WorldWideScience

Sample records for field-of-view zenith observations

  1. Inferring spatial clouds statistics from limited field-of-view, zenith observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C.H.; Thorne, L.R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Many of the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) measurements produce a time series of zenith observations, but spatial averages are often the desired data product. One possible approach to deriving spatial averages from temporal averages is to invoke Taylor`s hypothesis where and when it is valid. Taylor`s hypothesis states that when the turbulence is small compared with the mean flow, the covariance in time is related to the covariance in space by the speed of the mean flow. For clouds fields, Taylor`s hypothesis would apply when the {open_quotes}local{close_quotes} turbulence is small compared with advective flow (mean wind). The objective of this study is to determine under what conditions Taylor`s hypothesis holds or does not hold true for broken cloud fields.

  2. Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, C; Marshak, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, JC; Schmelzer, J

    2008-11-01

    The two-channel narrow field-of-view radiometer (NFOV2) is a ground-based radiometer that looks straight up and measures radiance directly above the instrument at wavelengths of 673 and 870 nm. The field-of-view of the instrument is 1.2 degrees, and the sampling time resolution is one second. Measurements of the NFOV2 have been used to retrieve optical properties for overhead clouds that range from patchy to overcast. With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in cloud optical properties at the natural time scale of cloud evolution.

  3. Showers with large zenith angles observed in emulsion chambers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任敬儒; 陆穗苓; 解卫; 王承瑞; 何瑁; 张乃健

    1997-01-01

    Showers with large zenith angles are observed in emulsion chambers exposed at Mt.Kanbala.The intensity of high energy muons is given and the multicore showers with large zenith angles are found.It is indicated that a new phenomenon may exist in the high energy nuclear interactions of cosmic rays.

  4. Spatiotemporal multiplexing method for visual field of view extension in holographic displays with naked eye observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, G.; Kujawińska, M.; Kozacki, T.; Zaperty, W.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we propose a method which allows to overcome the basic functional problems in holographic displays with naked eye observation caused by delivering too small images visible in narrow viewing angles. The solution is based on combining the spatiotemporal multiplexing method with a 4f optical system. It enables to increase an aperture of a holographic display and extend the angular visual field of view. The applicability of the modified display is evidenced by Wigner distribution analysis of holographic imaging with spatiotemporal multiplexing method and by the experiments performed at the display demonstrator.

  5. The Kep-Cont Mission: Continuing the observation of high-amplitude variable stars in the Kepler field of view

    CERN Document Server

    Molnár, L; Kolenberg, K; Borkovits, T; Antoci, V; Vida, K; Ngeow, C C; Guzik, J A; Plachy, E; Castanheira, B

    2013-01-01

    As a response to the Kepler white paper call, we propose to keep Kepler pointing to its current field of view and continue observing thousands of large amplitude variables (Cepheid, RR Lyrae and delta Scuti stars among others) with high cadence in the Kep-Cont Mission. The degraded pointing stability will still allow observation of these stars with reasonable (better than millimag) precision. The Kep-Cont mission will allow studying the nonradial modes in Blazhko-modulated and first overtone RR Lyrae stars and will give a better view on the period jitter of the only Kepler Cepheid in the field. With continued continuous observation of the Kepler RR Lyrae sample we may get closer to the origin of the century-old Blazhko problem. Longer time-span may also uncover new dynamical effects like apsidal motion in eclipsing binaries. A continued mission will have the advantage of providing unprecedented, many-years-long homogeneous and continuous photometric data of the same targets. We investigate the pragmatic detai...

  6. Persistent observations of the Arctic from highly elliptical orbits using multispectral, wide field of view day-night imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschell, Jeffery J.; Johnson, David; Miller, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Persistent satellite observations are essential for monitoring and understanding Earth's environmentally sensitive and rapidly changing Arctic region. Compact wide-field-of-view imagers aboard satellites in Highly Elliptical Orbit (HEO) could stare at the Arctic and collect multispectral, high dynamic range visible and near-infrared imagery with sensitivity similar to that of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) in sun synchronous polar orbit. These HEO Day/Night Imagers (HDNIs) provide high contrast visible wavelength imagery through the long polar night. Their dynamic range -- extending from the brightest sunlit clouds, ice and snow to reflected moonlight from open water -- enables cloud, ice and sea surface discrimination even under very low light and low thermal contrast conditions. Rapidly refreshed HDNI data results in frequent updates to key environmental products such as cloud imagery and microphysical properties, ice and open water distribution (including real-time maps of where leads are opening and new ice is forming), vector ice motion and vector polar winds from cloud motion. The relatively small size of HDNIs makes them ideal for deployment as a hosted payload or as the primary payload onboard a small satellite.

  7. Impacts of field of view configuration of Cross-track Infrared Sounder on clear-sky observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Likun; Chen, Yong; Han, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Hyperspectral infrared radiance measurements from satellite sensors contain valuable information on atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles and greenhouse gases, and therefore are directly assimilated into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models as inputs for weather forecasting. However, data assimilations in current operational NWP models still mainly rely on cloud-free observations due to the challenge of simulating cloud-contaminated radiances when using hyperspectral radiances. The limited spatial coverage of the 3×3 field of views (FOVs) in one field of regard (FOR) (i.e., spatial gap among FOVs) as well as relatively large footprint size (14 km) in current Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instruments limits the amount of clear-sky observations. This study explores the potential impacts of future CrIS FOV configuration (including FOV size and spatial coverage) on the amount of clear-sky observations by simulation experiments. The radiance measurements and cloud mask products (VCM) from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to simulate CrIS clear-sky observation under different FOV configurations. The results indicate that, given the same FOV coverage (e.g., 3×3), the percentage of clear-sky FOVs and the percentage of clear-sky FORs (that contain at least one clear-sky FOV) both increase as the FOV size decreases. In particular, if the CrIS FOV size were reduced from 14 km to 7 km, the percentage of clear-sky FOVs increases from 9.02% to 13.51% and the percentage of clear-sky FORs increases from 18.24% to 27.51%. Given the same FOV size but with increasing FOV coverage in each FOR, the clear-sky FOV observations increases proportionally with the increasing sampling FOVs. Both reducing FOV size and increasing FOV coverage can result in more clear-sky FORs, which benefit data utilization of NWP data assimilation.

  8. Zenith total delay study of a mesoscale convective system : GPS observations and fine-scale modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cucurull, I.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Rius, A.

    2002-01-01

    Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) observations and model calculations are used to analyze a mesoscale convective system which yielded a large amount of precipitation over a short period of time in the north-western Mediterranean. ZTD observations are derived from the GPS signal delay whereas the ZTD model re

  9. Differential measurement of atmospheric refraction with a telescope with double fields of view

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yong; Tang, Zheng-Hong; Luo, Hao; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    For the sake of complete theoretical research of atmospheric refraction, the atmospheric refraction under the condition of lower angles of elevation is still worthy to be analyzed and explored. In some engineering applications, the objects with larger zenith distance must be observed sometimes. Carrying out observational research of the atmospheric refraction at lower angles of elevation has an important significance. It has been considered difficult to measure the atmospheric refraction at lower angles of elevation. A new idea for determining atmospheric refraction by utilizing differential measurement with double fields of view is proposed. Taking the observational principle of HIPPARCOS satellite as a reference, a schematic prototype with double fields of view was developed. In August of 2013, experimental observations were carried out and the atmospheric refractions at lower angles of elevation can be obtained by the schematic prototype. The measured value of the atmospheric refraction at the zenith dista...

  10. Kepler Observations and Asteroseismology of θ Cyg, the Brightest StarObservable in the Kepler Field of View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzik, Joyce A.; Houdek, G.; Chaplin, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    θ Cyg (13 Cyg) is an F4 main sequence star that, at visual magnitude V=4.48, is the brightest star observable by the Kepler spacecraft. Short-cadence photometric data using a custom aperture requiring 1800 pixels were obtained for this star during Quarter 6 (June-Sept 2010) and Quarter 8 (Jan-Mar...

  11. Kepler Observations and Asteroseismology of θ Cyg, the Brightest StarObservable in the Kepler Field of View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzik, Joyce A.; Houdek, G.; Chaplin, W. J.;

    2012-01-01

    θ Cyg (13 Cyg) is an F4 main sequence star that, at visual magnitude V=4.48, is the brightest star observable by the Kepler spacecraft. Short-cadence photometric data using a custom aperture requiring 1800 pixels were obtained for this star during Quarter 6 (June-Sept 2010) and Quarter 8 (Jan...

  12. Large zenith angle observations with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera

    CERN Document Server

    Petry, D

    2001-01-01

    The GRANITE III camera of the Whipple Cherenkov Telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona (2300 m a.s.l.) has the highest angular resolution of all cameras used on this telescope so far. The central region of the camera has 379 pixels with an individual angular diameter of 0.12 degrees. This makes the instrument especially suitable for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at large zenith angles since the increase in average distance to the shower maximum leads to smaller shower images in the focal plane of the telescope. We examine the performance of the telescope for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at zenith angles up to 63 degrees based on observations of Mkn 421 and using Monte Carlo Simulations. An improvement to the standard data analysis is suggested.

  13. High zenith angle observations of PKS 2155-304 with the MAGIC-I telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2012-08-01

    Context. The high frequency peaked BL Lac PKS 2155-304 with a redshift of z = 0.116 was discovered in 1997 in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray range by the University of Durham Mark VI γ-ray Cherenkov telescope in Australia with a flux corresponding to 20% of the Crab Nebula flux. It was later observed and detected with high significance by the southern Cherenkov observatory H.E.S.S. establishing this source as the best studied southern TeV blazar. Detection from the northern hemisphere is difficult due to challenging observation conditions under large zenith angles. In July 2006, the H.E.S.S. collaboration reported an extraordinary outburst of VHE γ-emission. During the outburst, the VHE γ-ray emission was found to be variable on the time scales of minutes and with a mean flux of ~7 times the flux observed from the Crab Nebula. Follow-up observations with the MAGIC-I standalone Cherenkov telescope were triggered by this extraordinary outburst and PKS 2155-304 was observed between 28 July to 2 August 2006 for 15 h at large zenith angles. Aims: We studied the behavior of the source after its extraordinary flare. Furthermore, we developed an analysis method in order to analyze these data taken under large zenith angles. Methods: Here we present an enhanced analysis method for data taken at high zenith angles. We developed improved methods for event selection that led to a better background suppression. Results: The quality of the results presented here is superior to the results presented previously for this data set: detection of the source on a higher significance level and a lower analysis threshold. The averaged energy spectrum we derived has a spectral index of (-3.5 ± 0.2) above 400 GeV, which is in good agreement with the spectral shape measured by H.E.S.S. during the major flare on MJD 53 944. Furthermore, we present the spectral energy distribution modeling of PKS 2155-304. With our observations we increased the duty cycle of the source

  14. High zenith angle observations of PKS 2155-304 with the MAGIC-I telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antoranz, P; Asensio, M; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Tridon, D Borla; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Cossio, L; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadamek, A; Hadasch, D; Häfner, D; Herrero, A; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Huber, B; Jankowski, F; Jogler, T; Kadenius, V; Klepser, S; Knoetig, M L; Krähenbühl, T; Krause, J; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Leonardo, E; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Niedzwiecki, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Persic, M; Pilia, M; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R

    2012-01-01

    The high frequency peaked BL Lac PKS 2155-304 with a redshift of z=0.116 was discovered in 1997 in the very high energy (VHE, E >100GeV) gamma-ray range by the University of Durham Mark VI gamma-ray Cherenkov telescope in Australia with a flux corresponding to 20% of the Crab Nebula flux. It was later observed and detected with high significance by the Southern Cherenkov observatory H.E.S.S. Detection from the Northern hemisphere is difficult due to challenging observation conditions under large zenith angles. In July 2006, the H.E.S.S. collaboration reported an extraordinary outburst of VHE gamma-emission. During the outburst, the VHE gamma-ray emission was found to be variable on the time scales of minutes and with a mean flux of ~7 times the flux observed from the Crab Nebula. Follow-up observations with the MAGIC-I standalone Cherenkov telescope were triggered by this extraordinary outburst and PKS 2155-304 was observed between 28 July to 2 August 2006 for 15 hours at large zenith angles. Here we present ...

  15. Cassini UVIS observations of Titan ultraviolet airglow intensity dependence with solar zenith angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, E. M.; Ajello, J. M.; Holsclaw, G. M.; West, R. A.; Esposito, L. W.; Bradley, E. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) observed the airglow (dayglow and nightglow) of Titan over a range of solar zenith angles (SZA) from 14 to 150° on five separate observations obtained between 2008 and 2012. The modeling of the solar cycle normalized UVIS observations indicates that a Chapman layer function provides a satisfactory fit to the intensity of the EUV and FUV airglow molecular emissions of the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band system (LBH a1Πg→X1>∑g+), the Carroll-Yoshino band system (c4'1>∑u+→X1>∑g+), and of several atomic multiplets of nitrogen (NI, II) as a function of SZA. This result shows that the strongest contribution to the Titan dayglow occurs by processes (photoelectrons and photodissociation) involving the solar EUV flux rather than magnetospheric particle precipitation that dominates emission excitation in the nightglow.

  16. Retrieval of stratospheric O3 and NO2 vertical profiles using zenith scattered light observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G S Meena; C S Bhosale; D B Jadhav

    2006-06-01

    Daily zenith scattered light intensity observations were carried out in the morning twilight hours using home-made UV-visible spectrometer over the tropical station Pune (18° 31′, 73° 51′)for the years 2000-2003.These observations are obtained in the spectral range 462-498 nm for the solar zenith angles (SZAs)varying from 87° to 91.5°. An algorithm has been developed to retrieve vertical profiles of ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from ground-based measurements using the Chahine iteration method.This retrieval method has been checked using measured and recalculated slant column densities (SCDs)and they are found to be well matching. O3 and NO2 vertical profiles have been retrieved using a set of their air mass factors (AMFs)and SCDs measured over a range of 87-91.5° SZA during the morning.The vertical profiles obtained by this method are compared with Umkehr profiles and ozonesondes and they are found to be in good agreement.The bulk of the column density is found near layer 20-25 km.Daily total column densities (TCDs)of O3 and NO2 along with their stratospheric and tropospheric counterparts are derived using their vertical profiles for the period 2000-2003.The total column,stratospheric column and tropospheric column amounts of both trace gases are found to be maximum in summer and minimum in the winter season.Increasing trend is found in column density of NO2 in stratospheric,tropospheric and surface layers,but no trend is observed in O3 columns for above layers during the period 2000-2003.

  17. Can liquid water profiles be retrieved from passive microwave zenith observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewell, Susanne; Ebell, Kerstin; Löhnert, Ulrich; Turner, D. D.

    2009-03-01

    The ability to determine the cloud boundaries and vertical distribution of cloud liquid water for single-layer liquid clouds using zenith-pointing microwave radiometers is investigated. Simulations are used to demonstrate that there is little skill in determining either cloud base or cloud thickness, especially when the cloud thickness is less than 500 m. It is also shown that the different distributions of liquid water content within a cloud with known cloud boundaries results in a maximum change in the brightness temperature of less than 1 K at the surface from 20 to 150 GHz, which is on the order of the instrument noise level. Furthermore, it is demonstrated using the averaging kernel that the number of degrees of freedom for signal (i.e., independent pieces of information) is approximately 1, which implies there is no information on vertical distribution of liquid water in the microwave observations.

  18. Observations of Mkn 421 in 2004 with H.E.S.S. at large zenith angles

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; De Jager, O C; Johnston, S; Khelifi, B; Kirk, J G; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Leroy, N; Martineau-Huynh, O; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Skjraasen, O; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-01-01

    Mkn 421 was observed during a high flux state for nine nights in April and May 2004 with the fully operational High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) in Namibia. The observations were carried out at zenith angles of 60$^\\circ$--65$^\\circ$, which result in an average energy threshold of 1.5 TeV and a collection area reaching 2~km$^2$ at 10~TeV. Roughly 7000 photons from Mkn~421 were accumulated with an average gamma-ray rate of 8 photons/min. The overall significance of the detection exceeds 100 standard deviations. The light-curve of integrated fluxes above 2~TeV shows changes of the diurnal flux up to a factor of 4.3. For nights of high flux, intra-night variability is detected with a decay time of less than 1 hour. The time averaged energy spectrum is curved and is well described by a power-law with a photon index $\\egamm$ and an exponential cutoff at $\\ecut$~TeV and an average integral flux above 2~TeV of 3 Crab flux units. Significant variations of the spectral shape are detected with a spectral harde...

  19. Estimating Zenith Tropospheric Delays from BeiDou Navigation Satellite System Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Sui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The GNSS derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD plays today a very critical role in meteorological study and weather forecasts, as ZTDs of thousands of GNSS stations are operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. Recently, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS was officially announced to provide operational services around China and its neighborhood and it was demonstrated to be very promising for precise navigation and positioning. In this contribution, we concentrate on estimating ZTD using BDS observations to assess its capacity for troposphere remote sensing. A local network which is about 250 km from Beijing and comprised of six stations equipped with GPS- and BDS-capable receivers is utilized. Data from 5 to 8 November 2012 collected on the network is processed in network mode using precise orbits and in Precise Point Positioning mode using precise orbits and clocks. The precise orbits and clocks are generated from a tracking network with most of the stations in China and several stations around the world. The derived ZTDs are compared with that estimated from GPS data using the final products of the International GNSS Service (IGS. The comparison shows that the bias and the standard deviation of the ZTD differences are about 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, which are very close to the differences of GPS ZTD estimated using different software packages.

  20. Estimating zenith tropospheric delays from BeiDou navigation satellite system observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Aigong; Xu, Zongqiu; Ge, Maorong; Xu, Xinchao; Zhu, Huizhong; Sui, Xin

    2013-04-03

    The GNSS derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) plays today a very critical role in meteorological study and weather forecasts, as ZTDs of thousands of GNSS stations are operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. Recently, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) was officially announced to provide operational services around China and its neighborhood and it was demonstrated to be very promising for precise navigation and positioning. In this contribution, we concentrate on estimating ZTD using BDS observations to assess its capacity for troposphere remote sensing. A local network which is about 250 km from Beijing and comprised of six stations equipped with GPS- and BDS-capable receivers is utilized. Data from 5 to 8 November 2012 collected on the network is processed in network mode using precise orbits and in Precise Point Positioning mode using precise orbits and clocks. The precise orbits and clocks are generated from a tracking network with most of the stations in China and several stations around the world. The derived ZTDs are compared with that estimated from GPS data using the final products of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The comparison shows that the bias and the standard deviation of the ZTD differences are about 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, which are very close to the differences of GPS ZTD estimated using different software packages.

  1. The temperatures of Giordano Bruno crater observed by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment: Application of an effective field of view model for a point-based data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J.-P.; Sefton-Nash, E.; Paige, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Point based planetary datasets are typically stored as discrete records that represent an infinitesimal location on the target body. Instrumental effects and spacecraft motion during integration time can cause single points to inadequately represent the total area on the target that contributes to an observation. Production of mapped data products from these data for scientific analysis proceeds by binning points onto rectangular grids. Empty bins occur where data coverage is insufficient relative to grid resolution, a common problem at high latitudes in cylindrical projections, and remedial interpolation can lead to high uncertainty areas and artifacts in maps. To address such issues and make better use of available data, we present a method to calculate the ground-projected effective field of view (EFOV) for point-based datasets, using knowledge of instrumental characteristics and observation geometry. We apply this approach to data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, a visible to far-infrared multispectral radiometer which acquires radiometric measurements of reflected visible and emitted infrared radiation of the Moon in 9 spectral channels between 0.35 and 400 μm. Analysis of gridded radiance from crater Giordano Bruno, a 22 km diameter rayed crater, is used to demonstrate our gridding procedure. Diviner data, with such processing, reveals details of the surface that are seen in the high-resolution LRO Camera NAC images. Brightness temperatures and anisothermality observed in Diviner's IR channels show the thermophysical properties of the crater ejecta to be very heterogeneous indicative of minimal mechanical disruption by micrometeoroid impacts consistent with a very young (<10 Ma) formation age as the lunar surface becomes rapidly homogenized over time. This heterogeneity has implications for crater-count studies as regions of high anisothermality are characterized by large blocks of material and lower crater

  2. Wide field of view telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-15

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  3. Development of a multiple-field-of-view multiple-scattering polarization lidar: comparison with cloud radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Makino, Toshiyuki; Jin, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Atsushi; Takano, Toshiaki; Fujikawa, Masahiro

    2016-12-26

    We developed a multiple-field-of-view multiple-scattering polarization lidar (MFMSPL) to study the microphysics of optically thick clouds. Designed to measure enhanced backscattering and depolarization ratio comparable to space-borne lidar, the system consists of four sets of parallel and perpendicular channels mounted with different zenith angles. Depolarization ratios from water clouds were large as observed by MFMSPL compared to those observed by conventional lidar. Cloud top heights and depolarization ratios tended to be larger for outer MFMSPL channels than for vertically pointing channels. Co-located 95 GHz cloud radar and MFMSPL observations showed reasonable agreement at the observed cloud top height.

  4. Mirror-concentrator for space telescope with wide field of view and "high" angular resolution for observation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and other atmospheric flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharakin, Sergey A.; Khrenov, Boris A.; Klimov, Pavel A.; Panasyuk, Mikhail I.; Potanin, Sergey A.; Yashin, Ivan V.

    2012-09-01

    Idea of ultrahigh cosmic rays (UHECR) measurement from satellites was suggested by Linsley in 1981 and since has being developed into projects of cosmic rays telescopes for International Space Station (ISS): JEM-EUSO - to be installed on the Japanese experimental module and KLYPVE - on the Russian ISS segment. A series of space-based detectors for measurements of background phenomena in those telescopes were developed in Russia (Universitetsky-Tatiana, Universitetsky-Tatiana-2 , Chibis satellites). The satellite Lomonosov with UHECR detector TUS on its board will be launched in 2013. TUS contains multi-channel photo receiver and Fresnel-type mirror manufactured with use of special multi-layer carbon plastic technology in RSC “Energia". In this paper one and two component optical systems with 360 cm entrance diameter and 400 cm focal distance for wide angle detector KLYPVE are studied. In one component case using generalized Davies-Cotton systems (Fresnel-type mirror with ellipsoidal gross surface) it is possible to obtain 8-10° field of view (FoV) with focal spot size less than pixel size equal to 15 x 15 mm. In two component system (parabolic mirror and a Fresnel lens, mounted close to photo receiver) it is possible to increase FoV up to 10-12° and significantly simplify the primary mirror construction.

  5. Multiple View Zenith Angle Observations of Reflectance From Ponderosa Pine Stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lee F.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Reflectance factors (RF(lambda)) from dense and sparse ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands, derived from radiance data collected in the solar principal plane by the Advanced Solid-State Array Spectro-radiometer (ASAS), were examined as a function of view zenith angle (theta(sub v)). RF(lambda) was maximized with theta(sub v) nearest the solar retrodirection, and minimized near the specular direction throughout the ASAS spectral region. The dense stand had much higher RF anisotropy (ma)dmurn RF is minimum RF) in the red region than did the sparse stand (relative differences of 5.3 vs. 2.75, respectively), as a function of theta(sub v), due to the shadow component in the canopy. Anisotropy in the near-infrared (NIR) was more similar between the two stands (2.5 in the dense stand and 2.25 in the sparse stand); the dense stand exhibited a greater hotspot effect than 20 the sparse stand in this spectral region. Two common vegetation transforms, the NIR/red ratio and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), both showed a theta(sub v) dependence for the dense stand. Minimum values occurred near the retrodirection and maximum values occurred near the specular direction. Greater relative differences were noted for the NIR/red ratio (2.1) than for the NDVI (1.3). The sparse stand showed no obvious dependence on theta(sub v) for either transform, except for slightly elevated values toward the specular direction.

  6. Stereoscopic wide field of view imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechtl, Eric F. (Inventor); Sedwick, Raymond J. (Inventor); Jonas, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A stereoscopic imaging system incorporates a plurality of imaging devices or cameras to generate a high resolution, wide field of view image database from which images can be combined in real time to provide wide field of view or panoramic or omni-directional still or video images.

  7. GPS Zenith Total Delays and Precipitable Water in comparison with special meteorological observations in Verona (Italyduring MAP-SOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Corradini

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuous meteorological examination of the Pre-Alpine zones in Northern Italy (Po Valleyis important for determination of atmospheric water cycles connected with floods and rainfalls.During a special meteorological observing period (MAP-SOP,radiosounding and other measurements were made in the site of Verona (Italy. This paper deals with Zenith Total Delay (ZTDand Precipitable Water (PWcomparisons obtained by GPS, radiosounding and other meteorological measurements.PW and ZTD from ground-based GPS data in comparisonwith classical techniques (e.g.,WVR,radiosoundingfrom recent literature present an accurate tool for use in meteorology applications (e.g.,assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWPmodels on short-range precipitation forecasts.Comparison of such ZTD for MAP-SOP showed a standard deviation of 16.1 mm and PW comparison showed a standard deviation of 2.7 mm,confirming the accuracy of GPS measurements for meteorology applications.In addition,PW data and its time variation are also matched with time series of meteorological situations.Those results indicate that changes in PW values could be connected to changes in air masses,i.e.to passages of both cold and warm fronts.There is also a correlation between precipitation, forthcoming increase and the following decrease of PW.A good agreement between oscillation of PW and precipitation and strong cyclonic activities is found.

  8. Fields of View for Environmental Radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    The gamma component of air radiation dose rates is a function of the amount and spread of radioactive nuclides in the environment. These radionuclides can be natural or anthropogenic in origin. The field of view describes the area of radionuclides on, or below, the ground that is responsible for determining the air dose rate, and hence correspondingly the external radiation exposure. This work describes Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations for the field of view under a variety of situations. Presented first are results for natural 40K and thorium and uranium series radionuclides distributed homogeneously within the ground. Results are then described for atmospheric radioactive caesium fallout, such as from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Various stages of fallout evolution are considered through the depth distribution of 134Cs and 137Cs in soil. The fields of view for the natural radionuclides and radiocaesium are different. This can affect the responses of radiation monitors to th...

  9. Effects of solar zenith angles on CO Cameron bands emission intensities in the dayside atmosphere of Mars: MEX/SPICAM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothuraju, Thirupathaiah; Haider, Syed A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a model to calculate the photoelectron energy fluxes and emission intensities of the CO Cameron bands in the upper atmosphere of Mars between solar zenith angles 0° to 90°. The production and loss mechanisms of CO (a ^{3}Π) are incorporated in the model. The atmospheric neutral parameters are adopted from the Mars Climate Database (v5.2). The required solar EUV fluxes are taken from the Solar2000 model (v2.37) and scaled to Mars. The photoelectron fluxes are calculated at different solar zenith angles using an analytical yield spectrum approach based on the Monte Carlo method. In this model we have assumed that crustal magnetic fields are horizontal in direction. Thus, photoelectrons are losing their energy at the same height where they are produced. This assumption is valid at mid and high latitudes where magnetic fields are mostly horizontal. We have also developed a coupled chemistry model to calculate the ion and electron density at different solar zenith angles, which are used in the airglow model. The model results are compared with the observations provided by the SPICAM onboard MEX. Our model reproduces the observed intensity profiles quite well. The CO (a ^{3}Π) is produced due to photoelectron excitation/dissociation, photodissociation, and dissociative recombination processes. It is destroyed by CO _{2}, CO and radiative decay. It is found that photon and photoelectron dissociation are dominant production processes of CO (a ^{3}Π), while radiative decay is a major loss mechanism of this state. The estimated photoelectron fluxes, production rates and intensities are decreasing with increasing solar zenith angles.

  10. The effects of field of view on the perception of 3D slant from texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todd, J.T.; Thaler, L.; Dijkstra, T.M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Observers judged the apparent signs and magnitudes of surface slant from monocular textured images of convex or concave dihedral angles with varying fields of view between 5 degrees C and 60 degrees C. The results revealed that increasing the field of view or the regularity of the surface texture

  11. A wide field of view plasma spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Möbius, E.; Harper, R. W.; Kihara, K. H.; Bower, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a fundamentally new type of space plasma spectrometer, the wide field of view plasma spectrometer, whose field of view is > 1.25π ster using fewer resources than traditional methods. The enabling component is analogous to a pinhole camera with an electrostatic energy-angle filter at the image plane. Particle energy-per-charge is selected with a tunable bias voltage applied to the filter plate relative to the pinhole aperture plate. For a given bias voltage, charged particles from different directions are focused by different angles to different locations. Particles with appropriate locations and angles can transit the filter plate and are measured using a microchannel plate detector with a position-sensitive anode. Full energy and angle coverage are obtained using a single high-voltage power supply, resulting in considerable resource savings and allowing measurements at fast timescales. We present laboratory prototype measurements and simulations demonstrating the instrument concept and discuss optimizations of the instrument design for application to space measurements.

  12. Retrieval of stratospheric and tropospheric BrO profiles and columns using ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations at Harestua, 60° N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Pyle

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A profiling algorithm based on the optimal estimation method is applied to ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible measurements from Harestua, Southern Norway (60° N, 11° E in order to retrieve BrO vertical profiles. The sensitivity of the zenith-sky observations to the tropospheric BrO detection is increased by using for the spectral analysis a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to clear-sky noon summer conditions. The information content and retrieval errors are characterized and it is shown that the retrieved stratospheric profiles and total columns are consistent with correlative balloon and satellite observations, respectively. Tropospheric BrO columns are derived from profiles retrieved at 80° solar zenith angle during sunrise and sunset for the 2000–2006 period. They show a marked seasonality with mean column value ranging from 1.52±0.62×1013 molec/cm² in late winter/early spring to 0.92±0.38×1013 molec/cm² in summer, which corresponds to 1.0±0.4 and 0.6±0.2 pptv, respectively, if we assume that BrO is uniformly mixed in the troposphere. These column values are also consistent with previous estimates made from balloon, satellite, and other ground-based observations. Daytime (10:30 LT tropospheric BrO columns are compared to the p-TOMCAT 3-D tropospheric chemical transport model (CTM for the 2002–2003 period. p-TOMCAT shows a good agreement with the retrieved columns except in late winter/early spring where an underestimation by the model is obtained. This finding could be explained by the non-inclusion of sea-ice bromine sources in the current version of p-TOMCAT. Therefore the model cannot reproduce the possible transport of air-masses with enhanced BrO concentration due to bromine explosion events from the polar region to Harestua. The daytime stratospheric BrO columns are compared to the SLIMCAT stratospheric 3-D-CTM. The model run used in this study, which assumes 21.2 pptv for the Bry loading (15 pptv for long

  13. An airborne pushbroom hyperspectral imager with wide field of view

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peixin Hu; Qirnin Lu; Rong Shu; Jianyu Wang

    2005-01-01

    @@ An airborne pushbroom hyperspectral imager (APHI) with wide field (42° field of view) is presented.It is composed of two 22°field of view (FOV) imagers and can provide 1304 pixels in spatial dimension,124 bands in spectral dimension in one frame. APHI has a bandwidth ranging from 400 to 900 nm.

  14. Retrieval of nitrogen dioxide stratospheric profiles from ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible observations: validation of the technique through correlative comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hendrick

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A retrieval algorithm based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM has been developed in order to provide vertical distributions of NO2 in the stratosphere from ground-based (GB zenith-sky UV-visible observations. It has been applied to observational data sets from the NDSC (Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change stations of Harestua (60° N, 10° E and Andøya (69° N, 16° E in Norway. The information content and retrieval errors have been analyzed following a formalism used for characterizing ozone profiles retrieved from solar infrared absorption spectra. In order to validate the technique, the retrieved NO2 vertical profiles and columns have been compared to correlative balloon and satellite observations. Such extensive validation of the profile and column retrievals was not reported in previously published work on the profiling from GB UV-visible measurements. A good agreement - generally better than 25% - has been found with the SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales and DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy balloons. A similar agreement has been reached with correlative satellite data from the HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instruments above 25km of altitude. Below 25km, a systematic underestimation - by up to 40% in some cases - of both HALOE and POAM III profiles by our GB profile retrievals has been observed, pointing out more likely a limitation of both satellite instruments at these altitudes. We have concluded that our study strengthens our confidence in the reliability of the retrieval of vertical distribution information from GB UV-visible observations and offers new perspectives in the use of GB UV-visible network data for validation purposes.

  15. Retrieval of nitrogen dioxide stratospheric profiles from ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible observations: validation of the technique through correlative comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hendrick

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available A retrieval algorithm based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM has been developed in order to provide vertical distributions of NO2 in the stratosphere from ground-based (GB zenith-sky UV-visible observations. It has been applied to observational data sets from the NDSC (Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change stations of Harestua (60° N, 10° E and Andøya (69.3° N, 16.1° E in Norway. The information content and retrieval errors have been analyzed following a formalism used for characterizing ozone profiles retrieved from solar infrared absorption spectra. In order to validate the technique, the retrieved NO2 vertical profiles and columns have been compared to correlative balloon and satellite observations. Such extensive validation of the profile and column retrievals was not reported in previously published work on the profiling from GB UV-visible measurements. A good agreement – generally better than 25% – has been found with the SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales and DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy balloon data. A similar agreement has been reached with correlative satellite data from HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instruments above 25 km of altitude. Below 25 km, a systematic overestimation of our retrieved profiles – by up to 50% in some cases – has been observed by both HALOE and POAM III, pointing out the limitation of the satellite solar occultation technique at these altitudes. We have concluded that our study strengthens our confidence in the reliability of the retrieval of vertical distribution information from GB UV-visible observations and offers new perspectives in the use of GB UV-visible network data for validation purposes.

  16. Monitoring stratospheric chlorine activation from time series of OClO DSCDs above Kiruna using ground-based zenith sky DOAS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Myojeong; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Pukite, Janis; Platt, Ulrich; Raffalski, Uwe; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    After to the Montreal protocol and amendments, the production of CFCs was strongly reduced. Since then scientists have steadily made efforts to monitor the amount of chlorine compounds which are responsible for the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Although very recent research of stratospheric ozone indicates an ozone recovery, ozone depletion is still observed in the polar spring and is expected to last for about another 70 years according to the WMO. Therefore, continuous observation and analysis of the stratospheric ozone as well as other stratospheric trace gases are highly demanded. Several previous studies have investigated OClO which is an indicator for stratospheric chlorine activation using satellite, ground-based, and balloon remote sensing measurements. In this work, we investigate long-term time series of OClO DSCDs (Differential Slant Column densities) above Kiruna, Sweden (67.84°N, 20.41°E) which is located inside the Arctic Circle by using the ground-based zenith sky DOAS measurements. Since our measurements are performed at the fixed site, for the interpretation also the relative position of the polar vortex has to be considered. Our long-term data obtained during about 15 years allows us to classify the dependence of the OClO amount on the various meteorological conditions. Our data show a large variability with high OClO SCDs in cold, and low OClO SCDs in warm winters. Our measurements also allow to investigate the effect of the chlorine activation and its duration on the strength of the ozone destruction.

  17. Effect of field of view and monocular viewing on angular size judgements in an outdoor scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denz, E. A.; Palmer, E. A.; Ellis, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    Observers typically overestimate the angular size of distant objects. Significantly, overestimations are greater in outdoor settings than in aircraft visual-scene simulators. The effect of field of view and monocular and binocular viewing conditions on angular size estimation in an outdoor field was examined. Subjects adjusted the size of a variable triangle to match the angular size of a standard triangle set at three greater distances. Goggles were used to vary the field of view from 11.5 deg to 90 deg for both monocular and binocular viewing. In addition, an unrestricted monocular and binocular viewing condition was used. It is concluded that neither restricted fields of view similar to those present in visual simulators nor the restriction of monocular viewing causes a significant loss in depth perception in outdoor settings. Thus, neither factor should significantly affect the depth realism of visual simulators.

  18. Extending the field of view of KD/asterisk/P electrooptic modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    The use of KD(asterisk)P as a polarization rotator has been limited to small field of view instruments. To investigate this limitation, the index ellipsoid is used to describe the optical properties of KD(asterisk)P and to calculate the retardance and fast axis as a function of the angle of incidence and voltage. Computed converging light patterns are then compared with observed intensity patterns formed by KD(asterisk)P. Finally, computed intensity patterns are used to demonstrate how the field of view of KD(asterisk)P can be increased when properly aligned with a positive uniaxial crystal.

  19. Field-balanced adaptive optics error function for wide field-of-view space-based systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Brian K.; Friedman, Edward J.

    2002-03-01

    Adaptive optics are regularly used in ground-based astronomical telescopes. These applications are characterized by a very narrow (approximately 1 arcmin) field of view. For economic reasons, commercial space-based earth-observing optical systems must have a field of view as large as possible. We develop a new error function that is an extension of conventional adaptive optics for wide field-of-view optical systems and show that this new error function enables diffraction-limited performance across a large field of view with only one deformable mirror. This new error function allows for reprogramming of aberration control algorithms for particular applications by the use of an addressable weighting function.

  20. Field Of View Of A Spacecraft Antenna: Analysis And Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Kipp, R.; Lee, S. W.

    1995-01-01

    Report summarizes computational analysis of field of view of rotating elliptical-cross-section parabolic-reflector antenna for SeaWinds spacecraft. Issues considered include blockage and diffraction by other objects near antenna, related concerns about electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility, and how far and in which configuration other objects positioned with respect to antenna to achieve required performance.

  1. Effect of field-of-view on the Coriolis illusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, E.L.; Muis, H.; Kooi, F.L.

    2008-01-01

    Tilting the head during rotation about an Earth-vertical axis produces cross-coupled stimulation of the semicircular canals. Without visual feedback on the actual self-motion, this leads to the so-called Coriolis illusion. We investigated the effect of the field-of-view (FOV) on the magnitude and du

  2. Validation of SCIAMACHY NO2 Vertical Column Densities with Mt.Cimone and Stara Zagora Ground-Based Zenith Sky DOAS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, I.; Petritoli, A.; Werner, R.; Valev, D.; Atanasov, At.; Bortoli, D.; Markova, T.; Ravegnani, F.; Palazzi, E.; Giovanelli, G.

    2004-08-01

    Ground-based zenith sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements performed by means of GASCOD instruments at Mt. Cimone (44N 11E), Italy and Stara Zagora (42N, 25E), Bulgaria are used for validation of SCIAMACHY NO2 vertical column density (vcd) of ESA SCI_NL product retrieved with 5.01 processor version. The results presented in this work regard satellite data for the JulyDecember 2002 period. On this base it is concluded that during summer-autumn period the overall NO2 vcd above both stations is fairly well reproduced by the SCIAMACHY data, while towards the winter period they deviate from the seasonal behaviour of NO2 vcd derived at both stations

  3. High-Resolution, Wide-Field-of-View Scanning Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Cesar; Wilson, Robert; Seshadri, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    A proposed telescope would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view (<0.10 ) while scanning over a total field of view nominally 16 wide without need to slew the entire massive telescope structure. The telescope design enables resolution of a 1-m-wide object in a 50- km-wide area of the surface of the Earth as part of a 200-km-wide area field of view monitored from an orbit at an altitude of 700 km. The conceptual design of this telescope could also be adapted to other applications both terrestrial and extraterrestrial in which there are requirements for telescopes that afford both wide- and narrow-field capabilities. In the proposed telescope, the scanning would be effected according to a principle similar to that of the Arecibo radio telescope, in which the primary mirror is stationary with respect to the ground and a receiver is moved across the focal surface of the primary mirror. The proposed telescope would comprise (1) a large spherical primary mirror that would afford high resolution over a narrow field of view and (2) a small displaceable optical relay segment that would be pivoted about the center of an aperture stop to effect the required scanning (see figure). Taken together, both comprise a scanning narrow-angle telescope that does not require slewing the telescope structure. In normal operation, the massive telescope structure would stare at a fixed location on the ground. The inner moveable relay optic would be pivoted to scan the narrower field of view over the wider one, making it possible to retain a fixed telescope orientation, while obtaining high-resolution images over multiple target areas during an interval of 3 to 4 minutes in the intended orbit. The pivoting relay segment of the narrow-angle telescope would include refractive and reflective optical elements, including two aspherical mirrors, to counteract the spherical aberration of the primary mirror. Overall, the combination of the primary mirror and the smaller relay optic

  4. Fundamentals of absolute pyroheliometry and objective characterization. [using a narrow field of view radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crommelynck, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The radiometric methodology in use with a narrow field of view radiometer for observation of the solar constant is described. The radiation output of the Sun is assumed to be constant, enabling the monitoring of the solar source by an accurately pointed radiometer, and the Sun's output is measured as a function of time. The instrument is described, its angular response considered, and principles for absolute radiometric measurement presented. Active modes of operation are analyzed, taking into consideration instrumental perturbations and sensor efficiency, heating wire effect, cavity sensor efficiency, thermal effects on the surface of the sensitive area, the effect of the field of view limiting system, and the frequency response of the heat flux detector and absolute radiometric system. Performance of absolute measurements with relatively high accuracy is demonstrated.

  5. Electrowetting liquid lens array on curved substrates for wide field of view image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Yousung; Lee, Muyoung; Won, Yong Hyub

    2016-03-01

    In this research, electrowetting liquid lens array on curved substrates is developed for wide field of view image sensor. In the conventional image sensing system, this lens array is usually in the form of solid state. However, in this state, the lens array which is similar to insect-like compound eyes in nature has several limitations such as degradation of image quality and narrow field of view because it cannot adjust focal length of lens. For implementation of the more enhanced system, the curved array of lenses based on electrowetting effect is developed in this paper, which can adjust focal length of lens. The fabrication of curved lens array is conducted upon the several steps, including chamber fabrication, electrode & dielectric layer deposition, liquid injection, and encapsulation. As constituent materials, IZO coated convex glass, UV epoxy (NOA 68), DI water, and dodecane are used. The number of lenses on the fabricated panel is 23 by 23 and each lens has 1mm aperture with 1.6mm pitch between adjacent lenses. When the voltage is applied on the device, it is observed that each lens is changed from concave state to convex state. From the unique optical characteristics of curved array of liquid lenses such as controllable focal length and wide field of view, we can expect that it has potential applications in various fields such as medical diagnostics, surveillance systems, and light field photography.

  6. Wide-Field-of-View, High-Resolution, Stereoscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechtl, Eric F.; Sedwick, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    A device combines video feeds from multiple cameras to provide wide-field-of-view, high-resolution, stereoscopic video to the user. The prototype under development consists of two camera assemblies, one for each eye. One of these assemblies incorporates a mounting structure with multiple cameras attached at offset angles. The video signals from the cameras are fed to a central processing platform where each frame is color processed and mapped into a single contiguous wide-field-of-view image. Because the resolution of most display devices is typically smaller than the processed map, a cropped portion of the video feed is output to the display device. The positioning of the cropped window will likely be controlled through the use of a head tracking device, allowing the user to turn his or her head side-to-side or up and down to view different portions of the captured image. There are multiple options for the display of the stereoscopic image. The use of head mounted displays is one likely implementation. However, the use of 3D projection technologies is another potential technology under consideration, The technology can be adapted in a multitude of ways. The computing platform is scalable, such that the number, resolution, and sensitivity of the cameras can be leveraged to improve image resolution and field of view. Miniaturization efforts can be pursued to shrink the package down for better mobility. Power savings studies can be performed to enable unattended, remote sensing packages. Image compression and transmission technologies can be incorporated to enable an improved telepresence experience.

  7. Wide-field-of-view (WFOV) night vision goggle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Wayne; Estrera, Joseph P.

    2003-09-01

    The United States' armed forces continue to be presented with increased challenges in adverse operational environments with increasing risk and complexity - especially at night. To ensure continued operational success and battlefield superiority during darkness, our armed forces must be equipped with night vision (NV) systems providing increased situational awareness. Doing so will significantly enhance threat detection and engagement, as well as survivability, thus ensuring greater mission success. Northrop Grumman Electro-Optical Systems (EOS) continues to develop its Wide Field of View (WFOV) image intensification (I2) night vision system for ground forces. This system will provide a significant increase in visual coverage enabling US forces to continue "to own the night". Until now, NV systems have typically been limited to a 40-degree field of view (FOV), vertically and horizontally. This limited FOV reduces off-axis detection, restricts an individual soldier's recognition and engagement capabilities and hinders added peripheral vision. To counter this operational deficiency, EOS proposes the Wide Field of View (WFOV) night vision binocular. The WFOV system will have a 70-degree horizontal FOV, with a 55-degree vertical FOV. The increased FOV will result in increased situational awareness of soldiers' surrounding environment (including terrain, hazards, threat, etc) during normal night operations. It will also allow for rapid and safer movement, especially in MOUT operations. Additionally, the increased visual coverage of large areas will enable soldiers to detect and engage targets faster and with greater reliability. The WFOV binocular will significantly enhance survivability, threat detection and engagement, and hence, greater mission success rate.

  8. Imaging ellipsometer with large field-of-view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liyuan; Zeng, Aijun; Hu, Shiyu; Yuan, Qiao; Cheng, Weilin; Zhang, Shanhua; Hu, Guohang; He, Hongbo; Huang, Huijie

    2016-11-01

    A polarizer-compensator-sample-analyzer (PCSA) imaging ellipsometer with large field of view is presented. The sample is imaged on a CCD sensor by a telecentric imaging system and its tilt is monitored by an optical autocollimator. The sample, the telecentric imaging system and the CCD sensor satisfy the Scheimpflug condition. In measurement, the light extinction measurement method and the four quadrants average method are used to improve the accuracy. In experiments, a chromium thin film sample is measured by the imaging ellipsometer and a spectroscopic ellipsometer. The measurement results by two ellipsometers are consistent. The usefulness of the imaging ellipsometer is verified.

  9. Sliding mode control based impact angle control guidance considering the seeker׳s field-of-view constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingliang; Zhang, Youan; Wu, Huali

    2016-03-01

    The problem of impact angle control guidance for a field-of-view constrained missile against non-maneuvering or maneuvering targets is solved by using the sliding mode control theory. The existing impact angle control guidance laws with field-of-view constraint are only applicable against stationary targets and most of them suffer abrupt-jumping of guidance command due to the application of additional guidance mode switching logic. In this paper, the field-of-view constraint is handled without using any additional switching logic. In particular, a novel time-varying sliding surface is first designed to achieve zero miss distance and zero impact angle error without violating the field-of-view constraint during the sliding mode phase. Then a control integral barrier Lyapunov function is used to design the reaching law so that the sliding mode can be reached within finite time and the field-of-view constraint is not violated during the reaching phase as well. A nonlinear extended state observer is constructed to estimate the disturbance caused by unknown target maneuver, and the undesirable chattering is alleviated effectively by using the estimation as a compensation item in the guidance law. The performance of the proposed guidance law is illustrated with simulations.

  10. Magnetic zenith effect in ionospheric modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, A.V.; Zybin, K.P.; Carlson, H.C.; Pedersen, T

    2002-12-09

    The theory of ionospheric modification for the beam of powerful radio emission directed along magnetic field lines is developed. Nonlinear process of beam self-focusing on striations is shown to determine strong amplification of heating and acceleration of plasma electrons. It results in a dramatic enhancement of optic emission from the magnetic zenith region in ionospheric F-layer. An excellent agreement between the theory and recent fundamental observations at HAARP facility (Alaska) [T. Pedersen et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. (2002), in press] is demonstrated.

  11. CIMEL Measurements of Zenith Radiances at the ARM Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander; Wiscombe, Warren; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Starting from October 1, 2001, Cimel at the ARM Central Facility in Oklahoma has been switched to a new "cloud mode." This mode allows taking measurements of zenith radiance when the Sun in blocked by clouds. In this case, every 13 min. Cimel points straight up and takes 10 measurements with 9 sec. time interval. The new Cimel's mode has four filters at 440, 670, 870 and 1020 nm. For cloudy conditions, the spectral contrast in surface albedo dominates over Rayleigh and aerosol effects; this makes normalized zenith radiances at 440 and 670 as well as for 870 and 1020 almost indistinguishable. We compare Cimel measurements with other ARM cart site instruments: Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), Narrow Field of View (NFOV) sensor, and MicroWave Radiometer(MWR). Based on Cimel and MFRSR 670 and 870 nm channels, we build a normalized difference cloud index (NDCI) for radiances and fluxes, respectively. Radiance NDCI from Cimel and flux NDCI from MFRSR are compared between themselves as well as with cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP) retrieved from MWR. Based on our theoretical calculations and preliminary data analysis,there is a good correlation between NDCIs and LWP for cloudy sky above green vegetation. Based on this correlation, an algorithm to retrieve cloud optical depth from NDCI is proposed.

  12. Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer–Zenith (SASZe) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Connor J [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer – Zenith (SASZe) provides measurements of zenith spectral shortwave radiance at 1Hz over a continuous spectral range from approximately 300 nm to 1700 nm. The SASZe design connects an optical collector located outdoors to a pair of spectrometers and data collections system located indoors within a climate-controlled building via an umbilical cable of fiber optic and electrical cables. The light collector incorporates a collimator yielding a 1-degree Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) field of view. The data-acquisition electronics and spectrometers include an in-line fiber optic shutter and two Avantes fiber-coupled grating spectroradiometers within a temperature-controlled container. The Avantes Avaspec ULS 2048 charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometer covers the wavelength range from about 300-1100 nm with a pixel spacing of less than 0.6 nm and a spectral resolution of about 2.4 nm FWHM. The Avantes Avaspec NIR256-1.7 spectrometer covers the wavelength range from about 950 nm to 1700 nm with a pixel spacing of less than 4 nm and a spectral resolution of about 6 nm FWHM.

  13. Wide field-of-view fluorescence imaging of coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P; Kline, David I; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L D; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-13

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys.

  14. Tiling strategies for optical follow-up of gravitational-wave triggers by telescopes with a wide field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shaon; Bloemen, Steven; Nelemans, Gijs; Groot, Paul J.; Price, Larry R.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: Binary neutron stars are among the most promising candidates for joint gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy. The goal of this work is to investigate various observing strategies that telescopes with wide field of view might incorporate while searching for electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave triggers. Methods: We examined various strategies of scanning the gravitational-wave sky localizations on the mock 2015-16 gravitational-wave events. First, we studied the performance of the sky coverage using a naive tiling system that completely covers a given confidence interval contour using a fixed grid. Then we propose the ranked-tiling strategy where we sample the localization in discrete two-dimensional intervals that are equivalent to the telescope's field of view and rank them based on their sample localizations. We then introduce an optimization of the grid by iterative sliding of the tiles. Next, we conducted tests for all the methods on a large sample of sky localizations that are expected in the first two years of operation of the Laser interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo detectors. We investigated the performance of the ranked-tiling strategy for telescope arrays and compared their performance against monolithic telescopes with a giant field of view. Finally, we studied the ability of optical counterpart detection by various types of telescopes. Results: Our analysis reveals that the ranked-tiling strategy improves the localization coverage over the contour-covering method. The improvement is more significant for telescopes with larger fields of view. We also find that while optimizing the position of the tiles significantly improves the coverage compared to contour-covering tiles. For ranked-tiles the same procedure leads to negligible improvement in the coverage of the sky localizations. We observed that distributing the field of view of the telescopes into arrays of multiple telescopes significantly

  15. Field of view for near-field aperture synthesis imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Buscher, David F

    2015-01-01

    Aperture synthesis techniques are increasingly being employed to provide high angular resolution images in situations where the object of interest is in the near field of the interferometric array. Previous work has showed that an aperture synthesis array can be refocused on an object in the near field of an array, provided that the object is smaller than the effective Fresnel zone size corresponding to the array-object range. We show here that, under paraxial conditions, standard interferometric techniques can be used to image objects which are substantially larger than this limit. We also note that interferometric self-calibration and phase-closure image reconstruction techniques can be used to achieve near-field refocussing without requiring accurate object range information. We use our results to show that the field of view for high-resolution aperture synthesis imaging of geosynchronous satellites from the ground can be considerably larger than the largest satellites in Earth orbit.

  16. Convergent acoustic field of view in echolocating bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Ratcliffe, John M; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    square at 10 cm. Thus all bats adapted their calls to achieve similar acoustic fields of view. We propose that the necessity for high directionality has been a key constraint on the evolution of echolocation, which explains the relationship between bat size and echolocation call frequency. Our results......Most echolocating bats exhibit a strong correlation between body size and the frequency of maximum energy in their echolocation calls (peak frequency), with smaller species using signals of higher frequency than larger ones. Size-signal allometry or acoustic detection constraints imposed...... on wavelength by preferred prey size have been used to explain this relationship. Here we propose the hypothesis that smaller bats emit higher frequencies to achieve directional sonar beams, and that variable beam width is critical for bats. Shorter wavelengths relative to the size of the emitter translate...

  17. A Dual Field-of-View Zoom Metalens

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Guoxing; Li, Zile; Zhang, Shuang; Mehmood, Muhammad Qasim; He, Pingan; Li, Song

    2016-01-01

    Conventional optical zoom system is bulky, expensive and complicated for real time adjustment. Recent progress in the metasurface research has provided a new solution to achieve innovative compact optical systems. In this paper, we propose a highly integrated zoom lens with dual field-of-view (FOV) based on double sided metasurfaces. With silicon nanobrick arrays of spatially varying orientations sitting on both side of a transparent substrate, this ultrathin zoom metalens can be designed to focus an incident circular polarized beam with spin-dependent FOVs without varying the focal plane, which is important for practical applications. The proposed dual FOV zoom metalens, with the advantages such as ultracompactness, flexibility and replicability, can find applications in fields which require ultracompact zoom imaging and beam focusing.

  18. A proposed increase in retinal field-of-view may lead to spatial shifts in images

    CERN Document Server

    Doshi, Rupak

    2010-01-01

    Visual information determines majority of our spatial behavior. The eye projects a 2-D image of the world on the retina. We demonstrate that when a monocular-like imaging system operates entirely with optically dense fluids, an increase in field-of-view (FOV) is observed compared to an experimental condition, where the ocular medium is optically neutral. Resulting spatial shifts in the retinal image towards the fovea complement the photoreceptor distribution pattern, incidentally revealing a new role for ocular fluids in the image space. Possible effects on the perceived egocentric object location are discussed.

  19. RCT photometry and HCT spectroscopy of blazar candidates in the Kepler field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Michael T.; Goyal, A.; Jose, J.

    2014-01-01

    The results of photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 9 blazar candidates in the Kepler field of view are presented. These sources were identified as blazar candidates based on their position in the so-called WISE blazar strip. Finding charts and comparison sequences were created using the NOMAD database. R band photometric monitoring was begun in spring 2013 with the Robotically Controlled Telescope(RCT), and spectroscopic observations of 7 of the sources were obtained with the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT) in September, 2013. Light curves for all 9 sources and preliminary spectroscopic classifications for the 7 sources with spectra will be presented.

  20. Depolarization Ratio of Clouds Measured by Multiple-Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Makino, Toshiyuki; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Jin, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    We have developed the Multiple Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar (MFMSPL) system for the study of optically thick low-level clouds. It has 8 telescopes; 4 telescopes for parallel channels and another 4 for perpendicular channels. The MFMSPL is the first lidar system that can measure depolarization ratio for optically thick clouds where multiple scattering is dominant. Field of view of each channel was 10mrad and was mounted with different angles ranging from 0 mrad (vertical) to 30mrad. And footprint size from the total FOV was achieved to be close to that of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar at the altitude of 1km in order to reproduce similar degree of multiple scattering effects as observed from space. The MFMSPL has started observations since June 2014 and has been continuously operated at National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) in Tsukuba, Japan. Observations proved expected performance such that measured depolarization ratio was comparable to the one observed by CALIPSO lidar.

  1. Face inversion and acquired prosopagnosia reduce the size of the perceptual field of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Belle, Goedele; Lefèvre, Philippe; Rossion, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Using a gaze-contingent morphing approach, we asked human observers to choose one of two faces that best matched the identity of a target face: one face corresponded to the reference face's fixated part only (e.g., one eye), the other corresponded to the unfixated area of the reference face. The face corresponding to the fixated part was selected significantly more frequently in the inverted than in the upright orientation. This observation provides evidence that face inversion reduces an observer's perceptual field of view, even when both upright and inverted faces are displayed at full view and there is no performance difference between these conditions. It rules out an account of the drop of performance for inverted faces--one of the most robust effects in experimental psychology--in terms of a mere difference in local processing efficiency. A brain-damaged patient with pure prosopagnosia, viewing only upright faces, systematically selected the face corresponding to the fixated part, as if her perceptual field was reduced relative to normal observers. Altogether, these observations indicate that the absence of visual knowledge reduces the perceptual field of view, supporting an indirect view of visual perception.

  2. Chip-based wide field-of-view nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Robin; Helle, Øystein I.; Øie, Cristina I.; McCourt, Peter; Huser, Thomas R.; Schüttpelz, Mark; Ahluwalia, Balpreet S.

    2017-04-01

    Present optical nanoscopy techniques use a complex microscope for imaging and a simple glass slide to hold the sample. Here, we demonstrate the inverse: the use of a complex, but mass-producible optical chip, which hosts the sample and provides a waveguide for the illumination source, and a standard low-cost microscope to acquire super-resolved images via two different approaches. Waveguides composed of a material with high refractive-index contrast provide a strong evanescent field that is used for single-molecule switching and fluorescence excitation, thus enabling chip-based single-molecule localization microscopy. Additionally, multimode interference patterns induce spatial fluorescence intensity variations that enable fluctuation-based super-resolution imaging. As chip-based nanoscopy separates the illumination and detection light paths, total-internal-reflection fluorescence excitation is possible over a large field of view, with up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm being demonstrated. Using multicolour chip-based nanoscopy, we visualize fenestrations in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

  3. Field of view selection for optimal airborne imaging sensor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Tristan M.; Barnard, P. Werner; Fildis, Halidun; Erbudak, Mustafa; Senger, Tolga; Alpman, Mehmet E.

    2014-05-01

    The choice of the Field of View (FOV) of imaging sensors used in airborne targeting applications has major impact on the overall performance of the system. Conducting a market survey from published data on sensors used in stabilized airborne targeting systems shows a trend of ever narrowing FOVs housed in smaller and lighter volumes. This approach promotes the ever increasing geometric resolution provided by narrower FOVs, while it seemingly ignores the influences the FOV selection has on the sensor's sensitivity, the effects of diffraction, the influences of sight line jitter and collectively the overall system performance. This paper presents a trade-off methodology to select the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor that is limited in aperture diameter by mechanical constraints (such as space/volume available and window size) by balancing the influences FOV has on sensitivity and resolution and thereby optimizing the system's performance. The methodology may be applied to staring array based imaging sensors across all wavebands from visible/day cameras through to long wave infrared thermal imagers. Some examples of sensor analysis applying the trade-off methodology are given that highlights the performance advantages that can be gained by maximizing the aperture diameters and choosing the optimal FOV for an imaging sensor used in airborne targeting applications.

  4. On the operation of X-ray polarimeters with a large field of view

    CERN Document Server

    Muleri, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the linear polarization is one of the hot topics of High Energy Astrophysics. Gas detectors based on photoelectric effect have paved the way for the design of sensitive instruments and mission proposals based on them have been presented in the last few years in the energy range from about 2 keV to a few tens of keV. As well, a number of polarimeters based on Compton scattering are approved or discussed for launch on-board balloons or space satellites at higher energies. These instruments are typically dedicated to pointed observations with narrow field of view telescopes or collimators, but there are also projects aimed at the polarimetry of bright transient sources, like Soft Gamma Repeaters or the prompt emission of Gamma Ray Bursts. Given the erratic appearance of such events in the sky, these polarimeters have a large field of view to catch a reasonable number of them and, as a result, photons may impinge on the detector off-axis. This changes dramatically the response of the instrument...

  5. Large field-of-view range-gated laser imaging based on image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Pengdao; Wang, Xinwei; Sun, Liang; You, Ruirong; Lei, Pingshun; Zhou, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Laser range-gated imaging has great potentials in remote night surveillance with far detection distance and high resolution, even if under bad weather conditions such as fog, snow and rain. However, the field of view (FOV) is smaller than large objects like buildings, towers and mountains, thus only parts of targets are observed in one single frame, so that it is difficult for targets identification. Apparently, large FOV is beneficial to solve the problem, but the detection range is not available due to low illumination density in a large field of illumination matching with the FOV. Therefore, a large field-of-view range-gated laser imaging is proposed based on image fusion in this paper. Especially an image fusion algorithm has been developed for low contrast images. First of all, an infrared laser range-gated system is established to acquire gate images with small FOV for three different scenarios at night. Then the proposed image fusion algorithm is used for generating panoramas for the three groups of images respectively. Compared with raw images directly obtained by the imaging system, the fused images have a larger FOV with more detail target information. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed image fusion algorithm is effective to expand the FOV of range-gated imaging.

  6. Defining Constellation Suit Helmet Field of View Requirements Employing a Mission Segment Based Reduction Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Shane

    2009-01-01

    Field of view has always been a design feature paramount to helmets, and in particular space suits, where the helmet must provide an adequate field of view for a large range of activities, environments, and body positions. For Project Constellation, a different approach to helmet requirement maturation was utilized; one that was less a direct function of body position and suit pressure and more a function of the mission segment in which the field of view will be required. Through taxonimization of various parameters that affect suited field of view, as well as consideration for possible nominal and contingency operations during that mission segment, a reduction process was employed to condense the large number of possible outcomes to only six unique field of view angle requirements that still captured all necessary variables while sacrificing minimal fidelity.

  7. Vision Based Navigation for a Mobile Robot with Different Field of Views

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Rizwan A; Saeed, Saqib

    2009-01-01

    The basic idea behind evolutionary robotics is to evolve a set of neural controllers for a particular task at hand. It involves use of various input parameters such as infrared sensors, light sensors and vision based methods. This paper aims to explore the evolution of vision based navigation in a mobile robot. It discusses in detail the effect of different field of views for a mobile robot. The individuals have been evolved using different FOV values and the results have been recorded and analyzed.The optimum values for FOV have been proposed after evaluating more than 100 different values. It has been observed that the optimum FOV value requires lesser number of generations for evolution and the mobile robot trained with that particular value is able to navigate well in the environment.

  8. Effect of age and pop out distracter on attended field of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Raiju J; Leat, Susan J; Irving, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the functional field of view (FFOV) of younger and older individuals using the attended field of view (AFOV), a method which allows for eye and head movement. The impact of a pop out distracter and a dual task on the FFOV measure was also investigated. Nine young adult (25±6 years) and 9 older participants (72±4 years) took part in the experiment. The AFOV test involved the binocular detection and localization of a white target (Landolt-C) in a field of 24 white rings (distracters). The further AFOV tests were modified to include the presence of a pop out distracter, a dual task condition, and a combination of the two. Older observers had lower viewing efficiency (log [1/presentation time]) in all conditions (pooled mean across conditions: older: 0.05±0.02; younger: 0.48±0.04) than the younger group. The addition of dual or a pop out distracter did not affect the older group (mean difference ∼104±150ms and ∼124±122ms respectively) but the additional pop out distracter reduced the efficiency of the younger group for targets near fixation (mean difference ∼68±35ms). Better viewing efficiency was observed in younger individuals compared to older individuals. Difficulty in disregarding irrelevant stimuli and thereby resorting to inefficient search strategy is proposed as the reason for the differences. The finding that both older and younger individuals are not affected significantly by the presence of the irrelevant pop out distracter has implications in situations such as driving or hazard avoidance. In such scenarios, search performance is likely not impaired beyond what is found with distracters (visual clutter) in the environment. Copyright © 2013 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Wide field of view adaptive optical system for lightweight deployable telescope technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Brian K.; Cermak, Michael A.; Friedman, Edward J.

    2003-02-01

    A NASA research contract (NAS1-00116) was awarded to Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in January 2000 to study wide field-of-view adaptive optical systems. These systems will be required on future high resolution Earth remote sensing systems that employ large, flexible, lightweight, deployed primary mirrors. The deformations from these primary mirrors will introduce aberrations into the optical system, which must be removed by corrective optics. For economic reasons, these remote sensing systems must have a large field-of-view (a few degrees). Unlike ground-based adaptive optical systems, which have a negligible field-of-view, the adaptive optics on these space-based remote sensing systems will be required to correct for the deformations in the primary mirror over the entire field-of-view. A new error function, which is an enhancement to conventional adaptive optics, for wide field-of-view optical systems will be introduced. This paper will present the goals of the NASA research project and its progress. The initial phase of this research project is a demonstration of the wide field-of-view adaptive optics theory. A breadboard has been designed and built for this purpose. The design and assembly of the breadboard will be presented, along with the final results for this phase of the research project. Finally, this paper will show the applicability of wide field-of-view adaptive optics to space-based astronomical systems.

  10. Initial feasibility testing of limited field of view magnetic resonance thermometry using a local cardiac radiofrequency coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Nelly A; Kholmovski, Eugene G; Parker, Dennis L; Hadley, J Rock

    2013-10-01

    The visualization of lesion formation in real time is one potential benefit of carrying out radiofrequency ablation under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance in the treatment of atrial fibrillation. MR thermometry has the potential to detect such lesions. However, performing MR thermometry during cardiac radiofrequency ablation requires high temporal and spatial resolution and a high signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, a local MR coil (2-cm diameter) was developed to investigate the feasibility of performing limited field of view MR thermometry with high accuracy and speed. The local MR coil allowed high-resolution (1 × 1 × 3 mm(3)) image acquisitions in 76.3 ms with a field of view 64 × 32 mm(2) during an open-chest animal experiment. This represents a 4-fold image acquisition acceleration and an 18-fold field of view reduction compared to that achieved using external MR coils. The signal sensitivity achieved using the local coil was over 20 times greater than that achievable using external coils with the same scan parameters. The local coil configuration provided fewer artifacts and sharper and more stable images. These results demonstrate that MR thermometry can be performed in the heart wall and that lesion formation can be observed during radiofrequency ablation procedures in a canine model. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Design of optoelectronic imaging system with high resolution and large field-of-view based on dual CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hanglin; Hao, Qun; Hu, Yao; Cao, Jie; Wang, Shaopu; Li, Lin

    2016-10-01

    With the advantages of high resolution, large field of view and compacted size, optoelectronic imaging sensors are widely used in many fields, such as robot's navigation, industrial measurement and remote sensing. Many researchers pay more attention to improve the comprehensive performances of imaging sensors, including large field of view (FOV), high resolution, compact size and high imaging efficiency, etc. One challenge is the tradeoff between high resolution and large field of view simultaneously considering compacted size. In this paper, we propose an optoelectronic imaging system combining the lenses of short focal length and long focal length based on dual CMOS to simulate the characters of human eyes which observe object within large FOV in high resolution. We design and optimize the two lens, the lens of short focal length is used to search object in a wide field and the long one is responsible for high resolution imaging of the target area. Based on a micro-CMOS imaging sensor with low voltage differential transmission technology-MIPI (Mobile Industry Processor Interface), we design the corresponding circuits to realize collecting optical information with high speed. The advantage of the interface is to help decreasing power consumption, improving transmission efficiency and achieving compacted size of imaging sensor. Meanwhile, we carried out simulations and experiments to testify the optoelectronic imaging system. The results show that the proposed method is helpful to improve the comprehensive performances of optoelectronic imaging sensors.

  12. Chapman Solar Zenith Angle variations at Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Emilie M.; Ajello, Joseph; Holsclaw, Gregory; West, Robert; Esposito, Larry W.; Bradley, Eric Todd

    2016-10-01

    Solar XUV photons and magnetospheric particles are the two main sources contributing to the airglow in the Titan's upper atmosphere. We are focusing here on the solar XUV photons and how they influence the airglow intensity. The Cassini-UVIS observations analyzed in this study consist each in a partial scan of Titan, while the center of the detector stays approximately at the same location on Titan's disk. We used observations from 2008 to 2012, which allow for a wide range of Solar Zenith Angle (SZA). Spectra from 800 km to 1200 km of altitude have been corrected from the solar spectrum using TIMED/SEE data. We observe that the airglow intensity varies as a function of the SZA and follows a Chapman curve. Three SZA regions are identified: the sunlit region ranging from 0 to 50 degrees. In this region, the intensity of the airglow increases, while the SZA decreases. Between SZA 50 and 100 degrees, the airglow intensity decreases from it maximum to its minimum. In this transition region the upper atmosphere of Titan changes from being totally sunlit to being in the shadow of the moon. For SZA 100 to 180 degrees, we observe a constant airglow intensity close to zero. The behavior of the airglow is also similar to the behavior of the electron density as a function of the SZA as observed by Ågren at al (2009). Both variables exhibit a decrease intensity with increasing SZA. The goal of this study is to understand such correlation. We demonstrate the importance of the solar XUV photons contribution to the Titan airglow and prove that the strongest contribution to the Titan dayglow occurs by solar fluorescence rather than the particle impact that predominates at night.

  13. Wide Field-of-View (FOV) Soft X-Ray Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Wide Field-of-View (FOV) Soft X-Ray Imager proposes to be a state-of-art instrument with applications for numerous heliospheric and planetary...

  14. Characterisation of a high resolution small field of view portable gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, S L; Lees, J E; Bhatia, B S; Perkins, A C

    2014-05-01

    A handheld, high-resolution small field of view (SFOV) pinhole gamma camera has been characterised using a new set of protocols adapted from standards previously developed for large field of view (LFOV) systems. Parameters investigated include intrinsic and extrinsic spatial resolution, spatial linearity, uniformity, sensitivity, count rate capability and energy resolution. Camera characteristics are compared to some clinical LFOV gamma cameras and also to other SFOV cameras in development.

  15. A Novel Method for Quantifying Helmeted Field of View of a Spacesuit - And What It Means for Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Shane M.

    2010-01-01

    Field of view has always been a design feature paramount to helmet design, and in particular spacesuit design, where the helmet must provide an adequate field of view for a large range of activities, environments, and body positions. Historically, suited field of view has been evaluated either qualitatively in parallel with design or quantitatively using various test methods and protocols. As such, oftentimes legacy suit field of view information is either ambiguous for lack of supporting data or contradictory to other field of view tests performed with different subjects and test methods. This paper serves to document a new field of view testing method that is more reliable and repeatable than its predecessors. It borrows heavily from standard ophthalmologic field of vision tests such as the Goldmann kinetic perimetry test, but is designed specifically for evaluating field of view of a spacesuit helmet. In this test, four suits utilizing three different helmet designs were tested for field of view. Not only do these tests provide more reliable field of view data for legacy and prototype helmet designs, they also provide insight into how helmet design impacts field of view and what this means for the Constellation Project spacesuit helmet, which must meet stringent field of view requirements that are more generous to the crewmember than legacy designs.

  16. HF-induced airglow at magnetic zenith: theoretical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Mishin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of airglow at 630nm (red line and 557.7nm (green line during HF modification experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP heating facility are analyzed. We propose a theoretical framework for understanding the generation of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves during magnetic zenith injections. We show that observations of HF-induced airglow in an underdense ionosphere as well as a decrease in the height of the emitting volume are consistent with this scenario.

  17. GAW - A very large field-of-view Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Arruda, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    GAW (Gamma Air Watch) is a pathfinder experiment in the TeV range to test the feasibility of a new generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT). It combines high flux sensitivity with large field-of-view (FoV=24deg x 24deg) using Fresnel lenses, stereoscopic observational approach and single-photon counting mode. This particular counting mode, in comparison with the usual charge integration one, allows the triggering of events with a smaller number of collected Cherenkov photons keeping a good signal/background separation. GAW is conceived as an array of three identical imaging telescopes with 2.13 m diameter placed at the vertices of an equilateral triangle of 80 m side. The telescope will be built at the Calar Alto Observatory site (Sierra de Los Filabres - Almeria Spain, 2168 m a.s.l.) and is a joint effort of research institutes in Italy, Portugal and Spain. The main characteristics of the experiment will be reported.

  18. Colorimetric and spectroradiometric characteristics of narrow-field-of-view clear skylight in Granada, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Andrés, J; Romero, J; Lee, R L

    2001-02-01

    As part of our ongoing research into the clear daytime sky's visible structure, we analyze over 1,500 skylight spectra measured during a seven-month period in Granada, Spain. We use spectral radiances measured within 3 degrees fields of view (FOV's) to define colorimetric characteristics along four sky meridians: the solar meridian and three meridians at azimuths of 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 315 degrees relative to it. The resulting clear-sky chromaticities in 44 different view directions (1) are close to but do not coincide with the CIE daylight locus, (2) form V-shaped meridional chromaticity curves along it (as expected from theory), and (3) have correlated color temperatures (CCT's) ranging from 3,800 K to infinity K. We also routinely observe that sky color and luminance are asymmetric about the solar meridian, usually perceptibly so. A principal-components analysis shows that three vectors are required for accurate clear-sky colorimetry, whereas six are needed for spectral analyses.

  19. Real-time RGB-D image stitching using multiple Kinects for improved field of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengyu Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the problems of a defective depth map and limited field of view of Kinect-style RGB-D sensors. An anisotropic diffusion based hole-filling method is proposed to recover invalid depth data in the depth map. The field of view of the Kinect-style RGB-D sensor is extended by stitching depth and color images from several RGB-D sensors. By aligning the depth map with the color image, the registration data calculated by registering color images can be used to stitch depth and color images into a depth and color panoramic image concurrently in real time. Experiments show that the proposed stitching method can generate a RGB-D panorama with no invalid depth data and little distortion in real time and can be extended to incorporate more RGB-D sensors to construct even a 360° field of view panoramic RGB-D image.

  20. Atmospheric Aerosols Detection Research with a Dual Field of View Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Lihui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual field of view lidar system with two independent receivers is described to realize the detection of atmospheric aerosols. A CCD camera is attached to a backscatter lidar as a receiver to complement the data in the near-field range affected by the incomplete overlap between the laser beam and the receiver field of view. The signal detected by the CCD camera is corrected and finally glued with the signal of the backscatter lidar to retrieve the aerosol extinction coefficient with Fernald algorithm. The aerosol extinction profile and visibilities measured by the dual field of lidar had been compared with the results measured by another general backscatter lidar and a surface aerosol instrument, respectively. The results suggested that the dual field of view lidar based on a CCD camera is feasible and reliable. It could obtain the data both in the near and in the far range simultaneously, improving the detection accuracy of the lidar system effectively.

  1. A scheme for assessing the performance characteristics of small field-of-view gamma cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, B S; Bugby, S L; Lees, J E; Perkins, A C

    2015-02-01

    Existing protocols for assessing the performance characteristics of large field-of-view (LFOV) gamma cameras can be inappropriate and require modification for use with small field-of-view (SFOV) gamma camera systems. This communication proposes a generic scheme suitable for evaluating the performance characteristics of SFOV gamma cameras, based on modifications to the standard procedures of NEMA NU1-2007. Key differences in methodology between tests for LFOV and SFOV gamma cameras are highlighted along with the rationale for these changes. It is envisaged that this scheme will provide more appropriate methods for equipment characterisation, ensuring quality and consistency for all SFOV cameras.

  2. Systems and methods for maintaining multiple objects within a camera field-of-view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Nicholas R.; Dixon, Warren

    2016-03-15

    In one embodiment, a system and method for maintaining objects within a camera field of view include identifying constraints to be enforced, each constraint relating to an attribute of the viewed objects, identifying a priority rank for the constraints such that more important constraints have a higher priority that less important constraints, and determining the set of solutions that satisfy the constraints relative to the order of their priority rank such that solutions that satisfy lower ranking constraints are only considered viable if they also satisfy any higher ranking constraints, each solution providing an indication as to how to control the camera to maintain the objects within the camera field of view.

  3. A faster switching regime for zenithal bistable nematic displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, J

    1997-12-01

    A simpler and faster switching regime for Zenithal Bistable Nematic displays is reported. A cell, based on homeotropic alignment of nematic liquid crystal over a continuous blazed monograting on one surface, can be switched using bipolar pulses an order of magnitude faster than monopolar pulses of the same voltage. We propose that this regime relies on simple dielectric coupling to drive the cell into a higher energy state with a long pulse time, and the relaxation into a lower energy state after the creation of surface defects from a shorter applied pulse. Although flexoelectric effects are observed, they do not form the basis of state selection as was proposed for the monopolar pulses

  4. Tiling strategies for optical follow-up of gravitational wave triggers by wide field of view telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Shaon; Nelemans, Gijs; Groot, Paul J; Price, Larry R

    2015-01-01

    The advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors scheduled to come online in the next two years will open up the much anticipated era of gravitational wave astronomy. Among the strongest contenders for the first detection are merging binary neutron stars, a fraction of which are also expected to produce observable electromagnetic signals in coincidence with the gravitational wave events. In this paper we investigate the strategy of using gravitational wave sky-localizations that we can expect to see in the first two years of the advanced detector era, to look for electromagnetic counterparts using wide field of view optical telescopes. The key to efficient observation of the gravitational wave sky-localizations is to obtain the optimal discretized approximation of the sky-localizations, where the coarseness of the discretization will depend on the field of view of the telescope. We examine various strategies of scanning these sky-localizations and propose the ranked-tiling strategy that we found to be the most effective...

  5. Calibration and Testing of Digital Zenith Camera System Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulug, Rasit; Halicioglu, Kerem; Tevfik Ozludemir, M.; Albayrak, Muge; Basoglu, Burak; Deniz, Rasim

    2017-04-01

    Starting from the beginning of the new millennium, thanks to the Charged-Coupled Device (CCD) technology, fully or partly automatic zenith camera systems are designed and used in order to determine astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical components in several countries, including Germany, Switzerland, Serbia, Latvia, Poland, Austria, China and Turkey. The Digital Zenith Camera System (DZCS) of Turkey performed successful observations yet it needs to be improved in terms of automating the system and increasing observation accuracy. In order to optimize the observation time and improve the system, some modifications have been implemented. Through the modification process that started at the beginning of 2016, some DZCS components have been replaced with the new ones and some new additional components have been installed. In this presentation, the ongoing calibration and testing process of the DZCS are summarized in general. In particular, one of the tested system components is the High Resolution Tiltmeter (HRTM), which enable orthogonal orientation of DZCS to the direction of plump line, is discussed. For the calibration of these components, two tiltmeters with different accuracies (1 nrad and 0.001 mrad) were observed nearly 30 days. The data recorded under different environmental conditions were divided into hourly, daily, and weekly subsets. In addition to the effects of temperature and humidity, interoperability of two tiltmeters were also investigated. Results show that with the integration of HRTM and the other implementations, the modified DZCS provides higher accuracy for the determination of vertical deflections.

  6. Structured scene modeling using micro stereo vision system with large field of view

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a method for structured scene modeling using micro stereo vision system with large field of view. The proposed algorithm includes edge detection with Canny detector, line fitting with princi ple axis-based approach, finding corresponding lines using feature-based matching method, and 3D line depth computation.

  7. Interpupillary and Vertex Distance Effects on Field-of-View and Acuity With ANVIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    derived from binocular as opposed to monocular viewing ( Arditi , 1986; Boff and Lincoln, 1988). As an ANVIS with its IPD set to other than the optimal value...periphery of the field-of-view and under conditions of low stimulus contrast. 28 References Arditi , A. 1986. Binocular vision, in Boff, K.R., Kaufman

  8. Method and systems for collecting data from multiple fields of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods for processing light from multiple fields (48, 54, 55) of view without excessive machinery for scanning optical elements. In an exemplary embodiment of the invention, multiple holographic optical elements (41, 42, 43, 44, 45), integrated on a common film (4), diffract and project light from respective fields of view.

  9. Hemispherical-field-of-view, nonimaging narrow-band spectral filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, R. B.; Webb, S. G.; Griffith, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    Two compound parabolic concentrators are used to create a 180-deg-field-of-view spectral filter. The collection optics are reflective and are designed to collimate the light through a multilayer interference filter and then to refocus it onto an optical detector. Assuming unit reflectance and no loss through the optical filter, this device operates at the thermodynamic collection limit.

  10. Performance Modelling of Automatic Identification System with Extended Field of View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauersen, Troels; Mortensen, Hans Peter; Pedersen, Nikolaj Bisgaard

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with AIS (Automatic Identification System) behavior, to investigate the severity of packet collisions in an extended field of view (FOV). This is an important issue for satellite-based AIS, and the main goal is a feasibility study to find out to what extent an increased FOV...

  11. An insect eye based image sensor with very large field of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moens, E.; Meuret, Y.; Ottevaere, H.; Sarkar, M.; San Segundo Bello, D.; Merken, P.; Thienpont, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the design of a novel miniaturized image sensor based on the working principle of insect facet eyes. The main goals are to design an imaging system which captures a large field of view (FOV) and to find a good trade-off between image resolution and sensitivity. To capture a

  12. The CCAT-prime Extreme Field-of-View Submillimeter Telescope on Cerro Chajnantor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Brian; Bertoldi, Frank; Chapman, Scott; Fich, Michel; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Herter, Terry L.; Murray, Norman W.; Niemack, Michael D.; Riechers, Dominik; Schilke, Peter; Stacey, Gordon J.; Stutzki, Juergen; CCAT-prime Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    CCAT-prime is a six meter aperture off-axis submillimeter telescope that we plan to build at 5600m elevation on Cerro Chajnantor in Chile. The CCAT-prime optics are based on a cross-Dragone design with high throughput and a wide field-of-view optimized to increase the mapping speed of next generation cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. These characteristics make CCAT-prime an excellent platform for a wide range of next generation millimeter and submillimeter science goals, and a potential platform for CMB stage-IV measurements. Here we present the telescope design for CCAT-prime and review the science goals.Taking advantage of the high elevation site, the first generation instrument for CCAT-prime will measure seven different frequency bands from 350um to 3mm. These seven bands will enable precise measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effects (SZE) by separating contributions from CMB, thermal SZE, kinetic SZE, bright submm galaxies, and radio sources with a goal of extracting the peculiar velocities from a large number of galaxy clusters. Additional science priorities for CCAT-prime include: Galactic Ecology studies of the dynamic intersteller medium by mapping the fine structure lines [CI], [CII] and [NII] as well as high-excitation CO lines at the shortest wavelength bands; high redshift intensity mapping of [CII] emission from star-forming galaxies that likely dominates cosmic reionization at z~5-9 to probe the Epoch of Reionization; and next generation CMB polarization measurements to constrain inflation and cosmological models. The CCAT-prime facility will further our understanding of astrophysical processes from moments after the Big Bang to the present-day evolution of the Milky Way.

  13. Optimal usage of cone beam computed tomography system with different field of views in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Venkata Naga Madhusudhana Sresty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To find methods for optimal usage of XVI (X-ray volume imaging system in Elekta synergy linear accelerator with different field of views for same lesion in order to minimize patient dose due to imaging.Methods: 20 scans of 2 individual patients with ca sigmoid colon and ca lung were used in this study. Kilo voltage collimators with medium field of view were used as per the preset information. Images were reconstructed for another collimator with small field of view. The set up errors were evaluated with XVI software. Shift results of both methods were compared. Results: Variation in treatment set up errors with M20 and S20 collimators were ≤ 0.2 mm in translational and 0.30 in rotational shifts. Results showed almost equal translational and rotational shifts in both medium and small field of views with different collimators in all the scans. Visualization of target and surrounding structures were good enough and sufficient for XVI auto matching.Conclusion: Imaging with small field of view results less patient dose compared with medium or large field of views. It is Suggestible to use collimators with small field of view wherever possible. In this study, collimators with small field of view were sufficient for both patients though the preset information indicated medium field of view. But, it always depends on the area required for matching purpose. So, individual selection is important than preset information in the XVI system.

  14. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system.

  15. Analysis of accuracy and precision of GNSS zenith tropospheric delay

    OpenAIRE

    Bohanec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to compare the calculations of zenith tropospheric delay, computed within the meteorological model, with an independently acquired calculation of three GNSS data processing methods. Data analysis was done in the absolute and relative mode of determination. Using absolute mode of zenith tropospheric delay computation we computed the differences between the computed zenith tropospheric delay with the meteorological model ALADIN, taken as a reference, and results of zen...

  16. Cloud parameters from zenith transmittances measured by sky radiometer at surface: Method development and satellite product validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Pradeep; Hayasaka, Tadahiro; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Takamura, Tamio; Irie, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Takashi Y.; Letu, Husi; Kai, Qin

    2017-04-01

    data of a narrow field of view radiometer of collocated observation in one SKYNET site. Though the method is developed for the sky radiometer of SKYNET, it can be still used for the sky radiometer of AERONET and other instruments observing spectral zenith transmittances. The proposed retrieval method is then applied to retrieve cloud parameters at key sites of SKYNET within Japan, which are then used to validate cloud products obtained from space observations by MODIS sensors onboard TERRA/AQUA satellites and Himawari 8, a Japanese geostationary satellite. Our analyses suggest the underestimation (overestimation) of COD (Re) from space observations.

  17. EMBRACE@Nancay: An Ultra Wide Field of View Prototype for the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Torchinsky, S A; Censier, B; Karastergiou, A; Serylak, M; Renaud, P; Taffoureau, C

    2015-01-01

    A revolution in radio receiving technology is underway with the development of densely packed phased arrays for radio astronomy. This technology can provide an exceptionally large field of view, while at the same time sampling the sky with high angular resolution. Such an instrument, with a field of view of over 100 square degrees, is ideal for performing fast, all-sky, surveys, such as the "intensity mapping" experiment to measure the signature of Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations in the HI mass distribution at cosmological redshifts. The SKA, built with this technology, will be able to do a billion galaxy survey. I will present a very brief introduction to radio interferometry, as well as an overview of the Square Kilometre Array project. This will be followed by a description of the EMBRACE prototype and a discussion of results and future plans.

  18. High speed color imaging through scattering media with a large field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Huichang; He, Hexiang; Xie, Xiangsheng; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-09-01

    Optical imaging through complex media has many important applications. Although research progresses have been made to recover optical image through various turbid media, the widespread application of the technology is hampered by the recovery speed, requirement on specific illumination, poor image quality and limited field of view. Here we demonstrate that above-mentioned drawbacks can be essentially overcome. The realization of high speed color imaging through turbid media is successfully carried out by taking into account the media memory effect, the point spread function, the exit pupil of the optical system, and the optimized signal to noise ratio. By retrieving selected speckles with enlarged field of view, high quality image is recovered with a responding speed only determined by the frame rates of the image capturing devices. The immediate application of the technique is expected to register static and dynamic imaging under human skin to recover information with a wearable device.

  19. Augmented Reality in a Simulated Tower Environment: Effect of Field of View on Aircraft Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Adelstein, Bernard D.; Reisman, Ronald J.; Schmidt-Ott, Joelle R.; Gips, Jonathan; Krozel, Jimmy; Cohen, Malcolm (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical see-through, augmented reality display was used to study subjects' ability to detect aircraft maneuvering and landing at the Dallas Ft. Worth International airport in an ATC Tower simulation. Subjects monitored the traffic patterns as if from the airport's western control tower. Three binocular fields of view (14 deg, 28 deg and 47 deg) were studied in an independent groups' design to measure the degradation in detection performance associated with the visual field restrictions. In a second experiment the 14 deg and 28 deg fields were presented either with 46% binocular overlap or 100% overlap for separate groups. The near asymptotic results of the first experiment suggest that binocular fields of view much greater than 47% are unlikely to dramatically improve performance; and those of the second experiment suggest that partial binocular overlap is feasible for augmented reality displays such as may be used for ATC tower applications.

  20. Multi-beaming propertieis of reflector antennas used in radio telescopes with wide field of view

    CERN Document Server

    Iupikov, O

    2016-01-01

    The given work is devoted to the modern developments in the field of radio astronomy instrumentation. In particular, the sensitivity of the multi-beam reflector radio telescope which is fed by phased array (PAF) is considered. Using PAF as reflector feed allows obtaining wide and continuous field of view (FOV) of the telescope. This has several advantages with compare to horn-cluster feeds which are described in this work. The sensitivity inside whole FOV was computed using three different beamforming schemes.

  1. Properties and Performance of Two Wide Field of View Cherenkov/Fluorescence Telescope Array Prototypes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S S; Cao, Z; Chen, S Z; Chen, M J; Chen, Y; Chen, L H; Ding, K Q; He, H H; Liu, J L; Li, X X; Liu, J; Ma, L L; Ma, X H; Sheng, X D; Zhou, B; Zhang, Y; Zhao, J; Zha, M; Xiao, G

    2011-01-01

    A wide field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence telescope array is one of the main components of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory project. To serve as Cherenkov and fluorescence detectors, a flexible and mobile design is adopted for easy reconfiguring of the telescope array. Two prototype telescopes have been constructed and successfully run at the site of the ARGO-YBJ experiment in Tibet. The features and performance of the telescopes are presented.

  2. An Overview of Wide-Field-Of-View Optical Designs for Survey Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    aberrations while trying not to introduce chromatic aberration . For wide fields of view, the designs can become quite complex and expensive...published details of a refractive aberration corrector for the Ritchey- Chretien optical system [5]. Before this time, refractive correctors were not...well known, but were in use as chromatic correctors and field flatteners on refractor telescopes [2, 6]. The 1931 introduction of the Schmidt Camera

  3. Large field-of-view transmission line resonator for high field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johannesson, Kristjan Sundgaard; Boer, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line resonators is often a preferable choice for coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because they provide a number of advantages over traditional loop coils. The size of such resonators, however, is limited to shorter than half a wavelength due to high standing wave....... Achieved magnetic field distribution is compared to the conventional transmission line resonator. Imaging experiments are performed using 7 Tesla MRI system. The developed resonator is useful for building coils with large field-of-view....

  4. Large field-of-view transmission line resonator for high field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johannesson, Kristjan Sundgaard; Boer, Vincent;

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line resonators is often a preferable choice for coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because they provide a number of advantages over traditional loop coils. The size of such resonators, however, is limited to shorter than half a wavelength due to high standing wave....... Achieved magnetic field distribution is compared to the conventional transmission line resonator. Imaging experiments are performed using 7 Tesla MRI system. The developed resonator is useful for building coils with large field-of-view....

  5. PSF and field of view characteristics of imaging and nulling interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Hénault, François

    2010-01-01

    In this communication are presented some complements to a recent paper entitled "Simple Fourier optics formalism for high angular resolution systems and nulling interferometry", dealing with imaging and nulling capacities of a few types of multi-aperture optical systems. Herein the characteristics of such systems in terms of Point Spread Function (PSF) and Field of View (FoV) are derived from simple analytical expressions that are further evaluated numerically for various configurations. We c...

  6. Smartphone Microscopy of Parasite Eggs Accumulated into a Single Field of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowerby, Stephen J; Crump, John A; Johnstone, Maree C; Krause, Kurt L; Hill, Philip C

    2016-01-01

    A Nokia Lumia 1020 cellular phone (Microsoft Corp., Auckland, New Zealand) was configured to image the ova of Ascaris lumbricoides converged into a single field of view but on different focal planes. The phone was programmed to acquire images at different distances and, using public domain computer software, composite images were created that brought all the eggs into sharp focus. This proof of concept informs a framework for field-deployable, point of care monitoring of soil-transmitted helminths.

  7. First phantom and in vivo MPI images with an extended field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, I.; Rahmer, J.; Gleich, B.; Kanzenbach, J.; Schmidt, J. D.; Bontus, C.; Woywode, O.; Borgert, J.

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a high-potential new medical imaging modality that has been introduced in 2005. MPI uses the non-linear magnetization behavior of iron-oxide based nano-particles, named tracer, to perform quantitative measurements of their local concentration. Previous publications demonstrated the feasibility of real-time in vivo 3D imaging with clinical concentration of Resovist®. Given MPI's fast and sensitive imaging as well as its overall versatility, it has potential to support various medical applications spanning from diagnostics to therapy. As an example, ongoing research investigates the use of MPI in cardiovascular diagnostics for myocardial perfusion measurement. While previous publications reported results from experimental systems with limited bore size (3cm), this contribution presents first phantom and in vivo images acquired on the next hardware generation, an experimental system with an effective bore size of 12cm. The system is designed for pre-clinical studies and can capture image data from an extended field of view compared to the previous, experimental system. The contribution introduces concepts for the encoding of a larger field of view by means of additional magnetic fields, named focus-fields, and outlines the path to stitching of images from multiple focus field settings, called "multi-station reconstruction". To prove the feasibility of imaging of an extended field of view, volumetric images of a moving phantom as well as of a living rat were acquired.

  8. Direct design of two freeform optical surfaces for wide field of view line imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yunfeng; Thienpont, Hugo; Duerr, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-fields direct design method aiming to calculate two freeform surfaces with an entrance pupil incorporated for wide field of view on-axis line imaging applications. Both infinite and finite conjugate objectives can be designed with this approach. Since a wide angle imaging system requires more than few discrete perfect imaging points, the multi-fields design approach is based on partial coupling of multiple fields, which guarantees a much more balanced imaging performance over the full field of view. The optical path lengths (OPLs) and image points of numerous off-axis fields are calculated during the procedure, thus very few initial parameters are needed. The procedure to calculate such a freeform lens is explained in detail. We have designed an exemplary monochromatic single lens to demonstrate the functionality of the design method. A rotationally symmetric counterpart following the same specifications is compared in terms of RMS spot radius to demonstrate the clear benefit that freeform lens brings to on-axis line imaging systems. In addition, a practical achromatic wide angle objective is designed by combining our multi-fields design method with classic optical design strategies, serving as a very good starting point for further optimization in a commercial optical design program. The results from the perspective of aberrations plots and MTF values show a very good and well balanced performance over the full field of view.

  9. Automatic Processing of Chinese GF-1 Wide Field of View Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Wan, Y.; Wang, B.; Kang, Y.; Xiong, J.

    2015-04-01

    The wide field of view (WFV) imaging instrument carried on the Chinese GF-1 satellite includes four cameras. Each camera has 200km swath-width that can acquire earth image at the same time and the observation can be repeated within only 4 days. This enables the applications of remote sensing imagery to advance from non-scheduled land-observation to periodically land-monitoring in the areas that use the images in such resolutions. This paper introduces an automatic data analysing and processing technique for the wide-swath images acquired by GF-1 satellite. Firstly, the images are validated by a self-adaptive Gaussian mixture model based cloud detection method to confirm whether they are qualified and suitable to be involved into the automatic processing workflow. Then the ground control points (GCPs) are quickly and automatically matched from the public geo-information products such as the rectified panchromatic images of Landsat-8. Before the geometric correction, the cloud detection results are also used to eliminate the invalid GCPs distributed in the cloud covered areas, which obviously reduces the ratio of blunders of GCPs. The geometric correction module not only rectifies the rational function models (RFMs), but also provides the self-calibration model and parameters for the non-linear distortion, and it is iteratively processed to detect blunders. The maximum geometric distortion in WFV image decreases from about 10-15 pixels to 1-2 pixels when compensated by self-calibration model. The processing experiments involve hundreds of WFV images of GF-1 satellite acquired from June to September 2013, which covers the whole mainland of China. All the processing work can be finished by one operator within 2 days on a desktop computer made up by a second-generation Intel Core-i7 CPU and a 4-solid-State-Disk array. The digital ortho maps (DOM) are automatically generated with 3 arc second Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The geometric accuracies of the

  10. Wide-field-of-view narrow-band spectral filters based on photonic crystal nanocavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Wataru; Sun, Pang-Chen; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2002-02-01

    We describe a novel approach to implementing wide-field-of-view narrow-band spectral filters, using an array of resonant nanocavities consisting of periodic defects in a two-dimensional three-material photonic-crystal nanostructure. We analyze the transmissivity of this type of filter for a range of wavelengths and in-plane incidence angles as a function of the defect's refractive index, the number of layers in the photonic-crystal reflectors, and the period of the defects and find that this structure diminishes the angular sensitivity of the resonance condition relative to that of a standard multilayer filter.

  11. Population synthesis of RR Lyrae stars in the original $Kepler$ and $K2$ Fields of View

    CERN Document Server

    Hanyecz, Ottó

    2016-01-01

    It is interesting to ask what fraction of the total available RR Lyrae (RRL) sample that falls in the $Kepler$ and $K2$ Fields of View (FoV) is known or discovered. In order assess the completeness of our sample we compared the known RRL sample in the $Kepler$ and $K2$ fields with synthetic Galactic models. The Catalina Sky Survey RRL sample was used to calibrate our method. We found that a large number of faint RRL stars is missing from $Kepler$ and $K2$ fields.

  12. Extended field-of-view in a lensless endoscope using an aperiodic multicore fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Sivankutty, Siddharth; Bouwmans, Géraud; Kogan, Dani; Oron, Dan; Andresen, Esben Ravn; Rigneault, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    We investigate lensless endoscopy using coherent beam combining and aperiodic multicore fibers (MCF). We show that diffracted orders, inherent to MCF with periodically arranged cores, dramatically reduce the field of view (FoV) and that randomness in MCF core positions can increase the FoV up to the diffraction limit set by a single fiber core, while maintaining MCF experimental feasibility. We demonstrate experimentally pixelation-free lensless endoscopy imaging over a 120 micron FoV with an aperiodic MCF designed with widely spaced cores. We show that this system is suitable to perform beam scanning imaging by simply applying a tilt to the proximal wavefront.

  13. Range performance of the DARPA AWARE wide field-of-view visible imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J M; Judd, K P; Olson, C C; Novak, K; Waterman, J R; Feller, S; McCain, S; Anderson, J; Brady, D

    2016-06-01

    In a prior paper, we described a new imaging architecture that addresses the need for wide field-of-view imaging combined with the resolution required to identify targets at long range. Over the last two years substantive improvements have been made to the system, both in terms of the size, weight, and power of the camera as well as to the optics and data management software. The result is an overall improvement in system performance, which we demonstrate via a maritime target identification experiment.

  14. Field of view of limitations in see-through HMD using geometric waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHoog, Edward; Holmstedt, Jason; Aye, Tin

    2016-08-01

    Geometric waveguides are being integrated into head-mounted display (HMD) systems, where having see-through capability in a compact, lightweight form factor is required. We developed methods for determining the field of view (FOV) of such waveguide HMD systems and have analytically derived the FOV for waveguides using planar and curved geometries. By using real ray-tracing methods, we are able to show how the geometry and index of refraction of the waveguide, as well as the properties of the coupling optics, impact the FOV. Use of this analysis allows one to determine the maximum theoretical FOV of a planar or curved waveguide-based system.

  15. Coordinating one hand with two eyes: optimizing for field of view in a pointing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aarlenne Z; Crawford, J Douglas

    2003-02-01

    We previously found that subjects switched 'ocular dominance' as a function of horizontal gaze direction in a reaching task [Vision Res. 41 (14) (2001) 1743]. Here we extend these findings to show that when subjects pointed to targets across the horizontal binocular field, they aligned the fingertip with a vertical plane located between the eyes and the target. This eye-target plane gradually shifted from aligning with the left eye (leftward targets) to between the two eyes (intermediate targets) to the right eye (rightward targets). We suggest that this occurs to optimize eye-hand alignment towards the eye with the best overall field of view.

  16. Zenith Movie showing Phoenix's Lidar Beam (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation A laser beam from the Canadian-built lidar instrument on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander can be seen in this contrast-enhanced sequence of 10 images taken by Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager on July 26, 2008, during early Martian morning hours of the mission's 61st Martian day after landing. The view is almost straight up and includes about 1.5 kilometer (about 1 mile) of the length of the beam. The camera, from its position close to the lidar on the lander deck, took the images through a green filter centered on light with wavelength 532 nanometers, the same wavelength of the laser beam. The movie has been artificially colored to to approximately match the color that would be seen looking through this filter on Mars. Contrast is enhanced to make the beam more visible. The lidar beam can be seen extending from the lower right to the upper right, near the zenith, as it reflects off particles suspended in the atmosphere. Particles that scatter the beam directly into the camera can be seen to produce brief sparkles of light. In the background, dust can be seen drifting across the sky pushed by winds aloft. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. A long-range, wide field-of-view infrared eyeblink detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Steven B; Detweiler, Krystal L; Holland, Kyle H; Hord, Michael A; Bracha, Vlastislav

    2006-04-15

    Classical conditioning of the eyeblink response in the rabbit is one of the most advanced models of learning and memory in the mammalian brain. Successful use of the eyeblink conditioning paradigm requires precise measurements of the eyeblink response. One common technique of eyelid movement detection utilizes measurements of infrared (IR) light reflected from the surface of the eye. The performance of current IR sensors, however, is limited by their sensitivity to ambient infrared noise, by their small field-of-view and by short working distances. To address these limitations, we developed an IR eyeblink detector consisting of a pulsing (62.5 kHz) IR light emitting diode (LED) paired with a silicon IR photodiode and circuit that synchronously demodulates the recorded signal and rejects background IR noise. The working distance of the sensor exceeds 20 mm, and the field-of-view is larger than the area of a rabbit's eye. Due to its superior characteristics, the new sensor is ideally suited for both standard eyeblink conditioning and for studies that utilize IR-containing visual stimuli and/or that are conducted in an environment contaminated with IR noise.

  18. Photometric Calibration and Image Stitching for a Large Field of View Multi-Camera System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A new compact large field of view (FOV multi-camera system is introduced. The camera is based on seven tiny complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor modules covering over 160° × 160° FOV. Although image stitching has been studied extensively, sensor and lens differences have not been considered in previous multi-camera devices. In this study, we have calibrated the photometric characteristics of the multi-camera device. Lenses were not mounted on the sensor in the process of radiometric response calibration to eliminate the influence of the focusing effect of uniform light from an integrating sphere. Linearity range of the radiometric response, non-linearity response characteristics, sensitivity, and dark current of the camera response function are presented. The R, G, and B channels have different responses for the same illuminance. Vignetting artifact patterns have been tested. The actual luminance of the object is retrieved by sensor calibration results, and is used to blend images to make panoramas reflect the objective luminance more objectively. This compensates for the limitation of stitching images that are more realistic only through the smoothing method. The dynamic range limitation of can be resolved by using multiple cameras that cover a large field of view instead of a single image sensor with a wide-angle lens. The dynamic range is expanded by 48-fold in this system. We can obtain seven images in one shot with this multi-camera system, at 13 frames per second.

  19. GAW - An Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope with Large Field of View

    CERN Document Server

    Cusumano, G; Alberdi, A; Alvarez, M; Assis, P; Biondo, B; Bocchino, F; Brogueira, P; Caballero, J A; Carvajal, M; Castro-Tirado, A J; Catalano, O; Celi, F; Delgado, C; Di Cocco, G; Dominguez, A; Navas, J M Espino; Santo, M C Espirito; Gallardo, M I; García, J E; Giarrusso, S; Gómez, M; Gómez, J L; Gonçalves, P; Guerriero, M; La Barbera, A; La Rosa, G; Lozano, M; Maccarone, M C; Mangano, A; Martel, I; Massaro, E; Mineo, T; Moles, M; Pérez-Bernal, F; Peres-Torres, M A; Pimenta, M; Pina, A; Prada, F; Quesada, J M; Quintana, J M; Quintero, J R; Rodríguez, J; Russo, F; Sacco, B; Sanchez-Conde, M A; Segreto, A; Tome', B; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Vallania, P

    2007-01-01

    GAW, acronym for Gamma Air Watch, is a Research and Development experiment in the TeV range, whose main goal is to explore the feasibility of large field of view Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. GAW is an array of three relatively small telescopes (2.13 m diameter) which differs from the existing and presently planned projects in two main features: the adoption of a refractive optics system as light collector and the use of single photoelectron counting as detector working mode. The optics system allows to achieve a large field of view (24x24 squared degrees) suitable for surveys of large sky regions. The single photoelectron counting mode in comparison with the charge integration mode improves the sensitivity by permitting also the reconstruction of events with a small number of collected Cherenkov photons. GAW, which is a collaboration effort of Research Institutes in Italy, Portugal and Spain, will be erected in the Calar Alto Observatory (Sierra de Los Filabres - Andalucia, Spain), at 2150 m a.s....

  20. High-resolution LCD projector for extra-wide-field-of-view head-up display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert D.; Modro, David H.; Quast, Gerhardt A.; Wood, Robert B.

    2003-09-01

    LCD projection-based cockpit displays are beginning to make entry into military and commercial aircraft. Customers for commercial Head-Up Displays (HUDs)(including airframe manufacturers) are now interested in the adaptation of the technology into existing and future HUD optical systems. LCD projection can improve mean-time-between-failure rates because the LCDs are very robust and the light sources can be replaced with scheduled maintenance by the customer without the need for re-calibration. LCD projectors promise to lower the cost of the HUD because the cost of these displays continues to drop while the cost of CRTs remain stable. LCD projectors provide the potential for multi-colors, higher brightness raster, and all-digital communication between the flight computer and display unit. Another potential benefit of LCD projection is the ability to increase field of view and viewing eyebox without exceeding existing power budgets or reducing display lifetime and reliability compared to the capabilities provided by CRTs today. This paper describes the performance requirements and improved performance of a third-generation LCD projection image source for use in a wide field of view head-up display (HUD) optical system. This paper will focus on new HUD requirements and the application of various technologies such as LCOS microdisplays, arc lamps, and rear-projection screens. Measured performance results are compared to the design requirements.

  1. The widest contiguous field of view at Dome C and Mount Graham

    CERN Document Server

    Stoesz, J; Lascaux, F; Hagelin, S

    2009-01-01

    The image quality from Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics (GLAO) can be gradually increased with decreased contiguous field of view. This trade-off is dependent on the vertical profile of the optical turbulence (Cn2 profiles). It is known that the accuracy of the vertical distribution measured by existing Cn2 profiling techniques is currently quite uncertain for wide field performance predictions 4 to 20 arcminutes. With assumed uncertainties in measurements from Generalized-SCIDAR (GS), SODAR plus MASS we quantify the impact of this uncertainty on the trade-off between field of view and image quality for photometry of science targets at the resolution limit. We use a point spread function (PSF) model defined analytically in the spatial frequency domain to compute the relevant photometry figure of merit at infrared wavelengths. Statistics of this PSF analysis on a database of Cn2 measurements are presented for Mt. Graham, Arizona and Dome C, Antarctica. This research is part of the activities of ForOT (3D Forecasti...

  2. Polarization mosaicing: high dynamic range and polarization imaging in a wide field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechner, Yoav Y.; Nayar, Shree K.

    2003-12-01

    We present an approach for imaging the polarization state of scene points in a wide field of view, while enhancing the radiometric dynamic range of imaging systems. This is achieved by a simple modification of image mosaicking, which is a common technique in remote sensing. In traditional image mosaics, images taken in varying directions or positions are stitched to obtain a larger image. Yet, as the camera moves, it senses each scene point multiple times in overlapping regions of the raw frames. We rigidly attach to the camera a fixed, spatially varying polarization and attenuation filter. This way, the camera motion-induced multiple measurements per scene point are taken under different optical settings. This is in contrast to the redundant measurements of traditional mosaics. Computational algorithms then analyze the data to extract polarization imaging with high dynamic range across the mosaic field of view. We developed a Maximum Likelihood method to automatically register the images, in spite of the challenging spatially varying effects. Then, we use Maximum Likelihood to handle, in a single framework, variable exposures (due to transmittance variations), saturation, and partial polarization filtering. As a by product, these results enable polarization settings of cameras to change while the camera moves, alleviating the need for camera stability. This work demonstrates the modularity of the Generalized Mosaicing approach, which we recently introduced for multispectral image mosaics. The results are useful for the wealth of polarization imaging applications, in addition to mosaicking applications, particularly remote sensing. We demonstrate experimental results obtained using a system we built.

  3. Photometric Calibration and Image Stitching for a Large Field of View Multi-Camera System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yu; Wang, Keyi; Fan, Gongshu

    2016-04-11

    A new compact large field of view (FOV) multi-camera system is introduced. The camera is based on seven tiny complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor modules covering over 160° × 160° FOV. Although image stitching has been studied extensively, sensor and lens differences have not been considered in previous multi-camera devices. In this study, we have calibrated the photometric characteristics of the multi-camera device. Lenses were not mounted on the sensor in the process of radiometric response calibration to eliminate the influence of the focusing effect of uniform light from an integrating sphere. Linearity range of the radiometric response, non-linearity response characteristics, sensitivity, and dark current of the camera response function are presented. The R, G, and B channels have different responses for the same illuminance. Vignetting artifact patterns have been tested. The actual luminance of the object is retrieved by sensor calibration results, and is used to blend images to make panoramas reflect the objective luminance more objectively. This compensates for the limitation of stitching images that are more realistic only through the smoothing method. The dynamic range limitation of can be resolved by using multiple cameras that cover a large field of view instead of a single image sensor with a wide-angle lens. The dynamic range is expanded by 48-fold in this system. We can obtain seven images in one shot with this multi-camera system, at 13 frames per second.

  4. Retrieval of Droplet size Density Distribution from Multiple field of view Cross polarized Lidar Signals: Theory and Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    is derived to facilitate use of secondary polarization. The model is supported by exper- imental MFOV lidar measurements carried out in a controlled ...Retrieval of droplet-size density distribution from multiple-field-of- view cross-polarized lidar signals: theory and experimental validation...Gilles Roy, Luc Bissonnette, Christian Bastille, and Gilles Vallee Multiple-field-of- view (MFOV) secondary-polarization lidar signals are used to

  5. Compressive imaging for difference image formation and wide-field-of-view target tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhar

    2010-11-01

    Use of imaging systems for performing various situational awareness tasks in military and commercial settings has a long history. There is increasing recognition, however, that a much better job can be done by developing non-traditional optical systems that exploit the task-specific system aspects within the imager itself. In some cases, a direct consequence of this approach can be real-time data compression along with increased measurement fidelity of the task-specific features. In others, compression can potentially allow us to perform high-level tasks such as direct tracking using the compressed measurements without reconstructing the scene of interest. In this dissertation we present novel advancements in feature-specific (FS) imagers for large field-of-view surveillence, and estimation of temporal object-scene changes utilizing the compressive imaging paradigm. We develop these two ideas in parallel. In the first case we show a feature-specific (FS) imager that optically multiplexes multiple, encoded sub-fields of view onto a common focal plane. Sub-field encoding enables target tracking by creating a unique connection between target characteristics in superposition space and the target's true position in real space. This is accomplished without reconstructing a conventional image of the large field of view. System performance is evaluated in terms of two criteria: average decoding time and probability of decoding error. We study these performance criteria as a function of resolution in the encoding scheme and signal-to-noise ratio. We also include simulation and experimental results demonstrating our novel tracking method. In the second case we present a FS imager for estimating temporal changes in the object scene over time by quantifying these changes through a sequence of difference images. The difference images are estimated by taking compressive measurements of the scene. Our goals are twofold. First, to design the optimal sensing matrix for taking

  6. Homography-based control scheme for mobile robots with nonholonomic and field-of-view constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Nicolás, Gonzalo; Gans, Nicholas R; Bhattacharya, Sourabh; Sagüés, Carlos; Guerrero, Josechu J; Hutchinson, Seth

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we present a visual servo controller that effects optimal paths for a nonholonomic differential drive robot with field-of-view constraints imposed by the vision system. The control scheme relies on the computation of homographies between current and goal images, but unlike previous homography-based methods, it does not use the homography to compute estimates of pose parameters. Instead, the control laws are directly expressed in terms of individual entries in the homography matrix. In particular, we develop individual control laws for the three path classes that define the language of optimal paths: rotations, straight-line segments, and logarithmic spirals. These control laws, as well as the switching conditions that define how to sequence path segments, are defined in terms of the entries of homography matrices. The selection of the corresponding control law requires the homography decomposition before starting the navigation. We provide a controllability and stability analysis for our system and give experimental results.

  7. The NOAA-9 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Wide Field-of-View Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Kathryn A.; Smith, G. Louis; Young, David F.

    1999-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) consisted of wide field-of-view (WFOV) radiometers and scanning radiometers for measuring outgoing longwave radiation and solar radiation reflected from the Earth. These instruments were carried by the dedicated Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and by the NOAA-9 and -10 operational spacecraft. The WFOV radiometers provided data from which instantaneous fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are computed by use of a numerical filter algorithm. Monthly mean fluxes over a 5-degree equal angle grid are computed from the instantaneous TOA fluxes. The WFOV radiometers aboard the NOAA-9 spacecraft operated from February 1985 through December 1992, at which time a failure of the shortwave radiometer ended the usable data after nearly 8 years. This paper examines the monthly mean products from that data set.

  8. Large-field-of-view Chip-scale Talbot-grid-based Fluorescence Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pang, Shuo; Kato, Mihoko; Sternberg, Paul W; Yang, Changhuei

    2012-01-01

    The fluorescence microscope is one of the most important tools in modern clinical diagnosis and biological science. However, its expense, size and limited field-of-view (FOV) are becoming bottlenecks in key applications such as large-scale phenotyping and low-resource-setting diagnostics. Here we report a low-cost, compact chip-scale fluorescence-imaging platform, termed the Fluorescence Talbot Microscopy (FTM), which utilizes the Talbot self-imaging effect to enable efficient fluorescence imaging over a large and directly-scalable FOV. The FTM prototype has a resolution of 1.2 microns and an FOV of 3.9 mm x 3.5 mm. We demonstrate the imaging capability of FTM on fluorescently labeled breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) and HEK cells expressing green fluorescent protein.

  9. Plastic optical fiber for wide field-of-view optical wireless receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, Hoorieh; Sterckx, Karel; Saengudomlert, Poompat; Mohammed, Waleed S.

    2016-10-01

    This paper demonstrates a working indoor optical wireless link for smart environment applications. The system utilizes a wide field-of-view (FOV) optical wireless receiver through cleaving the tip of large core plastic optical fibers (POFs) attached to the detector. The quality of the optical link is quantified through bit error rate (BER) measurements. The experimental results show a wide FOV with the uncoded BER in the order of 10-3 for transmission distances up to 35 cm when using two POFs for signal collection. The distance can be improved further by increasing the number of fibers. The transmitted signal format and how the BER measurement is achieved are discussed at length. In addition, details are provided for the design of the electronics to establish the optical wireless link.

  10. PSF and field of view characteristics of imaging and nulling interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénault, François

    2010-07-01

    In this communication are presented some complements to a recent paper entitled "Simple Fourier optics formalism for high angular resolution systems and nulling interferometry" [1], dealing with imaging and nulling capacities of a few types of multi-aperture optical systems. Herein the characteristics of such systems in terms of Point Spread Function (PSF) and Field of View (FoV) are derived from simple analytical expressions that are further evaluated numerically for various configurations. We consider successively the general cases of Fizeau and Michelson interferometers, and those of a monolithic pupil, nulling telescope, of a nulling, Sheared-Pupil Telescope (SPT), and of a sparse aperture, Axially Combined Interferometer (ACI). The analytical formalism also allows establishing the exact Object-Image relationships applicable to nulling PSTs or ACIs that are planned for future space missions searching for habitable extra-solar planets.

  11. PSF and field of view characteristics of imaging and nulling interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Hénault, François

    2010-01-01

    In this communication are presented some complements to a recent paper entitled "Simple Fourier optics formalism for high angular resolution systems and nulling interferometry", dealing with imaging and nulling capacities of a few types of multi-aperture optical systems. Herein the characteristics of such systems in terms of Point Spread Function (PSF) and Field of View (FoV) are derived from simple analytical expressions that are further evaluated numerically for various configurations. We consider successively the general cases of Fizeau and Michelson interferometers, and those of a monolithic pupil, nulling telescope, of a nulling, Sheared-Pupil Telescope (SPT), and of a sparse aperture, Axially Combined Interferometer (ACI). The analytical formalism also allows establishing the exact Object-Image relationships applicable to nulling PSTs or ACIs that are planned for future space missions searching for habitable extra-solar planets.

  12. Foveated scanning: dynamic monodimensional enlargement of resolved field of view in lenses of scanner systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherian, Farhang; Rashidian, Bizhan

    2016-09-10

    An inconsistency between the circular symmetric geometry of conventional optical imagers and the geometry of long linear sensors used in today's line-scan cameras results in suboptimal separate design of optics and electronics of scanner systems. Based on the method of foveated optical imaging, a technique named foveated scanning (FS) is proposed in this paper. The FS technique is employed to enlarge the one-dimensional resolved field of view (RFOV) of conventional lenses and permits optimized performance on a line-of-interest in the image plane where the optoelectronic sensor is located. The achieved enlargement of RFOV is verified on a proof-of-concept basic telephoto lens. Both modulation transfer function analysis and the imaging simulation of a standard target have been performed. Results show a twofold increase in RFOV by this technique.

  13. Optimal GEO lasercomm terminal field of view for LEO link support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Charles W.; Hunt, Jeffrey P.; Engberg, Brian S.; Walchko, Kevin J.

    2006-02-01

    As alternatives to the traditional gimbaled terminal design, future satellite based laser communications terminals are envisioned that utilize a wide field of view or field of regard (WFOV/WFOR). This approach can be advantageous in situations requiring rapid switching between user terminals, support for multiple terminals simultaneously (via TDMA, SDMA or WDMA) or other non-standard mission requirements. However, a traditional gimbaled terminal has the capability to continuously track a single user over very large angles, such as the 18-20° spanned by a LEO satellite as seen from GEO. WFOV/WFOR designs face increasing cost and/or complexity issues with each incremental increase in angular coverage. The methodology and inputs for a trade study are presented here that attempts to maximize the available connectivity to a LEO satellite while minimizing cost and complexity metrics by choosing an optimal FOV/FOR size for a GEO terminal.

  14. Quantifying driver's field-of-view in tractors: methodology and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, Issachar; Byran, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    When driving a car, the visual awareness is important for operating and controlling the vehicle. When operating a tractor, it is even more complex. This is because the driving is always accompanied with another task (e.g., plough) that demands constant changes of body postures, to achieve the needed Field-of-View (FoV). Therefore, the cockpit must be well designed to provide best FoV. Today, the driver's FoV is analyzed mostly by computer simulations of a cockpit model and a Digital Human Model (DHM) positioned inside. The outcome is an 'Eye view' that displays what the DHM 'sees'. This paper suggests a new approach that adds quantitative information to the current display; presented on three tractor models as case studies. Based on the results, the design can be modified. This may assist the engineer, to analyze, compare and improve the design, for better addressing the driver needs.

  15. Active control of acoustic field-of-view in a biosonar system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossi Yovel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Active-sensing systems abound in nature, but little is known about systematic strategies that are used by these systems to scan the environment. Here, we addressed this question by studying echolocating bats, animals that have the ability to point their biosonar beam to a confined region of space. We trained Egyptian fruit bats to land on a target, under conditions of varying levels of environmental complexity, and measured their echolocation and flight behavior. The bats modulated the intensity of their biosonar emissions, and the spatial region they sampled, in a task-dependant manner. We report here that Egyptian fruit bats selectively change the emission intensity and the angle between the beam axes of sequentially emitted clicks, according to the distance to the target, and depending on the level of environmental complexity. In so doing, they effectively adjusted the spatial sector sampled by a pair of clicks-the "field-of-view." We suggest that the exact point within the beam that is directed towards an object (e.g., the beam's peak, maximal slope, etc. is influenced by three competing task demands: detection, localization, and angular scanning-where the third factor is modulated by field-of-view. Our results suggest that lingual echolocation (based on tongue clicks is in fact much more sophisticated than previously believed. They also reveal a new parameter under active control in animal sonar-the angle between consecutive beams. Our findings suggest that acoustic scanning of space by mammals is highly flexible and modulated much more selectively than previously recognized.

  16. Large field of view computed laminography with the asymmetric rotational scanning geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    X-ray computed laminography(CL)is used in the fields of industrial inspection and medical imaging.It can provide the internal structure three-dimensional(3D)information of a region of the objects nondestructively.It is important to the clinical diagnosis and the quality control of flat objects like printed circuit boards,aircraft wings and satellite solar panels.With the restriction that the imaging region must be within the X-ray beam formed by the X-ray source and the detector,the imaging field of view of CL is limited by the size of detector.A new CL method with an asymmetric rotational cone-beam scanning geometry,called large field of view CL,is presented to overcome the existing disadvantage.It can extend the imaging region when the imaging spatial resolution keeps the same as that of the conventional CL.It can also improve the imaging spatial resolution when the imaging region keeps the same as that of the conventional CL.The asymmetric configuration can be achieved by offsetting the detector from the conventional symmetric configuration.It does not,however,require new detectors and X-ray source nor alter the scanning mechanical system.The filtered back-projection(FBP)reconstruction algorithm and the data truncation smoothing functions have been deduced to reconstruct the images directly from the data acquired with this asymmetric configuration.We performed numerical studies and experiments to demonstrate and validate the proposed approach. Results in these studies and experiments confirm that the proposed method can enlarge the imaging region and improve the spatial resolution.The proposed approach may find applications in the CL system with the rotational scanning geometry.

  17. Hemispherical Field-of-View Above-Water Surface Imager for Submarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Farr, William H.; Dannecker, John D.

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses solutions to the problem of submarines having to rise above water to detect airplanes in the general vicinity. Two solutions are provided, in which a sensor is located just under the water surface, and at a few to tens of meter depth under the water surface. The first option is a Fish Eye Lens (FEL) digital-camera combination, situated just under the water surface that will have near-full- hemisphere (360 azimuth and 90 elevation) field of view for detecting objects on the water surface. This sensor can provide a three-dimensional picture of the airspace both in the marine and in the land environment. The FEL is coupled to a camera and can continuously look at the entire sky above it. The camera can have an Active Pixel Sensor (APS) focal plane array that allows logic circuitry to be built directly in the sensor. The logic circuitry allows data processing to occur on the sensor head without the need for any other external electronics. In the second option, a single-photon sensitive (photon counting) detector-array is used at depth, without the need for any optics in front of it, since at this location, optical signals are scattered and arrive at a wide (tens of degrees) range of angles. Beam scattering through clouds and seawater effectively negates optical imaging at depths below a few meters under cloudy or turbulent conditions. Under those conditions, maximum collection efficiency can be achieved by using a non-imaging photon-counting detector behind narrowband filters. In either case, signals from these sensors may be fused and correlated or decorrelated with other sensor data to get an accurate picture of the object(s) above the submarine. These devices can complement traditional submarine periscopes that have a limited field of view in the elevation direction. Also, these techniques circumvent the need for exposing the entire submarine or its periscopes to the outside environment.

  18. Wide field of view CT and acromioclavicular joint instability: A technical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, David R; Troupis, John M; Kamali Moaveni, Afshin

    2015-06-01

    A 21-year-old female with a traumatic shoulder injury is investigated and managed for symptoms relating to this injury. Pathology at the acromioclavicular joint is detected clinically; however, clinical examination and multiple imaging modalities do not reach a unified diagnosis on the grading of this acromioclavicular joint injury. When management appropriate to that suggested injury grading fail to help the patient's symptoms, further investigation methods were utilised. Wide field of view, dynamic CT (4D CT) is conducted on the patient's affected shoulder using a 320 × 0.5 mm detector multislice CT. Scans were conducted with a static table as the patient completed three movements of the affected shoulder. Capturing multiple data sets per second over a z-axis of 16 cm, measurements of the acromioclavicular joint were made, to show dynamic changes at the joint. Acromioclavicular (AC) joint translations were witnessed in three planes (a previously unrecognised pathology in the grading of acromioclavicular joint injuries). Translation in multiple planes was also not evident on careful clinical examination of this patient. AC joint width, anterior-posterior translation, superior-inferior translation and coracoclavicular width were measured with planar reconstructions while volume-rendered images and dynamic sequences aiding visual understanding of the pathology. Wide field of view dynamic CT (4D CT) is an accurate and quick modality to diagnose complex acromioclavicular joint injury. It provides dynamic information that no other modality can; 4D CT shows future benefits for clinical approach to diagnosis and management of acromioclavicular joint injury, and other musculoskeletal pathologies. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  19. A future wide field-of-view TeV gamma-ray observatory in the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Miguel; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    High-energy gamma-ray observations are an essential probe of cosmic-ray acceleration. Detection of the highest energies and the shortest timescales of variability are key motivations when designing the next generation of gamma-ray experiments. The Milagro experiment was the first-generation of gamma-ray detectors based on the water-Cherenkov technique, and demonstrated that it is possible to continuously monitor a large fraction of the TeV sky. The second-generation water-Cherenkov experiment, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory, consists of an array of 300 water-Cherenkov detectors covering an area of 22,000 m2 at 4,100 m a.s.l. The larger effective area, the higher altitude, and the optical isolation of the detectors led to a 15-fold increase in sensitivity relative to Milagro. Instruments with a wide field of view and large duty cycle are capable of surveying the TeV sky, mapping the diffuse emission, detecting emission from extended regions, and observing transient events such as gamma ray bursts. They also have the potential for discovering electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves and astrophysical neutrinos. I will present the preliminary design of a third-generation water-Cherenkov observatory located at very high altitude in South America.

  20. A Variational Method to Retrieve the Extinction Profile in Liquid Clouds Using Multiple Field-of-View Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounder, Nicola L.; Hogan, Robin J.; Varnai, Tamas; Battaglia, Alessandro; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    While liquid clouds playa very important role in the global radiation budget, it's been very difficult to remotely determine their internal cloud structure. Ordinary lidar instruments (similar to radars but using visible light pulses) receive strong signals from such clouds, but the information is limited to a thin layer near the cloud boundary. Multiple field-of-view (FOV) lidars offer some new hope as they are able to isolate photons that were scattered many times by cloud droplets and penetrated deep into a cloud before returning to the instrument. Their data contains new information on cloud structure, although the lack of fast simulation methods made it challenging to interpret the observations. This paper describes a fast new technique that can simulate multiple-FOV lidar signals and can even estimate the way the signals would change in response to changes in cloud properties-an ability that allows quick refinements in our initial guesses of cloud structure. Results for a hypothetical airborne three-FOV lidar suggest that this approach can help determine cloud structure for a deeper layer in clouds, and can reliably determine the optical thickness of even fairly thick liquid clouds. The algorithm is also applied to stratocumulus observations by the 8-FOV airborne "THOR" lidar. These tests demonstrate that the new method can determine the depth to which a lidar provides useful information on vertical cloud structure. This work opens the way to exploit data from spaceborne lidar and radar more rigorously than has been possible up to now.

  1. Study on a prototype of the large dimensional refractive lens for the future large field-of-view IACT

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, T L; Gao, Q; Liu, C; Zhang, Y; Hu, H B; Cai, H; Zhang, X Y; Yang, H Y; Shi, Y; Danzengluobu,; Liu, M Y; Feng, Z Y; Feng, Y L; Guo, Y Q; Gou, Q B; Tian, Z; Xiao, Y X

    2015-01-01

    In gamma ray astronomy, the energy range from sub-100GeV to TeV is crucial due to where there is a gap between space experiments and ground-based ones. In addition, observations in this energy range are expected to provide more details about the high energy emission from GRBs,and thus to understand EBL. Based on the observation results and the related knowledge, scientists may be able to unveil the mysteries of galaxy formation and the evolution of early universe. One of the principal issues for next generation Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) is to achieve larger field of view (FoV). In this work, we report a refractive water convex lens as light collector to test the feasibility of a new generation of IACT, and some preliminary test results on the optical properties (the focal length, spot size, transmittance, etc.) of a 0.9 m diameter water lens, the photodetectors and DAQ system of a prototype are presented and discussed.

  2. A new field-of-view autotracking method based on back-projected ray image cross-correlation for online tomography reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, Sachihiko; Baba, Misuzu; Baba, Norio

    2014-11-01

    In general, a tomogram cannot be observed immediately after the acquisition of a series of specimen tilt images, but is instead observed after the post-processing of the tilt series alignment, which often requires a substantial amount of time. Moreover, for general specimens, the automatic acquisition of the tilt series is difficult because field-of-view tracking frequently fails as the tilt angle or specimen thickness increases.In this study, we focus on the improvement of the field-of-view autotracking technique for the purpose of online tomography reconstruction and propose a new alternative technique [1,2]. The method we proposed uses a so-called 'back-projected ray image' instead of a specimen tilt image. The back-projected ray image is a cross-section image calculated from each projection image only during reconstruction. As a result of a study on 'ray images', the quality and accuracy of the cross-correlation between a pair of neighboring ray images among the tilt series were observed to be very high compared with those between a pair of projection images. We observed that a back projected ray image reliably cross-correlates with other neighboring ray images at the position of an existing three-dimensional object. The proposed method can therefore consistently track the field-of-view, overcoming the weakness of a conventional image-matching-based method. In addition, the present method is simple, and high speed processing is expected to be achieved because fast Fourier transform (FFT) and inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) algorithms can be used.We applied this method to real specimens in online experiments using a TEM and thereby demonstrated its successful performance. Online autotracking experiments with thin-section samples were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The field-of-view was automatically tracked with high accuracy through a tilt angle range. Furthermore, online tomograms were obtained immediately after the last

  3. Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data, zenith distributions, and three-flavor oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Fogli, G L; Marrone, A; Scioscia, G

    1999-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the zenith angle distributions of atmospheric neutrino events observed in the Super-Kamiokande (SK) underground experiment, assuming two-flavor and three-flavor oscillations (with one dominant mass scale) among active neutrinos. In particular, we calculate the five angular distributions associated to sub-GeV and multi-GeV \\mu-like and e-like events and to upward through-going muons, for a total of 30 accurately computed observables (zenith bins). First we study how such observables vary with the oscillation parameters, and then we perform a fit to the experimental data as measured in SK for an exposure of 33 kTy (535 days). In the two-flavor mixing case, we confirm the results of the SK Collaboration analysis, namely, that \

  4. A Method to Evaluate the Stimulation of a Real World Field of View by Means of a Spectroradiometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Nardecchia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation elicited by a real world field of view is related to the color, the intensity and the direction of the information reaching the eye: different spectral power distributions of light trigger different responses. An evaluation of the stimulation provided by the field of view can be performed by measuring the spectral radiance with a spectroradiometer and weighting this data with an efficiency curve. Different weights (physical, physiological and psychological can lead to different analyses and consequently to different results. The proposed method allows an overall and simplified evaluation of the field of view based on spectral and luminance measures and a script that processes the luminous information. The final aim of this approach is to provide further information about the light stimulation reaching the retina and to supply a qualitative evaluation of the field of view, allowing to know how much stimulation is coming from a certain area within the visual field depending on the type of surface, basing on spectral and directional information. This approach can have practical implications, allowing technicians and designers to take into consideration the possible visual fields, in order to properly shape the features of stimulation throughout the day, hence following a field of view-based dynamic design.

  5. Use and validation of epithelial recognition and fields of view algorithms on virtual slides to guide TMA construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Sanford; Gentchev, Lynda; Basu, Amitabha; Jimenez, Rafael; Boussaid, Kamel; Gholap, Abhi

    2009-11-01

    While tissue microarrays (TMAs) are a form of high-throughput screening, they presently still require manual construction and interpretation. Because of predicted increasing demand for TMAs, we investigated whether their construction could be automated. We created both epithelial recognition algorithms (ERAs) and field of view (FOV) algorithms that could analyze virtual slides and select the areas of highest cancer cell density in the tissue block for coring (algorithmic TMA) and compared these to the cores manually selected (manual TMA) from the same tissue blocks. We also constructed TMAs with TMAker, a robot guided by these algorithms (robotic TMA). We compared each of these TMAs to each other. Our imaging algorithms produced a grid of hundreds of FOVs, identified cancer cells in a stroma background and calculated the epithelial percentage (cancer cell density) in each FOV. Those with the highest percentages guided core selection and TMA construction. Algorithmic TMA and robotic TMA were overall approximately 50% greater in cancer cell density compared with Manual TMA. These observations held for breast, colon, and lung cancer TMAs. Our digital image algorithms were effective in automating TMA construction.

  6. A new wide field-of-view confocal imaging system and its applications in drug discovery and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Damaskinos, Savvas; Dixon, Arthur E.; Lee, Lucy E. J.

    2005-11-01

    Conventional widefield light microscopy and confocal scanning microscopy have been indispensable for pathology and drug discovery research. Clinical specimens from diseased tissues are examined, new drug candidates are tested on drug targets, and the morphological and molecular biological changes of cells and tissues are observed. High throughput screening of drug candidates requires highly efficient screening instruments. A standard biomedical slide is 1 by 3 inches (25.4 by 76.2 mm) in size. A typical tissue specimen is 10 mm in diameter. To form a high resolution image of the entire specimen, a conventional widefield light microscope must acquire a large number of small images of the specimen, and then tile them together, which is tedious, inefficient and error-prone. A patented new wide field-of-view confocal scanning laser imaging system has been developed for tissue imaging, which is capable of imaging an entire microscope slide without tiling. It is capable of operating in brightfield, reflection and epi-fluorescence imaging modes. Three (red, green and blue (RGB)) lasers are used to produce brightfield and reflection images, and to excite various fluorophores. This new confocal system makes examination of large biomedical specimens more efficient, and makes fluorescence examination of large specimens possible for the first time without tiling. Description of the new confocal technology and applications of the imaging system in pathology and drug discovery research, for example, imaging large tissue specimens, tissue microarrays, and zebrafish sections, are reported in this paper.

  7. High-resolution small field-of-view magnetic resonance image acquisition system using a small planar coil and a pneumatic manipulator in an open MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kohei; Masamune, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Low-field open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for performing image-guided neurosurgical procedures. Intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images are useful for tracking brain shifts and verifying residual tumors. However, it is difficult to precisely determine the boundary of the brain tumors and normal brain tissues because the MR image resolution is low, especially when using a low-field open MRI scanner. To overcome this problem, a high-resolution MR image acquisition system was developed and tested. An MR-compatible manipulator with pneumatic actuators containing an MR signal receiver with a small radiofrequency (RF) coil was developed. The manipulator had five degrees of freedom for position and orientation control of the RF coil. An 8-mm planar RF coil with resistance and inductance of 2.04 [Formula: see text] and 1.00 [Formula: see text] was attached to the MR signal receiver at the distal end of the probe. MR images of phantom test devices were acquired using the MR signal receiver and normal head coil for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) testing. The SNR of MR images acquired using the MR signal receiver was 8.0 times greater than that of MR images acquired using the normal head coil. The RF coil was moved by the manipulator, and local MR images of a phantom with a 2-mm grid were acquired using the MR signal receiver. A wide field-of-view MR image was generated from a montage of local MR images. A small field-of-view RF system with a pneumatic manipulator was integrated in a low-field MRI scanner to allow acquisition of both wide field-of-view and high-resolution MR images. This system is promising for image-guided neurosurgery as it may allow brain tumors to be observed more clearly and removed precisely.

  8. Evaluation of subjective image quality in relation to diagnostic task for cone beam computed tomography with different fields of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara, E-mail: sara.lofthag-hansen@vgregion.se [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Public Dental Health, Gothenburg (Sweden); Thilander-Klang, Anne, E-mail: anne.thilander-klang@vgregion.se [Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Groendahl, Kerstin, E-mail: kerstin.grondahl@lj.se [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Joenkoeping (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Aims: To evaluate subjective image quality for two diagnostic tasks, periapical diagnosis and implant planning, for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using different exposure parameters and fields of view (FOVs). Materials and methods: Examinations were performed in posterior part of the jaws on a skull phantom with 3D Accuitomo (FOV 3 cm x 4 cm) and 3D Accuitomo FPD (FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm). All combinations of 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 kV and 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 mA with a rotation of 180{sup o} and 360{sup o} were used. Dose-area product (DAP) value was determined for each combination. The images were presented, displaying the object in axial, cross-sectional and sagittal views, without scanning data in a random order for each FOV and jaw. Seven observers assessed image quality on a six-point rating scale. Results: Intra-observer agreement was good ({kappa}{sub w} = 0.76) and inter-observer agreement moderate ({kappa}{sub w} = 0.52). Stepwise logistic regression showed kV, mA and diagnostic task to be the most important variables. Periapical diagnosis, regardless jaw, required higher exposure parameters compared to implant planning. Implant planning in the lower jaw required higher exposure parameters compared to upper jaw. Overall ranking of FOVs gave 4 cm x 4 cm, 6 cm x 6 cm followed by 3 cm x 4 cm. Conclusions: This study has shown that exposure parameters should be adjusted according to diagnostic task. For this particular CBCT brand a rotation of 180{sup o} gave good subjective image quality, hence a substantial dose reduction can be achieved without loss of diagnostic information.

  9. Evaluation of subjective image quality in relation to diagnostic task for cone beam computed tomography with different fields of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara; Thilander-Klang, Anne; Gröndahl, Kerstin

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate subjective image quality for two diagnostic tasks, periapical diagnosis and implant planning, for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using different exposure parameters and fields of view (FOVs). Examinations were performed in posterior part of the jaws on a skull phantom with 3D Accuitomo (FOV 3 cm×4 cm) and 3D Accuitomo FPD (FOVs 4 cm×4 cm and 6 cm×6 cm). All combinations of 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 kV and 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 mA with a rotation of 180° and 360° were used. Dose-area product (DAP) value was determined for each combination. The images were presented, displaying the object in axial, cross-sectional and sagittal views, without scanning data in a random order for each FOV and jaw. Seven observers assessed image quality on a six-point rating scale. Intra-observer agreement was good (κw=0.76) and inter-observer agreement moderate (κw=0.52). Stepwise logistic regression showed kV, mA and diagnostic task to be the most important variables. Periapical diagnosis, regardless jaw, required higher exposure parameters compared to implant planning. Implant planning in the lower jaw required higher exposure parameters compared to upper jaw. Overall ranking of FOVs gave 4 cm×4 cm, 6 cm×6 cm followed by 3 cm×4 cm. This study has shown that exposure parameters should be adjusted according to diagnostic task. For this particular CBCT brand a rotation of 180° gave good subjective image quality, hence a substantial dose reduction can be achieved without loss of diagnostic information. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Research on field of view of optical receiving antenna based on indoor visible light communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingguang; Lan, Tian; Zhao, Tao; Zhang, Yilun; Cui, Zhenghua; Ni, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Optical receiving antenna is usually positioned before the detector of an indoor visible light communication (VLC) system in order to collect more optical energy into the detector. Besides optical gain of the antenna, the field of view (FOV) plays also an important role to the performance of a VLC system. In this paper, the signal noise ratio (SNR) and inter-symbol interference (ISI) versus FOV of the antenna are simulated via Line-of-Sight (LOS) and non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) links within a room with a size of 5m × 5m × 3m. Results show that, the blind area appears while the FOV is less than 40 deg. and the SNR reduces as FOV increases and keeps small when FOV is more than 70 deg.. Furthermore, the average power of ISI rises with the increase of FOV, and the rising trend is relatively moderate when FOV is below 50 deg., while there is a rapid increase between 50 deg. and 70 deg. and finally tends to be stable after 70 deg. Therefore, it is practical to determine the FOV of the optical receiving antenna in the scope of 40 to 50 deg. based on the installment of LED lights on the ceiling here so as to avoid the blind area, attain high SNR, and reduce the influence of ISI. It is also worthwhile in practice to provide an identifiable evidence for the determination of FOV of the optical antenna.

  11. The cognitive implications of virtual locomotion with a restricted field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, William E.; Kelly, Jonathan W.; Dark, Veronica J.; Oliver, James H.

    2012-03-01

    A study was conducted to examine the impact, in terms of cognitive demands, of a restricted field of view (FOV) on semi-natural locomotion in virtual reality (VR). Participants were divided into two groups: high-FOV and low-FOV. They were asked to perform basic movements using a locomotion interface while simultaneously performing one of two memory tasks (spatial or verbal) or no memory task. The memory tasks were intended to simulate the competing demands when a user has primary tasks to perform while using an unnatural interface to move through the virtual world. Results show that participants remembered fewer spatial or verbal items when performing locomotion movements with a low FOV than with a high FOV. This equivalent verbal and spatial detriment may indicate that locomotion movements with a restricted FOV require additional general cognitive resources as opposed to spatial or verbal resource pools. This also emphasizes the importance of this research, as users of a system may allow primary task performance to suffer when performing locomotion. Movement start and completion times were also measured to examine resource requirements of specific aspects of movements. Understanding specific performance problems resulting from concurrent tasks can inform the design of systems.

  12. Large field-of-view wavefront control for deep brain imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    The biggest obstacle for deep tissue imaging is the scattering of light due to the heterogeneous distribution of biological tissue. In this respect, multiphoton microscopy has an inherent advantage as the scattering is significantly reduced by the use of longer excitation wavelengths. However, as we go deeper into the brain, effects of scattering still accumulate resulting in a loss of resolution and increased background noise. Adaptive optics is an ideal tool of choice to correct for such distortions of the excitation wavefront; the incident light can be tuned to cancel out the wavefront distortion experienced while propagating into greater depths resulting in a diffraction limited focus at the depth of interest. However, the biggest limitation of adaptive optics for in vivo brain imaging is its limited corrected field-of-view (FOV). For typical multiphoton laser scanning microscopes, the wavefront corrector for adaptive optics is placed at the pupil plane. This means that a single correction wavefront is applied to the entire scanned FOV which results in inefficient correction as the correction is averaged over the entire FOV. In this work, we demonstrate a novel approach to measure and display different correction wavefronts over different segments of the FOV. The application of the different correction wavefronts for each segment is realized in parallel resulting in fast aberration corrected imaging over a large FOV for high resolution in vivo brain imaging.

  13. In vivo assessment of muscle fascicle length by extended field-of-view ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noorkoiv, M; Stavnsbo, A; Aagaard, Per

    2010-01-01

    occasions, with ICC = 0.95 (CI = 0.80-0.99). The average absolute difference between L(f) measured by EFOV US and using linear extrapolation was 12.6 ± 8.1% [ICC = 0.76 (CI = -0.20-0.94)]; EFOV L(f) was always longer than extrapolated L(f). The relative error of measurement between L(f) measured by EFOV US......The present study examined the reliability and validity of in vivo vastus lateralis (VL) fascicle length (L(f)) assessment by extended field-of-view ultrasonography (EFOV US). Intraexperimenter and intersession reliability of EFOV US were tested. Further, L(f) measured from EFOV US images were...... compared to L(f) measured from static US images (6-cm FOV) where out-of-field fascicle portions were trigonometrically estimated (linear extrapolation). Finally, spatial accuracy of the EFOV technique was assessed by comparing L(f) measured on swine VL by EFOV US to actual measurements from digital...

  14. Mimicking honeybee eyes with a 280{sup 0} field of view catadioptric imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuerzl, W; Boeddeker, N; Dittmar, L; Egelhaaf, M, E-mail: wolfgang.stuerzl@uni-bielefeld.d [Department of Neurobiology and Center of Excellence ' Cognitive Interaction Technology' , Bielefeld University (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    We present a small single camera imaging system that provides a continuous 280{sup 0} field of view (FOV) inspired by the large FOV of insect eyes. This is achieved by combining a curved reflective surface that is machined into acrylic glass with lenses covering the frontal field that otherwise would have been obstructed by the mirror. Based on the work of Seidl (1982 PhD Thesis Technische Hochschule Darmstadt), we describe an extension of the 'bee eye optics simulation' (BEOS) model by Giger (1996 PhD Thesis Australian National University) to the full FOV which enables us to remap camera images according to the spatial resolution of honeybee eyes. This model is also useful for simulating the visual input of a bee-like agent in a virtual environment. The imaging system in combination with our bee eye model can serve as a tool for assessing the visual world from a bee's perspective which is particularly helpful for experimental setups. It is also well suited for mobile robots, in particular on flying vehicles that need light-weight sensors.

  15. Reduced field-of-view DTI segmentation of cervical spine tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lihua; Wen, Ying; Zhou, Zhenyu; von Deneen, Karen M; Huang, Dehui; Ma, Lin

    2013-11-01

    The number of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies regarding the human spine has considerably increased and it is challenging because of the spine's small size and artifacts associated with the most commonly used clinical imaging method. A novel segmentation method based on the reduced field-of-view (rFOV) DTI dataset is presented in cervical spinal canal cerebrospinal fluid, spinal cord grey matter and white matter classification in both healthy volunteers and patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Due to each channel based on high resolution rFOV DTI images providing complementary information on spinal tissue segmentation, we want to choose a different contribution map from multiple channel images. Via principal component analysis (PCA) and a hybrid diffusion filter with a continuous switch applied on fourteen channel features, eigen maps can be obtained and used for tissue segmentation based on the Bayesian discrimination method. Relative to segmentation by a pair of expert readers, all of the automated segmentation results in the experiment fall in the good segmentation area and performed well, giving an average segmentation accuracy of about 0.852 for cervical spinal cord grey matter in terms of volume overlap. Furthermore, this has important applications in defining more accurate human spinal cord tissue maps when fusing structural data with diffusion data. rFOV DTI and the proposed automatic segmentation outperform traditional manual segmentation methods in classifying MR cervical spinal images and might be potentially helpful for detecting cervical spine diseases in NMO and MS.

  16. Solving outside-axial-field-of-view scatter correction problem in PET via digital experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Zhu, Yang-Ming; Ye, Jinghan; Song, Xiyun; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Unaccounted scatter impact from unknown outside-axial-field-of-view (outside-AFOV) activity in PET is an important degrading factor for image quality and quantitation. Resource consuming and unpopular way to account for the outside- AFOV activity is to perform an additional PET/CT scan of adjacent regions. In this work we investigate a solution to the outside-AFOV scatter problem without performing a PET/CT scan of the adjacent regions. The main motivation for the proposed method is that the measured random corrected prompt (RCP) sinogram in the background region surrounding the measured object contains only scattered events, originating from both inside- and outside-AFOV activity. In this method, the scatter correction simulation searches through many randomly-chosen outside-AFOV activity estimates along with known inside-AFOV activity, generating a plethora of scatter distribution sinograms. This digital experimentation iterates until a decent match is found between a simulated scatter sinogram (that include supposed outside-AFOV activity) and the measured RCP sinogram in the background region. The combined scatter impact from inside- and outside-AFOV activity can then be used for scatter correction during final image reconstruction phase. Preliminary results using measured phantom data indicate successful phantom length estimate with the method, and, therefore, accurate outside-AFOV scatter estimate.

  17. Lateral Scanning Linnik Interferometry for Large Field of View and Fast Scanning: Wafer Bump Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Y.; Veluvolu, Kalyana C.; Lee, Soon-Geul

    2011-07-01

    Wafer-level packaging is currently the major trend in semiconductor packaging for miniaturization and high-density integration. To ensure the package reliability, the wafer and substrate bumps utilized as connection junctions need to be in-line inspected as regards their top-height distribution, coplanarity, and volume uniformity. This article proposes a lateral scanning interferometric system for wafer bump shape inspection in three dimensions with a large field of view and fast inspection speed based on an optomechatronic system design. For multiple-peak interferogram from wafer bumps around a transparent film layer, two-step information extraction algorithms are suggested, including top surface profile and under-layer surface profile detection algorithms. The multiple-peak interferogram is acquired with variations of lateral position of the reference mirror by a piezoelectric transducer (PZT). A series of experiments is performed for representative wafer samples with solder and gold bumps, and the effectiveness of the proposed inspection system is verified from the test results.

  18. Optical characterization of a miniaturized large field of view motion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Els; Ottevaere, Heidi; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the geometrical and optical characterization of a miniaturized very wide field-of-view (FOV) motion sensor inspired by the working principle of insect facet eyes. The goal of the sensor is to detect movement in the environment and to specify where in the surroundings these changes took place. Based on the measurements of the sensor, certain actions can be taken such as sounding an alarm in security applications or turning on the light in domotic applications. The advantage of miniaturizing these sensors is that they are low-cost, compact and more esthetical compared to current motion detectors. The sensor was designed to have a very large FOV of 125° and an angular resolution of 1° or better. The micro-optics is built up of two stacked polymer plates consisting each out of a five by five lens array. In between there is a plate of absorbing material with a five by five array of baffles to create 25 optically isolated channels that each image part of the total FOV of 125° onto the detector. To geometrically characterize the lens arrays and verify the designed specifications, we made use of a coordinate measuring machine. The optical performance of the designed micro-optical system was analyzed by sending white light beams with different angles of incidence with respect to the sample through the sensor, comparing the position of the light spots visible on the detector and determining optical quality parameters such as MTF and distortion.

  19. Portable oral cancer detection using a miniature confocal imaging probe with a large field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youmin; Raj, Milan; McGuff, H. Stan; Bhave, Gauri; Yang, Bin; Shen, Ting; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate a MEMS micromirror enabled handheld confocal imaging probe for portable oral cancer detection, where a comparatively large field of view (FOV) was generated through the programmable Lissajous scanning pattern of the MEMS micromirror. Miniaturized handheld MEMS confocal imaging probe was developed, and further compared with the desktop confocal prototype under clinical setting. For the handheld confocal imaging system, optical design simulations using CODE VR® shows the lateral and axial resolution to be 0.98 µm and 4.2 µm, where experimental values were determined to be 3 µm and 5.8 µm, respectively, with a FOV of 280 µm×300 µm. Fast Lissajous imaging speed up to 2 fps was realized with improved Labview and Java based real-time imaging software. Properties such as 3D imaging through autofocusing and mosaic imaging for extended lateral view (6 mm × 8 mm) were examined for carcinoma real-time pathology. Neoplastic lesion tissues of giant cell fibroma and peripheral ossifying fibroma, the fibroma inside the paraffin box and ex vivo gross tissues were imaged by the bench-top and handheld imaging modalities, and further compared with commercial microscope imaging results. The MEMS scanner-based handheld confocal imaging probe shows great promise as a potential clinical tool for oral cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Characteristics of geometric distortion correction with increasing field-of-view in open-configuration MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Cheolpyo; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Han, Bong Soo

    2014-07-01

    Open-configuration magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems are becoming increasingly desirable for musculoskeletal imaging and image-guided radiotherapy because of their non-claustrophobic configuration. However, geometric image distortion in large fields-of-view (FOV) due to field inhomogeneity and gradient nonlinearity hinders the practical applications of open-type MRI. We demonstrated the use of geometric distortion correction for increasing FOV in open MRI. Geometric distortion was modeled and corrected as a global polynomial function. The appropriate polynomial order was identified as the minimum difference between the coordinates of control points in the distorted MR image space and those predicted by polynomial modeling. The sixth order polynomial function was found to give the optimal value for geometric distortion correction. The area of maximum distortion was<1 pixel with an FOV of 285mm. The correction performance error was increased at most 1.2% and 2.9% for FOVs of 340mm and~400mm compared with the FOV of 285mm. In particular, unresolved distortion was generated by local deformation near the gradient coil center. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Automatic magnetic resonance spinal cord segmentation with topology constraints for variable fields of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Carass, Aaron; Oh, Jiwon; Nair, Govind; Pham, Dzung L; Reich, Daniel S; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-12-01

    Spinal cord segmentation is an important step in the analysis of neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Several studies have shown correlations between disease progression and metrics relating to spinal cord atrophy and shape changes. Current practices primarily involve segmenting the spinal cord manually or semi-automatically, which can be inconsistent and time-consuming for large datasets. An automatic method that segments the spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid from magnetic resonance images is presented. The method uses a deformable atlas and topology constraints to produce results that are robust to noise and artifacts. The method is designed to be easily extended to new data with different modalities, resolutions, and fields of view. Validation was performed on two distinct datasets. The first consists of magnetization transfer-prepared T2*-weighted gradient-echo MRI centered only on the cervical vertebrae (C1-C5). The second consists of T1-weighted MRI that covers both the cervical and portions of the thoracic vertebrae (C1-T4). Results were found to be highly accurate in comparison to manual segmentations. A pilot study was carried out to demonstrate the potential utility of this new method for research and clinical studies of multiple sclerosis.

  2. Flexible reduced field of view magnetic resonance imaging based on single-shot spatiotemporally encoded technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敬; 蔡聪波; 陈林; 陈颖; 屈小波; 蔡淑惠

    2015-01-01

    In many ultrafast imaging applications, the reduced field-of-view (rFOV) technique is often used to enhance the spatial resolution and field inhomogeneity immunity of the images. The stationary-phase characteristic of the spatiotemporally-encoded (SPEN) method offers an inherent applicability to rFOV imaging. In this study, a flexible rFOV imaging method is presented and the superiority of the SPEN approach in rFOV imaging is demonstrated. The proposed method is validated with phantom and in vivo rat experiments, including cardiac imaging and contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. For com-parison, the echo planar imaging (EPI) experiments with orthogonal RF excitation are also performed. The results show that the signal-to-noise ratios of the images acquired by the proposed method can be higher than those obtained with the rFOV EPI. Moreover, the proposed method shows better performance in the cardiac imaging and perfusion imaging of rat kidney, and it can scan one or more regions of interest (ROIs) with high spatial resolution in a single shot. It might be a favorable solution to ultrafast imaging applications in cases with severe susceptibility heterogeneities, such as cardiac imaging and perfusion imaging. Furthermore, it might be promising in applications with separate ROIs, such as mammary and limb imaging.

  3. PSF Estimation of Space-Variant Ultra-Wide Field of View Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Janout

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-wide-field of view (UWFOV imaging systems are affected by various aberrations, most of which are highly angle-dependent. A description of UWFOV imaging systems, such as microscopy optics, security camera systems and other special space-variant imaging systems, is a difficult task that can be achieved by estimating the Point Spread Function (PSF of the system. This paper proposes a novel method for modeling the space-variant PSF of an imaging system using the Zernike polynomials wavefront description. The PSF estimation algorithm is based on obtaining field-dependent expansion coefficients of the Zernike polynomials by fitting real image data of the analyzed imaging system using an iterative approach in an initial estimate of the fitting parameters to ensure convergence robustness. The method is promising as an alternative to the standard approach based on Shack–Hartmann interferometry, since the estimate of the aberration coefficients is processed directly in the image plane. This approach is tested on simulated and laboratory-acquired image data that generally show good agreement. The resulting data are compared with the results of other modeling methods. The proposed PSF estimation method provides around 5% accuracy of the optical system model.

  4. KIC 9406652: An Unusual Cataclysmic Variable in the Kepler Field of View

    CERN Document Server

    Gies, Douglas R; Howell, Steve B; Still, Martin D; Boyajian, Tabetha S; Hoekstra, Abe J; Jek, Kian J; LaCourse, Daryll; Winarski, Troy

    2013-01-01

    KIC 9406652 is a remarkable variable star in the Kepler field of view that shows both very rapid oscillations and long term outbursts in its light curve. We present an analysis of the light curve over quarters 1 to 15 and new spectroscopy that indicates that the object is a cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 6.108 hours. However, an even stronger signal appears in the light curve periodogram for a shorter period of 5.753 hours, and we argue that this corresponds to the modulation of flux from the hot spot region in a tilted, precessing disk surrounding the white dwarf star. We present a preliminary orbital solution from radial velocity measurements of features from the accretion disk and the photosphere of the companion. We use a Doppler tomography algorithm to reconstruct the disk and companion spectra, and we also consider how these components contribute to the object's spectral energy distribution from ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths. This target offers us a remarkable opportunity to invest...

  5. Enhanced flight symbology for wide-field-of-view helmet-mounted displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Steven P.; Asbury, Charles N.; Szoboszlay, Zoltan P.

    2003-09-01

    A series of studies was conducted to improve the Army aviator's ability to perform night missions by developing innovative symbols that capitalize on the advantages of new wide field-of-view (WFOV) helmet-mounted displays (HMDs). The most important outcomes of the research were two new symbol types called the Cylinder and the Flight Path Predictor. The Cylinder provides a large symbolic representation of real-world orientation that enables pilots to maintain the world frame of reference even if the visibility of the world is lost due to dust, smoke, snow, or inadvertent instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). Furthermore, the Cylinder is peripherally presented, supporting the "ambient" visual mode so that it does not require the conscious attention of the viewer. The Flight Path Predictor was developed to show the predicted flight path of a maneuvering aircraft using earth-referenced HMD symbology. The experimental evidence and the pilot interview results show that the new HMD symbology sets are capable of preventing spatial disorientation, improving flight safety, enhancing flight maneuver precision, and reducing workload so that the pilot can more effectively perform the critical mission tasks.

  6. Comparison of simultaneous signals obtained from a dual-field-of-view lidar and its application to noise reduction based on empirical mode decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gong; Jun Li; Feiyue Mao; Jinye Zhang

    2011-01-01

    @@ Although the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method is an effective tool for noise reduction in lidar signals, evaluating the effectiveness of the denoising method is difficult.A dual-field-of-view lidar for observing atmospheric aerosols is described.The backscattering signals obtained from two channels have different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs).The performance of noise reduction can be investigated by comparing the high SNR signal and the denoised low SNR signal without a simulation experiment.%Although the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method is an effective tool for noise reduction in lidar signals, evaluating the effectiveness of the denoising method is difficult. A dual-field-of-view lidar for observing atmospheric aerosols is described. The backscattering signals obtained from two channels have different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). The performance of noise reduction can be investigated by comparing the high SNR signal and the denoised low SNR signal without a simulation experiment. With this approach, the signal and noise are extracted to one intrinsic mode function (IMF) by the EMD-based denolsing; thus, the threshold method is applied to the IMFs. Experimental results show that the improved threshold method can effectively perform noise reduction while preserving useful sudden-change information.

  7. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-03-06

    The Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) is a zenith-pointing Doppler cloud radar operating at approximately 35 GHz. The KAZR is an evolutionary follow-on radar to ARM's widely successful millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR). The main purpose of the KAZR is to provide vertical profiles of clouds by measuring the first three Doppler moments: reflectivity, radial Doppler velocity, and spectra width. At the sites where the dual-polarization measurements are made, the Doppler moments for the cross-polarization channel are also available. In addition to the moments, velocity spectra are also continuously recorded for each range gate.

  8. Modelling image profiles produced with a small field of view gamma camera with a single pinhole collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, S. L.; Lees, J. E.; Perkins, A. C.

    2012-11-01

    Gamma cameras making use of parallel-hole collimators have a long history in medical imaging. Pinhole collimators were used in the original gamma camera instruments and have been used more recently in dedicated organ specific systems, intraoperative instruments and for small animal imaging, providing higher resolution over a smaller field of view than the traditional large field of view systems. With the resurgence of interest in the use of pinhole collimators for small field of view (SOV) medical gamma cameras, it is important to be able to accurately determine their response under various conditions. Several analytical approaches to pinhole response have been reported in the literature including models of 3D pinhole imaging systems. Success has also been reported in the use of Monte Carlo simulations; however this approach can require significant time and computing power. This report describes a 2D model that was used to investigate some common problems in pinhole imaging, the variation in resolution over the field of view and the use of `point' sources for quantifying pinhole response.

  9. The effect of metal artifacts on the identification of vertical root fractures using different fields of view in cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudi, Ehsan; Haghanifar, Sina; Madani, Zahrasadat; Bijani, Ali; Nabavi, Zeynab Sadat [Babol University of Medical Science, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of metal artifacts on the accurate diagnosis of root fractures using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with large and small/limited fields of view (FOVs). Forty extracted molar and premolar teeth were collected. Access canals were made in all teeth using a rotary system. In half of the teeth, fractures were created by the application of mild pressure with a hammer. The teeth were then randomly put into a wax rim on an acryl base designed in the shape of a mandible. CBCT scans were obtained using a Newtom 5G system with FOVs of 18 cm×16 cm and 6 cm×6 cm. A metal pin was then placed into each tooth, and CBCT imaging was again performed using the same fields of view. All scans were evaluated by two oral and maxillofacial radiologists. The specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and likelihood ratios (positive and negative) were calculated. The maximum levels of sensitivity and specificity (100% and 100%, respectively) were observed in small volume CBCT scans of teeth without pins. The highest negative predictive value was found in the small-volume group without pins, whereas the positive predictive value was 100% in all groups except the large-volume group with pins.

  10. Refractive aiming corrections for satellite observation of stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittitoe, C.N.; Schmidt, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    Standard references describe how apparent zenith angles differ from true zenith angles for observers on the Earth. In fact, correction formulae are available for aiming Earth-based sensors at stars; some corrections give variations as a function of observer altitude. Such corrections have not been available for observers in space. This report develops formulae appropriate for proper aiming from space-based sensors toward the relatively few stars that are near the Earth`s limb at any given time. These formulae correct for refractive effects and may be critical for steerable space-borne sensors with fields of view less than one degree, tasked to observe starlight passing near the Earth`s surface. Ray tracing in the U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1976 including H{sub 2}O effects, is used to determine relations between the refracted tangent height, the apparent tangent height resulting from observation at the sensor, and the angle through which the detected rays have deviated. Analytic fits of the ray deviation as a function of apparent tangent height allows quick determination of corrections needed for a space-borne sensor. Using those results that apply in the plane of incidence and using the necessary coordinate rotations, alterations in the star`s apparent right ascension and declination are evaluated to improve the aim. Examples illustrate that alterations can be larger than one degree, with effects lasting up to a few minutes.

  11. What is the minimum field of view required for efficient navigation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Shirin E; Hicks, John C; Lei, Hao; Turano, Kathleen A

    2007-07-01

    Critical points were computed to determine the minimum field of view (FOV) size required for efficient navigation. Navigation performance in 20 normally sighted subjects was assessed using an immersive virtual environment. Subjects were instructed to walk through a virtual forest to a target tree as quickly as possible without hitting any obstacles (trees, boulders, and holes). The navigation task was performed in three FOV and image contrast conditions under binocular, monocular, chromatic and achromatic viewing conditions. FOV was constricted to 10 degrees , 20 degrees and 40 degrees diameter and average image contrast was nominally high (11%), medium (6%) and low (3%). Navigation performance was scored as latency in walk initiation, walk time to reach goal and the number of obstacle contacts. The results revealed a linear relationship between log FOV and the two time measures, log latency and log walk time. The slopes of the linear regressions for log latency and log walk time ranged between -0.11 and -0.41. Critical points were computed from the non-linear relationships found between the number of obstacle contacts and FOV. The critical points for efficient navigation were FOVs of 32.1 degrees , 18.4 degrees and 10.9 degrees (diam.) for low, medium and high image contrast levels, respectively, highlighting the importance of contrast on the size of the FOV required for efficient navigation. Neither binocularity nor image chromaticity significantly affected navigation performance. The findings of this study have important implications in the design and prescription of head mounted displays intended to augment navigation performance.

  12. Adaptive field-of-view imaging for efficient receive beamforming in medical ultrasound imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anup; Yoo, Yang Mo; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; Kim, Yongmin

    2008-09-01

    Quadrature demodulation-based phase rotation beamforming (QD-PRBF) is commonly used to support dynamic receive focusing in medical ultrasound systems. However, it is computationally demanding since it requires two demodulation filters for each receive channel. To reduce the computational requirements of QD-PRBF, we have previously developed two-stage demodulation (TSD), which reduces the number of lowpass filters by performing demodulation filtering on summation signals. However, it suffers from image quality degradation due to aliasing at lower beamforming frequencies. To improve the performance of TSD-PRBF with reduced number of beamforming points, we propose a new adaptive field-of-view (AFOV) imaging method. In AFOV imaging, the beamforming frequency is adjusted depending on displayed FOV size and the center frequency of received signals. To study its impact on image quality, simulation was conducted using Field II, phantom data were acquired from a commercial ultrasound machine, and the image quality was quantified using spatial (i.e., axial and lateral) and contrast resolution. The developed beamformer (i.e., TSD-AFOV-PRBF) with 1024 beamforming points provided comparable image resolution to QD-PRBF for typical FOV sizes (e.g., 4.6% and 1.3% degradation in contrast resolution for 160 mm and 112 mm, respectively for a 3.5 MHz transducer). Furthermore, it reduced the number of operations by 86.8% compared to QD-PRBF. These results indicate that the developed TSD-AFOV-PRBF can lower the computational requirement for receive beamforming without significant image quality degradation.

  13. Impairing the useful field of view in natural scenes: Tunnel vision versus general interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Ryan V; Throneburg, Zachary; Johnson, Aaron P; Kramer, Arthur F; Loschky, Lester C

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental issue in visual attention is the relationship between the useful field of view (UFOV), the region of visual space where information is encoded within a single fixation, and eccentricity. A common assumption is that impairing attentional resources reduces the size of the UFOV (i.e., tunnel vision). However, most research has not accounted for eccentricity-dependent changes in spatial resolution, potentially conflating fixed visual properties with flexible changes in visual attention. Williams (1988, 1989) argued that foveal loads are necessary to reduce the size of the UFOV, producing tunnel vision. Without a foveal load, it is argued that the attentional decrement is constant across the visual field (i.e., general interference). However, other research asserts that auditory working memory (WM) loads produce tunnel vision. To date, foveal versus auditory WM loads have not been compared to determine if they differentially change the size of the UFOV. In two experiments, we tested the effects of a foveal (rotated L vs. T discrimination) task and an auditory WM (N-back) task on an extrafoveal (Gabor) discrimination task. Gabor patches were scaled for size and processing time to produce equal performance across the visual field under single-task conditions, thus removing the confound of eccentricity-dependent differences in visual sensitivity. The results showed that although both foveal and auditory loads reduced Gabor orientation sensitivity, only the foveal load interacted with retinal eccentricity to produce tunnel vision, clearly demonstrating task-specific changes to the form of the UFOV. This has theoretical implications for understanding the UFOV.

  14. Estimates of radiance reflected towards the zenith at the surface of the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of water colour by ship-mounted sensors represents an important tool for the validation of satellite products and the monitoring of water quality. The recorded radiance from the sea has to be corrected for the surface-reflected radiance from sun and sky in order to obtain the water-leaving radiance. Here the simple case of radiance reflected towards the zenith is studied. A set of observed sky radiance and solar irradiance data from Oslo has been used together with a Gaussian slope distribution for the sea surface in order to estimate the reflected radiance. The spectral range studied is 405–650 nm, the solar zenith angles are in the range 37°–76°, and the wind speeds are up to 10 m s−1. The analysis of the results show that the reflected radiance has to be separated into three contributions: sky radiance and sun rays reflected at the foam-free surface and irradiance reflected by whitecaps and foam. It is then demonstrated that by using four input values, namely the downward irradiance, the sky radiance from the zenith, the solar zenith angle and the wind speed, it is possible to obtain by simple expressions estimates of the reflected radiance that only differ from the former calculated values by relative errors of less than 5%. The analysis also indicates that for the spectral range studied neither the water-leaving radiance nor the surface-reflected radiance can be disregarded relative to the other one in the Case 2 waters of the Oslofjord-Skagerrak area. The results form a first step towards the study of reflected radiance in viewing angles differing from the nadir direction.

  15. Estimates of radiance reflected towards the zenith at the surface of the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of water colour by ship-mounted sensors represents an important tool for the validation of satellite products and the monitoring of water quality. The recorded radiance from the sea has to be corrected for the surface-reflected radiance from sun and sky in order to obtain the water-leaving radiance. Here the simple case of radiance reflected towards the zenith is studied. A set of observed sky radiance and solar irradiance data from Oslo has been used together with a Gaussian slope distribution for the sea surface in order to estimate the reflected radiance. The spectral range studied is 405–650 nm, the solar zenith angles are in the range 37°–76°, and the wind speeds are up to 10 m s−1. The analysis of the results show that the reflected radiance has to be separated into three contributions: sky radiance and sun rays reflected at the foam-free surface and irradiance reflected by whitecaps and foam. It is then demonstrated that by using four input values, namely the downward irradiance, the sky radiance from the zenith, the solar zenith angle and the wind speed, it is possible to obtain by simple expressions estimates of the reflected radiance that only differ from the former calculated values by relative errors of 4% or less. The analysis also indicates that for the spectral range studied neither the water-leaving radiance nor the surface-reflected radiance can be disregarded relative to the other one in the Case 2 waters of the Oslofjord-Skagerrak area. The results form a first step towards the study of reflected radiance in viewing angles differing from the nadir direction.

  16. An enhanced reconstruction algorithm to extend CT scan field-of-view with z-axis consistency constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baojun; Deng, Junjun; Lonn, Albert H; Hsieh, Jiang

    2012-10-01

    To further improve the image quality, in particularly, to suppress the boundary artifacts, in the extended scan field-of-view (SFOV) reconstruction. To combat projection truncation artifacts and to restore truncated objects outside the SFOV, an algorithm has previously been proposed based on fitting a partial water cylinder at the site of the truncation. Previous studies have shown this algorithm can simultaneously eliminate the truncation artifacts inside the SFOV and preserve the total amount of attenuation, owing to its emphasis on consistency conditions of the total attenuation in the parallel sampling geometry. Unfortunately, the water cylinder fitting parameters of this 2D algorithm are inclined to high noise fluctuation in the projection samples from image to image, causing anatomy boundaries artifacts, especially during helical scans with higher pitch (≥1.0). To suppress the boundary artifacts and further improve the image quality, the authors propose to use a roughness penalty function, based on the Huber regularization function, to reinforce the z-dimensional boundary consistency. Extensive phantom and clinical tests have been conducted to test the accuracy and robustness of the enhanced algorithm. Significant reduction in the boundary artifacts is observed in both phantom and clinical cases with the enhanced algorithm. The proposed algorithm also reduces the percent difference error between the horizontal and vertical diameters to well below 1%. It is also noticeable that the algorithm has improved CT number uniformity outside the SFOV compared to the original algorithm. The proposed algorithm is capable of suppressing boundary artifacts and improving the CT number uniformity outside the SFOV.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of metal artifacts using different CBCT devices, high-density materials and field of views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codari, Marina; de Faria Vasconcelos, Karla; Ferreira Pinheiro Nicolielo, Laura; Haiter Neto, Francisco; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2017-04-22

    To objectively compare the influence of different cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) devices, high-density materials and field of views (FOVs) on metal artifact expression. For this in vitro study, three customized acrylic resin phantoms containing high-density materials cylinders: titanium, copper-aluminum alloy and amalgam were scanned on three CBCT devices using high-resolution protocols, same voxel size (0.2 mm) and different FOVs. After fully automatic segmentation and image registration, the same region of interest was defined for the small and medium FOVs. The difference between the segmented and the real volume of the metal cylinders was assessed. Moreover for each segmented slice, the area difference between the segmented and the real axial section was determined. The artifacts on the background were measured as normalizing standard deviation of voxel values in the vicinity of the cylinder, in three different distances. Considerable differences were observed in volume measurements for all CBCTs devices and materials for both FOV sizes (up to 67%). The slice per slice area analysis indicated higher artifacts at the edges of the metal cylinder. Within the materials, amalgam and titanium had, respectively, the worst and best artifact expression in all the CBCT devices. Standard deviation values varied differently between the three distances in each device. Our in vitro study showed that different CBCT devices, high-density materials and FOV should be considered while evaluating CBCT images. More carefully, diagnosis conclusions should be drawn in images containing amalgam and copper-aluminum alloy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A phase-contrast X-ray imaging system--with a 60x30 mm field of view--based on a skew-symmetric two-crystal X-ray interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, Akio E-mail: a-yoneya@rd.hitachi.co.jp; Takeda, Tohoru; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Wu Jin; Lwin, T.-T.; Koizumi, Aritaka; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Itai, Yuji

    2004-05-01

    A phase-contrast X-ray imaging system - with a 60x30 mm field of view - for biomedical observations was developed. To extend the observation field of view, the system is fitted with a skew-symmetric two-crystal X-ray interferometer. To attain the required sub-nanoradian mechanical stability between the crystal blocks for precise operation, the interferometer was mounted on two extremely rigid positioning tables (one with a sleeve bearings) and was controlled by a feedback positioning system using phase-lock interferometry. The imaging system produced a 60x30 mm interference pattern with 60% visibility using 17.7 keV monochromatic synchrotron X-rays at the Photon Factory. It was then used to perform radiographic observation (i.e., phase mapping) of rat liver vessels. These results indicate that this imaging system can be used to perform observations of large and in vivo biological samples.

  19. Measurements on pointing error and field of view of Cimel-318 Sun photometers in the scope of AERONET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Torres

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity studies indicate that among the diverse error sources of ground-based sky radiometer observations, the pointing error plays an important role in the correct retrieval of aerosol properties. The accurate pointing is specially critical for the characterization of desert dust aerosol. The present work relies on the analysis of two new measurement procedures (cross and matrix specifically designed for the evaluation of the pointing error in the standard instrument of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET, the Cimel CE-318 Sun photometer. The first part of the analysis contains a preliminary study whose results conclude on the need of a Sun movement correction for an accurate evaluation of the pointing error from both new measurements. Once this correction is applied, both measurements show equivalent results with differences under 0.01° in the pointing error estimations. The second part of the analysis includes the incorporation of the cross procedure in the AERONET routine measurement protocol in order to monitor the pointing error in field instruments. The pointing error was evaluated using the data collected for more than a year, in 7 Sun photometers belonging to AERONET sites. The registered pointing error values were generally smaller than 0.1°, though in some instruments values up to 0.3° have been observed. Moreover, the pointing error analysis shows that this measurement can be useful to detect mechanical problems in the robots or dirtiness in the 4-quadrant detector used to track the Sun. Specifically, these mechanical faults can be detected due to the stable behavior of the values over time and vs. the solar zenith angle. Finally, the matrix procedure can be used to derive the value of the solid view angle of the instruments. The methodology has been implemented and applied for the characterization of 5 Sun photometers. To validate the method, a comparison with solid angles obtained from the vicarious calibration method was

  20. Parallax error in long-axial field-of-view PET scanners—a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Karp, Joel S.; Werner, Matt; Surti, Suleman

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the design and construction of a PET scanner with a very long axial extent. One critical design challenge is the impact of the long axial extent on the scanner spatial resolution properties. In this work, we characterize the effect of parallax error in PET system designs having an axial field-of-view (FOV) of 198 cm (total-body PET scanner) using fully-3D Monte Carlo simulations. Two different scintillation materials were studied: LSO and LaBr3. The crystal size in both cases was 4  ×  4  ×  20 mm3. Several different depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding techniques were investigated to characterize the improvement in spatial resolution when using a DOI capable detector. To measure spatial resolution we simulated point sources in a warm background in the center of the imaging FOV, where the effects of axial parallax are largest, and at several positions radially offset from the center. Using a line-of-response based ordered-subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm we found that the axial resolution in an LSO scanner degrades from 4.8 mm to 5.7 mm (full width at half max) at the center of the imaging FOV when extending the axial acceptance angle (α) from  ±12° (corresponding to an axial FOV of 18 cm) to the maximum of  ±67°—a similar result was obtained with LaBr3, in which the axial resolution degraded from 5.3 mm to 6.1 mm. For comparison we also measured the degradation due to radial parallax error in the transverse imaging FOV; the transverse resolution, averaging radial and tangential directions, of an LSO scanner was degraded from 4.9 mm to 7.7 mm, for a measurement at the center of the scanner compared to a measurement with a radial offset of 23 cm. Simulations of a DOI detector design improved the spatial resolution in all dimensions. The axial resolution in the LSO-based scanner, with α  =  ± 67°, was improved from 5.7 mm to 5.0 mm by

  1. Risk of small field of view in lumbar spine computed tomography for assumed lumbar disc herniation: beware contained aortic aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsman, J.W.P. [Gooi-Noord Hospital, Blaricum (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology

    1995-05-01

    Among several other atypical clinical presentations, back and leg pain may ensue from a contained ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The present case concerns a patient whose back and leg pain were primarily thought to be orthopaedic or neurologic in origin. Computed tomography with small field of view, performed for the detection of a possible lumbar disc herniation, only partially showed a paraspinal soft tissue mass. Subsequently, recognition of this mass as a contained ruptured aortic aneurysm was delayed. The literature is reviewed concerning comparable cases and it is concluded that computed tomograms performed for possible lumbar disc herniation should also be screened for paraspinal disease and consequently, the applied field of view should be large enough to include at least the paraspinal psoas regions. 25 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  2. Monte-Carlo scatter correction for cone-beam computed tomography with limited scan field-of-view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Matthias; Sattel, Timo; Hohmann, Steffen; Wiegert, Jens

    2008-03-01

    In flat detector cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), scattered radiation is a major source of image degradation, making accurate a posteriori scatter correction inevitable. A potential solution to this problem is provided by computerized scatter correction based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Using this technique, the detected distributions of X-ray scatter are estimated for various viewing directions using Monte-Carlo simulations of an intermediate reconstruction. However, as a major drawback, for standard CBCT geometries and with standard size flat detectors such as mounted on interventional C-arms, the scan field of view is too small to accommodate the human body without lateral truncations, and thus this technique cannot be readily applied. In this work, we present a novel method for constructing a model of the object in a laterally and possibly also axially extended field of view, which enables meaningful application of Monte-Carlo based scatter correction even in case of heavy truncations. Evaluation is based on simulations of a clinical CT data set of a human abdomen, which strongly exceeds the field of view of the simulated C-arm based CBCT imaging geometry. By using the proposed methodology, almost complete removal of scatter-caused inhomogeneities is demonstrated in reconstructed images.

  3. User's guide: Nimbus-7 Earth radiation budget narrow-field-of-view products. Scene radiance tape products, sorting into angular bins products, and maximum likelihood cloud estimation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, H. Lee; Hucek, Richard R.; Groveman, Brian; Frey, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The archived Earth radiation budget (ERB) products produced from the Nimbus-7 ERB narrow field-of-view scanner are described. The principal products are broadband outgoing longwave radiation (4.5 to 50 microns), reflected solar radiation (0.2 to 4.8 microns), and the net radiation. Daily and monthly averages are presented on a fixed global equal area (500 sq km), grid for the period May 1979 to May 1980. Two independent algorithms are used to estimate the outgoing fluxes from the observed radiances. The algorithms are described and the results compared. The products are divided into three subsets: the Scene Radiance Tapes (SRT) contain the calibrated radiances; the Sorting into Angular Bins (SAB) tape contains the SAB produced shortwave, longwave, and net radiation products; and the Maximum Likelihood Cloud Estimation (MLCE) tapes contain the MLCE products. The tape formats are described in detail.

  4. Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumhagen, Jan O., E-mail: janole.blumhagen@siemens.com; Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias [Magnetic Resonance, Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Braun, Harald; Quick, Harald H. [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Faul, David [Siemens Medical Solutions, New York, New York 10015 (United States); Scheffler, Klaus [MRC Department, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen 72076, Germany and Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B{sub 0} inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might

  5. [Methods for Reducing Laser Speckles to Achieve Even Illumination of the Microscope Field of View in Biophysical Studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, V E; Lysov, Yu P; Yegorov, E E; Yurasov, D A; Mamaev, D D; Yurasov, R A; Cherepanov, A V; Chudinov, A V; Smoldovskaya, O V; Arefieva, A S; Rubina, A Yu; Zasedatelev, A S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare different speckle reduction techniques. It was shown that the use of devices based on liquid crystals only leads to partial reduction of speckle contrast. In quantitative luminescent microscopy an application of the mechanical devices when a laser beam is spread within the field of view turned out to be more efficient. Laser speckle noise was virtually eliminated with the developed and manufactured mechanical device comprising a fiber optic ring light guide and the vibrator that permits movement of optical fiber ends towards the laser diode during measurements. The method developed for the analysis of microarrays was successfully applied to the problem of speckle reduction.

  6. New in-flight calibration adjustment of the Nimbus 6 and 7 earth radiation budget wide field of view radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, H. L.; House, F. B.; Ardanuy, P. E.; Jacobowitz, H.; Maschhoff, R. H.; Hickey, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    In-flight calibration adjustments are developed to process data obtained from the wide-field-of-view channels of Nimbus-6 and Nimbus-7 after the failure of the Nimbus-7 longwave scanner on June 22, 1980. The sensor characteristics are investigated; the satellite environment is examined in detail; and algorithms are constructed to correct for long-term sensor-response changes, on/off-cycle thermal transients, and filter-dome absorption of longwave radiation. Data and results are presented in graphs and tables, including comparisons of the old and new algorithms.

  7. Photoacoustic tomography with a high lateral resolution and a large field of view using a rectangular focused ultrasound transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shangyu; Cheng, Renxiang; Tao, Chao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-04-01

    The enlargement of the field of view (FOV) of a photoacoustic (PA) tomography (PAT) system and the improvement of its lateral resolution are often two conflicting goals. A rectangular focused transducer is proposed to solve this problem. An asymmetric geometry of the transducer results in its asymmetric characteristics of the ultrasound (US) field. Both simulation and experiments confirm that the rectangular focused transducer can improve the FOV and lateral resolution of PAT systems simultaneously. The US transducer proposed in this study has the potential to improve the performance of a PAT system for practical biomedical applications.

  8. HF-Induced Airglow at Magnetic Zenith: Theoretical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    zenith (MZ) (Kosch et at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program al., 2002a; Pedersen et al., 2003). The same is true for the ( HAARP ) heating...fo’sinx must be met. For MZ injec- X _h k2 r 2 ə. Here, r, is the thermal electron gyroradius tions at the HAARP heating facility (XL- 14.60 ), Huhr...Langmuir waves (Kuo et al., 1997). These shadow height at the HAARP site increased from -230 to waves saturate via spectral transfer toward small ki, due

  9. Erythemal ultraviolet insolation in New Zealand at solar zenith angles of 30 and 45..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, K G; Smith, G J; Rhoades, D A; Coppell, R B

    1996-05-01

    Solar UV radiometers with spectral responsivities that are close to the erythemal/carcinogenic action spectrum of skin have been installed at several centers of population in New Zealand, including Auckland, 37 degrees S, Wellington, 41 degrees S and Christchurch, 43.5 degrees S. The data set covers the period from the time the radiometry program commenced in 1988/1989 to the end of the southern summer, March 1995. The radiometers were recalibrated annually and the data were corrected for changes in the absolute responsivity of the radiometers. Erythemally effective UV irradiances at solar zenith angles of 30 degrees and 45 degrees were then extracted from the data set. No monotonic trend in these data is apparent, although there are statistically significant differences in mean irradiances from one year to the next. An example of this is the decrease observed in all sites following the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in June 1991. The maximum erythemally effective insolations at solar zenith angles of 30 degrees and 45 degrees were consistently lower in Christchurch than in the other two New Zealand sites. This could arise from higher levels of atmospheric turbidity and/or tropospheric ozone at this location. Also, a seasonal increase in erythemally effective UV insolation from spring to autumn was observed each year in all three New Zealand sites.

  10. Asymmetric masks for large field-of-view and high-energy X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrizzi, M.; Astolfo, A.; Price, B.; Haig, I.; Olivo, A.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a large field of view, laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup. The method is based upon the asymmetric mask design that enables the retrieval of the absorption, refraction and scattering properties of the sample without the need to move any component of the imaging system. This can be thought of as a periodic repetition of a group of three (or more) apertures arranged in such a way that each laminar beam, defined by the apertures, produces a different illumination level when analysed with a standard periodic set of apertures. The sample is scanned through the imaging system, also removing possible aliasing problems that might arise from partial sample illumination when using the edge illumination technique. This approach preserves the incoherence and achromatic properties of edge illumination, removes the problems related to aliasing and it naturally adapts to those situations in clinical, industrial and security imaging where the image is acquired by scanning the sample relative to the imaging system. These concepts were implemented for a large field-of-view set of masks (20 cm × 1.5 cm and 15 cm × 1.2 cm), designed to work with a tungsten anode X-ray source operated up to 80-100 kVp, from which preliminary experimental results are presented.

  11. The inter-relationship between magnification, field of view and contrast reserve: the effect on reading performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Z; Dickinson, C M

    2000-11-01

    For the reading task, contrast reserve is defined as the ratio of the letter contrast of the printed letters, to the reader's contrast threshold. Acuity reserve is the ratio of the print size used for the reading task, to the reader's visual acuity. The effects of low contrast reserve on reading performance were investigated at various magnifications, ranging from 3x to 7.5x, with the field of view systematically controlled. Eye movements were recorded whilst normally sighted subjects read using the magnifiers. It was shown that with adequate contrast reserve, increasing the field of view improved the reading rate because of the resulting increase in forward saccade length. Conversely, reducing the contrast reserve slowed the reading rate by decreasing the length of forward saccades and increasing the mean fixation duration, suggesting that the perceptual span is reduced at low contrast reserve. This study also shows that when the contrast reserve is low, providing magnification higher than that required for letter recognition (that is, increasing the acuity reserve) will not improve the reading performance. Furthermore, even when the contrast reserve was high, reading rates were lower for the magnifications of 5x and higher, because increases in saccade length do not match those of the retinal image size at these magnifications.

  12. Monte-Carlo simulation of pinhole collimator of a small field of view gamma camera for small animal imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; MA Wenyan; ZHU Yufeng; MA Hongguang; WU Yuelei; HU Huasi; ZHANG Boping; HUO Yonggang; LIU Silu; JIAN Bin; WANG Zhaomin

    2009-01-01

    Needs in scintimammography applications,especially for small animal cardiac imaging,lead to develop a small field of view,high spatial resolution gamma camera with a pinhole collimator.However the ideal pinhole collimator must keep a compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity.In order to design a pinhole collimator with an optimized sensitivity and spatial resolution,the spatial resolution and the geometric sensitivity response as a function of the source to collimator distance has been obtained by means of Monte-Carlo simulation for a small field of view gamma camera with a pinhole collimator of various-hole diameters.The results show that the camera with pinhole of 1 mm,1.5 mm and 2 mm diameter has respectively spatial resolution of 1.5 mm,2.25 mm and 3 mm and geometric sensitivity of 0.016%,0.022% and 0.036%,while the source to collimator distance is 3 cm.We chose the pinhole collimator with hole diameter size of 1.2 mm for our the gamma camera designed based on the wade-off between sensitivity and resolution.

  13. Applying full polarization A-Projection to very wide field of view instruments: An imager for LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Tasse, C; van Zwieten, J; van Diepen, Ger; Bhatnagar, S

    2012-01-01

    The aimed high sensitivities and large fields of view of the new generation of interferometers impose to reach high dynamic range of order $\\sim$1:$10^6$ to 1:$10^8$ in the case of the Square Kilometer Array. The main problem is the calibration and correction of the Direction Dependent Effects (DDE) that can affect the electro-magnetic field (antenna beams, ionosphere, Faraday rotation, etc.). As shown earlier the A-Projection is a fast and accurate algorithm that can potentially correct for any given DDE in the imaging step. With its very wide field of view, low operating frequency ($\\sim30-250$ MHz), long baselines, and complex station-dependent beam patterns, the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) is certainly the most complex SKA precursor. In this paper we present a few implementations of A-Projection applied to LOFAR that can deal with non-unitary station beams and non-diagonal Mueller matrices. The algorithm is designed to correct for all the DDE, including individual antenna, projection of the dipoles on the...

  14. Normal CT morphology of the adrenal gland; Evaluation with thin-slice CT using a small field of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Eriko (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    This study was performed to determine the normal morphology and dimensions of the adrenal gland by studying 111 normal individuals using thin-slice CT with a small field of view. All the adrenal glands were well demonstrated and the medial and lateral limbs were recognized in 95.4% of the right adrenal glands. The outer border of the gland was generally straight or concave, although the caudal surface was convex in 25% of right and 50% of left adrenal glands. The height, thickness, and width of the gland were measured at multiple levels on both sides, and the results were compared with those for atrophic glands (21 Cushing's syndrome patients) and hypertrophic glands (8 patients). Multivariate analysis showed that the best features distinguishing between normal and atrophy were the height at the midpoint on the left side and the thickness of the ridge on the right side. Normal and hypertrophic glands could be distinguished by the thickness of the median limb at its upper portion and lower portion on the right side. On the left side, the thickness at the upper portion, the thickness of the ridge, and that of the median limb at its midpoint were the distinguishing features. It was concluded that thin-slice CT using a small field of view can accurately assess adrenal morphology and thus is useful for evaluating atrophy and hypertrophy. (author).

  15. Field-of-view characteristics and resolution matching for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Grant W.; Bennartz, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    Representative parameters of the scan geometry are empirically determined for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI). Effective fields of view (EFOVs) are computed for the GMI's 13 channels, taking into account the blurring effect of the measurement interval on the instantaneous fields of view (IFOVs). Using a Backus-Gilbert procedure, coefficients are derived that yield an approximate spatial match between synthetic EFOVs of different channels, using the 18.7 GHz channels as a target and with due consideration of the tradeoff between the quality of the fit and noise amplification and edge effects. Modest improvement in resolution is achieved for the 10.65 GHz channels, albeit with slight ringing in the vicinity of coastlines and other sharp brightness temperature gradients. For all other channels, resolution is coarsened to approximate the 18.7 GHz EFOV. It is shown that the resolution matching procedure reduces nonlinear correlations between channels in the presence of coastlines as well as enables the more efficient separation of large brightness temperature variations due to coastlines from the much smaller variations due to other geophysical variables. As a byproduct of this work, we report accurate EFOV resolutions as well as a self-consistent set of parameters for modeling the scan geometry of the GMI.

  16. Radar scatter from equatorial electrojet waves: An explanation for the constancy of the Type I Doppler shift with zenith angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, M. C.; Cuevas, R. A.; Hysell, D. L.

    2008-02-01

    The first results from the 430 MHz Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar Prototype (AMISR-P) at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory were reported by Hysell et al. (2007). We present additional data showing that the phase velocity of Type I echoes is independent of zenith angle, an unexplained property of these waves. We interpret the results using rocket data by predicting the total line-of-sight velocity at the four zenith angles used. We find that the radars preferentially detect waves within 10% of C s in at least four range gates for all beams and up to eight range gates for the 51 JULIA beam. This result is consistent with recent auroral observations that Type I waves are only generated with k vectors near the electron flow velocity, where the latter is the vector sum of the zero-order drift and the perturbation drift due to large-scale waves in the equatorial case.

  17. The solar zenith angle dependence of desert albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Barlage, Michael; Zeng, Xubin; Dickinson, Robert E.; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2005-03-01

    Most land models assume that the bare soil albedo is a function of soil color and moisture but independent of solar zenith angle (SZA). However, analyses of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) and albedo data over thirty desert locations indicate that bare soil albedo does vary with SZA. This is further confirmed using the in situ data. In particular, bare soil albedo normalized by its value at 60° SZA can be adequately represented by a one-parameter formulation (1 + C)/(1 + 2C * cos(SZA)) or a two-parameter formulation (1 + B1 * f1(SZA) + B2 * f2(SZA)). Using the MODIS and in situ data, the empirical parameters C, B1, and B2 are taken as 0.15, 0.346 and 0.063. The SZA dependence of soil albedo is also found to significantly affect the modeling of land surface energy balance over a desert site.

  18. Design of freeform imaging systems with linear field-of-view using a construction and iteration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tong; Zhu, Jun; Jin, Guofan

    2014-02-10

    In this paper, a design method based on a construction and iteration process is proposed for designing freeform imaging systems with linear field-of-view (FOV). The surface contours of the desired freeform surfaces in the tangential plane are firstly designed to control the tangential rays of multiple field angles and different pupil coordinates. Then, the image quality is improved with an iterative process. The design result can be taken as a good starting point for further optimization. A freeform off-axis scanning system is designed as an example of the proposed method. The convergence ability of the construction and iteration process to design a freeform system from initial planes is validated. The MTF of the design result is close to the diffraction limit and the scanning error is less than 1 μm. This result proves that good image quality and scanning linearity were achieved.

  19. Reduced field-of-view excitation using second-order gradients and spatial-spectral radiofrequency pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Xu, Dan; King, Kevin F; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2013-02-01

    The performance of multidimensional spatially selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses is often limited by their long duration. In this article, high-order, nonlinear gradients are exploited to reduce multidimensional RF pulse length. Specifically, by leveraging the multidimensional spatial dependence of second-order gradients, a two-dimensional spatial-spectral RF pulse is designed to achieve three-dimensional spatial selectivity, i.e., to excite a circular region-of-interest in a thin slice for reduced field-of-view imaging. Compared to conventional methods that use three-dimensional RF pulses and linear gradients, the proposed method requires only two-dimensional RF pulses, and thus can significantly shorten the RF pulses and/or improve excitation accuracy. The proposed method has been validated through Bloch equation simulations and phantom experiments on a commercial 3.0T MRI scanner.

  20. Real-time in vitro Fourier ptychographic microscopy for high resolution wide field of view phase imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Lei; Yeh, Li-Hao; Chen, Michael; Waller, Laura

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, microscopes have had to trade field of view (FOV) for resolution. Recently, a new computational imaging technique, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), circumvents this limit in order to capture gigapixel-scale images having both wide FOV and high resolution. FPM has enormous potential for revolutionizing biomedical microscopy; however, it has until now been limited to fixed samples, since acquisition time is on the order of minutes. Live biological samples are continuously evolving on multiple spatial and temporal scales, which can cause motion blur. Here, we present a Fast FPM method to achieve sub-second capture times for FPM results with 0.8 NA resolution across a 4x objective's FOV. We demonstrate the first FPM quantitative phase results for both growing and confluent in vitro cell cultures. Experiments capture real-time videos of HeLa and human mammary epithelial (MCF10A) cell division and migration and subcellular dynamical phenomena in adult rat neural stem cells.

  1. Construction of Extended 3D Field of Views of the Internal Bladder Wall Surface: A Proof of Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hamadou, Achraf; Daul, Christian; Soussen, Charles

    2016-09-01

    3D extended field of views (FOVs) of the internal bladder wall facilitate lesion diagnosis, patient follow-up and treatment traceability. In this paper, we propose a 3D image mosaicing algorithm guided by 2D cystoscopic video-image registration for obtaining textured FOV mosaics. In this feasibility study, the registration makes use of data from a 3D cystoscope prototype providing, in addition to each small FOV image, some 3D points located on the surface. This proof of concept shows that textured surfaces can be constructed with minimally modified cystoscopes. The potential of the method is demonstrated on numerical and real phantoms reproducing various surface shapes. Pig and human bladder textures are superimposed on phantoms with known shape and dimensions. These data allow for quantitative assessment of the 3D mosaicing algorithm based on the registration of images simulating bladder textures.

  2. Fluorescent imaging over an ultra-large field-of-view of 532 cm2 using a flatbed scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göröcs, Zoltán. S.; Ling, Yuye; Yu, Meng D.; Karahalios, Dimitri; Mogharabi, Kian; Lu, Kenny; Wei, Qingshan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a fluorescent imaging method that is capable of detecting fluorescent micro-particles over an ultra-wide field of view of 19 cm × 28 cm using a modified flatbed scanner. We added a custom-designed absorbing emission filter, a computer controlled two dimensional LED array, and modified the driver of the scanner to maximize the sensitivity, exposure time, and gain for fluorescent detection of micro-objects. This high-throughput fluorescent imaging device used in conjunction with a microfluidic sample holder enables rapid screening of fluorescent micro-objects inside more than 2.2mL of optically dense media (i.e., whole blood) within 5 minutes. The device is sensitive enough to detect fluorescently labeled cells, and generates images that have an effective pixel count of 2.2 Giga-pixels.

  3. Method to design two aspheric surfaces for a wide field of view imaging system with low distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yinxu; Li, Haifeng; Wang, Yifan; Zheng, Zhenrong; Liu, Xu

    2015-09-20

    This paper presents a distortion correction method for designing a wide field of view (FOV) lens for an imaging system. The lens is composed of two aspheric surfaces and several spheres. In the preliminary design, profiles of the aspheric surfaces can be obtained according to aplanatism, refraction law, and polynomial fitting methods, where the numeric computation, the differential geometry computation, and the polynomial fitting algorithm are stated in detail. Then the lens is optimized by the damped least squares method. Theoretically, this method cannot eliminate aberrations absolutely but can balance some kinds of aberrations to the image well. Furthermore, a projector lens with a wide FOV, low distortion, and low throw ratio [TR = (projection distance)/(image diagonal size)] is designed successfully by this method.

  4. A spatio-temporally compensated acousto-optic scanner for two-photon microscopy providing large field of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Y; Léger, J-F; Lapole, R; Honnorat, N; Candela, Y; Dieudonné, S; Bourdieu, L

    2008-07-07

    Acousto-optic deflectors (AOD) are promising ultrafast scanners for non-linear microscopy. Their use has been limited until now by their small scanning range and by the spatial and temporal dispersions of the laser beam going through the deflectors. We show that the use of AOD of large aperture (13mm) compared to standard deflectors allows accessing much larger field of view while minimizing spatio-temporal distortions. An acousto-optic modulator (AOM) placed at distance of the AOD is used to compensate spatial and temporal dispersions. Fine tuning of the AOM-AOD setup using a frequency-resolved optical gating (GRENOUILLE) allows elimination of pulse front tilt whereas spatial chirp is minimized thanks to the large aperture AOD.

  5. Applying full polarization A-Projection to very wide field of view instruments: An imager for LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasse, C.; van der Tol, S.; van Zwieten, J.; van Diepen, G.; Bhatnagar, S.

    2013-05-01

    The required high sensitivities and large fields of view of the new generation of radio interferometers impose high dynamic ranges, e.g., ~1:106 to 1:108 for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The main problem for achieving these high ranges is the calibration and correction of direction dependent effects (DDE) that can affect the electro-magnetic field (antenna beams, ionosphere, Faraday rotation, etc.). It has already been shown that the A-Projection is a fast and accurate algorithm that can potentially correct for any given DDE in the imaging step. With its very wide field of view, low operating frequency (~30-250 MHz), long baselines, and complex station-dependent beam patterns, the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is certainly the most complex SKA pathfinder instrument. In this paper we present a few implementations of the A-Projection in LOFAR which can deal nondiagonal Mueller matrices. The algorithm is designed to correct for all DDE, including individual antennas, projection of the dipoles on the sky, beam forming, and ionospheric effects. We describe a few important algorithmic optimizations related to LOFAR's architecture that allowed us to build a fast imager. Based on simulated datasets we show that A-Projection can dramatically improve the dynamic range for both phased array beams and ionospheric effects. However, certain problems associated with the calibration of DDE remain (especially ionospheric effects), and the effect of the algorithm on real LOFAR survey data still needs to be demonstrated. We will be able to use this algorithm to construct the deepest extragalactic surveys, comprising hundreds of days of integration.

  6. Afocal three-mirror anastigmat with zigzag optical axis for widened field of view and enlarged aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Han, Lin; Jin, Yangming; Shen, Weimin

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the detection accuracy and range of new generation of Forward Looking Infra-Red (FLIR) system for distant targets, its optical system, which usually consists of a fore afocal telescope and rear imaging lenses, is required to has wide spectral range, large entrance pupil aperture, and wide field of view (FOV). In this paper, a new afocal Three-Mirror Anastigmat (TMA) with widened field of view and high demagnification is suggested. Its mechanical structure remains coaxial, but it has zigzag optical axis through properly and slightly decentering and tilting of the three mirrors to avoid its secondary obscuration due to the third mirror as FOV increase. Compared with conventional off-axis TMA, the suggested zigzag-axis TMA is compact, easy-alignment and low-cost. The design method and optimum result of the suggested afocal TMA is presented. Its initial structural parameters are determined with its first-order relationship and primary aberration theory. Slight and proper decentration and tilt of each mirror is leaded in optimization so that its coaxial mechanical structure is held but attainable FOV and demagnification are respectively as wide and as high as possible. As an example, a 5.5-demagnification zigzag-axis afocal TMA with a wavelength range, an entrance pupil diameter, and FOV respectively from 3μm to 12μm, of 320mm, and 2×3.2 degrees and with a real exit pupil, is designed. Its imaging quality is diffraction limited. It is suitable for fore afocal telescope of the so-called third generation FLIR.

  7. Accuracy Improvement of Zenith Tropospheric Delay Estimation Based on GPS Precise Point Positioning Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Qinglin; ZHAO Zhenwei; LIN Leke; WU Zhensen

    2010-01-01

    In the precise point positioning (PPP), some impossible accurately simulated systematic errors still remained in the GPS observations and will inevitably degrade the precision of zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) estimation. The stochastic models used in the GPS PPP mode are compared. In this paper, the research results show that the precision of PPP-derived ZTD can be obviously improved through selecting a suitable stochastic model for GPS measurements. Low-elevation observations can cover more troposphere information that can improve the estimation of ZTD. A new stochastic model based on satellite low elevation cosine square is presented. The results show that the stochastic model using satellite elevation-based cosine square function is better than previous stochastic models.

  8. Scanning superlens microscopy for non-invasive large field-of-view visible light nanoscale imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Haibo; Wen, Yangdong; Yu, Peng; Liu, Zhu; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2016-12-01

    Nanoscale correlation of structural information acquisition with specific-molecule identification provides new insight for studying rare subcellular events. To achieve this correlation, scanning electron microscopy has been combined with super-resolution fluorescent microscopy, despite its destructivity when acquiring biological structure information. Here we propose time-efficient non-invasive microsphere-based scanning superlens microscopy that enables the large-area observation of live-cell morphology or sub-membrane structures with sub-diffraction-limited resolution and is demonstrated by observing biological and non-biological objects. This microscopy operates in both non-invasive and contact modes with ~200 times the acquisition efficiency of atomic force microscopy, which is achieved by replacing the point of an atomic force microscope tip with an imaging area of microspheres and stitching the areas recorded during scanning, enabling sub-diffraction-limited resolution. Our method marks a possible path to non-invasive cell imaging and simultaneous tracking of specific molecules with nanoscale resolution, facilitating the study of subcellular events over a total cell period.

  9. All weather IASI single field-of-view retrievals: case study – validation with JAIVEx data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Zhou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric thermodynamic parameters, such as atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles, cloud optical/microphysical properties, and surface properties are basic meteorological variables for weather forecasting. In addition, they are critical parameters in tropospheric chemistry studies. A physical, geophysical parameter retrieval scheme dealing with cloudy and cloud-free radiances observed with satellite ultraspectral infrared sounders has been developed to determine simultaneously surface, atmospheric thermodynamic, and cloud microphysical parameters. A one-dimensional variational (1-D Var. multivariable inverse solution of the radiative transfer equation is used to iteratively improve a background state defined by eigenvector regression. This algorithm has been applied to data from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI on the EUMETSAT Metop-A satellite. The IASI retrieved parameters presented herein are from radiance data gathered during the Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx. JAIVEx provided intensive aircraft observations obtained from airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS systems, such as the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed – Interferometer (NAST-I, in-situ measurements, and dedicated dropsonde and radiosonde measurements for the validation of the IASI products. Here, IASI atmospheric profile retrievals are compared with those obtained from dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and the airborne FTS system. The IASI examples presented here demonstrate the ability to retrieve fine-scale horizontal features with high vertical resolution from satellite ultraspectral sounder radiance spectra.

  10. Wide field of view computed tomography and mid carpal instability: The value of the sagittal radius–lunate–capitate axis – Preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repse, Stephen E., E-mail: stephrep@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Health, VIC (Australia); Koulouris, George, E-mail: GeorgeK@melbourneradiology.com.au [Melbourne Radiology Clinic, Ground Floor, 3-6/100 Victoria Parade, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Centre for Orthopaedic Research, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Troupis, John M., E-mail: john.troupis@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging & Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Monash Health and Department of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, Monash University, VIC (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Unique insight into the assessment of mid carpal instability. • 4D CT using sagittal reconstructions along the radius–lunate–capitate axis. • 4D CT observations of vacuum phenomenon, trigger lunate and capitate subluxation. • Earlier recognition of mid carpal instability. - Abstract: Purpose: Dynamic four dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has recently emerged as a practical method for evaluating complex functional abnormality of joints. We retrospectively analysed 4D CT studies undertaken as part of the clinical management of hand and wrist symptoms. We present our initial experience of 4D CT in the assessment of functional abnormalities of the wrist in a group of patients with mid carpal instability (MCI), specifically carpal instability non-dissociative. We aim to highlight unique features in assessment of the radius–lunate–capitate (RLC) axis which allows insight and understanding of abnormalities in function, not just morphology, which may be contributing to symptoms. Materials and methods: Wide field of view multi-detector CT scanner (320 slices, 0.5 mm detector thickness) was used to acquire bilateral continuous motion assessment in hand flexion and extension. A maximum z-axis coverage of 16 cm was available for each acquisition, and a large field of view (FOV) was used. Due to the volume acquisition during motion, reconstructions at multiple time points were undertaken. Dynamic and anatomically targeted multi-planar-reconstructions (MPRs) were then used to establish the kinematic functionality of the joint. Results: Our initial cohort of 20 patients was reviewed. Three findings were identified which were present either in isolation or in combination. These are vacuum phenomenon, triggering of the lunate and capitate subluxation. We provide 4D CT representations of each and highlight features considered of clinical importance and their significance. We also briefly discuss how the current classifications of dynamic wrist

  11. Study of shape evaluation for mask and silicon using large field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Mito, Hiroaki; Shinoda, Shinichi; Toyoda, Yasutaka

    2010-09-01

    We have developed a highly integrated method of mask and silicon metrology. The aim of this integration is evaluating the performance of the silicon corresponding to Hotspot on a mask. It can use the mask shape of a large field, besides. The method adopts a metrology management system based on DBM (Design Based Metrology). This is the high accurate contouring created by an edge detection algorithm used in mask CD-SEM and silicon CD-SEM. Currently, as semiconductor manufacture moves towards even smaller feature size, this necessitates more aggressive optical proximity correction (OPC) to drive the super-resolution technology (RET). In other words, there is a trade-off between highly precise RET and mask manufacture, and this has a big impact on the semiconductor market that centers on the mask business. As an optimal solution to these issues, we provide a DFM solution that extracts 2-dimensional data for a more realistic and error-free simulation by reproducing accurately the contour of the actual mask, in addition to the simulation results from the mask data. On the other hand, there is roughness in the silicon form made from a mass-production line. Moreover, there is variation in the silicon form. For this reason, quantification of silicon form is important, in order to estimate the performance of a pattern. In order to quantify, the same form is equalized in two dimensions. And the method of evaluating based on the form is popular. In this study, we conducted experiments for averaging method of the pattern (Measurement Based Contouring) as two-dimensional mask and silicon evaluation technique. That is, observation of the identical position of a mask and a silicon was considered. The result proved its detection accuracy and reliability of variability on two-dimensional pattern (mask and silicon) and is adaptable to following fields of mask quality management. •Discrimination of nuisance defects for fine pattern. •Determination of two-dimensional variability of

  12. MAIN-BELT ASTEROIDS IN THE K2 ENGINEERING FIELD OF VIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabó, R.; Sárneczky, K.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Pál, A.; Kiss, Cs. P.; Kiss, L. L. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15-17 (Hungary); Csák, B. [Gothard-Lendület Research Team, H-9704 Szombathely, Szent Imre herceg út 112 (Hungary); Illés, L.; Rácz, G., E-mail: rszabo@konkoly.hu [Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem, H-1117 Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-03-15

    Unlike NASA’s original Kepler Discovery Mission, the renewed K2 Mission will target the plane of the Ecliptic, observing each field for approximately 75 days. This will bring new opportunities and challenges, in particular the presence of a large number of main-belt asteroids that will contaminate the photometry. The large pixel size makes K2 data susceptible to the effects of apparent minor planet encounters. Here, we investigate the effects of asteroid encounters on photometric precision using a subsample of the K2 engineering data taken in 2014 February. We show examples of asteroid contamination to facilitate their recognition and distinguish these events from other error sources. We conclude that main-belt asteroids will have considerable effects on K2 photometry of a large number of photometric targets during the Mission that will have to be taken into account. These results will be readily applicable for future space photometric missions applying large-format CCDs, such as TESS and PLATO.

  13. Main-Belt Asteroids in the K2 Engineering Field of View

    CERN Document Server

    Szabó, R; Szabó, Gy M; Pál, A; Kiss, Cs P; Csák, B; Illés, L; Rácz, G; Kiss, L L

    2015-01-01

    Unlike NASA's original Kepler Discovery Mission, the renewed K2 Mission will stare at the plane of the Ecliptic, observing each field for approximately 75 days. This will bring new opportunities and challenges, in particular the presence of a large number of main-belt asteroids that will contaminate the photometry. The large pixel size makes K2 data susceptible to the effect of apparent minor planet encounters. Here we investigate the effects of asteroid encounters on photometric precision using a sub-sample of the K2 Engineering data taken in February, 2014. We show examples of asteroid contamination to facilitate their recognition and distinguish these events from other error sources. We conclude that main-belt asteroids will have considerable effects on K2 photometry of a large number of photometric targets during the Mission, that will have to be taken into account. These results will be readily applicable for future space photometric missions applying large-format CCDs, such as TESS and PLATO.

  14. Influence of solar zenith angle on the enhanced vegetation index of a Guyanese rainforest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brede, B.; Suomalainen, J.M.; Bartholomeus, H.M.; Herold, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of solar zenith angle () on enhanced vegetation index (EVI) of a Guyanese tropical rainforest was studied. For this sub-crown resolution, hyperspectral data have been collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at five different solar zenith angles in a 1-day period. Th

  15. Thromboembolic Complications after Zenith{sup ®} Low Profile Endovascular Graft for Infrarenal Abdominal Aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urlings, T. A. J., E-mail: t-urlings@hotmail.com [Medical Center Westeinde, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Vries, A. C. de, E-mail: a.de.vries@mchaaglanden.nl; Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A. de, E-mail: a.de.molvanotterloo@mchaaglanden.nl; Eefting, D., E-mail: d.eefting@mchaaglanden.nl [Medical Center Westeinde, Department of Vascular Surgery (Netherlands); Linden, E. van der, E-mail: e.van.der.linden@mchaaglanden.nl [Medical Center Westeinde, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to objectify and evaluate risk factors for thromboembolic complications after treatment with a Zenith{sup ®} Low Profile Endovascular Graft (Zenith LP). Results were compared with those in the recent literature on endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) and with the thromboembolic complications in the patient group treated with a Zenith Flex Endovascular Graft in our institute in the period before the use of the Zenith LP.Materials and MethodsAll consecutive patients who were suitable for treatment with a Zenith LP endograft between October 2010 and December 2011 were included. The preprocedural computed tomography scan (CT), procedural angiographic images, and the postprocedural CT scans were evaluated for risk factors for and signs of thromboembolic complications. All patients treated between December 2007 and November 2012 with a Zenith Flex endograft were retrospectively evaluated for thromboembolic complications.ResultsIn the study period 17 patients were treated with a LP Zenith endograft. Limb occlusion occurred in 35 % of the patients. Limb occlusions occurred in 24 % of the limbs at risk (one limb occluded twice). In one patient two risk factors for limb occlusion were identified. Between December 2007 and November 2012, a total of 43 patients were treated with a Zenith Flex endograft. No limb occlusion or distal embolization occurred.ConclusionDespite that this was a small retrospective study, the Zenith LP endograft seems to be associated with more frequent thromboembolic complications compared with the known limb occlusion rates in the literature and those of the patients treated with a Zenith Flex endograft in our institute.

  16. Quantitative assessment of meteorological and tropospheric Zenith Hydrostatic Delay models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Guo, Jiming; Chen, Ming; Shi, Junbo; Zhou, Lv

    2016-09-01

    Tropospheric delay has always been an important issue in GNSS/DORIS/VLBI/InSAR processing. Most commonly used empirical models for the determination of tropospheric Zenith Hydrostatic Delay (ZHD), including three meteorological models and two empirical ZHD models, are carefully analyzed in this paper. Meteorological models refer to UNB3m, GPT2 and GPT2w, while ZHD models include Hopfield and Saastamoinen. By reference to in-situ meteorological measurements and ray-traced ZHD values of 91 globally distributed radiosonde sites, over a four-years period from 2010 to 2013, it is found that there is strong correlation between errors of model-derived values and latitudes. Specifically, the Saastamoinen model shows a systematic error of about -3 mm. Therefore a modified Saastamoinen model is developed based on the "best average" refractivity constant, and is validated by radiosonde data. Among different models, the GPT2w and the modified Saastamoinen model perform the best. ZHD values derived from their combination have a mean bias of -0.1 mm and a mean RMS of 13.9 mm. Limitations of the present models are discussed and suggestions for further improvements are given.

  17. New versions of the BDS/GNSS zenith tropospheric delay model IGGtrop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yuan, Yunbin; Ou, Jikun; Chai, Yanju; Li, Zishen; Liou, Yuei-An; Wang, Ningbo

    2015-01-01

    The initial IGGtrop model proposed for Chinese BDS (BeiDou System) is not very suitable for BDS/GNSS research and application due to its large data volume while it shows a global mean accuracy of 4 cm. New versions of the global zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) model IGGtrop are developed through further investigation on the spatial and temporal characteristics of global ZTD. From global GNSS ZTD observations and weather reanalysis data, new ZTD characteristics are found and discussed in this study including: small and inconsistent seasonal variation in ZTD between and stable seasonal variation outside; weak zonal variation in ZTD at higher latitudes (north of and south of ) and at heights above 6 km, etc. Based on these analyses, new versions of IGGtrop, named , are established through employing corresponding strategies: using a simple algorithm for equatorial ZTD; generating an adaptive spatial grid with lower resolutions in regions where ZTD varies little; and creating a method for optimized storage of model parameters. Thus, the models require much less parameters than the IGGtrop model, nearly 3.1-21.2 % of that for the IGGtrop model. The three new versions are validated by five years of GNSS-derived ZTDs at 125 IGS sites, and it shows that: demonstrates the highest ZTD correction performance, similar to IGGtrop; requires the least model parameters; is moderate in both zenith delay prediction performance and number of model parameters. For the model, the biases at those IGS sites are between and 4.3 cm with a mean value of cm and RMS errors are between 2.1 and 8.5 cm with a mean value of 4.0 cm. Different BDS and other GNSS users can choose a suitable model according to their application and research requirements.

  18. Retrieving Precipitable Water Vapor Data Using GPS Zenith Delays and Global Reanalysis Data in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available GPS has become a very effective tool to remotely sense precipitable water vapor (PWV information, which is important for weather forecasting and nowcasting. The number of geodetic GNSS stations set up in China has substantially increased over the last few decades. However, GPS PWV derivation requires surface pressure to calculate the precise zenith hydrostatic delay and weighted mean temperature to map the zenith wet delay to precipitable water vapor. GPS stations without collocated meteorological sensors can retrieve water vapor using standard atmosphere parameters, which lead to a decrease in accuracy. In this paper, a method of interpolating NWP reanalysis data to site locations for generating corresponding meteorological elements is explored over China. The NCEP FNL dataset provided by the NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction and over 600 observed stations from different sources was selected to assess the quality of the results. A one-year experiment was performed in our study. The types of stations selected include meteorological sites, GPS stations, radio sounding stations, and a sun photometer station. Compared with real surface measurements, the accuracy of the interpolated surface pressure and air temperature both meet the requirements of GPS PWV derivation in most areas; however, the interpolated surface air temperature exhibits lower precision than the interpolated surface pressure. At more than 96% of selected stations, PWV differences caused by the differences between the interpolation results and real measurements were less than 1.0 mm. Our study also indicates that relief amplitude exerts great influence on the accuracy of the interpolation approach. Unsatisfactory interpolation results always occurred in areas of strong relief. GPS PWV data generated from interpolated meteorological parameters are consistent with other PWV products (radio soundings, the NWP reanalysis dataset, and sun photometer PWV data. The

  19. Is visual selective attention in deaf individuals enhanced or deficient? The case of the useful field of view.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W G Dye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early deafness leads to enhanced attention in the visual periphery. Yet, whether this enhancement confers advantages in everyday life remains unknown, as deaf individuals have been shown to be more distracted by irrelevant information in the periphery than their hearing peers. Here, we show that, in a complex attentional task, a performance advantage results for deaf individuals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed the Useful Field of View (UFOV which requires central target identification concurrent with peripheral target localization in the presence of distractors - a divided, selective attention task. First, the comparison of deaf and hearing adults with or without sign language skills establishes that deafness and not sign language use drives UFOV enhancement. Second, UFOV performance was enhanced in deaf children, but only after 11 years of age. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates that, following early auditory deprivation, visual attention resources toward the periphery slowly get augmented to eventually result in a clear behavioral advantage by pre-adolescence on a selective visual attention task.

  20. Predicting Motor Vehicle Collisions in a Driving Simulator in Young Adults Using the Useful Field of View Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Benjamin; Cox, Molly K.; Vance, David E.; Stavrinos, Despina

    2015-01-01

    Objective Being involved in motor vehicle collisions is the leading cause of death in 1 to 34 year olds, and risk is particularly high in young adults. The Useful Field of View (UFOV) task, a cognitive measure of processing speed, divided attention, and selective attention, has been shown to be predictive of motor vehicle collisions in older adults, but its use as a predictor of driving performance in a young adult population has not been investigated. The present study examined whether UFOV was a predictive measure of motor vehicle collisions in a driving simulator in a young adult population. Method The 3-subtest version of UFOV (lower scores measured in milliseconds indicate better performance) was administered to 60 college students. Participants also completed an 11-mile simulated drive to provide driving performance metrics. Results Findings suggested that subtests 1 and 2 suffered from a ceiling effect. UFOV subtest 3 significantly predicted collisions in the simulated drive. Each 30 milliseconds slower on the subtest was associated with nearly a 10% increase in the risk of a simulated collision. Post-hoc analyses revealed a small partially mediating effect of subtest 3 on the relationship between driving experience and collisions. Conclusion The selective attention component of UFOV subtest 3 may be a predictive measure of crash involvement in a young adult population. Improvements in selective attention may be the underlying mechanism in how driving experience improves driving performance. PMID:25794266

  1. Ground and aircraft lidar measurements of sea salt and dust plumes with a small wide-field-of-view system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John N.

    2004-12-01

    A small portable lidar system was recently used to derive aerosol optical concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. The mini lidar uses a telescope setup with a relatively wide field of view allowing for measurements from close in (~60 m range) with no near field correction. In order to account for the large dynamic range, a custom logarithmic amplifier is used. Lidar measurements have been made in Hawaii and examples will be shown. More recently the Lidar was mounted on an aircraft for an experiment in the United Arab Emirates. In this case, the Lidar system was used to looking up, forward and down. The Lidar measurements looking up and down provided vertical profiles of aerosol concentrations. The lidar looking forward were used to derive quantitative aerosol extinction values using an existing and a new approach. Preliminary examples of this UAE data are shown. Being able to model aerosol phase functions is important for both satellite and Lidar aerosol retrievals. Mie theory is adequate for spherical particles but complex aerosols such as dust and organics are more difficult to model. Here we discuss phase function measurements we have made with our ground based polar nephelometer for sea salt and more recently for dust in the United Arab Emirates.

  2. Intraoperative Scintigraphy Using a Large Field-of-View Portable Gamma Camera for Primary Hyperparathyroidism: Initial Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C. Hall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated a novel technique, intraoperative 99 mTc-Sestamibi (MIBI imaging (neck and excised specimen (ES, using a large field-of-view portable gamma camera (LFOVGC, for expediting confirmation of MIBI-avid parathyroid adenoma removal. Methods. Twenty patients with MIBI-avid parathyroid adenomas were preoperatively administered MIBI and intraoperatively imaged prior to incision (neck and immediately following resection (neck and/or ES. Preoperative and intraoperative serum parathyroid hormone monitoring (IOPTH and pathology (path were also performed. Results. MIBI neck activity was absent and specimen activity was present in 13/20 with imaging after initial ES removal. In the remaining 7/20 cases, residual neck activity and/or absent ES activity prompted excision of additional tissue, ultimately leading to complete hyperfunctioning tissue excision. Postexcision LFOVGC ES imaging confirmed parathyroid adenoma resection 100% when postresection imaging qualitatively had activity (ES and/or no activity (neck. The mean ± SEM time saving using intraoperative LFOVGC data to confirm resection versus first IOPTH or path result would have been 22.0 ± 2 minutes (specimen imaging and 26.0 ± 3 minutes (neck imaging. Conclusion. Utilization of a novel real-time intraoperative LFOVGC imaging approach can provide confirmation of MIBI-avid parathyroid adenoma removal appreciably faster than IOPTH and/or path and may provide a valuable adjunct to parathyroid surgery.

  3. Extended field of view ultrasound imaging to evaluate Achilles tendon length and thickness: a reliability and validity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, Karin Gravare; Shelley, Kristen; Powell, Stephen; Varrecchia, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Achilles tendon structural changes are common after injury and correlate with recovery of function. Having simple, inexpensive, yet valid and reliable measures of Achilles tendon structure are useful both in research and clinical. The purpose of this study was to perform reliability and validity measures of extended field of view (EFOV) ultrasound (US) imaging of the Achilles tendon. Methods eight cadavers (16 tendons) were used for the validation study to compare Achilles tendon length measurements from US images with actual measured length from dissected tendons. Nine healthy subjects (18 tendons) were included in the test-retest evaluation. Results the correlation between the US images and cadaveric measurements was excellent (ICC=0.895) for the length between calcaneus and the gastrocnemius and good (ICC=0.744) for the length between the calcaneus and the soleus. The between-limb reliability was excellent (ICC 0.886–0.940) for the tendon length measurements with standard error of measurements (SEM) of 0.64 cm for calcaneus to soleus and 0.67 cm for calcaneus to gastrocnemius. Between-day test-retest reliability was also excellent (ICC=0.898–0.944). Conclusion this study supports the use of EFOV US imaging as a reliable and valid method to determine Achilles tendon length and thickness, and using the uninjured limb for comparison. PMID:27331037

  4. Self-reconstructing sectioned Bessel beams offer submicron optical sectioning for large fields of view in light-sheet microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrbach, Florian O; Gurchenkov, Vasily; Alessandri, Kevin; Nassoy, Pierre; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2013-05-06

    One of main challenges in light-sheet microscopy is to design the light-sheet as extended and thin as possible--extended to cover a large field of view, thin to optimize resolution and contrast. However, a decrease of the beam's waist also decreases the illumination beam's depth of field. Here, we introduce a new kind of beam that we call sectioned Bessel beam. These beams can be generated by blocking opposite sections of the beam's angular spectrum. In combination with confocal-line detection the optical sectioning performance of the light-sheet can be decoupled from the depth of field of the illumination beam. By simulations and experiments we demonstrate that these beams exhibit self-reconstruction capabilities and penetration depths into thick scattering media equal to those of conventional Bessel beams. We applied sectioned Bessel beams to illuminate tumor multicellular spheroids and prove the increase in contrast. Sectioned Bessel beams turn out to be highly advantageous for the investigation of large strongly scattering samples in a light-sheet microscope.

  5. Does constraining field of view prevent extraction of geometric cues for humans during virtual-environment reorientation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturz, Bradley R; Kilday, Zachary A; Bodily, Kent D

    2013-10-01

    Environment size has been shown to influence the reliance on local and global geometric cues during reorientation. Unless changes in environment size are produced by manipulating length and width proportionally, changes in environment size are confounded by the amount of the environment that is visible from a single vantage point. Yet, the influence of the amount of the environment that is visible from any single vantage point on the use of local and global geometric cues remains unknown. We manipulated the amount of an environment that was visually available to participants by manipulating field of view (FOV) in a virtual environment orientation task. Two groups of participants were trained in a trapezoid-shaped enclosure to find a location that was uniquely specified by both local and global geometric cues. One group (FOV 50°) had visually less of the environment available to them from any one perspective compared to another group (FOV 100°). Following training, we presented both groups with a control test along with three novel-shaped environments. Testing assessed the use of global geometry in isolation, in alignment with local geometry, or in conflict with local geometry. Results (confirmed by a follow-up experiment) indicated that constraining FOV prevented extraction of geometric properties and relationships of space and resulted in an inability to use either global or local geometric cues for reorientation.

  6. The irradiating field of view of imaging laser radar under fog conditions in a controlled laboratory environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wen-Hua; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Lai, Jian-Cheng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Chun-Yong; Li, Zhen-Hua

    2017-04-01

    This paper theoretically and experimentally investigates the performance of the imaging laser radar (ILR) system under the fog condition. Fog is generated and controlled homogeneously within a dedicated indoor atmospheric chamber. A physical model of the reflected laser pulses due to fog and a standard Lambertian target are developed to determine the width of each echo pulse for different fog concentrations. We show that there is a good agreement between the predicted and measured results for the width of backscattered return pulses. Based on experimental results an empirical model of the horizontal and vertical irradiating field of views (FOVs) of ILR under different visibilities is also developed. Consequently, a new model is proposed to predict the horizontal and vertical irradiating FOVs of ILR by using the width of the backscattered return pulse under different fog conditions. The reported results can be used to dynamically adjust the scanning interval based on the variation of the irradiating FOVs of laser radar and improve the precision of target ranging and imaging.

  7. A design study of a triple field of view 8-12 μm waveband airborne FLIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikici, Atilla

    2011-04-01

    In this work, a design study of a three field-of-view (FOV) optical system for 8-12 μm imaging using a 288×4 focal plane array detector is presented. The detector pixel size is 25 μm×28 μm. The f/# of the detector is 1.76. In order to switch the FOVs, three different optical configurations are superimposed and all three configurations are optimized. The narrow and medium FOV switching is based on movement of the second negative lens of the afocal system, whereas the wide FOV is selected by inserting a mirror between the 4th and 5th lenses of the afocal system. By inserting a switching mirror, the objective part of the first configuration is blocked out; nevertheless the afocal of the wide FOV is activated. The imager part of the layout is common for all FOVs. Diffractive and aspheric surfaces are utilized to control chromatic and all other kinds of aberrations, reducing the total lens number. The final optical designs, together with their modulation transfer function (MTF) plots, are illustrated, exhibiting excellent performance in all three FOVs. More specifically, the paper emphasizes how the displacement of compensating lenses effect the MTF of the system and how automatic movements of the lenses are used to eliminate the defocusing problem under changing environmental conditions.

  8. Field-of-View Requirements for Approach and Landing of V/STOL (Vertical/Short Take-Off and Landing) Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    orthogonal) coordinate of a point of regard in the field of view defined with respect to the point where the aircraft longitudinal body reference...and 1i except that the origin of FOVi , FOVui in the picture plane is where the aircraft longitudinal body reference axis inter- cepts the picture

  9. Automated rain rate estimates using the Ka-band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chandra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of millimeter wavelength radars for probing precipitation has recently gained interest. However, estimation of precipitation variables is not straightforward due to strong attenuation, radar receiver saturation, antenna wet radome effects and natural microphysical variability. Here, an automated algorithm is developed for routinely retrieving rain rates from profiling Ka-band (35-GHz ARM zenith radars (KAZR. A 1-D simple, steady state microphysical model is used to estimate the impact of microphysical processes and attenuation on the profiles of the radar observables at 35-GHz and thus provide criteria for identifying when attenuation or microphysical processes dominate KAZR observations. KAZR observations are also screened for saturation and wet radome effects. The proposed algorithm is implemented in two steps: high rain rates are retrieved by using the amount of attenuation in rain layers, while lower rain rates by the Ze–R (reflectivity-rain rate relation is implemented. Observations collected by the KAZR, disdrometer and scanning weather radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign at Gan Island of the tropical Indian Ocean are used to validate the proposed approach. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm can be used to derive robust statistics of rain rates in the tropics from KAZR observations.

  10. Toward a real time stand-off submillimeter-wave imaging system with large field of view: quasi-optical system design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Erio; Llombart, Nuria

    2015-05-01

    In the frame-work of the European project CONSORTIS, a stand-off system for concealed object detections working at submillimeter-wave frequencies is being developed. The system is required to perform real-time image acquisition over a large field of view at a short range using both an active and a passive sensor operating in the frequency range from 250 to 600 GHz. In this contribution, the main trade-offs associated with the quasi-optical system design are presented. The imaging distance is from 2 m to 5 m range with a spatial resolution lower than 2 cm. Focal plane arrays will be used to achieve high imaging frame rates. Two configurations are considered in CONSORTIS: a sparse array of active transceivers and incoherent passive staring array with a large number of elements. Both cases use mechanical scanning to achieve the required field of view. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the different trade-offs driving the quasi-optical design: from the mechanical scanner considerations to the optical beam quality required over the whole field of view. This analysis starts from the fundamental limitations of the quasi-optical mechanical systems. The limitations of the optics are discussed considering a canonical elliptical reflector as a reference. After this fundamental analysis, we compare the performances of several practical standard implementations, based on dual-reflectors and lenses, with canonical geometries. It is shown that, at short ranges, the main limitation of the optical system is the poor beam quality associated with the wide angular field of view and none of the standard implementation fulfills the requirements. In the last section, a technique to overcome this limitation is investigated. In particular, the use of optics with oversized reflectors can significantly improve the performance over a larger field of view if the coma aberrations are limited by a good angular filter.

  11. Large field-of-view and depth-specific cortical microvascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-02-01

    Ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify of blood flow, blood vessel morphology, oxygenation and tissue morphology is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of various neurovascular disorders, e.g., stroke. Currently, no imaging technique is available that can satisfactorily extract these parameters from in vivo microcirculatory tissue beds, with large field of view and sufficient resolution at defined depth without any harm to the tissue. In order for more effective therapeutics, we need to determine the area of brain that is damaged but not yet dead after focal ischemia. Here we develop an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which SDW-LSCI (synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle imaging) is used as a guiding tool for OMAG (optical microangiography) to investigate the fine detail of tissue hemodynamics, such as vessel flow, profile, and flow direction. We determine the utility of the integrated system for serial monitoring afore mentioned parameters in experimental stroke, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice. For 90 min MCAO, onsite and 24 hours following reperfusion, we use SDW-LSCI to determine distinct flow and oxygenation variations for differentiation of the infarction, peri-infarct, reduced flow and contralateral regions. The blood volumes are quantifiable and distinct in afore mentioned regions. We also demonstrate the behaviors of flow and flow direction in the arterials connected to MCA play important role in the time course of MCAO. These achievements may improve our understanding of vascular involvement under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitate clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases, such as ischemic stroke.

  12. Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging with Optical-Quality Curved Microfluidic Chamber for Absolute Cell Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohiuddin Khan Shourav

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Field curvature and other aberrations are encountered inevitably when designing a compact fluorescence imaging system with a simple lens. Although multiple lens elements can be used to correct most such aberrations, doing so increases system cost and complexity. Herein, we propose a wide field-of-view (FOV fluorescence imaging method with an unconventional optical-quality curved sample chamber that corrects the field curvature caused by a simple lens. Our optics simulations and proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that a curved substrate with lens-dependent curvature can reduce greatly the distortion in an image taken with a conventional planar detector. Following the validation study, we designed a curved sample chamber that can contain a known amount of sample volume and fabricated it at reasonable cost using plastic injection molding. At a magnification factor of approximately 0.6, the curved chamber provides a clear view of approximately 119 mm2, which is approximately two times larger than the aberration-free area of a planar chamber. Remarkably, a fluorescence image of microbeads in the curved chamber exhibits almost uniform intensity over the entire field even with a simple lens imaging system, whereas the distorted boundary region has much lower brightness than the central area in the planar chamber. The absolute count of white blood cells stained with a fluorescence dye was in good agreement with that obtained by a commercially available conventional microscopy system. Hence, a wide FOV imaging system with the proposed curved sample chamber would enable us to acquire an undistorted image of a large sample volume without requiring a time-consuming scanning process in point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  13. Truly simultaneous SS-OCT of the anterior and posterior human eye with full anterior chamber and 50° retinal field of views (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, Ryan P.; Viehland, Christian; Keller, Brenton; Vann, Robin R.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Kuo, Anthony N.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized clinical observation of the eye and is an indispensable part of the modern ophthalmic practice. Unlike many other ophthalmic imaging techniques, OCT provides three-dimensional information about the imaged eye. However, conventional clinical OCT systems image only the anterior or the posterior eye during a single acquisition. Newer OCT systems have begun to image both during the same acquisition but with compromises such as limited field of view in the posterior eye or requiring rapid switching between the anterior and posterior eye during the scan. We describe here the development and demonstration of an OCT system with truly simultaneous imaging of both the anterior and posterior eye capable of imaging the full anterior chamber width and 50° on the retina (macula, optic nerve, and arcades). The whole eye OCT system was developed using custom optics and optomechanics. Polarization was utilized to separate the imaging channels. We utilized a 200kHz swept-source laser (Axsun Technologies) centered at 1040±50nm of bandwidth. The clock signal generated by the laser was interpolated 4x to generate 5504 samples per laser sweep. With the whole eye OCT system, we simultaneously acquired anterior and posterior segments with repeated B-scans as well as three-dimensional volumes from seven healthy volunteers (other than refractive error). On three of these volunteers, whole eye OCT and partial coherence interferometry (LenStar PCI, Haag-Streit) were used to measure axial eye length. We measured a mean repeatability of ±47µm with whole eye OCT and a mean difference from PCI of -68µm.

  14. Zenith Pass Problem of Inter-satellite Linkage Antenna Based on Program Guidance Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhai Kun; Yang Di

    2008-01-01

    While adopting an elevation-over-azimuth architecture by an inter-satellite linkage antenna of a user satellite, a zenith pass problem always occurs when the antenna is tracing the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS). This paper deals with this problem by way of,firstly, introducing movement laws of the inter-satellite linkage to predict the movement of the user satellite antenna followed by analyzing the potential pass moment and the actual one of the zenith pass in detail. A number of specific orbit altitudes for the user satellite that can remove the blindness zone are obtained. Finally, on the base of the predicted results from the movement laws of the inter-satellite linkage, the zenith pass tracing strategies for the user satellite antenna are designed under the program guidance using a trajectory preprocessor. Simulations have confirmed the reasonability and feasibility of the strategies in dealing with the zenith pass problem.

  15. Automated rain rate estimates using the Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, A.; Zhang, C.; Kollias, P.; Matrosov, S.; Szyrmer, W.

    2015-09-01

    The use of millimeter wavelength radars for probing precipitation has recently gained interest. However, estimation of precipitation variables is not straightforward due to strong signal attenuation, radar receiver saturation, antenna wet radome effects and natural microphysical variability. Here, an automated algorithm is developed for routinely retrieving rain rates from the profiling Ka-band (35-GHz) ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) zenith radars (KAZR). A 1-dimensional, simple, steady state microphysical model is used to estimate impacts of microphysical processes and attenuation on the profiles of radar observables at 35-GHz and thus provide criteria for identifying situations when attenuation or microphysical processes dominate KAZR observations. KAZR observations are also screened for signal saturation and wet radome effects. The algorithm is implemented in two steps: high rain rates are retrieved by using the amount of attenuation in rain layers, while low rain rates are retrieved from the reflectivity-rain rate (Ze-R) relation. Observations collected by the KAZR, rain gauge, disdrometer and scanning precipitating radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign at the Gan Island of the tropical Indian Ocean are used to validate the proposed approach. The differences in the rain accumulation from the proposed algorithm are quantified. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm has a potential for deriving continuous rain rate statistics in the tropics.

  16. Spectral invariant behavior of zenith radiance around cloud edges simulated by radiative transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Chiu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A previous paper discovered a surprising spectral-invariant relationship in shortwave spectrometer observations taken by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM program. Here, using radiative transfer simulations, we study the sensitivity of this relationship to the properties of aerosols and clouds, to the underlying surface type, and to the finite field-of-view (FOV of the spectrometer. Overall, the relationship is mostly sensitive to cloud properties and has little sensitivity to the other factors. At visible wavelengths, the relationship primarily depends on cloud optical depth regardless of cloud thermodynamic phase and drop size. At water-absorbing wavelengths, the slope of the spectral-invariant relationship depends primarily on cloud optical depth; the intercept, by contrast, depends primarily on cloud absorption properties, suggesting a new retrieval method for cloud drop effective radius. These results suggest that the spectral-invariant relationship can be used to infer cloud properties even with insufficient or no knowledge about spectral surface albedo and aerosol properties.

  17. Chinese Digital Zenith Telescope (DZT) used for Astro-geodetic Deflection of the Vertical Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, L.; Wang, B.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Z.; Hu, H.; Wang, H.; Han, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Classical optical astrometry can be used to measure and study variations of plumb line. For the earth gravity filed related researches, it is irreplaceable by technologies like GNSS、VLBI、SLR, etc. However, classical astrometric instruments have some major drawback, such as low efficiency, low automation, more operating observers, and individual error in some visual instruments. In 2011, The National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) successfully developed the new digital zenith telescope prototype (DZT-1), which has the ability of highly automatic observation and data processing, even allowing unattended observation by remote control. By utilizing CCD camera as imaging terminal and high-accuracy tiltmeter to replace mercurial plate, observation efficiency of DZT is improved greatly. According to the results of data obtained from test observations, single-observation accuracy of DZT-1 is 0.15-0.3″ and one night observation accuracy up to 0.07-0.08″, which is better than the observation accuracy of classical astrometric instruments. The observations of DZT can be used to obtain the plumb line variations and the vertical deflections, which can be used for carrying out seismic, geodetic and other related geo-scientific researches. Especially the collocated observations with gravimeters and the conjoint analysis of the observation data will be helpful to recognize the anomalous motion and variation of underground mass over time, and maybe provide significant information for estimating the scale of underground anomalous mass. The information is valuable for determining the three key factors of earthquake possibly. Moreover, the project team is carrying out the development of new DZT with better performance and studying the key techniques for new instrument to make DZT play a more significant role in the astronomy and geoscience fields.

  18. Usefulness of a large field of view sensor for physicochemical, textural, and yield predictions under industrial goat cheese (Murcia al Vino) manufacturing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, S; García, V; Ferrandini, E; Carrión, J; Castillo, M; López, M B

    2012-11-01

    The applicability of a light backscatter sensor with a large field of view was tested for on-line monitoring of coagulation and syneresis in a goat cheese (Murcia al Vino) manufactured under industrial conditions. Cheesemaking was carried out concurrently in a 12-L pilot vat and a 10,000-L industrial vat following the normal cheesemaking protocol. Cheese moisture, whey fat content, hardness, springiness, and adhesiveness were measured during syneresis. The results obtained show that cutting time is best predicted by considering the coagulation ratio at the inflection point and the percentage increase in the ratio during coagulation, with no need for the first derivative. The large field of view reflectance ratio provided good results for the prediction of moisture content, yield, hardness, springiness, and adhesiveness of the final cheese. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coordinated Control of Acoustical Field of View and Flight in Three-Dimensional Space for Consecutive Capture by Echolocating Bats during Natural Foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, Miwa; Fujioka, Emyo; Motoi, Kazuya; Kondo, Masaru; Hiryu, Shizuko

    2017-01-01

    Echolocating bats prey upon small moving insects in the dark using sophisticated sonar techniques. The direction and directivity pattern of the ultrasound broadcast of these bats are important factors that affect their acoustical field of view, allowing us to investigate how the bats control their acoustic attention (pulse direction) for advanced flight maneuvers. The purpose of this study was to understand the behavioral strategies of acoustical sensing of wild Japanese house bats Pipistrellus abramus in three-dimensional (3D) space during consecutive capture flights. The results showed that when the bats successively captured multiple airborne insects in short time intervals (less than 1.5 s), they maintained not only the immediate prey but also the subsequent one simultaneously within the beam widths of the emitted pulses in both horizontal and vertical planes before capturing the immediate one. This suggests that echolocating bats maintain multiple prey within their acoustical field of view by a single sensing using a wide directional beam while approaching the immediate prey, instead of frequently shifting acoustic attention between multiple prey. We also numerically simulated the bats' flight trajectories when approaching two prey successively to investigate the relationship between the acoustical field of view and the prey direction for effective consecutive captures. This simulation demonstrated that acoustically viewing both the immediate and the subsequent prey simultaneously increases the success rate of capturing both prey, which is considered to be one of the basic axes of efficient route planning for consecutive capture flight. The bat's wide sonar beam can incidentally cover multiple prey while the bat forages in an area where the prey density is high. Our findings suggest that the bats then keep future targets within their acoustical field of view for effective foraging. In addition, in both the experimental results and the numerical simulations

  20. Development and validation of a novel large field of view phantom and a software module for the quality assurance of geometric distortion in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfeh, Tarraf; Hammoud, Rabih; McGarry, Maeve; Al-Hammadi, Noora; Perkins, Gregory

    2015-09-01

    To develop and validate a large field of view phantom and quality assurance software tool for the assessment and characterization of geometric distortion in MRI scanners commissioned for radiation therapy planning. A purpose built phantom was developed consisting of 357 rods (6mm in diameter) of polymethyl-methacrylat separated by 20mm intervals, providing a three dimensional array of control points at known spatial locations covering a large field of view up to a diameter of 420mm. An in-house software module was developed to allow automatic geometric distortion assessment. This software module was validated against a virtual dataset of the phantom that reproduced the exact geometry of the physical phantom, but with known translational and rotational displacements and warping. For validation experiments, clinical MRI sequences were acquired with and without the application of a commercial 3D distortion correction algorithm (Gradwarp™). The software module was used to characterize and assess system-related geometric distortion in the sequences relative to a benchmark CT dataset, and the efficacy of the vendor geometric distortion correction algorithms (GDC) was also assessed. Results issued from the validation of the software against virtual images demonstrate the algorithm's ability to accurately calculate geometric distortion with sub-pixel precision by the extraction of rods and quantization of displacements. Geometric distortion was assessed for the typical sequences used in radiotherapy applications and over a clinically relevant 420mm field of view (FOV). As expected and towards the edges of the field of view (FOV), distortion increased with increasing FOV. For all assessed sequences, the vendor GDC was able to reduce the mean distortion to below 1mm over a field of view of 5, 10, 15 and 20cm radius respectively. Results issued from the application of the developed phantoms and algorithms demonstrate a high level of precision. The results indicate that this

  1. Effect of Object Position in Cone Beam Computed Tomography Field of View for Detection of Root Fractures in Teeth with Intra-Canal Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valizadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Vertical root fracture (VRF is a common problem in endodontically treated teeth. Due to its poor prognosis, a reliable technique must be used to make an accurate diagnosis. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has been recently introduced for maxillofacial imaging. Despite the high diagnostic value of this method, metal artifacts resulting from intra-canal posts still make the detection of VRFs challenging. Objectives This study aimed to assess the effect of object position in the field of view (FOV of CBCT on detection of VRFs in teeth with intra-canal posts. Materials and Methods The crowns of 60 extracted premolar teeth were cut at the level of cementoenamel junction (CEJ. Root canals were filled with gutta-percha and filling of the coronal 2/3 of the root canals was subsequently removed to fabricate intra-canal cast posts. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 30. Fracture was induced in group one using an Instron machine. Group two was considered as the control group with no fracture. All teeth were then randomly positioned and scanned in five different positions starting at the center of the FOV as well as right, left anterior and posterior relative to the center (3, 9, 12, and 6 O’clock via the New Tom VGI CBCT unit. Two observers evaluated images for VRFs. Sensitivity and specificity of fracture diagnosis in each position was calculated in comparison with the gold standard. Wilcoxon test was used for data analysis. Results Considering deterministic and probabilistic diagnostic parameters, probabilistic sensitivity was similar in all positions; but probabilistic specificity of the center position (65.1% was significantly higher than that of 6 and 12 O’clock positions. Considering the deterministic diagnostic parameters, the overall sensitivity and specificity values decreased in all positions in FOV, but sensitivity of the center position of FOV was significantly higher than that of other positions; specificity

  2. Reduced Field-of-View Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of the Lumbosacral Enlargement: A Pilot In Vivo Study of the Healthy Spinal Cord at 3T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grussu, Francesco; Louka, Polymnia; Prados, Ferran; Samson, Rebecca S.; Battiston, Marco; Altmann, Daniel R.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miller, David H.; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has recently started to be adopted into clinical investigations of spinal cord (SC) diseases. However, DTI applications to the lower SC are limited due to a number of technical challenges, related mainly to the even smaller size of the SC structure at this level, its position relative to the receiver coil elements and the effects of motion during data acquisition. Developing methods to overcome these problems would offer new means to gain further insights into microstructural changes of neurological conditions involving the lower SC, and in turn could help explain symptoms such as bladder and sexual dysfunction. In this work, the feasibility of obtaining grey and white matter (GM/WM) DTI indices such as axial/radial/mean diffusivity (AD/RD/MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) within the lumbosacral enlargement (LSE) was investigated using a reduced field-of-view (rFOV) single-shot echo-planar imaging (ss-EPI) acquisition in 14 healthy participants using a clinical 3T MR system. The scan-rescan reproducibility of the measurements was assessed by calculating the percentage coefficient of variation (%COV). Mean FA was higher in WM compared to GM (0.58 and 0.4 in WM and GM respectively), AD and MD were higher in WM compared to GM (1.66 μm2ms-1 and 0.94 μm2ms-1 in WM and 1.2 μm2ms-1 and 0.82 μm2ms-1 in GM for AD and MD respectively) and RD was lower in WM compared to GM (0.58 μm2ms-1 and 0.63 μm2ms-1 respectively). The scan-rescan %COV was lower than 10% in all cases with the highest values observed for FA and the lowest for MD. This pilot study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain reliable tissue-specific estimation of DTI indices within the LSE using a rFOV ss-EPI acquisition. The DTI acquisition and analysis protocol presented here is clinically feasible and may be used in future investigations of neurological conditions implicating the lower SC. PMID:27741303

  3. Measurement of the flux and zenith-angle distribution of upward through-going muons by Super-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuda, Y; Ichihara, E; Inoue, K; Ishihara, K; Ishino, H; Itow, Y; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kasuga, S; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M; Habig, A; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Price, L R; Reines, F; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Flanagan, J W; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Stenger, V J; Takemori, D; Ishii, T; Kanzaki, J; Kobayashi, T; Mine, S; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakai, A; Sakuda, M; Sasaki, O; Echigo, S; Kohama, M; Suzuki, A T; Haines, T J; Blaufuss, E; Kim, B K; Sanford, R; Svoboda, R; Chen, M L; Goodman, J A; Sullivan, G W; Hill, J; Jung, C K; Martens, K; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sharkey, E; Viren, B; Yanagisawa, C; Doki, W; Miyano, K; Okazawa, H; Saji, C; Takahata, M; Nagashima, Y; Takita, M; Yamaguchi, T; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Etoh, M; Fujita, K; Hasegawa, A; Hasegawa, T; Hatakeyama, S; Iwamoto, T; Koga, M; Maruyama, T; Ogawa, H; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Tsushima, F; Koshiba, M; Nemoto, M; Nishijima, K; Futagami, T; Hayato, Y; Kanaya, Y; Kaneyuki, K; Watanabe, Y; Kielczewska, D; Doyle, R A; George, J S; Stachyra, A L; Wai, L L; Wilkes, R J; Young, K K

    1999-01-01

    A total of 614 upward through-going muons of minimum energy 1.6 GeV are observed by Super-Kamiokande during 537 detector live days. The measured muon flux is 1.74+/-0.07(stat.)+/-0.02(sys.)x10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}sr^{-1} compared to an expected flux of 1.97+/-0.44(theo.)x10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}sr^{-1}. The absolute measured flux is in agreement with the prediction within the errors. However, the zenith angle dependence of the observed upward through-going muon flux does not agree with no-oscillation predictions. The observed distortion in shape is consistent with the \

  4. The accuracy of linear measurements of maxillary and mandibular edentulous sites in cone-beam computed tomography images with different fields of view and voxel sizes under simulated clinical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, Rumpa; Ramesh, Aruna; Pagni, Sarah [Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of varying resolutions of cone-beam computed tomography images on the accuracy of linear measurements of edentulous areas in human cadaver heads. Intact cadaver heads were used to simulate a clinical situation. Fiduciary markers were placed in the edentulous areas of 4 intact embalmed cadaver heads. The heads were scanned with two different CBCT units using a large field of view (13 cm×16 cm) and small field of view (5 cm×8 cm) at varying voxel sizes (0.3 mm, 0.2 mm, and 0.16 mm). The ground truth was established with digital caliper measurements. The imaging measurements were then compared with caliper measurements to determine accuracy. The Wilcoxon signed rank test revealed no statistically significant difference between the medians of the physical measurements obtained with calipers and the medians of the CBCT measurements. A comparison of accuracy among the different imaging protocols revealed no significant differences as determined by the Friedman test. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.961, indicating excellent reproducibility. Inter-observer variability was determined graphically with a Bland-Altman plot and by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient. The Bland-Altman plot indicated very good reproducibility for smaller measurements but larger discrepancies with larger measurements. The CBCT-based linear measurements in the edentulous sites using different voxel sizes and FOVs are accurate compared with the direct caliper measurements of these sites. Higher resolution CBCT images with smaller voxel size did not result in greater accuracy of the linear measurements.

  5. Impact of high-resolution data assimilation of GPS zenith delay on Mediterranean heavy rainfall forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Boniface

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Impact of GPS (Global Positioning System data assimilation is assessed here using a high-resolution numerical weather prediction system at 2.5 km horizontal resolution. The Zenithal Tropospheric Delay (ZTD GPS data from mesoscale networks are assimilated with the 3DVAR AROME data assimilation scheme. Data from more than 280 stations over the model domain have been assimilated during 15-day long assimilation cycles prior each of the two studied events. The results of these assimilation cycles show that the assimilation of GPS ZTD with the AROME system performs well in producing analyses closer to the ZTD observations in average.

    Then the impacts of assimilating GPS data on the precipitation forecast have been evaluated. For the first case, only the AROME runs starting a few hours prior the triggering of the convective system are able to simulate the convective precipitation. The assimilation of GPS ZTD observations improves the simulation of the spatial extent of the precipitation, but slightly underestimates the heaviest precipitation in that case compared with the experiment without GPS. The accuracy of the precipitation forecast for the second case is much better. The analyses from the control assimilation cycle provide already a good description of the atmosphere state that cannot be further improved by the assimilation of GPS observations. Only for the latest day (22 November 2007, significant differences have been found between the two parallel cycles. In that case, the assimilation of GPS ZTD allows to improve the first 6 to 12 h of the precipitation forecast.

  6. Tropospheric refractivity and zenith path delays from least-squares collocation of meteorological and GNSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgan, Karina; Hurter, Fabian; Geiger, Alain; Rohm, Witold; Bosy, Jarosław

    2016-08-01

    Precise positioning requires an accurate a priori troposphere model to enhance the solution quality. Several empirical models are available, but they may not properly characterize the state of troposphere, especially in severe weather conditions. Another possible solution is to use regional troposphere models based on real-time or near-real time measurements. In this study, we present the total refractivity and zenith total delay (ZTD) models based on a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data and ground-based meteorological observations. We reconstruct the total refractivity profiles over the western part of Switzerland and the total refractivity profiles as well as ZTDs over Poland using the least-squares collocation software COMEDIE (Collocation of Meteorological Data for Interpretation and Estimation of Tropospheric Pathdelays) developed at ETH Zürich. In these two case studies, profiles of the total refractivity and ZTDs are calculated from different data sets. For Switzerland, the data set with the best agreement with the reference radiosonde (RS) measurements is the combination of ground-based meteorological observations and GNSS ZTDs. Introducing the horizontal gradients does not improve the vertical interpolation, and results in slightly larger biases and standard deviations. For Poland, the data set based on meteorological parameters from the NWP Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and from a combination of the NWP model and GNSS ZTDs shows the best agreement with the reference RS data. In terms of ZTD, the combined NWP-GNSS observations and GNSS-only data set exhibit the best accuracy with an average bias (from all stations) of 3.7 mm and average standard deviations of 17.0 mm w.r.t. the reference GNSS stations.

  7. Tropospheric refractivity and zenith path delays from least-squares collocation of meteorological and GNSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgan, Karina; Hurter, Fabian; Geiger, Alain; Rohm, Witold; Bosy, Jarosław

    2017-02-01

    Precise positioning requires an accurate a priori troposphere model to enhance the solution quality. Several empirical models are available, but they may not properly characterize the state of troposphere, especially in severe weather conditions. Another possible solution is to use regional troposphere models based on real-time or near-real time measurements. In this study, we present the total refractivity and zenith total delay (ZTD) models based on a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data and ground-based meteorological observations. We reconstruct the total refractivity profiles over the western part of Switzerland and the total refractivity profiles as well as ZTDs over Poland using the least-squares collocation software COMEDIE (Collocation of Meteorological Data for Interpretation and Estimation of Tropospheric Pathdelays) developed at ETH Zürich. In these two case studies, profiles of the total refractivity and ZTDs are calculated from different data sets. For Switzerland, the data set with the best agreement with the reference radiosonde (RS) measurements is the combination of ground-based meteorological observations and GNSS ZTDs. Introducing the horizontal gradients does not improve the vertical interpolation, and results in slightly larger biases and standard deviations. For Poland, the data set based on meteorological parameters from the NWP Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and from a combination of the NWP model and GNSS ZTDs shows the best agreement with the reference RS data. In terms of ZTD, the combined NWP-GNSS observations and GNSS-only data set exhibit the best accuracy with an average bias (from all stations) of 3.7 mm and average standard deviations of 17.0 mm w.r.t. the reference GNSS stations.

  8. Algorithm of Restoring Field of View Lines Based on Multi-camera%多摄像机视野分界线恢复算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛翠红; 于洋; 粱艳; 于明

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a kind of method about restoring multi-camera' field of view line is researched. Harris corner detection and homograph method should be done to restore the field of view line between the cameras. First, it extracts corner features in the image using Harris corner detection algorithm. Next the feature point matching is performed between the images' overlap region. Then the homograph is computed according to matching points between images. Finally the FOV lines are restored by the image boundary points and images' homograph. This method can restore the camerag field of view line, with accuracy and robustness.%研究了一种多摄像机的视野(Field of View,FOV)分界线恢复方法,利用Harris角点检测和单应矩阵的方法完成摄像机视野分界线恢复。用Harris角点检测算法提取图像中角点特征;在有重叠区域图像间进行特征点匹配,再根据匹配点计算图像间的单应矩阵;最后由图像的边界点及图像间的单应矩阵计算摄像机的FOV分界线。该方法能准确恢复摄像机的视野分界线,具有准确性和鲁棒性。

  9. Modeling and optimization of the antenna system with focal plane array for the new generation radio telescopes with wide field of view

    CERN Document Server

    Iupikov, O

    2016-01-01

    The model of the reflector antenna system with focal plane array, low-noise amplifier and beamformer is developed in the work. The beamformer strategy is suggested to reduce the receiving sensitivity ripple inside field of view of the telescope, while the sensitivity itself drops slightly (less than 10%). The system APERTIF (which is currently under development in Netherlands Institute For Radioastronomy, ASTRON) has been analyzed using developed model, and numerical results are presented. The obtained numerical results have been verified experimentally in anechoic chamber as well as on one of the dishes of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (all measurements have been done in ASTRON).

  10. Combined large field-of-view MRA and time-resolved MRA of the lower extremities: Impact of acquisition order on image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riffel, Philipp, E-mail: Philipp.Riffel@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Haneder, Stefan; Attenberger, Ulrike I. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Brade, Joachim [Department of Medical Statistics and Biomathematics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Michaely, Henrik J. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Different approaches exist for hybrid MRA of the calf station. So far, the order of the acquisition of the focused calf MRA and the large field-of-view MRA has not been scientifically evaluated. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate if the quality of the combined large field-of-view MRA (CTM MR angiography) and time-resolved MRA with stochastic interleaved trajectories (TWIST MRA) depends on the order of acquisition of the two contrast-enhanced studies. Methods: In this retrospective study, 40 consecutive patients (mean age 68.1 ± 8.7 years, 29 male/11 female) who had undergone an MR angiographic protocol that consisted of CTM-MRA (TR/TE, 2.4/1.0 ms; 21° flip angle; isotropic resolution 1.2 mm; gadolinium dose, 0.07 mmol/kg) and TWIST-MRA (TR/TE 2.8/1.1; 20° flip angle; isotropic resolution 1.1 mm; temporal resolution 5.5 s, gadolinium dose, 0.03 mmol/kg), were included. In the first group (group 1) TWIST-MRA of the calf station was performed 1–2 min after CTM-MRA. In the second group (group 2) CTM-MRA was performed 1–2 min after TWIST-MRA of the calf station. The image quality of CTM-MRA and TWIST-MRA were evaluated by 2 two independent radiologists in consensus according to a 4-point Likert-like rating scale assessing overall image quality on a segmental basis. Venous overlay was assessed per examination. Results: In the CTM-MRA, 1360 segments were included in the assessment of image quality. CTM-MRA was diagnostic in 95% (1289/1360) of segments. There was a significant difference (p < 0.0001) between both groups with regard to the number of segments rated as excellent and moderate. The image quality was rated as excellent in group 1 in 80% (514/640 segments) and in group 2 in 67% (432/649), respectively (p < 0.0001). In contrast, the image quality was rated as moderate in the first group in 5% (33/640) and in the second group in 19% (121/649) respectively (p < 0.0001). The venous overlay was disturbing in 10% in group 1 and 20% in group

  11. Narrow-band, narrow-field-of-view Raman lidar with combined day and night capability for tropospheric water-vapor profile measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, S E; Goldsmith, J E; Mitchell, M G

    1999-03-20

    We describe a high-performance Raman lidar system with combined day and night capability for tropospheric water-vapor profile measurements. The system incorporates high-performance UV interference filters and a narrow-band, dual-field-of-view receiver for rejection of background sunlight. Daytime performance has been demonstrated up to 5 km with 150-m vertical and 5-min temporal averaging. The nighttime performance is significantly better with measurements routinely extending from 10 to 12 km with 75-m range resolution and a 5-min temporal average. We describe design issues for daytime operation and a novel daytime calibration technique.

  12. Wide field-of-view Cherenkov telescope for the detection of cosmic rays in coincidence with the Yakutsk extensive air shower array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.A., E-mail: ivanov@ikfia.ysn.ru; Knurenko, S.P.; Krasilnikov, A.D.; Petrov, Z.E.; Pravdin, M.I.; Sleptsov, I.Ye.; Timofeev, L.V.

    2015-02-01

    The Yakutsk array group is developing a wide field-of-view Cherenkov telescope to be operated in coincidence with the surface detectors of the extensive air shower array. Currently, the engineering prototype of the reflecting telescope with the front-end electronics is designed, assembled, and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the conceived instrument. The status and specifications of the prototype telescope are presented, as well as the modernization program of the already existing Cherenkov light detectors subset of the array measuring ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

  13. Hybrid Endograft Solution for Complex Iliac Anatomy : Zenith Body and Excluder Limbs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Wendy T.; Tielliu, Ignace F.; Sondakh, Arthur O.; Vourliotakis, Georgios; Bracale, Umberto M.; Verhoeven, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate single-center results with selective use of Gore Excluder limbs (W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) in a Cook Zenith body (Cook Inc, Bloomington, IN) for elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. A prospectively held database for

  14. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  15. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  16. Determining precipitable water in the atmosphere of Iran based on GPS zenith tropospheric delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Sadeghi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Precipitable water (PW is considered as one of the most important weather parameters in meteorology. Moreover, moisture affects the propagation of the Global Positioning System’s (GPS signals. Using four different models, the current paper tries to identify the best relationship between the atmospheric error known as zenith wet delay (ZWD and PW. For that matter, based on 54,330 radiosonde profiles from 11 stations, two different models i.e. linear and quadratic have been derived for Iran. For analyzing the accuracy of these models, ZWDs of three permanent GPS stations located in the cities of Tehran, Ahvaz and Tabriz have been used. Applying the aforementioned models as well as those already developed for Europe and the U.S., PWs are derived at the position of these stations in Iran. Further, in this research, root mean square error (RMSE and bias are the measures for selecting the optimal model. Here, the bias and the RMSE (between GPS and radiosonde derived PWs for the proposed linear model for Iran is 1.44 mm and 4.42 mm, and for quadratic model 2.18 mm and 4.74 mm respectively while, the bias and the RMSE for Bevis’ linear model is 2.63 mm and 4.98 mm and for Emardson and Derk’s quadratic models are 2.80 mm and 5.08 mm respectively. As such, it is observed that the bias of the proposed linear model for Iran is 1.19 mm and 1.36 mm less than the Bevis’ and Emardson and Derk’s models. In addition, the RMSE of the proposed linear model is 0.56 and 0.66 mm less than the RMSE of the later ones. This emphasizes that the estimation of the model coefficients must be based on regional meteorological measurements.

  17. Global model of zenith tropospheric delay proposed based on EOF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Langlang; Chen, Peng; Wei, Erhu; Li, Qinzheng

    2017-07-01

    Tropospheric delay is one of the main error budgets in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements. Many empirical correction models have been developed to compensate this delay, and models which do not require meteorological parameters have received the most attention. This study established a global troposphere zenith total delay (ZTD) model, called Global Empirical Orthogonal Function Troposphere (GEOFT), based on the empirical orthogonal function (EOF, also known as geographically weighted PCAs) analysis method and the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) Atmosphere data from 2012 to 2015. The results showed that ZTD variation could be well represented by the characteristics of the EOF base function Ek and associated coefficients Pk. Here, E1 mainly signifies the equatorial anomaly; E2 represents north-south asymmetry, and E3 and E4 reflects regional variation. Moreover, P1 mainly reflects annual and semiannual variation components; P2 and P3 mainly contains annual variation components, and P4 displays semiannual variation components. We validated the proposed GEOFT model using tropospheric delay data of GGOS ZTD grid data and the tropospheric product of the International GNSS Service (IGS) over the year 2016. The results showed that GEOFT model has high accuracy with bias and RMS of -0.3 and 3.9 cm, respectively, with respect to the GGOS ZTD data, and of -0.8 and 4.1 cm, respectively, with respect to the global IGS tropospheric product. The accuracy of GEOFT demonstrating that the use of the EOF analysis method to characterize ZTD variation is reasonable.

  18. Predictions of Tropospheric Zenithal Delay for South America : Seasonal Variability and Quality Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto Toledo Machado

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Zenithal Tropospheric Delay (Z TD is an important error source in the observable involved in the positioning methods using artificial satellite. Frequently, the Z TD influence in the positioning is minimized by applying empirical models. However, such models are not able to supply the precision required to some real time applications, such as navigation and steak out. In 2010 it will be implanted the new navigation and administration system of the air traffic, denominated CNS-ATM (Communication Navigation Surveillance - Air Traffic Management. In this new system the application of positioning techniques by satellites in the air traffic will be quite explored because they provide good precision in real time. The predictions of Z TD values from Numeric Weather Prediction (NWP, denominated dynamic modeling, is an alternative to model the atmospheric gases effects in the radio-frequency signals in real time. The Center for Weather Forecasting and Climate Studies (CPTEC has generated operationally prediction of Z TD values to South American Continent since March, 2004. The aims of the present paper are to investigate the Z TD seasonal variability and evaluate the quality of predicted Z TD values. One year of GPS data from Brazilian Continuous GPS Network (RBMC was used in this evaluation. The RMS values resulting from this evaluation were in the range of 4 to 11 cm. Considering the Z TDtemporal variability, the advantages provide by this modeling, the results obtained in this evaluation and the future improvements, this work shows that the dynamic modeling has great potential to become the most appropriate alternative to model Z TD in real time.

  19. Development and validation of a real-time reduced field of view imaging driven by automated needle detection for MRI-guided interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlitz, Roland A.; Tokuda, Junichi; Hoge, Scott W.; Chu, Renxin; Panych, Lawrence P.; Tempany, Clare; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2010-02-01

    Automatic tracking and scan plane control in MRI-guided therapy is an active area of research. However, there has been little research on tracking needles without the use of external markers. Current methods also do not account for possible needle bending, because the tip does not get tracked explicitly. In this paper, we present a preliminary method to track a biopsy needle in real-time MR images based on its visible susceptibility artifact and automatically adjust the next scan plane in a closed loop to keep the needle's tip in the field of view. The images were acquired with a Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) sequence combined with a reduced field of view (rFOV) technique using 2D RF pulses, which allows a reduction in scan time without compromising spatial resolution. The needle tracking software was implemented as a plug-in module for open-source medical image visualization software 3D Slicer to display the current scan plane with the highlighted needle. Tests using a gel phantom and an ex vivo tissue sample are reported and evaluated in respect to performance and accuracy. The results proved that the method allows an image update rate of one frame per second with a root mean squared error within 4 mm. The proposed method may therefore be feasible in MRI-guided targeted therapy, such as prostate biopsies.

  20. Large field-of-view asymmetric masks for high-energy x-ray phase imaging with standard x-ray tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrizzi, M.; Astolfo, A.; Price, B.; Haig, I.; Olivo, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on a new approach to large field-of-view laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging. The method is based upon the asymmetric mask design that enables the retrieval of the absorption, refraction and ultra-small- angle scattering properties of the sample without the need to move any component of the imaging system. The sample is scanned through the imaging system, which also removes possible aliasing problems that might arise from partial sample illumination when using the edge illumination technique. This concept can be extended to any desired number of apertures providing, at the same time, intensity projections at complementary illumination conditions. Experimental data simultaneously acquired at seven different illumination fractions are presented along with the results obtained from a numerical model that incorporates the actual detector performance. The ultimate shape of the illumination function is shown to be significantly dependent on these detector-specific characteristics. Based on this concept, a large field-of-view system was designed, which is also capable to cope with relatively high (100 kVp) X-ray energies. The imaging system obtained in this way, where the asymmetric mask design enables the data to be collected without moving any element of the instrumentation, adapts particularly well to those situations in medical, industrial and security imaging where the sample has to be scanned through the system.

  1. 基于雨雪天气背景的微波辐射计斜路径与天顶观测的反演结果对比分析%Comparative analysis of the zenith and off-zenith retrieved results from microwave radiometer in rain and snow weather conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英英; 杨凡; 徐桂荣; 李德俊; 袁正腾; 熊洁

    2015-01-01

    In order to test the improvement of results in the off-zenith directions under rain and snow weather, the retrieved temperature, hu-midity, vapor density and liquid water density profiles from MP-3000A microwave radiometer (MWR) of the zenith and off-zenith observa-tions from 17 to 18 February 2014 are studied by comparing them with the Thies Clima laser precipitation monitor,L-band sounding data and precipitable water retrieved from GPS-MET from Wuhan station. Results are as follows. (1) If observed at off-zenith, the brightness tempera-ture signal saturation phenomenon at K and V bands can be eliminated effectively. Brightness temperature varies with rainfall intensity. (2) The correlation coefficient between the MWR product retrieved in off-zenith observation and sounding is better. (3) Although precipitable wa-ter vapor (PWV) retrieved in off-zenith observation is larger than the GPS/PWV, their trends are consistent. In contrast, there is a clear jump for the result in zenith observation after precipitation occurs. (4) There is a good corresponding relationship between the accumulation of cloud liquid water retrieved in off-zenith observation and the enhancement precipitation intensity.%为检验斜路径观测反演方法对雨雪天气背景下微波辐射计反演结果的改进,以2014年2月17-18日发生在武汉的一次雨雪过程为例,利用武汉观象台MP-3000A型微波辐射计天顶方向和斜路径观测反演的温度、相对湿度、水汽密度、液态水含量等廓线产品,分别与武汉观象台L波段探空资料,以及GPS-MET和Thies Clima激光雨滴谱仪的观测资料进行了对比检验.结果表明:(1)微波辐射计以斜路径方向观测,可以较好地消除K、V波段亮温信号饱和现象,亮温随降水强度的变化出现起伏波动的特征;(2)微波辐射计斜路径方向的反演产品与探空观测的相关性较好;(3)与GPS-MET观测的大气整层可降水量(PWV)比较,斜路径观测反演的PWV虽然

  2. Optimizing sensitivity of Unmanned Aerial System optical sensors for low zenith angles and cloudy conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Sheng; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Zarco Tejada, Pablo J.

    Satellite-based imagery in optical domains cannot provide information on the land surface during periods of cloud cover. This issue is especially relevant for high latitudes where overcast days and low solar zenith angles are common. Current remote sensing-based models of evapotranspiration......) with UAV flight campaigns over a willow eddy covariance flux site under different cloudiness levels and solar zenith angles using varying camera settings. Radiance, reflectance, and vegetation indices were validated with ASD measurements and signal to noise metrics and dynamic ranges were assessed. Our....... The multispectral camera (Tetra Mini-MCA6) has 6 channels in the visible and near Infrared. For the laboratory calibration experiment, different camera settings and typical irradiance levels from cloudy to clear sky were designed. The light-source is based on super-continuum generation to produce a continuous solar...

  3. Rankin Inlet PolarDARN radar observations of duskward moving Sun-aligned optical forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Koustov

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available On 15 February 2007, several duskward moving sun-aligned (SA auroral forms have been observed by the all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, Nunavut (Canada. Concurrent observations with the Rankin Inlet (RANK PolarDARN HF radar within the field-of-view of the camera showed signatures of moving auroral forms in all signal parameters with the most remarkable effects being the echo power drop and velocity reversal as the arc reached a specific radar beam/gate. Spatial and temporal variations of the velocity in the vicinity of the SA form are investigated. It is shown that the form-associated convection reversal was located poleward (duskward of the global-scale convection reversal associated with the dawn cell of the large-scale convection pattern. Thus, the RANK radar was monitoring the polar cap portion of the global-scale convection pattern and its transition from the IMF By<0 to the By>0 situation. Magnetic perturbations associated with the SA form passing the zenith of several magnetometers are investigated. It is shown that although magnetometer signatures of the moving form were clear, the convection pattern derivation from magnetometer records alone is not straightforward.

  4. The LAMOST spectroscopic survey of stars in the Kepler field of view: Activity indicators and stellar parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenda-Żakowicz, Joanna; Frasca, Antonio; De Cat, Peter; Catanzaro, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    We summarize the results of the completed first round of the LAMOST-Kepler project, and describe the status of its on-going second round. As a result of the first round of this project, the atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, and [Fe/H]), the spectral classification (spectral type and luminosity class), and the radial velocities (RV) have been measured for 51,385 stars. For 4031 stars, we were able to measure the projected rotational velocity, while the minimum detectable v sin i was 120 km s-1. For 8821 stars with more than one observation, we computed the χ-square probability that the detected RV variations have a random occurrence. Finally, we classified 442 stars as chromospherically active on the basis of the analysis of their Hα and Ca II-IRT fluxes. All our results have been obtained from the low-resolution (R ˜ 1800) spectroscopic observations acquired with the LAMOST instrument. Based on observations collected with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) located at the Xinglong Observatory, China.

  5. Zenith distribution and flux of atmospheric muons measured with the 5-line ANTARES detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANTARES Collaboration; Aguilar, J. A.; Albert, A.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Castel, D.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; de Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Giacomelli, G.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; de Jong, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Laschinsky, H.; Lefèvre, D.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Lyons, K.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Maurin, G.; Mazure, A.; Melissas, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Ostasch, R.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Pillet, R.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Reed, C.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2010-10-01

    The ANTARES high-energy neutrino telescope is a three-dimensional array of about 900 photomultipliers distributed over 12 mooring lines installed in the Mediterranean Sea. Between February and November 2007 it acquired data in a 5-line configuration. The zenith angular distribution of the atmospheric muon flux and the associated depth-intensity relation are measured and compared with previous measurements and Monte Carlo expectations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is presented.

  6. Gingival zenith and its role in redefining esthetics: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Pawar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to quantify some clinical parameters useful as esthetic guidelines when gingival contour is modified and to compare the left and right sides of six maxillary anterior teeth. Materials and Methods: Maxillary casts mounted on an articulator according to the axis orbital plane were photographed from 35 young adults. The angle formed between the gingival line and maxillary midline (GLA and the distance between the gingival zenith of the lateral incisor and the gingival line were measured (LID using a flexible protractor and digital vernier caliper, respectively. The asymmetry was evaluated using a paired t test for the left vs right measurements of GLA and LID. The descriptive statistics for GLA and LID were calculated. Results: The GLA measurements of the left side (86.7΀΁4.2΀ were significantly greater than those of the right side (84.6΀΁5.4΀, and the mean absolute symmetry for GLA was 1.7΀΁4.4΀. The mean LID measurement was 0.92΁0.11. Conclusions: The gingival zenith of the canine is apical to the gingival zenith of the incisors (GLA <90΀ and the gingival zenith of the lateral incisor is below or on (17% the gingival line when head is oriented on the axis orbital plane. A directional asymmetry was shown with the right side higher than the left side. Along with the other parameters related to dental esthetics, these clinical parameters may serve as esthetic guidelines and may enable us to obtain a more predictable outcome.

  7. Reactivity and reaction rate studies on the fourth loading of ZENITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, I.R.; Freemantle, R.G.; Reed, D.L.; Wilson, D.J. [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    1963-08-15

    The determination of the excess reactivity, control rod worths, prompt neutron lifetime, flux fine structure, and reaction rates of various nuclides for the fourth loading of the heated zero energy reactor ZENITH is described. The core contains 7.76 kg of U235, giving a carbon/U235 atom ratio of 7578, and forms the most dilute of the range studied. Comparisons of the experimental results with calculations using multigroup diffusion codes are presented. (author)

  8. Assessment of Automated Snow Cover Detection at High Solar Zenith Angles with PROBA-V

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the snow cover extent are both a cause and a consequence of climate change. Optical remote sensing with heliosynchronous satellites currently provides snow cover data at high spatial resolution with daily revisiting time. However, high latitude image acquisition is limited because reflective sensors of many satellites are switched off at high solar zenith angles (SZA) due to lower signal quality. In this study, the relevance and reliability of high SZA acquisition are objectively q...

  9. The Dependence of the Age Parameter from EAS Size and Zenith Angle of Incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Chilingarian, A A; Kazarian, S; Hovsepyan, G G; Mamidjanyan, E A; Melkumyan, L G; Sokhoyan, S H

    2000-01-01

    The quality of the MAKET-ANI detector installation in view of the uniformityof the registration efficiency is demonstrated. Based on a data samplecollected by the MAKET-ANI array in the period of June 1997 - March 1999, thedependencies of the age parameter on the zenith angle and the EAS size(10^5-10^7) are studied. The variation of the age parameter with the showersize can be approximately related to the elongation rate.

  10. Genetic modulation of training and transfer in older adults:BDNF Val66Met polymorphism is associated with wider useful field of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza S Colzato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Western society has an increasing proportion of older adults. Increasing age is associated with a general decrease in the control over task-relevant mental processes. In the present study we investigated the possibility that successful transfer of game-based cognitive improvements to untrained tasks in elderly people is modulated by preexisting neuro-developmental factors as genetic variability related to levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, an important neuromodulator underlying cognitive processes. We trained participants, genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, on cognitive tasks developed to improve dynamic attention. Pre-training (baseline and post-training measures of attentional processes (divided and selective attention were acquired by means of the Useful Field of View (UFOV task. As expected, Val/Val homozygous individuals showed larger beneficial transfer effects than Met/-carriers. Our findings support the idea that genetic predisposition modulates transfer effects.

  11. Markov dynamics as a zooming lens for multiscale community detection: non clique-like communities and the field-of-view limit

    CERN Document Server

    Schaub, Michael T; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a surge of interest in community detection algorithms for complex networks. The proposed algorithms are based on a variety of heuristics, some with a long history, for the identification of communities or, alternatively, of good graph partitions. In most cases, the algorithms proceed by maximizing a particular objective function, thereby finding the `right' split into communities. Although a thorough comparative analysis of these algorithms is still lacking, there has also been an effort to design random graph models with known community structure against which the performance of different algorithms can be benchmarked. However, such benchmarks normally impose not only a known community structure but also a clique-like random structure for the communities which may differ significantly from those found in real networks. We show here that popular community detection methods are affected by a restricted `field-of-view' limit, an intrinsic upper scale that does not allow them to detect c...

  12. Development of a Large Field-of-View PIV System for Rotorcraft Testing in the 14- x 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Harris, Jerome; Allan, Brian; Wong, Oliver; Mace, W. Derry

    2009-01-01

    A Large Field-of-View Particle Image Velocimetry (LFPIV) system has been developed for rotor wake diagnostics in the 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The system has been used to measure three components of velocity in a plane as large as 1.524 meters by 0.914 meters in both forward flight and hover tests. Overall, the system performance has exceeded design expectations in terms of accuracy and efficiency. Measurements synchronized with the rotor position during forward flight and hover tests have shown that the system is able to capture the complex interaction of the body and rotor wakes as well as basic details of the blade tip vortex at several wake ages. Measurements obtained with traditional techniques such as multi-hole pressure probes, Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), and 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) show good agreement with LFPIV measurements.

  13. Design of 1-μm-pitch liquid crystal spatial light modulators having dielectric shield wall structure for holographic display with wide field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomae, Yoshitomo; Shibata, Yosei; Ishinabe, Takahiro; Fujikake, Hideo

    2017-03-01

    In the development of electronic holographic displays with a wide field of view, one issue is the realization of 1-μm-pitch spatial light modulators (SLMs) using liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) techniques. We clarified that it is necessary to suppress not only the leakage of fringe electric fields from adjacent pixels but also the effect of elastic forces in the liquid crystal to achieve full-phase modulation (2π) in individual pixels. We proposed a novel LCOS-SLM with a dielectric shield wall structure, and achieved driving of individual 1-μm-pitch pixels. We also investigated the optimum values for width and dielectric constant of the wall structure when enlarging the area that can modulate light in the pixels. These results contribute to the design of 1-μm-pitch LCOS-SLM devices for wide-viewing-angle holographic displays.

  14. Data analysis methods for a small field-of-view combined scintimammography/digital X-ray system in breast lesion management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieper, D. E-mail: kieper@jlab.org; Green, T.D.; Hoefer, R.; Keppel, C.; Wymer, D.C.; Weisenberger, A.G.; Welch, B

    2003-01-21

    Recently, a multidisciplinary research collaboration began a clinical study employing a dual modality, small field-of-view breast imaging system. The system, comprised of a mini gamma camera and digital X-ray detector, was designed to examine the possible clinical advantages of dual modality breast imaging in the management of patients with suspicious findings (BIRADS 3-5) from a screening mammogram. In addition, dynamic time-resolution studies of radiotracer uptake and washout were evaluated for their value in differentiation of lesion type. This preliminary report focuses on the development and implementation of these techniques and presents patient data as evidence of their effectiveness. The results of this study indicate that applying these techniques may significantly improve the diagnostic value of scintimammography by increasing specificity to 97.7% by differentiation of true positive and false positive lesions.

  15. Data analysis methods for a small field-of-view combined scintimammography/digital X-ray system in breast lesion management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieper, D.; Green, T. D.; Hoefer, R.; Keppel, C.; Wymer, D. C.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Welch, B.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a multidisciplinary research collaboration began a clinical study employing a dual modality, small field-of-view breast imaging system. The system, comprised of a mini gamma camera and digital X-ray detector, was designed to examine the possible clinical advantages of dual modality breast imaging in the management of patients with suspicious findings (BIRADS 3-5) from a screening mammogram. In addition, dynamic time-resolution studies of radiotracer uptake and washout were evaluated for their value in differentiation of lesion type. This preliminary report focuses on the development and implementation of these techniques and presents patient data as evidence of their effectiveness. The results of this study indicate that applying these techniques may significantly improve the diagnostic value of scintimammography by increasing specificity to 97.7% by differentiation of true positive and false positive lesions.

  16. Photomultiplier tube selection for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence Telescope Array of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Maomao, E-mail: gemaomao@ynu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Key Laboratory of Astroparticle Physics of Yunnan Province, Kunming 650091 (China); Zhang, Li, E-mail: lizhang@ynu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Key Laboratory of Astroparticle Physics of Yunnan Province, Kunming 650091 (China); Chen, Yingtao [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Key Laboratory of Astroparticle Physics of Yunnan Province, Kunming 650091 (China); Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Shoushan; Wang, Chong; Bi, Baiyang [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-05-21

    For the purpose of selecting the most suitable photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence Telescope Array (WFCTA), we have performed extensive tests on seven models of 25.4 mm PMTs: Hamamatsu R1924A and R7899, Beijing Hamamatsu CR303, CR332A and CR364, and HZC Photonics XP3102 and XP3182. A dedicated test system has been developed to measure the PMT characteristics such as single photo-electron spectrum, gain, linearity, and spatial uniformity of anode output. The XP3182 and CR364 (R7899) tubes both meet the pivotal requirement due to their superior pulse linearity. The PMT test system, techniques used for these measurements, and their results are also reported.

  17. Photomultiplier tube selection for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence Telescope Array of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Maomao; Zhang, Li; Chen, Yingtao; Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Shoushan; Wang, Chong; Bi, Baiyang

    2016-05-01

    For the purpose of selecting the most suitable photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence Telescope Array (WFCTA), we have performed extensive tests on seven models of 25.4 mm PMTs: Hamamatsu R1924A and R7899, Beijing Hamamatsu CR303, CR332A and CR364, and HZC Photonics XP3102 and XP3182. A dedicated test system has been developed to measure the PMT characteristics such as single photo-electron spectrum, gain, linearity, and spatial uniformity of anode output. The XP3182 and CR364 (R7899) tubes both meet the pivotal requirement due to their superior pulse linearity. The PMT test system, techniques used for these measurements, and their results are also reported.

  18. Metrology of Wide Field of View Nano-Thickness Foils' Homogeneity by Conventional and Phase Contrast Soft X-ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Fukuda, Yuji; Kando, Masaki; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Homma, Takayuki; Kawase, Keigo; Skobelev, Igor; Gasilov, Sergei; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Daido, Hiroyuki; Tajima, Toshiki; Kato, Yoshiaki; Bulanov, Sergei

    2010-06-01

    A tabletop ultra-bright, debris-free femtosecond-laser-driven cluster-based plasma soft X-ray source, which emits more than 1012 photons/(sr·pulse) in the spectral range 1-10 nm within a 4π sr solid angle was developed. Using such source in combination with a high dynamic range LiF crystal soft X-ray detector allows obtaining contact and propagation-based phase-contrast images of nanostructures with 700 nm spatial resolutions in a wide field of view. It was demonstrated that the high precision of used techniques enable distinguishing inhomogeneity of measured intensities of ultrathin foils in the order of ±3%. All of this opens a new approach for PBPC imaging and metrology of full areas of free-standing or mesh-supported nano-thickness foils, or other nanostructures.

  19. Metrology of Wide Field of View Nano-Thickness Foils’ Homogeneity by Conventional and Phase Contrast Soft X-ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatoly Faenov,; Tatiana Pikuz,; Yuji Fukuda,; Masaki Kando,; Hideyuki Kotaki,; Takayuki Homma,; Keigo Kawase,; Igor Skobelev,; Sergei Gasilov,; Tetsuya Kawachi,; Hiroyuki Daido,; Toshiki Tajima,; Yoshiaki Kato,; Sergei Bulanov,

    2010-06-01

    A tabletop ultra-bright, debris-free femtosecond-laser-driven cluster-based plasma soft X-ray source, which emits more than 1012 photons/(sr\\cdotpulse) in the spectral range 1-10 nm within a 4π sr solid angle was developed. Using such source in combination with a high dynamic range LiF crystal soft X-ray detector allows obtaining contact and propagation-based phase-contrast images of nanostructures with 700 nm spatial resolutions in a wide field of view. It was demonstrated that the high precision of used techniques enable distinguishing inhomogeneity of measured intensities of ultrathin foils in the order of ± 3%. All of this opens a new approach for PBPC imaging and metrology of full areas of free-standing or mesh-supported nano-thickness foils, or other nanostructures.

  20. Increasing the effective aperture of a detector and enlarging the receiving field of view in a 3D imaging lidar system through hexagonal prism beam splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xiaobao; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cui, Tianxiang; Wang, Chunhui; Li, Yunxi; Li, Hailong; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-11

    The detector in a highly accurate and high-definition scanning 3D imaging lidar system requires high frequency bandwidth and sufficient photosensitive area. To solve the problem of small photosensitive area of an existing indium gallium arsenide detector with a certain frequency bandwidth, this study proposes a method for increasing the receiving field of view (FOV) and enlarging the effective photosensitive aperture of such detector through hexagonal prism beam splitting. The principle and construction of hexagonal prism beam splitting is also discussed in this research. Accordingly, a receiving optical system with two hexagonal prisms is provided and the splitting beam effect of the simulation experiment is analyzed. Using this novel method, the receiving optical system's FOV can be improved effectively up to ±5°, and the effective photosensitive aperture of the detector is increased from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm.

  1. Markov dynamics as a zooming lens for multiscale community detection: non clique-like communities and the field-of-view limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Michael T; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in community detection algorithms for complex networks. A variety of computational heuristics, some with a long history, have been proposed for the identification of communities or, alternatively, of good graph partitions. In most cases, the algorithms maximize a particular objective function, thereby finding the 'right' split into communities. Although a thorough comparison of algorithms is still lacking, there has been an effort to design benchmarks, i.e., random graph models with known community structure against which algorithms can be evaluated. However, popular community detection methods and benchmarks normally assume an implicit notion of community based on clique-like subgraphs, a form of community structure that is not always characteristic of real networks. Specifically, networks that emerge from geometric constraints can have natural non clique-like substructures with large effective diameters, which can be interpreted as long-range communities. In this work, we show that long-range communities escape detection by popular methods, which are blinded by a restricted 'field-of-view' limit, an intrinsic upper scale on the communities they can detect. The field-of-view limit means that long-range communities tend to be overpartitioned. We show how by adopting a dynamical perspective towards community detection [1], [2], in which the evolution of a Markov process on the graph is used as a zooming lens over the structure of the network at all scales, one can detect both clique- or non clique-like communities without imposing an upper scale to the detection. Consequently, the performance of algorithms on inherently low-diameter, clique-like benchmarks may not always be indicative of equally good results in real networks with local, sparser connectivity. We illustrate our ideas with constructive examples and through the analysis of real-world networks from imaging, protein structures and the power grid, where a

  2. Simultaneous fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field imaging with aberration correction over a wide field-of-view with Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jaebum; Kim, Jinho; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to acquire both fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field images with correction for the spatially varying aberrations over a microscope's wide field-of-view (FOV). First, the procedure applies Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to retrieve the amplitude and phase of a sample, at a resolution that significantly exceeds the cutoff frequency of the microscope objective lens. At the same time, FPM algorithm is able to leverage on the redundancy within the set of acquired FPM bright-field images to estimate the microscope aberrations, which usually deteriorate in regions further away from the FOV's center. Second, the procedure acquires a raw wide-FOV fluorescence image within the same setup. Lack of moving parts allows us to use the FPM-estimated aberration map to computationally correct for the aberrations in the fluorescence image through deconvolution. Overlaying the aberration-corrected fluorescence image on top of the high-resolution bright-field image can be done with accurate spatial correspondence. This can provide means to identifying fluorescent regions of interest within the context of the sample's bright-field information. An experimental demonstration successfully improves the bright-field resolution of fixed, stained and fluorescently tagged HeLa cells by a factor of 4.9, and reduces the error caused by aberrations in a fluorescence image by 31%, over a field of view of 6.2 mm by 9.3 mm. For optimal deconvolution, we show the fluorescence image needs to have a signal-to-noise ratio of ~18.

  3. Search for GeV gamma ray burst signal in the field of view of muon telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Augusto, C R A; Navia, C E; Shigueoka, H; Tsui, K H

    2011-01-01

    We present a search for the muon excess associated in time (preceding or following) with the trigger of gamma ray burst (GRB) detected by the satellite borne instruments. The 1 Hz rate data was collected at the sea level in the area located at 22S and 43W, inside the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region and close to its center. Using 1 sec amd 10 sec time binning, we found the muon excess with significance $>5\\sigma$ associated with the gamma ray burst GRB091112 observed by Swift BAT, Fermi GBM and Suzaku-WAM satellites. The detected muon time profile shows a rough peak at $\\sim T+223$ sec ($5.2\\sigma$), corresponding to 7 sec time interval during which 90% of the sub-MeV signal (T90) was detected by satellites. The FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation of the photon-to-muon conversion in the atmosphere shows that the observed muon excess can be explained by progenitor photons with energies above 10 GeV. This energy value is above the limits expected from the maximum synchrotron emission combined with the shock wave ev...

  4. Triple rule-out CT angiography protocol with restricting field of view for detection of pulmonary thromboembolism and aortic dissection in emergency department patients: simulation of modified CT protocol for reducing radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Kim, Sung Mok; Cha, Min Jae; Kim, Yoo Na; Kim, Hae Jin; Choi, Jin-Ho; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2017-05-01

    Background Triple rule-out computed tomography (TRO CT) is a CT protocol designed to simultaneously evaluate the coronary, aorta, and pulmonary arteries. Purpose To evaluate potential diagnostic performance of TRO CT with restricted volume coverage for detection of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) and aortic dissection (AD). Material and Methods This study included 1224 consecutive patients with acute chest pain who visited the emergency department and underwent TRO CT using a 128-slice dual-source CT. Image data were reconstructed according to the display field of view (DFOV) of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and TRO CT protocols in each patient. The presence of PTE and AD was evaluated by independent observers in each DFOV. The radiation dose was calculated to evaluate the potential benefits by restricting z-axis coverage to cardiac scan range instead of the whole thorax. Results Among all patients, 22 cases with PTE (1.9%) and nine cases with AD (0.8%) were found. Except for one PTE case, all cases were detected on both DFOV of TRO CT and CCTA. Mean effective dose for evaluation of entire thorax and cardiac scan coverage were 5.9 ± 1.1 mSv and 3.5 ± 0.7 mSv, respectively. Conclusion Isolated PTE and AD outside the CCTA DFOV rarely occur. Therefore, modified TRO CT protocol using cardiac scan coverage can be adopted to detect PTE and AD with reduced radiation dose.

  5. TU-C-12A-05: Repeatability Study of Reduced Field-Of-View Diffusion-Weighted MRI On Human Thyroid Gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla-Dave, A; Lu, Y; Hatzoglou, V; Stambuk, H; Mazaheri, Y [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Banerjee, S; Shankaranarayanan, A [GE Healthcare, Menlo Park, California (United States); Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the repeatability of reduced field-of-view diffusion-weighted imaging (rFOV DWI) in quantifying apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) for human thyroid glands in a clinical setting. Methods: Nine healthy human volunteers were enrolled and underwent 3T MRI exams. For each volunteer, 3 longitudinal exams (2 weeks apart) with 2 repetitive sessions within each exam, including rFOV and conventional full field-of-view (fFOV) DWI scans, were performed. In the acquired DWI images, a fixed-size region of interest (ROI; diameter=8mm) was placed on thyroid glands to calculate ADC. ADC was calculated using a monoexponential function with a noise correction scheme. The repeatability of ADC was assessed by using coefficient variation (CV) across sessions or exams, which was defined to be: r = 1-CV, 0 < r < 1, where CV=STD/m, STD is the standard deviation of ADC, and m is the average of ADC across sessions or exams. An experienced radiologist assessed and scored rFOV and fFOV DW images based on image characteristics (1, nondiagnostic; 2, poor; 3, satisfactory; 4, good; and 5, excellent).Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare ADC values, CV of ADC, repeatability of ADC across sessions and exams, and radiologic scores between rFOV and fFOV DWI techniques. Results: There was no significant difference in ADC values across sessions and exams either in rFOV or fFOV DWI. The average CVs of both rFOV and fFOV DWI were less than 13%. The repeatability of ADC measurement between rFOV and fFOV DWI was not significantly different. The overall image quality was significantly higher with rFOV DWI than with fFOV DWI. Conclusion: This study suggested that ADCs from both rFOV and fFOV DWI were repeatable, but rFOV DWI had superior imaging quality for human thyroid glands in a clinical setting.

  6. Technology for zenithal bistable display%顶点双稳显示技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李耐和

    2004-01-01

    顶点双稳显示(Zenithal Bistable Display,简称ZBD)技术的最大特点是零功耗显示,它是唯一能够同有源阵列LCD竞争的无源寻址技术。ZBD技术能提供与有源阵列LcD同样的性能及图像质量,但功耗更低,且成本节约一半。

  7. Improving the solar zenith angle dependence of broadband UV radiometers calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Cancillo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focusses on the proposal of a new method for the calibration of broadband ultraviolet radiometers. The advantage of the method proposed is the accurate modelling of the dependence on the solar zenith angle. The new model is compared with other one-step calibration methods and with the two-step method, which requires the knowledge of the actual response of the broadband radiometer. For this purpose, three broadband radiometers are calibrated against a spectrophotometer of reference. The new method is validated comparing its predictions with the spectrophotometer measurements using an independent data set.

  8. MediSPECT: Single photon emission computed tomography system for small field of view small animal imaging based on a CdTe hybrid pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi, R.; Autiero, M.; Celentano, L.; Chmeissani, M.; Cozzolino, R.; Curion, A. S.; Frallicciardi, P.; Laccetti, P.; Lanza, R. C.; Lauria, A.; Maiorino, M.; Marotta, M.; Mettivier, G.; Montesi, M. C.; Riccio, P.; Roberti, G.; Russo, P.

    2007-02-01

    We describe MediSPECT, a new scanner developed at University and INFN Napoli, for SPECT studies on small animals with a small field of view (FOV) and high spatial resolution. The CdTe pixel detector (a 256×256 matrix of 55 μm square pixels) operating in single photon counting for detection of gamma-rays with low and medium energy (e.g. 125I, 27-35 keV, 99mTc, 140 keV), is bump bonded to the Medipix2 readout chip. The FOV of the MediSPECT scanner with a coded aperture mask collimator ranges from 6.3 mm (system spatial resolution 110 μm at 27-35 keV) to 24.3 mm. With a 0.30 mm pinhole the FOV ranges from 2.4 to 29 mm (where the system spatial resolution is 1.0 mm at 27-35 keV and 2.0 mm at 140 keV). MediSPECT will be used for in vivo imaging of small organs or tissue structures in mouse, e.g., brain, thyroid, heart or tumor.

  9. Spectroscopic determination of the fundamental parameters of 66 B-type stars in the field-of-view of the CoRoT satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Lefever, K; Morel, T; Aerts, C; Decin, L; Briquet, M

    2009-01-01

    We aim to determine the fundamental parameters of a sample of B stars with apparent visual magnitudes below 8 in the field-of-view of the CoRoT space mission, from high-resolution spectroscopy. We developed an automatic procedure for the spectroscopic analysis of B-type stars with winds, based on an extensive grid of FASTWIND model atmospheres. We use the equivalent widths and/or the line profile shapes of continuum normalized hydrogen, helium and silicon line profiles to determine the fundamental properties of these stars in an automated way. After thorough tests, both on synthetic datasets and on very high-quality, high-resolution spectra of B stars for which we already had accurate values of their physical properties from alternative analyses, we applied our method to 66 B-type stars contained in the ground-based archive of the CoRoT space mission. We discuss the statistical properties of the sample and compare them with those predicted by evolutionary models of B stars. Our spectroscopic results provide a...

  10. Effects of Inboard Horizontal Field of View Display Limitations on Pilot Path Control During Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) Flight Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Parrish, Russell V.; Williams, Steven P.; Lavell, Jeffrey S.

    1999-01-01

    A flight test was conducted aboard Calspan's Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) aircraft by researchers within the External Visibility System (XVS) element of the High-Speed Research program. The purpose was to investigate the effects of inboard horizontal field of view (FOV) display limitations on pilot path control and to learn about the TIFS capabilities and limitations for possible use in future XVS flight tests. The TIFS cockpit windows were masked to represent the front XVS display area and the High-Speed Civil Transport side windows, as viewed by the pilot. Masking limited the forward FOV to 40 deg. horizontal and 50 deg. vertical for the basic flight condition, With an increase of 10 deg. horizontal in the inboard direction for the increased FOV flight condition. Two right-hand approach tasks (base-downwind-final) with a left crosswind on final were performed by three pilots using visual flight rules at Niagara Falls Airport. Each of the two tasks had three replicates for both horizontal FOV conditions, resulting in twelve approaches per test subject. Limited objective data showed that an increase of inboard FOV had no effect (deficiences in objective data measurement capabilities were noted). However, subjective results showed that a 50 deg. FOV was preferred over the 40 deg. FOV.

  11. Simulator sickness when performing gaze shifts within a wide field of view optic flow environment: preliminary evidence for using virtual reality in vestibular rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney Susan L

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wide field of view virtual environments offer some unique features that may be beneficial for use in vestibular rehabilitation. For one, optic flow information extracted from the periphery may be critical for recalibrating the sensory processes used by people with vestibular disorders. However, wide FOV devices also have been found to result in greater simulator sickness. Before a wide FOV device can be used in a clinical setting, its safety must be demonstrated. Methods Symptoms of simulator sickness were recorded by 9 healthy adult subjects after they performed gaze shifting tasks to locate targets superimposed on an optic flow background. Subjects performed 8 trials of gaze shifting on each of the six separate visits. Results The incidence of symptoms of simulator sickness while subjects performed gaze shifts in an optic flow environment was lower than the average reported incidence for flight simulators. The incidence was greater during the first visit compared with subsequent visits. Furthermore, the incidence showed an increasing trend over the 8 trials. Conclusion The performance of head unrestrained gaze shifts in a wide FOV optic flow environment is tolerated well by healthy subjects. This finding provides rationale for testing these environments in people with vestibular disorders, and supports the concept of using wide FOV virtual reality for vestibular rehabilitation.

  12. High-resolution diffusion tensor imaging of the human pons with a reduced field-of-view, multishot, variable-density, spiral acquisition at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Van, Anh T; Olivero, William C; Georgiadis, John G; Sutton, Bradley P

    2009-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging of localized anatomic regions, such as brainstem, cervical spinal cord, and optic nerve, is challenging because of the existence of significant susceptibility differences, severe physiologic motion in the surrounding tissues, and the need for high spatial resolution to resolve the underlying complex neuroarchitecture. The aim of the methodology presented here is to achieve high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging in localized regions of the central nervous system that is motion insensitive and immune to susceptibility while acquiring a set of two-dimensional images with more than six diffusion encoding directions within a reasonable total scan time. We accomplish this aim by implementing self-navigated, multishot, variable-density, spiral encoding with outer volume suppression. We establish scan protocols for achieving equal signal-to-noise ratio at 1.2 mm and 0.8 mm in-plane resolution for reduced field-of-view diffusion tensor imaging of the brainstem. In vivo application of the technique on the human pons of three subjects shows a clear delineation of the multiple local neural tracts. By comparing scans acquired with varying in-plane resolution but with constant signal-to-noise ratio, we demonstrate that increasing the resolution and reducing the partial volume effect result in higher fractional anisotropy values for the corticospinal tracts. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Long-range and wide field of view optical coherence tomography for in vivo 3D imaging of large volume object based on akinetic programmable swept source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shaozhen; Xu, Jingjiang; Wang, Ruikang K

    2016-11-01

    Current optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging suffers from short ranging distance and narrow imaging field of view (FOV). There is growing interest in searching for solutions to these limitations in order to expand further in vivo OCT applications. This paper describes a solution where we utilize an akinetic swept source for OCT implementation to enable ~10 cm ranging distance, associated with the use of a wide-angle camera lens in the sample arm to provide a FOV of ~20 x 20 cm(2). The akinetic swept source operates at 1300 nm central wavelength with a bandwidth of 100 nm. We propose an adaptive calibration procedure to the programmable akinetic light source so that the sensitivity of the OCT system over ~10 cm ranging distance is substantially improved for imaging of large volume samples. We demonstrate the proposed swept source OCT system for in vivo imaging of entire human hands and faces with an unprecedented FOV (up to 400 cm(2)). The capability of large-volume OCT imaging with ultra-long ranging and ultra-wide FOV is expected to bring new opportunities for in vivo biomedical applications.

  14. Real-time display with large field of view on fourier domain optical coherence tomography at 1310 nm wavelength for dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qing; Hou, Jue; Fu, Ling

    2012-06-01

    A Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with 1310 nm light was demonstrated to study inflammatory human skin and the skin coated with a moisturizer in vivo. By using a graphics processing unit (GPU), the display rate could reach 20 frames/s with 1000 A-scans contained in one image. The field of view (FOV) of the cross-sectional image is 7 mm in the lateral direction and the penetration depth is ˜1 mm in skin. The result shows that, in inflammatory skin, the epidermis became thicker and had a decreased scattering; furthermore, the region of the severe lesion present an uneven thickness of the epidermis compared with the peripheral area. For the result of a finger tip coated with the moisturizer, the antireflection effect was significant and the stratum corneum became more transparent. In this letter, we demonstrated that real-time display with a large FOV could enable screening of a large tissue area; thereby increasing the dermatologic diagnostic potential of the method by permitting a comparison of the lesion and the normal peripheral region.

  15. Impact of the initial tropospheric zenith path delay on precise point positioning convergence during active conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, J. Z.; Rzepecka, Z.

    2017-04-01

    Tropospheric delay is one of the key factors that influence the convergence time of the precise point positioning (PPP) method. Current models do not allow for the fixing of the zenith path delay tropospheric parameter, leaving the difference between nominal and final value to the estimation process. Here, we present an analysis of several PPP result-sets using the tropospheric parameter’s nominal value adopted from models: VMF1, GPT2w, MOPS, and ZERO-WET. The last variant assumes a zero value for the initial wet part of the zenith delay. The PPP results are subtracted from a solution based on the final tropospheric product from the International GNSS Service (IGS). Several days exhibiting the most active tropospheric conditions were selected for each of the 7 stations located in the mid-latitude Central European region. During the active days, application of the VMF1 model increases the resulting height component’s quality by about 33–36% when compared to the GPT2w and MOPS. The respective improvement in VMF1 latitude and longitude components is 27% and 15%. The average relative deterioration in the result standard deviations between active and calm tropospheric conditions reaches about 20–30% of the former. We discuss the impact of the initial tropospheric parameter’s variance and bias on positioning. In addition, we compare the results with those of other studies over the impact of active tropospheric conditions on the PPP method.

  16. Overview of the MISSE 7 Polymers and Zenith Polymers Experiments After 1.5 Years of Space Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Grace T.; de Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Haloua, Athena; Imka, Emily C.; Mitchell, Gianna G.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 7 (MISSE 7), two experiments called the Polymers Experiment and the Zenith Polymers Experiment were flown on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) and exposed to the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment for 1.5 years. The Polymers Experiment contained 47 samples, which were flown in a ram or wake flight orientation. The objectives of the Polymers Experiment were to determine the LEO atomic oxygen erosion yield (Ey, volume loss per incident oxygen atoms, given in cu cm/atom) of the polymers, and to determine if atomic oxygen erosion of high and low ash containing polymers is dependent on fluence. The Zenith Polymers Experiment was flown in a zenith flight orientation. The primary objective of the Zenith Polymers Experiment was to determine the effect of solar exposure on the erosion of fluoropolymers. Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) was flown in each experiment for atomic oxygen fluence determination. This paper provides an introduction to both the MISSE 7 Polymers Experiment and the MISSE 7 Zenith Polymers Experiment, and provides initial erosion yield results.

  17. Rarity of isolated pulmonary embolism and acute aortic syndrome occurring outside of the field of view of dedicated coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Chung-Ang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Yoo, Seung Min; Rho, Ji Young (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology CHA Medical Univ. Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of)), email: smyoo68@hanmail.net; Moon, Jae Youn; Kim, In Jai; Lim, Sang Wook; Sung, Jung Hoon; Cha, Dong Hun (Dept. of Cardiology CHA Medical Univ. Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of)); White, Charles S. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore (United States))

    2011-05-15

    Background Although triple rule-out CT angiography (TRO) to simultaneously evaluate acute coronary syndrome (ACS), pulmonary embolism (PE), and acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is increasingly used in many institutions, TRO is inevitably associated with increased radiation exposure due to extended z-axis coverage compared with dedicated coronary CT angiography (DCTA). Purpose To determine the frequency of exclusion of findings of AAS, PE, and significant incidental non-cardiac pathology that may be the cause of acute chest pain when using a restricted DCTA field of view (FOV). Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed CT images and charts of 103 patients with acute PE and 50 patients with AAS. Either non-ECG gated dedicated pulmonary or aortic CT angiography was performed using 16- or 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT). We analyzed the incidence of isolated PE, AAS, or significant non-cardiac pathology outside of DCTA FOV (i.e. from tracheal carina to the base of heart). Results There were two cases of isolated PE (2/103, 1.9%) excluded from the FOV of DCTA. One case of PE was isolated to the subsegmental pulmonary artery in the posterior segment of the right upper lobe. In the second case, pulmonary embolism in the left main pulmonary artery was located out of the FOV of DCTA because the left main pulmonary artery was retracted upwardly by fibrotic scar in the left upper lobe due to prior tuberculosis. There was no case of AAS and significant non-cardiac pathology excluded from the FOV of DCTA. AAS (n = 50) consisted of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (n = 7), intramural hematoma (n = 5) and aortic dissection (n = 38). Conclusion As isolated PE, AAS, and significant non-cardiac pathology outside of the DCTA FOV rarely occur, DCTA may replace TRO in the evaluation of patients with non-specific acute chest pain and a low pre-test probability of PE or aortic dissection

  18. The effect of activity outside the direct field of view in a 3D-only whole-body positron tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, T. J.; Miller, M. P.; Bailey, D. L.; Bloomfield, P. M.; Livieratos, L.; Jones, T.

    1998-04-01

    The ECAT EXACT3D (CTI/Siemens 966) 3D-only PET tomograph has unprecedented sensitivity due to the large BGO (bismuth germanate) detector volume. However, the consequences of a large (23.4 cm) axial field-of-view (FOV) and the need for a patient port diameter to accommodate body scanning make the device more sensitive to photons arising from activity outside the direct (coincidence) FOV. This leads to relatively higher deadtime and an increased registration of random and scatter (true) coincidences. The purpose of this study is to determine the influence of activity outside the FOV on (i) noise-equivalent counts (NEC) and (ii) the performance of a `model-based' scatter correction algorithm, and to investigate the effect of side shielding additional to that supplied with the tomograph. Annular shielding designed for brain scanning increased the NEC for blood flow (43/4/017/img1.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>O) measurement (integrated over 120 s) by up to 25%. For 43/4/017/img2.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> tracer studies, the increase is less than 5% over 120 min. Purpose-built additional body shielding, made to conform to the shape of a volunteer, reduced the randoms count rate in a heart blood flow measurement (43/4/017/img1.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>O) by about 30%. After scatter correction the discrepancy between ROI count ratios for compartments within the 20 cm diameter `Utah' phantom differed by less than 5% from true (sampled) activity concentration ratios. This was so with or without activity outside the FOV and with or without additional side shielding. Count rate performance is thus improved by extra shielding but more improvement is seen in head than in body scanning. Measurement of heart blood flow using bolus injections of 43/4/017/img1.gif" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/>O would benefit from the use of detectors with lower deadtime and superior timing resolution such as LSO (lutetium oxyorthosilicate).

  19. Multi-field-of-view strategy for image-based outcome prediction of multi-parametric estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer histopathology: Comparison to Oncotype DX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Basavanhally

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we attempt to quantify the prognostic information embedded in multi-parametric histologic biopsy images to predict disease aggressiveness in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+ breast cancers (BCa. The novel methodological contribution is in the use of a multi-field-of-view (multi-FOV framework for integrating image-based information from differently stained histopathology slides. The multi-FOV approach involves a fixed image resolution while simultaneously integrating image descriptors from many FOVs corresponding to different sizes. For each study, the corresponding risk score (high scores reflecting aggressive disease and vice versa, predicted by a molecular assay (Oncotype DX, is available and serves as the surrogate ground truth for long-term patient outcome. Using the risk scores, a trained classifier is used to identify disease aggressiveness for each FOV size. The predictions for each FOV are then combined to yield the final prediction of disease aggressiveness (good, intermediate, or poor outcome. Independent multi-FOV classifiers are constructed for (1 50 image features describing the spatial arrangement of cancer nuclei (via Voronoi diagram, Delaunay triangulation, and minimum spanning tree graphs in H and E stained histopathology and (2 one image feature describing the vascular density in CD34 IHC stained histopathology. In a cohort of 29 patients, the multi-FOV classifiers obtained by combining information from the H and E and CD34 IHC stained channels were able to distinguish low- and high-risk patients with an accuracy of 0.91 ± 0.02 and a positive predictive value of 0.94 ± 0.10, suggesting that a purely image-based assay could potentially replace more expensive molecular assays for making disease prognostic predictions.

  20. Multi-field-of-view strategy for image-based outcome prediction of multi-parametric estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer histopathology: Comparison to Oncotype DX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavanhally, Ajay; Feldman, Michael; Shih, Natalie; Mies, Carolyn; Tomaszewski, John; Ganesan, Shridar; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to quantify the prognostic information embedded in multi-parametric histologic biopsy images to predict disease aggressiveness in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers (BCa). The novel methodological contribution is in the use of a multi-field-of-view (multi-FOV) framework for integrating image-based information from differently stained histopathology slides. The multi-FOV approach involves a fixed image resolution while simultaneously integrating image descriptors from many FOVs corresponding to different sizes. For each study, the corresponding risk score (high scores reflecting aggressive disease and vice versa), predicted by a molecular assay (Oncotype DX), is available and serves as the surrogate ground truth for long-term patient outcome. Using the risk scores, a trained classifier is used to identify disease aggressiveness for each FOV size. The predictions for each FOV are then combined to yield the final prediction of disease aggressiveness (good, intermediate, or poor outcome). Independent multi-FOV classifiers are constructed for (1) 50 image features describing the spatial arrangement of cancer nuclei (via Voronoi diagram, Delaunay triangulation, and minimum spanning tree graphs) in H and E stained histopathology and (2) one image feature describing the vascular density in CD34 IHC stained histopathology. In a cohort of 29 patients, the multi-FOV classifiers obtained by combining information from the H and E and CD34 IHC stained channels were able to distinguish low- and high-risk patients with an accuracy of 0.91 ± 0.02 and a positive predictive value of 0.94 ± 0.10, suggesting that a purely image-based assay could potentially replace more expensive molecular assays for making disease prognostic predictions.

  1. Neural dynamics of object-based multifocal visual spatial attention and priming: object cueing, useful-field-of-view, and crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nicholas C; Grossberg, Stephen; Mingolla, Ennio

    2012-08-01

    How are spatial and object attention coordinated to achieve rapid object learning and recognition during eye movement search? How do prefrontal priming and parietal spatial mechanisms interact to determine the reaction time costs of intra-object attention shifts, inter-object attention shifts, and shifts between visible objects and covertly cued locations? What factors underlie individual differences in the timing and frequency of such attentional shifts? How do transient and sustained spatial attentional mechanisms work and interact? How can volition, mediated via the basal ganglia, influence the span of spatial attention? A neural model is developed of how spatial attention in the where cortical stream coordinates view-invariant object category learning in the what cortical stream under free viewing conditions. The model simulates psychological data about the dynamics of covert attention priming and switching requiring multifocal attention without eye movements. The model predicts how "attentional shrouds" are formed when surface representations in cortical area V4 resonate with spatial attention in posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC), while shrouds compete among themselves for dominance. Winning shrouds support invariant object category learning, and active surface-shroud resonances support conscious surface perception and recognition. Attentive competition between multiple objects and cues simulates reaction-time data from the two-object cueing paradigm. The relative strength of sustained surface-driven and fast-transient motion-driven spatial attention controls individual differences in reaction time for invalid cues. Competition between surface-driven attentional shrouds controls individual differences in detection rate of peripheral targets in useful-field-of-view tasks. The model proposes how the strength of competition can be mediated, though learning or momentary changes in volition, by the basal ganglia. A new explanation of

  2. Spatially selective 2D RF inner field of view (iFOV diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI of the pediatric spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris J. Conklin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance based diffusion imaging has been gaining more utility and clinical relevance over the past decade. Using conventional echo planar techniques, it is possible to acquire and characterize water diffusion within the central nervous system (CNS; namely in the form of Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI. While each modality provides valuable clinical information in terms of the presence of diffusion and its directionality, both techniques are limited to assuming an ideal Gaussian distribution for water displacement with no intermolecular interactions. This assumption neglects pathological processes that are not Gaussian therefore reducing the amount of potentially clinically relevant information. Additions to the Gaussian distribution measured by the excess kurtosis, or peakedness, of the probabilistic model provide a better understanding of the underlying cellular structure. The objective of this work is to provide mathematical and experimental evidence that Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI can offer additional information about the micromolecular environment of the pediatric spinal cord. This is accomplished by a more thorough characterization of the nature of random water displacement within the cord. A novel DKI imaging sequence based on a tilted 2D spatially selective radio frequency pulse providing reduced field of view (FOV imaging was developed, implemented, and optimized on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, and tested on pediatric subjects (healthy subjects: 15; patients with spinal cord injury (SCI:5. Software was developed and validated for post processing of the DKI images and estimation of the tensor parameters. The results show statistically significant differences in mean kurtosis (p < 0.01 and radial kurtosis (p < 0.01 between healthy subjects and subjects with SCI. DKI provides incremental and novel information over conventional diffusion acquisitions when coupled with higher order estimation

  3. Investigation of the zenith angle dependence of cosmic-ray muons at sea level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Bektasoglu; Halil Arslan

    2013-05-01

    Angular distribution of cosmic-ray muons at sea level has been investigated using the Geant4 simulation package. The model used in the simulations was tested by comparing the simulation results with the measurements made using the Berkeley Lab cosmic ray detector. Primary particles’ energy and fluxes were obtained from the experimental measurements. Simulations were run at each zenith angle starting from = 0° up to = 70° with 5° increment. The angular distribution of muons at sea level has been estimated to be in the form $I() = I(0^{°}) \\cos^{n}()$, where (0°) is the muon intensity at 0° and is a function of the muon momentum. The exponent = 1.95 ± 0.08 for muons with energies above 1 GeV is in good agreement, within error, with the values reported in the literature.

  4. Zenith skylight intensity and color during the total solar eclipse of 20 July 1963.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, W E; Lloyd, J W; Silverman, S M

    1966-05-01

    The zenith skylight intensity was measured, with a resolution of 10 A, over the wavelength range from 5200 A to 6400 A during a total solar eclipse at Hermon, Maine. The intensity was found to change by about two orders of magnitude in the 2-min period before totality and reached a minimum during totality of 19.5 kR/A at 5200 A. The spectral distribution remained that of the day sky until the sun was more than 99.8% obscured. During totality, the shorter wavelengths were enhanced, indicating a shift to the blue in sky color. Comparisons with an independent measurement from an aircraft show that the intensity scale height of the secondary scattered component, predominating at totality, is significantly less than that of the day sky. The measurements are compared with the day and twilight sky.

  5. Order reconstruction phenomena and temperature-driven dynamics in a 3D zenithally bistable device

    KAUST Repository

    Raisch, A.

    2014-07-01

    We model the zenithally bistable device (ZBD) in three dimensions (3D), within the Landau-de Gennes theory, and find three stable static states in 3D without an applied field: the vertically aligned nematic (VAN) state, the hybrid aligned nematic (HAN) state and a third, high-tilt state, which we call the THAN state, with an interior and a surface defect. We recover the order reconstruction (OR) phenomenon around the defects in the HAN and THAN states and the 3D THAN and HAN solutions exhibit stable biaxial cylinders connecting defects on opposite faces of the ZBD device. We demonstrate a two-way temperature-driven switching between high-tilt and low-tilt states through controlled heating and cooling procedures in two dimensions (2D), with no applied fields. © CopyrightEPLA, 2014.

  6. Cloud and aerosol optics by polarized micro pulse Lidar and ground based measurements of zenith radiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo, Rodrigo

    Clouds impact Earth's climate through cloud transmission and reflection properties. Clouds reflect approximately 15 percent of the incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. A key cloud radiative variable is cloud optical depth, which gives information about how much light is transmitted through a cloud. Historically, remote measurements of cloud optical depth have been limited to uniform overcast conditions and had low temporal and spatial resolution. We present a novel method to measure cloud optical depth for coastal regions from spectral zenith radiance measurements for optically thin clouds, which removes some of these limitations. Our measurement site is part of South Florida's Cloud-Aerosol-Rain Observatory (CAROb), located on Virginia Key, FL (6 km from Miami). This work is based on Marshak et al.'s method for finding cloud optical depth from vegetative sites that provide a strong spectral contrast between red and near infrared surface albedo. However, given the unique nature of our site, which contains water, vegetation, beach, and urban surface types, we found no such spectral contrast at those wavelength pairs. We measured albedo, with hyperspectral resolution, for different surface types around our measurement site to estimate the effective spectral albedo for the area centered on the site with a 5km radius. From this analysis, we found the best possible albedo contrast (573.9 and 673.1 nm) for our site. We tested the derived cloud optical depth from zenith radiance at these two wavelengths against a concurrently running polarized micro pulse LIDAR (MPL) and found good agreement.

  7. Assessment of Automated Snow Cover Detection at High Solar Zenith Angles with PROBA-V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Hawotte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the snow cover extent are both a cause and a consequence of climate change. Optical remote sensing with heliosynchronous satellites currently provides snow cover data at high spatial resolution with daily revisiting time. However, high latitude image acquisition is limited because reflective sensors of many satellites are switched off at high solar zenith angles (SZA due to lower signal quality. In this study, the relevance and reliability of high SZA acquisition are objectively quantified in the purpose of high latitude snow cover detection, thanks to the PROBA-V (Project for On-Board Autonomy-Vegetation satellite. A snow cover extent classification based on Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI has been performed for the northern hemisphere on latitudes between 55°N and 75°N during the 2015–2016 winter season. A stratified probabilistic sampling was used to estimate the classification accuracy. The latter has been evaluated among eight SZA intervals to determine the maximum usable angle. The global overall snow classification accuracy with PROBA-V, 82% ± 4%, was significantly larger than the MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer snow cover extent product (75% ± 4%. User and producer accuracy of snow are above standards and overall accuracy is stable until 88.5° SZA. These results demonstrate that optical remote sensing data can still be used with large SZA. Considering the relevance of snow cover mapping for ecology and climatology, the data acquisition at high solar zenith angles should be continued by PROBA-V.

  8. Observations of day-to-day variability in precursor signatures to equatorial F-region plasma depletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Fagundes

    Full Text Available In December 1995, a campaign was carried out to study the day-to-day variability in precursor signatures to large-scale ionospheric F-region plasma irregularities, using optical diagnostic techniques, near the magnetic equator in the Brazilian sector. Three instruments were operated simultaneously: (a an all-sky (180° field of view imaging system for observing the OI 630 nm nightglow emission at Alcântara (2.5°S, 44.4°W; (b a digisonde (256-Lowell at São Luis (2.6°S, 44.2°W; and (c a multi-channel tilting filter-type zenith photometer for observing the OI 630 nm and mesospheric nightglow emissions at Fortaleza (3.9°S, 38.4°W. During the period December 14-18, 1995 (summer in the southern hemisphere, a good sequence of the OI 630 nm imaging observations on five consecutive nights were obtained, which are presented and discussed in this study. The observing period was geomagnetically quiet to moderate 
    (Kp = 0+ to 5+; Dst = 18 nT to -37 nT. On four nights, out of the five observation nights, the OI 630 nm imaging pictures showed formations of transequatorial north-south aligned intensity depletions, which are the optical signatures of large-scale ionospheric F-region plasma bubbles. However, considerable day-to-day variability in the onset and development of the plasma depleted bands was observed. On one of the nights it appears that the rapid uplifting of the F-layer in the post-sunset period, in conjunction with gravity wave activity at mesospheric heights, resulted in generation of very strong plasma bubble irregularities. One of the nights showed an unusual formation of north-south depleted band in the western sector of the imaging system field of view, but the structure did not show any eastward movement, which is a normal characteristic of plasma bubbles. This type of irregularity structure, which probably can be observed only by wide-angle imaging system, needs more investigations for a better understanding of

  9. Study and Design on Freeform Surface Compound Eye with Large Field of View%大视场自由曲面复眼设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范阳; 张红霞; 宋乐; 贾大功

    2014-01-01

    The ommatidia arranged at the edge have great off-axis aberrations in artificial compound eye structure with wide Field of View (FOV) and small volume. A new compound eye structure is presented, where the ommatidia are designed as freeform prisms. With the light passing through the freeform surface and folding in the ommatidium, the off-axis aberrations are well corrected. Therefore, the image quality of the ommatidia arranged at the edge is improved, and the FOV of the structure is enlarged. To image 180° FOV, this structure contains 5 groups of ommatidia with a particular FOV correspondingly. The model of each group is designed and the ray trace is completed based on the optical simulation software codeV. The results demonstrate that the compound eyes structure has high image quality for the entire 180° FOV. On the one hand, the modulation transformation function MTF is greater than 0.2 at the frequency of 100lp/mm, and on the other hand, the distortion is less than 30%.%在大视场小体积的人造复眼结构中,倾斜的边缘子眼成像时存在较大的轴外像差。提出一种复眼结构,利用光线在子眼中的折转与自由曲面矫正像差,提高了边缘子眼的成像质量,进而增大了复眼结构的视场角。设计出5组子眼对180°视场成像,每组对应特定的视场范围。利用光学仿真软件CodeV对5组子眼分别做了光学仿真,得到了各组子眼的像差曲线,光学传递函数 MTF 曲线。结果表明,在整个180°视场范围内,频率为100 lp/mm时,MTF值均大于0.2,畸变在30%以内,复眼具有良好的成像质量。

  10. The effect of activity outside the field of view on image quality for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Della Monica, P; Leva, L; Sacchetti, G; Inglese, E; Brambilla, M

    2009-10-07

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of outside field of view (FOV) activity concentration (A(c)(,out)) on the noise equivalent count rate (NECR), scatter fraction (SF) and image quality of a 3D LSO whole-body PET/CT scanner. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was the figure of merit used to characterize the image quality of PET scans. A modified International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) phantom was used to obtain SF and counting rates similar to those found in average patients. A scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the modified IEC phantom to simulate an activity that extends beyond the scanner. The modified IEC phantom was filled with (18)F (11 kBq mL(-1)) and the spherical targets, with internal diameter (ID) ranging from 10 to 37 mm, had a target-to-background ratio of 10. PET images were acquired with background activity concentrations into the FOV (A(c)(,bkg)) about 11, 9.2, 6.6, 5.2 and 3.5 kBq mL(-1). The emission scan duration (ESD) was set to 1, 2, 3 and 4 min. The tube inside the scatter phantom was filled with activities to provide A(c)(,out) in the whole scatter phantom of zero, half, unity, twofold and fourfold the one of the modified IEC phantom. Plots of CNR versus the various parameters are provided. Multiple linear regression was employed to study the effects of A(c)(,out) on CNR, adjusted for the presence of variables (sphere ID, A(c)(,bkg) and ESD) related to CNR. The presence of outside FOV activity at the same concentration as the one inside the FOV reduces peak NECR of 30%. The increase in SF is marginal (1.2%). CNR diminishes significantly with increasing outside FOV activity, in the range explored. ESD and A(c)(,out) have a similar weight in accounting for CNR variance. Thus, an experimental law that adjusts the scan duration to the outside FOV activity can be devised. Recovery of CNR loss due to an elevated A(c)(,out) activity seems feasible by modulating the ESD in individual bed positions according to A(c)(,out).

  11. Observation and Characterization of a Cosmic Muon Neutrino Flux from the Northern Hemisphere using six years of IceCube data

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Anderson, T; Ansseau, I; Anton, G; Archinger, M; Argüelles, C; Auffenberg, J; Axani, S; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blot, S; Bohm, C; Börner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Burgman, A; Carver, T; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Collin, G H; Conrad, J M; Cowen, D F; Cross, R; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Rosendo, E del Pino; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; di Lorenzo, V; Dujmovic, H; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Eller, P; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Flis, S; Fösig, C -C; Franckowiak, A; Friedman, E; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Giang, W; Gladstone, L; Glagla, M; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Grant, D; Griffith, Z; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansen, E; Hansmann, B; Hansmann, T; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfel, K; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jeong, M; Jero, K; Jones, B J P; Jurkovic, M; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Katz, U; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, J; Kheirandish, A; Kim, M; Kintscher, T; Kiryluk, J; Kittler, T; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, M; Krückl, G; Krüger, C; Kunnen, J; Kunwar, S; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lauber, F; Lennarz, D; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leuner, J; Lu, L; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Mancina, S; Mandelartz, M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meier, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Moulai, M; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Neer, G; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Pollmann, A Obertacke; Olivas, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Pankova, D V; Peiffer, P; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Quinnan, M; Raab, C; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Reimann, R; Relethford, B; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ryckbosch, D; Rysewyk, D; Sabbatini, L; Herrera, S E Sanchez; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Satalecka, K; Schimp, M; Schlunder, P; Schmidt, T; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schumacher, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Soldin, D; Song, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stahlberg, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Steuer, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tatar, J; Tenholt, F; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Turcati, A; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vandenbroucke, J; van Eijndhoven, N; Vanheule, S; van Rossem, M; van Santen, J; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallace, A; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Weiss, M J; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wickmann, S; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wills, L; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woolsey, E; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zoll, M

    2016-01-01

    The IceCube Collaboration has previously discovered a high-energy astrophysical neutrino flux using neutrino events with interaction vertices contained within the instrumented volume of the IceCube detector. We present a complementary measurement using charged current muon neutrino events where the interaction vertex can be outside this volume. As a consequence of the large muon range the effective area is significantly larger but the field of view is restricted to the Northern Hemisphere. IceCube data from 2009 through 2015 have been analyzed using a likelihood approach based on the reconstructed muon energy and zenith angle. At the highest neutrino energies between 191 TeV and 8.3 PeV a significant astrophysical contribution is observed, excluding a purely atmospheric origin of these events at $5.6\\,\\sigma$ significance. The data are well described by an isotropic, unbroken power law flux with a normalization at 100 TeV neutrino energy of $\\left(0.90^{+0.30}_{-0.27}\\right)\\times10^{-18}\\,\\mathrm{GeV^{-1}\\,c...

  12. A CAD-CAM prosthodontic option and gingival zenith position for a rotated maxillary right central incisor: An evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Singhal

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Digital imaging provides an immediate treatment option for the patients. Software also provides an interim aid, for the clinician as well as technician, in the form of two-dimensional photographs. CAD-CAM is entirely a helping instrument against the conservative prosthetic options and gingival zenith position for a rotated central incisor. It helps in patient education and in motivation.

  13. Optical Design of Spaceborne Shortwave Infrared Imaging Spectrometer with Wide Field of View%星载大视场短波红外成像光谱仪光学设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛庆生; 林冠宇; 宋克非

    2011-01-01

    Based on the requirements of shotwave infrared imaging spectrometer with wide field of view,considering the restrictive off-the-shelf detectors, a split field of view (FOV) method was developed. The principle of split field of view was analyzed. A spaceborne shortwave infrared imaging spectrometer with wide field of view was designed using the method. The imaging spectrometer are composed of a 11.42°telecentric off-axis three-mirror anastigmatic telescope and two offner convex grating spectral imaging system. Ray tracing, optimization and analyzing were performed by CODE V and ZEMAX software. The analyzed results demonstrate that the modulation transfer function for different spectral band is more than 0.7 which satisfies the pre-designed requirement.%根据大视场短波红外成像光谱仪的要求,考虑到市售探测器的限制,提出了视场分离的方法,分析了视场分离方法的原理.利用此方法设计了一个星载大视场短波红外成像光谱仪光学系统,该系统由11.42°远心离轴三反消像散前置望远系统和2个Offner凸面光栅光谱成像系统组成,运用光学设计软件CODE V和ZEMAX对成像光谱仪光学系统进行了光线追迹和优化,并对设计结果进行了分析,分析结果表明,光学系统在各个谱段的光学传递函数均达到0.7以上,完全满足设计指标要求.

  14. An analysis of GPT2/GPT2w+Saastamoinen models for estimating zenith tropospheric delay over Asian area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiye; Chen, Xihong; Sun, Jizhe; Liu, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    The tropospheric delay is a systematic error source in the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning. However, without accuracy meteorological information, the quality of the Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) derived from empirical tropospheric models like Saastamoinen model will degrade, leading to inaccurate estimates of positions. To solve the above problem, on the basis of Global Pressure and Temperature 2/2w (GPT2/GPT2w) model, this paper conducted GPT2/GPT2w+Saastamoinen models for estimating ZTD over Asian area. As GPT2w model has two resolutions of 1 and 5 degrees, the effects of two models (GPT2_5w+S refers to GPT2w+Saastamoinen model with the resolution of 5 degree; GPT2_1w+S refers to GPT2w+Saastamoinen model with the resolution of 1 degree) were analyzed respectively. The model's validation was carried out using the International GNSS Service (IGS) ZTD values derived from the observed data in the year 2012 at 27 IGS stations. The results show that the GPT2_1w+S model can provide tropospheric delay corrections with bias of 0.66 cm and Root Mean Square (RMS) of 4.93 cm, which is superior to GPT2+S model. The annual bias and RMS for the GPT2_5w+S model are slightly worse than that for the GPT2_1w+S model. For most stations, the bias and RMS show seasonal characteristics. The relation between the annual bias and RMS with latitude for the models is not obvious, and a latitude dependency between the models could not be detected.

  15. Reduced field-of -view diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas: Comparison with conventional single-shot echo-planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Jeong Min; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Jang, Jin Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Ryu, Ji Kon; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kannengiesser, Stephan [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the image quality (IQ) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of reduced field-of-view (FOV) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of pancreas in comparison with full FOV DWI. In this retrospective study, 2 readers independently performed qualitative analysis of full FOV DWI (FOV, 38 × 38 cm; b-value, 0 and 500 s/mm{sup 2}) and reduced FOV DWI (FOV, 28 × 8.5 cm; b-value, 0 and 400 s/mm{sup 2}). Both procedures were conducted with a two-dimensional spatially selective radiofrequency excitation pulse, in 102 patients with benign or malignant pancreatic diseases (mean size, 27.5 ± 14.4 mm). The study parameters included 1) anatomic structure visualization, 2) lesion conspicuity, 3) artifacts, 4) IQ score, and 5) subjective clinical utility for confirming or excluding initially considered differential diagnosis on conventional imaging. Another reader performed quantitative ADC measurements of focal pancreatic lesions and parenchyma. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare qualitative scores and ADCs between DWI sequences. Mann Whitney U-test was used to compare ADCs between the lesions and parenchyma. On qualitative analysis, reduced FOV DWI showed better anatomic structure visualization (2.76 ± 0.79 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 2.81 ± 0.64 at b = 400 s/mm{sup 2}), lesion conspicuity (3.11 ± 0.99 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 3.15 ± 0.79 at b = 400 s/mm{sup 2}), IQ score (8.51 ± 2.05 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 8.79 ± 1.60 at b = 400 s/mm{sup 2}), and higher clinical utility (3.41 ± 0.64), as compared to full FOV DWI (anatomic structure, 2.18 ± 0.59 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 2.56 ± 0.47 at b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}; lesion conspicuity, 2.55 ± 1.07 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 2.89 ± 0.86 at b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}; IQ score, 7.13 ± 1.83 at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} and 8.17 ± 1.31 at b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}; clinical utility, 3.14 ± 0.70) (p < 0.05). Artifacts were significantly improved on reduced FOV DWI (2.65 ± 0.68) at b = 0 s/mm{sup 2} (full FOV DWI, 2.41 ± 0.63) (p

  16. WE-G-BRD-01: A Data-Driven 4D-MRI Motion Model to Estimate Full Field-Of-View Abdominal Motion From 2D Image Navigators During MR-Linac Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemkens, B; Tijssen, RHN; Denis de Senneville, B Denis; Lagendijk, JJW; Berg, CAT van den [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate full field-of-view abdominal respiratory motion from fast 2D image navigators using a 4D-MRI based motion model. This will allow for radiation dose accumulation mapping during MR-Linac treatment. Methods: Experiments were conducted on a Philips Ingenia 1.5T MRI. First, a retrospectively ordered 4D-MRI was constructed using 3D transient-bSSFP with radial in-plane sampling. Motion fields were calculated through 3D non-rigid registration. From these motion fields a PCA-based abdominal motion model was constructed and used to warp a 3D reference volume to fast 2D cine-MR image navigators that can be used for real-time tracking. To test this procedure, a time-series consisting of two interleaved orthogonal slices (sagittal and coronal), positioned on the pancreas or kidneys, were acquired for 1m38s (dynamic scan-time=0.196ms), during normal, shallow, or deep breathing. The coronal slices were used to update the optimal weights for the first two PCA components, in order to warp the 3D reference image and construct a dynamic 4D-MRI time-series. The interleaved sagittal slices served as an independent measure to test the model’s accuracy and fit. Spatial maps of the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) and histograms of the motion differences within the pancreas and kidneys were used to evaluate the method. Results: Cranio-caudal motion was accurately calculated within the pancreas using the model for normal and shallow breathing with an RMSE of 1.6mm and 1.5mm and a histogram median and standard deviation below 0.2 and 1.7mm, respectively. For deep-breathing an underestimation of the inhale amplitude was observed (RMSE=4.1mm). Respiratory-induced antero-posterior and lateral motion were correctly mapped (RMSE=0.6/0.5mm). Kidney motion demonstrated good motion estimation with RMSE-values of 0.95 and 2.4mm for the right and left kidney, respectively. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a method that can calculate dynamic 3D abdominal motion in a large volume

  17. Remote Synchronization Experiments for Quasi-Zenith Satellite System Using Multiple Navigation Signals as Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Iwata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote synchronization system for the onboard crystal oscillator (RESSOX is a remote control method that permits synchronization between a ground station atomic clock and Japanese quasi-zenith satellite system (QZSS crystal oscillators. To realize the RESSOX of the QZSS, the utilization of navigation signals of QZSS for feedback control is an important issue. Since QZSS transmits seven navigation signals (L1C/A, L1CP, L1CD, L2CM, L2CL, L5Q, and L5I, all combinations of these signals should be evaluated. First, the RESSOX algorithm will be introduced. Next, experimental performance will be demonstrated. If only a single signal is available, ionospheric delay should be input from external measurements. If multiple frequency signals are available, any combination, except for L2 and L5, gives good performance with synchronization error being within two nanoseconds that of RESSOX. The combination of L1CD and L5Q gives the best synchronization performance (synchronization error within 1.14 ns. Finally, in the discussion, comparisons of long-duration performance, computer simulation, and sampling number used in feedback control are considered. Although experimental results do not correspond to the simulation results, the tendencies are similar. For the overlapping Allan deviation of long duration, the stability of 1.23×10−14 at 100,160 s is obtained.

  18. High-energy spectrum and zenith-angle distribution of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2011-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons produced through the collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form the background in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. An ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. We present results of the calculation of the energy spectrum and zenith-angle distribution of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 10 GeV to 10 PeV. The calculation was performed with usage of known hadronic models (QGSJET-II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, Kimel & Mokhov) for two of the primary spectrum parametrizations, by Gaisser & Honda and by Zatsepin & Sokolskaya. The comparison of the calculated muon neutrino spectrum with the IceCube40 experiment data make it clear that even at energies above 100 TeV the prompt neutrino contribution is not so apparent because of tangled uncertainties of the strange (kaons) and charm...

  19. Assessment of Neutrospheric Zenith Delay predictions from regional NWP in the context of PPP quality results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, T. A. F.; Galera Monico, J. F.; Alves, D. B. M.; Sapucci, L.

    2016-12-01

    The effect that the GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) satellites signals suffer when passing through the electrically neutral Earth's atmosphere (neutrosphere) is due to the presence of gases and water vapor with heterogeneous distribution. This effect is the neutrospheric (or tropospheric) delay. In order to minimize such delay, which is normally mapped to the zenith (ZND), models can be used: theoretical models (blinds models; Hopfield; Saastamoinen); Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models; or estimated during the GNSS data processing. ZND obtained from the regional NWP models present better accuracy when assessed against the estimated ZND (reference), because the influence of regional climatic characteristics is better described when using NWP. Such models include continentality, dry and wet (like Amazon region) regions, seasonality with stronger variation (summer and winter), as well as a better spatial resolution. In Brazil, CPTEC/INPE (Center for Weather Forecasting and Climate Studies/Brazilian Institute for Space Research) is operating a NWP model for South America. ZND/CPTEC predictions are produced as an operational product from regional NWP. In this work our main aim is to assess the quality of PPP (Precision Point Positioning) considering the temporal resolution of the new CPTEC/INPE NWP regional model. For doing that, the impact of different neutrosphere models in the context of PPP, considering blind models for the neutrosphere delay in the PPP are also assessed by comparison to the ZND/CPTEC model. The analysis is accomplished in different Brazilian regions considering the ZND seasonal variations.

  20. Anomalies of zenith tropospheric delay following the Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y. B.; Lei, X. X.; Liu, Q.; He, C. Y.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, L.

    2014-05-01

    The 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake was a massive Mw 7.8 earthquake that struck the Queen Carlotte Islands Region on 28 October 2012 (UTC). This study analyzed the variations in zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) following the Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii earthquake using near real-time ZTD data collected from eleven stations in the seismic region and the forecast ZTD of ECMWF. A new differential method was used to detect anomalies of ZTD time series. Result showed that obvious ZTD anomalies occurred on the day of the earthquake (day-of-year, doy 302). There were anomalous ZTD variations at eight stations in the post-earthquake period on doy 302, possibly due to the processes of earthquake-generated acoustic waves. Propagation of acoustic waves caused variations of tropospheric parameters (e.g., atmospheric pressure, temperate, and atmosphere density), thus influencing ZTD. Absence of anomalous ZTD variations at the remaining three stations was attributed to the special topographic conditions, i.e., the long epicentral distance and the presence of huge mountains as a natural protective screen. Our work provides new insights to the relationship between of earthquake event and ZTD variation. The proposed differential method is superior to conventional method for detecting specific ZTD anomalies caused by earthquake events.

  1. Performance analysis of GPS augmentation using Japanese Quasi-Zenith Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F.; Kubo, N.; Yasuda, A.

    2004-01-01

    The current GPS satellite constellation provides limited availability and reliability for a country like Japan where mountainous terrain and urban canyons do not allow a clear skyline to the horizon. At present, the Japanese Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) is under investigation through a government-private sector cooperation. QZSS is considered a multi-mission satellite system, as it is able to provide communication, broadcasting and positioning services for mobile users in a specified region with high elevation angle. The performance of a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) can be quantified by availability, accuracy, reliability and integrity. This paper focuses on availability, accuracy and reliability of GPS with and without augmentation using QZSS. The availability, accuracy and reliability of GPS only and augmented GPS using QZSS in the Asia-Pacific and Australian area is studied by software simulation. The simulation results are described by the number of visible satellites as a measure of availability, geometric dilution of precision as a measure of accuracy and minimal detectable bias, and bias-to-noise rate as a measure of reliability, with spatial and temporal variations. It is shown that QZSS does not only improve the availability and accuracy of GPS positioning, but also enhances the reliability of GPS positioning in Japan and its neighboring area.

  2. A novel Region of Interest (ROI) imaging technique for biplane imaging in interventional suites: high-resolution small field-of-view imaging in the frontal plane and dose-reduced, large field-of-view standard-resolution imaging in the lateral plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetadri Vasan, Setlur Nagesh; Ionita, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Endovascular-Image-Guided-Interventional (EIGI) treatment of neuro-vascular conditions such as aneurysms, stenosed arteries, and vessel thrombosis make use of treatment devices such as stents, coils, and balloons which have very small feature sizes, 10's of microns to a few 100's of microns, and hence demand a high resolution imaging system. The current state-of-the-art flat panel detector (FPD) has about a 200-um pixel size with the Nyquist of 2.5 lp/mm. For higher-resolution imaging a charge-coupled device (CCD) based Micro-Angio - Fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) with a pixel size of 35um (Nyquist of 11 lp/mm) was developed and previously reported. Although the detector addresses the high resolution needs, the Field-Of-View (FOV) is limited to 3.5 cm x 3.5 cm, which is much smaller than current FPDs. During the use of the MAF-CCD for delicate parts of the intervention, it may be desirable to have real-time monitoring outside the MAF FOV with a low dose, and lower, but acceptable, quality image. To address this need, a novel imaging technique for biplane imaging systems has been developed, using an MAFCCD in the frontal plane and a dose-reduced standard large FOV imager in the lateral plane. The dose reduction is achieved by using a combination of ROI fluoroscopy and spatially different temporal filtering, a technique that has been previously presented. In order to evaluate this technique, a simulation using images acquired during an actual EIGI treatment on a patient, followed by an actual implementation on phantoms is presented.

  3. Gingival Zenith Positions and Levels of Maxillary Anterior Dentition in Cases of Bimaxillary Protrusion: A Morphometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowd, Snigdha; Shankar, T; Chatterjee, Suravi; Mohanty, Pritam; Sahoo, Nivedita; Baratam, Srinivas

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the two clinical parameters, such as gingival zenith positions (GZPs) and gingival zenith levels (GZLs), of maxillary anterior dentition in bimaxillary protrusion cases and collate it with severiety of crown inclination. Gingival zenith position and GZL in 40 healthy patients (29 females and 11 males) with an average age of 21.5 years were assessed. Inclusion criteria involved absence of periodontal diseases, Angle's class I molar relationship, and upper anterior proclination within 25 to 45° based on Steiner's analysis; exclusion criteria included spacing, crowding, anterior restoration and teeth with incisor attrition or rotation. The GZP was evaluated using digital calipers from voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and GZL was assessed from the tangent drawn from GZP of central incisor and canines to the linear vertical distance of GZP of lateral incisor. All the central incisors showed a GZP distal to VBM with a mean average of 1 mm. Severe proclination between 40 and 45° showed a statistically significant variation. Lateral incisors displayed a mean of 0.5 mm deviation of GZP from the vertically bisected midline. In 80% of canine population, GZP was centralized. We conclude that the degree of proclination of maxillary anterior dentition was correlated to the gingival contour in bimaxillary cases. The investigation revealed that there is a variation in the location of GZP as the severity of proclination increases. This study highlights the importance of microesthetics in fixed orthodontic treatment. The gingival contour should be unaltered while retraction during management of bimaxillary protrusion.

  4. Salivary cortisol, stress and mood in healthy older adults: the Zenith study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ellen E A; McConville, Chris; Rae, Gordon; O'Connor, Jacqueline M; Stewart-Knox, Barbara J; Coudray, Charles; Strain, J J

    2008-04-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between salivary cortisol, stress and mood and to look at the circadian rhythms of positive (PA) and negative (NA) mood in older adults. The participants were 41 healthy adults aged 55-69 years, recruited in Northern Ireland as part of the European Commission-funded Zenith project. Salivary cortisol samples were obtained twice a day (2.30 p.m. and 10.30 p.m.) for 7 consecutive days in conjunction with momentary measures of positive (PA) and negative mood (NA), using PANAS and a trait measure of perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale). Salivary cortisol levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunoassay kit. Higher perceived stress levels were associated with lower afternoon PA (r=-0.46, p=0.003) and higher afternoon (r=0.43, p=0.007) and evening (r=0.45, p=0.004) NA. Lower afternoon PA was correlated with higher evening cortisol concentrations (r=-0.47, p=0.002). Greater afternoon PA variability was associated with higher evening cortisol concentrations (r=0.38, p=0.015). A high intra-class correlation between cortisol and positive mood was found (r=0.67, p=0.009). Previously established rhythms for positive and negative mood were confirmed. Interestingly, there was no association between salivary cortisol levels and perceived stress in these healthy older adults. Further, more extensive research is required to better understand the apparent interplay between these variables and ageing.

  5. Surface and Tethered-Balloon Observations of Actinic Flux: Effects of Arctic stratus, Surface Albedo and Solar Zenith Angle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roode, S.R. de; Duynkerke, P.G.; Boot, Wim; Hage, Jeroen C.H. van der

    2000-01-01

    As part of the FIRE III (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) Arctic Cloud Experiment actinic flux measurements were made above the Arctic Sea ice during May 1998. FIRE III was designed to address questions concerning clouds, radiation and chemistry in the Arctic sea ice region. The actinic flux,

  6. Object Matching Across Multiple Non-overlapping Fields of View Using Fuzzy Logic%基于模糊逻辑的多相机非重叠场景的物体匹配

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOKE Yuan Ren; KUMAR Pankaj; RANGANATH Surendra; 黄为民

    2006-01-01

    An approach based on fuzzy logic for matching both articulated and non-articulated objects across multiple non-overlapping field of views (FoVs) from multiple cameras is proposed.We call it fuzzy logic matching algorithm (FLMA). The approach uses the information of object motion, shape and camera topology for matching objects across camera views. The motion and shape information of targets are obtained by tracking them using a combination of ConDensation and CAMShift tracking algorithms. The information of camera topology is obtained and used by calculating the projective transformation of each view with the common ground plane. The algorithm is suitable for tracking non-rigid objects with both linear and non-linear motion. We show videos of tracking objects across multiple cameras based on FLMA. From our experiments, the system is able to correctly match the targets across views with a high accuracy.

  7. Optical Design of Spaceborne High Resolution Hyperspectral Imagers with Wide Field of View%星载高分辨力、大视场高光谱成像仪光学设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛庆生

    2011-01-01

    根据高分辨力,大视场的要求,考虑到市售探测器的限制,提出了视场分离分光的方法,分析了视场分离分光的原理.利用此方法设计了一个星载高分辨力、大视场高光谱成像仪光学系统,该系统由11.42°远心离轴三反消像散(TMA)望远系统和2个Offner凸面光栅光谱成像系统组成,运用光学设计软件CODE V对高光谱成像仪光学系统进行了光线追迹和优化,并对设计结果进行了分析,分析结果表明,光学系统在各个谱段的光学传递函数均达到0.7以上,完全满足设计指标要求.%Based on the requirements of high resolution and wide field of view, considering the restrictive off-tlhe-shelf detectors, the design method of split Field of View (FOV) is developed. The principle of split FOV is analyzed. A spaceborne high resolution hyperspectral imager with wide FOV is designed using the method. The hyperspectral imager are composed of a 11.42° telecentric off-axis Three-Mirror Anastigmatic (TMA) telescope and two Offner convex grating spectral imaging system. Ray tracing, optimization and analyzing are performed by CODE V software. The analyzed results demonstrate that the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for different spectral band is more than 0.7, which satisfies the pre-designed requirement.

  8. MTF characterization in 2D and 3D for a high resolution, large field of view flat panel imager for cone beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jainil; Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Richmond, Michelle; Zentai, George

    2014-03-01

    The 2D and 3D modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a custom made, large 40x30cm2 area, 600- micron CsI-TFT based flat panel imager having 127-micron pixellation, along with the micro-fiber scintillator structure, were characterized in detail using various techniques. The larger area detector yields a reconstructed FOV of 25cm diameter with an 80cm SID in CT mode. The MTFs were determined with 1x1 (intrinsic) binning. The 2D MTFs were determined using a 50.8 micron tungsten wire and a solid lead edge, and the 3D MTF was measured using a custom made phantom consisting of three nearly orthogonal 50.8 micron tungsten wires suspended in an acrylic cubic frame. The 2D projection data was reconstructed using an iterative OSC algorithm using 16 subsets and 5 iterations. As additional verification of the resolution, along with scatter, the Catphan® phantom was also imaged and reconstructed with identical parameters. The measured 2D MTF was ~4% using the wire technique and ~1% using the edge technique at the 3.94 lp/mm Nyquist cut-off frequency. The average 3D MTF measured along the wires was ~8% at the Nyquist. At 50% MTF, the resolutions were 1.2 and 2.1 lp/mm in 2D and 3D, respectively. In the Catphan® phantom, the 1.7 lp/mm bars were easily observed. Lastly, the 3D MTF measured on the three wires has an observed 5.9% RMSD, indicating that the resolution of the imaging system is uniform and spatially independent. This high performance detector is integrated into a dedicated breast SPECT-CT imaging system.

  9. Simulating the star tracks in the field of view of the Lunar polar telescope of the ILOM project in dependence on the Lunar dynamical figure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, N.; Gusev, A.

    2009-04-01

    The measurement of the rotation of the Moon is one of techniques to get the information of the internal structure of celestial body. The Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) has given unprecedented data on the lunar rotation, and gives some proposals of the state of the core. In situ Lunar Orientation Measurement (ILOM) is an experiment to measure the lunar physical librations in situ on the Moon with a small telescope which tracks stars. Simulating the trajectory of stars due to the lunar rotation observed by the ILOM-telescope in the polar region was already made by using numerical theory DE405 (Noda et al., 2008). We have executed calculations of libration tracks of stars on the basis of analytical libration theory (Petrova, 1996; Chapront et al, 1999). It allowed us to do simulating for various models of Lunar gravity field (Lunar dynamical figure). We used dynamical figures constructed on the basis of data received in the current mission Kaguya (SELENE), and then we compared the results with calculations with other dynamic models constructed on the data obtained by the Clementine (GLGM-2) and the Lunar Prospector (LP150Q). The differences between the models GLGM-2, LP150Q and the Kaguya model are larger than 10 milliseconds of arc. This means that proposed accuracy of ILOM observations - 1 millisecond of arc will be enough to improve many parameters of the Lunar interior. In particular, residual estimations will allow to detect small amplitudes of free libration caused by a liquid Lunar core and to estimate its characteristic, first of all - core's ellipticity. All calculation and comparisons, graphic presentation were executed in the VBA environment for MS Excel. The research was supported by the Russian-Japanese grant RFFI-JSPS N 07-02-91212, (2007 - 2009).

  10. Spectroscopic and Photometric Observations of Kepler Asteroseismic Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Kopacki, G; Frasca, A; Catanzaro, G; Latham, D W; Niemczura, E; Narwid, A; Steslicki, M; Arentoft, T; Kubat, J; Drobek, D; Dimitrow, W; 10.1063/1.3246557

    2012-01-01

    We summarize our ground-based program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of the asteroseismic targets of the Kepler space telescope. We have already determined atmospheric parameters, projected velocity of rotation, and radial velocity of 62 Kepler asteroseismic targets and 33 other stars in the Kepler field of view. We discovered six single-lined and two double-lined spectroscopic binaries, we determined the interstellar reddening for 29 stars in the Kepler field of view, and discovered three delta Sct, two gamma Dor and 14 other variable stars in the field of NGC 6866.

  11. Phenomena induced by powerful HF pumping towards magnetic zenith with a frequency near the F-region critical frequency and the third electron gyro harmonic frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Blagoveshchenskaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-instrument observational data from an experiment on 13 October 2006 at the EISCAT/HEATING facility at Tromsø, Norway are analysed. The experiment was carried out in the evening hours when the electron density in the F-region dropped, and the HF pump frequency fH was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer. The distinctive feature of this experiment is that the pump frequency was just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency, while both the HF pump beam and UHF radar beam were directed towards the magnetic zenith (MZ. The HF pump-induced phenomena were diagnosed with several instruments: the bi-static HF radio scatter on the London-Tromsø-St. Petersburg path, the CUTLASS radar in Hankasalmi (Finland, the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT UHF radar at Tromsø and the Tromsø ionosonde (dynasonde. The results show thermal electron excitation of the HF-induced striations seen simultaneously from HF bi-static scatter and CUTLASS radar observations, accompanied by increases of electron temperature when the heater frequency was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer by up to 0.4 MHz. An increase of the electron density up to 25% accompanied by strong HF-induced electron heating was observed, only when the heater frequency was near the critical frequency and just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency. It is concluded that the combined effect of upper hybrid resonance and gyro resonance at the same altitude gives rise to strong electron heating, the excitation of striations, HF ray trapping and extension of HF waves to altitudes where they can excite Langmuir turbulence and fluxes of electrons accelerated to energies that produce ionization.

  12. Cloud Droplet Size and Liquid Water Path Retrievals From Zenith Radiance Measurements: Examples From the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and the Aerosol Robotic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, J. C.; Marshak, A.; Huang, C.-H.; Varnai, T.; Hogan, R. J.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Knyazikhin, Y.; O'Connor, E. J.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) routinely monitor clouds using zenith radiances at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Using the transmittance calculated from such measurements, we have developed a new retrieval method for cloud effective droplet size and conducted extensive tests for non-precipitating liquid water clouds. The underlying principle is to combine a water-absorbing wavelength (i.e. 1640 nm) with a nonwater-absorbing wavelength for acquiring information on cloud droplet size and optical depth. For simulated stratocumulus clouds with liquid water path less than 300 g/sq m and horizontal resolution of 201m, the retrieval method underestimates the mean effective radius by 0.8 m, with a root-mean-squared error of 1.7 m and a relative deviation of 13 %. For actual observations with a liquid water path less than 450 gm.2 at the ARM Oklahoma site during 2007-2008, our 1.5 min-averaged retrievals are generally larger by around 1 m than those from combined ground-based cloud radar and microwave radiometer at a 5min temporal resolution. We also compared our retrievals to those from combined shortwave flux and microwave observations for relatively homogeneous clouds, showing that the bias between these two retrieval sets is negligible, but the error of 2.6 m and the relative deviation of 22% are larger than those found in our simulation case. Finally, the transmittance-based cloud effective droplet radii agree to better than 11% with satellite observations and have a negative bias of 1 m. Overall, the retrieval method provides reasonable cloud effective radius estimates, which can enhance the cloud products of both ARM and AERONET.

  13. Zenith-Distance Dependence of Chromatic Shear Effect: A Limiting Factor for an Extreme Adaptive Optics System

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, T

    2006-01-01

    Consider a perfect AO system with a very fine wavefront sampling interval and a very small actuator interval. If this AO system senses wavefront at a wavelength, lambda_{WFS}, and does science imaging at another wavelength, lambda_{SCI}, the light paths through the turbulent atmosphere at these two wavelengths are slightly different for a finite zenith distance, z. The error in wavefront reconstruction of the science channel associated with this non-common path effect, or so-called chromatic shear, is uncorrectable and sets an upper bound of the system performance. We evaluate the wavefront variance, sigma^2(lambda_{WFS},lambda_{SCI},z) for a typical seeing condition at Mauna Kea and find that this effect is not negligible at a large z. If we require that the Strehl ratio be greater than 99 or 95%, z must be less than about 50 or 60 deg respectively, for the combination of visible wavefront sensing and infrared science imaging.

  14. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlar, Joseph; Tjernstroem, Michael; Leck, Caroline [Stockholm University, Department of Meteorology, Stockholm (Sweden); Mauritsen, Thorsten [Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Shupe, Matthew D.; Persson, P.O.G. [University of Colorado, NOAA-ESRL-PSD, Boulder, CO (United States); Brooks, Ian M.; Birch, Cathryn E. [University of Leeds, School of Earth and Environment, Leeds (United Kingdom); Sirevaag, Anders [University of Bergen, Bjerknes Center for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); Nicolaus, Marcel [Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsoe (Norway); Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Snow surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5 N during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS), from August to early September 2008. Surface temperature indicated four distinct temperature regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermodynamic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt-season regime was interrupted by a 3-day cold regime where temperatures dropped from near zero to -7 C. Subsequently mean energy budget residuals remained small and near zero for 1 week until once again temperatures dropped rapidly and the energy budget residuals became negative. Energy budget transitions were dominated by the net radiative fluxes, largely controlled by the cloudiness. Variable heat, moisture and cloud distributions were associated with changing air-masses. Surface cloud radiative forcing, the net radiative effect of clouds on the surface relative to clear skies, is estimated. Shortwave cloud forcing ranged between -50 W m{sup -2} and zero and varied significantly with surface albedo, solar zenith angle and cloud liquid water. Longwave cloud forcing was larger and generally ranged between 65 and 85 W m{sup -2}, except when the cloud fraction was tenuous or contained little liquid water; thus the net effect of the clouds was to warm the surface. Both cold periods occurred under tenuous, or altogether absent, low-level clouds containing little liquid water, effectively reducing the cloud greenhouse effect. Freeze-up progression was enhanced by a combination of increasing solar zenith angles and surface albedo, while inhibited by a large, positive surface cloud forcing until a new air-mass with considerably less cloudiness advected over the experiment area. (orig.)

  15. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  16. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  17. Assessment of the near real-time GNSS zenith total delay estimated from different solutions using different orbit and clock products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, T.; Lidberg, M.; Johansson, J. M.; Ridal, M.; Jivall, L.; Kempe, C.

    2016-12-01

    Due to the fact that there is a big lack of humidity observations in the meteorological observing system, usage of ground-based GNSS data to provide the near real-time (NRT) zenith total delay (ZTD) is important for operational meteorology. The accuracy of the NRT GNSS ZTD is highly dependent on the quality of the real-time satellite orbits and clock products used for the data processing. Therefore, the effect of real-time satellite orbits and clock errors on the NRT GNSS ZTD estimates is necessary to investigate. Since March, 2016, Lantmäteriet (Swedish Mapping, Cadastre and Land Registration Authority) became one of the analysis centres contributing NRT GNSS ZTDs to the E-GVAP program. Currently we are processing the GNSS data obtained from around 680 stations in Sweden, Finland, Denmark, and Norway. The NRT GNSS ZTDs are estimated using two different solutions: network and precise point positioning (PPP). The network solution is running by Bernese (V5.2) using the CODE ultra-rapid orbits product. The PPP solutions are running by the GIPSY-OASIS (V6.2) using two different satellite orbits and clock products. One is using the IGS provided real-time products. The other is using the JPL ultra-rapid products which however has a longer latency (over one hour). The NTR ZTDs from all three solutions will be assessed with respect to the ones estimated using the IGS final satellite orbits and clock product in terms of accuracy and precision.

  18. The effect of solar zenith angle on MODIS cloud optical and microphysical retrievals within marine liquid water clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosvenor, D. P.; Wood, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we use a novel observational approach to investigate MODIS satellite retrieval biases of τ and re (using three different MODIS bands: 1.6, 2.1 and 3.7 μm, denoted as re1.6, re2.1 and re3.7, respectively) that occur at high solar zenith angles (θ0) and how they affect retrievals of cloud droplet concentration (Nd). Utilizing the large number of overpasses for polar regions and the diurnal variation of θ0 we estimate biases in the above quantities for an open ocean region that is dominated by low level stratiform clouds. We find that the mean τ is fairly constant between θ0 = 50° and ~65-70°, but then increases rapidly with an increase of over 70 % between the lowest and highest θ0. The re2.1 and re3.7 decrease with θ0, with effects also starting at around θ0 = 65-70°. At low θ0, the re values from the three different MODIS bands agree to within around 0.2 μm, whereas at high θ0 the spread is closer to 1 μm. The percentage changes of re with θ0 are considerably lower than those for τ, being around 5 % and 7% for re2.1 and re3.7. For re1.6 there was very little change with θ0. Evidence is provided that these changes are unlikely to be due to any physical diurnal cycle. The increase in τ and decrease in re both contribute to an overall increase in Nd of 40-70% between low and high θ0. Whilst the overall re changes are quite small, they are not insignificant for the calculation of Nd; we find that the contributions to Nd biases from the τ and re biases were roughly comparable for re3.7, although for the other re bands the τ changes were considerably more important. Also, when considering only the clouds with the more heterogeneous tops, the importance of the re biases was considerably enhanced for both re2.1 and re3.7. When using the variability of 1 km resolution τ data (γτ) as a heterogeneity parameter we obtained the expected result of increasing differences in τ between high and low θ0 as heterogeneity increased, which was

  19. Large Scale Distribution of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with Zenith Angles up to 80°

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in

  20. LARGE SCALE DISTRIBUTION OF ULTRA HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS DETECTED AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY WITH ZENITH ANGLES UP TO 80 degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Fernandez, G. Rodriguez; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60 degrees and 80 degrees. We perform two Rayleigh ana

  1. LARGE SCALE DISTRIBUTION OF ULTRA HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS DETECTED AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY WITH ZENITH ANGLES UP TO 80 degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Fernandez, G. Rodriguez; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60 degrees and 80 degrees. We perform two Rayleigh ana

  2. Large Scale Distribution of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with Zenith Angles up to 80°

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the large angular scale distribution of the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 4 EeV detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory including for the first time events with zenith angle between 60° and 80°. We perform two Rayleigh analyses, one in

  3. Data analysis results of the second sea trial of ambient noise imaging with acoustic lens in 2014: Two-dimensional target images affected by direction of field of view and spatial noise distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    An aspherical lens with an aperture diameter of 1.0 m has been designed and fabricated to develop a prototype system for ambient noise imaging (ANI). A sea trial of silent target detection using the prototype ANI system was conducted under only natural ocean ambient noise at Uchiura Bay in November 2010. It was verified that targets are successfully detected under natural ocean ambient noise, mainly generated by snapping shrimps. Recently, we have built a second prototype ANI system using an acoustic lens with a two-dimensional (2D) receiver array with 127 elements corresponding to a field of view (FOV) spanning 15° horizontally by 9° vertically. In this study, we investigated the effects of the direction of the FOV and the spatial noise distribution on the 2D target image obtained by ANI. Here, the noise sources in front of the target are called “front light”, and those at the rear of the target are called “back light”. The second sea trial was conducted to image targets arranged in the FOV and measure the positions of noise sources at Uchiura Bay in November 10-14, 2014. For front light, the pixel values in the on-target directions were greater than those in other directions owing to the dominant target scatterings. Reversely, for back light, the pixel values in the on-target directions were lower than those in other directions owing to the dominant direct noises such as “silhouette”.

  4. A new global zenith tropospheric delay model GZTD%一种新的全球对流层天顶延迟模型GZTD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚宜斌; 何畅勇; 张豹; 许超钤

    2013-01-01

    Troposphere delay is one of the main error sources in global navigation satellite systems (GNSS).Its obvious randomness is mainly attributed to meteorological parameters (total pressure,temperature and water vapor pressure,etc.).In this paper,the temporal and spatial variations of global Zenith Troposphere Delay (ZTD) is analyzed using the time series of global 4D-grid ZTD from 2002 to 2009,provided by Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS)Atmosphere.According to the analysis,a new global ZTD correction model without requiring meteorological parameters,called GZTD,is developed based on spherical harmonics.Experimental results show that the precision of inner coincidence of GZTD model (bias:0.2 cm,RMS:3.7 cm) considering the longitudinal and latitudinal variations of ZTD performs better than other latitude-only models,such as UNB3m (bias:3.4 cm,RMS:6.0 cm),UNB4 (bias:4.7 cm,RMS:7.4 cm),UNB3 (bias:4.0 cm,RMS:7.0 cm) and EGNOS (bias:4.5 cm,RMS:6.9 cm).Compared to ZTD time series from 385 global International GNSS Service (IGS) sites,GZTD model (bias:-0.02 cm,RMS:4.24 cm) is still clearly superior to other similar models.The GZTD model owns such advantages as well-performance,simplicity in computation and less parameters-requirement.%对流层延迟是GNSS导航定位主要误差源之一,主要受气象参数(如总气压、温度和水汽压等)的影响,具有变化随机性强的特点.本文利用GGOS Atmosphere提供的2002 2009年全球天顶对流层延迟格网时间序列研究了全球对流层天顶延迟的时空变化特征.并以此为基础对全球天顶对流层延迟(Zenith Troposphere Delay,ZTD)进行建模,提出了一种基于球谐函数的全球非气象参数对流层天顶延迟改正模型——GZTD模型.实验对比结果表明考虑ZTD经纬向变化的GZTD模型内符合精度全球统计结果(bias:0.2 cm,RMS:3.7 cm)优于只考虑ZTD纬向变化的UNB3m(bias:3.4 cm,RMS:6.0 cm)、UNB4 (bias:4.7 cm,RMS:7.4 cm)、UNB3 (bias:4.0 cm,RMS:7

  5. A new zenith-looking narrow-band radiometer-based system (ZEN) for dust aerosol optical depth monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansa, A. Fernando; Cuevas, Emilio; Torres, Benjamín; Barreto, África; García, Rosa D.; Cachorro, Victoria E.; de Frutos, Ángel M.; López, César; Ramos, Ramón

    2017-02-01

    A new zenith-looking narrow-band radiometer based system (ZEN), conceived for dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) monitoring, is presented in this paper. The ZEN system comprises a new radiometer (ZEN-R41) and a methodology for AOD retrieval (ZEN-LUT). ZEN-R41 has been designed to be stand alone and without moving parts, making it a low-cost and robust instrument with low maintenance, appropriate for deployment in remote and unpopulated desert areas. The ZEN-LUT method is based on the comparison of the measured zenith sky radiance (ZSR) with a look-up table (LUT) of computed ZSRs. The LUT is generated with the LibRadtran radiative transfer code. The sensitivity study proved that the ZEN-LUT method is appropriate for inferring AOD from ZSR measurements with an AOD standard uncertainty up to 0.06 for AOD500 nm ˜ 0.5 and up to 0.15 for AOD500 nm ˜ 1.0, considering instrumental errors of 5 %. The validation of the ZEN-LUT technique was performed using data from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) Cimel Electronique 318 photometers (CE318). A comparison between AOD obtained by applying the ZEN-LUT method on ZSRs (inferred from CE318 diffuse-sky measurements) and AOD provided by AERONET (derived from CE318 direct-sun measurements) was carried out at three sites characterized by a regular presence of desert mineral dust aerosols: Izaña and Santa Cruz in the Canary Islands and Tamanrasset in Algeria. The results show a coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.99 to 0.97, and root mean square errors (RMSE) ranging from 0.010 at Izaña to 0.032 at Tamanrasset. The comparison of ZSR values from ZEN-R41 and the CE318 showed absolute relative mean bias (RMB) < 10 %. ZEN-R41 AOD values inferred from ZEN-LUT methodology were compared with AOD provided by AERONET, showing a fairly good agreement in all wavelengths, with mean absolute AOD differences < 0.030 and R2 higher than 0.97.

  6. Airborne observation of 2011 Draconids meteor outburst: the Italian mission

    CERN Document Server

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2011-01-01

    The outburst of 8 October 2011 of Draconids meteors has been observed visually onboard of Alitalia AZ790 flight. The enhanced zenithal hourly rate around ZHR=300 from 19 UT to 21:50 UT has been observed over central Asia. The data and the method of analysis are described and compared with other observations made worldwide.

  7. [Measurement of atmosphere NO2 amounts and angle spacial distribution using zenith-light spectra and sky-light spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jing-Guo; Gong, Min; He, Jie; Cao, Ting-Ting; Liang, Hui-Min; Sun, Peng

    2009-07-01

    A novel approach to retrieving atmosphere NO2 slant column density is described, in which the sunlight scattered in the zenith direction and the skylight are used as the light sources. The slant column density of the same azimuth but different obliquities, which are between 0.5 x 10(16) and 11 x 10(16) molecule x cm(-2), with the angle from 85 degrees to 10 degrees, as well as that of the same obliquity but different azimuths, which are between 10(16) and 10(17) molecule cm(-2), were calculated. The study indicates that the results have good correlation with real atmosphere status. The angle spatial distribution could be embodied by the difference of NO2 slant column density in different azimuths and obliquities. The reference spectrum and sample spectrum were collected with the same instrument at the same time, so the measurement accuracy has been improved. This method favored not only real-time monitoring NO2 content of space arbitrary direction, especially near the ground NO2 pollution emergencies, but also overcast and rainy areas where it is very difficult to collect good direct solar spectrum.

  8. 超长焦距红外双视场光学系统设计%Design of infrared optical system with super-long focal length and dual field-of-view

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白玉琢; 木锐; 马琳; 贾钰超; 普群雁; 薛经纬

    2014-01-01

    设计了一种超长焦距中波红外双视场光学系统,该系统采用二次成像结构,通过透镜轴向移动实现变焦功能。设计结果表明,该系统可以实现超长焦距600~150 mm的变焦功能,且中心视场在探测器特征频率20 lp/mm处的光学传递函数值高于0.5,接近衍射极限,能够很好地满足军事侦察对远距离目标同时搜索和瞄准的要求。%A mid-wavelength infrared optical system with super-long focal length and dual field-of-view is de-signed in this paper .Based on the re-image configuration , this system can realize the zoom by axial motion of a lens along the optical axis .The design results show that this system realizes the zoom with a super-long focal length of 600-1 500 mm, and the MTF of the central view is more than 0.5 at the characteristic frequency of 20 lp/mm of detector , which shows its optical performance approximates to the diffraction limit .This system can meet the requirement of military investigation for seeking and aiming at target in a long distance .

  9. 对流层延迟修正的实证模型%Empirical model of correction for zenith tropospheric delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V F Kravchenko; V I Lutsenko; I V Lutsenko; D O Popov; A G Laush3; V N Gudkov3

    2014-01-01

    针对对流层延迟问题,考虑测量时对流层的折射率,采用标准模型计算对流层修正概率。经大量实验研究得到对流层延迟修正模型,它可以减少坐标测量误差约30%,海拔测量误差约40%。%The paper considers the possibility of correction of zenith tropospheric delays ,and calculates it with the standard model ,which takes into account the values of the refractive index of the troposphere at the time of measurement .Based on the experimental research ,this empirical model of correction for zenith tropospheric delays can reduce the measurement er -ror of coordinates to about 30% and altitude to about 40% .

  10. High time resolution PFISR and optical observations of naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Michell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Observations of naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines (NEIALs taken with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR using a mode with very high time resolution are presented. The auroral event took place over Poker Flat, Alaska on 8 February 2007 at 09:35 UT (~22:00 MLT, and the radar data are complemented by common-volume high-resolution auroral imaging. The NEIALs occurred during only one of the standard 15-s integration periods. The raw data of this time show very intermittent NEIALs which occur only during a few very short time intervals (≤1 s within the 15-s period. The time sampling of the raw data, ~19 ms on average, allows study of the time development of the NEIALs, though there are indications that even finer time resolution would be of interest. The analysis is based on the assumption that the NEIAL returns are the result of Bragg scattering from ion-acoustic waves that have been enhanced significantly above thermal levels. The spectra of the raw data indicate that although the up- and down-shifted shoulders can both become enhanced at the same time, (within 19 ms, they are most often enhanced individually. The overall power in the up-and down-shifted shoulders is approximately equal throughout the event, with the exception of one time, when very large up-shifted power was observed with no corresponding down-shifted power. This indicates that during the 480 μs pulse, the strongly enhanced ion-acoustic waves were only traveling downward and not upward. The exact time that the NEIALs occurred was when the radar beam was on the boundary of a fast-moving (~10 km/s, bright auroral structure, as seen in the high resolution auroral imaging of the magnetic zenith. When viewed with high time resolution, the occurrence of NEIALs is associated with rapid changes in auroral luminosity within the radar field of view due to fast-moving auroral fine structures.

  11. Enhancing real-time precise point positioning with zenith troposphere delay products and the determination of corresponding tropospheric stochastic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yibin; Peng, Wenjie; Xu, Chaoqian; Cheng, Shuyang

    2017-02-01

    By introducing two types of zenith troposphere delay (ZTD) products in precise point positioning (PPP), we developed the ZTD-corrected PPP and the ZTD-constrained PPP, both of them reduced the PPP convergence time. Both enhanced PPP methods are examined by global empirical ZTD models and regional ZTD corrections. For global ZTD models, we verified that ZTD-corrected PPP will deviate the positioning results, while ZTD-constrained PPP could produce unbiased estimations. Therefore, the latter is utilized to study the performance of global ZTD models (ITG, GPT2w, GZTD and UNB3m). After numerous experiments, we found that the performance of ZTD models was positively related to the real ZTD accuracy, and we proposed a universal tropospheric stochastic model 2SQR(9rms) which denotes double the square of nine times ZTD rms, to constrain ZTD in PPP. The proposed model subsequently was validated by real-time static and kinematic ZTD-constrained PPP on the premise that the ZTD rms on every station was known. Compared with traditional PPP, in static PPP, the number of improved stations is increased by 15.5 per cent (ITG), 14.4 per cent (GPT2w), 11.1 per cent (GZTD) and 8.3 per cent (UNB3m). For kinematic PPP, PPP constrained by ITG model still had the best performance, the number of improved stations is increased by 14.4 per cent, after 30 min of initialization time, 13.4 cm east, 13.4 cm north and 11.7 cm up positioning accuracy was obtained, compared with 15.3 cm east, 15.3 cm north and 14.3 cm up accuracy by traditional PPP. In addition, experiments using regional ZTD corrections to enhance real-time PPP showed that both ZTD-corrected PPP and ZTD-constrained PPP can notably reduce the convergence time on the vertical component (within 15 cm).

  12. Influence of field of view alignment on division of time polarimetry accuracy%视场重合程度对分时偏振测量精度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王羿; 洪津; 骆冬根; 胡亚东; 汪方斌; 李志伟

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all polarization measurement suffers from field of view (FOV) misalignment. FOV misalignment would result in discrepancy between the polarization measurement to the target and actual polarization information, named artificial polarization. Instrument and the platform (plane or satellite) movement are the main factors resulting in FOV misalignment of division of time polarization measurement. First of all, the principle of polarization measurement was discussed. The reason of FOV alignment influencing on polarimetry accuracy was described. Then the method on measurement on FOV alignment was proposed on reviewing and summarizing domestic and international current research. After that, factors on influence of FOV alignment space borne and the compensate effect were analyzed in detail. Finally, the discussion on a imaging Polarimeter was shown. Results indicate that FOV misalignment caused by satellite is decreased after compensation. Polarimetry accuracy was increased.%视场不完全重合是偏振测量的共性问题。视场不重合导致对目标探测时获取的偏振信息与真实的偏振信息存在差异,即产生伪偏振。造成分时偏振测量视场不重合的主要因素由两方面构成:仪器自身和仪器所搭载平台(飞机或卫星)的运动状态。首先介绍了偏振测量的基本原理,提出了视场重合程度影响偏振测量精度的原因;其次,结合国内外研究现状,提出了视场不重合的度量方法;再次,重点分析了星载背景下影响视场不重合的因素以及改进措施;最后以某星载偏振成像仪为例给出了分析结果并讨论。结果表明:采取补偿措施后由卫星平台造成的视场不重合程度远小于采取补偿前,仪器偏振测量精度得到了提高。

  13. Interference visibility of wide-field-of-view polarization interference imaging spetrometer%宽场偏振干涉成像光谱仪的调制度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海英; 张三喜; 王维强; 张伟光; 张玉伦

    2014-01-01

    干涉成像光谱技术是一种集双光束干涉技术、二维成像技术以及高分辨率光谱技术于一体的高新遥感探测技术,常用来进行监视、识别和探测各种民用和军事目标。基于双折射晶体的宽场偏振型干涉成像光谱仪是该技术中的一种典型代表,组成其系统的偏光元件的性能是决定其成像质量和光谱复原精度的关键因素。论文考虑元件偏振误差和延迟误差对光路传播的影响,采用偏振追迹法推导出了系统干涉调制度的理论表达式,给出了其随入射角、入射波长、入射方位角以及元件偏振化方向和相位延迟量的变化特性,并定量分析了其允差范围。这为基于偏光器件成像光谱仪的系统设计、高光谱复原以及工程实践提供了重要的理论指导和技术支持。%Interference imaging spectroscopy (IIS) is a novel high technology integrated by the two-beam interference technique, 2D imaging technique and spectroscopy with high resolution. The wide-field-of-view polarized type is an attractive scheme in IIS. It employs polarized components to realize interference and thus the image quality and spectrum reconstruction are principally determined by the characteristics of these polarization components. In this work, theoretical analysis of the interference visibility was performed by considering the polarization deviations and the retardation deviation of elements. The theoretical expression of interference visibility was deduced by polarization tracing method. The varying characteristics of interference visibility with incident angle, wavelength, azimuth angle, polarization direction and phase retardation were presented and the permissible deviation was quantitatively analyzed. This work would provide suggestions for system design, hyperspectral reconstruction and engineering practice of spectrometers composed of polarization components.

  14. SABRE observations of Pi2 pulsations: case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, E. G.; Lester, M.

    1997-01-01

    The characteristics of substorm-associated Pi2 pulsations observed by the SABRE coherent radar system during three separate case studies are presented. The SABRE field of view is well positioned to observe the differences between the auroral zone pulsation signature and that observed at mid-latitudes. During the first case study the SABRE field of view is initially in the eastward electrojet, equatorward and to the west of the substorm-enhanced electrojet current. As the interval progresses, the western, upward field-aligned current of the substorm current wedge moves westward across the longitudes of the radar field of view. The westward motion of the wedge is apparent in the spatial and temporal signatures of the associated Pi2 pulsation spectra and polarisation sense. During the second case study, the complex field-aligned and ionospheric currents associated with the pulsation generation region move equatorward into the SABRE field of view and then poleward out of it again after the third pulsation in the series. The spectral content of the four pulsations during the interval indicate different auroral zone and mid-latitude signatures. The final case study is from a period of low magnetic activity when SABRE observes a Pi2 pulsation signature from regions equatorward of the enhanced substorm currents. There is an apparent mode change between the signature observed by SABRE in the ionosphere and that on the ground by magnetometers at latitudes slightly equatorward of the radar field of view. The observations are discussed in terms of published theories of the generation mechanisms for this type of pulsation. Different signatures are observed by SABRE depending on the level of magnetic activity and the position of the SABRE field of view relative to the pulsation generation region. A twin source model for Pi2 pulsation generation provides the clearest explanation of the signatures observed Acknowledgements. The authors are grateful to Prof. D. J. Southwood

  15. 超大视场红外鱼眼告警系统的成像响应特性分析%Imaging response characteristics analysis of ultra-wide field of view infrared fish-eye warning system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周玉龙; 王永仲

    2011-01-01

    超大视场红外鱼眼告警系统具有凝视半球空域,实时感知来自空中不同方向威胁的独特优点,在未来战争中必将有着广泛的应用.而对超大视场红外鱼眼告警系统的成像响应特性进行分析有助于解决其在应用中所出现的问题.对系统的温度响应特性、时间响应特性以及像面照度进行了分析,结果表明,在相同的环境温度下,系统的温度响应特性是线性的,且随着时间的推移系统的输出逐渐变大,在约70 min以后趋于稳定;当环境温度升高时,系统输出也相应变大,说明系统存在着能量漂移.通过对实验结果的进一步分析,结果表明,这种能量漂移是环境温度和系统的自热效应共同作用的结果.通过对同一目标不同位置处的灰度值进行分析,发现灰度值相对标准偏差仅为2.26%,说明不同位置处目标的灰度值几乎是相等的,从而表明系统的像面照度是均匀的,这与随后的理论分析相一致.对于超大视场红外鱼眼告警系统的算法设计方面具有重要的参考价值.%The ultra-wide field of view(UWFV)infrared fish-eye warning system has the ability of staring hemisphere space so that it can sense the threats from different directions at real time,which makes it be widely used in the future modern wars.It will be helpful in solving the problems in practical application to analyze the thermal imaging response characteristics of UWFV infrared fish-eye warning system.In this paper,the thermal imaging response characteristics including temperature response,time response and image illumination were analyzed respectively for UWFV infrared fish-eye warning system.It was found that under the same ambient temperature condition,the system temperature response was linear.With the process of time,the system output became bigger gradually,and it tended to be a fixed value after about 70 minutes.When the ambient temperature got higher,the system output was also

  16. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

    2011-05-24

    We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: • Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. • Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. • Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

  17. The prediction of zenith range refraction from surface measurements of meteorological parameters. [mathematical models of atmospheric refraction used to improve spacecraft tracking space navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    In the last two decades, increasingly sophisticated deep space missions have placed correspondingly stringent requirements on navigational accuracy. As part of the effort to increase navigational accuracy, and hence the quality of radiometric data, much effort has been expended in an attempt to understand and compute the tropospheric effect on range (and hence range rate) data. The general approach adopted has been that of computing a zenith range refraction, and then mapping this refraction to any arbitrary elevation angle via an empirically derived function of elevation. The prediction of zenith range refraction derived from surface measurements of meteorological parameters is presented. Refractivity is separated into wet (water vapor pressure) and dry (atmospheric pressure) components. The integration of dry refractivity is shown to be exact. Attempts to integrate wet refractivity directly prove ineffective; however, several empirical models developed by the author and other researchers at JPL are discussed. The best current wet refraction model is here considered to be a separate day/night model, which is proportional to surface water vapor pressure and inversely proportional to surface temperature. Methods are suggested that might improve the accuracy of the wet range refraction model.

  18. Observation and Characterization of a Cosmic Muon Neutrino Flux from the Northern Hemisphere Using Six Years of IceCube Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Argüelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Burgman, A.; Carver, T.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Eller, P.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Giang, W.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Krüger, C.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Moulai, M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Peiffer, P.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sanchez Herrera, S. E.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schimp, M.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Rossem, M.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Weiss, M. J.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.; Icecube Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    The IceCube Collaboration has previously discovered a high-energy astrophysical neutrino flux using neutrino events with interaction vertices contained within the instrumented volume of the IceCube detector. We present a complementary measurement using charged current muon neutrino events where the interaction vertex can be outside this volume. As a consequence of the large muon range the effective area is significantly larger but the field of view is restricted to the Northern Hemisphere. IceCube data from 2009 through 2015 have been analyzed using a likelihood approach based on the reconstructed muon energy and zenith angle. At the highest neutrino energies between 194 {TeV} and 7.8 {PeV} a significant astrophysical contribution is observed, excluding a purely atmospheric origin of these events at 5.6σ significance. The data are well described by an isotropic, unbroken power-law flux with a normalization at 100 {TeV} neutrino energy of ({0.90}-0.27+0.30)× {10}-18 {{GeV}}-1 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1 {{sr}}-1 and a hard spectral index of γ =2.13+/- 0.13. The observed spectrum is harder in comparison to previous IceCube analyses with lower energy thresholds which may indicate a break in the astrophysical neutrino spectrum of unknown origin. The highest-energy event observed has a reconstructed muon energy of (4.5+/- 1.2) {PeV} which implies a probability of less than 0.005 % for this event to be of atmospheric origin. Analyzing the arrival directions of all events with reconstructed muon energies above 200 {TeV} no correlation with known γ-ray sources was found. Using the high statistics of atmospheric neutrinos we report the current best constraints on a prompt atmospheric muon neutrino flux originating from charmed meson decays which is below 1.06 in units of the flux normalization of the model in Enberg et al.

  19. Very short-term reactive forecasting of the solar ultraviolet index using an extreme learning machine integrated with the solar zenith angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravinesh C; Downs, Nathan; Parisi, Alfio V; Adamowski, Jan F; Quilty, John M

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to erythemally-effective solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) that contributes to malignant keratinocyte cancers and associated health-risk is best mitigated through innovative decision-support systems, with global solar UV index (UVI) forecast necessary to inform real-time sun-protection behaviour recommendations. It follows that the UVI forecasting models are useful tools for such decision-making. In this study, a model for computationally-efficient data-driven forecasting of diffuse and global very short-term reactive (VSTR) (10-min lead-time) UVI, enhanced by drawing on the solar zenith angle (θs) data, was developed using an extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm. An ELM algorithm typically serves to address complex and ill-defined forecasting problems. UV spectroradiometer situated in Toowoomba, Australia measured daily cycles (0500-1700h) of UVI over the austral summer period. After trialling activations functions based on sine, hard limit, logarithmic and tangent sigmoid and triangular and radial basis networks for best results, an optimal ELM architecture utilising logarithmic sigmoid equation in hidden layer, with lagged combinations of θs as the predictor data was developed. ELM's performance was evaluated using statistical metrics: correlation coefficient (r), Willmott's Index (WI), Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (ENS), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute error (MAE) between observed and forecasted UVI. Using these metrics, the ELM model's performance was compared to that of existing methods: multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS), M5 Model Tree, and a semi-empirical (Pro6UV) clear sky model. Based on RMSE and MAE values, the ELM model (0.255, 0.346, respectively) outperformed the MARS (0.310, 0.438) and M5 Model Tree (0.346, 0.466) models. Concurring with these metrics, the Willmott's Index for the ELM, MARS and M5 Model Tree models were 0.966, 0.942 and 0.934, respectively. About 57% of the ELM model's absolute

  20. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 890119A1. 10032 Alsys AlsyCOMP 019, Version 4.1 Zenith Z-248 Model 50 and Intel isBC 286/12 Single Board Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-19

    Zenith Z-248 Model 50 under MS/DOS, Version 3.2 (host) to Intel isBC 286/12 single board computer (target), ACVC 1.10 g0 01 03 004 DD tŘ 1473 1DITION...Intel isBC 286/12 single board computer Completion of On-Site Testing: 19 January 1989 AcCesion For DTIC Tii prepared BY: . AFNOR .,ltir...Number: 890119A1.10032 Host: Zenith Z-248 Model 50 under MS/DOS, Version 3.2 Target: Intel isBC 286/12 single board computer Testing Completed 19 January

  1. Lighting measurement station: measurements of natural lighting for characterization of sky and zenith illuminance; Estacao de medicao de iluminacao: medicao de niveis de iluminacao natural para caracterizacao de iluminancias de ceu e luminancia de zenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Roberta Vieira Goncalves de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Arquitetura. Dept. de Tecnologia da Arquitetura e do Urbanismo]. E-mail: roberta@arq.ufmg.br; Pereira, Fernando Oscar Ruttkay [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Arquitetura. Lab. de Conforto Ambiental]. E-mail: feco@arq.ufsc.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes the assembly of a standard station for measuring the day lighting for evaluation of the natural light availability. The mounting and data obtention form will also be described from a standard IDMP day lighting station for measuring the data from measuring zenith, horizontal, and vertical illuminance of the sky and vertical irradiance for the cardinal points.

  2. Zenith sky brightness and celestial objects visibility during total solar eclipse on March 9, 2016 at Terentang Beach Bangka Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, A. F. C.; Asmoro, C. P.; Rochman, A. A.; Ramalis, T. R.; Utama, J. A.; Ardi, N. D.; Amsor; Nugraha, M. G.; Saepuzaman, D.; Sutiadi, A.; Nurfiani, D.

    2016-11-01

    This paper endeavor to describe sky brightness measurements which was carried out by a team of total solar eclipse observers (TOGEMA) on 9th March 2016. The observations took place at Tarentang Beach, Bangka Island and it utilized the SQM-LU instrument (Sky Quality Meter- USB Connector) with 1 second time interval data. During total phase that lasted about 1 minute 52 seconds, the instrument recorded the brightness of the sky of 12.88 mag/["]2 as the dimmest value. This value is approximately 500 times brighter than the dimmest night sky conditions at the same location, obtained on the previous observation. It was found that the brightest sky that could be measured by SQM-LU during Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) 2016 was 5.91 mag/["]2. The activity with digital camera also captured the appearance of Venus and Mercury. The appearance of Venus (-3.71 mag) confirmed naked eye limited magnitude theory. This may explain the inability of observers to perceive Mercury (0.46 mag) using naked eye during the total phase of solar eclipse.

  3. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF THE NOVA IN V407 CYGNI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliu, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bradbury, S. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Decerprit, G. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Duke, C., E-mail: daniel-d-gall@uiowa.edu, E-mail: kazuma-tsurusaki@uiowa.edu [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); and others

    2012-07-20

    We report on very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray observations of V407 Cygni, a symbiotic binary that underwent a nova outburst producing 0.1-10 GeV gamma rays during 2010 March 10-26. Observations were made with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System during 2010 March 19-26 at relatively large zenith angles due to the position of V407 Cyg. An improved reconstruction technique for large zenith angle observations is presented and used to analyze the data. We do not detect V407 Cygni and place a differential upper limit on the flux at 1.6 TeV of 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (at the 95% confidence level). When considered jointly with data from Fermi-LAT, this result places limits on the acceleration of very high energy particles in the nova.

  4. VERITAS Observations of the Nova in V407 Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Decerprit, G.; Dickherber, R.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We report on very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray observations of V407 Cygni, a symbiotic binary that underwent a nova outburst producing 0.1- 10 GeV gamma rays during 2010 March 10-26. Observations were made with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System during 2010 March 19-26 at relatively large zenith angles, due to the position of V407 Cyg. An improved reconstruction technique for large zenith angle observations is presented and used to analyze the data. We do not detect V407 Cygni and place a differential upper limit on the flux at 1.6 TeV of 2.3 10(exp -12) erg/sq cm/s (at the 95% confidence level). When considered jointly with data from Fermi-LAT, this result places limits on the acceleration of very high energy particles in the nova.

  5. VERITAS Observations of the Nova in V407 Cygni

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Decerprit, G; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dumm, J; Dwarkadas, V V; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Lee, K; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nuñez, P D; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Skole, C; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Welsing, R; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2012-01-01

    We report on very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray observations of V407 Cygni, a symbiotic binary that underwent a nova outburst producing 0.1-10 GeV gamma rays during 2010 March 10-26. Observations were made with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System during 2010 March 19-26 at relatively large zenith angles, due to the position of V407 Cyg. An improved reconstruction technique for large zenith angle observations is presented and used to analyze the data. We do not detect V407 Cygni and place a differential upper limit on the flux at 1.6 TeV of 2.3 \\times 10^(-12) erg cm^(-2) s^(-1) (at the 95% confidence level). When considered jointly with data from Fermi-LAT, this result places limits on the acceleration of very high energy particles in the nova.

  6. Odin/OSIRIS observations of stratospheric NO3 through sunrise and sunset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Haley

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The nitrate radical (NO3 has been detected in visible limb-scattered spectra measured by the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS on-board the Odin satellite when observing at large solar zenith angles (91–97°. Apparent slant column densities of NO3 at tangent heights between 10 and 45 km are derived via spectral fitting in the 610–680 nm window. Using observations from multiple scans spanning solar zenith angles of 91–97°, the rapid evolution of NO3 through sunrise and sunset can be traced. Slant column densities are found to be generally consistent with those simulated using a radiative transfer model with coupled photochemistry. In addition, a strong dependence of NO3 with temperature is observed. These results indicate that our current knowledge of NO3 photochemistry is generally consistent with OSIRIS observations to within the limitations of the radiative transfer modeling. Furthermore, they reveal that OSIRIS possesses signal-to-noise sufficient to make useful measurements of scattered sunlight out to solar zenith angles of 91–97° and suggest the possibility of retrieving profile information for NO3 and other species at large solar zenith angles.

  7. Abundance analysis of prime B-type targets for asteroseismology II. B6--B9.5 stars in the field of view of the CoRoT

    CERN Document Server

    Niemczura, E; Aerts, C

    2009-01-01

    The CoRoT satellite is collecting precise time-resolved photometry for tens of asteroseismology targets. To ensure a correct interpretation of the CoRoT data, the atmospheric parameters, chemical compositions, and rotational velocities of the stars must be determined. The main goal of the ground-based seismology support program for the CoRoT mission was to obtain photometric and spectroscopic data for stars in the fields monitored by the satellite. These ground-based observations were collected in the GAUDI archive. High-resolution spectra of more than 200 B-type stars are available in this database, and about 45% of them is analysed here. To derive the effective temperature of the stars, we used photometric indices. Surface gravities were obtained by comparing observed and theoretical Balmer line profiles. To determine the chemical abundances and rotational velocities, we used a spectrum synthesis method, which consisted of comparing the observed spectrum with theoretical ones based on the assumption of LTE....

  8. Invited Article: First Flight in Space of a Wide-field-of-view Soft X-Ray Imager Using Lobster-Eye Optics: Instrument Description and Initial Flight Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael; Porter, F. Scott; Sibeck, David G.; Carter, Jenny A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chomay, Dennis J.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Galeazzi, Massiniliano; Keller, John; Koutroumpa, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development, launch into space, and initial results from a prototype wide eld-of-view (FOV) soft X-ray imager that employs Lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) is the rst instrument using this type of optics launched into space and provides proof-of-concept for future ight instruments capable of imaging structures such as the terrestrial cusp, the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere, comets, the moon, and the solar wind interaction with planetary bodies like Venus and Mars.

  9. Invited Article: First Flight in Space of a Wide-field-of-view Soft X-Ray Imager Using Lobster-Eye Optics: Instrument Description and Initial Flight Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael; Porter, F. Scott; Sibeck, David G.; Carter, Jenny A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chomay, Dennis J.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Galeazzi, Massiniliano; Keller, John; Koutroumpa, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development, launch into space, and initial results from a prototype wide eld-of-view (FOV) soft X-ray imager that employs Lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) is the rst instrument using this type of optics launched into space and provides proof-of-concept for future ight instruments capable of imaging structures such as the terrestrial cusp, the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere, comets, the moon, and the solar wind interaction with planetary bodies like Venus and Mars.

  10. ClOOCl photolysis at high solar zenith angles: analysis of the RECONCILE self-match flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Sumińska-Ebersoldt

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The photolysis frequency of dichlorine peroxide (ClOOCl JClOOCl is a critical parameter in catalytic cycles destroying ozone in the polar stratosphere. In the atmospherically relevant wavelength region, published laboratory measurements of ClOOCl absorption cross sections and spectra are not in good agreement, resulting in significant discrepancies in JClOOCl. Previous investigations of the consistency with atmospheric observations of ClO and ClOOCl have focused on the photochemical equilibrium between ClOOCl formation and photolysis, and thus could only constrain the ratio of JClOOCl over the rate constant of the ClO recombination reaction krec. Here, we constrain the atmospherically effective JClOOCl independent of krec using ClO data sampled in the same air masses before and directly after sunrise. Over sunrise, when the ClO/ClOOCl system comes out of thermal equilibrium and the influence of the ClO recombination reaction is negligible, the rise in ClO concentration is significantly faster than expected from JClOOCl based on the absorption spectrum proposed by Pope et al. (2007, but does not warrant cross sections larger than recently published values by Papanastasiou et al. (2009. In particular, the existence of a significant ClOOCl absorption band longwards of 420 nm, is effectively ruled out by our observations. Additionally, the night-time ClO observations show that the ClO/ClOOCl thermal equilibrium constant can not be significantly higher than the one proposed by Plenge et al. (2005.

  11. Odin/OSIRIS observations of stratospheric NO3 through sunrise and sunset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Haley

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The nitrate radical (NO3 has been detected in visible limb-scattered spectra measured by the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS on-board the Odin satellite when observing at large solar zenith angles (91–97°. Apparent slant column densities of NO3 at tangent heights between 10 and 45 km are derived via spectral fitting in the 590–680 nm window. Using observations from multiple scans spanning solar zenith angles of 91–97°, the rapid evolution of NO3 through sunrise and sunset can be traced. Slant column densities are found to be consistent with those simulated using a radiative transfer model with coupled photochemistry. In addition, a strong dependence of NO3 with temperature is observed. These results indicate that OSIRIS possesses signal-to-noise sufficient to make useful measurements of scattered sunlight out to solar zenith angles of 96–97° and suggests the possibility of retrieving profile information for NO3 and other species at large solar zenith angles.

  12. ClOOCl photolysis at high solar zenith angles: analysis of the RECONCILE self-match flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Sumińska-Ebersoldt

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The photolysis rate constant of dichlorine peroxide (ClOOCl, ClO dimer JClOOCl is a critical parameter in catalytic cycles destroying ozone (O3 in the polar stratosphere. In the atmospherically relevant wavelength region (λ > 310 nm, significant discrepancies between laboratory measurements of ClOOCl absorption cross sections and spectra cause a large uncertainty in JClOOCl. Previous investigations of the consistency of published JClOOCl with atmospheric observations of chlorine monoxide (ClO and ClOOCl have focused on the photochemical equilibrium between ClOOCl formation and photolysis, and thus could only constrain the ratio of JClOOCl over the ClOOCl formation rate constant krec. Here, we constrain the atmospherically effective JClOOCl independent of krec, using ClO measured in the same air masses before and directly after sunrise during an aircraft flight that was part of the RECONCILE field campaign in the winter 2010 from Kiruna, Sweden. Over sunrise, when the ClO/ClOOCl system comes out of thermal equilibrium and the influence of the ClO recombination reaction is negligible, the increase in ClO concentrations is significantly faster than expected from JClOOCl based on the absorption spectrum proposed by Pope et al. (2007, but does not warrant cross sections larger than recently published values by Papanastasiou et al. (2009. In particular, the existence of a significant ClOOCl absorption band longwards of 420 nm is not supported by our observations. The observed night-time ClO would not be consistent with a ClO/ClOOCl thermal equilibrium constant significantly higher than the one proposed by Plenge et al. (2005.

  13. The effect of solar zenith angle on MODIS cloud optical and microphysical retrievals within marine liquid water clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Grosvenor

    2014-07-01

    better predictor of τ biases at high θ0 than σCTT. For a given θ0, large decreases in re were observed as the cloud top heterogeneity changed from low to high values, although it is possible that physical changes to the clouds associated with cloud heterogeneity variation may account for some of this. However, for a given cloud top heterogeneity we find that the value of θ0 affects the sign and magnitude of the relative differences between re1.6, re2.1 and re3.7, which has implications for attempts to retrieve vertical cloud information using the different MODIS bands. The relatively larger decrease in re3.7 and the lack of change of re1.6 with both θ0 and cloud top heterogeneity suggest that re3.7 is more prone to retrieval biases due to high θ0 than the other bands. We discuss some possible reasons for this. Our results have important implications for individual MODIS swaths at high θ0, which may be used for case studies for example. θ0 values > 65° can occur at latitudes as low as 28° in mid-winter and for higher latitudes the problem will be more acute. Also, Level-3 daily averaged MODIS cloud property data consist of the averages of several overpasses for the high latitudes, which will occur at a range of θ0 values. Thus, some biased data are likely to be included. It is also likely that some of the θ0 effects described here would apply to τ and re retrievals from satellite instruments that use visible light at similar wavelengths along with forward retrieval models that assume plane parallel clouds, such as the GOES imagers, SEVIRI, etc.

  14. A NuSTAR observation of the center of the coma cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gastaldello, Fabio; Wik, Daniel R.; Molendi, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a 55 ks NuSTAR observation of the core of the Coma Cluster. The global spectrum can be explained by thermal gas emission, with a conservative 90% upper limit to non-thermal inverse Compton (IC) emission of 5.1 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 in a 12' × 12' field of view. The bright...

  15. First catalogue of variable sources observed by INTEGRAL/OMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Garzón, J.; Domingo, A.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    The Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC) onboard INTEGRAL provides photometry in the V Johnson band. With an aperture of 50 mm and a field of view of 5°×5°, OMC is able to detect optical sources brighter than around V˜18 from a previously selected list of potential targets of interest. This first catalogue of variable sources observed by OMC contains more than 5000 variables objects. The long time interval of the observations (more than 7 years) allowed us to study the potential periodicity of these sources determining periods for more than 1000 objects.

  16. Observing the high redshift universe using the VIMOS-IFU

    CERN Document Server

    Foucaud, S; Zanichelli, A; Garilli, B; Giallongo, E

    2003-01-01

    We describe the advantages of using Integral Field Spectroscopy to observe deep fields of galaxy. The VIMOS Integral Field Unit is particularly suitable for this kind of studies thanks to its large field-of-view (~ 1 arcmin^2). After a short description of the VIMOS-IFU data reduction, we detail the main scientific issues which can be addressed using observations of the Hubble Deep Field South with a combination of Integral Field Spectroscopy and broad band optical and Near-Infrared imaging.

  17. 薄层小视野高分辨MRI结合DCE-MRI对卵巢肿瘤的诊断价值%Diagnostic value of high resolution MRI using thin-section and small field of view technique combined with DCE-MRI in ovarian tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金兴兴; 岳巍; 韩东明; 闫瑞芳; 孟楠; 翟战胜

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨薄层小视野高分辨 MRI结合DCE-MRI对卵巢肿瘤的临床诊断价值。方法:51例经超声检出的卵巢肿块患者,均行盆腔MRI平扫、病变区薄层小视野高分辨MRI和DCE-MRI。分析卵巢肿瘤的影像学表现,并与手术病理结果进行对照,比较三种检查方法对卵巢肿瘤的诊断准确性。结果:51例患者共检出57个病灶。常规 MRI、薄层高分辨 MRI对卵巢肿块的定性诊断准确率分别为85.96%(49/57)和96.49%(55/57),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。常规MRI和薄层高分辨 MRI分别结合DCE-MRI检查的诊断符合率为92.98%(53/57)和100%(57/57),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。常规结合薄层高分辨MRI与常规结合DCE-MRI检查对卵巢肿块的定性诊断准确率的差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论:薄层小视野高分辨 MRI 对卵巢肿瘤的诊断具有重要临床价值,薄层小视野高分辨 MRI 结合 DCE-MRI可以明显提高卵巢肿瘤的定性诊断准确性,但薄层高分辨 MRI尚不能取代DCE-MRI。%Objective:To explore the diagnostic value of high resolution MRI (HR-MRI)using thin-section and small field of view technique combined with DCE-MRI in ovarian tumor.Methods:5 1 patients with ovarian mass detected by ultra-sound underwent routine pelvic MRI scan,high resolution MRI using thin-section and small field of view technique in the re-gion of lesions and DCE-MRI examination.The imaging characteristics of ovarian tumors were analyzed and correlated with postoperative pathology,and the diagnostic accuracy of the three methods of scanning were compared.Results:In the 51 pa-tients,57 ovarian tumors were found,the accuracy of characteristic diagnosis of routine MRI was 87.71% (49/57),and that of HR-MRI was 96.49% (55/57),there were statistical difference between the two methods (P0.05).Conclusion:High resolution MRI (HR-MRI)using thin-section and small field

  18. 大视场宽谱段高分辨率分波段机载紫外-可见光成像光谱仪设计%Design of Airborne Dual Channel Ultraviolet-Visible Imaging Spectrometer with Large Field of View,Wide Spectrum, and High Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝爱花; 胡炳樑; 白加光; 李立波; 于涛; 李思远

    2013-01-01

    紫外-可见光(200~500 nm )成像光谱仪是空间遥感的重要组成部分,本文基于机载紫外-可见成像光谱仪的特殊性和实际应用要求,提出了一种采用面阵CCD的摆扫式成像光谱仪,这样既克服了传统线阵CCD摆扫式成像光谱仪空间分辨率低的缺点,同时又弥补了推扫式成像光谱仪视场范围有限的缺点,能够满足大视场、宽谱段、高分辨率成像光谱仪的应用要求;此外,考虑400~500 nm波段中200~250 nm波段二级光谱的影响和<290 nm的短波区和>310 nm的长波区两个波段相差3个数量级的辐射波动,采用了分波段、分系统的方式独立进行消杂光光谱成像。在系统结构设计方面,本着高性能、低成本的设计理念,选用了两镜同心系统作为望远系统,Czerny-T urner平面光栅结构作为成像光谱仪系统的光学设计方案;设计了一种不使用任何辅助光学元件,全部采用球面镜结构的成像光谱仪。整个系统结构简单、紧凑,性能优良,可行性好。全谱段、全视场调制传递函数值在0.6以上。%The ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis 200~500 nm) imaging spectrometer is an important part of space remote sensing . Based on special requirements and practical application of the airborne UV-VIS spectrometer ,a kind of scanning imaging spec-trometer using area array CCD is proposed ,which can meet the application requirements of large field of view ,wide spectrum and high resolution .It overcomes low spatial resolution of traditional line array CCD scanning imaging spectrometer ,and limited field of view of the pushbroom imaging spectrometer .In addition ,dual channel was designed to reduce stray light .400~500 nm band includes two order spectrum for 200~250 nm band ,and variation of radiance from earth between the shorter wavelength (310 nm) is above three orders of magnitude .In the structure design of the system , the imaging spectrometer is

  19. High Resolution Wide Field of View Stereographic Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overarching challenge of tele-presence is to provide an environment to the human operator that is sufficiently familiar that the interface itself does not become...

  20. Internal and external fields of view affect cybersickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerik, M.L. van; Vries, S.C. de; Bos, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    People playing computer games sometimes experience a form of visually induced motion sickness called cybersickness. This phenomenon poses a problem for the entertainment market as well as the practice of training, where serious gaming is gaining acceptance as a new way of training. Although cybersic

  1. Subcutaneous electrocardiogram monitors and their field of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzbaecher, Robert; Hampton, David R; Burke, Martin C; Garrett, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring of cardiac patients on a long-term, even permanent, basis has become possible. Postsurgical cases, those with significant risk factors, or patients with chronic conditions are candidates for these procedures to assess evolving risk factors and detect life-threatening events. A small sensing device can be implanted subcutaneously to assess the ECG, transmitting status and alerts to local caregivers or a remote monitoring service. We and others have shown that a differential electrode pair with only 2- to 3-cm spacing can produce QRS amplitudes greater than 1 mV, sufficient to accurately identify asystole, tachyarrhythmias, and ST-segment changes. Medtronic's REVEAL and St Jude Medical's CONFIRM are implantable look recorders (ILRs) with a single pair of subcutaneous electrodes mounted on the surface of the case (6 × 2 × 0.7 cm). They store representative rhythm strips when the heart rate exceeds preset limits or when the patient presses a button on the accompanying actuator. These records may be transferred for physician review during a subsequent office visit. Transoma's SLEUTH is a similar ILR, except that one of the electrodes is at the end of a 6-cm lead tunneled under the skin and the wider separation may result in a larger ECG amplitude. Instead of storing the records, SLEUTH transmits them through the skin to a home base unit, which sends them via telephone to a monitoring service. Angel Medical's ALERT system also has a tunneled lead, but one that is introduced pervenously into the right ventricle hoping to detect ST changes in addition to rhythm abnormalities. Advanced multivector ILR devices with integrated event alerting are rapidly approaching commercialization. AJ Medical Devices' CARDIOALARM (4 × 4 × 0.6 cm) has 4 electrodes at the corners of the square package, arranged as 2 orthogonal recording pairs that can produce a robust signal that is relatively immune to signal fluctuations caused by changes in the direction of cardiac activation and patient's body position. This permits accurate identification of dramatic changes in the ECG pattern, such as those occurring in ventricular fibrillation and polymorphic tachycardia. Because of this feature, CARDIOALARM can detect cardiac arrest, and its external receiver can alert bystanders to begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation and can automatically summon Emergency Medical Services. In the future, addition of other sensors, integration of data streams via body surface wireless networks, and real-time interpretive algorithms will allow enhanced monitoring systems to more generally assess evolving risks, the impacts of therapeutic interventions, and patient compliance with rehabilitative programs. When coupled to remote medical monitoring services, these devices have the potential to dramatically impact patient outcomes by lessening the diagnostic dependence on symptom recognition and decreasing event response times. Significant cost savings may also be realized through more efficient use of specialist resources, reduction in the number of office visits to physicians, and long-term improvements in patient health. Structural and behavior barriers to adoption need to be addressed for these methods to reach their full potential, addressing patient privacy concerns, adequate reimbursement, and integration into standard care protocols.

  2. Flight Simulator: Field of View Utilized in Performing Tactical Maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    were taken in the Simulator for Air-to-Air Combat (SAAC) and the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ). During the air-to-ground data collection...ground maneuvers were performed In the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ). The data collected provided an estimate of the FOV dimensions that a...tactical maneuvers were conducted in the AFHIRL ASPT located at Williams AFB. The ASPT had a fully instrumnted F-16 cockpit. The g-cueing was available

  3. Field of View Requirements for Carrier Landing Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Pilot Training ( ASPT ) at Williams Air Force Base. The visual image for the simulation was provided by a data base which crea&.ed the aircraft carrier...USS Forrestal (CVA-59) in the ASPT computer-image-generation systor.m. The pilots in these three groups’ were trained under different conditions. Two...Advanced Simalator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) would be ideal for this effort, and later, Lt Col Samuel T. Hannan and Capt Ricky A. Perry were assigned

  4. Electronically Steerable Antennas with Panoramic Scan Field of View Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electronically steerable antennas are key to effective radio transmission at millimeter-wave frequencies. To enable communication with rovers, robots, EVA...

  5. Resolution of ultramicroscopy and field of view analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Leischner

    Full Text Available In a recent publication we described a microscopical technique called Ultramicroscopy, combined with a histological procedure that makes biological samples transparent. With this combination we can gather three-dimensional image data of large biological samples. Here we present the theoretical analysis of the z-resolution. By analyzing the cross-section of the illuminating sheet of light we derive resolution values according to the Rayleigh-criterion. Next we investigate the resolution adjacent to the focal point of the illumination beam, analyze throughout what extend the illumination beam is of acceptable sharpness and investigate the resolution improvements caused by the objective lens. Finally we conclude with a useful rule for the sampling rates. These findings are of practical importance for researchers working with Ultramicroscopy to decide on adequate sampling rates. They are also necessary to modify deconvolution techniques to gain further image improvements.

  6. Camera relative orientation in large field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Dong, Mingli; Li, Wei; Sun, Peng

    2016-01-01

    A new relative orientation w local parameter optimization method of the essential matrix for the large scale close range photogrammetry is presented in this paper to improve the accuracy and stability of the measurement system. For the matched images, according to the closed-loop polynomial algorithm, the essential matrix is initialized, and an iterative algorithm based on local parameter optimization is proposed. Then the relative exterior orientation parameters are solved from the essential matrix, and only one correct solution is determined by the Cheirality constraints. The orientation experiment of the expandable truss microwave antenna profile measurement is carried out to verify the accuracy and reliability of the new method. Compared with the traditional methods, this new method has minimum projection error and the least iterations, and it will play a key role in the performance improvement of the whole system.

  7. Vignetting and Field of View with the KAMRA Corneal Inlay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Langenbucher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the effect of the KAMRA corneal inlay on the retinal image brightness in the peripheral visual field. Methods. A KAMRA inlay was “implanted” into a theoretical eye model in a corneal depth of 200 microns. Corneal radius was varied to a steep, normal, and flat (7.37, 7.77, and 8.17 mm version keeping the proportion of anterior to posterior radius constant. Pupil size was varied from 2.0 to 5.0 mm. Image brightness was determined for field angles from −70° to 70° with and without KAMRA and proportion of light attenuation was recorded. Results. In our parameter space, the attenuation in brightness ranges in between 0 and 60%. The attenuation in brightness is not affected by corneal shape. For large field angles where the incident ray bundle is passing through the peripheral cornea, brightness is not affected. For combinations of small pupil sizes (2.0 and 2.5 mm and field angles of 20–40°, up to 60% of light may be blocked with the KAMRA. Conclusion. For combinations of pupil sizes and field angles, the attenuation of image brightness reaches levels up to 60%. Our theoretical findings have to be clinically validated with detailed investigation of this vignetting effect.

  8. 一种基于梯度方向直方图的俯视行人的检测方法%Zenithal Pedestrian Detection Based on Histogram of Oriented Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐春晖

    2015-01-01

    There are extensive researches on pedestrian detection, which mostly suppose visible humans observed in flat view and are applied in video surveillance,driving assistance etc. However, sometimes pedestrian detection from another perspective should be considered in practice. In this paper, a histogram of oriented gradients ( HOG ) descriptor is introduced for the zenithal pedestrian head detection. The vectors extracted from training samples are trained in the support vector machine to get the classifier parameters, and then the vectors of test samples are input into the classifier to discriminate which targets are. Compared with the existing methods, the proposed descriptor highlights both the region and the contour of the object. Partitioning blocks are reformed, and the feature calculation and statistical method are changed adaptively to the task. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and can be applied to count pedestrians in vertical view with a faster processing speed.%目前已有很多关于行人检测方面的研究,这些研究基本建立在行人竖直站立或行走的平视图上,主要应用于视频监控和车载辅助驾驶等领域,但在实际应用中,有时需要从不同的视角检测行人。文中提出一种针对俯视行人检测方法,该方法将俯视行人头部的梯度方向直方图统计信息作为检测目标的特征。通过训练样本提取的特征向量在支持向量机中进行训练得到分类模型参数,然后提取检测样本的特征向量输入分类模型进行判别。与现有行人检测的梯度方向直方图算子相比,文中特征描述算子突出目标的区域与轮廓特征,在目标分块、特征计算和特征统计方法上均有变化。实验证明算法有效且处理速度明显提升。

  9. 改进的对流层天顶延迟估计方法%Improved Method of Estimate the Zenith Troposphere Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴文溢; 陈西宏; 孙际哲; 刘赞

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the poor performance of tradition models in the zenith tropospheric non-hydrostatic delay evaluation,a variable method based on improved Hopfield model was proposed.The meteorological parameters formula in the model of medium latitude atmosphere was used to infer the formula of the hydrostatic and non-hy-drostatic delay again in this method.In order to get the factors of temperature and water vapor pressure,the method interpolated value in the table of global tropospheric delay atmosphere parameter.By using the meteoro-logical data of eight International GPS service stations in Asia,the tropospheric delay was compared between im-proved model and tradition models,such as Hopfield model,Saastamoinen model and Black model.Computing results showed that the accuracy of improved model was better than tradition models.%针对传统对流层延迟模型在估计天顶湿延迟方面存在精度不高和稳定性差的问题,提出了基于改进Hopfield模型的对流层天顶延迟估计方法。该方法利用中纬度大气模式中的气象参数公式,重新推导了Hopfield模型中静力项和湿项延迟表达式,并利用全球对流层延迟气象参数格网值进行内插获取温度变化率和水汽压系数。选取亚洲地区不同经纬度的八个国际 GPS 服务(IGS,International GPS Service)站的气象数据,分别采用传统模型和改进模型进行对流层天顶延迟估计,计算结果表明改进模型的精度优于传统模型,尤其是湿项延迟方面,估算精度提高了一个数量级。

  10. Effect of densifying the GNSS GBAS network on monitoring the troposphere zenith total delay and precipitable water vapour content during severe weather events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapłon, Jan; Stankunavicius, Gintautas

    2016-04-01

    The dense ground based augmentation networks can provide the important information for monitoring the state of neutral atmosphere. The GNSS&METEO research group at Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences (WUELS) is operating the self-developed near real-time service estimating the troposphere parameters from GNSS data for the area of Poland. The service is operational since December 2012 and it's results calculated from ASG-EUPOS GBAS network (120 stations) data are supporting the EGVAP (http://egvap.dmi.dk) project. At first the zenith troposphere delays (ZTD) were calculated in hourly intervals, but since September 2015 the service was upgraded to include SmartNet GBAS network (Leica Geosystems Polska - 150 stations). The upgrade included as well: increasing the result interval to 30 minutes, upgrade from Bernese GPS Software v. 5.0 to Bernese GNSS Software v. 5.2 and estimation of the ZTD and it's horizontal gradients. Processing includes nowadays 270 stations. The densification of network from 70 km of mean distance between stations to 40 km created the opportunity to investigate on it's impact on resolution of estimated ZTD and integrated water vapour content (IWV) fields during the weather events of high intensity. Increase in density of ZTD measurements allows to define better the meso-scale features within different synoptic systems (e.g. frontal waves, meso-scale convective systems, squall lines etc). These meso-scale structures, as a rule are short living but fast developing and hardly predictable by numerical models. Even so, such limited size systems can produce very hazardous phenomena - like widespread squalls and thunderstorms, tornadoes, heavy rains, snowfalls, hail etc. because of prevalence of Cb clouds with high concentration of IWV. Study deals with two meteorological events: 2015-09-01 with the devastating squalls and rainfall bringing 2M Euro loss of property in northern Poland and 2015-10-12 with the very active front bringing

  11. An Investigation on the Use of Different Centroiding Algorithms and Star Catalogs in Astro-Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, Burak; Halicioglu, Kerem; Albayrak, Muge; Ulug, Rasit; Tevfik Ozludemir, M.; Deniz, Rasim

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade, the importance of high-precise geoid determination at local or national level has been pointed out by Turkish National Geodesy Commission. The Commission has also put objective of modernization of national height system of Turkey to the agenda. Meanwhile several projects have been realized in recent years. In Istanbul city, a GNSS/Levelling geoid was defined in 2005 for the metropolitan area of the city with an accuracy of ±3.5cm. In order to achieve a better accuracy in this area, "Local Geoid Determination with Integration of GNSS/Levelling and Astro-Geodetic Data" project has been conducted in Istanbul Technical University and Bogazici University KOERI since January 2016. The project is funded by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey. With the scope of the project, modernization studies of Digital Zenith Camera System are being carried on in terms of hardware components and software development. Accentuated subjects are the star catalogues, and centroiding algorithm used to identify the stars on the zenithal star field. During the test observations of Digital Zenith Camera System performed between 2013-2016, final results were calculated using the PSF method for star centroiding, and the second USNO CCD Astrograph Catalogue (UCAC2) for the reference star positions. This study aims to investigate the position accuracy of the star images by comparing different centroiding algorithms and available star catalogs used in astro-geodetic observations conducted with the digital zenith camera system.

  12. Validation of the CUTLASS HF radar gravity wave observing capability using EISCAT CP-1 data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Arnold

    Full Text Available Quasi-periodic fluctuations in the returned ground-scatter power from the SuperDARN HF radars have been linked to the passage of medium-scale gravity waves. We have applied a technique that extracts the first radar range returns from the F-region to study the spatial extent and characteristics of these waves in the CUTLASS field-of-view. Some ray tracing was carried out to test the applicability of this method. The EISCAT radar facility at Tromsø is well within the CUTLASS field-of-view for these waves and provides a unique opportunity to assess independently the ability of the HF radars to derive gravity wave information. Results from 1st March, 1995, where the EISCAT UHF radar was operating in its CP-1 mode, demonstrate that the radars were in good agreement, especially if one selects the electron density variations measured by EISCAT at around 235 km. CUTLASS and EISCAT gravity wave observations complement each other; the former extends the spatial field of view considerably, whilst the latter provides detailed vertical information about a range of ionospheric parameters.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere – atmosphere interactions · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics · Radio science (ionospheric propagations

  13. Estimation of the parameter error propagation in inversion based BRDF observations at single sun position

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小文; 高峰; 王锦地; A.H.Strahler; W.Lucht; C.Schaaf

    2000-01-01

    In multiangular remote sensing observations, the variable range of the solar zenith angle (SZN) is narrow. We takes the linear kernel-driven model as an example to analyze the parameter error propagation in inversion by using the observations at single sun position and to show that in such case it is unreliable to invert the BRDF tendency with SZN. To improve the algorithm, we suggest adding certain constraint for the changing trend of albedo with SZN in the model inversion.

  14. Search for GeV gamma-ray bursts with the ARGO-YBJ detector: summary of eight years of observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S.; Piazzoli, B. D' Ettorre; Di Girolamo, T. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Napoli " Federico II," Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Bernardini, P.; D' Amone, A.; De Mitri, I. [Dipartimento Matematica e Fisica " Ennio De Giorgi," Università del Salento, via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, 100049 Beijing (China); Branchini, P.; Budano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Camarri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Roma " Tor Vergata," via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Cardarelli, R.; Sciascio, G. Di [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Chen, T. L.; Danzengluobu [Tibet University, 850000 Lhasa, Xizang (China); Creti, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cui, S. W. [Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016, Hebei (China); Dai, B. Z., E-mail: digirola@na.infn.it, E-mail: Piero.Vallania@to.infn.it, E-mail: vigorito@to.infn.it [Yunnan University, 2 North Cuihu Rd., 650091 Kunming, Yunnan (China); Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-10

    The search for gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission in the energy range of 1-100 GeV in coincidence with the satellite detection has been carried out using the Astrophysical Radiation with Ground-based Observatory at YangBaJing (ARGO-YBJ) experiment. The high-altitude location (4300 m a.s.l.), the large active surface (∼6700 m{sup 2} of Resistive Plate Chambers), the wide field of view (∼2 sr, limited only by the atmospheric absorption), and the high duty cycle (>86%) make the ARGO-YBJ experiment particularly suitable to detect short and unexpected events like GRBs. With the scaler mode technique, i.e., counting all the particles hitting the detector with no measurement of the primary energy and arrival direction, the minimum threshold of ∼1 GeV can be reached, overlapping the direct measurements carried out by satellites. During the experiment lifetime from 2004 December 17 to 2013 February 7, a total of 206 GRBs occurring within the ARGO-YBJ field of view (zenith angle θ ≤ 45°) have been analyzed. This is the largest sample of GRBs investigated with a ground-based detector. Two light curve models have been assumed and since in both cases no significant excess has been found, the corresponding fluence upper limits in the 1-100 GeV energy region have been derived, with values as low as 10{sup –5} erg cm{sup –2}. The analysis of a subset of 24 GRBs with known redshift has been used to constrain the fluence extrapolation to the GeV region together with possible cutoffs under different assumptions on the spectrum.

  15. SMM coronagraph observations of particulate contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Warner, T.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent images taken by the white light coronagraph telescope aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) observatory show bright streaks that are apparently caused by particles associated with the spacecraft. In this report we describe these observations, and we analyze the times of their occurrence. We demonstrate that the sightings occur most often near SMM's orbital dawn, and we speculate that thermal shock is the mechanism that produces the particles. Although these sightings have not seriously affected the coronagraph's scientific operations, the unexpected passage of bright material through the field of view of sensitive spaceborne telescopes can lead to data loss or, in some cases, serious detector damage. The topic of space debris has become a significant concern for designers of both manned and unmanned orbiting platforms. The returned samples from the SMM spacecraft and the observations reported here provide a baseline of experience for future orbital platforms that plan long duration missions.

  16. LAMOST observations in the Kepler field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Cat P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST at the Xinglong observatory in China is a new 4-m telescope equipped with 4,000 optical fibers. In 2010, we initiated the LAMOST-Kepler project. We requested to observe the full field-of-view of the nominal Kepler mission with the LAMOST to collect low-resolution spectra for as many objects from the KIC 10 catalogue as possible. So far, 12 of the 14 requested LAMOST fields have been observed resulting in more than 68,000 low-resolution spectra. Our preliminary results show that the stellar parameters derived from the LAMOST spectra are in good agreement with those found in the literature based on high-resolution spectroscopy. The LAMOST data allows to distinguish dwarfs from giants and can provide the projected rotational velocity for very fast rotators.

  17. Techniques for computing regional radiant emittances of the earth-atmosphere system from observations by wide-angle satellite radiometers, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, J. F.; House, F. B.

    1975-01-01

    Radiometers on earth orbiting satellites measure the exchange of radiant energy between the earth-atmosphere (E-A) system and space at observation points in space external to the E-A system. Observations by wideangle, spherical and flat radiometers are analyzed and interpreted with regard to the general problem of the earth energy budget (EEB) and to the problem of determining the energy budget of regions smaller than the field of view (FOV) of these radiometers.

  18. NACO/SAM observations of sources at the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J; Alberdi, A; Pott, J U

    2012-01-01

    Sparse aperture masking (SAM) interferometry combined with Adaptive Optics (AO) is a technique that is uniquely suited to investigate structures near the diffraction limit of large telescopes. The strengths of the technique are a robust calibration of the Point Spread Function (PSF) while maintaining a relatively high dynamic range. We used SAM+AO observations to investigate the circumstellar environment of several bright sources with infrared excess in the central parsec of the Galaxy. For our observations, unstable atmospheric conditions as well as significant residuals after the background subtraction presented serious problems for the standard approach of calibrating SAM data via interspersed observations of reference stars. We circumvented these difficulties by constructing a synthesized calibrator directly from sources within the field-of-view. When observing crowded fields, this novel method can boost the efficiency of SAM observations because it renders interspersed calibrator observations unnecessary...

  19. Serendipitous asteroid observations by OSIRIS/Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carry, B.; Berthier, J.; Vachier, F.; Küppers, M.

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, many efforts have been undertaken to extract the astrometry, photometry, and colors of Solar System Small Bodies from large surveys and widefield camera, such as the SDSS Moving Object Catalog [2] or EuroNear [3]. Since 2006, the IMCCE provides a service, called SkyBoT [1], that list all the Solar System Objects in a given field of view for a given epoch. Such a tool is of high interest for any data mining purpose of large archives. We will present an extension of SkyBoT from ground-based to space-based geometries. As a demonstration, we will present our search for serendipitously observed asteroids in the data archive of the OSIRIS instrument on-board the ESA Rosetta mission.

  20. Tidi Observations Relating to High Latitude Aeronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, D.; Niciejewski, R.; Killeen, T.; Wu, Q.; Skinner, W.; Solomon, S.; Ortland, D.; Kafkalidis, J.; Gablehouse, D.; Johnson, R.

    2003-12-01

    Unique observations of the horizontal neutral winds at high latitudes in the altitude range 60 to 180 km have been performed by TIDI (Thermosphere Ionosphere Doppler Interferometer) since January 2002. The satellite orbit is such that the TIDI field of view includes latitudes to both the north pole and the south pole. Though high latitude neutral wind measurements have been obtained from space with the DE-2 satellite and the UARS satellite, TIDI is the first instrument to sample the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere up to and including both polar regions on a long-term basis. Ground based studies have previously reported a strong semi-diurnal tide in the mesosphere over Resolute, Canada. This paper will describe the climatology that has been obtained by the TIDI instrument since early 2002 for high latitudes. The precession rate of TIMED supports two month averaging of data sets in order to sample all local solar time.

  1. The Importance of Wide-field Foreground Removal for 21 cm Cosmology: A Demonstration With Early MWA Epoch of Reionization Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pober, J C; Beardsley, A P; Barry, N A; Martinot, Z E; Sullivan, I S; Morales, M F; Bell, M E; Bernardi, G; Bhat, N D R; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Deshpande, A A; Dillon, Joshua S; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A M; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Jacobs, D C; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P; Kratzenberg, E; Kudryavtseva, N; Lenc, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morgan, E; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Sethi, Shiv K; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tegmark, M; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S J; Trott, C M; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wyithe, J S B

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present observations, simulations, and analysis demonstrating the direct connection between the location of foreground emission on the sky and its location in cosmological power spectra from interferometric redshifted 21 cm experiments. We begin with a heuristic formalism for understanding the mapping of sky coordinates into the cylindrically averaged power spectra measurements used by 21 cm experiments, with a focus on the effects of the instrument beam response and the associated sidelobes. We then demonstrate this mapping by analyzing power spectra with both simulated and observed data from the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that removing a foreground model which includes sources in both the main field-of-view and the first sidelobes reduces the contamination in high k_parallel modes by several percent relative to a model which only includes sources in the main field-of-view, with the completeness of the foreground model setting the principal limitation on the amount of power removed. ...

  2. On estimating the force-freeness based on observed magnetograms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, X M; Su, J T

    2016-01-01

    It is a common practice in the solar physics community to test whether or not measured photospheric or chromospheric vector magnetograms are force-free, using the Maxwell stress as a measure. Some previous studies have suggested that magnetic fields of active regions in the solar chromosphere are close to be force-free whereas there is no consistency among previous studies on whether magnetic fields of active regions in the solar photosphere are force-free or not. Here we use three kinds of representative magnetic fields (analytical force-free solutions, modeled solar-like force-free fields and observed non-force-free fields) to discuss on how the measurement issues such as limited field of view, instrument sensitivity and measurement error could affect the estimation of force-freeness based on observed magnetograms. Unlike previous studies that focus on discussing the effect of limited field of view or instrument sensitivity, our calculation shows that just measurement error alone can significantly influence...

  3. Optical observations of the nearby galaxy IC342 with narrow band [SII] and Hα filters. I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučetić M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of a portion of the nearby spiral galaxy IC342 using narrow band [SII] and Hα filters. These observations were carried out in November 2011 with the 2m RCC telescope at Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory in Bulgaria. In this paper we report coordinates, diameters, Hα and [SII] fluxes for 203 HII regions detected in two fields of view in IC342 galaxy. The number of detected HII regions is 5 times higher than previously known in these two parts of the galaxy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176005: Emission nebulae: structure and evolution

  4. Status of GRB Observations with the Suzaku Wideband All-sky Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, M S; Urata, Y; Onda, K; Kodaka, N; Endo, A; Suzuki, M; Morigami, K; Yamaoka, K; Nakagawa, Y E; Sugita, S; Fukazawa, Y; Ohno, M; Takahashi, T; Kira, C; Uehara, T; Tamagawa, T; Enoto, T; Miyawaki, R; Nakazawa, K; Makishima, K; Sonoda, E; Yamauchi, M; Maeno, S; Tanaka, H; Hara, R; Suzuki, M; Kokubun, M; Takahashi, T; Hong, S J; Murakami, T; Tajima, H

    2008-01-01

    The Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) is a function of the large lateral BGO shield of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) onboard Suzaku. Its large geometrical area of 800 cm^2 per side, the large stopping power for the hard X-rays and the wide-field of view make the WAM an ideal detector for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observations in the energy range of 50-5000 keV. In fact, the WAM has observed 288 GRBs confirmed by other satellites, till the end of May 2007.

  5. Assessing impacts of off-nadir observation on remote sensing of vegetation - Use of the Suits model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D. S.; Johnson, R. W.; Hardisky, M. A.; Klemas, V.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Suits' (1972a, b) digital radiative transfer model to simulate the effect of nonLambertian canopy reflectance on off-nadir observations of vegetation is discussed. Canopy reflectances of cord grass are calculated using the radiative transfer model, field radiometric measurements, and airborne multispectral scanner data. The effects of varying view angles on canopy reflectance are analyzed and compared. The comparison reveals that the model is effective in simulating the sense and magnitude of reflectance change due to variable angles of observations; however, the model does not reproduce the observed dependence of nadir canopy reflectance on solar zenith angle. It is concluded that the radiative transfer model is applicable for predicting the variation in canopy reflectance due to changing view zenith angles.

  6. Assessing impacts of off-nadir observation on remote sensing of vegetation - Use of the Suits model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D. S.; Johnson, R. W.; Hardisky, M. A.; Klemas, V.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Suits' (1972a, b) digital radiative transfer model to simulate the effect of nonLambertian canopy reflectance on off-nadir observations of vegetation is discussed. Canopy reflectances of cord grass are calculated using the radiative transfer model, field radiometric measurements, and airborne multispectral scanner data. The effects of varying view angles on canopy reflectance are analyzed and compared. The comparison reveals that the model is effective in simulating the sense and magnitude of reflectance change due to variable angles of observations; however, the model does not reproduce the observed dependence of nadir canopy reflectance on solar zenith angle. It is concluded that the radiative transfer model is applicable for predicting the variation in canopy reflectance due to changing view zenith angles.

  7. Optimal strategies for observation of active galactic nuclei variability with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giomi, Matteo; Gerard, Lucie; Maier, Gernot

    2016-07-01

    Variable emission is one of the defining characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGN). While providing precious information on the nature and physics of the sources, variability is often challenging to observe with time- and field-of-view-limited astronomical observatories such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In this work, we address two questions relevant for the observation of sources characterized by AGN-like variability: what is the most time-efficient way to detect such sources, and what is the observational bias that can be introduced by the choice of the observing strategy when conducting blind surveys of the sky. Different observing strategies are evaluated using simulated light curves and realistic instrument response functions of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a future gamma-ray observatory. We show that strategies that makes use of very small observing windows, spread over large periods of time, allows for a faster detection of the source, and are less influenced by the variability properties of the sources, as compared to strategies that concentrate the observing time in a small number of large observing windows. Although derived using CTA as an example, our conclusions are conceptually valid for any IACTs facility, and in general, to all observatories with small field of view and limited duty cycle.

  8. MUSE observations of the lensing cluster Abell 1689

    CERN Document Server

    Bina, D; Richard, J; Lewis, J; Patrício, V; Cantalupo, S; Herenz, E C; Soto, K; Weilbacher, P; Bacon, R; Vernet, J D R; Wisotzki, L; Clément, B; Cuby, J G; Lagattuta, D J; Soucail, G; Verhamme, A

    2016-01-01

    We present the results obtained with MUSE on the core of the lensing cluster A1689. Integral-field observations with MUSE provide a unique view of the central region, allowing us to conduct a complete census on both cluster galaxies and lensed background sources, identified based on their spectral features without preselection. We investigate the multiple-image configuration for all known sources in the field. Previous to our survey, 28 different lensed galaxies displaying 46 multiple images were known in the MUSE field of view, most of them based on photometric redshifts and lensing considerations. Among them, we spectroscopically confirm 12 images based on their emission-lines, corresponding to 7 different lensed galaxies between z = 0.95 and 5.0. In addition, 14 new galaxies have been spectroscopically identified in this area, with redshifts ranging between 0.8 and 6.2. All background sources within the MUSE field of view correspond to multiple-imaged systems lensed by A1689. 17 sources in total are found ...

  9. The integration of astro-geodetic data observed with ACSYS to the local geoid models Istanbul-Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozludemir, M. Tevfik; Deniz, Rasim; Ozener, Haluk; Albayrak, Muge; Ulug, Rasit; Basoglu, Burak

    2017-04-01

    Astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical components provide accurate and valuable information of Earth's gravity filed. Conventional methods require considerable effort and time whereas new methods, namely digital zenith camera systems (DZCS), have been designed to eliminate drawbacks of the conventional methods, such as observer dependent errors, long observation times, and to improve the observation accuracy. The observation principle is based on capturing star images near zenithal direction to determine astronomical coordinates of the station point with the integration of CCD, telescope, tiltmeters, and GNSS devices. In Turkey a new DZCS have been designed and tested on control network located in Istanbul, of which the geoid height differences were known with the accuracy of ±3.5 cm. Astro-geodetic Camera System (ACSYS) was used to determine the deflections of the vertical components with an accuracy of ±0.1 - 0.3 arc seconds, and results were compared with geoid height differences using astronomical levelling procedure. The results have also been compared with the ones calculated from global geopotential models. In this study the recent results of the first digital zenith camera system of Turkey are presented and the future studies are introduced such as the current developments of the system including hardware and software upgrades as well as the new observation strategy of the ACSYS. We also discuss the contribution and integration of the astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical components to the geoid determination studies in the light of information of current ongoing projects being operated in Turkey.

  10. THE IMPORTANCE OF WIDE-FIELD FOREGROUND REMOVAL FOR 21 cm COSMOLOGY: A DEMONSTRATION WITH EARLY MWA EPOCH OF REIONIZATION OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pober, J. C. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Hazelton, B. J.; Beardsley, A. P.; Barry, N. A.; Martinot, Z. E.; Sullivan, I. S.; Morales, M. F.; Carroll, P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bell, M. E. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bernardi, G. [Square Kilometre Array South Africa (SKA SA), Pinelands 7405 (South Africa); Bhat, N. D. R.; Emrich, D. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Bowman, J. D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Briggs, F. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E. [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); De Oliveira-Costa, A. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Deshpande, A. A. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India); Dillon, Joshua S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ewall-Wice, A. M. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); and others

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present observations, simulations, and analysis demonstrating the direct connection between the location of foreground emission on the sky and its location in cosmological power spectra from interferometric redshifted 21 cm experiments. We begin with a heuristic formalism for understanding the mapping of sky coordinates into the cylindrically averaged power spectra measurements used by 21 cm experiments, with a focus on the effects of the instrument beam response and the associated sidelobes. We then demonstrate this mapping by analyzing power spectra with both simulated and observed data from the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that removing a foreground model that includes sources in both the main field of view and the first sidelobes reduces the contamination in high k{sub ∥} modes by several per cent relative to a model that only includes sources in the main field of view, with the completeness of the foreground model setting the principal limitation on the amount of power removed. While small, a percent-level amount of foreground power is in itself more than enough to prevent recovery of any Epoch of Reionization signal from these modes. This result demonstrates that foreground subtraction for redshifted 21 cm experiments is truly a wide-field problem, and algorithms and simulations must extend beyond the instrument’s main field of view to potentially recover the full 21 cm power spectrum.

  11. 一种有撞击角和视场角约束的运动目标的偏置比例导引算法%A Biased Proportional Guidance Algorithm for Moving Target with Impact Angle and Field-of-View Constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄诘; 张友安; 刘永新

    2016-01-01

    A indirect impact angle control based method with biased proportional guidance is proposed for a moving target in this paper.The concept of collision triangle which satisfies impact angle constraint is defined,and then the guidance law with the form of biased proportional guidance is given.According to the Collision triangle desired bias term integral,both two-phases method and one-phase method for calculating the bias term are designed,where the former does not need to compute time-to-go and the latter can attack a maneuvering target.Considering the field-of-view angle and acceleration constraints,three-phase bias-shaping method is proposed for the biased proportional guidance to satisfy these constraint conditions and the impact angle desired integral of bias term.In order to attack the maneuvering target,the bias term is real-time updated on-line by considering the current states of the missile and the target.Finally,numerical simulation for attacking moving and maneuvering targets is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.%针对以一定角度攻击运动目标问题,提出一种采用偏置比例导引的间接撞击角度控制方法。定义满足攻击角度约束的碰撞三角形概念,在这基础上给出了具有偏置比例导引形式的制导律。根据碰撞三角形要求的偏置项积分值设计两阶段和一阶段这两种计算偏置项的方法,其中两阶段方法不需要计算剩余时间,而一阶段方法能够攻击机动目标。考虑视场角和过载等约束条件限制,对偏置项进行三阶段改进,使导弹在满足这些约束条件的同时满足撞击角要求的偏置项积分值。为了适应机动目标的情况,考虑当前时刻导弹和目标运动信息,在线地偏置项进行实时更新。最后对运动目标和机动目标两种情况进行了仿真实验,验证了本文方法的有效性。

  12. The Small Size Debris Population at GEO from Optical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Ed; Buckalew, Brent; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James; Kaleida, Catherine; Lederer, Susan M.; Lee, Chris H.

    2017-01-01

    We have observed the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris population at sizes smaller than 10 cm using optical observations with the 6.5-m Magellan telescope 'Walter Baade' at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The IMACS f/2 imaging camera with a 0.5-degree diameter field of view has been used in small area surveys of the GEO regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the population of GEO debris that is fainter than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. A significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude has been found. These objects have observed with angular rates consistent with circular orbits and orbital inclinations up to 15 degrees at GEO. A sizeable number of these objects have significant brightness variations ("flashes") during the 5-second exposure, which suggest rapid changes in the albedo-projected size product.

  13. Maximizing the Detection Probability of Kilonovae Associated with Gravitational Wave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Man Leong; Hu, Yi-Ming; Messenger, Chris; Hendry, Martin; Heng, Ik Siong

    2017-01-01

    Estimates of the source sky location for gravitational wave signals are likely to span areas of up to hundreds of square degrees or more, making it very challenging for most telescopes to search for counterpart signals in the electromagnetic spectrum. To boost the chance of successfully observing such counterparts, we have developed an algorithm that optimizes the number of observing fields and their corresponding time allocations by maximizing the detection probability. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we optimize follow-up observations targeting kilonovae using telescopes including the CTIO-Dark Energy Camera, Subaru-HyperSuprimeCam, Pan-STARRS, and the Palomar Transient Factory. We consider three simulated gravitational wave events with 90% credible error regions spanning areas from ∼ 30 {\\deg }2 to ∼ 300 {\\deg }2. Assuming a source at 200 {Mpc}, we demonstrate that to obtain a maximum detection probability, there is an optimized number of fields for any particular event that a telescope should observe. To inform future telescope design studies, we present the maximum detection probability and corresponding number of observing fields for a combination of limiting magnitudes and fields of view over a range of parameters. We show that for large gravitational wave error regions, telescope sensitivity rather than field of view is the dominating factor in maximizing the detection probability.

  14. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  15. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  16. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... a participant and, as such, co-producer of the observed phenomenon. There is no such thing as a neutral or objective description. As observation deals with differences and process meaning, all descriptions are reconstructions and interpretations of the observed. Hence, the idea of neutral descriptions as well...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  17. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... a participant and, as such, co-producer of the observed phenomenon. There is no such thing as a neutral or objective description. As observation deals with differences and process meaning, all descriptions are re-constructions and interpretations of the observed. Hence, the idea of neutral descriptions as well...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  18. A stroboscopic method for phase resolved pulsar observations

    CERN Document Server

    Vidrih, S; Carramiñana, A; Vidrih, Simon; Cadez, Andrej; Carraminana, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    We present a stroboscopic system developed for optical observations of pulsars and its application in the CLYPOS survey. The stroboscopic device is connected to a GPS clock and provides absolute timing to the stroboscopic shutter relative to the pulsar's radio ephemerides. By changing the phase we can examine the pulsar's light curve. The precisely timed stroboscope in front of the CCD camera can perform highly accurate time resolved pulsar photometry and offers the advantages of CCD cameras, which are high quantum efficiency as well as relatively large field of view, which is important for flux calibrations. CLYPOS (Cananea Ljubljana Young Pulsar Optical Survey) is an extensive search for optical counterparts of about 30 northern hemisphere radio pulsars. It is a collaboration between the INAOE, Mexico and the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics of the University of Ljubljana. Stroboscopic observations were done between December 1998 and November 2000 at the 2.12 m telescope of the Observatory Guillermo Haro ...

  19. Optical observations of the nearby galaxy IC342 with narrow band [SII] and H$\\alpha$ filters. I

    CERN Document Server

    Vucetic, M M; Urosevic, D; Dobardzic, A; Pavlovic, M Z; Pannuti, T G; Petrov, N

    2013-01-01

    We present observations of the portion of the nearby spiral galaxy IC342 using narrow band [SII] and H$\\alpha$ filters. These observations were carried out in November 2011 with the 2m RCC telescope at Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory in Bulgaria. In this paper we report coordinates, diameters, H$\\alpha$ and [SII] fluxes for 203 HII regions detected in two fields of view in IC342 galaxy. The number of detected HII regions is 2.5 times higher than previously known in these two parts of the galaxy.

  20. Characteristics of EUV Coronal Jets Observed with STEREO/SECCHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, G.; Bothmer, V.; Patsourakos, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present the first comprehensive statistical study of EUV coronal jets observed with the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) imaging suites of the two STEREO spacecraft. A catalogue of 79 polar jets is presented, identified from simultaneous EUV and white-light coronagraph observations, taken during the time period March 2007 to April 2008, when solar activity was at a minimum. The twin spacecraft angular separation increased during this time interval from 2 to 48 degrees. The appearances of the coronal jets were always correlated with underlying small-scale chromospheric bright points. A basic characterization of the morphology and identification of the presence of helical structure were established with respect to recently proposed models for their origin and temporal evolution. Though each jet appeared morphologically similar in the coronagraph field of view, in the sense of a narrow collimated outward flow of matter, at the source region in the low corona the jet showed different characteristics, which may correspond to different magnetic structures. A classification of the events with respect to previous jet studies shows that amongst the 79 events there were 37 Eiffel tower-type jet events, commonly interpreted as a small-scale (˜35 arc sec) magnetic bipole reconnecting with the ambient unipolar open coronal magnetic fields at its loop tops, and 12 lambda-type jet events commonly interpreted as reconnection with the ambient field happening at the bipole footpoints. Five events were termed micro-CME-type jet events because they resembled the classical coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but on much smaller scales. The remaining 25 cases could not be uniquely classified. Thirty-one of the total number of events exhibited a helical magnetic field structure, indicative for a torsional motion of the jet around its axis of propagation. A few jets are also found in equatorial coronal holes. In this study we present sample

  1. Clear widens the field for observations of the Sun with multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Dirk; Gorceix, Nicolas; Goode, Philip R.; Marino, Jose; Rimmele, Thomas; Berkefeld, Thomas; Wöger, Friedrich; Zhang, Xianyu; Rigaut, François; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    The multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) pathfinder Clear on the New Solar Telescope in Big Bear Lake has provided the first-ever MCAO-corrected observations of the Sun that show a clearly and visibly widened corrected field of view compared to quasi-simultaneous observations with classical adaptive optics (CAO) correction. Clear simultaneously uses three deformable mirrors, each conjugated to a different altitude, to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. While the MCAO correction was most effective over an angle that is approximately three times wider than the angle that was corrected by CAO, the full 53'' field of view did benefit from MCAO correction. We further demonstrate that ground-layer-only correction is attractive for solar observations as a complementary flavor of adaptive optics for observational programs that require homogenous seeing improvement over a wide field rather than diffraction-limited resolution. We show illustrative images of solar granulation and of a sunspot obtained on different days in July 2016, and present a brief quantitative analysis of the generalized Fried parameters of the images. The movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  2. HST/WFC3 Observations of Uranus' 2014 Storm Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; Orton, Glenn S.; Toledo, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    In November 2014 Uranus was observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument of the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Hubble 2020: Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy program, OPAL. OPAL annually maps Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune (and also Saturn from 2018) in several visible/near-IR wavelength filters. The Uranus 2014 OPAL observations were made on the 8 – 9th November at a time when a huge convective storm system, first observed by amateur astronomers, was present at 30 – 40°N. The entire visible atmosphere, including the storm system, was imaged in seven filters spanning 467 – 924 nm, capturing variations in the coloration of Uranus' clouds and also vertical distribution due to wavelength dependent changes in Rayleigh scattering and methane absorption. Here we analyse these new HST observations with the NEMESIS radiative-transfer and retrieval code, in multiple-scattering mode, to determine the vertical cloud structure in and around the convective storm cloud system.The same storm system was also observed in the H-band (1.4 – 1.9 µm) with the SINFONI Integral Field Unit Spectrometer on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) on 31st October and 11th November (Irwin et al., 2016, 10.1016/j.icarus.2015.09.010). To constrain better the cloud particle sizes and scattering properties over a wide wavelength range we also conducted a limb-darkening analysis of the background cloud structure in the 30 – 40°N latitude band by simultaneously fitting: a) these HST/OPAL observations at a range of zenith angles; b) the VLT/SINFONI observations at a range of zenith angles; and c) IRTF/SpeX observations of this latitude band made in 2009 at a single zenith angle of 23°, spanning the wavelength range 0.8 – 1.8 µm (Irwin et al., 2015, 10.1016/j.icarus.2014.12.020).We find that the HST observations and the combined HST/VLT/IRTF observations are well modeled with a three-component cloud comprised of: 1) a thin 'deep' cloud at a pressure of ~2 bars; 2) a methane

  3. Multi-scale auroral observations in Apatity: winter 2010–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Kozelov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Routine observations of the aurora are conducted in Apatity by a set of five cameras: (i all-sky TV camera Watec WAT-902K (1/2"CCD with Fujinon lens YV2.2 × 1.4A-SA2; (ii two monochromatic cameras Guppy F-044B NIR (1/2"CCD with Fujinon HF25HA-1B (1:1.4/25 mm lens for 18° field of view and glass filter 558 nm; (iii two color cameras Guppy F-044C NIR (1/2"CCD with Fujinon DF6HA-1B (1:1.2/6 mm lens for 67° field of view. The observational complex is aimed at investigating spatial structure of the aurora, its scaling properties, and vertical distribution in the rayed forms. The cameras were installed on the main building of the Apatity division of the Polar Geophysical Institute and at the Apatity stratospheric range. The distance between these sites is nearly 4 km, so the identical monochromatic cameras can be used as a stereoscopic system. All cameras are accessible and operated remotely via Internet. For 2010–2011 winter season the equipment was upgraded by special blocks of GPS-time triggering, temperature control and motorized pan-tilt rotation mounts. This paper presents the equipment, samples of observed events and the web-site with access to available data previews.

  4. HST/WFC3 Observations of Uranus' 2014 storm clouds and comparison with VLT/SINFONI and IRTF/SpeX observations

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Patrick G J; Simon, Amy A; Orton, G S; Toledo, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Observations of Uranus were made on the 8/9th November with HST/WFC3 at a time when a huge cloud complex was present at 30 - 40N. We imaged Uranus in seven filters spanning 467 - 924 nm, and analysed these observations with the NEMESIS radiative-transfer and retrieval code. The same system was also observed in the H-band with VLT/SINFONI ON 31st October and 11th November (Irwin et al., 2016). To constrain the background cloud particle sizes and scattering properties we conducted a limb-darkening analysis of the background cloud structure at 30-40N by simultaneously fitting: a) these HST/OPAL observations at a range of zenith angles; b) the VLT/SINFONI observations at a range of zenith angles; and c) IRTF/SpeX observations made in 2009 (Irwin et al., 2015). We find that the observations are well modelled with a three-component cloud comprised of: 1) a vertically thin, but optically thick 'deep' tropospheric cloud at a pressure of ~2 bars; 2) a methane-ice cloud at the methane-condensation level with variable v...

  5. Physics-based formula representations of high-latitude ionospheric outflows: H+ and O+ densities, flow velocities, and temperatures versus soft electron precipitation, wave-driven transverse heating, and solar zenith angle effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Zeng, W.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive systematic dynamic fluid kinetic (DyFK) model simulations are conducted to obtain advanced simulation-based formula representations of ionospheric outflow parameters, for possible use by global magnetospheric modelers. Under F10.7 levels of 142, corresponding to solar medium conditions, we obtain the H+ and O+ outflow densities, flow velocities, and perpendicular and parallel temperatures versus energy fluxes and characteristic energies of soft electron precipitation, wave spectral densities of ion transverse wave heating, and F region level solar zenith angle in the high-latitude auroral region. From the results of hundreds of DyFK simulations of auroral outflows for ranges of each of these driving agents, we depict the H+ and O+ outflow density and flow velocity parameters at 3 R E altitude at the ends of these 2-h simulation runs in spectrogram form versus various pairs of these influencing parameters. We further approximate these results by various distilled formula representations for the O+ and H+ outflow velocities, densities, and temperatures at 3 R E altitude, as functions of the above indicated four ``driver'' parameters. These formula representations provide insight into the physics of these driven outflows, and may provide a convenient set of tools to set the boundary conditions for ionospheric plasma sources in global magnetospheric simulations.

  6. Optimal strategies for observation of active galactic nuclei variability with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Giomi, Matteo; Maier, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Variable emission is one of the defining characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGN). While providing precious information on the nature and physics of the sources, variability is often challenging to observe with time- and field-of-view-limited astronomical observatories such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In this work, we address two questions relevant for the observation of sources characterized by AGN-like variability: what is the most time-efficient way to detect such sources, and what is the observational bias that can be introduced by the choice of the observing strategy when conducting blind surveys of the sky. Different observing strategies are evaluated using simulated light curves and realistic instrument response functions of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a future gamma-ray observatory. We show that strategies that makes use of very small observing windows, spread over large periods of time, allows for a faster detection of the source, and are less influenced by the...

  7. NaCo/SAM observations of sources at the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Schödel, R.; Alberdi, A.; Pott, J. U.

    2012-07-01

    Sparse aperture masking (SAM) interferometry combined with Adaptive Optics (AO) is a technique that is uniquely suited to investigate structures near the diffraction limit of large telescopes. The strengths of the technique are a robust calibration of the Point Spread Function (PSF) while maintaining a relatively high dynamic range. We used SAM+AO observations to investigate the circumstellar environment of several bright sources with infrared excess in the central parsec of the Galaxy. For our observations, unstable atmospheric conditions as well as significant residuals after the background subtraction presented serious problems for the standard approach of calibrating SAM data via interspersed observations of reference stars. We circumvented these difficulties by constructing a synthesized calibrator directly from sources within the field-of-view. When observing crowded fields, this novel method can boost the efficiency of SAM observations because it renders interspersed calibrator observations unnecessary. Here, we presented the first NaCo/SAM images reconstructed using this method.

  8. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.;

    1995-01-01

    The GRANAT observatory was launched into a high apogee orbit on 1 December, 1989. Three instruments onboard GRANAT - PHEBUS, WATCH and SIGMA are able to detect gamma-ray bursts in a very broad energy range from 6 keV up to 100 MeV. Over 250 gamma-ray bursts were detected. We discuss the results...... of four differently behaving componenents in gamma-ray burst spectra is discussed. Statistical properties of the gamma-ray burst sources based on the 5 years of observations with (∼ 10−6 erg/cm2) sensitivity as well as the results of high sensitivity (∼ 10−8 erg/cm2) search for Gamma-Ray Bursts within...... the SIGMA telescope field of view are reviewed....

  9. Multi-object fixed delay Michelson interferometer for astronomical observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Yongtian; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yi; Wang, Liang

    2012-10-01

    Optical interferometry isn't only widely applied into optical workshop, but also makes great contribution in astronomical observation. A multi-object fixed delay Michelson interferometer commissioned to search extra-solar planet (exoplanet) is introduced here. Fixed delay of 1.9mm, which is good for stellar radial velocity measuring precision, is obtained by two interference arms with different materials. This configuration has different refractive indexes and physical characteristics so that supplies wider field of view and better thermal stability. In addition, compact interference component with three glued prisms and smart structure are the other important features. Because of vibration influence, the combination among the prisms is a direct and effective method. And the reason why make the structure as small as possible is of central obscuration under the workspace of interferometer.

  10. Solar wind modulation of the Martian ionosphere observed by Mars Global Surveyor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-S. Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron density profiles in the Martian ionosphere observed by the radio occultation experiment on board Mars Global Surveyor have been analyzed to determine if the densities are influenced by the solar wind. Evidence is presented that the altitude of the maximum ionospheric electron density shows a positive correlation to the energetic proton flux in the solar wind. The solar wind modulation of the Martian ionosphere can be attributed to heating of the neutral atmosphere by the solar wind energetic proton precipitation. The modulation is observed to be most prominent at high solar zenith angles. It is argued that this is consistent with the proposed modulation mechanism.

  11. Estimation of the parameter error propagation in inversion based BRDF observations at single sun position

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In multiangular remote sensing observations,the variable range of the solar zenith angle (SZN) is narrow.We takes the linear kernel-driven model as an example to analyze the parameter error propagation in inversion by using the observations at single sun position and to show that in such case it is unreliable to invert the BRDF tendency with SZN.To improve the algorithm,we suggest adding certain constraint for the changing trend of albedo with SZN in the model inversion.

  12. Observer's observables. Residual diffeomorphisms

    CERN Document Server

    Duch, Paweł; Świeżewski, Jedrzej

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the fate of diffeomorphisms when the radial gauge is imposed in canonical general relativity. As shown elsewhere, the radial gauge is closely related to the observer's observables. These observables are invariant under a large subgroup of diffeomorphisms which results in their usefulness for canonical general relativity. There are, however, some diffeomorphisms, called residual diffeomorphisms, which might be "observed" by the observer as they do not preserve her observables. The present paper is devoted to the analysis of these diffeomorphisms in the case of the spatial and spacetime radial gauges. Although the residual diffeomorphisms do not form a subgroup of all diffeomorphisms, we show that their induced action in the phase space does form a group. We find the generators of the induced transformations and compute the structure functions of the algebras they form. The obtained algebras are deformations of the algebra of the Euclidean group and the algebra of the Poincar\\'e group in the spat...

  13. A NuSTAR OBSERVATION OF THE CENTER OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastaldello, Fabio; Molendi, S. [IASF-Milano, INAF, Via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Wik, Daniel R.; Zhang, W. W. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Westergaard, N. J.; Hornstrup, A.; Ferreira, D. D. M.; Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Madejski, G. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Madsen, K. K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, D., E-mail: gasta@lambrate.inaf.it [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We present the results of a 55 ks NuSTAR observation of the core of the Coma Cluster. The global spectrum can be explained by thermal gas emission, with a conservative 90% upper limit to non-thermal inverse Compton (IC) emission of 5.1 × 10{sup –12} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} in a 12' × 12' field of view. The brightness of the thermal component in this central region does not allow more stringent upper limits on the IC component when compared with non-imaging instruments with much larger fields of view where claims of detections have been made. Future mosaic NuSTAR observations of Coma will further address this issue. The temperature map shows a relatively uniform temperature distribution with a gradient from the hot northwest side to the cooler southeast, in agreement with previous measurements. The temperature determination is robust given the flat effective area and low background in the 3-20 keV band, making NuSTAR an ideal instrument to measure high temperatures in the intracluster medium.

  14. The Source Density and Observability of Pair-Instability Supernovae from the First Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hummel, Jacob; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical models predict the supernova explosions ending the lives of some of the first stars to have been extremely energetic pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). With energies approaching 10^53 ergs, these supernovae are expected to be within the detection limits of the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), allowing observational constraints to be placed on the properties of the first stars. We estimate the source density of PISNe using a semi-analytic halo mass function based approach, accounting for the effects of feedback from star formation on the PISN rate using cosmological simulations. We estimate an upper limit of ~2 PISNe per JWST field of view at any given time. Feedback can reduce this rate significantly, e.g., lowering it to approximately one PISN visible per 2.5 JWST fields of view. We also find that the main obstacle to observing PISNe from the first stars is their scarcity, not their faintness; exposures longer than a few times 10^4 s will do little to increase the number of PISNe fou...

  15. THE SOURCE DENSITY AND OBSERVABILITY OF PAIR-INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE FROM THE FIRST STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, Jacob A.; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker [Department of Astronomy and Texas Cosmology Center, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    Theoretical models predict that some of the first stars ended their lives as extremely energetic pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). With energies approaching 10{sup 53} erg, these supernovae are expected to be within the detection limits of the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), allowing observational constraints to be placed on the properties of the first stars. We estimate the source density of PISNe using a semi-analytic halo mass function based approach, accounting for the effects of feedback from star formation on the PISN rate using cosmological simulations. We estimate an upper limit of {approx}0.2 PISNe per JWST field of view at any given time. Feedback can reduce this rate significantly, e.g., lowering it to as little as one PISN per 4000 JWST fields of view for the most pessimistic explosion models. We also find that the main obstacle to observing PISNe from the first stars is their scarcity, not their faintness; exposures longer than a few times 10{sup 4} s will do little to increase the number of PISNe found. Given this, we suggest a mosaic style search strategy for detecting PISNe from the first stars. Even rather high-redshift PISNe are unlikely to be missed by moderate exposures, and a large number of pointings will be required to ensure a detection.

  16. A study of tri-static PMSE observations with EISCAT at 224 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Häggström, Ingemar; Tjulin, Anders; Rostami, Sina

    2014-05-01

    Polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) are assumed to form as a consequence of mesospheric neutral air turbulence in the presence of massive charged ice particles. They offer an opportunity to study the thermal and dynamical structure of the mesopause region and its coupling to other altitude regions. In the summer of 2013 the EISCAT radars, located in Northern Scandinavia, could for the first time be used for tri-static observations in the VHF band (224 MHz). This is a frequency range where PMSE are often observed. We report observations carried out in June 2013. The radar signal was transmitted in zenith direction with the EISCAT VHF antenna near Tromsø (69.59 deg N, 19.23 deg E) and the scattered signal was measured from Tromsø, Kiruna (67.86 deg N, 20.44 deg E) and Sodankylä (67.36 deg N, 26.63 deg E). PMSE were observed in the 80 to 90 km altitude range from all three receivers for a large fraction of the observation time. Zenith observations simultaneously carried out with the Tromsø UHF radar (933 MHz) displayed predominantly incoherent scatter and an electron density typical for the altitude. Our observations suggest that the scattering process underlying the PMSE occurs over a broad range of scattering angles and that the atmospheric layers generating the PMSE move with a speed in the order of up to a few 10 m/s.

  17. Registration of ‘Zenith' black bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Zenith’ black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (Reg. no. CV- , PI -), developed by Michigan State University AgBioResearch was released in 2014 as an upright, full-season cultivar with anthracnose [caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. et Magnus) Lams.-Scrib] resistance and excellent canning q...

  18. Image-domain sampling properties of the Hotelling Observer in CT using filtered back-projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    The Hotelling Observer (HO),1 along with its channelized variants,2 has been proposed for image quality evaluation in x-ray CT.3,4 In this work, we investigate HO performance for a detection task in parallel-beam FBP as a function of two image-domain sampling parameters, namely pixel size and field-of-view. These two parameters are of central importance in adapting HO methods to use in CT, since the large number of pixels in a single image makes direct computation of HO performance for a full image infeasible in most cases. Reduction of the number of image pixels and/or restriction of the image to a region-of-interest (ROI) has the potential to make direct computation of HO statistics feasible in CT, provided that the signal and noise properties lead to redundant information in some regions of the image. For small signals, we hypothesize that reduction of image pixel size and enlargement of the image field-of-view are approximately equivalent means of gaining additional information relevant to a detection task. The rationale for this hypothesis is that the backprojection operation in FBP introduces long range correlations so that, for small signals, the reconstructed signal outside of a small ROI is not linearly independent of the signal within the ROI. In this work, we perform a preliminary investigation of this hypothesis by sweeping these two sampling parameters and computing HO performance for a signal detection task.

  19. Optical follow-up observations of Locburst GRB locations with OMC test camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezek, Tomás

    1999-01-01

    The test camera of the Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC) experiment for INTEGRAL spacecraft achieving the angular pixel size of 18 arcsec and the field of view 7.5 degx5.1 deg has been succesfully developed and tested at the Astronomical Institute Ondrejov. The test camera is able to provide imaging down to 15 mag over the whole field of view within one exposure of 300 seconds. Although developed primarily to test the OMC performance and help with software development, this device is ideally suitable for the use as ground-based camera for the sites where Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory BATSE Locburst triggers are followed-up in optical waveband and also for widefield sky monitoring in general. The low cost of this camera makes it possible to duplicate the system to a number of observing sites. A chart and a corresponding CCD-image for the BACODINE Locburst Position 6368 taken with OMC test camera at Ondrejov observatory are also presented. The image taken 18 hours after the trigger was computer-blinked with the frame taken 30 days later. No optical activity has been found down to 13.5 mag.

  20. A fast method for quantifying observational selection effects in asteroid surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedicke, Robert; Bolin, Bryce; Granvik, Mikael; Beshore, Ed

    2016-03-01

    We present a fast method to calculate an asteroid survey's 'bias' - essentially a correction factor from the observed number of objects to the actual number in the population. The method builds upon the work of Jedicke and Metcalfe (Jedicke, R., Metcalfe, T.S. [1998]. Icaurs 131, 245-260) and Granvik et al. (Granvik, M., Vaubaillon, J., Jedicke, R. [2012]. Icarus 218, 262-277) and essentially efficiently maps out the phase space of orbit elements that can appear in a field-of-view. It does so by 'integrating' outwards in geocentric distance along a field's boresite from the topocentric location of the survey and calculating the allowable angular elements for each desired combination of semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination. We then use a contour algorithm to map out the orbit elements that place an object at the edge of the field-of-view. We illustrate the method's application to calculate the bias correction for near Earth Objects detected with the Catalina Sky Survey (Christensen, E. et al. [2012]. AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts, vol. 44, p. 210.13; Larson, S. et al. [1998]. Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, vol. 30, p. 1037).

  1. Observing Pulsars with a Phased Array Feed at the Parkes Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, X.; Chippendale, A. P.; Hobbs, G.; Johnston, S.; Dai, S.; George, D.; Kramer, M.; Karuppusamy, R.; Malenta, M.; Spitler, L.; Tzioumis, T.; Wieching, G.

    2017-07-01

    During 2016 February, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science and the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy installed, commissioned, and carried out science observations with a phased array feed receiver system on the 64-m diameter Parkes radio telescope. Here, we demonstrate that the phased array feed can be used for pulsar observations and we highlight some unique capabilities. We demonstrate that the pulse profiles obtained using the phased array feed can be calibrated and that multiple pulsars can be simultaneously observed. Significantly, we find that an intrinsic polarisation leakage of -31 dB can be achieved with a phased array feed beam offset from the centre of the field of view. We discuss the possibilities for using a phased array feed for future pulsar observations and for searching for fast radio bursts with the Parkes and Effelsberg telescopes.

  2. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  3. Multi-Frequency Observations of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) Under Artificial Electron Heating at EISCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.; Kosch, M.; Senior, A.; Pinedo, H.; Havnes, O.; Rietveld, M. T.; Häggström, I.

    2011-12-01

    In a unique experiment at EISCAT, located in northern Norway and executed in July 2011, Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been observed in the zenith at four different radar frequencies (933, 224, 56 and 7.9 MHz) simultaneously whilst artificially heating the electrons with high-frequency radio waves. Increasing the electron temperature reduces PMSE backscatter power at VHF but may increase it at HF, while the opposite may happen during the relaxation period following heater off. The PMSE backscatter power depends on many parameters, including dust size and charge, radar frequency and electron temperature. By observing the artificially modified PMSE at multiple radar frequencies, it may be possible to uniquely determine dust parameters as a function of altitude. Validation of PMSE theories and its behaviour under electron heating employing this unique set of observations are underway. In addition, high aspect angle observations of the PMSE were obtained at 224 MHz with 66 degrees zenith angle. These clearly show that PMSE can be observed at very high aspect angle, at least for VHF, contrary to results from earlier attempts to investigate PMSE's aspect sensitivity behaviour that has a bearing on the geometry of the electron density irregularities that cause the scattering. Preliminary results from the campaign are presented.

  4. Letter to the Editor Simultaneous observations of the ionospheric footprint of flux transfer events and dispersed ion signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Yeoman

    Full Text Available We perform a case study of a favourable conjunction of overpasses of the DMSP F11 and F13 spacecraft with the field of view of the Hankasalmi HF coherent scatter. At the time, pulsed ionospheric flows (PIFs were clearly observed at a high-latitude in the radar field of view. The PIFs were associated with medium spectral width values and were identified as the fossilized signatures of pulsed dayside reconnection. Simultaneously, DMSP spectrograms from the two spacecraft showed dispersed ion signatures, observed equatorwards of the PIF signatures. We identified dayside high-latitude magnetosphere boundaries; these boundaries agreed well with those defined using the algorithm on the JHU/APL auroral particle website (Haerendel et al., 1978; Newell and Meng, 1988, 1995; Newell et al., 1991a, 1991b, 1991c; Traver et al., 1991. We conclude that in this case study the dispersed ion signatures map to regions of very newly-opened flux. It is only when this flux has convected polewards that the signatures of the PIFs with medium spectral widths are observed by the HF radars. These particular PIF signatures map to regions of mantle precipitation, i.e. recently reconnected flux.Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interaction – Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; plasma convection

  5. Observations of the diffuse UV radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra are presented for the diffuse UV radiation field between 1250 to 3100 A from eight different regions of the sky, which were obtained with the Johns Hopkins UVX experiment. UVX flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-61C) in January 1986 as part of the Get-Away Special project. The experiment consisted of two 1/4 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometers, covering the spectral range 1250 to 1700 A at 17 A resolution and 1600 to 3100 A at 27 A resolution, respectively, with a field of view of 4 x .25 deg, sufficiently small to pick out regions of the sky with no stars in the line of sight. Values were found for the diffuse cosmic background ranging in intensity from 300 to 900 photons/sq cm/sec/sr/A. The cosmic background is spectrally flat from 1250 to 3100 A, within the uncertainties of each spectrometer. The zodiacal light begins to play a significant role in the diffuse radiation field above 2000 A, and its brightness was determined relative to the solar emission. Observed brightnesses of the zodiacal light in the UV remain almost constant with ecliptic latitude, unlike the declining visible brightnesses, possibly indicating that those (smaller) grains responsible for the UV scattering have a much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering.

  6. 30 MHz radar observations of artificial E region field-aligned plasma irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial E region field aligned irregularities (FAIs have been observed during heating experiments at the HAARP facility using a new 30 MHz coherent scatter radar imager deployed near Homer, Alaska. Irregularities were observed during brief experiments on three quiet days in July and August, 2007, when the daytime E region critical frequency was close to 3 MHz. Irregularities were consistently generated and detected during experiments with O-mode HF pumping on zenith with a 1-min on, 1-min off CW modulation. The scattering cross sections, rise, and fall times of the echoes were observed as well as their spectral properties. Results were found to be mainly in agreement with observations from other mid- and high-latitude sites with some discrepancies. Radar images of the irregularity-filled volume on one case exhibited clear variations in backscatter power and Doppler shift across the volume. The images furthermore show the emergence of a small irregularity-filled region to the south southwest of the main region in the approximate direction of magnetic zenith.

  7. WFC3: Status, Calibrations and Advice for the CY24 Observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbi, Elena; WFC3 Team

    2016-06-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 is UV, Visible and near Infrared Camera on boar of the Hubble Space Telescope. We report on the current status of the instrument and on the recent significant improvements in the photometric, flat fields, dark current, and CTE calibrations for the UVIS channel. As a result of this effort we obtained the new independent solutions for the two CCD detectors, and have improved the zero points and color terms in the near-UV and visual wavelengths. We report on the improved astrometric solutions and PSF calibrations. We also highlight new observing strategies recently developed to allow efficient observations of very wide fields of view. Finally new tools for the planning and extraction of slittles spectroscopic observations of crowded fields are presented.

  8. The SELGIFS data challenge: generating synthetic observations of CALIFA galaxies from hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Guidi, Giovanni; Ascasibar, Yago; Galbany, Lluis; Sánchez-Blázquez, Patricia; Sánchez, Sebastian F; Rosales-Ortega, F Fabián; Scannapieco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a set of synthetic observations that mimic the properties of the Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) survey CALIFA, generated using radiative transfer techniques applied to hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies in a cosmological context. The simulated spatially-resolved spectra include stellar and nebular emission, kinematic broadening of the lines, and dust extinction and scattering. The results of the radiative transfer simulations have been post-processed to reproduce the main properties of the CALIFA V500 and V1200 observational setups. The data has been further formatted to mimic the CALIFA survey in terms of field of view size, spectral range and sampling. We have included the effect of the spatial and spectral Point Spread Functions affecting CALIFA observations, and added detector noise after characterizing it on a sample of 20 galaxies. The simulated datacubes are suited to be analyzed by the same algorithms used on real IFS data. In order to provide a benchmark to compare the ...

  9. Photometry of Variable Stars from Dome A, Antarctica: Results from the 2010 Observing Season

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lingzhi; Wang, Lifan; Ashley, Michael C B; Cui, Xiangqun; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Lawrence, Jon S; Liu, Qiang; Luong-Van, Daniel; Pennypacker, Carl R; Shang, Zhaohui; Storey, John W V; Yang, Huigen; Yang, Ji; Yuan, Xiangyan; York, Donald G; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Zhenxi; Zhu, Zonghong

    2013-01-01

    We present results from a season of observations with the Chinese Small Telescope ARray (CSTAR), obtained over 183 days of the 2010 Antarctic winter. We carried out high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 20,000 stars with i<15.3 mag located in a 23 square-degree region centered on the south celestial pole. We identified 188 variable stars, including 67 new objects relative to our 2008 observations, thanks to broader synoptic coverage, a deeper magnitude limit and a larger field of view. We used the photometric data set to derive site statistics from Dome A. Based on two years of observations, we find that extinction due to clouds at this site is less than 0.1 and 0.4 mag during 45% and 75% of the dark time, respectively.

  10. Early-time observations of gamma-ray burst error boxes with the Livermore optical transient imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G G

    2000-08-01

    Despite the enormous wealth of gamma-ray burst (GRB) data collected over the past several years the physical mechanism which causes these extremely powerful phenomena is still unknown. Simultaneous and early time optical observations of GRBs will likely make an great contribution t o our understanding. LOTIS is a robotic wide field-of-view telescope dedicated to the search for prompt and early-time optical afterglows from gamma-ray bursts. LOTIS began routine operations in October 1996 and since that time has responded to over 145 gamma-ray burst triggers. Although LOTIS has not yet detected prompt optical emission from a GRB its upper limits have provided constraints on the theoretical emission mechanisms. Super-LOTIS, also a robotic wide field-of-view telescope, can detect emission 100 times fainter than LOTIS is capable of detecting. Routine observations from Steward Observatory's Kitt Peak Station will begin in the immediate future. During engineering test runs under bright skies from the grounds of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Super-LOTIS provided its first upper limits on the early-time optical afterglow of GRBs. This dissertation provides a summary of the results from LOTIS and Super-LOTIS through the time of writing. Plans for future studies with both systems are also presented.

  11. 3D Orbit Visualization for Earth-Observing Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Joseph C.; Plesea, Lucian; Chafin, Brian G.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2011-01-01

    This software visualizes orbit paths for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), but was designed to be general and applicable to any Earth-observing mission. The software uses the Google Earth user interface to provide a visual mechanism to explore spacecraft orbit paths, ground footprint locations, and local cloud cover conditions. In addition, a drill-down capability allows for users to point and click on a particular observation frame to pop up ancillary information such as data product filenames and directory paths, latitude, longitude, time stamp, column-average dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide, and solar zenith angle. This software can be integrated with the ground data system for any Earth-observing mission to automatically generate daily orbit path data products in Google Earth KML format. These KML data products can be directly loaded into the Google Earth application for interactive 3D visualization of the orbit paths for each mission day. Each time the application runs, the daily orbit paths are encapsulated in a KML file for each mission day since the last time the application ran. Alternatively, the daily KML for a specified mission day may be generated. The application automatically extracts the spacecraft position and ground footprint geometry as a function of time from a daily Level 1B data product created and archived by the mission s ground data system software. In addition, ancillary data, such as the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide and solar zenith angle, are automatically extracted from a Level 2 mission data product. Zoom, pan, and rotate capability are provided through the standard Google Earth interface. Cloud cover is indicated with an image layer from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) aboard the Aqua satellite, which is automatically retrieved from JPL s OnEarth Web service.

  12. Design and Commissioning of the LWA1 Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingson, S W; Dowell, J; Taylor, G B; Helmboldt, J F

    2013-01-01

    LWA1 is a new large radio telescope array operating in the frequency range 10-88 MHz, located in central New Mexico. The telescope consists of 260 pairs of dipole-type antennas whose outputs are individually digitized and formed into beams. Simultaneously, signals from all dipoles can be recorded using one of the telescope's "all dipoles" modes, facilitating all-sky imaging. Notable features of the instrument include four independently-steerable beams utilizing digital "true time delay" beamforming, high intrinsic sensitivity (about 6 kJy zenith system equivalent flux density), large instantaneous bandwidth (up to 78 MHz), and large field of view (about 3-10 degrees, depending on frequency and zenith angle of pointing). This paper summarizes the design of LWA1, its performance as determined in commissioning experiments, and results from early science observations demonstrating the capabilities of the instrument.

  13. Simultaneous Multi-angle Observations of Strong Langmuir Turbulence at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Naomi; Golkowski, Mark; Sheerin, James P.; Watkins, Brenton J.

    2015-10-01

    We report results from a recent series of experiments employing the HF transmitter of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. The Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) located at the HAARP facility is used as the primary diagnostic. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments are used to avoid generation of artificial field-aligned irregularities and isolate ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. The HF pump frequency is close to the 3rd gyro-harmonic frequency and the HF pointing angle and MUIR look angle are between the HF Spitze angle and Magnetic Zenith angle. Plasma line spectra measured simultaneously in different spots of the interaction region display differences dependent on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam in the boresight direction and the pointing angle of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Outshifted Plasma Lines, cascade, collapse, coexistence, spectra are observed in agreement with existing theory and simulation results of Strong Langmuir Turbulence in ionospheric interaction experiments. It is found that SLT at HAARP is most readily observed at a HF pointing angle of 11° and UHF observation angle of 15°, which is consistent with the magnetic zenith effect as documented in previous works and optimal orientation of the refracted HF electric field vector.

  14. Radar observations of artificial E-region field-aligned irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nossa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial E region field aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs were generated using HAARP in four different experimental modes and observed with a coherent scatter radar imager located 450 km to the southwest where it could detect field-aligned backscatter. The experiments were conducted in July of 2008, during the Polar Aeronomy and Radio Science Summer School (PARS, during quiet conditions in the daytime when the E layer was dense and absorption was modest. The echoes observed during zenith and magnetic zenith heating experiments were deflected from their nominally anticipated horizontal positions toward the midpoint position. The occurrence of hysteresis when heating with amplitude modulated pulses implied the development of the resonance instability, although the threshold for the onset of instability appeared to be higher than what has been predicted theoretically. Heating experiments involving pump frequencies slightly above and below the second electron gyroharmonic frequency produced no significant differences in the observed echoes. Finally, heating with a pump frequency slightly above the E region critical frequency appears to have produced FAIs at two distinct altitudes where the upper-hybrid resonance condition could be satisfied.

  15. Variation of Jupiter's aurora observed by Hisaki/EXCEED: 1. Observed characteristics of the auroral electron energies compared with observations performed using HST/STIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Badman, Sarah V.; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; André, Nicolas; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Shiota, Daikou; Tadokoro, Hiroyasu; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Temporal variation of Jupiter's northern aurora is detected using the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics (EXCEED) on board JAXA's Earth-orbiting planetary space telescope Hisaki. The wavelength coverage of EXCEED includes the H2 Lyman and Werner bands at 80-148 nm from the entire northern polar region. The prominent periodic modulation of the observed emission corresponds to the rotation of Jupiter's main auroral oval through the aperture, with additional superposed -50%-100% temporal variations. The hydrocarbon color ratio (CR) adopted for the wavelength range of EXCEED is defined as the ratio of the emission intensity in the long wavelength range of 138.5-144.8 nm to that in the short wavelength range of 126.3-130 nm. This CR varies with the planetary rotation phase. Short- (within one planetary rotation) and long-term (> one planetary rotation) enhancements of the auroral power are observed in both wavelength ranges and result in a small CR variation. The occurrence timing of the auroral power enhancement does not clearly depend on the central meridian longitude. Despite the limitations of the wavelength coverage and the large field of view of the observation, the auroral spectra and CR-brightness distribution measured using EXCEED are consistent with other observations.

  16. Atmospheric monitoring in the mm and sub-mm bands for cosmological observations: CASPER2

    CERN Document Server

    De Petris, Marco; Decina, Barbara; Lamagna, Luca; Pardo, Juan R

    2012-01-01

    Cosmological observations from ground at millimetre and sub-millimetre wavelengths are affected by atmospheric absorption and consequent emission. The low and high frequency (sky noise) fluctuations of atmospheric performance imply careful observational strategies and/or instrument technical solutions. Measurements of atmospheric emission spectra are necessary for accurate calibration procedures as well as for site testing statistics. CASPER2, an instrument to explore the 90-450 GHz (3-15 1/cm) spectral region, was developed and verified its operation in the Alps. A Martin-Puplett Interferometer (MPI) operates comparing sky radiation, coming from a field of view (fov) of 28 arcminutes (FWHM) collected by a 62-cm in diameter Pressman-Camichel telescope, with a reference source. The two output ports of the interferometer are detected by two bolometers cooled down to 300 mK inside a wet cryostat. Three different and complementary interferometric techniques can be performed with CASPER2: Amplitude Modulation (AM)...

  17. Commissioning and First Observations with Wide FastCam at the Telescopio Carlos S\\'anchez

    CERN Document Server

    Velasco, Sergio; Oscoz, Alejandro; López, Roberto L; Puga, Marta; Murga, Gaizka; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Pallé, Enric; Ricci, Davide; Ayuso, Ismael; Hernández-Sánchez, Mónica; Truant, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The FastCam instrument platform, jointly developed by the IAC and the UPCT, allows, in real-time, acquisition, selection and storage of images with a resolution that reaches the diffraction limit of medium-sized telescopes. FastCam incorporates a specially designed software package to analyse series of tens of thousands of images in parallel with the data acquisition at the telescope. Wide FastCam is a new instrument that, using the same software for data acquisition, does not look for lucky imaging but fast observations in a much larger field of view. Here we describe the commissioning process and first observations with Wide FastCam at the Telescopio Carlos S\\'anchez (TCS) in the Observatorio del Teide.

  18. A micro-fluidic treadmill for observing suspended plankton in the lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, J. S.; Laxton, B.; Garwood, J. C.; Franks, P. J. S.; Roberts, P. L.

    2016-02-01

    A significant obstacle to laboratory studies of interactions between small organisms ( mm) and their fluid environment is our ability to obtain high-resolution images while allowing freedom of motion. This is because as the organisms sink, they will often move out of the field of view of the observation system. One solution to this problem is to impose a water circulation pattern that preserves their location relative to the camera system while imaging the organisms away from the glass walls. To accomplish this we have designed and created a plankton treadmill. Our computer-controlled system consists of a digital video camera attached to a macro or microscope and a micro-fluidic pump whose flow is regulated to maintain a suspended organism's position relative to the field of view. Organisms are detected and tracked in real time in the video frames, allowing a control algorithm to compensate for any vertical movement by adjusting the flow. The flow control can be manually adjusted using on-screen controls, semi-automatically adjusted to allow the user to select a particular organism to be tracked or fully automatic through the use of classification and tracking algorithms. Experiments with a simple cm-sized cuvette and a number of organisms that are both positively and negatively buoyant have demonstrated the success of the system in permitting longer observation times than would be possible in the absence of a controlled-flow environment. The subjects were observed using a new dual-view, holographic imaging system that provides 3-dimensional microscopic observations with relatively isotropic resolution. We will present the system design, construction, the control algorithm, and some images obtained with the holographic system, demonstrating its effectiveness. Small particles seeded into the flow clearly show the 3D flow fields around the subjects as they freely sink or swim.

  19. Gamma-ray observations of SN 1987A with an array of high-purity germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandie, W. G.; Nakano, G. H.; Chase, L. F., Jr.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W.

    A balloonborne gamma-ray spectrometer comprising an array of high-purity n-type germanium detectors was flown from Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 29 - 30, 1987, 96 days after the observed neutrino pulse. SN 1987A was within the 22-deg field of view for about 3300 s during May 29.9 - 30.3 UT. No excess gamma rays were observed at energies appropriate to the Ni(56) - Co(56) decay chain or from other lines in the energy region from 0.1 to 3.0 MeV. The data imply that there was less than 2.5×10-4 solar masses of Co(56) exposed to the Earth at the time of the observation. Additional balloon-borne observations are planned.

  20. Surface Net Solar Radiation Estimated from Satellite Measurements: Comparisons with Tower Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Leighton, H. G.; Cess, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    A parameterization that relates the reflected solar flux at the top of the atmosphere to the net solar flux at the surface in terms of only the column water vapor amount and the solar zenith angle was tested against surface observations. Net surface fluxes deduced from coincidental collocated satellite-measured radiances and from measurements from towers in Boulder during summer and near Saskatoon in winter have mean differences of about 2 W/sq m, regardless of whether the sky is clear or cloudy. Furthermore, comparisons between the net fluxes deduced from the parameterization and from surface measurements showed equally good agreement when the data were partitioned into morning and afternoon observations. This is in contrast to results from an empirical clear-sky algorithm that is unable to account adequately for the effects of clouds and that shows, at Boulder, a distinct morning to afternoon variation, which is presumably due to the predominance of different cloud types throughout the day. It is also demonstrated that the parameterization may be applied to irradiances at the top of the atmosphere that have been temporally averaged by using the temporally averaged column water vapor amount and the temporally averaged cosine of the solar zenith angle. The good agreement between the results of the parameterization and surface measurements suggests that the algorithm is a useful tool for a variety of climate studies.

  1. Multi-system, multi-signal GNSS-reflectometry for sea level observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Johan; Haas, Rüdiger

    2014-05-01

    Information on sea level and its changes are important in connection to global change processes. For centuries sea level has been observed with coastal tide gauges and since some decades with satellite altimetry. Furthermore, during recent years also the application of GNSS-reflectometry for sea level observations has been developed. Various methods exist, using ground-based, airborne and space-borne systems, and using different analysis methods. We present results from a dedicated GNSS-based tide gauge installed at the Onsala Space Observatory at the Swedish west coast. This installation consists of two sets of commercially-off-the-shelf GNSS equipment, including geodetic-type choke-ring antennae and geodetic-type receivers. The two antennae are mounted on a beam extending in southward direction over the coastline. The antennae are aligned along the local vertical with one antenna facing toward zenith direction and the other facing toward nadir. The zenith-looking antenna is Right-Hand-Circular-Polarised (RHCP) while the nadir-looking antenna is Left-Hand-Circular-Polarised (LHCP). The zenith-looking antenna receives predominantly the direct RHCP satellite signals, while the nadir-looking antenna receives predominantly signals that are reflected off the sea surface and thus have changed polarisation to LHCP in the reflection process. The GNSS-receivers are connected to one antenna each and individually record multi-frequency signals of several GNSS. The recorded data can be analysed in different ways to derive information on the sea level and its variation. For example, data from both receivers can be analysed together applying geodetic-type phase-delay analysis with a single-difference and/or double-difference strategy. These analysis methods determine the baseline between the two antennae, which is proportional to the height of the installation above the sea surface. Another analysis method exploits the multipath oscillations in the recorded Signal

  2. Analysis of plasma waves observed in the inner Saturn magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasma waves observed in the Saturn magnetosphere provide an indication of the plasma population present in the rotationally dominated inner magnetosphere. Electrostatic cyclotron emissions often with harmonics and whistler mode emission are a common feature of Saturn's inner magnetosphere. The electron observations for a region near 5 RS outside and near a plasma injection region indicate a cooler low-energy (<100 eV, nearly isotropic plasma, and a much warmer (E>1000 eV more pancake or butterfly distribution. We model the electron plasma distributions to conduct a linear dispersion analysis of the wave modes. The results suggest that the electrostatic electron cyclotron emissions can be generated by phase space density gradients associated with a loss cone that may be up to 20° wide. This loss cone is sometimes, but not always, observed because the field of view of the electron detectors does not include the magnetic field line at the time of the observations. The whistler mode emission can be generated by the pancake-like distribution and temperature anisotropy (T/T||>1 of the warmer plasma population.

  3. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection in the Extended Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; West, Matthew J.; Seaton, Daniel B.; Kobelski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Observational signatures of reconnection have been studied extensively in the lower corona for decades, successfully providing insight into energy release mechanisms in the region above post-flare arcade loops and below 1.5 solar radii. During large eruptive events, however, energy release continues to occur well beyond the presence of reconnection signatures at these low heights. Supra-Arcade Downflows (SADs) and Supra-Arcade Downflowing Loops (SADLs) are particularly useful measures of continual reconnection in the corona as they may indicate the presence and path of retracting post-reconnection loops. SADs and SADLs have been faintly observed up to 18 hours beyond the passage of coronas mass ejections through the SOHO/LASCO field of view, but a recent event from 2014 October 14 associated with giant arches provides very clear observations of these downflows for days after the initial eruption. We report on this unique event and compare these findings with observational signatures of magnetic reconnection in the extended corona for more typical eruptions.

  4. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection in the Extended Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; West, Matthew J.; Seaton, Danial B.; Kobelski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Observational signatures of reconnection have been studied extensively in the lower corona for decades, successfully providing insight into energy release mechanisms in the region above post-flare arcade loops and below 1.5 solar radii. During large eruptive events, however, energy release continues to occur well beyond the presence of reconnection signatures at these low heights. Supra-Arcade Downflows (SADs) and Supra-Arcade Downflowing Loops (SADLs) are particularly useful measures of continual reconnection in the corona as they may indicate the presence and path of retracting post-reconnection loops. SADs and SADLs have been faintly observed up to 18 hours beyond the passage of corona mass ejections through the SOHO/LASCO field of view, but a recent event from 2014 October 14 associated with giant arches provides very clear observations of these downflows for days after the initial eruption. We report on this unique event and compare these findings with observational signatures of magnetic reconnection in the extended corona for more typical eruptions.

  5. Astronomical Observing Conditions at Xinglong Observatory from 2007 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Cheng; Ge, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Meng; Cao, Zi-Huang; Chen, Xu; Mao, Yong-Na; Jiang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    ) and photometric observations. Analysis shows that sky brightness at the zenith is around 21.1 mag arcsec-2 and becomes brighter with a larger zenith angle. Sky brightness increases due to the light pollution of the surrounding cities, Beijing, Tangshan, and Chengde. Significant influence toward the direction of Beijing, at an altitude of 30°, can increase the sky brightness up to 20.0 mag arcsec-2. Sky brightness reduces after midnight, mainly because of the influence of city lights and the artificial acts. The above results suggest that Xinglong Observatory is still a good site for astronomical observations. Our analysis of the observing conditions at Xinglong Observatory can be used as a reference to the observers on targets selection, observing strategy, and telescope operation.

  6. PMSE Observations With the Tri-Static EISCAT VHF Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I.; Tjulin, A.; Häggström, I.

    2013-12-01

    The polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) are generated in the ionosphere at roughly 80 to 90 altitude by electron irregularities in the presence of charged solid particles and PMSE are most likely observed when ice particles form onto nanodust. PMSE formation is an important part in understanding mesospheric processes, but is also an interesting example for dusty plasma phenomena occurring in space. To investigate the phenomena that lead to formation of PMSE it is helpful to study the radar reflectivity of the mesosphere at different angles. PMSE were previously studied at different aspect angles in order to better understand the scattering process. Another way is observing PMSE from multiple sites simultaneously. During this summer the EISCAT radars that are located in Northern Scandinavia could for the first time be used for tri-static observations in the VHF band and we carried out observations during three subsequent days in June 2013. The radar signal was transmitted in zenith direction with the EISCAT VHF antenna near Tromsø (69.59 deg N, 19.23 deg E) and the scattered signal was measured from Tromsø, Kiruna (67.86 deg N, 20.44 deg E) and Sodankylä (67.36 deg N, 26.63 deg E). Zenith observations were simultaneously carried out with the Tromsø UHF radar (933 MHz). Other groups have previously reported the observations of PMSE simultaneously with the EISCAT VHF and UHF radars, but with a much lower occurrence rate for the UHF. UHF observations made during this campaign are dominated by incoherent scatter. The VHF system in Tromsø detected PMSE for a large fraction of the observation time. The VHF receivers in Kiruna and Sodankylä were pointed at typical PMSE heights above the Tromsø transmitter and detected radar reflections at the same time and altitude as the Tromsø radar. These observations are among the first tri-static observations of PMSE. Preliminary results from the campaign will be presented and discussed.

  7. A Global Analysis of the ZWD/PW Conversion Methods using Radiosonde Observations and Numerical Weather Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsa, S.

    2014-12-01

    Water vapor plays an important role as a basic climate variable in the thermodynamics and dynamics of the storm systems at the atmosphere and in hydrological cycles of local, regional and global scales. Moreover, the distribution of atmospheric water vapor is difficult to determine because of its rapid change in spatial and temporal scales. Atmospheric water vapor can be estimated by the zenith delay derived from ground-based GNSS data. Ground-based GNSS receivers are a valuable source for determining total zenith delay (ZTD) and precipitable water vapor (PW) data for meteorology since they are portable, economic and provide measurements that are not affected by weather conditions. They cannot provide a humidity profile as radiosondes can, however they have the advantage of producing automated continuous data as opposed to operational radiosondes usually providing two measurements in a day. Therefore, tropospheric delay modeling methods for estimating precipitable water vapor using GNSS signals are being developed frequently. Wet and hydrostatic zenith delays can be computed by applying the mapping functions which are mathematical equations using elevation angles. The observed tropospheric delays can be used for monitoring the water vapor content of the troposphere. In several regions of the world GNSS derived products are already used on a routine basis for numerical weather prediction. In this study, PW values obtained from radiosonde profiles and the ones derived from ground-based GNSS data are processed both with BERNESE v5.0 using Niell mapping function and GAMIT/GLOBK using empirical model GPT (Global Pressure and Temperature) are compared with the values computed from radiosonde analysis algorithm under severe storm conditions. In order to convert the ZWD to PW new, locally fitted models are derived using local radiosonde observations and ECMWF model data.

  8. Prospect for UV observations from the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, Margarita; Mathew, Joice; Mohan, Rekhesh; Sreejith, A. G.; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah; Kappelmann, Norbert; Sharma, Arpit; Narayan, Rahul

    2014-10-01

    Space astronomy in the last 40 years has largely been done from spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) for which the technology is proven and delivery mechanisms are readily available. However, new opportunities are arising with the surge in commercial aerospace missions. We describe here one such possibility: deploying a small instrument on the Moon. This can be accomplished by flying onboard the Indian entry to the Google Lunar X PRIZE competition, Team Indus mission, which is expected to deliver a nearly 30 kgs of payloads to the Moon, with a rover as its primary payload. We propose to mount a wide-field far-UV (130-180 nm) imaging telescope as a payload on the Team Indus lander. Our baseline operation is a fixed zenith pointing but with the option of a mechanism to allow observations of different attitudes. Pointing towards intermediate ecliptic latitude (50∘ or above) ensures that the Sun is at least 40∘ off the line of sight at all times. In this position, the telescope can cover higher galactic latitudes as well as parts of Galactic plane. The scientific objectives of such a prospective are delineated and discussed.

  9. Prospect for UV observations from the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Safonova, Margarita; Mohan, Rekhesh; Sreejith, A G; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah; Kappelmann, Norbert; Sharma, Arpit; Narayan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Space astronomy in the last 40 years has largely been done from spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) for which the technology is proven and delivery mechanisms are readily available. However, new opportunities are arising with the surge in commercial aerospace missions. We describe here one such possibility: deploying a small instrument on the Moon. This can be accomplished by flying onboard the Indian entry to the Google Lunar X PRIZE competition, Team Indus mission, which is expected to deliver a nearly 30 kgs of payloads to the Moon, with a rover as its primary payload. We propose to mount a wide-field far-UV (130--180 nm) imaging telescope as a payload on the Team Indus lander. Our baseline operation is a fixed zenith pointing but with the option of a mechanism to allow observations of different attitudes. Pointing towards intermediate ecliptic latitude (50 deg or above) ensures that the Sun is at least 40 deg off the line of sight at all times. In this position, the telescope can cover higher galactic lat...

  10. EIT: Solar corona synoptic observations from SOHO with an Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaboudiniere, J. P.; Gabriel, A. H.; Artzner, G. E.; Michels, D. J.; Dere, K. P.; Howard, R. A.; Catura, R.; Stern, R.; Lemen, J.; Neupert, W.

    1988-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) of SOHO (solar and heliospheric observatory) will provide full disk images in emission lines formed at temperatures that map solar structures ranging from the chromospheric network to the hot magnetically confined plasma in the corona. Images in four narrow bandpasses will be obtained using normal incidence multilayered optics deposited on quadrants of a Ritchey-Chretien telescope. The EIT is capable of providing a uniform one arc second resolution over its entire 50 by 50 arc min field of view. Data from the EIT will be extremely valuable for identifying and interpreting the spatial and temperature fine structures of the solar atmosphere. Temporal analysis will provide information on the stability of these structures and identify dynamical processes. EIT images, issued daily, will provide the global corona context for aid in unifying the investigations and in forming the observing plans for SOHO coronal instruments.

  11. Observation of TeV gamma ray extended sources with ARGO-YBJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetto, Silvia, E-mail: vernetto@to.infn.it

    2014-04-01

    More than 80% of TeV galactic gamma ray sources are spatially extended and many of them are still unidentified. The extended emission could be the result of cosmic ray interactions with the ambient medium which provides the target to produce TeV gamma rays. The sensitivity of ground based gamma ray detectors decreases for extended sources; shower detectors, due to their large field of view, are less affected with respect to Cherenkov telescopes. The ARGO-YBJ experiment (Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory, Tibet, China, 4300 m of altitude) is an air shower detector devoted to gamma ray astronomy at energies above a few hundred GeV, with an integrated sensitivity ranging from 0.24 to ∼1 Crab units, depending on the source declination. In this paper the observation of galactic extended sources with ARGO-YBJ during 5 years is reviewed.

  12. Real-time interactive 3D manipulation of particles viewed in two orthogonal observation planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perch-Nielsen, I.; Rodrigo, P.J.; Glückstad, J.

    2005-01-01

    The generalized phase contrast (GPC) method has been applied to transform a single TEM00 beam into a manifold of counterpropagating-beam traps capable of real-time interactive manipulation of multiple microparticles in three dimensions (3D). This paper reports on the use of low numerical aperture...... (NA), non-immersion, objective lenses in an implementation of the GPC-based 3D trapping system. Contrary to high-NA based optical tweezers, the GPC trapping system demonstrated here operates with long working distance (>10 mm), and offers a wider manipulation region and a larger field of view...... for imaging through each of the two opposing objective lenses. As a consequence of the large working distance, simultaneous monitoring of the trapped particles in a second orthogonal observation plane is demonstrated. (C) 2005 Optical Society of America....

  13. Astrophysical objects observed by the MESSENGER X-ray spectrometer during Mercury flybys

    CERN Document Server

    Bannister, N P; Lindsay, S T; Martindale, A; Talboys, D L

    2012-01-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft conducted its first flyby of Mercury on 14th January 2008, followed by two subsequent encounters on 6th October 2008 and 29th September 2009, prior to Mercury orbit insertion on 18th March 2011. We have reviewed MESSENGER flight telemetry and X-ray Spectrometer observations from the first two encounters, and correlate several prominent features in the data with the presence of astrophysical X-ray sources in the instrument field of view. We find that two X-ray peaks attributed in earlier work to the detection of suprathermal electrons from the Mercury magnetosphere, are likely to contain a significant number of events that are of astrophysical origin. The intensities of these two peaks cannot be explained entirely on the basis of astrophysical sources, and we support the previous suprathermal explanation but suggest that the electron fluxes derived in those studies be revised to correct for a significant astrophysical signal.

  14. Evolution in Cloud Population Statistics of the MJO. From AMIE Field Observations to Global-Cloud Permitting Models final report Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Min [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2016-01-08

    Methods of convective/stratiform precipitation classification and surface rain rate estimation based on the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program cloud radar measurements were developed and evaluated. Simultaneous and collocated observations of the Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR), two scanning precipitation radars (NCAR S-PolKa and Texas A&M University SMART-R), and surface precipitation during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign were used. The motivation of this study is to apply the unique long-term ARM cloud radar observations without accompanying precipitation radars to the study of cloud lifecycle and precipitation features under different weather and climate regimes.

  15. Testing the Empirical Shock Arrival Model using Quadrature Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, N; Xie, H; Yashiro, S

    2013-01-01

    The empirical shock arrival (ESA) model was developed based on quadrature data from Helios (in-situ) and P-78 (remote-sensing) to predict the Sun-Earth travel time of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) [Gopalswamy et al. 2005a]. The ESA model requires earthward CME speed as input, which is not directly measurable from coronagraphs along the Sun-Earth line. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) were in quadrature during 2010 - 2012, so the speeds of Earth-directed CMEs were observed with minimal projection effects. We identified a set of 20 full halo CMEs in the field of view of SOHO that were also observed in quadrature by STEREO. We used the earthward speed from STEREO measurements as input to the ESA model and compared the resulting travel times with the observed ones from L1 monitors. We find that the model predicts the CME travel time within about 7.3 hours, which is similar to the predictions by the ENLIL model. We also find that CME-CME and CME...

  16. WIDGET: System Performance and GRB Prompt Optical Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Yuji; Tamagawa, Toru; Usui, Fumihiko; Kuwahara, Makoto; Lin, Hungmiao; Kageyama, Shoichi; Iwakiri, Wataru; Sugasahara, Takako; Takahara, Kazuki; Kodaka, Natsuki; Abe, Keiichi; Masuno, Keisuke; Onda, Kaori

    2010-01-01

    The WIDeField telescope for Gamma-ray burst Early Timing (WIDGET) is used for a fully automated, ultra-wide-field survey aimed at detecting the prompt optical emission associated with Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). WIDGET surveys the HETE-2 and Swift/BAT pointing directions covering a total field of view of 62 degree x 62 degree every 10 secounds using an unfiltered system. This monitoring survey allows exploration of the optical emission before the gamma-ray trigger. The unfiltered magnitude is well converted to the SDSS r' system at a 0.1 mag level. Since 2004, WIDGET has made a total of ten simultaneous and one pre-trigger GRB observations. The efficiency of synchronized observation with HETE-2 is four times better than that of Swift. There has been no bright optical emission similar to that from GRB 080319B. The statistical analysis implies that GRB080319B is a rare event. This paper summarizes the design and operation of the WIDGET system and the simultaneous GRB observations obtained with this instrument.

  17. The Moon as a Tiny Bright Disc: Insights From Observations in the Planetarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2015-01-01

    Despite a relatively constant visual angle, the size of the moon appears very variable, mostly depending on elevation and context factors--the so-called moon illusion. As our perceptual experience of the size of the moon is clearly limited to the perceptual sphere of the sky, however, we do not know whether the typical perception of the moon at its zenith reflects a veridical interpretation of its visual angle of only 0.5 degrees. When testing the moon illusion in a large-scale planetarium, we observed two important things: (a) variation in perceptual size was no longer apparent, and (b) the moon looked very much smaller than in any viewing condition in the real sky--even when comparing it at its zenith. A closer inspection of the control console of the planetarium revealed that classic-analog as well as updated-digital planetariums use projections of the moon with strongly increased sizes to compensate for the loss of a natural view of the moon in the artificial dome of the sky.

  18. HST WFC3 Observations of Uranus' 2014 Storm Clouds and Comparison with VLT/SINFONI and IRTF/Spex Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Wong, Michael H.; Simon, Amy A.; Orton, G. S.; Toledo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In November 2014 Uranus was observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument of the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Hubble 2020: Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy program, OPAL. OPAL annually maps Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune (and will also map Saturn from 2018) in several visible near- infrared wavelength filters. The Uranus 2014 OPAL observations were made on the 89th November at a time when a huge cloud complex, first observed by de Pater et al. (2015) and subsequently tracked by professional and amateur astronomers (Sayanagi et al., 2016), was present at 30-40deg N. We imaged the entire visible atmosphere, including the storm system, in seven filters spanning 467924 nm, capturing variations in the coloration of Uranus clouds and also vertical distribution due to wavelength dependent changes in Rayleigh scattering and methane absorption optical depth. Here we analyse these new HST observations with the NEMESIS radiative-transfer and retrieval code in multiple-scattering mode to determine the vertical cloud structure in and around the storm cloud system. The same storm system was also observed in the H-band (1.4-1.8 micrometers) with the SINFONI Integral Field Unit Spectrometer on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) on 31st October and 11th November, reported by Irwin et al. (2016, 10.1016j.icarus.2015.09.010). To constrain better the cloud particle sizes and scattering properties over a wide wavelength range we also conducted a limb-darkening analysis of the background cloud structure in the 30-40deg N latitude band by simultaneously fitting: a) thes