaborative work with the Russian Electrotechnical University (ETU) “LETI” is aimed at advancing CCIM process monitoring, process control and design. The goal is to further mature the CCIM technology and to establish it as a viable HLW vitrification technology. The greater than two year effort conducted with the International Radioecology Laboratory in the Ukraine recently completed. The objectives of this study were: to assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ); and to provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ch

  2. THE DOE OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM: OVERVIEW OF TECHNICAL TASKS AND RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Fox, K.; Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2009-12-08

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Engineering and Technology is responsible for implementing EM's International Cooperative Program. Over the past 15 years, collaborative work has been conducted through this program with researchers in Russia, Ukraine, France, United Kingdom and Republic of Korea. Currently, work is being conducted with researchers in Russia and Ukraine. Efforts aimed at evaluating and advancing technologies to support U.S. high-level waste (HLW) vitrification initiatives are being conducted in collaboration with Russian researchers. Work at Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) is targeted at improving the throughput of current vitrification processes by increasing melting rate. These efforts are specifically targeted at challenging waste types identified at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford Site. The objectives of current efforts at SIA Radon are to gain insight into vitrification process limits for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) technology. Previous demonstration testing has shown that the CCIM offers the potential for dramatic increases in waste loading and waste throughput. However, little information is known regarding operational limits that could affect long-term, efficient CCIM operations. Collaborative work with the Russian Electrotechnical University (ETU) 'LETI' is aimed at advancing CCIM process monitoring, process control and design. The goal is to further mature the CCIM technology and to establish it as a viable HLW vitrification technology. The greater than two year effort conducted with the International Radioecology Laboratory in the Ukraine recently completed. The objectives of this study were: to assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ); and to provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

  3. An Overview of Hardware for Protein Crystallization in a Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er-Kai Yan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein crystallization under a magnetic field is an interesting research topic because a magnetic field may provide a special environment to acquire improved quality protein crystals. Because high-quality protein crystals are very useful in high-resolution structure determination using diffraction techniques (X-ray, neutron, and electron diffraction, research using magnetic fields in protein crystallization has attracted substantial interest; some studies have been performed in the past two decades. In this research field, the hardware is especially essential for successful studies because the environment is special and the design and utilization of the research apparatus in such an environment requires special considerations related to the magnetic field. This paper reviews the hardware for protein crystallization (including the magnet systems and the apparatus designed for use in a magnetic field and progress in this area. Future prospects in this field will also be discussed.

  4. An Overview of the Los Alamos Program on Asteroid Mitigation by a Nuclear Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R.; Gisler, G. R.; Plesko, C. S.; Ferguson, J.

    2014-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is standing up a new program to address the mitigation of a potentially hazardous objects (PHO) by using nuclear explosives. A series of efforts at Los Alamos have been working this problem for the last few years in an informal fashion. We now have a funded program to dedicate time to this important mission. The goal of our project is to study the effectiveness of using a nuclear explosive to mitigate (alter orbit or destroy) an PHO on an Earth crossing path. We are also pursuing studies of impact hazards should the international leadership decide not to organize a mission for active mitigation of a PHO. Such impact hazards are characterized as local, regional or global. Impact hazards include: a direct hit in an urban area (potentially catastrophic but highly unlikely); the generation a significant tsunami from an ocean impact close to a coastline and regional and global effects from medium to large impactors. Previous studies at Los Alamos have looked at 2D and 3D simulations in the deep ocean from large bolides, as well as impacts that have global consequences. More recent work has included radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of momentum transfer (and enhancement) from a low energy (10 kt) stand-off source, as well as surface and subsurface high energy explosions (100 kt - 10 Mt) for example PHOs. The current program will carefully look at two main aspects of using a standoff nuclear source: 1) a computational study for the optimum height-of-burst (HOB) of a stand-off burst using our best energy coupling techniques for both neutrons and x-rays; and 2) as a function of the nuclear energy produced and the HOB what is the optimum energy field: neutrons or x-rays. This team is also working with NNSA and NASA Goddard to compare numerical results for these complicated simulations on a well defined series of test problems involving both kinetic impactors and stand-off nuclear energy sources. Results will be shown by the co-authors on

  5. An Overview on Magnetic Field and Electric Field Interactions with Ice Crystallisation; Application in the Case of Frozen Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Kumar Jha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation is a stochastic process and it is very difficult to be controlled. Freezing technologies and more specifically crystallisation assisted by magnetic, electric and electromagnetic fields have the capability to interact with nucleation. Static magnetic field (SMF may affect matter crystallisation; however, this is still under debate in the literature. Static electric field (SEF has a significant effect on crystallisation; this has been evidenced experimentally and confirmed by the theory. Oscillating magnetic field induces an oscillating electric field and is also expected to interact with water crystallisation. Oscillating electromagnetic fields interact with water, perturb and even disrupt hydrogen bonds, which in turn are thought to increase the degree of supercooling and to generate numerous fine ice crystals. Based on the literature, it seems that the frequency has an influence on the above-mentioned phenomena. This review article summarizes the fundamentals of freezing under magnetic, electric and electromagnetic fields, as well as their applicability and potentials within the food industry.

  6. 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration program data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cromer, M.V. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newman, G.C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beiso, D.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration program, hosted by Fernald Environmental Management Project, was established to investigate technologies that are applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. An important part of this effort was evaluating field-screening tools potentially capable of acquiring high-resolution information on uranium contamination distribution in surface soils. Further-more, the information needed to be obtained in a cost- and time-efficient manner. Seven advanced field-screening technologies were demonstrated at a uranium-contaminated site at Fernald, located 29 kilometers northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. The seven technologies tested were: (1) alpha-track detectors, (2) a high-energy beta scintillometer, (3) electret ionization chambers, (4) and (5) two variants of gamma-ray spectrometry, (6) laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, and (7) long-range alpha detection. The goals of this field demonstration were to evaluate the capabilities of the detectors and to demonstrate their utility within the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration Program. Identical field studies were conducted using four industry-standard characterization tools: (1) a sodium-iodide scintillometer, (2) a low-energy FIDLER scintillometer, (3) a field-portable x-ray fluorescence detector, and (4) standard soil sampling coupled with laboratory analysis. Another important aspect of this program was the application of a cost/risk decision model to guide characterization of the site. This document is a compilation of raw data submitted by the technologies and converted total uranium data from the 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration.

  7. H0LiCOW I. H0 Lenses in COSMOGRAIL's Wellspring: Program Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Suyu, S H; Courbin, F; Fassnacht, C D; Rusu, C E; Sluse, D; Treu, T; Wong, K C; Auger, M W; Ding, X; Hilbert, S; Marshall, P J; Rumbaugh, N; Sonnenfeld, A; Tewes, M; Tihhonova, O; Agnello, A; Blandford, R D; Chen, G C -F; Collett, T; Koopmans, L V E; Liao, K; Meylan, G; Spiniello, C

    2016-01-01

    Strong gravitational lens systems with time delays between the multiple images are a powerful probe of cosmology and astrophysics. In particular, the time-delay distance from such a system is primarily sensitive to the Hubble constant that is key to probing dark energy, neutrino physics, and the spatial curvature of the Universe, as well as discovering new physics. We present H0LiCOW (H0 Lenses in COSMOGRAIL's Wellspring), a program that aims to measure H0 with <3.5% uncertainty in precision and accuracy from five lens systems (B1608+656, RXJ1131-1231, HE0435-1223, WFI2033-4723 and HE1104-1805). We have acquired or are in the process of acquiring (1) time delays through COSMOGRAIL and Very Large Array monitoring, (2) high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging for the lens mass modeling, (3) wide-field imaging and spectroscopy to characterize the lens environment, and (4) moderate-resolution spectroscopy for obtaining the stellar velocity dispersion of the lenses and, thus, to further constrain our lens...

  8. Overview of C-2U FRC Experimental Program and Plans for C-2W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, H.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Yang, X.; Cappello, M.; Ivanov, A. A.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Tri Alpha Energy's experimental program has been focused on a demonstration of reliable field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment, driven by fast ions via high-power neutral-beam (NB) injection. The world's largest compact-toroid experimental devices, C-2 and C-2U, have successfully produced a well-stabilized, sustainable FRC plasma state with NB injection (input power, PNB 10 + MW; 15 keV hydrogen) and end-on coaxial plasma guns. Remarkable improvements in confinement and stability of FRC plasmas have led to further improved fast-ion build up; thereby, an advanced beam-driven FRC state has been produced and sustained for up to 5 + ms (longer than all characteristic system time scales), only limited by hardware and electric supply constraints such as NB and plasma-gun power supplies. To further improve the FRC performance the C-2U device is being replaced by C-2W featuring higher injected NB power, longer pulse duration as well as enhanced edge-biasing systems and substantially upgraded divertors. Main C-2U experimental results and key features of C-2W will be presented. Tri Alpha Energy, Inc.

  9. An overview of the HSST Full-Thickness Shallow-Crack Clad Beam Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, J. A.; Theiss, T. J.; McAfee, W. J.; Bass, B. R.

    1994-08-01

    A testing program is described that will utilize full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow flaws in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPV's). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow flaws in the beam specimen include material gradients due to welding and cladding applications, as well as material inhomogeneities in welded regions due to reheating in multiple weld passes. Fracture toughness tests focusing on shallow flaws in plate and weld material will also provide data for evaluating the relative influence of absolute and normalized crack depth on constraint conditions. Pretest finite-element analyses are described that provide near-tip stress and strain fields for characterization of constraint in the shallow-crack specimens in terms of the Q-stress. Analysis results predict a constraint loss in the shallow-crack clad beam specimen similar to that determined for a previously tested shallow-crack single-edge notch homogeneous bend specimen with the same normalized crack depth.

  10. A National Overview of Staff and Program Characteristics 1984-1985. HEP/CAMP National Evaluation Project. Research Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gary L.

    One of four products of the 1984-85 National Evaluation Project to compile baseline data on characteristics and impacts of High School Equivalency Programs (HEP) and College Assistance for Migrants Programs (CAMP), this report presents a brief overview of the goals, basic research design, and summary of the evaluation project products and a…

  11. Study choice and career development in STEM fields: an overview and integration of the research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijl, van Cathy; Walma van der Molen, Juliette H.

    2015-01-01

    Although science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) study paths and STEM work fields may be relatively difficult and therefore not appropriate for everyone, too many children prematurely exclude STEM-related study and work options, based on negative images of the field or negative abili

  12. Environmental Field Surveys, EMF Rapid Program, Engineering Project No.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enertech Consultants

    1996-04-01

    The EMF Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) includes several engineering research in the area of exposure assessment and source characterization. RAPID engineering project No. 3: ''Environmental Field Surveys'' was performed to obtain information on the levels and characteristics of different environments, for which only limited data were available, especially in comparison to magnetic field data for the residential environment and for electric utility facilities, such as power lines and substations. This project was also to provide information on the contribution of various field sources in the surveyed environments. Magnetic field surveys were performed at four sites for each of five environments: schools, hospitals, office buildings, machine shops, and grocery stores. Of the twenty sites surveyed, 11 were located in the San Francisco Bay Area and 9 in Massachusetts. The surveys used a protocol based on magnetic field measurements and observation of activity patterns, designed to provide estimates of magnetic field exposure by type of people and by type of sources. The magnetic field surveys conducted by this project produced a large amount of data which will form a part of the EMF measurement database Field and exposure data were obtained separately for ''area exposure'' and ''at exposure points''. An exposure point is a location where persons engage in fixed, site specific activities near a local source that creates a significant increase in the area field. The area field is produced by ''area sources'', whose location and field distribution is in general not related to the location of the people in the area.

  13. A geological overview of the Panuke field reservoir sandstones, offshore Nova Scotia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogg, J.R.; DeLong, I.D. [PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    The Panuke oil field, discovered in 1986, was one of the first producing fields in the Canadian offshore with first oil in 1992. The field is associated with the Scotian Basin, an early Cretaceous reservoir with porosity ranging from 20 to 26 per cent and permeability from 500 to 2000 md. The Cohasset and Panuke fields combined, produce an average of 4500 m{sup 3}/d of high gravity oil with a gas-oil ratio of 17 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}. Migration of the hydrocarbons into the structure is believed to be through a listric normal fault formed by differential subsidence of the Cretaceous sediments over the Jurassic bank edge. Details of the sedimentology and the stratigraphic relationship of the reservoir sandstones of the Panuke field are provided. 4 figs.

  14. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials sciences and technologies; chemistry and materials, explosives, special nuclear materials (SNM), and tritium. (2) Design sciences and advanced computation; physics, conceptual design and assessment, and computation and modeling. (3) Advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities; system engineering science and technology, and electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components. Section I gives a brief summary of 23 major defense program (DP) research and technology facilities and shows how these major facilities are organized by program elements. Section II gives a more detailed breakdown of the over 200 research and technology facilities being used at the Laboratories to support the Defense Programs mission.

  15. 75 FR 43510 - Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; Charter Schools Program (CSP) Grants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ...-State Educational Agencies for Planning, Program Design, and Implementation and for Dissemination.... The non-State educational agency (non-SEA) grants for planning, program design, and implementation... program. 5. Funding Restrictions: Use of Funds for Post-Award Planning and Design of the...

  16. The Math and Science Partnership Program Evaluation: Overview of the First Two Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the Math and Science Partnership Program Evaluation (MSP-PE) during the project's first two years and provides the evaluation framework being used to assess the National Science Foundation's MSP Program. The study conveys the MSP-PE's ongoing design and implementation. To show how they reflect the nature of the MSP Program,…

  17. Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Overview of scientific and technical program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R.B.; Collett, T.S.; Boswell, R.; Anderson, B.J.; Digert, S.A.; Pospisil, G.; Baker, R.; Weeks, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well was drilled within the Alaska North Slope (ANS) Milne Point Unit (MPU) from February 3 to 19, 2007. The well was conducted as part of a Cooperative Research Agreement (CRA) project co-sponsored since 2001 by BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BPXA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help determine whether ANS gas hydrate can become a technically and commercially viable gas resource. Early in the effort, regional reservoir characterization and reservoir simulation modeling studies indicated that up to 0.34 trillion cubic meters (tcm; 12 trillion cubic feet, tcf) gas may be technically recoverable from 0.92 tcm (33 tcf) gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation near industry infrastructure within ANS MPU, Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), and Kuparuk River Unit (KRU) areas. To further constrain these estimates and to enable the selection of a test site for further data acquisition, the USGS reprocessed and interpreted MPU 3D seismic data provided by BPXA to delineate 14 prospects containing significant highly-saturated gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The "Mount Elbert" site was selected to drill a stratigraphic test well to acquire a full suite of wireline log, core, and formation pressure test data. Drilling results and data interpretation confirmed pre-drill predictions and thus increased confidence in both the prospect interpretation methods and in the wider ANS gas hydrate resource estimates. The interpreted data from the Mount Elbert well provide insight into and reduce uncertainty of key gas hydrate-bearing reservoir properties, enable further refinement and validation of the numerical simulation of the production potential of both MPU and broader ANS gas hydrate resources, and help determine viability of potential field sites for future extended term production testing. Drilling and data acquisition operations demonstrated that gas hydrate

  18. Overview of the TCV tokamak program: scientific progress and facility upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, S.; Ahn, J.; Albanese, R.; Alberti, S.; Alessi, E.; Allan, S.; Anand, H.; Anastassiou, G.; Andrèbe, Y.; Angioni, C.; Ariola, M.; Bernert, M.; Beurskens, M.; Bin, W.; Blanchard, P.; Blanken, T. C.; Boedo, J. A.; Bolzonella, T.; Bouquey, F.; Braunmüller, F. H.; Bufferand, H.; Buratti, P.; Calabró, G.; Camenen, Y.; Carnevale, D.; Carpanese, F.; Causa, F.; Cesario, R.; Chapman, I. T.; Chellai, O.; Choi, D.; Cianfarani, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Citrin, J.; Costea, S.; Crisanti, F.; Cruz, N.; Czarnecka, A.; Decker, J.; De Masi, G.; De Tommasi, G.; Douai, D.; Dunne, M.; Duval, B. P.; Eich, T.; Elmore, S.; Esposito, B.; Faitsch, M.; Fasoli, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Felici, F.; Février, O.; Ficker, O.; Fietz, S.; Fontana, M.; Frassinetti, L.; Furno, I.; Galeani, S.; Gallo, A.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Garrido, I.; Geiger, B.; Giovannozzi, E.; Gobbin, M.; Goodman, T. P.; Gorini, G.; Gospodarczyk, M.; Granucci, G.; Graves, J. P.; Guirlet, R.; Hakola, A.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Hawke, J.; Hennequin, P.; Hnat, B.; Hogeweij, D.; Hogge, J.-Ph.; Honoré, C.; Hopf, C.; Horáček, J.; Huang, Z.; Igochine, V.; Innocente, P.; Ionita Schrittwieser, C.; Isliker, H.; Jacquier, R.; Jardin, A.; Kamleitner, J.; Karpushov, A.; Keeling, D. L.; Kirneva, N.; Kong, M.; Koubiti, M.; Kovacic, J.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Krawczyk, N.; Kudlacek, O.; Labit, B.; Lazzaro, E.; Le, H. B.; Lipschultz, B.; Llobet, X.; Lomanowski, B.; Loschiavo, V. P.; Lunt, T.; Maget, P.; Maljaars, E.; Malygin, A.; Maraschek, M.; Marini, C.; Martin, P.; Martin, Y.; Mastrostefano, S.; Maurizio, R.; Mavridis, M.; Mazon, D.; McAdams, R.; McDermott, R.; Merle, A.; Meyer, H.; Militello, F.; Miron, I. G.; Molina Cabrera, P. A.; Moret, J.-M.; Moro, A.; Moulton, D.; Naulin, V.; Nespoli, F.; Nielsen, A. H.; Nocente, M.; Nouailletas, R.; Nowak, S.; Odstrčil, T.; Papp, G.; Papřok, R.; Pau, A.; Pautasso, G.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Pisokas, T.; Porte, L.; Preynas, M.; Ramogida, G.; Rapson, C.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Reich, M.; Reimerdes, H.; Reux, C.; Ricci, P.; Rittich, D.; Riva, F.; Robinson, T.; Saarelma, S.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Sauter, O.; Scannell, R.; Schlatter, Ch.; Schneider, B.; Schneider, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Sciortino, F.; Sertoli, M.; Sheikh, U.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, M.; Sinha, J.; Sozzi, C.; Spolaore, M.; Stange, T.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Tamain, P.; Teplukhina, A.; Testa, D.; Theiler, C.; Thornton, A.; Tophøj, L.; Tran, M. Q.; Tsironis, C.; Tsui, C.; Uccello, A.; Vartanian, S.; Verdoolaege, G.; Verhaegh, K.; Vermare, L.; Vianello, N.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Vlahos, L.; Vu, N. M. T.; Walkden, N.; Wauters, T.; Weisen, H.; Wischmeier, M.; Zestanakis, P.; Zuin, M.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-10-01

    The TCV tokamak is augmenting its unique historical capabilities (strong shaping, strong electron heating) with ion heating, additional electron heating compatible with high densities, and variable divertor geometry, in a multifaceted upgrade program designed to broaden its operational range without sacrificing its fundamental flexibility. The TCV program is rooted in a three-pronged approach aimed at ITER support, explorations towards DEMO, and fundamental research. A 1 MW, tangential neutral beam injector (NBI) was recently installed and promptly extended the TCV parameter range, with record ion temperatures and toroidal rotation velocities and measurable neutral-beam current drive. ITER-relevant scenario development has received particular attention, with strategies aimed at maximizing performance through optimized discharge trajectories to avoid MHD instabilities, such as peeling-ballooning and neoclassical tearing modes. Experiments on exhaust physics have focused particularly on detachment, a necessary step to a DEMO reactor, in a comprehensive set of conventional and advanced divertor concepts. The specific theoretical prediction of an enhanced radiation region between the two X-points in the low-field-side snowflake-minus configuration was experimentally confirmed. Fundamental investigations of the power decay length in the scrape-off layer (SOL) are progressing rapidly, again in widely varying configurations and in both D and He plasmas; in particular, the double decay length in L-mode limited plasmas was found to be replaced by a single length at high SOL resistivity. Experiments on disruption mitigation by massive gas injection and electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) have begun in earnest, in parallel with studies of runaway electron generation and control, in both stable and disruptive conditions; a quiescent runaway beam carrying the entire electrical current appears to develop in some cases. Developments in plasma control have benefited from

  19. Electric Field Measurements During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Monte G.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field program, a system of 6 electric field mills was flown on one of NASA's Global Hawk aircraft. We placed several mills on the aircraft to enable us to measure the vector electric field. We created a distributed, ethernet-connected system so that each sensor has its own embedded Linux system, complete with web server. This makes our current generation system fully "sensor web enabled." The Global Hawk has several unique qualities, but relevant to quality storm electric field measurements are high altitude (20 km) and long duration (20-30 hours) flights. There are several aircraft participating in the GRIP program, and coordinated measurements are happening. Lightning and electric field measurements will be used to study the relationships between lightning and other storm characteristics. It has been long understood that lightning can be used as a marker for strong convective activity. Past research and field programs suggest that lightning flash rate may serve as an indicator and precursor for rapid intensification change in tropical cyclones and hurricanes. We have the opportunity to sample hurricanes for many hours at a time and observe intensification (or de-intensification) periods. The electrical properties of hurricanes during such periods are not well known. American

  20. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Overview and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeksema, J Todd; Hayashi, Keiji; Sun, Xudong; Schou, Jesper; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee; Bobra, Monica; Centeno, Rebecca; Leka, K D; Barnes, Graham; Turmon, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) began near-continuous full-disk solar measurements on 1 May 2010 from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). An automated processing pipeline keeps pace with observations to produce observable quantities, including the photospheric vector magnetic field, from sequences of filtergrams. The primary 720s observables were released in mid 2010, including Stokes polarization parameters measured at six wavelengths as well as intensity, Doppler velocity, and the line-of-sight magnetic field. More advanced products, including the full vector magnetic field, are now available. Automatically identified HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) track the location and shape of magnetic regions throughout their lifetime. The vector field is computed using the Very Fast Inversion of the Stokes Vector (VFISV) code optimized for the HMI pipeline; the remaining 180 degree azimuth ambiguity is resolved with the Minimum Energy (ME0) code. The Milne-Eddington inversion is performed on all full-di...

  1. An Overview of Wide-Field-Of-View Optical Designs for Survey Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    aberrations while trying not to introduce chromatic aberration . For wide fields of view, the designs can become quite complex and expensive...published details of a refractive aberration corrector for the Ritchey- Chretien optical system [5]. Before this time, refractive correctors were not...well known, but were in use as chromatic correctors and field flatteners on refractor telescopes [2, 6]. The 1931 introduction of the Schmidt Camera

  2. The Cluster Magnetic Field Investigation: overview of in-flight performance and initial results

    OpenAIRE

    A. Balogh; Carr, C. M.; Acuña, M. H.; M. W. Dunlop; Beek, T. J.; Brown, P.; Fornacon, K.-H.; Georgescu, E.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Harris, J.; Musmann, G.; Oddy, T.; Schwingenschuh, K.

    2001-01-01

    The accurate measurement of the magnetic field along the orbits of the four Cluster spacecraft is a primary objective of the mission. The magnetic field is a key constituent of the plasma in and around the magnetosphere, and it plays an active role in all physical processes that define the structure and dynamics of magnetospheric phenomena on all scales. With the four-point measurements on Cluster, it has become possible to study the three-dimensional aspects of space plasma ...

  3. Yucca Mountain site characterization: The field testing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.R.; Matthusen, A.C.

    1994-12-31

    The Yucca Mountain area was first considered as a site for possible characterization as a high level waste repository in 1977. Since that time preliminary field testing and Congressional directive recommended continued testing and determined in 1987 that Yucca Mountain would be the only site characterized. Following environmental assessment, the development of a site characterization plan, and litigation with the State of Nevada testing from both surface-based perspective and underground in the Exploratory Studies Facility is underway. Data and analyses from the comprehensive testing program will be evaluated on a periodic basis of two year cycles to provide direction to the testing program. The entire testing program will culminate in a determination of site suitability near the end of the twentieth century.

  4. A critical overview of industrial energy decoupling programs in six developing countries in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luken, Ralph A., E-mail: SkipLuken@yahoo.com [UNIDO, PO Box 300 (Library), A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Piras, Stefano [UNIDO (Austria)

    2011-06-15

    In reviewing the journal literature on the decoupling of energy use and industrial output in the Asian region, particularly with respect to developing countries, we found little information about most country programs other than for China and India and only one article that compared the programs of these two countries. For this reason, we used diverse sources to identify the key programmatic features that have contributed, but clearly are not totally responsible for, decoupling achievements of two countries ( China and Thailand) and then, on the basis of these findings, reviewed emerging industrial energy decoupling programs in four other countries (India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam). We found that the design of the two successful on-going decoupling programs have common features, which are setting an explicit target for decoupling of energy use and industrial output, a government program that offers financial incentives and imposes specific auditing and reporting requirements and involvement of the manufacturing sector in designing and implementing targets as they apply to individual enterprises. We also found that the emerging programs in the other four countries lack some or all of these essential programmatic features. - Highlights: > We reviewed two on-going and four emerging industrial energy decoupling programs. > These six Asian developing countries have very different rates of decoupling. > The two successful on-going programs share three common features. > These are quantitative targets, supportive programs and industry involvement. > The four emerging programs lack some or all of these features.

  5. Aircraft structural health monitoring system development: overview of the Air Force/Navy smart metallic structures program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Way, Craig B.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Zeigler, Michael L.; Alper, James M.

    1995-05-01

    Significant progress in fulfilling the current joint Air Force/Navy `Smart Metallic Structures (SMS)' program primary objective, to demonstrate a viable structural health monitoring system (SHMS) for a large structural aircraft component, is presented. Structural health monitoring and its relation to current Force Management (FM) and Aircraft Structural Integrity Program (ASIP) procedures are first reviewed together with a brief status overview of the relevant sensor technologies (e.g. AE, fiber-optic, corrosion, etc.). Key features of the SHMS architecture are described for the selected F/A-18 bulkhead and T-38 wing spar structural demonstration articles, highlighting sensors, processors, data busses, hardware, and software. Results from acoustic monitoring of the program sub-element structural tests are presented in some detail along with a status review of the SHMS multiplex bus component hardware and software. Finally, structural requirements for an SHMS meeting minimum ASIP guidelines for damage detection are discussed along with foals for future testing and development of the SHMS under the SMS program.

  6. Program definition and assessment overview. [for thermal energy storage project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    The implementation of a program level assessment of thermal energy storage technology thrusts for the near and far term to assure overall coherent energy storage program is considered. The identification and definition of potential thermal energy storage applications, definition of technology requirements, and appropriate market sectors are discussed along with the necessary coordination, planning, and preparation associated with program reviews, workshops, multi-year plans and annual operating plans for the major laboratory tasks.

  7. Preventing cervical cancer : overviews of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program and 2 US immunization programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kris; Curtis, C Robinette; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Stokley, Shannon; Walker, Chastity; Roland, Katherine; Benard, Vicki; Saraiya, Mona

    2008-11-15

    Three federal programs with the potential to reduce cervical cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, especially among underserved populations, are administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program, and the Section 317 immunization grant program. The NBCCEDP provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to uninsured and underinsured women. The VFC program and the Section 317 immunization grant program provide vaccines, including human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, to targeted populations at no cost for these vaccines. This article describes the programs, their histories, populations served, services offered, and roles in preventing cervical cancer through HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Potential long-term reduction in healthcare costs resulting from HPV vaccination is also discussed. As an example of an initiative to vaccinate uninsured women aged 19-26 years through a cancer services program, a state-based effort that was recently launched in New York, is highlighted.

  8. National waste terminal storage program: Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation Technical Program Plan. Volume 1, Technical Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-16

    A Technical Program Plan was developed detailing projected activities toward the development and operation of a geologic waste repository. This volume presents the overall program in summary fashion: objectives, technical scope, technical approach, schedule plan, FY 1979 budget and milestone plan, organization, management processes, and nuclear waste isolation issues. 8 figures, 8 tables. (DLC)

  9. Biological effects of static and low-frequency electromagnetic fields: an overview of United States literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.

    1977-04-12

    Results are reviewed from a number of studies on the biological effects of static and low frequency electromagnetic fields on animals. Based on a long history of experience with electric fields by the utility industry, it appears that intermittent and repeated exposures to strong 60-Hz electromagnetic fields from present power transmission systems have no obvious adverse effect on the health of man. It has been recognized recently that this belief must be tested by carefully designed and executed experiments under laboratory conditions where precise control can be exercised over coexisting environmental factors. A number of studies have been initiated in response to this need to evaluate possible effects from both acute and chronic exposures. 100 references.

  10. Biological effects of static and low-frequency electromagnetic fields: an overview of United States literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.

    1977-04-12

    Results are reviewed from a number of studies on the biological effects of static and low frequency electromagnetic fields on animals. Based on a long history of experience with electric fields by the utility industry, it appears that intermittent and repeated exposures to strong 60-Hz electromagnetic fields from present power transmission systems have no obvious adverse effect on the health of man. It has been recognized recently that this belief must be tested by carefully designed and executed experiments under laboratory conditions where precise control can be exercised over coexisting environmental factors. A number of studies have been initiated in response to this need to evaluate possible effects from both acute and chronic exposures. 100 references.

  11. Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  12. General Overview Over Investigations on Low-Dimensional Carbon-Based Materials in Magnetic Fields above 50 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugall, Oliver

    Carbon nanotubes have been intensively investigated in pulsed magnetic fields, mainly to identify the effect of a magnetic flux along the tube axis on the energy band structure. Clear manifestations of the Ahoronov-Bohm effect have been observed in near-infrared absorption measurements on suspended tubes1 as well as in single-tube transport experiments.2 Subsequent studies have shed light on the excitonic nature of optical excitations3 and the magnetic-field induced optical activity of such excitons.4,5 Ongoing activities are focussing on the magnetic alignment dynamics of carbon nanotubes in liquid suspension which has the potential to provide valuable information on their magnetic susceptibility. Experimental investigations on graphene in pulsed magnetic fields are far less advanced than those on carbon nanotubes. This is due to various experimental factors such as intrinsically short integration times for optical experiments and the destructive effect of electromagnetic perturbations on insufficiently screened transport samples. First results have nevertheless been obtained in both cases: Previous absorption measurements6 up to 32 T have been extended to higher fields thereby confirming the characteristic B1/2-dependence of energy levels. Transport measurements, on the other hand, have revealed extended plateaus in the two-terminal resistance of graphene.7 In this talk we gave a complete overview over recent and ongoing experimental investigations on carbon nanotubes and graphene in magnetic fields above 50 T. We referred to the work of several international collaborations including groups from Houston, Los Alamos, Berlin, Oxford, Tokyo, Dublin, Grenoble and Toulouse. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  13. Taxonomic systems in the field of health care, family care, and child and youth care : A systematic overview of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evenboer, K. E.; Huyghen, A. M. N.; Tuinstra, J.; Reijneveld, S. A.; Knorth, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Taxonomies of child, youth, and family care are needed for the adequate comparison of the effectiveness and usefulness of care and treatment programs. Until now, no systematic overview has been made of the taxonomies available and their outcomes. The aim of this paper is to systematically summarize

  14. Overview of the synoptic and pollution situation over Europe during the EUCAARI-LONGREX field campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamburger, T.; McMeeking, G.; Minikin, A.; Birmili, W.; Dall'Osto, M.; O'Dowd, C.; Flentje, H.; Henzing, B.; Junninen, H.; Kristensson, A.; Leeuw, G. de; Stohl, A.; Burkhart, J.F.; Coe, H.; Krejci, R.; Petzold, A.

    2011-01-01

    In May 2008 the EUCAARI-LONGREX aircraft field campaign was conducted within the EUCAARI intensive observational period. The campaign aimed at studying the distribution and evolution of air mass properties on a continental scale. Airborne aerosol and trace gas measurements were performed aboard the

  15. Project Overview: Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS): Proposed Summer 2007 ASP Field Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Berg, Larry K.; Ogren, J. A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard

    2006-05-18

    This white paper presents the scientific motivation and preliminary logistical plans for a proposed ASP field campaign to be carried out in the summer of 2007. The primary objective of this campaign is to use the DOE Gulfstream-1 aircraft to make measurements characterizing the chemical, physical and optical properties of aerosols below, within and above large fields of fair weather cumulus and to use the NASA Langley Research Center’s High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to make independent measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles in the vicinity of these fields. Separate from the science questions to be addressed by these observations will be information to add in the development of a parameterized cumulus scheme capable of including multiple cloud fields within a regional or global scale model. We will also be able to compare and contrast the cloud and aerosol properties within and outside the Oklahoma City plume to study aerosol processes within individual clouds. Preliminary discussions with the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) science team have identified overlap between the science questions posed for the CLASIC Intensive Operation Period (IOP) and the proposed ASP campaign, suggesting collaboration would benefit both teams.

  16. Intensive English Programs in the United States: An Overview of Structure and Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    Although English as a second language (ESL) programs are common in the United States, there is surprisingly little research documenting the existing structures and mentoring strategies they use. This lack of research could be partly due to ESL programs' widely varying internal structures (Larson, 1990) and the fact that they are often marginalized…

  17. 75 FR 37771 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Transition Programs for Students with...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ...) With mental retardation or a cognitive impairment, characterized by significant limitations in-- (i.... 4. Intergovernmental Review: This program is subject to Executive Order 12372 and the regulations in 34 CFR part 79. Information about Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs under Executive Order...

  18. Application of Communications Satellite to Educational Development; An Overview of the Washington University Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robert P.; And Others

    Selected aspects and results of an interdisciplinary research and education program to examine the potential and problems associated with the use of communication satellites to help meet educational needs in the United States are summarized. The progress of the program to date in four major areas is described: needs analysis, communications…

  19. 75 FR 67705 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Talent Search (TS) Program; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... rigorous secondary school program of study, postsecondary education enrollment, and postsecondary degree... individuals with potential for education at the postsecondary level and encourage them to complete secondary school and undertake a program of postsecondary education. TS projects publicize the availability of,...

  20. The U.S. Global Change Research Program: An Overview and Perspectives on the FY 1992 Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corell, Robert W.

    1991-05-01

    The U.S. Global Change Research Program (US/GCRP) represents an integrated, government-wide scientific effort designed to document, understand, and predict changes in the global environment as the foundation for national and international policymaking. The President's budget message to the U.S. Congress for FY 1992 proposes spending $1.186 billion on the U.S. Global Change Research Program, an increase of $232 million or almost 25 percent over FY 1991. The budget details a coordinated program of research that involves nine agencies, including the addition in FY 1992 of the several units within the Department of Defense and the Smithsonian Institution.

  1. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. IV. Field programming achieved with channels of non-constant cross-sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocková, Jana; Matulík, Frantisek; Chmelík, Josef

    2002-04-26

    Force field programming provided increased speed of separation with an improved resolution and detection capability in many field-flow fractionation (FFF) techniques. Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) uses the Earth's gravitational field to cause the settlement of particles towards the channel accumulation wall. Although this field is constant and relatively weak, there are different ways to implement force field programming in GFFF. Because hydrodynamic lift forces (HLF) participate in the separation process in focusing (hyperlayer) elution mode, they can control the resulting force field acting on particles via changes in flow-velocity. These changes can be accomplished by a programmable pump or with channels of non-constant cross-sections. This work is focused on flow-velocity programming accomplished with channels of non-constant cross-sections. Three trapezoidal channels of decreasing breadth and two channels of decreasing height (along the longitudinal axis) are tested as tools for optimization of the separation of a model silica gel particle mixture. The trapezoidal channels yielded reduced separation times. However, taking into account both speed of separation and resolution, the optimization effect was lower compared with the flow-rate gradients generated by a programmable pump. The channels of non-constant height did not yield advantageous separations.

  2. Overview of Evaluation Methods for R&D Programs. A Directory of Evaluation Methods Relevant to Technology Development Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruegg, Rosalie [TIA Consulting, Inc., Emeral Isle, NC (United States); Jordan, Gretchen B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2007-03-01

    This document provides guidance for evaluators who conduct impact assessments to determine the “realized” economic benefits and costs, energy, environmental benefits, and other impacts of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) R&D programs. The focus of this Guide is on realized outcomes or impacts of R&D programs actually experienced by American citizens, industry, and others.

  3. AN OVERVIEW ON STATE OF KNOWLEDGE OF RISK AND RISK MANAGEMENT IN ECONOMICS FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela NICHITA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a history and an evolution of concepts of risk and risk management in economic, respectively financial fields, highlighting the usefulness (or not and complexity of tools for risk assessment developed over time. The main objective of risk management is to reduce costs and increase the value of company and stakeholders gains; also, a coherent risk management strategy may improve entity capital structure which will derive in a healthy financing policy. The risk and risk management field has been developed merely after the second world war and creates the favourable context of a new C position in business chart – Chief Risk Officer. The paper will explore the etymology of term risk correlated with the uncertainty. Research on risk and risk management is not possible without taking into account the derivatives market.

  4. AN OVERVIEW ON STATE OF KNOWLEDGE OF RISK AND RISK MANAGEMENT IN ECONOMICS FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela NICHITA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a history and an evolution of concepts of risk and risk management in economic, respectively financial fields, highlighting the usefulness (or not and complexity of tools for risk assessment developed over time. The main objective of risk management is to reduce costs and increase the value of company and stakeholders gains; also, a coherent risk management strategy may improve entity capital structure which will derive in a healthy financing policy. The risk and risk management field has been developed merely after the second world war and creates the favourable context of a new C position in business chart – Chief Risk Officer. The paper will explore the etymology of term risk correlated with the uncertainty. Research on risk and risk management is not possible without taking into account the derivatives market.

  5. An Overview of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing Project and Ultra High Bypass Partnership Research Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) mission and goals is presented. One of the subprograms under the FAP, the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project (SFW), is the focus of the presentation. The SFW system environmental metrics are discussed, along with highlights of planned, systematic approach to research to reduce the environmental impact of commercial aircraft in the areas of acoustics, fuel burn and emissions. The presentation then focuses on collaborative research being conducted with U.S. Industry on the Ultra High Bypass (UHB) engine cycle, the propulsion cycle selected by the SFW to meet the system goals. The partnerships with General Electric Aviation to investigate Open Rotor propulsion concepts and with Pratt & Whitney to investigate the Geared Turbofan UHB engine are highlighted, including current and planned future collaborative research activities with NASA and each organization.

  6. Use of Coatings on Hydraulic Steel Structures: Part 1-Overview and Field Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Reclamation has begun using field electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to monitor coating conditions. Even if the corrosion is not visible to the...chains that are highly durable and minimally affected by ultraviolet ( UV ) rays. Thus, urethanes are versatile because they can be applied over epoxies to...provide UV protection. They can also be formulated as zinc-rich primers that are applied directly to steel. This category includes any and all

  7. AN OVERVIEW ON STATE OF KNOWLEDGE OF RISK AND RISK MANAGEMENT IN ECONOMICS FIELDS

    OpenAIRE

    Mirela NICHITA

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a history and an evolution of concepts of risk and risk management in economic, respectively financial fields, highlighting the usefulness (or not) and complexity of tools for risk assessment developed over time. The main objective of risk management is to reduce costs and increase the value of company and stakeholders gains; also, a coherent risk management strategy may improve entity capital structure which will derive in a healthy financing policy. T...

  8. Field Operations Program - Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Fleet Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, J. E.; Carroll, M. R.

    2001-07-02

    This report summarizes a study of 15 automotive fleets that operate neighborhood electric vehicles (NEVs) in the United States. The information was obtained to help Field Operations Program personnel understand how NEVs are being used, how many miles they are being driven, and if they are being used to replace other types of fleet vehicles or as additions to fleets. (The Field Operations Program is a U.S. Department of Energy Program within the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Transportation Technologies). The NEVs contribution to petroleum avoidance and cleaner air can be estimated based on the miles driven and by assuming gasoline use and air emissions values for the vehicles being replaced. Gasoline and emissions data for a Honda Civic are used as the Civic has the best fuel use for a gasoline-powered vehicle and very clean emissions. Based on these conservation assumptions, the 348 NEVs are being driven a total of about 1.2 million miles per year. This equates to an average of 3,409 miles per NEV annually or 9 miles per day. It is estimated that 29,195 gallons of petroleum use is avoided annually by the 348 NEVs. This equates to 87 gallons of petroleum use avoided per NEV, per year. Using the 348 NEVs avoids the generation of at least 775 pounds of smog-forming emissions annually.

  9. Field Operations Program Neighborhood Electric Vehicles - Fleet Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, James Edward; Carroll, M.

    2001-07-01

    This report summarizes a study of 15 automotive fleets that operate neighborhood electric vehicles(NEVs) in the United States. The information was obtained to help Field Operations Program personnel understand how NEVs are being used, how many miles they are being driven, and if they are being used to replace other types of fleet vehicles or as additions to fleets. (The Field Operations Program is a U.S. Department of Energy Program within the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Transportation Technologies). The NEVs contribution to petroleum avoidance and cleaner air can be estimated based on the miles driven and by assuming gasoline use and air emissions values for the vehicles being replaced. Gasoline and emissions data for a Honda Civic are used as the Civic has the best fuel use for a gasoline-powered vehicle and very clean emissions. Based on these conservation assumptions, the 348 NEVs are being driven a total of about 1.2 million miles per year. This equates to an average of 3,409 miles per NEV annually or 9 miles per day. It is estimated that 29,195 gallons of petroleum use is avoided annually by the 348 NEVs. This equates to 87 gallons of petroleum use avoided per NEV, per year. Using the 348 NEVs avoids the generation of at least 775 pounds of smog- forming emissions annually.

  10. The Program Manager’s Support System (PMSS). An Executive Overview and System Description,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    process. The PMSS tool will, when completed, support the program management process in all stages of program nanagement; that is, birth of the...module, developed as a template on LOTUS 1-2-3, is an application of the Constructive Cost Model (COCOMO) developed by B. Boehm. The DSMC SWCE module, a...developed for a specific program office but can be modified for use by others. It is a "template" system designed to operate on a Zenith Z-150 using Lotus 1

  11. Overview of the NASA Lewis component technology program for Stirling power converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Swec, Diane M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an update on the NASA Lewis Stirling component technology program. The component technology program has been organized as part of the NASA Lewis effort to develop Stirling converter technology for space power applications. The Stirling space power program is part of the High Capacity Power element of the NASA Civil Space Technology Initiative. Lewis is also providing technical management of a DOE-funded project to develop Stirling converter systems for distributed dish solar terrestrial power applications. The Lewis component technology program is coordinated with the primary contract efforts of these projects but is aimed at longer term issues, advanced technologies, and independent assessments. Topics to be discussed include bearings, linear alternators, controls and load interaction, materials/life assessment, and heat exchangers.

  12. 76 FR 4330 - American Overseas Research Centers (AORC) Program; Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ..., Javanese, Kannada, Kashmiri, Kazakh, Khmer (Cambodian), Kirghiz, Korean, Kurdish (Kurmanji), Kurdish... International Education and Foreign Language Studies: Domestic Programs, of which we intend to allocate $1,400... you. 2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements: We identify administrative and...

  13. An Overview of ARM Program Climate Research Facility Data Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peppler, Randy A. [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Long, Chuck A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Sisterson, D. L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Turner, D. [University of Wisconsin; Bahrmann, C. P. [Pennsylvania State University; Christensen, Sigurd W [ORNL; Doty, K. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Eagan, R. C. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Halter, T. D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ivey, M. D. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Keck, N. N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kehoe, Kenneth E. [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Liljegren, J. C. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Macduff, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Mather, J. H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); McCord, Raymond A [ORNL; Monroe, Justin W. [University of Oklahoma; Moore, Sean T. [Mission Research and Technical Services; Nitschke, K. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Orr, B. W. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Perez, Robin C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Perkins, B. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Richardson, S. J. [Pennsylvania State University; Sonntag, Karen L. [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Voyles, Jimmy W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wagener, Richard [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    2008-10-30

    This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's data quality assurance program. Processes described include data archival, display, and distribution, data stream reprocessing, and future directions in ARM data quality checking. A comprehensive, end-to-end data quality assurance program, from instrument siting, to calibration and maintenance, through data quality control and well-documented dissemination, is essential for producing a high-quality research data set. The processes developed over the past 15 years by the ARM Program offer a possible framework for use by other instrumentation-diverse networks, and are offered here to highlight the myriad aspects that go into producing such a data set.

  14. An Overview of the Society of Actuaries and Its Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugman, Stuart; Long, Gena

    2014-01-01

    The Society of Actuaries (SOA) is the world's largest actuarial organization. This article describes the SOA with particular attention paid to its education and qualification processes and resources available for university and college programs.

  15. 2017-04-28_W88 ALT 370 Program Overview(OUO).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Vonceil

    2017-04-01

    All major program milestones have been met and the program is executing within budget. The ALT 370 program achieved Phase 6.4 authorization in February of this year. Five component Final Design Reviews (FDRs) have been completed, indicating progress in finalizing the design and development phase of the program. A series of ground-based qualification activities have demonstrated that designs are meeting functional requirements. The first fully functional flight test, FCET-53, demonstrated end-to-end performance in normal flight environments in February. Similarly, groundbased nuclear safety and hostile environments testing indicates that the design meets requirements in these stringent environments. The first in a series of hostile blast tests was successfully conducted in April.

  16. Overview of the NASA Lewis component technology program for Stirling power converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Swec, Diane M.

    This paper presents an update on the NASA Lewis Stirling component technology program. The component technology program has been organized as part of the NASA Lewis effort to develop Stirling converter technology for space power applications. The Stirling space power program is part of the High Capacity Power element of the NASA Civil Space Technology Initiative. Lewis is also providing technical management of a DOE-funded project to develop Stirling converter systems for distributed dish solar terrestrial power applications. The Lewis component technology program is coordinated with the primary contract efforts of these projects but is aimed at longer term issues, advanced technologies, and independent assessments. Topics to be discussed include bearings, linear alternators, controls and load interaction, materials/life assessment, and heat exchangers.

  17. Overview of the TCV tokamak program: scientific progress and facility upgrades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coda, S.; Ahn, J.; Albanese, R.

    2017-01-01

    The TCV tokamak is augmenting its unique historical capabilities (strong shaping, strong electron heating) with ion heating, additional electron heating compatible with high densities, and variable divertor geometry, in a multifaceted upgrade program designed to broaden its operational range with...

  18. Project overview and update on WEAVE: the next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Dalton, Gavin; Abrams, Don Carlos; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Aguerri, J Alfonso L; Middleton, Kevin; Benn, Chris; Dee, Kevin; Sayede, Frederic; Lewis, Ian; Pragt, Johannes; Pico, Sergio; Walton, Nic; Rey, Juerg; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Penate, Jose; Lhome, Emilie; Agocs, Tibor; Alonso, Jose; Terrett, David; Brock, Matthew; Gilbert, James; Ridings, Andy; Guinouard, Isabelle; Verheijen, Marc; Tosh, Ian; Rogers, Kevin; Steele, Iain; Stuik, Remko; Tromp, Neils; Jasko, Attila; Kragt, Jan; Lesman, Dirk; Mottram, Chris; Bates, Stuart; Gribbin, Frank; Rodriguez, Luis Fernando; Delgado, Jose Miguel; Martin, Carlos; Cano, Diego; Navarro, Ramon; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, Jim; Solares, Eduardo Gonzales; Mahony, Neil O; Bianco, Andrea; Zurita, Christina; ter Horst, Rik; Molinari, Emilio; Lodi, Marcello; Guerra, Jose; Vallenari, Antonella; Baruffolo, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of and status report on the WEAVE next-generation spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT). WEAVE principally targets optical ground-based follow up of upcoming ground-based (LOFAR) and space-based (Gaia) surveys. WEAVE is a multi-object and multi-IFU facility utilizing a new 2-degree prime focus field of view at the WHT, with a buffered pick-and-place positioner system hosting 1000 multi-object (MOS) fibres, 20 integral field units, or a single large IFU for each observation. The fibres are fed to a single spectrograph, with a pair of 8k(spectral) x 6k (spatial) pixel cameras, located within the WHT GHRIL enclosure on the telescope Nasmyth platform, supporting observations at R~5000 over the full 370-1000nm wavelength range in a single exposure, or a high resolution mode with limited coverage in each arm at R~20000. The project is now in the final design and early procurement phase, with commissioning at the telescope expected in 2017.

  19. Overview of the Diagnostic Methods Used in the Field for Human African Trypanosomiasis: What Could Change in the Next Years?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Bonnet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleeping sickness is a parasitic infection caused by two species of trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and rhodesiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly. The disease eventually affects the central nervous system, resulting in severe neurological symptoms. Without treatment, death is inevitable. During the first stage of the disease, infected patients are mildly symptomatic and early detection of infection allows safer treatment (administered on an outpatient basis which can avoid death; routine screening of the exposed population is necessary, especially in areas of high endemicity. The current therapeutic treatment of this disease, especially in stage 2, can cause complications and requires a clinical surveillance for several days. A good stage diagnosis of the disease is the cornerstone for delivering the adequate treatment. The task faced by the medical personnel is further complicated by the lack of support from local health infrastructure, which is at best weak, but often nonexistent. Therefore it is crucial to look for new more efficient technics for the diagnosis of stage which are also best suited to use in the field, in areas not possessing high-level health facilities. This review, after an overview of the disease, summarizes the current diagnosis procedures and presents the advances in the field.

  20. Overview of the Diagnostic Methods Used in the Field for Human African Trypanosomiasis: What Could Change in the Next Years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Julien; Boudot, Clotilde; Courtioux, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Sleeping sickness is a parasitic infection caused by two species of trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and rhodesiense), transmitted by the tsetse fly. The disease eventually affects the central nervous system, resulting in severe neurological symptoms. Without treatment, death is inevitable. During the first stage of the disease, infected patients are mildly symptomatic and early detection of infection allows safer treatment (administered on an outpatient basis) which can avoid death; routine screening of the exposed population is necessary, especially in areas of high endemicity. The current therapeutic treatment of this disease, especially in stage 2, can cause complications and requires a clinical surveillance for several days. A good stage diagnosis of the disease is the cornerstone for delivering the adequate treatment. The task faced by the medical personnel is further complicated by the lack of support from local health infrastructure, which is at best weak, but often nonexistent. Therefore it is crucial to look for new more efficient technics for the diagnosis of stage which are also best suited to use in the field, in areas not possessing high-level health facilities. This review, after an overview of the disease, summarizes the current diagnosis procedures and presents the advances in the field.

  1. Overview of the biomedical and environmental programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfuderer, H.A.; Moody, J.B. (comps.)

    1981-07-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 6 chapters presented by the six divisions involved in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The introduction is not covered by an abstract and deals with the environmental, health and safety considerations of energy technology decisions, the major initiatives now being taken by these 6 divisions, and recent major accomplishments in the biomedical and environmental science program. (KRM)

  2. High field magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, A; Muratore, J; Parker, B; Sampson, W; Wanderer, P J; Willen, E

    2000-01-01

    The magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focussed on superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. The effort includes magnet production at the laboratory and in industry, magnet R&D, and test facilities for magnets and superconductors. Nearly 2000 magnets-dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles and correctors for the arc and insertion regions-were produced for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which is being commissioned. Currently, production of helical dipoles for the polarized proton program at RHIC, insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and an insertion magnet system for the Hadron-Elektron-Ring- Analage (HERA) collider at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) is underway. The R&D effort is exploring dipoles with fields above 10 T for use in post-LHC colliders. Brittle superconductors-Nb/sub 3/Sn or HTS-are being used for these magnets. The superconductor test facility measures short-sample currents and other characteristics of sample...

  3. Satellite Power System (SPS): an Overview of Prospective Organizational Structures in the Solar Satellite Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    A literature survey, interviews with acknowledged experts in the fields of organizational entities, space, solar energy, and the SPS concept, and an analysis of these inputs to identify the organizational alternatives and make judgments as to their feasibility to serve as patterns for a future SPS entity are presented. Selection and evaluation criteria were determined to include timeliness, reliability, and adequacy to contribute meaningfully to the U.S. supply; political feasibility (both national and international) and cost-effectiveness (including environmental and other external costs). Based on these criteria, four organizational alternatives are discussed which offer reasonable promise as potential options for SPS. These included three domestic alternatives and one international alternative.

  4. Overview of NASA Finesse (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) Science and Exploration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, J. L.; Lim, D.S.S.; Hughes, S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, B.; Sears, D.; Neish, C.; Osinski, G. R.; Hodges, K.; Downs, M.; Busto, J.; Cohen, B.; Caldwell, B.; Jones, A. J. P.; Johnson, S.; Kobayashi, L.; Colaprete, A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) project was selected as a research team by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI). SSERVI is a joint Institute supported by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD). As such, FINESSE is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program to generate strategic knowledge in preparation for human and robotic exploration of other planetary bodies including our Moon, Mars moons Phobos and Deimos, and near-Earth asteroids. FINESSE embodies the philosophy that "science enables exploration and exploration enables science".

  5. Overview of the SAMSI year-long program on Statistical, Mathematical and Computational Methods for Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogesh Babu, G.

    2017-01-01

    A year-long research (Aug 2016- May 2017) program on `Statistical, Mathematical and Computational Methods for Astronomy (ASTRO)’ is well under way at Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI), a National Science Foundation research institute in Research Triangle Park, NC. This program has brought together astronomers, computer scientists, applied mathematicians and statisticians. The main aims of this program are: to foster cross-disciplinary activities; to accelerate the adoption of modern statistical and mathematical tools into modern astronomy; and to develop new tools needed for important astronomical research problems. The program provides multiple avenues for cross-disciplinary interactions, including several workshops, long-term visitors, and regular teleconferences, so participants can continue collaborations, even if they can only spend limited time in residence at SAMSI. The main program is organized around five working groups:i) Uncertainty Quantification and Astrophysical Emulationii) Synoptic Time Domain Surveysiii) Multivariate and Irregularly Sampled Time Seriesiv) Astrophysical Populationsv) Statistics, computation, and modeling in cosmology.A brief description of each of the work under way by these groups will be given. Overlaps among various working groups will also be highlighted. How the wider astronomy community can both participate and benefit from the activities, will be briefly mentioned.

  6. Overview of C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gota, H., E-mail: hgota@trialphaenergy.com; Thompson, M. C.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. W. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A comprehensive diagnostic suite for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been developed and installed on the C-2 device at Tri Alpha Energy to investigate the dynamics of FRC formation as well as to understand key FRC physics properties, e.g., confinement and stability, throughout a discharge. C-2 is a unique, large compact-toroid merging device that produces FRC plasmas partially sustained for up to ∼5 ms by neutral-beam (NB) injection and end-on plasma-guns for stability control. Fundamental C-2 FRC properties are diagnosed by magnetics, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. These diagnostics (totaling >50 systems) are essential to support the primary goal of developing a deep understanding of NB-driven FRCs.

  7. An Overview on the South Korean Scientific Production in the Field of Chemistry (1993–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Magnone

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present review seeks to take stock of the South Korean publication activity on the field of chemistry by analyzing systematically all chemistry-related scholarly communications collected in the Web of Science (WOS database published by at least one Korean author or Korean institute- or university-affiliated author from 1993 to 2012. The studied parameters included the growth in number of the communications, as well as the language-, document-, category-, source-, organization-, and collaboration-wise distribution of the South Korean communications. A total of 5660 communications on chemistry were found to be published by South Korean researchers during the aforementioned period of time, and South Korea was the 15th country (1.77% in the world in terms of informational communication activity in chemistry.

  8. Overview of C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, H; Thompson, M C; Tuszewski, M; Binderbauer, M W

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive diagnostic suite for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been developed and installed on the C-2 device at Tri Alpha Energy to investigate the dynamics of FRC formation as well as to understand key FRC physics properties, e.g., confinement and stability, throughout a discharge. C-2 is a unique, large compact-toroid merging device that produces FRC plasmas partially sustained for up to ∼5 ms by neutral-beam (NB) injection and end-on plasma-guns for stability control. Fundamental C-2 FRC properties are diagnosed by magnetics, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. These diagnostics (totaling >50 systems) are essential to support the primary goal of developing a deep understanding of NB-driven FRCs.

  9. Overview of results from phase I of the Beam Energy Scan program at RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonald Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC was successfully completed during the years 2010, 2011 and 2014, with Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energies (√sNN of 7.7, 11.5, 14.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV. The BES has three distinct goals: search for the turning off of the signatures of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP, search for the first-order phase transition, and search for the critical point. We report several interesting results that address each of these goals of the BES program.

  10. The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Phase I Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mearns, L. O.; Arritt, R.; Biner, S.; Bukovsky, Melissa; McGinnis, Seth; Sain, Steve; Caya, Daniel; Correia Jr., James; Flory, Dave; Gutowski, William; Takle, Gene; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Moufouma-Okia, Wilfran; McDaniel, Larry; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun; Roads, J.; Sloan, Lisa; Snyder, Mark A.

    2012-09-20

    The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program is an international effort designed to systematically investigate the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and produce high resolution climate change scenarios using multiple regional climate models (RCMs) nested within atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with the A2 SRES scenario, with a common domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The program also includes an evaluation component (Phase I) wherein the participating RCMs are nested within 25 years of NCEP/DOE global reanalysis II. The grid spacing of the RCM simulations is 50 km.

  11. Student Research in Asia Overview of 2007 Student-Faculty Fellows Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Symons

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available During the summer of 2007, mentors from fourteen different small college/universities in North America, each with from two to five students, conducted undergraduate research in East and Southeast Asia as part of the 9th annual Student-Faculty Fellows Program. Each project was generously funded by the Freeman Foundation and administered by ASIANetwork.

  12. 75 FR 28789 - Office of Innovation and Improvement; Overview Information; Charter Schools Program (CSP) Grants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    ... of the Social Security Act, or (iv) data on children eligible to receive medical assistance under the Medicaid program under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, or (v) an alternate method that combines or... to participate in the meeting (e.g., interpreting service, assistive listening device, or...

  13. Gang Prevention: An Overview of Research and Programs. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, James C.

    2010-01-01

    This bulletin presents research on why youth join gangs and how a community can build gang prevention and intervention services. The author summarizes recent literature on gang formation and identifies promising and effective programs for gang prevention. The following are some key findings: (1) Youth join gangs for protection, enjoyment, respect,…

  14. Key Implementation Considerations for Executing Evidence-Based Programs: Project Overview. ASPE Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In April 2011, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) hosted a Forum, Emphasizing Evidence-Based Programs for Children and Youth, to convene the nation's leading practitioners and researchers with experience using and evaluating an array of evidence-based…

  15. 24 CFR 291.510 - Overview of the GNND Sales Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Program enables a full-time law enforcement officer, teacher, or firefighter/emergency medical technician... the law enforcement officer, teacher, or firefighter/emergency medical technician finances the home... officers, teachers, and firefighters/emergency medical technicians prior to listing the properties for...

  16. 75 FR 8316 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Erma Byrd Scholarship Program; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Rulemaking Requirements. Under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553) and section 437 of the... provisions of section 553 of the APA and section 437 of GEPA do not apply to this program. IV. Application... of the application package in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or...

  17. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys: Overview and Catalog from the COSMOS Field

    CERN Document Server

    Civano, F; Puccetti, S; Comastri, A; Mullaney, J R; Zappacosta, L; LaMassa, S M; Aird, J; Alexander, D M; Ballantyne, D R; Bauer, F E; Brandt, W N; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Del-Moro, A; Elvis, M; Forster, K; Gandhi, P; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Lansbury, G B; Luo, B; Madsen, K; Saez, C; Stern, D; Treister, E; Urry, M C; Wik, D R; Zhang, W

    2015-01-01

    To provide the census of the sources contributing to the X-ray background peak above 10 keV, NuSTAR is performing extragalactic surveys using a three-tier "wedding cake" approach. We present the NuSTAR survey of the COSMOS field, the medium sensitivity and medium area tier, covering 1.7 deg2 and overlapping with both Chandra and XMM-Newton data. This survey consists of 121 observations for a total exposure of ~3 Ms. To fully exploit these data, we developed a new detection strategy, carefully tested through extensive simulations. The survey sensitivity at 20% completeness is 5.9, 2.9 and 6.4 x 10^-14 erg/cm2/s in the 3-24 keV, 3-8 keV and 8-24 keV bands, respectively. By combining detections in 3 bands, we have a sample of 91 NuSTAR sources with 10^42 -10^45.5 erg/s luminosities and redshift z=0.04-2.5. Thirty two sources are detected in the 8-24 keV band with fluxes ~100 times fainter than sources detected by Swift-BAT. Of the 91 detections, all but four are associated with a Chandra and/or XMM-Newton point-...

  18. QC of sampling processes- a first overview: from field to test portion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, Kim H; Ramsey, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Quality control (QC) is a systematic approach for estimating and minimizing significant error contributions to the measurement uncertainty from the full sampling and analysis process. Many types of QC measures can be implemented; the three dealt with here are primary sampling reproducibility, sample processing reproducibility, and contamination. Sampling processes can be subject to QC by applying a replication experiment, used either from the top by replication of the entire sampling/ preparation/analysis process, or in a hierarchical fashion successively at each subsequent sampling stage. The analytical repeatability is necessarily always included in either alternative. The replication experiment results in a quality index, the Relative Sampling Variability, which is used to assess the total error associated with the full field-to-analysis pathway. Contamination can occur at essentially all locations in the sampling regimen in the food/feed realm, affecting sample containers, sampling tools, sample processing equipment, environmental conditions, and sampling personnel. QC events to determine contamination should always be included where appropriate, but is of most concern for low concentration and/or volatile analytes. It is also of key importance in the development of new sampling protocols or carried-over protocols intended for use on new types of materials/lots than the ones for which they were originally developed. We here establish a first practical framework for QC as applied to the sampling context.

  19. Wake Vortex Field Measurement Program at Memphis, Tennessee: Data Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S. D.; Dasey, T. J.; Freehart, R. E.; Heinrichs, R. M.; Mathews, M. P.; Perras, G. H.; Rowe, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    Eliminating or reducing current restrictions in the air traffic control system due to wake vortex considerations would yield increased capacity, decreased delays, and cost savings. Current wake vortex separation standards are widely viewed as very conservative under most conditions. However, scientific uncertainty about wake vortex behavior under different atmospheric conditions remains a barrier to development of an adaptive vortex spacing system. The objective of the wake vortex field measurement efforts during December, 1994 and August, 1995 at Memphis, TN were to record wake vortex behavior for varying atmospheric conditions and types of aircraft. This effort is part of a larger effort by the NASA Langley Research Center to develop an Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) as an element of the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The TAP program is being performed in concert with the FAA Terminal Air Traffic Control Automation (TATCA) program and ATC Automation. Wake vortex behavior was observed using a mobile continuous-wave (CW) coherent laser Doppler radar (lidar) developed at Lincoln Laboratory. This lidar features a number of improvements over previous systems, including the first-ever demonstration of an automatic wake vortex detection and tracking algorithm.

  20. DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

  1. An overview of practice facilitation programs in Canada: current perspectives and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Clare; Laferriere, Dianne; Baskerville, Bruce; Dahrouge, Simone; Knox, Lyndee; Hogg, William

    2013-02-01

    Practice facilitation has proven to be effective in improving the quality of primary care. A practice facilitator is a health professional, usually external to the practice, who regularly visits the practice to provide support in change management that targets improvements in the delivery of care. Our environmental scan shows that several initiatives across Canada utilize practice facilitation as a quality improvement method; however, many are conducted in isolation as there is a lack of coordinated effort, knowledge translation and dissemination in this field across the country. We recommend that investments be made in capacity building, knowledge exchange and facilitator training, and that partnership building be considered a priority in this field.

  2. Process of consumer energy conservation: A conceptual framework for program analysis. Energy conservation programs for consumers: A comparative overview of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joerges, B.; Olsen, M.E.; Mueller, H.

    1983-01-01

    In the first volume of the CECP Technical Reports Series two studies are combined: one version of the initial conceptual framework guiding CECP-research, and a condensed comparative analysis of the national findings in phase I of our research. Since the two papers originally stood on their own, some figures, tables, introductory remarks, and explications of terms are repeated. The first part, on the process of consumer energy conservation, is one of several formulations of a conceptual and analytical perspective for the evaluation of energy conservation policies and programs. The second part, on the comparison of conservation policies and programs, summarizes the findings of studies in the eight countries included. This cross-national overview should be understood as an attempt to identify common themes and trends as well as characteristic differences in conservation policies and programs directed at private end-users of energy. It should not be read as a substitute but rather an invitation to refer back to the original studies contained in this series.

  3. Target salt 2025: a global overview of national programs to encourage the food industry to reduce salt in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jacqui; Trieu, Kathy; Dunford, Elizabeth; Hawkes, Corinna

    2014-08-21

    Reducing population salt intake has been identified as a priority intervention to reduce non-communicable diseases. Member States of the World Health Organization have agreed to a global target of a 30% reduction in salt intake by 2025. In countries where most salt consumed is from processed foods, programs to engage the food industry to reduce salt in products are being developed. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of national initiatives to encourage the food industry to reduce salt. A systematic review of the literature was supplemented by key informant questionnaires to inform categorization of the initiatives. Fifty nine food industry salt reduction programs were identified. Thirty eight countries had targets for salt levels in foods and nine countries had introduced legislation for some products. South Africa and Argentina have both introduced legislation limiting salt levels across a broad range of foods. Seventeen countries reported reductions in salt levels in foods-the majority in bread. While these trends represent progress, many countries have yet to initiate work in this area, others are at early stages of implementation and further monitoring is required to assess progress towards achieving the global target.

  4. Target Salt 2025: A Global Overview of National Programs to Encourage the Food Industry to Reduce Salt in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqui Webster

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Reducing population salt intake has been identified as a priority intervention to reduce non-communicable diseases. Member States of the World Health Organization have agreed to a global target of a 30% reduction in salt intake by 2025. In countries where most salt consumed is from processed foods, programs to engage the food industry to reduce salt in products are being developed. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of national initiatives to encourage the food industry to reduce salt. A systematic review of the literature was supplemented by key informant questionnaires to inform categorization of the initiatives. Fifty nine food industry salt reduction programs were identified. Thirty eight countries had targets for salt levels in foods and nine countries had introduced legislation for some products. South Africa and Argentina have both introduced legislation limiting salt levels across a broad range of foods. Seventeen countries reported reductions in salt levels in foods—the majority in bread. While these trends represent progress, many countries have yet to initiate work in this area, others are at early stages of implementation and further monitoring is required to assess progress towards achieving the global target.

  5. Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale in SITU Thermal NAPL Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butherus, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Ingle, David S. [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Juhlin, Randall [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Daniel, Joseph [S.M. Stoller Corporation; none,

    2004-10-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a field-scale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The Young-Rainey STAR Center is a former DOE facility that was previously known as the Pinellas Plant and the Pinellas STAR Center. The remediation project encompassed an area of 10,000 ft2 and depths extending to 35 ft below ground surface. Prior to the remediation, DOE evaluated technologies that had the potential to remove NAPLs from the subsurface at the site. Because of site conditions (clay lenses and an underlying clay layer that were thought to be contaminated), steam injection and electrical heating were considered to be the only technologies that had the potential to remove these NAPLs. In July 2001, DOE’s contractor awarded a subcontract for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were a combination of steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Remedial operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted during a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Additional confirmatory sampling was conducted 18 months after operations ended. Analytical results of the confirmatory sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects.

  6. Overview of the synoptic and pollution situation over Europe during the EUCAARI-LONGREX field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hamburger

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The European integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI focuses on understanding the interactions of climate and air pollution. As part of the EUCAARI intensive observational period, an aircraft field campaign (EUCAARI-LONGREX was conducted in May 2008. The campaign aimed at studying the distribution and evolution of air mass properties on a continental scale. Airborne aerosol and trace gas measurements were performed aboard the German DLR Falcon 20 and the British FAAM BAe-146 aircraft. This paper outlines the meteorological situation over Europe during May 2008 and the temporal and spatial evolution of predominantly anthropogenic particulate pollution inside the boundary layer and the free troposphere. Time series data of six selected ground stations are used to discuss continuous measurements besides the single flights. The observations encompass total and accumulation mode particle number concentration (0.1–0.8 μm and black carbon mass concentration as well as several meteorological parameters. Vertical profiles of total aerosol number concentration up to 10 km are compared to vertical profiles probed during previous studies.

    During the first half of May 2008 an anticyclonic blocking event dominated the weather over Central Europe. It led to increased pollutant concentrations within the centre of the high pressure inside the boundary layer. Due to long-range transport the accumulated pollution was partly advected towards Western and Northern Europe. The measured aerosol number concentrations over Central Europe showed in the boundary layer high values up to 14 000 cm−3 for particles in diameter larger 10 nm and 2300 cm−3 for accumulation mode particles during the high pressure period, whereas the middle free troposphere showed rather low concentrations of particulates. Thus a strong negative gradient of aerosol concentrations between the well mixed boundary layer

  7. 75 FR 5296 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; National Resource Centers (NRC) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... activities with professional schools such as Business, Law, Public Health, Public Policy, Environmental... professional studies students in fields such as Business, Law, Public Health, Public Policy, Environmental... receive this grant notification within 15 business days from the application deadline date, you...

  8. Program director`s overview report for the Office of Health & Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, D. [ed.

    1994-02-01

    LBL performs basic and applied research and develops technologies in support of the Office of Health and Environmental Research`s mission to explore and mitigate the long-term health and environmental consequences of energy use and to advance solutions to major medical challenges. The ability of the Laboratory to engage in this mission depends upon the strength of its core competencies. In addition, there are several key capabilities that are cross-cutting, or underlie, many of the core competencies. Attention is focused on the following: Facilities and resources; research management practices; research in progress; program accomplishments and research highlights; program orientation; work for non-OHER organizations DOE; critical issues; and resource orientation.

  9. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12189

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Christopher [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Kothari, Vijendra [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States); Starr, Ken [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado (United States); Gillespie, Joey; Widdop, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to address residual radiological contamination at sites where work was performed for the Manhattan Engineer District and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Initially, FUSRAP activities began with a records search for sites that had the potential to contain residual radiological contamination; 46 sites were identified that were eligible for and required remediation. Remedial action began in 1979. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for the remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE retains responsibility for determining if sites are eligible for FUSRAP remediation and for providing long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) of remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE LTS and M activities are designed to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment and to preserve knowledge regarding FUSRAP sites. Additional elements include eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS and M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close coordination with USACE and regulators to ensure there is no loss of protectiveness when sites transition to DOE for LTS and M. Over the life of the FUSRAP program from 1974 to the present, DOE's primary mission and responsibility has been to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment. In fulfilling this mission, the DOE program includes the following key elements: eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS and M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close communication stakeholders as well as state and federal regulators

  10. Joint Service Chemical and Biological Defense Program FY 08-09 Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    detoxifying component. These include photocatalysts, nanoceramic -supported enzymes, and biocides/sporocides. Researchers will also pursue technologies...oil, and lubricants (POLs)—significant capability improvements for the armor community. The JSLIST Block II Glove Upgrade (JB2GU) provides protection...Strategy, and Support PM Project manager POL petroleum, oil, and lubricants POM Program objective memorandum PPE personal protective equipment R&D

  11. Evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer in southern West Africa - an overview from the DACCIWA field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalthoff, Norbert; Lohou, Fabienne; Brooks, Barbara; Jegede, Gbenga; Adler, Bianca; Ajao, Adewale; Ayoola, Muritala; Babić, Karmen; Bessardon, Geoffrey; Delon, Claire; Dione, Cheikh; Handwerker, Jan; Jambert, Corinne; Kohler, Martin; Lothon, Marie; Pedruzo-Bagazgoitia, Xabier; Smith, Victoria; Sunmonu, Lukman; Wieser, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    In southern West Africa, extended low-level stratus clouds form very frequently during night-time and persist long into the following day influencing the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). During the course of the day, a transition from nocturnal low-level stratus to stratocumulus, cumulus, and sometimes congestus and possibly cumulonimbus clouds is observed. In June and July 2016, a ground-based field campaign took place in southern West Africa within the framework of the Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) project with the aim to identify the meteorological controls on the stratus and the evolution of the ABL. During the measurement period, extensive remote sensing and in-situ measurements were performed at three supersites in Kumasi (Ghana), Savè (Benin) and Ile-Ife (Nigeria). We give an overview of the atmospheric conditions during the whole measurement period focusing on the vertical and temporal distribution of the stratus and relevant related atmospheric features.

  12. An overview of PETC`s gas-to-liquids technology R&D Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiegel, G.J.; Bose, A.C.; Srivastava, R.D.

    1995-04-01

    The overall goal of the Gas-to-Liquids Program at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) is to develop technologies for the production of hydrocarbon fuels and premium chemicals from light alkane gases. PETC`s current Gas-to-Liquids Program comprises the development of four primary advanced conversion technologies, namely, partial oxidation, oxidative coupling, oxyhydrochlorination, and novel conversion processes. Based on the current state of development, it can be concluded that, in the near future, one or more of these technologies will reach proof-of-concept demonstration. Oxyhydrochlorination is the most advanced direct conversion technology, and the synthesis of lower cost methyl chloride from natural gas would impact several commercial technologies that utilize methyl chloride as an intermediate to high value products. Technology development for the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas using ceramic membranes could result in significant savings in synthesis gas generation costs by eliminating the air separation plant and replacing the conventional synthesis gas generation loop. A mixed conducting membrane has been developed, and sustained proof-of-principle tests have shown commercially relevant methane conversions and CO selectivities. A multichannel reactor development and demonstration program has been proposed.

  13. An overview of Compassionate Use Programs in the European Union member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Gayathri; Morampudi, Suman; Chhabra, Pankdeep; Gowda, Arun; Zomorodi, Behsad

    2016-11-01

    The past decade witnessed rapid development of novel drugs and therapeutic biological agents. The marketing authorization for novel therapies is often time consuming and distressing for patients. Earlier clinical trials were the only way to access new drugs under development. However, not every patient meets the enrolment criteria, and participation is difficult for patients with life-threatening, long-lasting or seriously debilitating diseases like rare diseases. Early access programs like "Compassionate Use Program (CUP)" have generated alternative channels for such patients. The European Medical Agency provides regulations and recommendations for compassionate use, upon which every European Union (EU) member state has developed its own rules and regulations. Despite previous reviews and studies, the available information is limited and gaps exist. This literature review explores CUP in 28 EU member states. Data was collected through literature review and use of country-specific search terms from the healthcare domain. Data sources were not limited to databases and articles published in journals, but also included grey literature. The results implied that CUP was present in 20 EU member states (71%). Of 28 EU states, 18 (∼64%) had nationalized regulations and processes were well-defined. Overall, this review identified CUP and its current status and legislation in 28 EU member states. The established legislation for CUP in the EU member states suggest their willingness to adopt processes that facilitate earlier and better access to new medicines. Further research and periodic reviews are warranted to understand the contemporary and future regulatory trends in early access programs.

  14. The NIH Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats Program: overview and special challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, David A

    2016-06-01

    Intentional exposures to toxic chemicals can stem from terrorist attacks, such as the release of sarin in the Tokyo subway system in 1995, as well as from toxic industrial accidents that are much more common. Developing effective medical interventions is a critical component of the overall strategy to overcome the challenges of chemical emergencies. These challenges include the rapid and lethal mode of action of many toxic chemicals that require equally fast-acting therapies, the large number of chemicals that are considered threats, and the diverse demographics and vulnerabilities of those who may be affected. In addition, there may be long-term deleterious effects in survivors of a chemical exposure. Several U.S. federal agencies are invested in efforts to improve preparedness and response capabilities during and after chemical emergencies. For example, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) Program supports investigators who are developing therapeutics to reduce mortality and morbidity from chemical exposures. The program awards grants to individual laboratories and includes contract resource facilities and interagency agreements with Department of Defense laboratories. The range of high-quality research within the NIH CounterACT Program network is discussed.

  15. Physical program and diagnostics of the T-15 upgrade tokamak (brief overview)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, A.V., E-mail: melnikov_07@yahoo.com [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Sushkov, A.V.; Belov, A.M.; Dnestrovskij, Yu.N.; Eliseev, L.G.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Ivanov, D.P. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kirneva, N.A. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Korobov, K.V.; Krupin, V.A.; Lysenko, S.E.; Mukhovatov, V.S.; Mustafin, N.A.; Perfilov, S.V.; Razumova, K.A.; Roy, I.N.; Savrukhin, P.V. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Strelkov, V.S. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shestakov, E.A.; Tilinin, G.N. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • T-15 upgrade – the low aspect ratio tokamak with a high magnetic field, ECRH, NBI, ICRH, LH. • Main tasks: steady-state operation, plasma turbulence and confinement with an emphasis of the role of electric field. • Main diagnostics: CXRS/MSE, SXR, reflectometry, Thomson scattering. • Unique diagnostics: heavy ion beam probe. - Abstract: Kurchatov Institute is upgrading now the T-15 tokamak to the machine with D-shaped plasma and copper magnetic system, capable for realizing lower and upper single-null and double-null magnetic configurations. The heating and current drive (CD) system consisting of the neutral beam injection (NBI), electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH/CD), electron Bernstein waves (EBW) heating and CD, ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH/CD), helicon and Lower Hybrid (LH) waves heating and CD is aiming to provide an effective heating of both electrons and ions, and on- and off-axis CD. The main research topics foreseen are the features of the confinement at high magnetic field and low aspect ratio, Advanced Tokamak regimes, steady-state operation, effects of turbulence with an emphasis on the role of the radial electric field E{sub r}, Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAM) and Zonal Flows (ZF) in transport and confinement (including plasma self-organization, profile resiliency, influence of the q-profile), investigations of MHD effects and disruptions, Alfvén Eigenmodes (AE) and fast particles. Extended set of advanced diagnostics with identical equipment located at two toroidal positions will contribute to the 3D reconstruction of various types of the plasma structures like quasicoherent modes and long-range correlations.

  16. Overview of the University of Washington's Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Daryl; Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    2015-01-01

    The fraction of science PhDs awarded to women, African American, Latino, and other minority students is currently far smaller than the fraction of the general population that these groups constitute (NSF 06-320, NSF 04-317). The future of Physics and Astronomy in the United States depends on recruiting and retaining these students in STEM majors and careers (Norman et al., 2009). The greatest obstacles for persistence in science reported by students are loss of interest, intimidation, poor advising, and lack of acceptance (Seymour & Hewitt, 1997). In 2005, a group of University of Washington graduate students created the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) to connect incoming undergraduate students to authentic research experiences as a means of recruiting and retaining them in STEM. Pre-MAP was one of only 13 initiatives supported by the President's Diversity Appraisal Implementation Fund and has proved to be one of its greatest success stories. At its core is a 10-week seminar in which undergraduates learn astronomical research techniques (e.g., computing, data analysis, documentation, statistics, and literature review) and apply them to projects conducted in small groups, under the supervision of faculty and postdocs. Now in its tenth year, Pre-MAP has engaged more than 100 undergraduates — its ongoing success has made it a model for similar programs at UW and other universities.I will outline the beginnings, funding streams, and structure of this long-running diversity program. The Pre-MAP sessions that follow will highlight our best practices and lessons learned, and feature first-hand accounts from several of our fantastic Pre-MAP alumni.

  17. Investigation of Neutron-induced Reactions at n_TOF: an Overview of the 2009–2012 Experimental Program

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, C; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Massimi, C; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    The neutron time-of-flight facility n\\_TOF is operating at CERN (Switzerland) since 2001, having started in 2009 a new campaign with an upgraded spallation target. The ambitious program carried out includes a large number of experiments in nuclear technology, astrophysics, basic physics, detector development and medical applications. This paper is devoted to the physics program at n\\_TOF and the measurements performed between 2009 and 2012. Special attention is given to those experiments that have been most challenging, are more important for a particular field, have reached unprecedented levels of accuracy, or have been carried out for the first time ever.

  18. National Swine Genetic Improvement: An overview of essential program components and organizational structure needed for success

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; MABRY

    2005-01-01

    The swine industry in China is a thrivingand evolving industry that has shown phenome-nal growth over the past10years.Newand mod-ern swine farms have been started in locationsacross the country.Genetics has been importedfrom many different countries in an effort to up-grade the quality and efficiency of the traditionalbreeds of swine.But to insure long term successand viability in a worldwide competitive industrysuch as pork,there is need for a National SwineGenetic Improvement Program.This programneeds to ...

  19. Overview of CMC Development Activities in NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Dave

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of the UEET (Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology) Program is to address two of the most critical propulsion issues: performance/efficiency and reduced emissions. High performance, low emissions engine systems will lead to significant improvement in local air quality, minimum impact on ozone depletion and level to an overall reduction in aviation contribution to global warming. The Materials and Structures for High Performance project will develop and demonstrate advanced high temperature materials to enable high-performance, high efficiency, and environmentally compatible propulsion systems.

  20. Overview 2010 of ARL Program on Network Science for Human Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Bruce J

    2011-01-01

    The Army Research Laboratory program on the Network Science of Human Decision Making brings together researchers from a variety of disciplines to work on a complex research problem that defies confinement within any single discipline. Consequently, new and rewarding solutions have been obtained for a problem of importance to society and the Army, that being, the human dimension of complex networks. This program investigates the basic research foundation of a science of networks supporting the linkage between the cognitive and social domains as they relate to human decision making. The research strategy extends recent methods of non-equilibrium statistical physics to non-stationary, renewal stochastic processes characteristic of the interactions among nodes in complex networks. The theoretical analyses of complex networks, although mathematically rigorous, often elude analytic solutions and require simulation and computation to analyze the underlying dynamic process. The information transfer between two complex networks is calculated using the principle of complexity management as well as direct numerical calculation of the decision making model developed within the project.

  1. OVERVIEW 2010 OF ARL PROGRAM ON NETWORK SCIENCE FOR HUMAN DECISION MAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce J West

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Army Research Laboratory program on the Network Science of Human Decision Making brings together researchers from a variety of disciplines to work on a complex research problem that defies confinement within any single discipline. Consequently, new and rewarding solutions have been obtained for a problem of importance to society and the Army, that being, the human dimension of complex networks. This program investigates the basic research foundation of a science of networks supporting the linkage between the cognitive and social domains as they relate to human decision making. The research strategy extends recent methods of non-equilibrium statistical physics to non-stationary, renewal stochastic processes characteristic of the interactions among nodes in complex networks. The theoretical analyses of complex networks, although mathematically rigorous, often elude analytic solutions and require simulation and computation to analyze the underlying dynamic process. The information transfer between two complex networks is calculated using the Principle of Complexity Management (PCM as well as direct numerical calculation of the decision making model (DMM developed within the project.

  2. Overview of recent results from the Beam Energy Scan program in the STAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiec, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    It is believed, that shortly after the Big Bang the Universe existed in the state of the Quark Gluon Plasma, where quarks and gluons act as quasi-free particles. During relativistic heavy ion collisions this state of matter can be reproduced. Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD) calculations show possible existence of the critical point and the 1st order phase transition between hadron gas and QGP. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider's (RHIC) program called Beam Energy Scan (BES) was developed for experimental verification of above QCD predictions. Within this program the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment gathered data from gold-gold collisions at √sNN = 7.7, 11.5, 14.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV. This data are analysed by STAR Collaboration in search for answers to questions concerning the nuclear matter phases, namely: what is the collision energy for the onset of the QGP formation? What is the nature of a phase transition between QGP and hadron gas? Is there a critical point and if yes, where is it situated? In this proceedings a few of the latest STAR results that address these questions are presented.

  3. H0LiCOW - I. H0 Lenses in COSMOGRAIL's Wellspring: program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyu, S. H.; Bonvin, V.; Courbin, F.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Rusu, C. E.; Sluse, D.; Treu, T.; Wong, K. C.; Auger, M. W.; Ding, X.; Hilbert, S.; Marshall, P. J.; Rumbaugh, N.; Sonnenfeld, A.; Tewes, M.; Tihhonova, O.; Agnello, A.; Blandford, R. D.; Chen, G. C.-F.; Collett, T.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Liao, K.; Meylan, G.; Spiniello, C.

    2017-07-01

    Strong gravitational lens systems with time delays between the multiple images allow measurements of time-delay distances, which are primarily sensitive to the Hubble constant that is key to probing dark energy, neutrino physics and the spatial curvature of the Universe, as well as discovering new physics. We present H0LiCOW (H0 Lenses in COSMOGRAIL's Wellspring), a program that aims to measure H0 with species to 0.2 (1σ uncertainties) when combined with current cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. These are, respectively, a factor of ˜15, ˜2 and ˜1.5 tighter than CMB alone. Our data set will further enable us to study the stellar initial mass function of the lens galaxies, and the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. This program will provide a foundation for extracting cosmological distances from the hundreds of time-delay lenses that are expected to be discovered in current and future surveys.

  4. Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs (J-TUPP): Overview and Major Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula

    2016-03-01

    The Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs (JTUPP) was formed in response to growing awareness in the physics community that physics majors pursue a wide range of careers after graduation, with very few ending up in academia. The task force is charged with identifying the skills and knowledge that undergraduate physics degree holders should possess to be well prepared for a diverse set of careers, and providing guidance for physicists considering revising the undergraduate curriculum to improve the education of a diverse student population. Task force members represent large and small universities, professional societies, and industry, and have expertise in a broad range of areas including entrepreneurship, physics education research and systemic change in education. We reviewed employment data, surveys of employers, and reports generated by other disciplines. We also met with physicists in selected industries to get their views on the strengths and weaknesses of physics graduates, commissioned a series of interviews with recent physics graduates employed in the private sector, and identified exemplary programs that ensure that all of their students are well prepared to pursue a wide range of career paths. The findings and recommendations will be summarized.

  5. Advanced Earth-to-orbit propulsion technology program overview: Impact of civil space technology initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Frank W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) Propulsion Technology Program is dedicated to advancing rocket engine technologies for the development of fully reusable engine systems that will enable space transportation systems to achieve low cost, routine access to space. The program addresses technology advancements in the areas of engine life extension/prediction, performance enhancements, reduced ground operations costs, and in-flight fault tolerant engine operations. The primary objective is to acquire increased knowledge and understanding of rocket engine chemical and physical processes in order to evolve more realistic analytical simulations of engine internal environments, to derive more accurate predictions of steady and unsteady loads, and using improved structural analyses, to more accurately predict component life and performance, and finally to identify and verify more durable advanced design concepts. In addition, efforts were focused on engine diagnostic needs and advances that would allow integrated health monitoring systems to be developed for enhanced maintainability, automated servicing, inspection, and checkout, and ultimately, in-flight fault tolerant engine operations.

  6. Field Assessment of Energy Audit Tools for Retrofit Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Bohac, D. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Nelson, C. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Smith, I. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This project focused on the use of home energy ratings as a tool to promote energy retrofits in existing homes. A home energy rating provides a quantitative appraisal of a home’s energy performance, usually compared to a benchmark such as the average energy use of similar homes in the same region. Rating systems based on energy performance models, the focus of this report, can establish a home’s achievable energy efficiency potential and provide a quantitative assessment of energy savings after retrofits are completed, although their accuracy needs to be verified by actual measurement or billing data. Ratings can also show homeowners where they stand compared to their neighbors, thus creating social pressure to conform to or surpass others. This project field-tested three different building performance models of varying complexity, in order to assess their value as rating systems in the context of a residential retrofit program: Home Energy Score, SIMPLE, and REM/Rate.

  7. Overview of the ion projection lithography European MEDEA and international program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaesmaier, Rainer; Loeschner, Hans

    2000-07-01

    Ion Projection Lithography (IPL) follows the same principle as optical wafer steppers when using hydrogen or helium ions for the reduction printing of stencil mask patterns to wafer substrates: (1) DUV resists can be used with ion beam exposure; (2) well established optical wafer alignment techniques are used; (3) the mask is stable during exposure. IPL is the only NGL technique where the mask is not scanned during exposure. Because of the very small particle wavelength (5 * 10-5 nm for 100 keV He+ ions there is the possibility of using electrostatic ion-optics with very small numerical aperture (NA approximately equals 10-5). The ion-optics is based on aluminum lens electrode and standard insulator materials. Mechanical tolerances on lens electrode manufacturing and adjustment are in the micrometer range because of in-situ electronic column fine adjustment possibilities. Wafer stage movements with micrometer precision is sufficient through feedback from precise laser interferometer stage position measurements to electronic image placement of the ion image projected to the wafer with on-line 'pattern lock' control. As part of the MEDEA project an IPL process development tool (PDT) is being integrated by IMS with the target to achieve 50 nm resolution within a 12.5 mm exposure field. The IPL production stepper will be based on a similar but more compact ion-optical column, exposing large (e.g. 25 mm) chip fields by stitching of 12.5 mm fields. A 300 mm wafer throughput of 30 WPH is feasible also for the 50 nm node. IPL has the potential of achieving the lowest NGL cost of ownership with the longest multi-generational life time. The practical resolution limit of the IPL technique is below 35 nm.

  8. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. III. Field programming by flow-rate gradient generated by a programmable pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocková, J; Chmelík, J

    2001-05-25

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) utilizes the Earth's gravitational field as an external force that causes the settlement of particles towards the channel accumulation wall. Hydrodynamic lift forces oppose this action by elevating particles away from the channel accumulation wall. These two counteracting forces enable modulation of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. In this work, force-field programming based on modulating the magnitude of hydrodynamic lift forces was implemented via changes of flow-rate, which was accomplished by a programmable pump. Several flow-rate gradients (step gradients, linear gradients, parabolic, and combined gradients) were tested and evaluated as tools for optimization of the separation of a silica gel particle mixture. The influence of increasing amount of sample injected on the peak resolution under flow-rate gradient conditions was also investigated. This is the first time that flow-rate gradients have been implemented for programming of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF.

  9. Overview of the Present HSX Program and Plans for HSX/U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David; HSX Team

    2014-10-01

    Heat pulse propagation experiments yield electron thermal diffusivities comparable to those obtained from power balance, showing that HSX electron transport is not stiff. Nonlinear gyrokinetic calculations using GENE are used to calculate the saturated heat flux under experimental conditions. A new 80-coil internal magnetic diagnostic array is used for equilibrium reconstruction using the V3FIT code including the effect of eddy currents as modeled with the SPARK code. CXRS measurements of Pfirsh-Schlüter ion flows give inferred radial electric fields larger than previous estimates, but still smaller than neoclassically predicted values. New MSE systems to directly measure and model the radial electric field are under implementation. Measurements of the edge properties and structure in HSX are compared to models from EMC3-EIRENE. A proposed major upgrade is under consideration for HSX to modify the vacuum vessel and to use neutral beam injection to increase the ion temperature. This would allow access to low ion collisionality and ion-root discharges. Higher density operation provides for increased divertor parameters, impurity transport studies, and operational flexibility. A particular emphasis of the upgrade would allow for flexible divertor configurations as part of an expanded domestic initiative to improve the stellarator concept for extrapolation to a reactor. Supported by USDOE under Grant DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  10. The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: Overview of innovative science programs

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Shelley A; Moore, Anna M; Do, Tuan; Simard, Luc; Adamkovics, Mate; Armus, Lee; Barth, Aaron J; Barton, Elizabeth; Cooke, Hope Boyce Jeffrey; Cote, Patrick; Davidge, Timothy; Ellerbroek, Brent; Ghez, Andrea; Liu, Michael C; Lu, Jessica R; Macintosh, Bruce A; Mao, Shude; Marois, Christian; Schoeck, Mathias; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tan, Jonathan C; Treu, Tommaso; Wang, Lianqi; Weiss, Jason

    2014-01-01

    IRIS (InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph) is a first light near-infrared diffraction limited imager and integral field spectrograph being designed for the future Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS is optimized to perform astronomical studies across a significant fraction of cosmic time, from our Solar System to distant newly formed galaxies (Barton et al. [1]). We present a selection of the innovative science cases that are unique to IRIS in the era of upcoming space and ground-based telescopes. We focus on integral field spectroscopy of directly imaged exoplanet atmospheres, probing fundamental physics in the Galactic Center, measuring 10^4 to 10^10 Msun supermassive black hole masses, resolved spectroscopy of young star-forming galaxies (1 < z < 5) and first light galaxies (6 < z < 12), and resolved spectroscopy of strong gravitational lensed sources to measure dark matter substructure. For each of these science cases we use the IRIS simulator (Wright et al. [2], Do et al. [3]) to explore IRIS capabi...

  11. Field Assessment of Energy Audit Tools for Retrofit Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.; Bohac, D.; Nelson, C.; Smith, I.

    2013-07-01

    This project focused on the use of home energy ratings as a tool to promote energy retrofits in existing homes. A home energy rating provides a quantitative appraisal of a home's asset performance, usually compared to a benchmark such as the average energy use of similar homes in the same region. Home rating systems can help motivate homeowners in several ways. Ratings can clearly communicate a home's achievable energy efficiency potential, provide a quantitative assessment of energy savings after retrofits are completed, and show homeowners how they rate compared to their neighbors, thus creating an incentive to conform to a social standard. An important consideration is how rating tools for the retrofit market will integrate with existing home energy service programs. For residential programs that target energy savings only, home visits should be focused on key efficiency measures for that home. In order to gain wide adoption, a rating tool must be easily integrated into the field process, demonstrate consistency and reasonable accuracy to earn the trust of home energy technicians, and have a low monetary cost and time hurdle for homeowners. Along with the Home Energy Score, this project also evaluated the energy modeling performance of SIMPLE and REM/Rate.

  12. Financing Sources of Tasks in the Field of Environmental Protection in Poland – an Overview of Applied Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Barczak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant development of investments to protect environment has been noticed in the past ten years in Poland. The purpose of this paper is to present financial instruments which are the financing sources of the tasks in the field of environmental protection. It has been noticed their special role. It has also been emphasized that without the participation of all those instruments would be impossible to achieve environmental plans and priorities, projected in the National Environmental Policy and local environmental programs. This study is a comprehensive analysis of the normative material and ideas presented in the literature of financial and environmental law.

  13. Overview of high-Q2 nucleon form factor program with Super BigBite Spectrometer in JLab's Hall A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Andrew; Jefferson Lab Hall A; Super BigBite Spectrometer Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The elastic electromagnetic form factors (EMFFs) of the nucleon describe the impact-parameter-space distributions of electric charge and magnetization in the nucleon in the infinite momentum frame. The form factors are among the simplest and most fundamental measurable dynamical quantities describing the nucleon's structure. Precision measurements of the nucleon form factors provide stringent benchmarks testing the most sophisticated theoretical models of the nucleon, as well as ab initio calculations in lattice QCD and continuum non-perturbative QCD calculations based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations. Measurements at momentum transfers Q in the few-GeV range probe the theoretically challenging region of transition between the non-perturbative and perturbative regimes of QCD. The recent upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to a maximum electron beam energy of 11 GeV will facilitate the measurement of the nucleon helicity-conserving (F1) and helicity-flip (F2) form factors of both proton and neutron to Q2 > 10 GeV2, In this talk, I will present an overview of the Super BigBite Spectrometer, currently under construction in CEBAF's experimental Hall A, and its physics program of high-Q2 nucleon EMFF measurements. Supported by US DOE award DE-SC0014230.

  14. Integrated design and synthesis of smart material systems: an overview of the ARPA SPICES program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jack H.

    1995-05-01

    The Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures (SPICES) program is comprised of a consortium of industrial, academic and government labs to develop cost effective material processing and synthesis technologies to enable new products using active vibration suppression and control devices to be brought to market. Each team member possesses a specialty in the area of smart structures which has been focused towards the development of several actively controlled smart material systems. Since smart structures involve the integration of multiple engineering disciplines, it is the objective of the consortium to establish cost effective design processes between this multiorganizational team for future incorporation of this new technology into each members respective product lines. To accomplish this task, the disciplines of materials, manufacturing, analytical modeling, actuation, sensing, signal processing, and control had to be synthesized into a unified approach between all ten consortium members. The process developed for intelligent structural systems can truly be classified as multiorganization/multidiciplined Integrated Product Development. This process is described in detail as it applies to the SPICES development articles and smart material fabrication in general.

  15. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12189

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Christopher [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Gillespie, Joey [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado; Widdop, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado; none,

    2012-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to address residual radiological contamination at sites where work was performed for the Manhattan Engineer District and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Initially, FUSRAP activities began with a records search for sites that had the potential to contain residual radiological contamination; 46 sites were identified that were eligible for and required remediation. Remedial action began in 1979. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for the remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE retains responsibility for determining if sites are eligible for FUSRAP remediation and for providing long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) of remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE LTS&M activities are designed to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment and to preserve knowledge regarding FUSRAP sites. Additional elements include eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS&M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close coordination with USACE and regulators to ensure there is no loss of protectiveness when sites transition to DOE for LTS&M.

  16. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score System: Program Overview and Technical Protocol (Version 1.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Na; Gorrissen, Willy J.

    2013-01-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a national voluntary energy asset score system that includes an energy asset score tool to help building owners evaluate their buildings with respect to the score system. The goal of the energy asset score system is to facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency improvements of commercial buildings. The system will allow building owners and managers to compare their building infrastructure against peers and track building upgrade progress over time. The system can also help other building stakeholders (e.g., building operators, tenants, financiers, and appraisers) understand the relative efficiency of different buildings in a way that is independent from their operations and occupancy. This report outlines the technical protocol used to generate the energy asset score, explains the scoring methodology, and provides additional details regarding the energy asset score tool. This report also describes alternative methods that were considered prior to developing the current approach. Finally, this report describes a few features of the program where alternative approaches are still under evaluation.

  17. Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Landreth

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was

  18. Overview and Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements spanning a longer interval. The NSF/NCAR GV employed standard flight-level measurements and new airborne lidar and imaging measurements of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-105 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) and two IR "wing" cameras imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar measuring radial winds below the Falcon. DEEPWAVE also included extensive ground-based measurements in New Zealand, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean Islands. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights and 13 Falcon flights, and ground-based measurements occurred whether or not the aircraft were flying. Collectively, many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation spanning altitudes of 0-100 km were observed. Examples include strong mountain wave (MW) forcing and breaking in the lower and middle stratosphere, weak MW forcing yielding MW penetration into the MLT having very large amplitudes and momentum fluxes, MW scales at higher altitudes ranging from ~10-250 km, large-scale trailing waves from orography refracting into the polar vortex and extending to high altitudes, GW generation by deep convection, large-scale GWs arising from jet stream sources, and strong MWs in the MLT arising from strong surface flow over a small island. DEEPWAVE yielded a number of surprises, among

  19. An overview of the United States Department of Energy plant lifetime improvement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Clauss, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrison, D.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Today, 109 nuclear power plants provide over 20 percent of the electrical energy generated in the US. The operating license of the first of these plants will expire in the year 2000; one third of the operating licenses will expire by 2010 and the remaining plant licenses are scheduled to expire by 2033. The National Energy Strategy assumes that 70 percent of these plants will continue to operate beyond their current license expiration to assist in ensuring an adequate, diverse, and environmentally acceptable energy supply for economic growth. In order to preserve this energy resource in the US three major tasks must be successfully completed: (1) establishment of the regulations, technical standards, and procedures for the preparation and review of a license renewal application; (2) development, verification, and validation of the various technical criteria and bases for needed monitoring, refurbishment, or replacement of plant equipment; and (3) demonstration of the regulatory process. Since 1985, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear industry and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish and demonstrate the option to extend the life of nuclear power plants through the renewal of operating licenses. This paper focuses primarily on DOE`s Plant Lifetime Improvement (PLIM) Program efforts to develop the technical criteria and bases for effective aging management and lifetime improvement for continued operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes current projects to resolve generic technical issues, including degradation of long-lived components, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) embrittlement management approaches, and analytical methodologies to characterize RPV integrity.

  20. ARPA/NIJ/Rome Laboratory concealed weapon detection program: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Nicholas C.; Demma, Fred J.; Ferris, David D., Jr.; McMillan, Robert W.; Wicks, Michael C.

    1996-06-01

    Recent advances in passive and active imaging and non- imaging sensor technology offer the potential to detect weapons that are concealed beneath a person's clothing. Sensors that are discussed in this paper are characterized as either non-imaging or imaging. Non-imaging sensors include wide band radar and portal devices such as metal detectors. In general the strength of non-imaging sensors rest with the fact that they are generally inexpensive and can rapidly perform bulk separation between regions where persons are likely to be carrying concealed weapons and those regions that are likely to contain persons who are unarmed. The bulk process is typically accomplished at the expense of false alarm rate. Millimeter-wave (MMW), microwave, x-ray, acoustic, magnetic, and infrared (IR) imaging sensor technologies provide with greater certainty the means to isolate persons within a crowd that are carrying concealed weapons and to identify the weapon type. The increased certainty associated with imaging sensors is accomplished at the expense of cost and bulk surveillance of the crowd. CWD technologies have a variety of military and civilian applications. This technology focus area addresses specific military needs under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) operations other than war/law enforcement (OOTW/LE). Additionally, this technology has numerous civilian law enforcement applications that are being investigated under the National Institute of Justice's (NIJ) Concealed Weapons Detection program. This paper discusses the wide variety of sensors that might be employed in support of a typical scenario, the strengths and weaknesses of each of the sensors relative to the given scenario, and how CWD breadboards will be tested to determine the optimal CWD application. It rapidly becomes apparent that no single sensor will completely satisfy the CWD mission necessitating the fusion of two or more of these sensors.

  1. Overview of the DoD's rf multifunction structural aperture (MUSTRAP) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Kevin H.; Lockyer, Allen J.; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Tuss, James

    2001-08-01

    structural and electrical performance. Highlights of the program are presented in the text.

  2. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Overview and Policy Context of UF6 Cylinder Tracking Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, J. Michael [ORNL; White-Horton, Jessica L. [ORNL; Durbin, Karyn R. [NNSA

    2012-07-12

    Thousands of cylinders containing uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) move around the world from conversion plants to enrichment plants to fuel fabrication plants, and their contents could be very useful to a country intent on diverting uranium for clandestine use. Each of these large cylinders can contain close to a significant quantity of natural uranium (48Y cylinder) or low-enriched uranium (LEU) (30B cylinder) defined as 75 kg {sup 235}U which can be further clandestinely enriched to produce 1.5 to 2 significant quantities of high enriched uranium (HEU) within weeks or months depending on the scale of the clandestine facility. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) kicked off a 5-year plan in April 2011 to investigate the concept of a unique identification system for UF{sub 6} cylinders and potentially to develop a cylinder tracking system that could be used by facility operators and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The goal is to design an integrated solution beneficial to both industry and inspectorates that would improve cylinder operations at the facilities and provide enhanced capabilities to deter and detect both diversion of low-enriched uranium and undeclared enriched uranium production. The 5-year plan consists of six separate incremental tasks: (1) define the problem and establish the requirements for a unique identification (UID) and monitoring system; (2) develop a concept of operations for the identification and monitoring system; (3) determine cylinder monitoring devices and technology; (4) develop a registry database to support proof-of-concept demonstration; (5) integrate that system for the demonstration; and (6) demonstrate proof-of-concept. Throughout NNSA's performance of the tasks outlined in this program, the multi-laboratory team emphasizes that extensive engagement with industry stakeholders, regulatory authorities and inspectorates is essential to its success.

  3. The NASA/Industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program - A government overview. [of rotorcraft technology development using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of government contributions to the program called Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMV) which attempted to develop finite-element-based analyses of rotorcraft vibrations. NASA initiated the program with a finite-element modeling program for the CH-47D tandem-rotor helicopter. The DAMV program emphasized four areas including: airframe finite-element modeling, difficult components studies, coupled rotor-airframe vibrations, and airframe structural optimization. Key accomplishments of the program include industrywide standards for modeling metal and composite airframes, improved industrial designs for vibrations, and the identification of critical structural contributors to airframe vibratory responses. The program also demonstrated the value of incorporating secondary modeling details to improving correlation, and the findings provide the basis for an improved finite-element-based dynamics design-analysis capability.

  4. An overview of fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) product requirements and qualification programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebizlioglu, Osman S.; Gallo, Ernest J.

    2006-04-01

    North American deployments of FTTP architectures have been rapidly increasing. While the FTTP market is being driven by major telecommunications service providers, equipment suppliers have been scrambling to bring products to market that will ensure them a piece of this high-stakes market. In this invited presentation/paper, we propose to examine the technical requirements that are needed to support the new FTTP network with a host of new products that have been in development. To enable service providers select the best new products for FTTP deployment, product selection needs to be based on the analysis and testing of new products for performance and reliability, Telcordia, in its traditional role of telecommunications standards development, has been publishing generic requirements (GR) documents that have been used by suppliers, service providers and the industry at large. Product qualification programs based on the established performance and reliability requirements/standards have been designed to evaluate products to determine if they can 1) withstand the rigors of the outside plant deployment environment and perform for extended periods of time, 2) be upgradeable, and 3) craft friendly. The outside plant is a tough environment to live in. A product must perform under the extreme conditions of cold down -40°C (-40°F) and hot up to 46°C (115°F) with high humidity of 95%, rain, snow, sleet, vibration due to traffic, lightning, heating due to solar loads, high winds, ice, sand storms, and products are even tested to demonstrate if they can continue to operate in an earthquake, a wild fire and a shotgun blast. All FTTP products are not only expected to perform, but they must meet stringent optical performance criteria of low insertion loss and reflectance / return loss at a broad range of wavelengths from 1310, 1490, 1550 and 1625 nm. While the upstream (from the customer to the CO) voice and data transmission is currently planned over 1310-nm wavelength, the

  5. Earth2Class Overview: An Innovative Program Linking Classroom Educators and Research Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M.; Iturrino, G. J.; Baggio, F. D.; Assumpcao, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    The Earth2Class (E2C) workshops, held at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), provide an effective model for improving knowledge, teaching, and technology skills of middle and high school science educators through ongoing interactions with research scientists and educational technology. With support from an NSF GeoEd grant, E2C has developed monthly workshops, web-based resources, and summer institutes in which classroom teachers and research scientists have produced exemplar curriculum materials about a wide variety of cutting-edge geoscience investigations suitable for dissemination to teachers and students. Some of the goals of this program are focused to address questions such as: (1) What aspects of the E2C format and educational technology most effectively connect research discoveries with classroom teachers and their students? (2) What benefits result through interactions among teachers from highly diverse districts and backgrounds with research scientists, and what benefits do the scientists gain from participation? (3) How can the E2C format serve as a model for other research institution-school district partnerships as a mechanism for broader dissemination of scientific discoveries? E2C workshops have linked LDEO scientists from diverse research specialties-seismology, marine geology, paleoclimatology, ocean drilling, dendrochronology, remote sensing, impact craters, and others-with teachers from schools in the New York metropolitan area. Through the workshops, we have trained teachers to enhance content knowledge in the Earth Sciences and develop skills to incorporate new technologies. We have made a special effort to increase the teaching competency of K-12 Earth Sciences educators serving in schools with high numbers of students from underrepresented groups, thereby providing greater role models to attract students into science and math careers. E2C sponsored Earth Science Teachers Conferences, bringing together educators from New York and New

  6. Overview of NASA FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) Science and Exploration Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, Jennifer L.; Lim, Darlene S. S.; Hughes, S.; Kobs, S.; Garry, B.; Osinski, G. R.; Hodges, K.; Kobayashi, L.; Colaprete, A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) project is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program to generate strategic knowledge in preparation for human and robotic exploration of other planetary bodies including our moon, Mars' moons Phobos and Deimos, and near-Earth asteroids. Scientific study focuses on planetary volcanism (e.g., the formation of volcanoes, evolution of magma chambers and the formation of multiple lava flow types, as well as the evolution and entrapment of volatile chemicals) and impact cratering (impact rock modification, cratering mechanics, and the chronologic record). FINESSE conducts multiple terrestrial field campaigns (Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve in Idaho for volcanics, and West Clearwater Impact Structure in Canada for impact studies) to study such features as analogs relevant to our moon, Phobos, Deimos, and asteroids. Here we present the science and exploration results from two deployments to Idaho (2014, 2015) and our first deployment to Canada (2014). FINESSE was selected as a research team by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI). SSERVI is a joint effort by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD).

  7. Determination of calibration function in thermal field flow fractionation under thermal field programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastil, Luisa; Ventosa, Edgar A; Mingozzi, Ines; Dondi, Francesco

    2006-05-01

    A new procedure for determining the calibration function able to relate retention and operative parameters to molecular weight of the species in thermal field flow (ThFFF) under thermal field programming (TFP) conditions is presented. The procedure involves determining the average values of retention parameters under TFP and determining a numerical function related to the temperature variations that occur during TFP. The calibration parameters are obtained by a procedure fitting the retention and operative parameters that hold true at the beginning of the TFP. The procedure is closely related to the one previously developed to calibrate the retention time axis under TFP ThFFF and, together, they constitute a full calibration procedure. Experimental validation was performed with reference to polystyrene (PS)-decalin and PS-THF systems. The calibration functions here obtained were compared to those derived by the classical procedure at constant thermal field ThFFF to obtain the calibration function at variable cold wall temperatures. Excellent agreement was found in all cases proving "universality" of the ThFFF calibration concept, i.e. it is independent of the particular system on which it was determined and can thus be extended to ThFFF operating under TFP. The new procedure is simpler than the classical one since it requires less precision in setting the instrumentation and can be obtained with fewer experiments. The potential applications for the method are discussed.

  8. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCP METHOD - U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new technologies to assess their effectiveness. This bulletin summarizes results from the 1993 SITE demonstration of the Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) Pentachlorophenol (PCP) Method to determine P...

  9. Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program: 10 years of field research-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Gribbin, S.; Peteet, D. M.; Sambrotto, R.; Bostick, B. C.; Corbett, E.; Nguyen, K.; Bjornton, J.; Lee, D.; Dubossi, D.; Reyes, N.

    2014-12-01

    This fall marks the 10th year in which we have run a research-project-based educational program for high school students and science teachers at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. This summer's cohort included 31 teenagers, 7 science teachers, and 16 college students, most of whom are returning to the program to help run the research projects. Nearly all of our students attend non-competitive-entry public schools in NYC or the neighborhoods around the Observatory. Over 80% are from under-served minority populations. Most receive Title I/III assistance. About 60% are young women. During the past 10 years, nearly all of our participants have gone on to 4-year colleges. About half are declaring science and engineering majors. Our students receive scholarship support at rates several times higher than their graduating peers, including 5 Gates Millennium scholars over the past 5 years. Our science is centered on studies of a nearby tidal wetland, where we have expanded from fish collections in year one to include everything from sediment core analysis to soil chemistry to nutrient cycles to the local food web. In this presentation we will look back over 10 years of experience and focus on what lessons can be learned about (1) how to engage teams of young investigators in authentic scientific research; (2) what cultural/organizational structures encourage them to make use of place- and project-based learning and (3) what the participants themselves report as the most useful aspects of our programming. The presentation will include video clips from the students' field experiences and from reflective interviews with "graduates".

  10. Field-trip guide to Mount St. Helens, Washington - An overview of the eruptive history and petrology, tephra deposits, 1980 pyroclastic density current deposits, and the crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, John S.; Clynne, Michael A.; Wright, Heather M.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Vallance, James W.; Sherrod, David R.; Kokelaar, B. Peter

    2017-08-02

    This field trip will provide an introduction to several fascinating features of Mount St. Helens. The trip begins with a rigorous hike of about 15 km from the Johnston Ridge Observatory (9 km north-northeast of the crater vent), across the 1980 Pumice Plain, to Windy Ridge (3.6 km northeast of the crater vent) to examine features that document the dynamics and progressive emplacement of pyroclastic flows. The next day, we examine classic tephra outcrops of the past 3,900 years and observe changes in thickness and character of these deposits as we traverse their respective lobes. We examine clasts in the deposits and discuss how the petrology and geochemistry of Mount St. Helens deposits reveal the evolution of the magmatic system through time. We also investigate the stratigraphy of the 1980 blast deposit and review the chronology of this iconic eruption as we travel through the remains of the blown-down forest. The third day is another rigorous hike, about 13 km round trip, climbing from the base of Windy Ridge (elevation 1,240 m) to the front of the Crater Glacier (elevation 1,700 m). En route we examine basaltic andesite and basalt lava flows emplaced between 1,800 and 1,700 years before present, a heterolithologic flow deposit produced as the 1980 blast and debris avalanche interacted, debris-avalanche hummocks that are stranded on the north flank and in the crater mouth, and shattered dacite lava domes that were emplaced between 3,900 and 2,600 years before present. These domes underlie the northern part of the volcano. In addition, within the crater we traverse well-preserved pyroclastic-flow deposits that were emplaced on the crater floor during the summer of 1980, and a beautiful natural section through the 1980 deposits in the upper canyon of the Loowit River.Before plunging into the field-trip log, we provide an overview of Mount St. Helens geology, geochemistry, petrology, and volcanology as background. The volcano has been referred to as a

  11. Overview of Relational Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    Computer Science Department Technical Report NPS52-81-014, Naval Postgraduate School, October 1981. [7) Whitehead, A. N. and Russell, B. Principia ... Mathematica to *56, Cambridge, 1970. 17 - APPENDIX: RELATIONAL CALCULUS - REVISED NOTATION - 18- Old Notation Name New Notation xGC class membership x EC

  12. Project overview and update on WEAVE: the next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, Gavin; Trager, Scott; Abrams, Don Carlos; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; López Aguerri, J. Alfonso; Middleton, Kevin; Benn, Chris; Dee, Kevin; Sayède, Frédéric; Lewis, Ian; Pragt, Johan; Pico, Sergio; Walton, Nic; Rey, Juerg; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Peñate, José; Lhome, Emilie; Agócs, Tibor; Alonso, José; Terrett, David; Brock, Matthew; Gilbert, James; Ridings, Andy; Guinouard, Isabelle; Verheijen, Mark; Tosh, Ian; Rogers, Kevin; Steele, Iain; Stuik, Remko; Tromp, Neils; Jasko, Attila; Kragt, Jan; Lesman, Dirk; Mottram, Chris; Bates, Stuart; Gribbin, Frank; Rodriguez, Luis Fernando; Delgado, José M.; Martin, Carlos; Cano, Diego; Navarro, Ramón; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, Jim; Gonzalez Solares, Eduardo; O'Mahony, Neil; Bianco, Andrea; Zurita, Christina; ter Horst, Rik; Molinari, Emilio; Lodi, Marcello; Guerra, José; Vallenari, Antonella; Baruffolo, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of and status report on the WEAVE next-generation spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT). WEAVE principally targets optical ground-based follow up of upcoming ground-based (LOFAR) and space-based (Gaia) surveys. WEAVE is a multi-object and multi-IFU fac

  13. Overview of Initial Results From Studies of the Bagnold Dune Field on Mars by the Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Nathan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Ewing, Ryan; Newman, Claire; Sullivan, Robert; Conrad, Pamela; Cousin, Agnes; Edgett, Kenneth; Fisk, Martin; Fraeman, Abigail; Johnson, Jeffrey; Lamb, Michael; Lapotre, Mathieu; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Martinez, German; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Thompson, Lucy; van Beek, Jason; Vasavada, Ashwin; Wiens, Roger

    2016-04-01

    The Curiosity Rover is currently studying the Bagnold Dunes in Gale Crater. Here we provide a general overview of results and note that other EGU presentations will focus on specific aspects. The in situ activities have not yet occurred as of this writing, but other analyses have been performed approaching and within the dunefield. ChemCam passive spectra of Bagnold Dune sands are consistent with the presence of olivine. Two APXS spots on the High Dune stoss slope margin, and two others in an engineering test sand patch, show less inferred dust, greater Si, and higher Fe/Mn than other "soils" in Gale Crater. ChemCam analyses of more than 300 soils along the Curiosity traverse show that both fine and coarse soils have increasing iron and alkali content as the Bagnold Dunes are approached, a trend that may reflect admixtures of local rocks (alkalis + iron) to the fines, but also a contribution of Bagnold-like sand (iron) that increases toward the dunefield. MAHLI images of sands on the lower east stoss slope of High Dune show medium and coarse sand in ripple forms, and very fine and fine sand in ripple troughs. Most grains are dark gray, but some are also brick-red/brown, white, green translucent, yellow, brown„ colorless translucent, or vitreous spheres HiRISE orbital images show that the Bagnold Dunes migrate on the order of decimeters or more per Earth year. Prior to entering the dune field, wind disruption of dump piles and grain movement was observed over multi-sol time spans, demonstrating that winds are of sufficient strength to mobilize unconsolidated material, either through direct aerodynamic force or via the action of smaller impacting grains. Within the dune field, we are, as of this writing, engaged in change detection experiments with Mastcam and ChemCam's RMI camera. Data we have so far, spanning 8 sols from the same location, shows no changes. Mastcam and RMI images of the stoss sides of Namib, Noctivaga, and High Dune show that the "ripples" seen

  14. Special Concretes and Field Problems; Instructor's Guide; Pilot Program Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portland Cement Association, Cleveland, OH.

    This guide, prepared for a 2-year program in junior colleges and technical institutes, is designed for a national program to train persons for employment as technicians in the cement and concrete industries. Included are 48 session oultines divided into four units of study. Each unit contains session objectives and outlines, presentation outlines,…

  15. Mean magnetic field calculation program with allowance for flutter for isochronous cyclotron (Cyclotron Analytic Model Program - CAMP)

    CERN Document Server

    Kiyan, I N; Vorozhtsov, S B

    2002-01-01

    The Cyclotron Analytic Model Program (CAMP) written in C++ with the use of Visual C++ is described. The program is intended for the mean magnetic field calculation of the isochronous cyclotron with allowance for flutter. The program algorithm was developed on the basis of the paper 'Calculation of Isochronous Fields for Sector-Focused Cyclotrons', by M.M.Gordon (Particle Accelerators. 1983. V.13). The accuracy of the calculations, performed with this program, was tested with the use of maps of isochronous magnetic fields of different cyclotrons with the azimuthally varying fields - AVF cyclotrons, in which the ion beams were produced. The calculation by CAMP showed that the isochronous mean magnetic field curve for the measured magnetic field, in which the ion beam was produced, exactly corresponded to the curve of the isochronous mean magnetic field, calculated with the allowance for flutter for all the AVF cyclotrons that were considered. As is evident from the calculations, this program can be used for cal...

  16. Evolutionary Computation:ao Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HeZhenya; WeiChengjian

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary computation is a field of simulating evolution on a computer.Both aspects of it ,the problem solving aspect and the aspect of modeling natural evolution,are important.Simulating evolution on a computer results in stochastic optimization techniques that can outperform classical methods of optimization when applied to difficult real-world problems.There are currently four main avenues of research in simulated evolution:genetic algorithms,evolutionary programming,evolution strategies,and genetic programming.This paper presents a brief overview of thd field on evolutionary computation,including some theoretical issues,adaptive mechanisms,improvements,constrained optimizqtion,constrained satisfaction,evolutionary neural networks,evolutionary fuzzy systems,hardware evolution,evolutionary robotics,parallel evolutionary computation,and co-evolutionary models.The applications of evolutionary computation for optimizing system and intelligent information processing in telecommunications are also introduced.

  17. Social scientific environmental research in Finland. An overview on the research fields and literature; Yhteiskuntatieteellinen ympaeristoetutkimus Suomessa. Katsaus tutkimusaloihin ja kirjallisuuteen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viinikainen, T. [ed.

    1997-12-31

    This report presents an overview on Finnish social scientific research on the environment. This research field studies the interaction between man and nature, as well as the causes, solutions and effects of environmental problems, in their social context. Research activities in the field have increased in Finland in the 1990`s. In the resort the following research areas are shortly described: environmental history, environmental philosophy and theology, environmental sociology, environmental research in communication studies, research on environmental politics, economics, geography and urban planning, environmental education, environmental law, and forestry. In each research field the latest projects in different research institutions are also listed. In addition to this, the report contains a bibliography on Finnish social scientific research on the environment between the years 1990 and 1996. (orig.) 98 refs.

  18. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the MARGINS-GeoPRISMS Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. K.; Costa, A.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Marshall, J. S.; Iverson, E. A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes, organized around four initiatives: (1) chemical cycling in subduction zones (SubFac), (2) seismogenic zone processes at subduction zones (SEIZE), (3) rupturing continental lithosphere (RCL), and (4) source to sink sediment cycling at continental margins (S2S). The outcomes of this research provided critical new observations and insights into fundamental geologic processes along continental margins, and associated geologic hazards and economic resources. The transition to the successor GeoPRISMS Program provided a unique opportunity to identify and synthesize the highlights of MARGINS research, and to disseminate this knowledge to educators and students who will carry out the next phase of cutting-edge scientific research. The NSF TUES Program funded a two-year project entitled: "Bringing NSF MARGINS Continental Margins Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum," enabling development of ~15 mini-lessons drawing on key MARGINS results and data sets. The mini-lesson development team consists of 18 educators and scientists, grouped by initiative, and guided by experts in MARGINS science and current educational research and practices. Webinars and virtual check-ins enable team interactions and exchange of ideas and experiences; in person workshops solidified pedagogical approaches and assessment strategies, as well as initiative frameworks for the mini-lessons. Field testing by team members and outside volunteers during AY 2013-14 identified challenges and opportunities, guiding mini-lesson revision and finalization. The MARGINS mini-lessons define coordinated, data-rich educational resources, easy to access and free to the public, ready to be incorporated into multiple common geoscience course frameworks, taking the first step toward building a community of practice of scientists and curriculum specialists with the shared goal of moving cutting-edge science into undergraduate

  19. Field Practica: An Appraisal of One BSW Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, James G.

    A model of field instruction for bachelor of social work (BSW) students was studied. Objectives were: to examine selected agency indicators of practica satisfaction, determine the extent of integration between field practica and other social work courses, ascertain the contribution of the social work curriculum in preparing students for their…

  20. Pathways to Excellence Scholarship Program for women in STEM fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Rienzi, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    Notre Dame of Maryland University (NDMU) has an NSF S-STEM grant, Pathways to Excellence, that gives 10 scholarships annually to academically talented women undergraduates with demonstrated financial need who are pursuing degrees in mathematics, physics, computer information systems, or engineering. NDMU has been cited (Whitten, et al. (2007)) as providing a female friendly environment for the study of physics. In this program we are using a tri-part mentoring system involving a faculty member in the student's discipline, a peer mentor from the program and an external alumnae mentor. The program also has a thematic seminar course for the scholars. Each student in the program is tasked to construct a career development plan in assistance with her faculty mentor and set measured annual goals. In addition, all scholarship students are requested to have an experiential experience. As a result, NDMU aims to strengthen its role in increasing the numbers of well-educated and skilled women employees from diverse backgrounds, including mostly first-generation college students, in technical and scientific areas. Early assessment of the success of the program will be presented as well as modifications that resulted from the formative evaluation. This program is funded by a National Science Foundation S-STEM grant which is not responsible for its content.

  1. 78 FR 47717 - The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013: Overview of Applicability to HUD Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... development of regulations or guidance, or both, as may be applicable. A. Coverage for Victims of Sexual... URBAN DEVELOPMENT The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013: Overview of Applicability to... of General Counsel, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Room...

  2. Fern Biology in Mexico - (A Class Field Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Rolla; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Organized field trips in the tropics proved to be an effective way to gather new information about ferns. The areas of study covered were: systematics and ecology, cytology and gametophyte structure, and morphogenesis and physiology. (PS)

  3. Field analytical technology verification: The ETV Site Characterization Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einfeld, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jenkins, R.A.; Dindal, A.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Innovative field characterization and monitoring technologies are often slow to be adopted by the environmental engineering/consulting community because of concerns that their performance has not been proven by an independent testing body, and/or they have not received the EPA`s blessing on a regional or national level. The purpose of the EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Site Characterization Pilot, a joint effort between EPA and DOE, is to accelerate the acceptance of technologies that reduce the cost and increase the speed of environmental clean-up and monitoring. Technology verifications that have been completed or are underway include: in situ technologies for the characterization of sub-surface hydrocarbon plumes, field-portable GC/MS systems, field-portable X-ray fluorescence analyzers, soil sampling technologies, field-portable PCB analyzers, analyzers for VOC analysis at the wellhead, and decision support software systems to aid site sample collection and contaminant plume definition. The verification process follows a somewhat generic pathway. A user-community need is identified, the vendor community is canvassed, and relevant, interested companies are selected. A demonstration plan is prepared by the verification organization and circulated to participants prior to the field activities. Field trials are normally held at two geologically or environmentally different sites and typically require one week at each site. Samples (soil, soil gas, water, surface wipe etc.) provided to the vendor at the demonstration include site-specific samples and standards or performance evaluation samples. Sample splits are sent to a pre-selected laboratory for analysis using a reference method. Laboratory data are used for comparison with field technology results during the data analysis phase of the demonstration.

  4. Transducer models in the ultrasound simulation program FIELD II and their accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Bæk, David

    2010-01-01

    The FIELD II simulation program can be used for simulating any kind of linear ultrasound fields. The program is capable of describing multi-element transducers used with any kind of excitation, apodization, and focusing. The program has been widely used in both academia and by commercial ultrasound...... companies for investigation novel transducer geometries and advanced linear imaging schemes. The program models transducer geometries using a division of the transducer elements into either rectangles, triangles, or bounding lines. The precision of the simulation and the simulation time is intimately linked...

  5. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of Field Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute

    1997-08-01

    This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic fields sectio~ and field reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic field reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic field shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic field plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.

  6. NASA thunderstorm overflight program: Atmospheric electricity research. An overview report on the optical lightning detection experiment for spring and summer 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the NASA Thunderstorm Overflight Program (TOP)/Optical Lightning Experiment (OLDE) being conducted by the Marshall Space Flight Center and university researchers in atmospheric electricity. Discussed in this report are the various instruments flown on the NASA U-2 aircraft, as well as the ground instrumentation used in 1983 to collect optical and electronic signatures from the lightning events. Samples of some of the photographic and electronic signatures are presented. Approximately 4132 electronic data samples of optical pulses were collected and are being analyzed by the NASA and university researchers. A number of research reports are being prepared for future publication. These reports will provide more detailed data analysis and results from the 1983 spring and summer program.

  7. Insights into Contaminant Leaching Through An Intensive Field Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, D.; Ireson, A. M.; Ali, M.; Steele, C.; Penrod, D.

    2014-12-01

    Risks to groundwater quality from mobile contaminants in the unsaturated zone associated with active or legacy mines present significant challenges for land managers and policy makers worldwide. Unsaturated zone flow processes are a dominant control on contaminant loading. However, the presence of unsaturated zone heterogeneity results in spatially and temporally variable flow pathways, due to capillary breaks and hydraulic barriers forming in various locations. This can result in the development of focused flow paths from where rapid contaminant transport to the water table may occur. In this study we designed an intensive monitoring program to attempt to characterise time-varying flow paths through a highly heterogeneous unsaturated zone through a dense network of combined soil moisture, electric conductivity and temperature probes. Estimations of surface fluxes and soil drainage along with observed water table response at a waste management site in Chalk River, Canada are presented providing insights into flow and transport processes.

  8. The Natural Classroom: A Directory of Field Courses, Programs, and Expeditions in the Natural Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Jack R.

    The purpose of this book is to increase awareness of the numerous seminars, short courses, field courses, workshops, and programs for teachers, students, naturalists, and independent scholars. These programs emphasize the natural sciences including general biology, botany, zoology, ecology, marine biology, ichthyology, microbiology, natural…

  9. Expanding Learning, Enriching Learning: Portraits of Five Programs. Stories from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Daniel; Syed, Sarosh; Mendels, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    These "Stories From the Field" describe five Wallace-funded programs working to expand learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children, so they can benefit from the types of opportunities their wealthier counterparts have access to, from homework help to swimming classes. The report details each program's approach, successes and…

  10. South Atlantic Margin Processes and Links with Onshore Evolution: Overview of the German Priority Program SAMPLE (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbull, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2009 the SAMPLE program (www.spp-sample.de) provides a platform for research into the causes and effects of continental breakup and the evolution of passive margins. SAMPLE encompasses 28 projects from 13 German institutions and many international partnerships. The 6-year program will run through 2015. At the core of the program are observational studies that are interlinked by modelling projects examining the interplay of deep mantle dynamics, lithospheric stress fields, pre-rift fabric and melt-weaking on localizing rifting. Geophysics teams collect and integrate existing data from wide-angle seismic profiles, reprocessed multichannel seismics, as well as gravity, magnetics and heat-flow studies to construct self-consistent lithospheric-scale 3-D models along the conjugate margins. Key interests are variations in margin architecture, distribution of magmatic features and the evolution of sedimentary basins (subsidence and thermal histories). An exciting new contribution of SAMPLE geophysics is a linked set of seismic, seismologic and magnetotelluric experiments along the Walvis Ridge, including onshore NW Namibia and the Tristan da Cunha hotspot. In the deep mantle, we examine evidence from global seismic tomography for dramatic low seismic-velocity regions near the core-mantle boundary beneath southern Africa and their implications for dynamics in the deep Earth and the thermo-chemical nature of plumes. Petrologic studies focus on near-primary mantle melts represented by Mg-rich mafic dikes. Projects address the origin of magmas and crust-mantle interaction, and the environmental impact of mega-scale volcanism during breakup. Thermobarometry results from the African margin reveal a N-to-S decrease in mantle potential temperatures from 1520°C (N) to 1380° (S), which supports a thermal plume origin for excessive melt production in the north. Thermochronology data from both conjugate margins reveal complex and puzzling patterns in the denudation history

  11. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  12. Distribution and ecology of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) infesting livestock in Tunisia: an overview of eighth years field collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouattour, A; Darghouth, M A; Daoud, A

    1999-09-01

    Ticks (Ixodidae) play a significant role as vectors of pathogens of domestic animals in Tunisia. The major losses caused by ticks are related to transmission of protozoan parasites. These include agents of tropical theileriosis and babesiosis in ruminants. Since 1991, we conducted research studies on tick population of livestock in Tunisia. This overview reports a synthesis on tick distribution, their biology and their role as vectors of pathogens in domestic animals, particularly cattle. During the whole period of the study about 15,000 tick specimens were collected from different zones of the country. A total of 14 species were identified. Hyalomma detritum detritum was the most abundant and important (vector of Theileria annulata) species infesting cattle. Hyalomma dromedarii and Hyalomma impeltatum were collected on domestic ruminants in the arid and desertic zones. Hyalomma marginatum marginatum and Hyalomma anatolicum excavatum were widespread and found on livestock hosts. Ixodes ricinus, vector of Babesia divergens and Borrelia burgdorferi sl, colonises mainly the humid zone. Boophilus annulatus and Rhipicephalus bursa infesting cattle, sheep and goats were found in the sub-humid and semi-arid zones. Haemaphysalis sulcata and Hae. punctata were collected in humid and sub-humid zones on cattle and sheep. Rhipicephalus turanicus were collected in different regions, on different animal species. Rhipicephalus sanguineus, tick of dogs, were often collected on livestock. Only few specimens of Hyalomma marginatum rufipes and Hyalomma franchinii were collected.

  13. Forensic odontology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Duane E

    2014-06-01

    This article is an overview of the field of forensic odontology, highlighting historical cases, with an emphasis on California cases, and briefly discussing some of the current techniques and issues in the field. As with all fields of dentistry, forensic odontology is adapting to new methodologies, changes in techniques, research findings and legal issues. Today's dentist who works in the forensic arena must face and understand these changes and advancements.

  14. Easing the transition for queer student teachers from program to field: implications for teacher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Fiona J; Smith, Nathan Grant; Flanagan, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Tensions exist between what some queer student teachers experience in the university setting, their lives in schools during field placements, and upon graduation. We describe a series of workshops designed for queer student teachers and their allies that were conducted prior to field placement. Participants revealed high degrees of satisfaction with the program and increased feelings of personal and professional self-efficacy. Participants reported high levels of experienced homophobia in their academic programs; as such, the workshops were a valuable "safe space." These workshops appear to fill a significant gap for queer students and their allies in teacher preparation programs.

  15. Biomedical image analysis using Markov random fields & efficient linear programing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komodakis, Nikos; Besbes, Ahmed; Glocker, Ben; Paragios, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis through biomedical image analysis is increasingly considered in health sciences. This is due to the progress made on the acquisition side, as well as on the processing one. In vivo visualization of human tissues where one can determine both anatomical and functional information is now possible. The use of these images with efficient intelligent mathematical and processing tools allows the interpretation of the tissues state and facilitates the task of the physicians. Segmentation and registration are the two most fundamental tools in bioimaging. The first aims to provide automatic tools for organ delineation from images, while the second focuses on establishing correspondences between observations inter and intra subject and modalities. In this paper, we present some recent results towards a common formulation addressing these problems, called the Markov Random Fields. Such an approach is modular with respect to the application context, can be easily extended to deal with various modalities, provides guarantees on the optimality properties of the obtained solution and is computationally efficient.

  16. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Conference Registry Login SCR Training and Testing Cancer Cancer Programs Cancer Programs Overview of Cancer Programs Cancer Programs News American Joint Committee on ...

  17. A New Model Program for Academically Gifted Students in Turkey: Overview of the Education Program for the Gifted Students' Bridge with University (EPGBU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortop, Hasan Said

    2013-01-01

    All over the world, studies related to design of appropriate educational programs for gifted students have been continuing. It is also important that these programs should be adapted to both realities of countries and developing educational technologies. In Turkey, the structure of The Education Program for the Gifted Students' Bridge with…

  18. Overview of Student Characteristics and Program Outcomes. HEP/CAMP National Evaluation Project. Research Report No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gary L.; And Others

    This research report is a detailed summary of student backgrounds, family characteristics, and educational and career outcomes of the respondents in the 1984-85 High School Equivalency Programs (HEP) and College Assistance for Migrants Programs (CAMP) National Evaluation Project. The report indicates that approximately half the HEP/CAMP…

  19. State ICC Overview: Policies, Programs, and Practices of State Interagency Coordinating Councils under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Jo, Ed.

    This document presents general information about State Interagency Coordinating Councils (SICCs) which participate in the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (formerly Part H Program, now Part C) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The information was gathered from questionnaires returned…

  20. Filter concepts for gas turbines. Overview and field report on utility value enhancement with three-stage filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manstein, Heiko; Rothmann, Andreas [Scandinavia Freudenberg Filtration Technologies KG, Weinheim (Germany). Turbomachinery

    2009-07-01

    Efficient air filtration and its contribution towards cost-effective operation of gas turbines offer an extensive field for continual design enhancements. The utility value of three-stage, high-efficiency filter installations for gasturbine air intake systems was in terms of its basics covered by a previous publication. Feedback from multi-stage systems installed in the field validates the applicability to statically operated filter systems currently in common use, against the background of the stipulations posed for particle arrestance, coalescence characteristics and pressure-loss behaviour. (orig.)

  1. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers

  2. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers

  3. Swiss Energy research 2007 - Overview from the Heads of the Programs; Energie-Forschung 2007. Ueberblicksberichte der Programmleiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calisesi, Y.

    2008-04-15

    This comprehensive document issued by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the overview reports elaborated by the heads of the various Swiss energy research programmes. Topics covered include the efficient use of energy, with reports covering energy in buildings, traffic and accumulators, electrical technologies, applications and grids, ambient heat, combined heat and power, cooling, combustion, the 'power station 2000', fuel cells and hydrogen and process engineering. Renewable energy topics reported on include solar heat, photovoltaics, industrial solar energy, biomass and wood energy, hydropower, geothermal heat and wind energy. Nuclear energy topics include safety, regulatory safety research and nuclear fusion. Finally, energy economics basics are reviewed. The report is completed with annexes on the Swiss Energy Research Commission, energy research organisations and a list of important addresses.

  4. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys: Overview And Catalog From The Cosmos Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Civano, F.; Hickox, R. C.; Puccetti, S.

    2015-01-01

    To provide the census of the sources contributing to the X-ray background peak above 10 keV, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is performing extragalactic surveys using a three-tier "wedding cake" approach. We present the NuSTAR survey of the COSMOS field, the medium sensitivity...

  5. Overview of the trace gas measurements on board the Citation aircraft during the intensive field phase of INDOEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gouw, JA; Warneke, C; Scheeren, HA; van der Veen, C; Bolder, M; Scheele, MP; Williams, J; Wong, S; Lange, L; Fischer, H; Lelieveld, J

    2001-01-01

    During the intensive field phase of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), measurements of the atmospheric chemical and aerosol composition over the Indian Ocean were performed from a Cessna Citation aircraft. Measurements were performed during February and March 1999 over the northern Indian Ocean f

  6. XBootes: An X-Ray Survey of the NDWFS Bootes Field - Paper I Overview and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, S S; Forman, W R; Jones, C; Green, P J; Kochanek, C S; Vikhlinin, A; Fabricant, D; Fazio, G; Brand, K; Brown, M J I; Dey, A; Jannuzi, B T; Najita, J; McNamara, B; Shields, J; Rieke, M; Murray, Stephen S.; Kenter, Almus; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Green, Paul J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Fabricant, Daniel; Fazio, Giovani; Brand, Kate; Brown, Michael J. I.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Najita, Joan; Namara, Brian Mc; Shields, Joseph; Rieke, Marcia

    2005-01-01

    We obtained a 5 ksec deep Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-I map of the 9.3 square degree Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Here we describe the data acquisition and analysis strategies leading to a catalog of 4642 (3293) point sources with 2 or more (4 or more) counts, corresponding to a limiting flux of roughly 4(8)x10^{-15} erg cm^{-2}s^{-1} in the 0.5-7 keV band. These Chandra XBootes data are unique in that they consitute the widest contiguous X-ray field yet observed to such a faint flux limit. Because of the extraordinarily low background of the ACIS, we expect only 14% (0.7%) of the sources to be spurious. We also detected 43 extended sources in this survey. The distribution of the point sources among the 126 pointings (ACIS-I has a 16 x 16 arcminute field of view) is consistent with Poisson fluctuations about the mean of 36.8 sources per pointing. While a smoothed image of the point source distribution is clumpy, there is no statistically significant evidence of large scale filamentary s...

  7. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010): an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, J.; Crowley, J.; Fischer, H.; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Ouwersloot, H.G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPACOPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation) in Hyyti¨al¨a, Finland from 12 July–12 Augu

  8. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010): an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, J.; Crowley, J.; Fischer, H.; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Ouwersloot, H.G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPACOPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation) in Hyyti¨al¨a, Finland from 12 July–12

  9. An overview of MADONA: A multinational field study of high-resolution meteorology and diffusion over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cionco, R.M.; aufm Kampe, W.; Biltoft, C.;

    1999-01-01

    and aerosol sensors and four source generators were used during each day of the field study. This array of sensors included 14 towers of wind cups and vanes, 10 sonic anemometer/thermometers, one boundary layer sonde, two lidar, one ion sensor, the CEDE Weather Station, and several one-of-a-kind sensors...

  10. An Overview of MADONA: A Multinational Field Study of High-Resolution Meteorology and Diffusion over Complex Terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cionco, R. M.; Byers, J. H.; Aufm Kampe, W.; van Raden, H.; Weber, H.; Biltoft, C.; Collins, C. G.; Higgs, T. J.; Jones, C. D.; Ride, D. J.; Robson, R.; Hin, A. R. T.; Johansson, P.-E.; Nyrén, K.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Mikkelsen, T.; Santabarbara, J. M.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Kimber, J. F.; Streicher, J.

    1999-01-01

    The multination, high-resolution field study of Meteorology And Diffusion Over Non-Uniform Areas (MADONA) was conducted by scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, and the Netherlands at Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire, United Kingdom, during September and October 1992. The host of the field study was the Chemical and Biological Defence Establishment (CBDE, now part of Defence Evaluation and Research Agency) at Porton Down. MADONA was designed and conducted for high-resolution meteorological data collection and diffusion experiments using smoke, sulphurhexaflouride (SF6), and propylene gas during unstable, neutral, and stable atmospheric conditions in an effort to obtain terrain-influenced meteorological fields, dispersion, and concentration fluctuation measurements using specialized sensors and tracer generators. Thirty-one days of meteorological data were collected during the period 7 September-7 October and 27 diffusion experiments were conducted from 14 to 23 September 1992. Puffs and plumes of smoke and SF6 were released simultaneously for most of the experiments to gauge the resultant diffusion and concentration behavior. Some 44 meteorological and aerosol sensors and four source generators were used during each day of the field study. This array of sensors included 14 towers of wind cups and vanes, 10 sonic anemometer/thermometers, one boundary layer sonde, two lidar, one ion sensor, the CBDE Weather Station, and several one-of-a-kind sensors. Simulations of airflow and diffusion over the MADONA topography (a 9 km by 7.5 km area) were made with a variety of models. Wind fields and wind-related parameters were simulated with several high-resolution (microalpha scale) wind flow models. A tally of the various data-gathering activities indicates that the execution of MADONA was highly successful. Preliminary use of the datasets shows the high quality and depth of the MADONA database. This well-documented database is

  11. Perceived Impacts of a Public Health Training Center Field Placement Program Among Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik eJohansson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is heightened interest in identifying the impact of the federally-funded Public Health Training Center (PHTC program. Although evaluation studies have been conducted of public health training in general, evaluations of PHTC programs are rare. Field placement components are Congressionally-mandated requirements of PHTCs. Field placements are typically intensive, supervised externships for students to gain public health experience with local health departments or non-profit organizations. We have found no published evaluations of PHTC field placement components. This may be because of their small size and unique nature. We designed and evaluated a 200-hour field placement program at an established Public Health Training Center. The evaluation included pre/post surveys measuring public health core competencies, and post-experience interviews. We found significant increases in three competency domains among trainees: policy development and program planning, communication skills, and community dimensions of practice. These outcomes contribute to an evidence base on the efficacy of PHTC field placement programs, and underscore their role in public health training.

  12. Overview for geologic field-trip guides to Mount Mazama, Crater Lake Caldera, and Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.; Wright, Heather M.

    2017-08-16

    These field-trip guides were written for the occasion of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) quadrennial scientific assembly in Portland, Oregon, in August 2017. The guide to Mount Mazama and Crater Lake caldera is an updated and expanded version of the guide (Bacon, 1989) for part of an earlier IAVCEI trip to the southern Cascade Range. The guide to Newberry Volcano describes the stops included in the 2017 field trip. Crater Lake and Newberry are the two best-preserved and most recent calderas in the Cascades Volcanic Arc. Although located in different settings in the arc, with Crater Lake on the arc axis and Newberry in the rear-arc, both volcanoes are located at the intersection of the arc and the northwest corner region of the extensional Basin and Range Province.

  13. The INTERACT Quality Improvement Program: An Overview for Medical Directors and Primary Care Clinicians in Long-Term Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouslander, Joseph G.; Bonner, Alice; Herndon, Laurie; Shutes, Jill

    2014-01-01

    INTERACT is a publicly available quality improvement program that focuses on improving the identification, evaluation, and management of acute changes in condition of nursing home residents. Effective implementation has been associated with substantial reductions in hospitalization of nursing home residents. Familiarity with and support of program implementation by medical directors and primary care clinicians in the nursing home setting are essential to effectiveness and sustainability of the program over time. In addition to helping nursing homes prevent unnecessary hospitalizations and their related complications and costs, and thereby continuing to be or becoming attractive partners for hospitals, health care systems, managed care plans, and ACOs, effective INTERACT implementation will assist nursing homes in meeting the new requirement for a robust QAPI program which is being rolled out by the federal government over the next year. PMID:24513226

  14. KiVa Antibullying Program: Overview of Evaluation Studies Based on a Randomized Controlled Trial and National Rollout in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Salmivalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a Finnish national school-based antibullying program (KiVa were evaluated in a randomized controlled trial (2007–2009 and during nationwide implementation (since 2009. The KiVa program is been found to reduce bullying and victimization and increase empathy towards victimized peers and self-efficacy to support and defend them. KiVa increases school liking and motivation and contributes to significant reductions in anxiety, depression, and negative peer perceptions. Somewhat larger reductions in bullying and victimization were found in the randomized controlled trial than in the broad rollout, and the largest effects were obtained in primary school (grades 1–6. The uptake of the KiVa program is remarkable, with 90 percent of Finnish comprehensive schools currently registered as program users.

  15. The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program: Overview and the New Tenets for Cost Conscious Mission Assurance on Electrical, Electronic, and Electromechanical (EEE) Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Sampson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The NEPP Program focuses on the reliability aspects of electronic devices (integrated circuits such as a processor in a computer). There are three principal aspects of this reliability: 1) Lifetime, inherent failure and design issues related to the EEE parts technology and packaging; 2) Effects of space radiation and the space environment on these technologies, and; 3) Creation and maintenance of the assurance support infrastructure required for mission success. The NEPP mission is to provide guidance to NASA for the selection and application of microelectronics technologies, to improve understanding of the risks related to the use of these technologies in the space environment, and to ensure that appropriate EEE parts research is performed to meet NASA mission assurance needs. NEPPs FY15 goals are to represent the NASA voice to the greater aerospace EEE parts community including supporting anti-counterfeit and trust, provide relevant guidance to cost-effective missions, aid insertion of advanced (and commercial) technologies, resolve unexpected parts issues, ensure access to appropriate radiation test facilities, and collaborate as widely as possible with external entities. In accordance with the changing mission profiles throughout NASA, the NEPP Program has developed a balanced portfolio of efforts to provide agency-wide assurance for not only traditional spacecraft developments, but also those in-line with the new philosophies emerging worldwide. In this presentation, we shall present an overview of this program and considerations for EEE parts assurance as applied to cost conscious missions.

  16. Stroke: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Stroke: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Stroke is a leading cause of disability and death ...

  17. Modification of Saharan Mineral Dust during Transport across the Atlantic Ocean - Overview and Results from the SALTRACE Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, Bernadett; Ansmann, Albert; Reitebuch, Oliver; Freudenthaler, Volker; Müller, Thomas; Kandler, Konrad; Groß, Silke; Sauer, Daniel; Althausen, Dietrich; Toledano, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    under different atmospheric conditions. On the eastern side of the Atlantic, dust plumes were quite homogenous and extended up to 6-7 km altitude. In contrast, the dust layers in the Caribbean showed three layers with different dust characteristics and were mainly below 4.5 km altitude. In the upper part of the dust layers in the Caribbean, the aerosol properties were similar to the observations near Africa. In contrast, much more variability in the dust microphysical and optical properties was observed between 0.7 and 2.5 km altitude. The aerosol optical thickness of the dust outbreaks studied in the Barabados area ranged from 0.2 to 0.6 at 500 nm. Highlights during SALTRACE included the Lagrangian sampling of a dust plume in the Cape Verde area on 17 June which was again measured with the same instrumentation on 21 and 22 June 2013 near Barbados. The event was also captured by the ground-based lidar and in-situ instrumentation. Another highlight was the formation of tropical storm Chantal in the dusty environment. In our presentation, we give an overview of the SALTRACE study and investigate the impact of dust aging processes between the Cape Verde region and the Caribbean on dust microphysical and optical properties. We show vertical profiles of dust size distributions, CCN and dust optical properties and compare our results with the ground-based in-situ, sun photometer and lidar measurements. In particular, we show the results from the trans-Atlantic Lagrangian dust study and discuss similarities and differences of the dust plumes observed over Cape Verde and in the Caribbean.

  18. Linking population, health, and the environment: an overview of integrated programs and a case study in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sigrid; Anandaraja, Natasha; D'Agnes, Leona

    2011-01-01

    Population, health, and environment programs are cross-sectoral development initiatives that link conservation, health, and family planning interventions. These programs are generally located in biodiversity hotspots, where population pressure is among the factors contributing to environmental degradation. This review describes the general structure of population, health, and environment programs and provides selected examples to highlight various aspects of this approach. We focus in depth on a case study from the Integrating Population and Health into Forestry Management Agendas program in Nepal that simultaneously addressed deforestation from fuel-wood harvesting, indoor air pollution from wood fires, acute respiratory infections related to smoke inhalation, as well as family planning in communities in Nepal's densely populated forest corridors. Keys to the success of the Nepal project included empowerment of community forest user groups with population, health, and environment program know-how and appropriate technology. Lessons learned in Nepal point to the critical role that nongovernmental organizations can play as catalysts of cross-sectoral responses to complex development issues such as this one. The population, health, and environment approach can be an effective method for achieving sustainable development and meeting both conservation and health objectives.

  19. Transitioning Results From Recent ONR WESTPAC Field Programs to Operational Use (IWISE Analysis Expansion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Programs to Operational Use (IWISE Analysis Expansion ) Steven R. Ramp Soliton Ocean Services, Inc. 691 Country Club Drive Monterey, CA 93924 phone...characteristics in the deep basin and on the Chinese continental slope and shelf. APPROACH The approach is to particpate in a major ONR-sponsored...SUBTITLE Transitioning Results From Recent ONR WESTPAC Field Programs to Operational Use (IWISE Analysis Expansion ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  20. FEM Analysis of Physical Field in Level Rolling Process of Inversion Casting by ANSYS Program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The strain physical field in level rolling process of inversion casting was analyzed by ANSYS program. Plastics train, stress and displacement were gained. The results show that only surfaces train takes place; the maximum stress exists in the geometrical deformation zone ; In the deformation transition zone and the part leaving the rollers, different stress exists. The rolling force estimated with ANSYS program corresponds to those measured.

  1. An Overview of the Los Alamos Inertial Confinement Fusion and High-Energy-Density Physics Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Physics Division

    2016-07-15

    The Los Alamos Inertial Confinement Fusion and Science Programs engage in a vigorous array of experiments, theory, and modeling. We use the three major High Energy Density facilities, NIF, Omega, and Z to perform experiments. These include opacity, radiation transport, hydrodynamics, ignition science, and burn experiments to aid the ICF and Science campaigns in reaching their stewardship goals. The ICF program operates two nuclear diagnostics at NIF, the neutron imaging system and the gamma reaction history instruments. Both systems are being expanded with significant capability enhancements.

  2. Design and implementation of a genomics field trip program aimed at secondary school students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McQueen

    Full Text Available With the rapid pace of advancements in biological research brought about by the application of computer science and information technology, we believe the time is right for introducing genomics and bioinformatics tools and concepts to secondary school students. Our approach has been to offer a full-day field trip in our research facility where secondary school students carry out experiments at the laboratory bench and on a laptop computer. This experience offers benefits for students, teachers, and field trip instructors. In delivering a wide variety of science outreach and education programs, we have learned that a number of factors contribute to designing a successful experience for secondary school students. First, it is important to engage students with authentic and fun activities that are linked to real-world applications and/or research questions. Second, connecting with a local high school teacher to pilot programs and linking to curricula taught in secondary schools will enrich the field trip experience. Whether or not programs are linked directly to local teachers, it is important to be flexible and build in mechanisms for collecting feedback in field trip programs. Finally, graduate students can be very powerful mentors for students and should be encouraged to share their enthusiasm for science and to talk about career paths. Our experiences suggest a real need for effective science outreach programs at the secondary school level and that genomics and bioinformatics are ideal areas to explore.

  3. Design and implementation of a genomics field trip program aimed at secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Jennifer; Wright, Jody J; Fox, Joanne A

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid pace of advancements in biological research brought about by the application of computer science and information technology, we believe the time is right for introducing genomics and bioinformatics tools and concepts to secondary school students. Our approach has been to offer a full-day field trip in our research facility where secondary school students carry out experiments at the laboratory bench and on a laptop computer. This experience offers benefits for students, teachers, and field trip instructors. In delivering a wide variety of science outreach and education programs, we have learned that a number of factors contribute to designing a successful experience for secondary school students. First, it is important to engage students with authentic and fun activities that are linked to real-world applications and/or research questions. Second, connecting with a local high school teacher to pilot programs and linking to curricula taught in secondary schools will enrich the field trip experience. Whether or not programs are linked directly to local teachers, it is important to be flexible and build in mechanisms for collecting feedback in field trip programs. Finally, graduate students can be very powerful mentors for students and should be encouraged to share their enthusiasm for science and to talk about career paths. Our experiences suggest a real need for effective science outreach programs at the secondary school level and that genomics and bioinformatics are ideal areas to explore.

  4. Influence of clouds on the spectral actinic flux density in the lower troposphere (INSPECTRO: overview of the field campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thiel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation is the key factor driving tropospheric photochemistry. It is strongly modulated by clouds and aerosols. A quantitative understanding of the radiation field and its effect on photochemistry is thus only possible with a detailed knowledge of the interaction between clouds and radiation. The overall objective of the project INSPECTRO was the characterization of the three-dimensional actinic radiation field under cloudy conditions. This was achieved during two measurement campaigns in Norfolk (East Anglia, UK and Lower Bavaria (Germany combining space-based, aircraft and ground-based measurements as well as simulations with the one-dimensional radiation transfer model UVSPEC and the three-dimensional radiation transfer model MYSTIC.

    During both campaigns the spectral actinic flux density was measured at several locations at ground level and in the air by up to four different aircraft. This allows the comparison of measured and simulated actinic radiation profiles. In addition satellite data were used to complete the information of the three dimensional input data set for the simulation. A three-dimensional simulation of actinic flux density data under cloudy sky conditions requires a realistic simulation of the cloud field to be used as an input for the 3-D radiation transfer model calculations. Two different approaches were applied, to derive high- and low-resolution data sets, with a grid resolution of about 100 m and 1 km, respectively.

    The results of the measured and simulated radiation profiles as well as the results of the ground based measurements are presented in terms of photolysis rate profiles for ozone and nitrogen dioxide. During both campaigns all spectroradiometer systems agreed within ±10% if mandatory corrections e.g. stray light correction were applied. Stability changes of the systems were below 5% over the 4 week campaign periods and negligible over a few days. The J(O1D data of

  5. Influence of clouds on the spectral actinic flux density in the lower troposphere (INSPECTRO: overview of the field campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Topaloglou

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation is the key factor driving tropospheric photochemistry. It is strongly modulated by clouds and aerosols. A quantitative understanding of the radiation field and its effect on photochemistry is thus only possible with a detailed knowledge of the interaction between clouds and radiation. The overall objective of the project INSPECTRO was the characterization of the three-dimensional actinic radiation field under cloudy conditions. This was achieved during two measurement campaigns in Norfolk (East Anglia, UK and Lower Bavaria (Germany combining space-based, aircraft and ground-based measurements as well as simulations with the one-dimensional radiation transfer model UVSPEC and the three-dimensional radiation transfer model MYSTIC.

    During both campaigns the spectral actinic flux density was measured at several locations at ground level and in the air by up to four different aircraft. This allows the comparison of measured and simulated actinic radiation profiles. In addition satellite data were used to complete the information of the three dimensional input data set for the simulation. A three-dimensional simulation of actinic flux density data under cloudy sky conditions requires a realistic simulation of the cloud field to be used as an input for the 3-D radiation transfer model calculations. Two different approaches were applied, to derive high- and low-resolution data sets, with a grid resolution of about 100 m and 1 km, respectively.

    The results of the measured and simulated radiation profiles as well as the results of the ground based measurements are presented in terms of photolysis rate profiles for ozone and nitrogen dioxide. During both campaigns all spectroradiometer systems agreed within ±10% if mandatory corrections e.g. stray light correction were applied. Stability changes of the systems were below 5% over the 4 week campaign periods and negligible over a few days. The J(O1D data of

  6. THE INSTITUTION OF LEGISLATIVE DELEGATION IN THE FIELDS OF ECONOMICS AND FINANCE. AN OVERVIEW OF THE TIMEFRAME 2010-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel BOSTAN

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the Romanian Constitution (Art. 115, paragraph 1, the Government, as a body of the Executive Power, is endowed with attributions belonging to the Legislative function, specific to the Parliament. Thus, we are dealing with what the juridical science calls “legislative delegation”. On this basis, the Government may issue simple ordinances, under a special enabling law and emergency ordinances - in case of special circumstances, which both represent primary normative acts with the power of a law. In this paper we approach the issue of the legislative delegation during the recent five years (2010-2014, focusing on a few aspects relating to the fields of finance and economics.

  7. A COMPARATIVE OVERVIEW OF THE (SOMETIMES UNEASY RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIGITAL INFORMATION AND CERTAIN LEGAL FIELDS IN SOUTH AFRICA AND UGANDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana van der Merwe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present article focuses on the (sometimes problematic relationship between digital information and certain legal fields. Most legal rules developed long before the arrival of the computer and the digital telephone, and these rules are now under considerable strain to adapt. Digital information is rapidly becoming one of the 21st Century’s most valuable assets. This raises the question as to whether or not the law is able to adequately protect this phenomenon against the many attacks being launched against it. The present article analyses certain legal fields in this regard, namely privacy, criminal law, and the law of evidence. The world seems suddenly to have woken up to the fact that digital technology might be a mixed blessing, especially as is shown by certain recent incidents relating to privacy in the USA. In order to obtain an “Africa perspective” the legal situation in South Africa is compared to that in Uganda (East Africa against a background of multilateral treaties that might apply in this regard. An important point to keep in mind while weighing up legal interests is whether the State may attempt to be both neutral umpire (by means of its judicial power as well as one of the players who want to win (as the executive power, when government information is at stake. A number of recent incidents in which the United States government has been involved seem to indicate that this attempt to sit on two stools at the same time is likely to diminish respect for the government (and its regulatory efforts amongst the general population. A specific problem with enforcement consists of the international nature of infringements. The Internet knows no borders and this factor suggests that effective international co-operation is an essential prerequisite for the law to function adequately in an international context. The concluding of International treaties between groupings of countries is put forward as perhaps the most effective

  8. The Turkish Geography Teaching Program (2005) and Technology Use in Geography Courses: An Overview of High School Teachers' Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incekara, Suleyman

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the importance and use of technology in geography courses, what the 2005 geography teaching program changed in terms of technology and some of the factors preventing the effective use of technology from teachers' perspectives. The research outcomes suggested that, despite the fact that there is a common consensus among…

  9. The neurosciences research program at MIT and the beginning of the modern field of neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, George

    2010-01-15

    The interdisciplinary field, "neuroscience," began at MIT in 1962 with the founding of the Neurosciences Research Program (NRP) by Francis O. Schmitt and a group of US and international scientists - physical, biological, medical, and behavioral - interested in understanding the brain basis of behavior and mind. They organized and held specialist meetings of basic topics in neuroscience, and the journal and book publications over the next 20 years, based on these meetings, helped establish the new field.

  10. An overview of microbial food safety programs in beef, pork, and poultry from farm to processing in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajić, Andrijana; Waddell, Lisa A; Sargeant, Jan M; Read, Susan; Farber, Jeff; Firth, Martin J; Chambers, Albert

    2007-05-01

    Canada's vision for the agri-food industry in the 21st century is the establishment of a national food safety system employing hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) principles and microbiological verification tools, with traceability throughout the gate-to-plate continuum. Voluntary on-farm food safety (OFFS) programs, based in part on HACCP principles, provide producers with guidelines for good production practices focused on general hygiene and biosecurity. OFFS programs in beef cattle, swine, and poultry are currently being evaluated through a national recognition program of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Mandatory HACCP programs in federal meat facilities include microbial testing for generic Escherichia coli to verify effectiveness of the processor's dressing procedure, specific testing of ground meat for E. coli O157:H7, with zero tolerance for this organism in the tested lot, and Salmonella testing of raw products. Health Canada's policy on Listeria monocytogenes divides ready-to-eat products into three risk categories, with products previously implicated as the source of an outbreak receiving the highest priority for inspection and compliance. A national mandatory identification program to track livestock from the herd of origin to carcass inspection has been established. Can-Trace, a data standard for all food commodities, has been designed to facilitate tracking foods from the point of origin to the consumer. Although much work has already been done, a coherent national food safety strategy and concerted efforts by all stakeholders are needed to realize this vision. Cooperation of many government agencies with shared responsibility for food safety and public health will be essential.

  11. Electric and magnetic fields research and public information dissemination program. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) Research and Public Information Dissemination (RAPID) Program was authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (enacted October 24, 1992) to determine whether or not exposure to EMF produced by the generation, transmission, and use of electric energy affects human health. Two Federal agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), have primary responsibility for the program, but other Federal agencies are key participants as well. This program requires that Federal appropriations be matched by contributions from non-Federal sources. The authorized level of funding for the program was $65 million over a 5-year period (fiscal years 1993-1997 inclusive). For EMF RAPID to be a fully funded program, $32.5 million over 5 years will have to be appropriated by Congress and matched by non-Federal contributions.

  12. Physics Survey Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-30

    An overview of a series of assignments of the branches of physics carried out by the Board on Physics and Astronomy of the National Research Council. It identifies further theories in physics and makes recommendations on preventive priorities. The Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA) has conducted a new decadal survey of physics entitled ''Physics in a New Era''. The survey includes assessments of the main branches of physics as well as certain selected emerging areas. The various elements of the survey were prepared by separately-appointed National Research Council (NRC) committees. The BPA formed the Physics Survey Overview Committee (PSOVC) to complete the survey by preparing an overview of the field of physics to summarize and synthesize the results of the various assessments and to address cross-cutting issues that concern physics as a whole.

  13. Performance analysis in Japanese field test program; Field test data kara no chiiki hatsuden kaiseki hoho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, H.; Kurokawa, K.; Uchida, D. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Otani, K.; Sakuta, K.; Tsuda, I. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan); Oshiro, T.; Sakamoto, K. [Japan Quality Assurance Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Power generation characteristics are investigated using data collected in photovoltaic power generation field tests being undertaken by NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization). The photovoltaic power generation system performance is evaluated by examining loss factors leading to degradation in system performance, with weather conditions such as variation in insolation and air temperature, inverter performance, and shadows cast by surrounding buildings taken into consideration. As the result, it is found that the important loss factors are degradation in module performance due to elevated temperature, drift in the maximum output control, degraded inverter performance due to input power variation, effect of shadows, etc. It is learned that system is greatly affected by degradation in module performance due to increased temperature in summer and by shadows in winter, the two being responsible for the output coefficient dropping to approximately 75% throughout the year. The output coefficient frequency distribution charts for the 75 test sites confirm that the rate is as low as 70-80% at many sites. As for the system operating time, it tends to be longer in West Japan where the annual insolation rate is higher. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  14. An overview of intravenous-related medication administration errors as reported to MEDMARX, a national medication error-reporting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Rodney W; Becker, Shawn C

    2006-01-01

    Medication errors can be harmful, especially if they involve the intravenous (IV) route of administration. A mixed-methodology study using a 5-year review of 73,769 IV-related medication errors from a national medication error reporting program indicates that between 3% and 5% of these errors were harmful. The leading type of error was omission, and the leading cause of error involved clinician performance deficit. Using content analysis, three themes-product shortage, calculation errors, and tubing interconnectivity-emerge and appear to predispose patients to harm. Nurses often participate in IV therapy, and these findings have implications for practice and patient safety. Voluntary medication error-reporting programs afford an opportunity to improve patient care and to further understanding about the nature of IV-related medication errors.

  15. The first 7 years of the metropolitan fire brigade emergency responder program – an overview of incidents attended

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Malcolm J; Williams, Brett; Bibby, Colin; Morton, Allan; Huggins, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The Melbourne Metropolitan Fire and Emergency Services Board (MFESB) was the first fire service in Australia to implement a service-wide emergency medical response (EMR) program in 2001. No additional scientific analysis of the first responder program has been reported since the pilot program. The objective of this study was to report the first 7 years of responses by firefighters as first responders. Patients and methods The MFESB have three separate datasets with cardiac arrest information: (i) callout record; (ii) patient care record; and (iii) cardiac arrest record, including data from the automatic external defibrillator. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the demographic and specific outcome data. Ethics approval was granted. Results A total of 8227 incidents were attended over the first 7 years. The most incidents attended were cardiac arrest 54% (n = 4450) followed by other medical 19% (n = 1579), and drug overdose 11% (n = 908); the remainder were <10% each. Sixty-three percent of incidents involved males. Average age was 57.2 years, median age 63 years, range from <1 month to 101 years; average response time was 6.1 minutes, median response time 5.6 minutes, range from 9 seconds to 31.5 minutes. Firefighters provided “initial care” in 57% and assisted in 26% of the incidents. Firefighters spent on average 4.8 minutes with the patient before handing over to paramedics; median 3.9 minutes, range of a few seconds to 39.2 minutes. Conclusion This study suggests that the MFESB EMR program is providing firefighter first responders to emergency situations in a short timeframe to assist the ambulance service. PMID:27147841

  16. Overview of the U.S. DOE Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards Program. Part 4: Hydrogen Sensors; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William J.; Rivkin, Carl; Burgess, Robert; Brosha, Eric; Mukundan, Rangachary; James, C. Will; Keller, Jay

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen sensors are recognized as a critical element in the safety design for any hydrogen system. In this role, sensors can perform several important functions including indication of unintended hydrogen releases, activation of mitigation strategies to preclude the development of dangerous situations, activation of alarm systems and communication to first responders, and to initiate system shutdown. The functionality of hydrogen sensors in this capacity is decoupled from the system being monitored, thereby providing an independent safety component that is not affected by the system itself. The importance of hydrogen sensors has been recognized by DOE and by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's Safety and Codes Standards (SCS) program in particular, which has for several years supported hydrogen safety sensor research and development. The SCS hydrogen sensor programs are currently led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The current SCS sensor program encompasses the full range of issues related to safety sensors, including development of advance sensor platforms with exemplary performance, development of sensor-related code and standards, outreach to stakeholders on the role sensors play in facilitating deployment, technology evaluation, and support on the proper selection and use of sensors.

  17. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site in 2010 were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow than in the other years studied. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  18. Measuring and modelling the airborne particulate matter mass concentration field in the street environment: model overview and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, A; Colls, J J

    1999-09-01

    This paper discusses the outline structure and preliminary evaluation of an emission-dispersion model for predicting the temporal and spatial distribution of vehicle-derived airborne particulate matter mass concentration in street canyons. The model is called Street Level Air Quality (SLAQ). SLAQ is semi-empirical, in that it uses not only results from field and wind tunnel experiments but also theory and models derived from multiple runs of numerical routines in order to simulate the basic physical processes within the street canyon. A combination of a plume model, for the direct contribution of vehicle exhaust, and a box model for the recirculating part of the pollutants in the street, is used to predict concentration for receptors within the canyon. Emission rates of vehicle-derived particulate matter are calculated within SLAQ, which serve as input to the dispersion module. Exhaust emission rates are scaled element by element along the street for each of the lanes according to the direction of traffic flow to account for modal operation of vehicles near signalised intersections. This refinement allows SLAQ to account for non-uniformity in along-canyon emission rates and to model a street that has several intersections along its length. Thermal turbulence due to environmental surface sensible heat and vehicle-generated heat is accounted for in the model. Other features of SLAQ include correction for the urban heat island effect, dry deposition, wet deposition, particle settling and estimation of wind direction standard deviation, when this latter data is not available. SLAQ has been evaluated in a street in Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom and correlation coefficient of 0.8 between the modelled and measured concentrations has been obtained.

  19. Measuring and modelling the airborne particulate matter mass concentration field in the street environment. Model overview and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micallef, A.; Colls, J.J. [Division of Environmental Science, School of Biological Sciences, Sutton Bonington Campus, University of Nottingham, Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-01

    This paper discusses the outline structure and preliminary evaluation of an emission-dispersion model for predicting the temporal and spatial distribution of vehicle-derived airborne particulate matter mass concentration in street canyons. The model is called Street Level Air Quality (SLAQ). SLAQ is semi-empirical, in that it uses not only results from field and wind tunnel experiments but also theory and models derived from multiple runs of numerical routines in order to simulate the basic physical processes within the street canyon. A combination of a plume model, for the direct contribution of vehicle exhaust, and a box model for the recirculating part of the pollutants in the street, is used to predict concentration for receptors within the canyon. Emission rates of vehicle-derived particulate matter are calculated within SLAQ, which serve as input to the dispersion module. Exhaust emission rates are scaled element by element along the street for each of the lanes according to the direction of traffic flow to account for modal operation of vehicles near signalised intersections. This refinement allows SLAQ to account for non-uniformity in along-canyon emission rates and to model a street that has several intersections along its length. Thermal turbulence due to environmental surface sensible heat and vehicle-generated heat is accounted for in the model. Other features of SLAQ include correction for the urban heat island effect, dry deposition, wet deposition, particle settling and estimation of wind direction standard deviation, when this latter data is not available. SLAQ has been evaluated in a street in Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom and a correlation coefficient of 0.8 between the modelled and measured concentrations has been obtained.

  20. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  1. Field spectrometer (S191H) preprocessor tape quality test program design document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Program QA191H performs quality assurance tests on field spectrometer data recorded on 9-track magnetic tape. The quality testing involves the comparison of key housekeeping and data parameters with historic and predetermined tolerance limits. Samples of key parameters are processed during the calibration period and wavelength cal period, and the results are printed out and recorded on an historical file tape.

  2. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume I. A Field Study Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  3. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume II. A Field Study Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  4. Water Treatment Plant Operation Volume 2. A Field Study Training Program. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  5. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants. Volume 1. A Field Study Training Program. Third Edition. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The purpose of this wastewater treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified wastewater treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  6. Into the Field: Learning about English Language Learners in Newcomer Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cecila; Kucer, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the impact of field experiences with English language learners on the conceptual and emotional development of preservice disciplinary students. For one semester, preservice university students worked with English language learners enrolled in middle and high school Newcomer Programs. During this time the university students…

  7. A Decade of Field Changing Atmospheric Aerosol Research: Outcomes of EPA’s STAR Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conference: Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry, July 28 – August 2, 2013, VermontPresentation Type: PosterTitle: An Analysis of EPA’s STAR Program and a Decade of Field Changing Research in Atmospheric AerosolsAuthors: Kristina M. Wagstrom1,2, Sherri ...

  8. Effects of night time road traffic noise—an overview of laboratory and field studies on noise dose and subjective noise sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhrström, E.; Rylander, R.; Björkman, M.

    1988-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of research on sleep and noise at the Department of Environmental Hygiene, University of Gothenburg. Different methods were developed to study primary and after effects of night time road traffic noise on sleep. Three one-week laboratory experiments were undertaken to study the relevance of different noise descriptors— Leq, maximum peak noise level and number of events with high peak noise levels—for sleep disturbance effects. The noise exposure was either single noise evenys or a continuous, even road traffic noise. It was concluded that Leq was not related to sleep disturbance effects. Peak noise levels were significantly related to subjective sleep quality and body movements. Results from a third continuing study showed that there is a threshold for effects of the number of single noise events on sleep quality. Habituation to noise among subjects with differing noise sensitivity was studied in a two-week experiment. A significant noise effect on subjective sleep quality was found among sensitive subjects only. No habituation was seen for the negative influence of noise on sleep quality, mood and performance. Long-term effects of road traffic noise were also investigated in a field survey among 106 individuals. This study revealed the presence of a decrease in sleep quality as well as psycho-social effects on tiredness and mood, together with increased reports of headaches and nervous stomach. As in the laboratory study, sensitive individuals were more affected by noise than less sensitive individuals.

  9. Lessons in collaboration and effective field research from the Appalachian Headwaters Research Experience for Undergraduates Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. L.; Fox, J.; Wilder, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    In the summer of 2009, the authors launched year one of a three-year National Science Foundation-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates entitled "Carbon Storage and Headwater Health in the Appalachian Headwaters." Eight undergraduates selected from a nationally competitive field of more than 60 applicants participated in the ten-week field- and laboratory-based program along with three middle- and high-school teachers. Each student developed and completed an independent research project related to coal mining’s impact on soil organic carbon and sediment transport processes. Specifically, they used isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signature of soils and sediments in the Appalachian headwater landscapes and first order streams of Kentucky's southeastern coalfields. Among the program's innovative features was its fundamentally collaborative nature--which was represented in several ways. First, the background of the three program leaders was very different: an environmental planner with an academic background in land use planning and administration (Jones); a civil engineer trained in biogeochemistry and watershed modeling (Fox); and an environmental educator experienced in both formal and nonformal educator training and certification (Wilder). The program was also a collaboration between a Carnegie 1 research-oriented institution and an undergraduate/ teaching -focused regional comprehensive university. Finally, the participants themselves represented a diversity of disciplines and institutional backgrounds--including biology, geology, chemistry, environmental science and civil engineering. The Research Experience for Teachers component was another innovative program element. The teachers participated in all field and laboratory research activities during the first six weeks, then developed a unit of study for their own classrooms to be implemented during the current school year. In addition to the six

  10. The Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program: building and transforming the public health workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmbuji, Peter; Mukanga, David; Mghamba, Janeth; Ahly, Mohamed; Mosha, Fausta; Azima, Simba; Senga, Sembuche; Moshiro, Candida; Semali, Innocent; Rolle, Italia; Wiktor, Stefan; McQueen, Suzzane; McElroy, Peter; Nsubuga, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (TFELTP) was established in 2008 as a partnership among the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW), Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, National Institute for Medical Research, and local and international partners. TFELTP was established to strengthen the capacity of MOHSW to conduct public health surveillance and response, manage national disease control and prevention programs, and to enhance public health laboratory support for surveillance, diagnosis, treatment and disease monitoring. TFELTP is a 2-year full-time training program with approximately 25% time spent in class, and 75% in the field. TFELTP offers two tracks leading to an MSc degree in either Applied Epidemiology or, Epidemiology and Laboratory Management. Since 2008, the program has enrolled a total of 33 trainees (23 males, 10 females). Of these, 11 were enrolled in 2008 and 100% graduated in 2010. All 11 graduates of cohort 1 are currently employed in public health positions within the country. Demand for the program as measured by the number of applicants has grown from 28 in 2008 to 56 in 2011. While training the public health leaders of the country, TFELTP has also provided essential service to the country in responding to high-profile disease outbreaks, and evaluating and improving its public health surveillance systems and diseases control programs. TFELTP was involved in the country assessment of the revised International Health Regulations (IHR) core capabilities, development of the Tanzania IHR plan, and incorporation of IHR into the revised Tanzania Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) guidelines. TFELTP is training a competent core group of public health leaders for Tanzania, as well as providing much needed service to the MOHSW in the areas of routine surveillance, outbreak detection and response, and disease program management. However, the immediate challenges that the program must

  11. An Overview of the NASA Energy and Water cycle Study (NEWS) and the North American Water Program (NAWP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    NEWS: 10 years ago, NASA established the NASA Energy and Water-cycle Study (NEWS), whose long-term grand challenge is to document and enable improved, observationally based, predictions of water and energy cycle consequences of Earth system variability and change. The NEWS program builds upon existing NASA-supported basic research in atmospheric physics and dynamics, radiation, climate modeling, and terrestrial hydrology. While these NASA programs fund research activities that address individual aspects of the global energy and water cycles, they are not specifically designed to generate a coordinated result. NEWS developed the first coordinated attempt to describe the complete global energy and water cycle using existing and forthcoming satellite and ground based observations, and laying the foundation for essential NEWS developments in model representations of atmospheric energy and water exchange processes. This comprehensive energy and water data analysis program exploited crucial datasets, some requiring complete re-processing, and new satellite measurements. NAWP: Dramatically changing climates has had an indelible impact on North America's water crisis. To decisively address these challenges, we recommend that NAWP coalesce an interdisciplinary, international and interagency effort to make significant contributions to continental- to decision-scale hydroclimate science and solutions. By entraining, integrating and coordinating the vast array of interdisciplinary observational and prediction resources available, NAWP will significantly advance skill in predicting, assessing and managing variability and changes in North American water resources. We adopt three challenges to organize NAWP efforts. The first deals with developing a scientific basis and tools for mitigating and adapting to changes in the water supply-demand balance. The second challenge is benchmarking; to use incomplete and uncertain observations to assess water storage and quality dynamics, and

  12. Job-Oriented Basic Skills (JOBS) Curricula: An Overview of Four Research Studies to Improve Program Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    sls learning by lower aptitude students. UNCLASSIFIED U cUYY wAIPcAT op ThNs PAom of 3mom*g FOREWORD This research was conducted under contract with...identify instructional methods, techniques, strategies, or content areas that could be used to improve JOBS program effectiveness. The contracting ...differential Is accounted for In part by the fact that 3OBS students have mucL lower aptitude scores and lower post-"A"-school-attrition rates than

  13. The first 7 years of the metropolitan fire brigade emergency responder program – an overview of incidents attended

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm J Boyle

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Malcolm J Boyle1, Brett Williams1, Colin Bibby2, Allan Morton2, Chris Huggins11Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2Emergency Medical Services, Metropolitan Fire and Emergency Services Board, Richmond, Victoria, AustraliaPurpose: The Melbourne Metropolitan Fire and Emergency Services Board (MFESB was the first fire service in Australia to implement a service-wide emergency medical response (EMR program in 2001. No additional scientific analysis of the first responder program has been reported since the pilot program. The objective of this study was to report the first 7 years of responses by firefighters as first responders.Patients and methods: The MFESB have three separate datasets with cardiac arrest information: (i callout record; (ii patient care record; and (iii cardiac arrest record, including data from the automatic external defibrillator. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the demographic and specific outcome data. Ethics approval was granted.Results: A total of 8227 incidents were attended over the first 7 years. The most incidents attended were cardiac arrest 54% (n = 4450 followed by other medical 19% (n = 1579, and drug overdose 11% (n = 908; the remainder were <10% each. Sixty-three percent of incidents involved males. Average age was 57.2 years, median age 63 years, range from <1 month to 101 years; average response time was 6.1 minutes, median response time 5.6 minutes, range from 9 seconds to 31.5 minutes. Firefighters provided “initial care” in 57% and assisted in 26% of the incidents. Firefighters spent on average 4.8 minutes with the patient before handing over to paramedics; median 3.9 minutes, range of a few seconds to 39.2 minutes.Conclusion: This study suggests that the MFESB EMR program is providing firefighter first responders to emergency situations in a short timeframe to assist the ambulance service.Keywords: emergency

  14. A meteorological and chemical overview of the DACCIWA field campaign in West Africa in June–July 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Knippertz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In June and July 2016 the Dynamics–Aerosol–Chemistry–Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA project organised a major international field campaign in southern West Africa (SWA including measurements from three inland ground supersites, urban sites in Cotonou and Abidjan, radiosondes, and three research aircraft. A significant range of different weather situations were encountered during this period, including the monsoon onset. The purpose of this paper is to characterise the large-scale setting for the campaign as well as synoptic and mesoscale weather systems affecting the study region in the light of existing conceptual ideas, mainly using objective and subjective identification algorithms based on (re-analysis and satellite products. In addition, it is shown how the described synoptic variations influence the atmospheric composition over SWA through advection of mineral dust, biomass burning and urban pollution plumes.The boreal summer of 2016 was characterised by Pacific La Niña, Atlantic El Niño and warm eastern Mediterranean conditions, whose competing influences on precipitation led to an overall average rainy season. During the relatively dusty pre-onset Phase 1 (1–21 June 2016, three westward-propagating coherent cyclonic vortices between 4 and 13° N modulated winds and rainfall in the Guinea coastal area. The monsoon onset occurred in connection with a marked extratropical trough and cold surge over northern Africa, leading to a breakdown of the Saharan heat low and African easterly jet and a suppression of rainfall. During this period, quasi-stationary low-level vortices associated with the trough transformed into more tropical, propagating disturbances resembling an African easterly wave (AEW. To the east of this system, moist southerlies penetrated deep into the continent. The post-onset Phase 2 (22 June–20 July 2016 was characterised by a significant increase in low-level cloudiness, unusually dry conditions

  15. A meteorological and chemical overview of the DACCIWA field campaign in West Africa in June-July 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippertz, Peter; Fink, Andreas H.; Deroubaix, Adrien; Morris, Eleanor; Tocquer, Flore; Evans, Mat J.; Flamant, Cyrille; Gaetani, Marco; Lavaysse, Christophe; Mari, Celine; Marsham, John H.; Meynadier, Rémi; Affo-Dogo, Abalo; Bahaga, Titike; Brosse, Fabien; Deetz, Konrad; Guebsi, Ridha; Latifou, Issaou; Maranan, Marlon; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Schlueter, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    In June and July 2016 the Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) project organised a major international field campaign in southern West Africa (SWA) including measurements from three inland ground supersites, urban sites in Cotonou and Abidjan, radiosondes, and three research aircraft. A significant range of different weather situations were encountered during this period, including the monsoon onset. The purpose of this paper is to characterise the large-scale setting for the campaign as well as synoptic and mesoscale weather systems affecting the study region in the light of existing conceptual ideas, mainly using objective and subjective identification algorithms based on (re-)analysis and satellite products. In addition, it is shown how the described synoptic variations influence the atmospheric composition over SWA through advection of mineral dust, biomass burning and urban pollution plumes.The boreal summer of 2016 was characterised by Pacific La Niña, Atlantic El Niño and warm eastern Mediterranean conditions, whose competing influences on precipitation led to an overall average rainy season. During the relatively dusty pre-onset Phase 1 (1-21 June 2016), three westward-propagating coherent cyclonic vortices between 4 and 13° N modulated winds and rainfall in the Guinea coastal area. The monsoon onset occurred in connection with a marked extratropical trough and cold surge over northern Africa, leading to a breakdown of the Saharan heat low and African easterly jet and a suppression of rainfall. During this period, quasi-stationary low-level vortices associated with the trough transformed into more tropical, propagating disturbances resembling an African easterly wave (AEW). To the east of this system, moist southerlies penetrated deep into the continent. The post-onset Phase 2 (22 June-20 July 2016) was characterised by a significant increase in low-level cloudiness, unusually dry conditions and strong northeastward

  16. Using SIR (Scientific Information Retrieval System) for data management during a field program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tichler, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's program, PRocessing of Emissions by Clouds and Precipitation (PRECP), a team of scientists from four laboratories conducted a study in north central New York State, to characterize the chemical and physical processes occurring in winter storms. Sampling took place from three aircraft, two instrumented motor homes and a network of 26 surface precipitation sampling sites. Data management personnel were part of the field program, using a portable IBM PC-AT computer to enter information as it became available during the field study. Having the same database software on the field computer and on the cluster of VAX 11/785 computers in use aided database development and the transfer of data between machines. 2 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Bird use and nest success in Conservation Reserve Program fields in the northeastern Great Plains : Progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on a study of bird use and nest success in Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) fields. This study aims to find that reproductive success in CRP fields is at...

  18. Introductory Overviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakeman, A.J.; Hamilton, S.H.; Athanasiadis, I.N.; Pierce, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Introductory Overview articles are designed to provide introductory level background to key themes and topics that caters to the eclectic readership of EMS. It is envisaged that these articles will help to break down barriers to shared understanding and dialogue within multidisciplinary teams, and m

  19. Mission Operations Directorate - Success Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program (Overview of the Evolution and Success Stories from MOD During the Space Shuttle program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbell, Jim A.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Space Shuttle Program, as well as NASA's other human space flight programs, the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at the Johnson Space Center has become the world leader in human spaceflight operations. From the earliest programs - Mercury, Gemini, Apollo - through Skylab, Shuttle, ISS, and our Exploration initiatives, MOD and its predecessors have pioneered ops concepts and emphasized a history of mission leadership which has added value, maximized mission success, and built on continual improvement of the capabilities to become more efficient and effective. This paper provides specific examples that illustrate how MOD's focus on building and contributing value with diverse teams has been key to their successes both with the US space industry and the broader international community. This paper will discuss specific examples for the Plan, Train, Fly, and Facilities aspects within MOD. This paper also provides a discussion of the joint civil servant/contractor environment and the relative badge-less society within MOD. Several Shuttle mission related examples have also been included that encompass all of the aforementioned MOD elements and attributes, and are used to show significant MOD successes within the Shuttle Program. These examples include the STS-49 Intelsat recovery and repair, the (post-Columbia accident) TPS inspection process and the associated R-Bar Pitch Maneuver for ISS missions, and the STS-400 rescue mission preparation efforts for the Hubble Space Telescope repair mission. Since their beginning, MOD has consistently demonstrated their ability to evolve and respond to an ever changing environment, effectively prepare for the expected and successfully respond to the unexpected, and develop leaders, expertise, and a culture that has led to mission and Program success.

  20. Overview of the energy research and development program of the Federal Republic of Germany with special attention to coal utilization technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holighaus, R.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives, the content and the finding of the Energy Research and Development Program are outlined with special attention to coal utilization technology. The largest part of the program is borne by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology. The distribution of pending program shows clearly the priority for 'Coal and other fossil sources' which in fact means coal, the only large domestic energy source. The development activities are divided into following sections (in the order of financial priority): electricity generation from coal, gas generation from coal, liquefaction of coal, coal production and direct combustion. The different development strategies which are applied in the individual fields of coal utilization are discussed in detail. Several newly developed technologies are now, or in the near future, ready for commercial application. From the developments the Federal Government also expects to increase the attractivity of German industries as partners of joint ventures with countries having large coal deposits.

  1. Overview of the program to assess the reliability of emerging nondestructive techniques open testing and study of flaw type effect on NDE response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Komura, Ichiro; Kim, Kyung-cho; Zetterwall, Tommy; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2016-02-01

    In February 2012, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) executed agreements with VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Japan (NRA, former JNES), Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), and Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) to establish the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT). The goal of PARENT is to investigate the effectiveness of current emerging and perspective novel nondestructive examination procedures and techniques to find flaws in nickel-alloy welds and base materials. This is done by conducting a series of open and blind international round-robin tests on a set of large-bore dissimilar metal welds (LBDMW), small-bore dissimilar metal welds (SBDMW), and bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetration weld test blocks. The purpose of blind testing is to study the reliability of more established techniques and included only qualified teams and procedures. The purpose of open testing is aimed at a more basic capability assessment of emerging and novel technologies. The range of techniques applied in open testing varied with respect to maturity and performance uncertainty and were applied to a variety of simulated flaws. This paper will include a brief overview of the PARENT blind and open testing techniques and test blocks and present some of the blind testing results.

  2. Evolutionary programming-based univector field navigation method for past mobile robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y J; Kim, J H; Kwon, D S

    2001-01-01

    Most of navigation techniques with obstacle avoidance do not consider the robot orientation at the target position. These techniques deal with the robot position only and are independent of its orientation and velocity. To solve these problems this paper proposes a novel univector field method for fast mobile robot navigation which introduces a normalized two dimensional vector field. The method provides fast moving robots with the desired posture at the target position and obstacle avoidance. To obtain the sub-optimal vector field, a function approximator is used and trained by evolutionary programming. Two kinds of vector fields are trained, one for the final posture acquisition and the other for obstacle avoidance. Computer simulations and real experiments are carried out for a fast moving mobile robot to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  3. Modeling transducer impulse responses for predicting calibrated pressure pulses with the ultrasound simulation program Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    FIELD II is a simulation software capable of predicting the field pressure in front of transducers having any complicated geometry. A calibrated prediction with this program is, however, dependent on an exact voltage-to-surface acceleration impulse response of the transducer. Such impulse response...... is not calculated by FIELD II. This work investigates the usability of combining a one-dimensional multilayer transducer modeling principle with the FIELD II software. Multilayer here refers to a transducer composed of several material layers. Measurements of pressure and current from Pz27 piezoceramic disks...... as well as pressure and intensity measurements in front of a 128 element commercial convex medical transducer are compared to the simulations. Results show that the models can predict the pressure from the piezoceramic disks with a root mean square (rms) error of 11.2% to 36.2% with a 2 dB amplitude...

  4. Using convex quadratic programming to model random media with Gaussian random fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla, John A.; Jones, W. Max

    2007-04-01

    Excursion sets of Gaussian random fields (GRFs) have been frequently used in the literature to model two-phase random media with measurable phase autocorrelation functions. The goal of successful modeling is finding the optimal field autocorrelation function that best approximates the prescribed phase autocorrelation function. In this paper, we present a technique which uses convex quadratic programming to find the best admissible field autocorrelation function under a prescribed discretization. Unlike previous methods, this technique efficiently optimizes over all admissible field autocorrelation functions, instead of optimizing only over a predetermined parametrized family. The results from using this technique indicate that the GRF model is significantly more versatile than observed in previous studies. An application to modeling a base-catalyzed tetraethoxysilane aerogel system given small-angle neutron scattering data is also presented

  5. US Army TARDEC: Robotics Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    unclassified US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics 25 March 2010 Reference herein to any specific commercial...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Bernard... Robotics Industry Partnerships Academia PartnershipsGovernment Partnerships TRADOC Community Outreach • S&T Support to the RS-JPO • Develops and Fosters

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE`s overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program.

  7. The Bi-2212 conductor and magnet program at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Larbalestier, D; Jiang, J; Kametani, F; LoSchiavo, M; Myers, D; Schwartz, J; Shen, T; Trociewitz, U

    2009-01-01

    The NHMFL has had a long running program to develop Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi2212) for high field magnets. The recent development of round wire Bi2212 (RW2212) has strengthened the effort to develop solenoid magnets with fields substantially greater than can be achieved with Nb3Sn. The present paper briefly summarizes some of the results obtained at the NHMFL in the past 12 months. It summarizes the talk given by David Larbalestier at WAMSDO on May 24, 2008. Much of the work is ongoing and will be reported in the normal peer reviewed literature in late 2008.

  8. Nitryl chloride as a 'new' radical source and its role in production of ozone in polluted troposphere: an overview of the results from four field campaigns in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Tham, Yee Jun; Xue, Likun; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Weihao; Wang, Hao; Yun, Hui; Lu, Keding; Shao, Min; Louie, Peter K. K.; Blake, Donald R.; Brown, Steven S.; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-04-01

    Nitryl chloride (ClNO2) - a trace gas produced from heterogeneous reactions of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) on aerosols containing chorine - can significantly affect radical budget and concentrations of ozone and other secondary pollutants. However, the abundance, formation kinetics, and impact of ClNO2are not fully understood under different environmental conditions. This presentation gives an overview of recent field campaigns of ClNO2 and related chemical constituents in China, including one at a mountain top (957 m a.s.l) in Hong Kong of South China in winter 2013 and three in North China (urban Ji'nan, semi-rural Wangdu, and Mt Tai (1534 m a.s.l)) in summer 2014. ClNO2 and N2O5 were measured with a chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) system with iodide as the primary ions. Ambient concentrations of several hundreds ppts and up to 4.7 ppbv of ClNO2were observed in these locations, suggesting existence of elevated ClNO2 in both coastal and inland atmospheres of China. Measurements in North China exhibited generally low concentrations of N2O5, indicative of its fast uptake of on aerosols under aerosol and humid conditions. Indications of anthropogenic sources of chloride were observed at all these sites. The impact of photolysis of ClNO2 on radical budget and ozone enhancement was assessed with a MCM model which was updated with detailed chlorine chemistry and constrained by measurement data for the southern and a northern site. The results show that the ClNO2 could increase ozone production by 2-16% in the following day. Overall, our study re-affirms the need to include ClNO2 related reactions in photochemical models for prediction of ground-level ozone in polluted environments.

  9. Site Study Plan for Aesthetics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    The Aesthetic Site Study Plan describes a field program consisting of identification of the visually affected area; determination of scenic quality, visual sensitivity, and visual management classes of the site and vicinity; and analysis of the level of visual contrast that would be created by the project. Field ratings of scenic quality, visual sensitivity, and visual contrast will be supplemented by a public perception survey designed to incorporate the views of the public. This plan describes the need for the study, the study design, data management and use, schedule for proposed activities, and quality assurance program. This study will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, SRPO Requirement Document (SRP-RD). 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Piranti Lunak Pengujian Struktur Matematika Grup, Ring, Field Berbasis Osp (Open Source Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngarap Im Manik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This design of a computer software is a development and continuation of the software made on the previous research (2009/2010. However, this further research developed and expanded the scopes of testing more on the Siclic Group, Isomorphism Group, Semi Group, Sub Group and Abelian Group, Factor Ring, Sub Ring and Polynomial Ring; developed on the OSP (Open Source Program-based. The software was developed using the OSP-based language programming, such Java, so it is open and free to use for its users. This research succeeded to develop an open source software of Java program that can be used for testing specific mathematical Groups, such Ciclic Group, Isomorphism Group, Semi Group, Sub Group and Abelian Group, and Rings, Commutative Ring, Division Ring, Ideal Sub Ring, Ring Homomorphism, Ring Epimorphism and Fields. By the results, the software developed was able to test as same as the results from manual testing.

  11. Field Test of Advanced Duct-Sealing Technologies Within the Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, MP

    2001-12-05

    A field test of an aerosol-spray duct-sealing technology and a conventional, best-practice approach was performed in 80 homes to determine the efficacy and programmatic needs of the duct-sealing technologies as applied in the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program. The field test was performed in five states: Iowa, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. The study found that, compared with the best-practice approach, the aerosol-spray technology is 50% more effective at sealing duct leaks and can potentially reduce labor time and costs for duct sealing by 70%, or almost 4 crew-hours. Further study to encourage and promote use of the aerosol-spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program is recommended. A pilot test of full production weatherization programs using the aerosol-spray technology is recommended to develop approaches for integrating this technology with other energy conservation measures and minimizing impacts on weatherization agency logistics. In order to allow or improve adoption of the aerosol spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program, issues must be addressed concerning equipment costs, use of the technology under franchise arrangements with Aeroseal, Inc. (the holders of an exclusive license to use this technology), software used to control the equipment, safety, and training. Application testing of the aerosol-spray technology in mobile homes is also recommended.

  12. The impact of a sports vision training program in youth field hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Sebastian; Memmert, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a sports vision training program improves the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training. The choice reaction time task at the D2 board (Learning Task I), the functional field of view task (Learning Task II) and the multiple object tracking (MOT) task (Transfer Task) were assessed before and after the intervention and again six weeks after the second test. Analyzes showed significant differences between the two groups for the choice reaction time task at the D2 board and the functional field of view task, with significant improvements for the intervention group and none for the control group. For the transfer task, we could not find statistically significant improvements for either group. The results of this study are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications. Key pointsPerceptual training with youth field hockey playersCan a sports vision training program improve the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training?The intervention was performed in the "VisuLab" as DynamicEye(®) SportsVision Training at the German Sport University Cologne.We ran a series of 3 two-factor univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures on both within subject independent variables (group; measuring point) to examine the effects on central perception, peripheral perception and choice reaction time.The present study shows an improvement of certain visual abilities with the help of the sports vision training program.

  13. The Effectivenss of a Group Guidance Program on The Realistic Field Choice Amondst First Year High

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davut AYDIN

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effectiveness of a group guidance program in terms of assisting first year high school students to choose realistically their study field was examined.The research was carried out with 40 pupils who were randomly selected among the first year Özel Ferda Lisesi pupils, in Ankara, during the academic year 2001-2002.The subjects were separated to two groups: the experimental group which attended the group guidance program and the control group which did not. Both groups were tested before the guidance program was implemented and after.The program developed by the researcher, was mainly based on cognitive-behavioural approach with a substantial emphasis on informational and interactional techniques.The independent variable of the research was the group guidance program that was applied to the experimental group. The dependent variable of the study was students’ aptitude points.The program consisted of 12 sessions and it was administered every five days. Each session lasted for about 90 minutes. After the last session of the program, the student evaluation scale, which was developed by Kuzgun, was given to both the experimental and the control group members. In order to test this hypothesis thedependent-samples t-test was used.The results indicated that the experimental group members’ score both in the aptitude test become closer to their teachers rating after the group guidance program while the control group members score did not change from the first to the second application of the test.

  14. The Effects of Visual Cues and Learners' Field Dependence in Multiple External Representations Environment for Novice Program Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liew Tze; Sazilah, Salam

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of visual cues in multiple external representations (MER) environment on the learning performance of novices' program comprehension. Program codes and flowchart diagrams were used as dual representations in multimedia environment to deliver lessons on C-Programming. 17 field independent participants and 16 field…

  15. THE IMPACT OF A SPORTS VISION TRAINING PROGRAM IN YOUTH FIELD HOCKEY PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schwab

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether a sports vision training program improves the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training. The choice reaction time task at the D2 board (Learning Task I, the functional field of view task (Learning Task II and the multiple object tracking (MOT task (Transfer Task were assessed before and after the intervention and again six weeks after the second test. Analyzes showed significant differences between the two groups for the choice reaction time task at the D2 board and the functional field of view task, with significant improvements for the intervention group and none for the control group. For the transfer task, we could not find statistically significant improvements for either group. The results of this study are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications

  16. Coblation an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The term coblation is derived from “Controlled ablation”. This procedure involves non-heat driven process of soft tissue dissolution using bipolar radiofrequency energy under a conductive medium like normal saline. When current from radiofrequency probe pass through saline medium it breaks saline into sodium and chloride ions. These highly energized ions form a plasma field which is sufficiently strong to break organic molecular bonds within soft tissue causing its dissolution. This article attempts to provide a broad overview of the technology and its uses in the field of otolaryngology.

  17. University courses and opportunity for a European Master Program in Marine Renewable Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margheritini, Lucia; Tetu, Amélie; Frigaard, Peter Bak

    This document presents an overview of the existing European educational programmes in the field of marine renewable energy. It also includes suggestion for a transnational European master program in marine renewable energy.......This document presents an overview of the existing European educational programmes in the field of marine renewable energy. It also includes suggestion for a transnational European master program in marine renewable energy....

  18. Overview of the Department of Energy's research, development and demonstration program for the recovery of energy and materials from urban waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, A. S.

    1979-01-01

    This program is directed at improving and developing technologies that reprocess waste into fuels, metals, glass, paper, ammonia, glucose, fertilizers, and other energy-intensive products. Nontechnical issues relating to institutional, socio-economic, and legal constraints to resource recovery are also being investigated. This paper briefly describes the technological options available in the field of resource recovery. Some of the approximately 80 projects comprising the Urban Waste Technology Branch's R, D, and D program are discussed and related to the overall objectives of th branch. To facilitate this presentation, projects are grouped as being primarily related to mechanical, thermal, or biological processes. To date, the majority of R and D funding has been devoted to biological processes including anaerobic and enzymatic digestion, energy production and conservation in water and waste water treatment, and energy generation and recovery in sanitary landfills. However, demonstration activities, representing slightly less than half the program effort, are focused on the thermal/mechanical systems. DOE activities ar coordinated with the EPA and other Federal, state, and local efforts in resource recovery to ensure the development of an efficient and comprehensive national resource recovery program. If successful, approximately 3% of the nation's energy needs could be supplied by reprocessing wastes.

  19. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Associate Fellows Residents Medical Students Affiliate Members ACS Insurance Programs ACS Discount Programs FACS Resources Career Connection ... and Awards Overview Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards Overview Health Policy Scholarships Scholarships for International Surgeons Research Scholarships ...

  20. Integrated Geophysical Exploration Program at the Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Teplow

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of the geophysical exploration program was to use an integrated suite of detailed geophysical surveys to locate and map commercially productive zones in the Rye Patch geothermal field. The focus of the surveys was the production zone in Well 44-28 located at a depth of 3400' below surface. The primary goal of the program was to map the extension of the specific producing feature in 44-28 so that step-out wells could be targeted accurately. The second goal of the program was to identify additional production drilling targets that may be hydrologically independent from the 44-28 zone. The geophysical program was designed to measure a range of physical rock characteristics including magnetic, electrical, density, and sonic properties. This was done to help overcome the limitations and ambiguities inherent to any particular geophysical method. The studies and methodologies employed in the Rye Patch geophysical program are discussed. This report presents the results and a discussion of those results from each of the surveys and studies performed. Correlations among the data sets and between the data sets and the known producing zones are discussed, and drilling targets are presented as the end product of the correlations observed in the geophysical and geologic data.

  1. Personal Insights and Anecdotes about the Weatherization Assistance Program Process Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treitler, Inga [Anthropology Imagination, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The present report is based on the research conducted for the Process Field Study between March and September 2011. The Process Field Study documents how Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) services were delivered to clients, and the quality with which those services were delivered. The assessments were conducted by visiting 19 agencies in 19 states around the country interviewing agency managers, staff, and contractors; observing program intake along, with 43 audits, 45 measure installation and 37 final inspections; and conducting debriefing interviews with clients and weatherization staff following the observation of service delivery. In this report, we turn to detailed observations of a few field interactions. The client stories from our observations illustrate some of the ways clients and crew interact to build the success of the program, but shows there will always be unanticipated obstacles to building trust and getting the program to the public. Stories of staff and crew career paths indicate that weatherization technology and techniques are being learned and used by technicians out of the new home construction industry and that their new knowledge provides them with technical tools and methods that many hope to take back into the construction industry if and when they return. This report is organized according to the four stages of weatherization: intake, audit, installation, and inspection. It contributes to our understanding of the area where policy, environment, culture, and individual decisions influence social innovation. The anecdotes reveal the realities of implementing programs for the benefit of the greater good at minimal cost and sacrifice in times of ever restricting budgets. As the authors revisited their field notes and compiled memorable narratives to communicate the essence of the weatherization experience, they identified three key takeaways that summarize the major issues. First, in WAP as in all services there will always be

  2. The USAF STINFO Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    For N’IT T I S J ),.-t lf•i cation U ’Dstri:’... Ion/ A :.’ja I tY Codes ii r 2/or IDist SpOc al I/ - I 4318 essend noSteN INFO/tek 4318...accessible online as part I of the DROLS system. " STINFO responsibilities concerning Work Units are: m " Ensure that the R&T WUIS database is searched...System Database" i 5. DLAM 4185.18, "Defense RDT&E Online System, Dial-Up Retrieval Self-Training Manual" I I I I ’I I l I I I I USAF STINFO Ovwrview

  3. Overview of the COMPETE Program

    CERN Document Server

    Ezhela, Vladimir V; Gauron, P; Kang, K; Kang, S K; Kuyanov, Y V; Lengyel, A I; Lugovsky, K S; Lugovsky, S B; Lugovsky, V S; Martynov, E S; Nicolescu, Basarab; Razuvaev, E A; Sapunov, M Y; Selyugin, O V; Tkachenko, N P; Whalley, M R; Zenin, O V; Kuyanov, Yu.V.

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays, scientific databases have become the bread-and-butter of particle physicists. These databases must be maintained and checked repeatedly to insure the accuracy of their content. The COMPETE collaboration aims at motivating data maintenance via the interfacing of theory and experiment at the database level. The database concept then needs to be supplemented by a "model-base". Such an object enables one not only to decide what the best description may be, but also to discern what potential problems exist in the data. The systematization of such a cross-fertilization between models and data results in the "object of knowledge" that is the point at which all existing information resources on a given problem could converge. There are many advantages to such a global approach. First of all, the maintenance of a data set is not a static task: it needs to be motivated by physics. The second advantage is that one can have a common testing ground for theories and models. Thirdly, an extensive theoretical datab...

  4. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 1: Integrated approach and field campaign results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Vugts, H. F.; Ramothwa, G. K.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. Results of the first part of the program (Botswana 1) which ran from 1 Jan. 1988 - 31 Dec. 1990 are summarized. Botswana 1 consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components in general are described and activities performed during the surface energy modeling component including the extensive field campaign are summarized. The results of the passive microwave component are summarized. The key of the field campaign was a multilevel approach, whereby measurements by various similar sensors were made at several altitudes and resolution. Data collection was performed at two adjacent sites of contrasting surface character. The following measurements were made: micrometeorological measurements, surface temperatures, soil temperatures, soil moisture, vegetation (leaf area index and biomass), satellite data, aircraft data, atmospheric soundings, stomatal resistance, and surface emissivity.

  5. GSBPP Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The Graduate School of Business & Public Policy is responsible for academic programs designed to educate officers and DoD civilian employees in a variety of functional management specialties. About 250 resident students are enrolled in various Master's degree curricula at any point in time. The school offers resident graduate programs and non-resident graduate programs using on-site instructions or latest VTE technology.

  6. Digital electronic engine control F-15 overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, B.

    1984-01-01

    A flight test evaluation of the digital elctronic engine control (DEEC) system was conducted. An overview of the flight program is presented. The roles of the participating parties, the system, and the flight program objectives are described. The test program approach is discussed, and the engine performance benefits are summarized. A description of the follow-on programs is included.

  7. Digital Library Activities in Europe: A Brief Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is a brief overview of the digital library activities happening in the last decade in Europe. At first the definitions of the digital library was discussed. Then in the main part of the article the programs and projects on the digital library taking place in Europe are described briefly at three levels, which are digital library activities across Europe, national digital library activities and local digital library activities. In addition to the programs and projects several examples of the conferences and institutions in the field are also given in the article. Finally some conclusions are drawn based on the description above.

  8. Leveling the playing field: the development of a distance education program in rehabilitation counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, Linda L; Holcomb, John M

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the curriculum design and development of an online Master's degree program in Rehabilitation Counseling at the University of South Carolina. The use of Bloom's Taxonomy as a method for selecting distance education techniques and teaching methods to ensure equivalency of the educational experience to traditional classroom teaching is described. The author presents tables to demonstrate the cognitive competencies, traditional and distance education methods, and use of synchronous and asynchronous methods in reaching desired educational objectives. This process has resulted in the creation of a program that offers distance education options, traditional classroom options, or a blend of approaches. The menu of options has met the unique learning needs of all students and has offered students with disabilities a level playing field on which to build rehabilitation counseling competencies.

  9. The ABC's of Delivering A Research-Driven Adventure Learning Program From the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregont, P.; Porsild, M.

    2008-12-01

    A is for anchoring the delivery of your research to your audience in a standard-aligned curriculum. B is for BGAN Satellite Communication System assisting in delivering real-time authentic media. C is for a collaborative online learning environment to engage learners" Z is for the peaceful sleep you will get once your program is up and running! As part of Team GoNorth! (http://www.PolarHusky.com) it is our job to deliver adventure learning. We set out to do this back when the computer was a 4-foot, 50-lb box powered by a hand-crank where one would have a window of ten minutes in a 24-hour period to catch the satellite (before Al Gore created the Internet!). Every year we review the quantum leaps in what is now possible from the field and in the classroom, and over the years we have wrestled technical issues, solutions and numerous re-structures in the process of our of curriculum development. With this presentation we will provide some basic ABC's on how you can remained focused on your research, yet deliver an adventure learning program for learners to investigate real-world issues within your scientific research. Our scales are most likely different. The volume of our curriculum is an annual production of 4-500 pages to be used from Kindergarden through 12th grade around the world. The framework of our online learning environment must be able to supports millions of users at a time. "In the field" means on a a 3-4 month dogsled expedition - so sending out our live updates involve thawing out the computers and setting up the satellite communication system to work in a ground blizzard! But regardless of the scope and location of your field research, you can probably build on some of our experiences in the planning of an upcoming adventure learning program to engage learners of all or any ages in your scientific explorations!

  10. Evaluation of Visual Field Progression in Glaucoma: Quasar Regression Program and Event Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Alemán, Valentín T; González-Hernández, Marta; Perera-Sanz, Daniel; Armas-Domínguez, Karintia

    2016-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity, specificity and agreement between the Quasar program, glaucoma progression analysis (GPA II) event analysis and expert opinion in the detection of glaucomatous progression. The Quasar program is based on linear regression analysis of both mean defect (MD) and pattern standard deviation (PSD). Each series of visual fields was evaluated by three methods; Quasar, GPA II and four experts. The sensitivity, specificity and agreement (kappa) for each method was calculated, using expert opinion as the reference standard. The study included 439 SITA Standard visual fields of 56 eyes of 42 patients, with a mean of 7.8 ± 0.8 visual fields per eye. When suspected cases of progression were considered stable, sensitivity and specificity of Quasar, GPA II and the experts were 86.6% and 70.7%, 26.6% and 95.1%, and 86.6% and 92.6% respectively. When suspected cases of progression were considered as progressing, sensitivity and specificity of Quasar, GPA II and the experts were 79.1% and 81.2%, 45.8% and 90.6%, and 85.4% and 90.6% respectively. The agreement between Quasar and GPA II when suspected cases were considered stable or progressing was 0.03 and 0.28 respectively. The degree of agreement between Quasar and the experts when suspected cases were considered stable or progressing was 0.472 and 0.507. The degree of agreement between GPA II and the experts when suspected cases were considered stable or progressing was 0.262 and 0.342. The combination of MD and PSD regression analysis in the Quasar program showed better agreement with the experts and higher sensitivity than GPA II.

  11. Measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field spectrum by Extended Range Neutron Multisphere Spectrometers and unfolding program

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guanjia; Ma, Zhongjian; Guo, Siming; Yan, Mingyang; Shi, Haoyu; Xu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    This paper described a measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field at a transport beam line of Beijing-TBF. The experiment place was be selected around a Faraday Cup with a graphite target impacted by electron beam at 2.5GeV. First of all, we simulated the neutron radiation experiment by FLUKA. Secondly, we chose six appropriate ERNMS according to their neutron fluence response function to measure the neutron count rate. Then the U_M_G package program was be utilized to unfolding experiment data. Finally, we drew a comparison between the unfolding with the simulation spectrum and made an analysis about the result.

  12. IBL Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrere, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS IBL project is reaching a completion phase with the integration of the staves around the IPT and beam pipe structure. The installation and insertion into the Pixel will be done in May with a tight schedule constraint. This talk will give an overview of the project including the production status and the recent issues met like the corrosion problem. The tremendous effort made to recover the production and optimize the time and the available components to test the full on-detector and off-detector chain highlighted very efficient and excellent results. The integration tools and all the engineering efforts are also made to ensure the success of the last operations on the surface and in the cavern.

  13. The AKARI FU-HYU galaxy evolution program: First results from the GOODS-N field

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, C P; Negrello, M; Takagi, T; Jeong, W -S; Matsuhara, H; Wada, T; Oyabu, S; Lee, H M; Im, M S

    2010-01-01

    The AKARI FU-HYU mission program carried out mid-infrared imaging of several well studied Spitzer fields preferentially selecting fields already rich in multi-wavelength data from radio to X-ray wavelengths filling in the wavelength desert between the Spitzer IRAC and MIPS bands.We present the initial results for the FU-HYU survey in the GOODS-N field.We utilize the supreme multiwavelength coverage in the GOODS-N field to produce a multiwavelength catalogue from infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths, containing more than 4393 sources, including photometric redshifts. Using the FU-HYU catalogue we present colour-colour diagrams that map the passage of PAH features through our observation bands. We find that the longer mid-infrared bands from AKARI (IRC-L18W 18 micron band) and Spitzer (MIPS24 24 micron band) provide an accurate measure of the total MIR emission of the sources and therefore their probable total mid-infrared luminosity. We also find that colours incorporating the AKARI IRC-S11 11 micron band produ...

  14. Recommendations for Guidelines for Environment-Specific Magnetic-Field Measurements, Rapid Program Engineering Project #2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.; IIT Research Institute; Magnetic Measurements; Survey Research Center, University of California; T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The purpose of this project was to document widely applicable methods for characterizing the magnetic fields in a given environment, recognizing the many sources co-existing within that space. The guidelines are designed to allow the reader to follow an efficient process to (1) plan the goals and requirements of a magnetic-field study, (2) develop a study structure and protocol, and (3) document and carry out the plan. These guidelines take the reader first through the process of developing a basic study strategy, then through planning and performing the data collection. Last, the critical factors of data management, analysis reporting, and quality assurance are discussed. The guidelines are structured to allow the researcher to develop a protocol that responds to specific site and project needs. The Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) is based on exposure to magnetic fields and the potential health effects. Therefore, the most important focus for these magnetic-field measurement guidelines is relevance to exposure. The assumed objective of an environment-specific measurement is to characterize the environment (given a set of occupants and magnetic-field sources) so that information about the exposure of the occupants may be inferred. Ideally, the researcher seeks to obtain complete or "perfect" information about these magnetic fields, so that personal exposure might also be modeled perfectly. However, complete data collection is not feasible. In fact, it has been made more difficult as the research field has moved to expand the list of field parameters measured, increasing the cost and complexity of performing a measurement and analyzing the data. The guidelines address this issue by guiding the user to design a measurement protocol that will gather the most exposure-relevant information based on the locations of people in relation to the sources. We suggest that the "microenvironment" become the base unit of area in a study, with

  15. Rhinitis Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  16. SEI Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    Architecting • Edge Programming for Mobile Platforms • Software Assurance Argumentation Theories • Secure Coding Patterns for C, C++, and Java...ACE/TSP Software Assurance Cases SOA Certification Program V&B Documentation SMART Malware & Forensics Analysis for Mobile Platforms XNET 14...Technology Specific Training • IPv6 • Wireless Security • SiLK & Netflow Analysis 75 The Cyber Exercise Challenge How to make cyber exercises

  17. An Overview. High Risk Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report provides an overview of efforts undertaken by the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) in 1990 to review and report on federal program areas its work identified as high risk because of vulnerabilities to waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement. It reviews the current status of efforts to address these concerns. The six categories of…

  18. ECONOMIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF INTEGRATED CROP MANAGEMENT FARMER FIELD SCHOOL PROGRAM ON CORN PRODUCTION IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Kariyasa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Domestic supply of corn in Indonesia has not been able to meet demand satisfactorily due to demand rising faster than supply. Therefore, Indonesia has been continuously importing corn about of 10% of the total demand. To address this problem, the Indonesian government started to implement the Farmer Field School of Integrated Crop Management (ICM-FFS program on corn production since 2009. This study aimed to assess the impact of ICM-FFS on corn productivity, comparative and competitive advantages to produce corn as well as farmer’s income. The study found that ICM-FFS program could increase corn productivity by 30.95% of non ICM-FFS farms, of which 27.94% contributed by the difference in input use, while only 3.01% contributed by technological change. ICM-FFS farms were able to increase farmer’s income by 71.03% and social welfare by 94.69% compared to non ICMFFS farms. Through this program, Indonesia had higher comparative advantage in producing corn as an import substitute. The provision of competitive input and output markets, enhanced technical assistance to improve corn productivity and quality, and increasing attention on corn ICM-FFS development could be considered as policy directions to improve the next implementation strategies of corn production in Indonesia.

  19. Improving Graduates' Employability in It Field. The Case of Accounting and Information Systems Study Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminiţa HURBEAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies published in 2015 analyzing the need for human resource in Iasi IT market (the most representative market for the North-East of Romania conclude that the demand for specialists exceeds by far the number of graduates from faculties which train IT specialists. Nationwide, within the FEBA[1], the employment rate for the students that complete the Economic Informatics undergraduate program and different master programs that specialize students in BIS[2] is approximately 95%. We strongly believe that the students graduating the program AIS[3] could get a higher employability in the IT area and appropriate improvement measures would beneficially contribute to a higher rate of employability, but also to the diversification of their professional horizon and their adjustment to the IT field requirements for professional accountants nowadays. The research also attempts to determine the profile of AIS graduates and their compatibility with IT related positions in the labour market and graduates' employability in terms of knowledge, skills and attributes relevant to the employers' needs.

  20. Popeye Project: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, D.C.; Alford, B.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the Shell Offshore Inc. (SOI) Popeye Project, a remote subsea gas development in 2,040 ft. of water in the Gulf of Mexico. Planning and execution of the Project required a balance throughout between proven methods, cost reduction, requirement for extending technology, and the desire to develop a system which could be used as a stepping stone to future deep water prospects. Popeye was successfully installed and started up in January 1996. It represents application of an innovative, yet cost-effective, field development system which advanced the state of deep water subsea technology.

  1. Popeye project: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, D.C.; Alford, B.J. [Shell Offshore Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Shell Offshore Inc. (SOI) Popeye project, a remote subsea gas development in 2,040 ft of water in the Gulf of Mexico. Planning and execution of the project required a balance throughout between proven methods, cost reduction, requirement for extending technology, and the desire to develop a system which could be used as a stepping stone to future deepwater prospects. Popeye was successfully installed and started up in January 1996. It represents application of an innovative, yet cost-effective, field development system that advanced the state of deepwater subsea technology.

  2. Galaxy alignments: An overview

    CERN Document Server

    Joachimi, Benjamin; Kitching, Thomas D; Leonard, Adrienne; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schäfer, Björn Malte; Sifón, Cristóbal; Hoekstra, Henk; Kiessling, Alina; Kirk, Donnacha; Rassat, Anais

    2015-01-01

    The alignments between galaxies, their underlying matter structures, and the cosmic web constitute vital ingredients for a comprehensive understanding of gravity, the nature of matter, and structure formation in the Universe. We provide an overview on the state of the art in the study of these alignment processes and their observational signatures, aimed at a non-specialist audience. The development of the field over the past one hundred years is briefly reviewed. We also discuss the impact of galaxy alignments on measurements of weak gravitational lensing, and discuss avenues for making theoretical and observational progress over the coming decade.

  3. The AKARI FU-HYU galaxy evolution program: first results from the GOODS-N field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, C. P.; Serjeant, S.; Negrello, M.; Takagi, T.; Jeong, W.-S.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Oyabu, S.; Lee, H. M.; Im, M. S.

    2010-05-01

    The AKARI FU-HYU mission program carried out mid-infrared imaging of several well studied Spitzer fields preferentially selecting fields already rich in multi-wavelength data from radio to X-ray wavelengths filling in the wavelength desert between the Spitzer IRAC and MIPS bands. We present the initial results for the FU-HYU survey in the GOODS-N field. We utilize the supreme multiwavelength coverage in the GOODS-N field to produce a multiwavelength catalogue from infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths, containing more than 4393 sources, including photometric redshifts. Using the FU-HYU catalogue we present colour-colour diagrams that map the passage of PAH features through our observation bands. We find that the longer mid-infrared bands from AKARI (IRC-L18W 18 micron band) and Spitzer (MIPS24 24 micron band) provide an accurate measure of the total MIR emission of the sources and therefore their probable total mid-infrared luminosity. We also find that colours incorporating the AKARI IRC-S11 11 micron band produce a bimodal distribution where an excess at 11 microns preferentially selects moderate redshift star-forming galaxies. These powerful colour-colour diagnostics are further used as tools to extract anomalous colour populations, in particular a population of Silicate Break galaxies from the GOODS-N field showing that dusty starbursts can be selected of specific redshift ranges (z = 1.2-1.6) by mid-infrared drop-out techniques. The FU-HYU catalogue will be made publically available to the astronomical community.

  4. Entering the (Postgraduate) Field: Underrepresented Students' Acquisition of Cultural and Social Capital in Graduate School Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle; McCoy, Dorian L.

    2016-01-01

    Examining the role of humanities graduate preparation programs in facilitating underrepresented undergraduate students' socialization to the field (social context) of graduate education, this critical multisite case study finds that these programs are crucial to bidirectional anticipatory socialization for graduate education, where one gains new…

  5. Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines, Quartelry Report: 2nd Quarter, Issue No.1, October 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, P.; Forsyth, T.

    2000-11-02

    The Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines quarterly report provides industry members with a description of the program, its mission, and purpose. It also provides a vehicle for participants to report performance data, activities, and issues during quarterly test periods.

  6. Overview of the field measurement campaign in Hyytiälä, August 2001 in the framework of the EU project OSOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boy

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the OSOA (Origin and formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols project, two intensive field campaigns were conducted in Melpitz, Germany and Hyytiälä, Finland. This paper gives an overview of the measurements made during the Hyytiälä campaign, which was held between 1 and 16 August 2001. Various instrumental techniques were used to achieve physical and chemical characterisation of aerosols and to investigate possible precursor gases. During the OSOA campaign in Hyytiälä, particle formation was observed on three consecutive days at the beginning of the campaign (1 to 3 August 2001 and on three days later on. The investigation of the meteorological situation divided the campaign into two parts. During the first three days of August, relatively cold and clean air masses from northwest passed over the station (condensation sink – CS: -1, NOx: -3 were observed. After this period, warmer and more polluted air from south-west to south-east arrived at the station (CS: 0.002–0.01 s-1, NOx: 0.5–4 ppb and during these 13 days only three events were observed. These events were not as apparent as those that occurred during the earlier period of the campaign. The chemical analyses from different institutes of PM2, PM2.5 and PM10 particles confirmed the assumption that organic matter from the oxidation of various terpenes contributed to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA. Concerning these conclusions among others, the ratio between formic (oxidation product of isoprene and monoterpenes by ozone and acetic acid (increased by anthropogenic emissions (ratio=1 to 1.5 and concentration of different carboxylic acids (up to 62 ngm-3 were investigated. Gas/particle partitioning of five photo-oxidation products from α- and β-pinene resulted in higher concentrations of pinonic, nor pinonic and pinic acids in the particle phase than in the gas phase, which indicates a preference to the particle phase for these compounds. The average

  7. Overview of the field measurement campaign in Hyytiälä, August 2001 in the framework of the EU project OSOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boy

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available As one part of the OSOA (Origin and formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols project, two intensive field campaigns were conducted in Melpitz, Germany and Hyytiälä, Finland. This paper gives an overview of the measurements made during the Hyytiälä campaign, which was held between the 1st and 16th of August 2001. Various instrumental techniques were used to achieve physical and chemical characterisation of aerosols and to investigate possible precursor gases.

    During the OSOA campaign in Hyytiälä, particle formation was observed on three consecutive days at the beginning of the campaign (1 to 3 August 2001 and on three days later on. The investigation of the meteorological situation divided the campaign into two parts. During the first three days of August, relatively cold and clean air masses from northwest passed over the station (condensation sink – CS: <0.002 s−1, NOx: < 0.5 ppb. Daily particle bursts of one fraction of the nucleation mode aerosols (3–10,nm with number concentrations between 600–1200 particles cm-3 were observed. After this period, warmer and more polluted air from south-west to south-east arrived at the station (CS: 0.002-0.01 s−1, NOx: 0.5–4 ppb and during these 13 days only three events were observed. These events were not as apparent as those that occurred during the earlier period of the campaign. The chemical analyses from different institutes of PM2, PM2.5 and PM10 particles confirmed the assumption that organic matter from the oxidation of various terpenes contributed to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA. Concerning these conclusions among others, the ratio between formic (oxidation product of isoprene and monoterpenes by ozone and acetic acid (increased by anthropogenic emissions (ratio=1 to 1.5 and concentration of different carboxylic acids (up to 62 ng m−3 were investigated

  8. Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP: a pathway to sustainable public health capacity development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cáceres Victor M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP is a public health capacity-building training programme aimed at developing high-caliber field epidemiologists at various levels of the public health system. It began in 2000 as part of the effort to rebuild public health infrastructure in six Central American and Caribbean countries following the devastation of Hurricanes Mitch and Georges in late 1998. Since then, the CA FETP has evolved from one regional training programme managed by CDC to several national FETPs with each country assuming ownership of its domestic programme. The curriculum is competency-based, and is divided into a three-tiered training pyramid that corresponds to the needs at the local, district and central levels of the health system. Trainees at each tier spend about 20% of their time in the classroom and 80% in the field implementing what they have learned while being mentored by graduates of the programme. FETP trainees have responded to multiple natural disasters and conducted hundreds of investigations including surveillance evaluations, outbreak responses and planned studies. Also graduates of the CA FETP are assuming influential positions in their respective ministries. As countries meet the challenge of institutionalizing their programmes, the CA FETP concept will increasingly be recognized as a model for sustainable public health capacity development.

  9. Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP): a pathway to sustainable public health capacity development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Augusto; Cáceres, Victor M

    2008-12-16

    The Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP) is a public health capacity-building training programme aimed at developing high-caliber field epidemiologists at various levels of the public health system. It began in 2000 as part of the effort to rebuild public health infrastructure in six Central American and Caribbean countries following the devastation of Hurricanes Mitch and Georges in late 1998. Since then, the CA FETP has evolved from one regional training programme managed by CDC to several national FETPs with each country assuming ownership of its domestic programme. The curriculum is competency-based, and is divided into a three-tiered training pyramid that corresponds to the needs at the local, district and central levels of the health system. Trainees at each tier spend about 20% of their time in the classroom and 80% in the field implementing what they have learned while being mentored by graduates of the programme. FETP trainees have responded to multiple natural disasters and conducted hundreds of investigations including surveillance evaluations, outbreak responses and planned studies. Also graduates of the CA FETP are assuming influential positions in their respective ministries. As countries meet the challenge of institutionalizing their programmes, the CA FETP concept will increasingly be recognized as a model for sustainable public health capacity development.

  10. Hypermedia Concepts and Research: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, John K.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of hypermedia, including a history of hypertext and multimedia, and discusses how they have been combined into the term hypermedia; a cognitive overview; dual coding and cue summation; and theories related to learners, including field dependence-independence, memory, and metacognition. Contains 156 references. (LRW)

  11. Radiation Detection Overview for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-16

    This presentation discusses the fundamentals of gamma and neutron detection; presents an overview of the DOE Triage and JTOT Programs, gamma, and neutron signatures in select measurements; and offers a detector demonstration.

  12. Introducing a computer program devoted to renewable integration assessment of multi-field solar photovoltaic power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, M.A.C.; Arroba, J.P.; Ibanez, J.C.; Criado, J.A.R. [Ciudad Univ., Madrid (Spain)

    1996-11-01

    The objectives of this paper are to present a computer program devoted to the simulation of solar photovoltaic power plants, namely the assessment of their power generation technical potential. The most general configuration of a former program devoted to single-field photovoltaic generators has been extended and updated to multi-field systems. This program is also intended to provide capabilities in order to assess the integration of renewable energy resources. Mainly solar and wind energy systems will be considered, as well as pumped-storage stations, of which an example is included.

  13. Overview of the SDSS-IV MaNGA Survey: Mapping nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Law, David R.; Yan, Renbin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Wake, David A.; Cherinka, Brian; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Tremonti, Christy; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Blanton, Michael R.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Byler, Nell; Cappellari, Michele; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Etherington, James; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fu, Hai; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Johnston, Evelyn J.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kinemuchi, Karen; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Li, Cheng; Lin, Lihwai; Maiolino, Roberto; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; McDermid, Richard M.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David; Simmons, Audrey; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Thanjavur, Karun; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Wilkinson, David; Wright, Shelley; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic stru

  14. Overview of the SDSS-IV MaNGA Survey: Mapping nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Law, David R.; Yan, Renbin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Wake, David A.; Cherinka, Brian; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Tremonti, Christy; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Blanton, Michael R.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Byler, Nell; Cappellari, Michele; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Etherington, James; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fu, Hai; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Johnston, Evelyn J.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kinemuchi, Karen; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Li, Cheng; Lin, Lihwai; Maiolino, Roberto; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; McDermid, Richard M.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David; Simmons, Audrey; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Thanjavur, Karun; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Wilkinson, David; Wright, Shelley; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic

  15. Literacy in Action: A Carbon-Neutral Field Program at Cornell University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A.; Derry, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Cornell Earth and Environmental Systems (EES) Field Program is a semester-length undergraduate field program located on the island of Hawai`i. The Hawaiian Islands are the world’s most dynamic natural laboratory and the premier location for Earth systems research and education. While there are compelling reasons for students and faculty to travel from the US mainland to Hawai`i, the air and ground travel that comprises the program carries a large carbon footprint. This liability is also an extraordinary educational opportunity. For the past two years EES students have been challenged to make the program carbon-neutral. They are asked to devise a set of criteria for a credible and defensible zero-CO2 footprint and then to put their plan into action. The C-neutral project consists of three elements: (1) quantifying CO2 emissions, (2) reducing emissions wherever possible, and (3) offsetting emissions that cannot be eliminated. In quantifying emissions six areas are identified: air travel, ground travel, domestic electricity, natural gas, food, and waste. Emissions reductions include all of the standard “carpool--turn it down--turn it off “ conservation behaviors, with special emphasis on food and waste; eating local and organic, shopping at re-use centers, and compost and recycling of garbage. Our program facility utilizes solar hot water and is equipped with neither heat nor air conditioning, thus domestic energy use is low. Students tabulate all of our energy use and calculate the resulting CO2 emissions for all program participants for a period of four months. The CO2 offsetting strategy is conducted in collaboration with a native ecosystem restoration project. Students participate in all aspects of forest restoration, including seed collection, germination and outplanting of native plant species and removal of invasive pest species. The initial goal of this locally-supported project was to restore degraded pasture to native forest. The EES students have

  16. 45 CFR 2554.1 - Overview of regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overview of regulations. 2554.1 Section 2554.1... SERVICE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Overview and Definitions § 2554.1 Overview of... claim, regardless of whether property, services, or money is actually delivered or paid by...

  17. Commentary: collaboration in dual degree programs contributes something new to both fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumil, Marcia M

    2014-05-01

    Dual degree programs in public health and law have blossomed in the United States and beyond. They are traditionally promoted on the premise that public health efforts often require legal authority to legitimize and implement their goals and objectives, and that participation of lawyers safeguards respect for individual rights, privacy, and autonomy against governmental intrusion in furtherance of public health objectives. Thus, lawyers who understand public health are far more valuable in promoting population health than traditional constitutional and administrative law practitioners without such understanding. On the public health side, epidemiologists and other practitioners trained in the law ensure that reliable data inform public policy. In the classroom, we have found that dual degree students enrich the educational experience in both fields, broadening understanding and creating conversations that transcend law or public health alone.

  18. Quantum field theory and the linguistic Minimalist Program: a remarkable isomorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piattelli-Palmarini, M.; Vitiello, G.

    2017-08-01

    By resorting to recent results, we show that an isomorphism exist between linguistic features of the Minimalist Program and the quantum field theory formalism of condensed matter physics. Specific linguistic features which admit a representation in terms of the many-body algebraic formalism are the unconstrained nature of recursive Merge, the operation of the Labeling Algorithm, the difference between pronounced and un-pronounced copies of elements in a sentence and the build-up of the Fibonacci sequence in the syntactic derivation of sentence structures. The collective dynamical nature of the formation process of Logical Forms leading to the individuation of the manifold of concepts and the computational self-consistency of languages are also discussed.

  19. A History of Probabilistic Inductive Logic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio eRiguzzi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The field of Probabilistic Logic Programming (PLP has seen significant advances in the last 20 years, with many proposals for languages that combine probability with logic programming. Since the start, the problem of learning probabilistic logic programs has been the focus of much attention. Learning these programs represents a whole subfield of Inductive Logic Programming (ILP. In Probabilistic ILP (PILP two problems are considered: learning the parameters of a program given the structure (the rules and learning both the structure and the parameters. Usually structure learning systems use parameter learning as a subroutine. In this article we present an overview of PILP and discuss the main results.

  20. Role of land atmosphere interactions in WCRP - overview of the terrestrial component of GEWEX and the observing networks and field campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Try, P.

    2002-06-01

    The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) has been designed to observe and model the hydrologic cycle and energy fluxes in the atmosphere, at the land surface, and in the upper oceans. GEWEX is an integrated program of research, observations, and science activities ultimately leading to the prediction of global and regional climate change. The objectives of the GEWEX Program are to: -- determine the hydrological cycle and energy fluxes by means of global measurements of atmospheric and surface properties; -- model the global hydrological cycle and its impact on the atmosphere, oceans and land surfaces; -- develop the ability to predict the variations of global and regional hydrological processes and water resources, and their response to environmental change; and, -- advance the development of observing techniques, data management, and assimiliation systems for operational application to long-range weather forecasts, hydrology, and climate predictions. The primary activities of GEWEX are a) global data set development, b) process studies, c) model development support. To accomplish this, GEWEX has many components to address the critical elements with roles in the energy and water cycles. The data projects focus on global distribution and variability of clouds, water vapour, aerosols, surface radiation, precipitation and the features of the land surface and near surface meteorology that couple the land to the atmosphere. The modelling projects focus on the cloud, land-atmosphere and boundary layer parameterizations necessary to drive our regional and global predictive models. Coupling the land-atmosphere at the mesoscale has been the initial strategy for GEWEX and five major continental-scale field campaigns have been underway to provide new process and modelling understanding in the Amazon, Baltic Sea, Mississippi River Basin, MacKenzie River Basin, and four basins in Asia (Thailand, Tibet, Siberia and China