WorldWideScience

Sample records for field reversal compact

  1. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment (i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems). In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development.

  2. Plasma engineering design of a Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathke, C. G.; Embrechts, M. J.; Hagenson, R. L.; Krakowski, R. A.; Miller, R. L.

    1983-11-01

    The rationale for and the characteristics of the high-power-density Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to key plasma engineering aspects of the conceptual design, including plasma operations, current drive, and impurity/ash control by means of pumped limiters or magnetic divertors. A brief description of the Fusion-Power-Core integration is given.

  3. Two-dimensional TBR calculations for conceptual compact reversed-field pinch reactor blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J. W.; Battat, M. E.; Dudziak, D. J.

    A detailed two-dimensional nucleonic analysis was performed for a conceptual first wall, blanket, and shield design for the Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor. The design includes significant two-dimensional aspects presented by the limiter, vacuum ducts, and coolant manifolds; these aspects seriously degrade the tritium-breeding reaction (TBR) predicted by one-dimensional calculations. A range of design change to increase the TBR were investigated within the two-dimensional analysis. The results of this investigation indicated that an adequate TBR could be achieved with a thinning copper first wall, a (6)Li enrichment near 90%, the proper selection of reflector, and a small addition to the blanket thickness, determined by the one-dimensional analysis.

  4. Fusion-power-core design of a Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N. M.; Krakowski, R. A.; Hagenson, R. L.; Mynard, R. C.; Cappiello, C.; Lujan, R. E.; Davidson, J. W.; Chaffee, A. D.; Battat, M. E.

    A conceptual design of a fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, coils) based on a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) has been completed. After a brief statement of rationale and description of the reactor configuraton, the FPC integration is described in terms of power balance, thermal-hydraulics, and mechanical design. The engineering versatility, promise, and problems of this high-power-density approach to fusion are addressed.

  5. High-power-density approaches to magnetic fusion energy: Problems and promise of compact reversed-field pinch reactors (CRFPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenson, Randy L.; Krakowski, Robert A.; Dreicer, Harry

    1983-03-01

    If the costing assumptions upon which the positive assessment of conventional large superconducting fusion reactors are based proves overly optimistic, approaches that promise considerably increased system power density and reduced mass utilization will be required. These more compact reactor embodiments generally must operate with reduced shield thickness and resistive magnets. Because of the unique magnetic topology associated with the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP), the compact reactor embodiment for this approach is particularly attractive from the viewpoint of low-field resistive coils operating with ohmic losses that can be made small relative to the fusion power. The RFP, therefore, is used as one example of a high-power-density (HPD) approach to magnetic fusion energy. A comprehensive system model is described and applied to select a unique, cost-optimized design point that will be used for a subsequent conceptual engineering design of the compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR). This cost-optimized CRFPR design serves as an example of a HPD fusion reactor that would operate with system power densities and mass utilizations that are comparable to fission power plants, these measures of system performance being an order of magnitude more favorable than the conventional approaches to magnetic fusion energy (MFE).

  6. Electron density measurements of a field-reversed configuration plasma using a novel compact ultrastable second-harmonic interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandi, F.; Giammanco, F. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Harris, W. S.; Roche, T.; Trask, E.; Wessel, F. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    A compact high-sensitivity second-harmonic interferometer for line-integrated electron density measurements on a large plasma machine is presented. The device is based on a fiber coupled near-infrared continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser and is remotely controlled. The performances of the instrument are tested on the Irvine field-reversed configuration machine, and a sensitivity of few 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} in measuring line integrated electron density is demonstrated with a time resolution of a few microseconds. The interferometer is self calibrated, has an impressive stability, and it does not require any further alignment after proper installation. These features make this device a real turn-key system suitable for electron density measurement in large plasma machines.

  7. Development of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for compact toroid injection into the C-2 field-reversed configuration device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Sekiguchi, J; Asai, T; Gota, H; Garate, E; Allfrey, I; Valentine, T; Morehouse, M; Roche, T; Kinley, J; Aefsky, S; Cordero, M; Waggoner, W; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2016-05-01

    A compact toroid (CT) injector was developed for the C-2 device, primarily for refueling of field-reversed configurations. The CTs are formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylindrical electrodes and a bias coil for creating a magnetic field. First, a plasma ring is generated by a discharge between the electrodes and is accelerated by Lorenz self-force. Then, the plasma ring is captured by an interlinkage flux (poloidal flux). Finally, the fully formed CT is ejected from the MCPG. The MCPG described herein has two gas injection ports that are arranged tangentially on the outer electrode. A tungsten-coated inner electrode has a head which can be replaced with a longer one to extend the length of the acceleration region for the CT. The developed MCPG has achieved supersonic CT velocities of ∼100 km/s. Plasma parameters for electron density, electron temperature, and the number of particles are ∼5 × 10(21) m(-3), ∼40 eV, and 0.5-1.0 × 10(19), respectively.

  8. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  9. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, D.C.; Fernandez, J.C.; Rej, D.J. (comps.)

    1990-05-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately.

  10. US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasmas and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D. C.; Fernandez, J. C.; Rej, D. J.

    1990-05-01

    The U.S.-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th U.S.-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7 to 9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately.

  11. Dynamic formation of a hot field reversed configuration with improved confinement by supersonic merging of two colliding high-β compact toroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binderbauer, M W; Guo, H Y; Tuszewski, M; Putvinski, S; Sevier, L; Barnes, D; Rostoker, N; Anderson, M G; Andow, R; Bonelli, L; Brandi, F; Brown, R; Bui, D Q; Bystritskii, V; Ceccherini, F; Clary, R; Cheung, A H; Conroy, K D; Deng, B H; Dettrick, S A; Douglass, J D; Feng, P; Galeotti, L; Garate, E; Giammanco, F; Glass, F J; Gornostaeva, O; Gota, H; Gupta, D; Gupta, S; Kinley, J S; Knapp, K; Korepanov, S; Hollins, M; Isakov, I; Jose, V A; Li, X L; Luo, Y; Marsili, P; Mendoza, R; Meekins, M; Mok, Y; Necas, A; Paganini, E; Pegoraro, F; Pousa-Hijos, R; Primavera, S; Ruskov, E; Qerushi, A; Schmitz, L; Schroeder, J H; Sibley, A; Smirnov, A; Song, Y; Sun, X; Thompson, M C; Van Drie, A D; Walters, J K; Wyman, M D

    2010-07-23

    A hot stable field-reversed configuration (FRC) has been produced in the C-2 experiment by colliding and merging two high-β plasmoids preformed by the dynamic version of field-reversed θ-pinch technology. The merging process exhibits the highest poloidal flux amplification obtained in a magnetic confinement system (over tenfold increase). Most of the kinetic energy is converted into thermal energy with total temperature (T{i}+T{e}) exceeding 0.5 keV. The final FRC state exhibits a record FRC lifetime with flux confinement approaching classical values. These findings should have significant implications for fusion research and the physics of magnetic reconnection.

  12. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

  13. Compact Electric- And Magnetic-Field Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, Daniel; Smith, Edward

    1994-01-01

    Compact sensor measures both electric and magnetic fields. Includes both short electric-field dipole and search-coil magnetometer. Three mounted orthogonally providing triaxial measurements of electromagnetic field at frequencies ranging from near 0 to about 10 kHz.

  14. Motion Analysis of Fiber Band in Compact Field of Compact Spinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The technological process of compact spinning and the compact procedure of fiber band in compact field are briefly illustrated. The motions of fiber band in compact field are discussed theoretically from which tilting angle of suction slot in profile tube, additional twists created by fiber band's rotating around its own axis and ultimate twists in compact yarn are deduced accordingly. The existence of additional twists is also verified through experiments.

  15. Compact Variables and Singular Fields in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, F; Lenz, Frieder; Woerlen, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    Subject of our investigations is QCD formulated in terms of physical degrees of freedom. Starting from the Faddeev-Popov procedure, the canonical formulation of QCD is derived for static gauges. Particular emphasis is put on obstructions occurring when implementing gauge conditions and on the concomitant emergence of compact variables and singular fields. A detailed analysis of non-perturbative dynamics associated with such exceptional field configurations within Coulomb- and axial gauge is described. We present evidence that compact variables generate confinement-like phenomena in both gauges and point out the deficiencies in achieving a satisfactory non-perturbative treatment concerning all variables. Gauge fixed formulations are shown to constitute also a useful framework for phenomenological studies. Phenomenological insights into the dynamics of Polyakov loops and monopoles in confined and deconfined phases are presented within axial gauge QCD

  16. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  17. Magnetic field reversals and galactic dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We argue that global magnetic field reversals similar to those observed in the Milky Way occur quite frequently in mean-field galactic dynamo models that have relatively strong, random, seed magnetic fields that are localized in discrete regions. The number of reversals decreases to zero with reduction of the seed strength, efficiency of the galactic dynamo and size of the spots of the seed field. A systematic observational search for magnetic field reversals in a representative sample of spi...

  18. A high performance field-reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Garate, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Smirnov, A.; Gota, H.; Barnes, D.; Deng, B. H.; Thompson, M. C.; Trask, E.; Yang, X.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Andow, R.; Aefsky, S.; Bolte, N.; Bui, D. Q.; Ceccherini, F.; Clary, R. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Conventional field-reversed configurations (FRCs), high-beta, prolate compact toroids embedded in poloidal magnetic fields, face notable stability and confinement concerns. These can be ameliorated by various control techniques, such as introducing a significant fast ion population. Indeed, adding neutral beam injection into the FRC over the past half-decade has contributed to striking improvements in confinement and stability. Further, the addition of electrically biased plasma guns at the ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved stability. Together, these enabled the build-up of a well-confined and dominant fast-ion population. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, macroscopically stable hot FRCs (with total plasma temperature of ∼1 keV) with record lifetimes were achieved. These accomplishments point to the prospect of advanced, beam-driven FRCs as an intriguing path toward fusion reactors. This paper reviews key results and presents context for further interpretation.

  19. Reversed polarity patches at the CMB and geomagnetic field reversal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Wenyao(徐文耀); WEI; Zigang(魏自刚)

    2002-01-01

    The International Geomagnetic Reference Field models (IGRF) for 1900-2000 are used to calculate the geomagnetic field distribution in the Earth' interior from the ground surface to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) under the assumption of insulated mantle. Four reversed polarity patches, as one of the most important features of the CMB field, are revealed. Two patches with +Z polarity (downward) at the southern African and the southern American regions stand out against the background of -Z polarity (upward) in the southern hemisphere, and two patches of -Z polarity at the North Polar and the northern Pacific regions stand out against the +Z background in the northern hemisphere. During the 1900-2000 period the southern African (SAF) patch has quickly drifted westward at a speed of 0.2-0.3°/a; meanwhile its area has expanded 5 times, and the magnetic flux crossing the area has intensified 30 times. On the other hand, other three patches show little if any change during this 100-year period. Extending upward, each of the reversed polarity patches at the CMB forms a chimney-shaped "reversed polarity column" in the mantle with the bottom at the CMB. The height of the SAF column has grown rapidly from 200km in 1900 to 900km in 2000. If the column grows steadily at the same rate in the future, its top will reach to the ground surface in 600-700 years. And then a reversed polarity patch will be observed at the Earth's surface, which will be an indicator of the beginning of a magnetic field reversal. On the basis of this study, one can describe the process of a geomagnetic polarity reversal, the polarity reversal may be observed firstly in one or several local regions; then the areas of these regions expand, and at the same time, other new reversed polarity regions may appear. Thus several poles may exist during a polarity reversal.

  20. Internal magnetic field measurement on C-2 field-reversed configuration plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, H; Thompson, M C; Knapp, K; Van Drie, A D; Deng, B H; Mendoza, R; Guo, H Y; Tuszewski, M

    2012-10-01

    A long-lived field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma has been produced in the C-2 device by dynamically colliding and merging two oppositely directed, highly supersonic compact toroids (CTs). The reversed-field structure of the translated CTs and final merged-FRC state have been directly verified by probing the internal magnetic field structure using a multi-channel magnetic probe array near the midplane of the C-2 confinement chamber. Each of the two translated CTs exhibits significant toroidal fields (B(t)) with opposite helicity, and a relatively large B(t) remains inside the separatrix after merging.

  1. C-2-Upgrade Field Reversed Configuration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Artem

    2016-10-01

    In the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment, tangential neutral beam injection (20 - 40 keV hydrogen, 4 MW total), coupled with electrically-biased plasma guns at the plasma ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning, led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved plasma stability. Under such conditions, highly reproducible FRCs with a significant fast-ion population and total plasma temperature of about 1 keV were achieved. The FRC's were macroscopically stable and decayed on characteristic transport time scales of a few milliseconds. In order to sustain an FRC configuration, the C-2 device was upgraded with a new neutral beam injection (NBI) system, which can deliver a total of 10 + MW of hydrogen beam power, by far the largest ever used in a compact toroid plasma experiment. Compared to C-2, the beam energy was lowered to 15 keV and angled injection geometry was adopted to provide better beam coupling to the FRC. The upgraded neutral beams produce a dominant fast ion population that makes a dramatic beneficial impact on the overall plasma performance. Specifically: (1) high-performance, advanced beam-driven FRCs were produced and sustained for times significantly longer (5 + ms) than all characteristic plasma decay times without the beams, (2) the sustainment is fully correlated with neutral beam injection, (3) confinement of fast ions is close to the classical limit, and (4) new, benign collective fast ion effects were observed. Collectively, these accomplishments represent a dramatic advance towards the scientific validation of the FRC-based approach to fusion. This talk will provide a comprehensive overview of the C-2U device and recent experimental advances.

  2. What happens when the geomagnetic field reverses?

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, Joseph F

    2012-01-01

    During geomagnetic field reversals the radiation belt high-energy proton populations become depleted. Their energy spectra become softer, with the trapped particles of highest energies being lost first, and eventually recovering after a field reversal. The radiation belts rebuild in a dynamical way with the energy spectra flattening on the average during the course of many millennia, but without ever reaching complete steady state equilibrium between successive geomagnetic storm events determined by southward turnings of the IMF orientation. Considering that the entry of galactic cosmic rays and the solar energetic particles with energies above a given threshold are strongly controlled by the intensity of the northward component of the interplanetary magnetic field, we speculate that at earlier epochs when the geomagnetic dipole was reversed, the entry of these energetic particles into the geomagnetic field was facilitated when the interplanetary magnetic field was directed northward. Unlike in other compleme...

  3. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2017-09-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  4. Reversals of the Earth's Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duene E.

    J.A. Jacobs of Cambridge University has written a concise, authoritative, and up-todate text on reversals of the earth's magnetic field. Chapter 1 is a concise summary of the basic attributes of the geomagnetic field and its behavior in different time frames. It explains spherical harmonic analysis of the field and presents the history of acquisition of the data that best represent the recent field. Lastly, it includes a short summary of the origin and electrodynamics of the magnetic field, outlining the current theoretical basis for its generation.

  5. Compact muon solenoid magnet reaches full field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Scientist of the U.S. Department of Energy in Fermilab and collaborators of the US/CMS project announced that the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet has reached full field in tests at CERN. (1 apge)

  6. Translating laboratory compaction test results to field scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roholl, J.A.; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Breunese, J.N.

    2016-01-01

    In recent studies on the surface subsidence caused by hydrocarbon recovery of the Groningen gas field, the predicted subsidence is overestimated if results of compaction experiments are not corrected by an empirical `upscaling factor'. In order to find an explanation for this `upscaling factor', an

  7. Midday reversal of equatorial ionospheric electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Rastogi

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the geomagnetic and ionospheric data at equatorial and low-latitude stations in India over the 20 year period 1956–1975 is described. The reversal of the electric field in the ionosphere over the magnetic equator during the midday hours indicated by the disappearance of the equatorial sporadic E region echoes on the ionograms is a rare phenomenon occurring on about 1% of time. Most of these events are associated with geomagnetically active periods. By comparing the simultaneous geomagnetic H field at Kodaikanal and at Alibag during the geomagnetic storms it is shown that ring current decreases are observed at both stations. However, an additional westward electric field is superimposed in the ionosphere during the main phase of the storm which can be strong enough to temporarily reverse the normally eastward electric field in the dayside ionosphere. It is suggested that these electric fields associated with the V×Bz electric fields originate at the magnetopause due to the interaction of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field.

  8. Using nanocomposite materials technology to understand and control reverse osmosis membrane compaction

    KAUST Repository

    Pendergast, Mary Theresa M.

    2010-10-01

    Composite reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were formed by interfacial polymerization of polyamide thin films over pure polysulfone and nanocomposite-polysulfone support membranes. Nanocomposite support membranes were formed from amorphous non-porous silica and crystalline microporous zeolite nanoparticles. For each hand-cast membrane, water flux and NaCl rejection were monitored over time at two different applied pressures. Nanocomposite-polysulfone supported RO membranes generally had higher initial permeability and experienced less flux decline due to compaction than pure polysulfone supported membranes. In addition, observed salt rejection tended to increase as flux declined from compaction. Crosssectional SEM images verified significant reduction in thickness of pure polysulfone supports, whereas nanocomposites better resisted compaction due to enhanced mechanical stability imparted by the nanoparticles. A conceptual model was proposed to explain the mechanistic relationship between support membrane compaction and observed changes in water flux and salt rejection. As the support membrane compacts, skin layer pore constriction increased the effective path length for diffusion through the composite membranes, which reduced both water and salt permeability identically. However, experimental salt permeability tended to decline to a greater extent than water permeability; hence, the observed changes in flux and rejection might also be related to structural changes in the polyamide thin film. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Microtearing Modes in Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Predebon, I; Veranda, M; Bonfiglio, D; Cappello, S

    2010-01-01

    In the reversed field pinch RFX-mod strong electron temperature gradients develop when the Single-Helical-Axis regime is achieved. Gyrokinetic calculations show that in the region of the strong temperature gradients microtearing instabilities are the dominant turbulent mechanism acting on the ion Larmor radius scale. The quasi-linear evaluation of the electron thermal conductivity is in good agreement with the experimental estimates.

  10. Radiation Fields in the Vicinity of Compact Accelerator Neutron Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Chichester; Brandon W. Blackburn; Augustine J. Caffrey

    2006-10-01

    Intense pulsed radiation fields emitted from sealed tube neutron generators provide a challenge for modern health physics survey instrumentation. The spectral sensitivity of these survey instruments requires calibration under realistic field conditions while the pulsed emission characteristics of neutron generators can vary from conditions of steady-state operation. As a general guide for assessing radiological conditions around neutron generators, experiments and modeling simulations have been performed to assess radiation fields near DD and DT neutron generators. The presence of other materials and material configurations can also have important effects on the radiation dose fields around compact accelerator neutron generators.

  11. Magnetization reversal in ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, M; Fassbender, J; Hillebrands, B

    2000-01-01

    We report the switching properties of a thin magnetic film subject to an ultrashort, laterally localized magnetic field pulse, obtained by numerical investigations. The magnetization distribution in the film is calculated on a grid assuming Stoner-like coherent rotation within the grid square size. Perpendicularly and in-plane magnetized films exhibit a magnetization reversal due to a 4 ps magnetic field pulse. Outside the central region the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period. In this area the evolution of the magnetization during the field pulse does not depend strongly on magnetic damping and/or pulse shape. However, the final magnetization distribution is affected by the magnetic damping. Although the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period, the time needed for the relaxation of the magnetization to the equilibrium state is rather large. The influence of the different magnetic anisotropy contributions and the magnetic damping parameter enters into the magnetization ...

  12. A compact time reversal emitter-receiver based on a leaky random cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Trung-Dung; Hies, Thomas; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-11-01

    Time reversal acoustics (TRA) has gained widespread applications for communication and measurements. In general, a scattering medium in combination with multiple transducers is needed to achieve a sufficiently large acoustical aperture. In this paper, we report an implementation for a cost-effective and compact time reversal emitter-receiver driven by a single piezoelectric element. It is based on a leaky cavity with random 3-dimensional printed surfaces. The random surfaces greatly increase the spatio-temporal focusing quality as compared to flat surfaces and allow the focus of an acoustic beam to be steered over an angle of 41°. We also demonstrate its potential use as a scanner by embedding a receiver to detect an object from its backscatter without moving the TRA emitter.

  13. Nonlocal Transport in the Reversed Field Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spizzo, G.; White, R. B.; Cappello, S.; Marrelli, L.

    2009-09-21

    Several heuristic models for nonlocal transport in plasmas have been developed, but they have had a limited possibility of detailed comparision with experimental data. Nonlocal aspects introduced by the existence of a known spectrum of relatively stable saturated tearing modes in a low current reversed field pinch offers a unique possibility for such a study. A numerical modelling of the magnetic structure and associated particle transport is carried out for the reversed-field pinch experiment at the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy. A reproduction of the tearing mode spectrum with a guiding center code1 reliably reproduces the observed soft X-ray tomography. Following particle trajectories in the stochastic magnetic field shows the transport across the unperturbed flux surfaces to be due to a spectrum of Levy flights, with the details of the spectrum position dependent. The resulting transport is subdiffusive, and cannot be described by Rechester-Rosenbluth diffusion, which depends on a random phase approximation. If one attempts to fit the local transport phenomenologically, the subdiffusion can be fit with a combination of diffusion and inward pinch2. It is found that whereas passing particles explore the stochastic field and hence participate in Levy flights, the trapped particles experience normal neoclassical diffusion. A two fluid nonlocal Montroll equation is used to model this transport, with a Levy flight defined as the motion of an ion during the period that the pitch has one sign. The necessary input to the Montroll equation consists of a time distribution for the Levy flights, given by the pitch angle scattering operator, and a distribution of the flight distances, determined numerically using a guiding center code. Results are compared to experiment. The relation of this formulation to fractional kinetics is also described.

  14. Characterization of compact-toroid injection during formation, translation, and field penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a compact toroid (CT) injector system for particle refueling of the advanced beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The CT injector is a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), and the produced CT must cross the perpendicular magnetic field surrounding the FRC for the refueling of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of ˜1 kG is established, which is comparable to the C-2U axial magnetic field in the confinement section, and CTs are fired across it. On the test stand we have been characterizing and studying CT formation, ejection/translation from the MCPG, and penetration into transverse magnetic fields.

  15. Characterization of compact-toroid injection during formation, translation, and field penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, T., E-mail: cstd14003@g.nihon-u.ac.jp; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T. [Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Gota, H.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Tajima, T. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We have developed a compact toroid (CT) injector system for particle refueling of the advanced beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The CT injector is a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), and the produced CT must cross the perpendicular magnetic field surrounding the FRC for the refueling of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of ∼1 kG is established, which is comparable to the C-2U axial magnetic field in the confinement section, and CTs are fired across it. On the test stand we have been characterizing and studying CT formation, ejection/translation from the MCPG, and penetration into transverse magnetic fields.

  16. A domino model for geomagnetic field reversals

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, N; Ferriz-Mas, A; Wicht, J; Mouri, H; Nakamichi, A; Morikawa, M

    2011-01-01

    We solve the equations of motion of a one-dimensional planar Heisenberg (or Vaks-Larkin) model consisting of a system of interacting macro-spins aligned along a ring. Each spin has unit length and is described by its angle with respect to the rotational axis. The orientation of the spins can vary in time due to random forcing and spin-spin interaction. We statistically describe the behaviour of the sum of all spins for different parameters. The term "domino model" in the title refers to the interaction among the spins. We compare the model results with geomagnetic field reversals and find strikingly similar behaviour. The aggregate of all spins keeps the same direction for a long time and, once in a while, begins flipping to change the orientation by almost 180 degrees (mimicking a geomagnetic reversal) or to move back to the original direction (mimicking an excursion). Most of the time the spins are aligned or anti-aligned and deviate only slightly with respect to the rotational axis (mimicking the secular v...

  17. On the gravitational field of compact objects in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Ruffini, Remo

    2012-01-01

    We study some exact and approximate solutions of Einstein's equations that can be used to describe the gravitational field of astrophysical compact objects in the limiting case of slow rotation and slight deformation. First, we show that none of the standard models obtained by using Fock's method can be used as an interior source for the approximate exterior Kerr solution. We then use Fock's method to derive a generalized interior solution, and also an exterior solution that turns out to be equivalent to the exterior Hartle-Thorne approximate solution that, in turn, is equivalent to an approximate limiting case of the exact Quevedo-Mashhoon solution. As a result we obtain an analytic approximate solution that describes the interior and exterior gravitational field of a slowly rotating and slightly deformed astrophysical object.

  18. Transport and equilibrium in field-reversed mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    Two plasma models relevant to compact torus research have been developed to study transport and equilibrium in field reversed mirrors. In the first model for small Larmor radius and large collision frequency, the plasma is described as an adiabatic hydromagnetic fluid. In the second model for large Larmor radius and small collision frequency, a kinetic theory description has been developed. Various aspects of the two models have been studied in five computer codes ADB, AV, NEO, OHK, RES. The ADB code computes two dimensional equilibrium and one dimensional transport in a flux coordinate. The AV code calculates orbit average integrals in a harmonic oscillator potential. The NEO code follows particle trajectories in a Hill's vortex magnetic field to study stochasticity, invariants of the motion, and orbit average formulas. The OHK code displays analytic psi(r), B/sub Z/(r), phi(r), E/sub r/(r) formulas developed for the kinetic theory description. The RES code calculates resonance curves to consider overlap regions relevant to stochastic orbit behavior.

  19. Behavior of Compact Toroid in the External Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, N.; Ioroi, A.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T.

    1999-11-01

    We have investigated the possibility of refueling and density control of tokamak plasmas by the spheromak-type Compact Toroid (CT) injection in the JFT-2M tokamak in collaboration with JAERI. We demonstrated the CT injection into OH plasmas and observed the core penetration at B_T=0.8 T. The tokamak electron density increased ~0.2× 10^19m-3 at a rate of 2× 10^21m-3/s. We also observed the decrease of the CT velocity by the external magnetic field of the tokamak, which is applied across the CT acceleration region. We have examined the behavior of the CT translated in the external fields B_ext using the magnetic probes and the fast framing camera at Himeji Inst. of tech.. CT plasma in the acceleration region is deformed by the Lorentz force of Jg × B_ext, where Jg is the gun current for CT acceleration. The magnetic field structures of a long CT in the drift region has been revealed to be the mixed relaxed state of m=0 and m=1. Results from CT acceleration and injection in a transverse field will be presented.

  20. A compact neutron scatter camera for field deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, John E M; Brennan, James S

    2016-01-01

    We describe a very compact (0.9 m high, 0.4 m diameter, 40 kg) battery operable neutron scatter camera designed for field deployment. Unlike most other systems, the configuration of the sixteen liquid-scintillator detection cells are arranged to provide omnidirectional (4{\\pi}) imaging with sensitivity comparable to a conventional two-plane system. Although designed primarily to operate as a neutron scatter camera for localizing energetic neutron sources, it also functions as a Compton camera for localizing gamma sources. In addition to describing the radionuclide source localization capabilities of this system, we demonstrate how it provides neutron spectra that can distinguish plutonium metal from plutonium oxide sources, in addition to the easier task of distinguishing AmBe from fission sources.

  1. Magnetic field evolution and reversals in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, C. L.; Price, D. J.; Pettitt, A. R.; Bate, M. R.; Tricco, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    We study the evolution of galactic magnetic fields using 3D smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of galaxies with an imposed spiral potential. We consider the appearance of reversals of the field, and amplification of the field. We find that magnetic field reversals occur when the velocity jump across the spiral shock is above ≈20 km s-1, occurring where the velocity change is highest, typically at the inner Lindblad resonance in our models. Reversals also occur at corotation, where the direction of the velocity field reverses in the corotating frame of a spiral arm. They occur earlier with a stronger amplitude spiral potential, and later or not at all with weaker or no spiral arms. The presence of a reversal at radii of around 4-6 kpc in our fiducial model is consistent with a reversal identified in the Milky Way, though we caution that alternative Galaxy models could give a similar reversal. We find that relatively high resolution, a few million particles in SPMHD, is required to produce consistent behaviour of the magnetic field. Amplification of the magnetic field occurs in the models, and while some may be genuinely attributable to differential rotation or spiral arms, some may be a numerical artefact. We check our results using ATHENA, finding reversals but less amplification of the field, suggesting that some of the amplification of the field with SPMHD is numerical.

  2. Tandem mirror and field-reversed mirror experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coensgen, F.H.; Simonen, T.C.; Turner, W.C.

    1979-08-21

    This paper is largely devoted to tandem mirror and field-reversed mirror experiments at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), and briefly summarizes results of experiments in which field-reversal has been achieved. In the tandem experiment, high-energy, high-density plasmas (nearly identical to 2XIIB plasmas) are located at each end of a solenoid where plasma ions are electrostatically confined by the high positive poentials arising in the end plug plasma. End plug ions are magnetically confined, and electrons are electrostatically confined by the overall positive potential of the system. The field-reversed mirror reactor consists of several small field-reversed mirror plasmas linked together for economic reasons. In the LLL Beta II experiment, generation of a field-reversed plasma ring will be investigated using a high-energy plasma gun with a transverse radial magnetic field. This plasma will be further heated and sustained by injection of intense, high-energy neutral beams.

  3. A Gaussian Model for Simulated Geomagnetic Field Reversals

    CERN Document Server

    Wicht, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Field reversals are the most spectacular changes in the geomagnetic field but remain little understood. Paleomagnetic data primarily constrain the reversal rate and provide few additional clues. Reversals and excursions are characterized by a low in dipole moment that can last for some 10kyr. Some paleomagnetic records also suggest that the field decreases much slower before an reversals than it recovers afterwards and that the recovery phase may show an overshoot in field intensity. Here we study the dipole moment variations in several extremely long dynamo simulation to statistically explored the reversal and excursion properties. The numerical reversals are characterized by a switch from a high axial dipole moment state to a low axial dipole moment state. When analysing the respective transitions we find that decay and growth have very similar time scales and that there is no overshoot. Other properties are generally similar to paleomagnetic findings. The dipole moment has to decrease to about 30% of its m...

  4. Polar Magnetic Field Reversals of the Sun in Maunder Minimum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. I. Makarov; A. G. Tlatov

    2000-09-01

    A possible scenario of polar magnetic field reversal of the Sun during the Maunder Minimum (1645-1715) is discussed using data of magnetic field reversals of the Sun for 1880-1991 and the 14C content variations in the bi-annual rings of the pine-trees in 1600-1730 yrs.

  5. Integral Field Spectroscopy of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Lorenzo, Begona; Caon, Nicola; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Kehrig, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    We present results on integral-field optical spectroscopy of five luminous Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies. The data were obtained using the fiber system INTEGRAL attached at the William Herschel telescope. The galaxies Mrk 370, Mrk 35, Mrk 297, Mrk 314 and III Zw 102 were observed. The central 33"x29" regions of the galaxies were mapped with a spatial resolution of 2"/spaxel, except for Mrk 314, in which we observed the central 16"x12" region with a resolution of 0.9"/spaxel$. We use high-resolution optical images to isolate the star-forming knots in the objects; line ratios, electron densities and oxygen abundances in each of these regions are computed. We build continuum and emission-line intensity maps as well as maps of the most relevant line ratios: [OIII]5007\\Hb, [NII]6584\\Ha, and Ha\\Hb, which allow us to obtain spatial information on the ionization structure and mechanisms. We also derive the gas velocity field from the Ha and [OIII]5007 emission lines. We find that all the five galaxies are in the high e...

  6. PZT-Based Detection of Compactness of Concrete in Concrete Filled Steel Tube Using Time Reversal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A smart aggregate-based approach is proposed for the concrete compactness detection of concrete filled steel tube (CFST columns. The piezoceramic-based smart aggregates (SAs were embedded in the predetermined locations prior to the casting of concrete columns to establish a wave-based smart sensing system for the concrete compactness detection purpose. To evaluate the efficiency of the developed approach, six specimens of the CFST columns with the rectangular cross-section were produced by placing some artificial defects during casting of concrete for simulating various uncompacted voids such as cavities, cracks, and debond. During the test, the time reversal technology was applied to rebuild the received signals and launch the reversed signals again by SAs, to overcome the issue of the lack of the prototype. Based on the proposed nonprototype, two indices of time reversibility (TR and symmetry (SYM were applied to relatively evaluate the level of concrete compactness in the range of the two SAs. The experimental results show that the developed method can effectively detect the compactness of concrete in CFST columns.

  7. Compact model for switching characteristics of graphene field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenath, R.; Bala Tripura Sundari, B.

    2016-04-01

    The scaling of CMOS transistors has resulted in intensified short channel effects, indicating that CMOS has reached its physical limits. Alternate non silicon based materials namely carbon based graphene, carbon nanotubes are being explored for usability as channel and interconnect material due to their established higher mobility and robustness. This paper presents a drift-diffusion based circuit simulatable Verilog-A compact model of graphene field effect transistor (GFET) for channel length of 100nm.The focus is on the development of simulatable device model in Verilog A based on intrinsic parameters and obtain the current, high cutoff frequency and use the model into circuit level simulations to realize an inverter and a 3-stage ring oscillator using Synopsys HSPICE. The applications are so chosen that their switching characteristics enable the determination of the RF frequency ranges of operation that the model can achieve when used in digital applications and also to compare its performance with existing CMOS model. The GFET's switching characteristics and power consumption were found to be better than similarly sized CMOS operating at same range of voltages. The basic frequency of operation in the circuit is of significant importance so as to use the model in other applications at RF and in future for millimeter wave applications. The frequency of operation at circuit level is found to be 1.1GHz at 100nm which is far higher than the existing frequency of 245 MHz reported at 500nm using AlN.

  8. Magnetic field evolution and reversals in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, C L; Pettitt, A R; Bate, M R; Tricco, T

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of galactic magnetic fields using 3D smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of galaxies with an imposed spiral potential. We consider the appearance of reversals of the field, and amplification of the field. We find magnetic field reversals occur when the velocity jump across the spiral shock is above $\\approx$20km s$^{-1}$, occurring where the velocity change is highest, typically at the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) in our models. Reversals also occur at corotation, where the direction of the velocity field reverses in the co-rotating frame of a spiral arm. They occur earlier with a stronger amplitude spiral potential, and later or not at all with weaker or no spiral arms. The presence of a reversal at a radii of around 4--6 kpc in our fiducial model is consistent with a reversal identified in the Milky Way, though we caution that alternative Galaxy models could give a similar reversal. We find that relatively high resolution, a few million particles in SPMHD, is ...

  9. A gaussian model for simulated geomagnetic field reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, Johannes; Meduri, Domenico G.

    2016-10-01

    Field reversals are the most spectacular events in the geomagnetic history but remain little understood. Here we explore the dipole behaviour in particularly long numerical dynamo simulations to reveal statistically significant conditions required for reversals and excursions to happen. We find that changes in the axial dipole moment behaviour are crucial while the equatorial dipole moment plays a negligible role. For small Rayleigh numbers, the axial dipole always remains strong and stable and obeys a clearly Gaussian probability distribution. Only when the Rayleigh number is increased sufficiently the axial dipole can reverse and its distribution becomes decisively non-Gaussian. Increased likelihoods around zero indicate a pronounced lingering in a new low dipole moment state. Reversals and excursions can only happen when axial dipole fluctuations are large enough to drive the system from the high dipole moment state assumed during stable polarity epochs into the low dipole moment state. Since it is just a matter of chance which polarity is amplified during dipole recovery, reversals and grand excursions, i.e. excursions during which the dipole assumes reverse polarity, are equally likely. While the overall reversal behaviour seems Earth-like, a closer comparison to palaeomagnetic findings suggests that the simulated events last too long and that grand excursions are too rare. For a particularly large Ekman number we find a second but less Earth-like type of reversals where the total field decays and recovers after a certain time.

  10. Eccentric binaries of compact objects in strong-field gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, Roman

    2011-09-27

    In this thesis we study the dynamics as well as the resulting gravitational radiation from eccentric binaries of compact objects in the non-linear regime of General Relativity. For this purpose we solve Einstein's field equation numerically in a 3+1 decomposition using the moving-puncture technique. We focus our study on very particular orbits, arising as a purely relativistic phenomenon of the two-body problem in General Relativity, which are associated with unstable circular orbits. They are governed by a fast, nearly circular revolution at a short distance followed by a slow, radial motion on a nearly elliptic trajectory. Due to the unique features of their orbital trajectories they are called zoom-whirl orbits. We analyze how the peculiar dynamics manifests itself in the emitted gravitational radiation and to which extent one can infer the orbital properties from observations of the gravitational waves. In the first part, we consider black hole binaries. We perform a comprehensive parameter study by varying the initial eccentricity, computing and characterizing the resulting gravitational waveforms. We address aspects, which can only be obtained from non-perturbative methods, and which are crucial to the astrophysical relevance of these orbits. In particular, our results imply a fairly low amount of fine-tuning necessary to spot zoom-whirl effects. We find whirl orbits for values of the eccentricities, which fall in disjunct intervals extending to rather low values. Furthermore, we show that whirl effects just before merger cause a signal with significant amplitude. In the second part, we investigate neutron star binaries on eccentric orbits in full General Relativity, which has not been studied so far. We explore their phenomenology and study the consequences for the matter after the neutron stars have merged. In these evolutions the merged neutron stars sooner or later collapse to form a black hole. During the collapse most of the matter is accreted on

  11. The Liverpool Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal : New evidences for a complex magnetic field behavior during reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, P.; Perrin, M.; Hoffman, K. A.; Singer, B. S.

    2009-04-01

    We carried out a detailed and continuous paleomagnetic re-sampling of the reversed-to-normal Eocene -36 Ma- geomagnetic transition recorded in the Liverpool (NSW, Australia) volcanic range [Hoffman, 1986]. Our main objective was to obtain a precise description of the variation in the paleofield vector (direction and absolute intensity) as the geomagnetic field reverses. With more than 30 transitional directions documented, the Liverpool reversal is, along with the Miocene record -16.2 Ma- of the Steens Mountain (Oregon, USA) [Mankinen et al., 1985] and the Matuyama-Brunhes -780 Ka- record of Hawaii [Coe et al, 2004], among the best example of a transition record from a volcanic sequence. The Liverpool polarity reversal shows a complex path of the Virtual Geomagnetic poles between the initial (reverse) and final (normal) polarities. Two loops in the trajectory of VGPs before the actual polarity switch are documented [Hoffman, 1986]. Such swings preceding the reversal seems to be a common characteristic of reversal since similar features are described on the Steens Mountain [Jarboe et al., 2007] and a long period of instability, estimated to 18 ka, is now well established prior to the Matuyama-Brunhes reversal [Singer et al., 2005]. In the present study, we found an additional swing through the reversed polarity yielding a complex R-T-R-T-R-T-R-T-N path for VGPs to achieve the reversal process. During the sampling campaign, we did not find evidence for significant hiatus in the eruptive activity such as soil horizons or sediments. We do not believe either that some part of the volcanic sequence be duplicate by the presence of tectonic faults. Hence, we think that the three excursions and the actual reversal belong to a single phenomenon. In order to strengthen this conclusion, precise Ar/ Ar will be performed. Twelve flows (5 of transitional and 7 of reversed polarity, respectively) all located in the lower half part of the Liverpool record, yielded paleointensity

  12. Gauge theories on compact toric surfaces, conformal field theories and equivariant Donaldson invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Bershtein, Mikhail; Ronzani, Massimiliano; Tanzini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We show that equivariant Donaldson polynomials of compact toric surfaces can be calculated as residues of suitable combinations of Virasoro conformal blocks, by building on AGT correspondence between N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories and two-dimensional conformal field theory.

  13. A study on dynamic heat assisted magnetization reversal mechanisms under insufficient reversal field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Wu, B. L.; Asbahi, M.; Yu Ko, Hnin Yu; Yang, J. K. W.; Ng, V.

    2014-10-01

    We report an experimental study on the dynamic thermomagnetic (TM) reversal mechanisms at around Curie temperature (Tc) for isolated 60 nm pitch single-domain [Co/Pd] islands heated by a 1.5 μm spot size laser pulse under an applied magnetic reversal field (Hr). Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) observations with high resolution MFM tips clearly showed randomly trapped non-switched islands within the laser irradiated spot after dynamic TM reversal process with insufficient Hr strength. This observation provides direct experimental evidence by MFM of a large magnetization switching variation due to increased thermal fluctuation/agitation over magnetization energy at the elevated temperature of around Tc. The average percentage of non-switched islands/magnetization was further found to be inversely proportional to the applied reversal field Hr for incomplete magnetization reversal when Hr is less than 13% of the island coercivity (Hc), showing an increased switching field distribution (SFD) at elevated temperature of around Tc (where main contributions to SFD broadening are from Tc distribution and stronger thermal fluctuations). Our experimental study and results provide better understanding and insight on practical heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) process and recording performance, including HAMR writing magnetization dynamics induced SFD as well as associated DC saturation noise that limits areal density, as were previously observed and investigated by theoretical simulations.

  14. Reversible electric-field control of magnetization at oxide interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, F. A.; Liu, Y. H.; Salafranca, J.; Nemes, N.; Iborra, E.; Sanchez-Santolino, G.; Varela, M.; Hernandez, M. Garcia; Freeland, J. W.; Zhernenkov, M.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Okamoto, S.; Pennycook, S. J.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.; Te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Sefrioui, Z.; Leon, C.; Santamaria, J.

    2014-06-01

    Electric-field control of magnetism has remained a major challenge which would greatly impact data storage technology. Although progress in this direction has been recently achieved, reversible magnetization switching by an electric field requires the assistance of a bias magnetic field. Here we take advantage of the novel electronic phenomena emerging at interfaces between correlated oxides and demonstrate reversible, voltage-driven magnetization switching without magnetic field. Sandwiching a non-superconducting cuprate between two manganese oxide layers, we find a novel form of magnetoelectric coupling arising from the orbital reconstruction at the interface between interfacial Mn spins and localized states in the CuO2 planes. This results in a ferromagnetic coupling between the manganite layers that can be controlled by a voltage. Consequently, magnetic tunnel junctions can be electrically toggled between two magnetization states, and the corresponding spin-dependent resistance states, in the absence of a magnetic field.

  15. The reversal of the Sun's magnetic field in cycle 24

    CERN Document Server

    Mordvinov, Alexander V; Bertello, Luca; Petrie, Gordon J D

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of synoptic data from the Vector Stokes Magnetograph (VSM) of the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) and the NASA/NSO Spectromagnetograph (SPM) at the NSO/Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope facility shows that the reversals of solar polar magnetic fields exhibit elements of a stochastic process, which may include the development of specific patterns of emerging magnetic flux, and the asymmetry in activity between northern and southern hemispheres. The presence of such irregularities makes the modeling and prediction of polar field reversals extremely hard if possible. In a classical model of solar activity cycle, the unipolar magnetic regions (UMRs) of predominantly following polarity fields are transported polewards due to meridional flows and diffusion. The UMRs gradually cancel out the polar magnetic field of the previous cycle, and re-build the polar field of opposite polarity setting the stage for the next cycle. We show, however, that this deterministic picture can be easily a...

  16. Inter- and Intra- Field variations in soil compaction levels and subsequent impacts on hydrological extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Ian; Coates, Victoria

    2015-04-01

    The rural landscape in the UK is dominated by pastoral agriculture, with about 40% of land cover classified as either improved or semi-natural grassland according to the Land Cover Map 2007. Intensification has resulted in greater levels of compaction associated with higher stocking densities. However, there is likely to be a great amount of variability in compaction levels within and between fields due to multiple controlling factors. This research focusses in on two of these factors; firstly animal species, namely sheep, cattle and horses; and secondly field zonation e.g. feeding areas, field gates, open field. Field experiments have been conducted in multiple fields in the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK, which has an area of 140km2. The effect on physical and hydrologic soil characteristics such as bulk density and moisture contents have been quantified using a wide range of field and laboratory based experiments. Results have highlighted statistically different properties between heavily compacted areas where animals congregate and less-trampled open areas. Furthermore, soil compaction has been hypothesised to contribute to increased flood risk at larger spatial scales. Previous research (Pattison, 2011) on a ~40km2 catchment (Dacre Beck, Lake District, UK) has shown that when soil characteristics are homogeneously parameterised in a hydrological model, downstream peak discharges can be 65% higher for a heavy compacted soil than for a lightly compacted soil. Here we report results from spatially distributed hydrological modelling using soil parameters gained from the field experimentation. Results highlight the importance of both the percentage of the catchment which is heavily compacted and also the spatial distribution of these fields.

  17. Realistic Field Theories on Submanifolds of Compact Extra Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabelli, E.

    2005-04-05

    In this thesis, they study various physical models which assume the existence of spatial dimensions beyond the familiar three. While everyday observation suggests only three dimensions, there is no shortage of potential explanations for how extra dimensions could have escaped detection for so long. For instance, the extra dimensions could be compact, curled into a microscopic volume so that you can never move far in the extra dimensions without ending up back where you started. Or, the elements of everyday experience could be trapped on a three-dimensional membrane floating in a higher dimensions space. The models studied in this thesis each use both of these mechanisms in tandem, with electrons, photons, quarks, and the like being confined to a three-dimensional membrane that sits in a space with compact extra dimensions. Gravitons (and perhaps other new types of particles) could travel beyond the three-dimensional membrane, so they can feel the effects of the higher-dimensional space, but because the extra dimensions are compactified on a small scale, the effects are subtle.

  18. Solar Magnetic Field Reversals and the Role of Dynamo Families

    CERN Document Server

    DeRosa, M L; Hoeksema, J T

    2012-01-01

    The variable magnetic field of the solar photosphere exhibits periodic reversals as a result of dynamo activity occurring within the solar interior. We decompose the surface field as observed by both the Wilcox Solar Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager into its harmonic constituents, and present the time evolution of the mode coefficients for the past three sunspot cycles. The interplay between the various modes is then interpreted from the perspective of general dynamo theory, where the coupling between the primary and secondary families of modes is found to correlate with large-scale polarity reversals for many examples of cyclic dynamos. Mean-field dynamos based on the solar parameter regime are then used to explore how such couplings may result in the various long-term trends in the surface magnetic field observed to occur in the solar case.

  19. Toroidal equilibrium in an iron-core reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G.

    1984-04-01

    An analytical theory of toroidal equilibrium in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch is obtained, including effects of iron cores and resistive shell. The iron cores alter the form of the equilibrium condition and cause the equilibrium to be unstable on the shell resistive time scale.

  20. Spurious behavior in volcanic records of geomagnetic field reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlut, Julie; Vella, Jerome; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Soler, Vicente; Legoff, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Very large directional variations of magnetization have been reported in several lava flows recording a geomagnetic reversal. Such behavior could reflect real geomagnetic changes or be caused by artifacts due to post-emplacement alteration and/or non-ideal magnetic behavior. More recently, a high resolution paleomagnetic record from sediments pleads also for an extremely rapid reversal process during the last reversal. Assuming that the geomagnetic field would have moved by tens of degrees during cooling of moderate thickness lava flows implies brief episodes of rapid changes by a few degrees per day that are difficult to reconcile with the rate of liquid motions at the core surface. Systematical mineralogical bias is a most likely explanation to promote such behavior as recently reconsidered by Coe et al., 2014 for the rapid field changes recorded at Steens Mountain. We resampled three lava flows at La Palma island (Canarias) that are sandwiched between reverse polarity and normal polarity flows associated with the last reversal. The results show an evolution of the magnetization direction from top to bottom. Thermal demagnetization experiments were conducted using different heating and cooling rates. Similarly, continuous demagnetization and measurements. In both cases, we did not notice any remagnetization associated with mineralogical transformations during the experiments. Magnetic grain sizes do not show any correlation with the amplitude of the deviations. Microscopic observations indicate poor exsolution, which could suggests post-cooling thermochemical remagnetization processes.

  1. Galois Field Based Very Fast and Compact Error Correcting Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin Sindhu.A,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the technology is improving the memory devices are becoming larger, so powerful error correction codes are needed. Error correction codes are commonly used to protect memories from soft errors, which change the logical value of memory cells without damaging the circuit. These codes can correct a large number of errors, but generally require complex decoders. In order to avoid this decoding complexity, in this project it uses Euclidean geometry LDPC codes with one step majority decoding technique. This method detects words having error in the first iteration of the majority logic decoding process and reduces the decoding time by stopping the decoding process when no errors are detected as well as reduces the memory access time. And the result obtained through this technique also proves that it is an effective and compact error correcting technique.

  2. Dynamo and anomalous transport in the reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prager, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    The reversed field pinch is an effective tool to study the macroscopic consequences of magnetic fluctuations, such as the dynamo effect and anomalous transport. Several explanations exist for the dynamo (the self-generation of plasma current)--the MHD dynamo, the kinetic dynamo, and the diamagnetic dynamo. There is some experimental evidence for each, particularly from measurements of ion velocity and electron pressure fluctuations. Magnetic fluctuations are known to produce energy and particle flux in the RFP core. Current profile control is able to decrease fluctuation-induced transport by a factor of five. Improved confinement regimes are also obtained at deep reversal and, possibly, with flow shear.

  3. Electromagnetic time reversal focusing of near field waves in metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalko, Matthew J.; Sample, Alanson P.

    2016-12-01

    Precise control of electromagnetic energy on a deeply subwavelength scale in the near field regime is a fundamentally challenging problem. In this letter we demonstrate the selective focusing of electromagnetic energy via the electromagnetic time reversal in the near field of a metamaterial. Our analysis begins with fundamental mathematics, and then is extended to the experimental realm where focusing in space and time of the magnetic fields in the near field of a 1-Dimensional metamaterial is shown. Under time reversal focusing, peak instantaneous fields at receiver locations are at minimum ˜200% greater than other receivers. We then leverage the strong selective focusing capabilities of the system to show individual and selective powering of light emitting diodes connected to coil receivers placed in the near field of the metamaterial. Our results show the possibility of improving display technologies, near field imaging systems, increasing channel capacity of near field communication systems, and obtaining a greater control of energy delivery in wireless power transfer systems.

  4. Bistability between equatorial and axial dipoles during magnetic field reversals

    CERN Document Server

    Gissinger, Christophe; Schrinner, Martin; Dormy, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the geodynamo in presence of an heterogeneous heating are presented. We study the dynamics and the structure of the magnetic field when the equatorial symmetry of the flow is broken. If the symmetry breaking is sufficiently strong, the m = 0 axial dipolar field is replaced by an hemispherical magnetic field, dominated by an oscillating m = 1 magnetic field. Moreover, for moderate symmetry breaking, a bistability between the axial and the equatorial dipole is observed. In this bistable regime, the axial magnetic field exhibits chaotic switches of its polarity, involving the equatorial dipole during the transition period. This new scenario for magnetic field reversals is discussed within the framework of the Earth's dynamo.

  5. Bistability between equatorial and axial dipoles during magnetic field reversals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissinger, Christophe; Petitdemange, Ludovic; Schrinner, Martin; Dormy, Emmanuel

    2012-06-08

    Numerical simulations of the geodynamo in the presence of heterogeneous heating are presented. We study the dynamics and the structure of the magnetic field when the equatorial symmetry of the flow is broken. If the symmetry breaking is sufficiently strong, the m=0 axial dipolar field is replaced by a hemispherical magnetic field, dominated by an oscillating m=1 magnetic field. Moreover, for moderate symmetry breaking, a bistability between the axial and the equatorial dipole is observed. In this bistable regime, the axial magnetic field exhibits chaotic switches of its polarity, involving the equatorial dipole during the transition period. This new scenario for magnetic field reversals is discussed within the framework of Earth's dynamo.

  6. Criticality and novel quantum liquid phases in Ginzburg-Landau theories with compact and non-compact gauge fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smiseth, Jo

    2005-07-01

    The critical properties of three-dimensional U(1)-symmetric lattice gauge theories have been studied. The models apply to various physical systems such as insulating phases of strongly correlated electron systems as well as superconducting and superfluid states of liquid metallic hydrogen under extreme pressures. The thesis contains an introductory part and a collection of research papers of which seven are published works and one is submitted for publication. The outline of this thesis is as follows. In Chapter 2 the theory of phase transitions is discussed with emphasis on continuous phase transitions, critical phenomena and phase transitions in gauge theories. In the next chapter the phases of the abelian Higgs model are presented, and the critical phenomena are discussed. Furthermore, the multicomponent Ginzburg-Landau theory and the applications to liquid metallic hydrogen are presented. Chapter 4 contains an overview of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, including the Metropolis algorithm, error estimates, and re weighting techniques. This chapter is followed by the papers I-VIII. Paper I: Criticality in the (2+1)-Dimensional Compact Higgs Model and Fractionalized Insulators. Paper II: Phase structure of (2+1)-dimensional compact lattice gauge theories and the transition from Mott insulator to fractionalized insulator. Paper III: Compact U(1) gauge theories in 2+1 dimensions and the physics of low dimensional insulating materials. Paper IV: Phase structure of Abelian Chern-Simons gauge theories. Paper V: Critical Properties of the N-Color London Model. Paper VI: Field- and temperature induced topological phase transitions in the three-dimensional N-component London superconductor. Paper VII: Vortex Sublattice Melting in a Two-Component Superconductor. Paper VIII: Observation of a metallic superfluid in a numerical experiment (ml)

  7. Topological Field Theory of Time-Reversal Invariant Insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Hughes, Taylor; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    We show that the fundamental time reversal invariant (TRI) insulator exists in 4 + 1 dimensions, where the effective field theory is described by the 4 + 1 dimensional Chern-Simons theory and the topological properties of the electronic structure is classified by the second Chern number. These topological properties are the natural generalizations of the time reversal breaking (TRB) quantum Hall insulator in 2 + 1 dimensions. The TRI quantum spin Hall insulator in 2 + 1 dimensions and the topological insulator in 3 + 1 dimension can be obtained as descendants from the fundamental TRI insulator in 4 + 1 dimensions through a dimensional reduction procedure. The effective topological field theory, and the Z{sub 2} topological classification for the TRI insulators in 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions are naturally obtained from this procedure. All physically measurable topological response functions of the TRI insulators are completely described by the effective topological field theory. Our effective topological field theory predicts a number of novel and measurable phenomena, the most striking of which is the topological magneto-electric effect, where an electric field generates a magnetic field in the same direction, with an universal constant of proportionality quantized in odd multiples of the fine structure constant {alpha} = e{sup 2}/hc. Finally, we present a general classification of all topological insulators in various dimensions, and describe them in terms of a unified topological Chern-Simons field theory in phase space.

  8. Field Assessment and Specification Review for Roller-Integrated Compaction Monitoring Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. White

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Roller-integrated compaction monitoring (RICM technologies provide virtually 100-percent coverage of compacted areas with real-time display of the compaction measurement values. Although a few countries have developed quality control (QC and quality assurance (QA specifications, broader implementation of these technologies into earthwork construction operations still requires a thorough understanding of relationships between RICM values and traditional in situ point test measurements. The purpose of this paper is to provide: (a an overview of two technologies, namely, compaction meter value (CMV and machine drive power (MDP; (b a comprehensive review of field assessment studies, (c an overview of factors influencing statistical correlations, (d modeling for visualization and characterization of spatial nonuniformity; and (e a brief review of the current specifications.

  9. International Field Reversible Thermal Connector (RevCon) Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2016-0108 INTERNATIONAL FIELD REVERSIBLE THERMAL CONNECTOR (RevCon) CHALLENGE Chung-Lung Chen University of...or corporation; or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. This report is...DD-MM-YY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) July 2016 Final 07 November 2013 – 15 March 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTERNATIONAL

  10. Two-Fluid Physics and Field Reversed Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Ammar

    2006-10-01

    Fluid models of plasmas are a common tool to study fusion devices. In this talk algorithms for the solution of Two-Fluid plasma equations are presented and applied to the study of Field Reversed Configurations (FRCs). The Two-Fluid model is more general than the often used magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The model takes into account electron inertia, charge separation and the full electromagnetic field equations and allows for separate electron and ion motion. Finite Lamor Radii effects are taken into account by self consistently evolving the anisotropic pressure tensor. The algorithm presented is the high resolution wave propagation scheme. The wave propagation method is based on solutions to the Riemann problem at cell interfaces. Operator splitting is used to incorporate the Lorentz and electromagnetic source terms. To preserve the divergence constraints on the electric and magnetic fields the so called perfectly-hyperbolic form of Maxwell equations are used which explicitly incorporate the divergence equations into the time stepping scheme. A detailed study of Field-Reversed Configuration stability and formation is performed. The study is divided into two parts. In the first, FRC stability is studied. The simulation is initialized with various FRC equilibria and perturbed. The growth rates are calculated and compared with MHD results. It is shown that the FRCs are indeed more stable within the Two-Fluid model than the MHD model. In the second part formation of FRCs is studied. In this set of simulations a cylindrical column of plasma is initialized with a uniform axial magnetic field. The field is reversed at the walls. Via the process of magnetic reconnection FRC formation is observed. The effects of Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) drive on the formation of FRC are also presented. Here, a set of current carrying coils apply a RMF at the plasma boundary, causing a electron flow in the R-Z plane leading to field reversal. The strong azimuthal electron flow causes

  11. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  12. Quark matter with strong magnetic field and possibility of the third family of compact stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotani, Hajime; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    2017-05-01

    We consider the possibility for the existence of the third family of compact objects, considering the effect of strong magnetic fields inside the hybrid stars. As a result, we demonstrate such new sequences of stable equilibrium configurations for some hadronic equations of state. Through the analysis of the adiabatic index inside stars, we find the conditions for appearing the third family of compact objects, i.e. for hadronic stars without quarks, that the maximum mass should be small, the central density for the maximum mass should be also small, and the radius for the maximum mass should be large. Even for soft hadronic equations of state, the two solar-mass stars might survive as the third family of compact objects, once quark matter with strong magnetic field, such as {˜ } O(10^{19} G), is taken into account. It might give a hint to solve the so-called hyperon puzzle in nuclear physics.

  13. Effect of Magnetic Fields on Explosive Welding of Metals and Explosive Compaction of Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov, G. A.; Mali, V. I.; Bashkatov, Yu. L.; Anisimov, A. G.; Matrosov, A. D.; Teslenko, T. S.

    2005-07-01

    Explosive welding and explosive compaction of powders are new technologies for producing composite materials, which have been actively studied in recent decades. Considerable experience has been accumulated in producing composite materials with new physical properties, and these materials have been widely used in industry. At the same time, these technologies have certain limitations for high-temperature materials. The present research into the influence of magnetic fields on the explosive welding of metals and the explosive compaction of powders seeks to extend the possibilities of the indicated technologies. The results of the first experiments have shown that the use of magnetic fields holds promise for extending the possibilities of material welding and powder compaction.

  14. Quark matter with strong magnetic field and possibility of the third family of compact stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotani, Hajime; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    2017-01-01

    We consider the possibility for the existence of the third family of compact objects, considering the effect of strong magnetic fields inside the hybrid stars. As a result, we demonstrate such new sequences of stable equilibrium configurations for some hadronic equations of state. Through the analysis of the adiabatic index inside stars, we find the conditions for appearing the third family of compact objects, i.e., for hadronic stars without quarks, that the maximum mass should be small, the central density for the maximum mass should be also small, and the radius for the the maximum mass should be large. Even for soft hadronic equations of state, the two solar-mass stars might survive as the third family of compact objects, once quark matter with strong magnetic field, such as ˜ O(10^{19} G), is taken into account. It might give a hint to solve the so-called hyperon puzzle in nuclear physics.

  15. Compact and user-friendly ultrasound acquisition systems optimized for field recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Specht Raimund

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact and rugged hardware interface for laptop-based ultrasound recording in the field has been developed. The versatile devices overcome the limitations and drawbacks of previously available solutions. The accompanying recording software enables flexible hard disk recording for both manual and automated operation.

  16. Overview of C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gota, H., E-mail: hgota@trialphaenergy.com; Thompson, M. C.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. W. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A comprehensive diagnostic suite for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been developed and installed on the C-2 device at Tri Alpha Energy to investigate the dynamics of FRC formation as well as to understand key FRC physics properties, e.g., confinement and stability, throughout a discharge. C-2 is a unique, large compact-toroid merging device that produces FRC plasmas partially sustained for up to ∼5 ms by neutral-beam (NB) injection and end-on plasma-guns for stability control. Fundamental C-2 FRC properties are diagnosed by magnetics, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. These diagnostics (totaling >50 systems) are essential to support the primary goal of developing a deep understanding of NB-driven FRCs.

  17. Overview of C-2 field-reversed configuration experiment plasma diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, H; Thompson, M C; Tuszewski, M; Binderbauer, M W

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive diagnostic suite for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas has been developed and installed on the C-2 device at Tri Alpha Energy to investigate the dynamics of FRC formation as well as to understand key FRC physics properties, e.g., confinement and stability, throughout a discharge. C-2 is a unique, large compact-toroid merging device that produces FRC plasmas partially sustained for up to ∼5 ms by neutral-beam (NB) injection and end-on plasma-guns for stability control. Fundamental C-2 FRC properties are diagnosed by magnetics, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. These diagnostics (totaling >50 systems) are essential to support the primary goal of developing a deep understanding of NB-driven FRCs.

  18. The coronal magnetic field reversal observed by the SOLARC instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High-sensitivity measurements for mapping coronal magnetic field have become possible since the recent development of infrared detection techniques. One urgent task that arises from the routine infrared observations is to interpret what the Stokes signals could indicate for coronal magnetic fields. It is the first time for us to successfully reveal the coronal field structure above a simple and stable sunspot on the photosphere using profiles of full Stokes parameters. In this paper, the author further points out the deficiency in any conclusions/judgements just based on incomplete polarization data. A magnetic flux reversal feature, observed from circular polarization data, may correspond to one or more coronal tubes with their front or farside arching apex there, more complicated than people imagined before. To exactly locate the infrared radiation sources, we need both circular and linear polarization data for an integrated analysis of them.

  19. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of a field reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulton, D. P., E-mail: dfulton@uci.edu; Lau, C. K.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z., E-mail: zhihongl@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Dettrick, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Gyrokinetic particle simulation of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) has been developed using the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is mapped from cylindrical coordinates to Boozer coordinates for the FRC core and scrape-off layer (SOL), respectively. A field-aligned mesh is constructed for solving self-consistent electric fields using a semi-spectral solver in a partial torus FRC geometry. This new simulation capability has been successfully verified and driftwave instability in the FRC has been studied using the gyrokinetic simulation for the first time. Initial GTC simulations find that in the FRC core, the ion-scale driftwave is stabilized by the large ion gyroradius. In the SOL, the driftwave is unstable on both ion and electron scales.

  20. Electrical modeling of the Reversed Field Pinch configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazzana, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Starting from the Poynting theorem, a two port equivalent formulation for the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is obtained. At first a general formulation applicable to any sort of underlying MHD physics is derived. Then its specialization is discussed, showing that: i) the toroidal field reversal is guided from outside the plasma by the external imposed boundary conditions; ii) the classic textbook RFP derivation with the toroidal flux Φt conserved is only a particular choice among the many possible. Here a parametric force free MHD family of equilibria is used to derive the two port equation of a realistic RFP boundary condition. The key master parameter turns out to be the edge safety factor q (a) = a / R .Bt (a) /Bp (a) , whereas Φt becomes a free variable determined by the RFP self-organization processes. As a by product a correct expression for the resistive component of the toroidal loop voltage is given. The two port model obtained is finally closed by adding the poloidal and toroidal power supply networks and evolved by means of a SPICE simulator. The results enlighten some peculiarities found in the RFP transient operations: RFP startup and formation, pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) and oscillating field current drive (OFCD).

  1. Turbulence, flow and transport: hints from reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-04-01

    The interplay between sheared E × B flows and turbulence has been experimentally investigated in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Electrostatic fluctuations are found to rule the momentum balance equation representing the main driving term for sheared flows which counterbalances anomalous viscous damping. The driving role of electrostatic fluctuations is proved by the spatial structure of the Reynolds stress and by the time behaviour of the mean energy production term which supports the existence of an energy exchange from the small scales of turbulence to the larger scales of the mean flow.

  2. Near- and Far-Field Response to Compact Acoustic Sources in Stratified Convection Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Cally, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the acoustic continuum associated with compact sources in the Sun's interior wave field is explored for a simple polytropic model. The continuum produces a near-field acoustic structure -- the so-called `acoustic jacket' -- that cannot be represented by a superposition of discrete normal modes. Particular attention is paid to monochromatic point sources of various frequency and depth, and to the surface velocity power that results, both in the discrete f- and p-mode spectrum and i...

  3. Mapping the spatial patterns of field traffic and traffic intensity to predict soil compaction risks at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttmann, Rainer; Kuhwald, Michael; Nolde, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is one of the main threats to cropland soils in present days. In contrast to easily visible phenomena of soil degradation, soil compaction, however, is obscured by other signals such as reduced crop yield, delayed crop growth, and the ponding of water, which makes it difficult to recognize and locate areas impacted by soil compaction directly. Although it is known that trafficking intensity is a key factor for soil compaction, until today only modest work has been concerned with the mapping of the spatially distributed patterns of field traffic and with the visual representation of the loads and pressures applied by farm traffic within single fields. A promising method for for spatial detection and mapping of soil compaction risks of individual fields is to process dGPS data, collected from vehicle-mounted GPS receivers and to compare the soil stress induced by farm machinery to the load bearing capacity derived from given soil map data. The application of position-based machinery data enables the mapping of vehicle movements over time as well as the assessment of trafficking intensity. It also facilitates the calculation of the trafficked area and the modeling of the loads and pressures applied to soil by individual vehicles. This paper focuses on the modeling and mapping of the spatial patterns of traffic intensity in silage maize fields during harvest, considering the spatio-temporal changes in wheel load and ground contact pressure along the loading sections. In addition to scenarios calculated for varying mechanical soil strengths, an example for visualizing the three-dimensional stress propagation inside the soil will be given, using the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) to construct 2D or 3D maps supporting to decision making due to sustainable field traffic management.

  4. Equilibrium reconstruction for Single Helical Axis reversed field pinch plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Martines, Emilio; Momo, Barbara; Terranova, David; Zanca, Paolo; Alfier, Alberto; Bonomo, Federica; Canton, Alessandra; Fassina, Alessandro; Franz, Paolo; Innocente, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Single Helical Axis (SHAx) configurations are emerging as the natural state for high current reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. These states feature the presence of transport barriers in the core plasma. Here we present a method for computing the equilibrium magnetic surfaces for these states in the force-free approximation, which has been implemented in the SHEq code. The method is based on the superposition of a zeroth order axisymmetric equilibrium and of a first order helical perturbation computed according to Newcomb's equation supplemented with edge magnetic field measurements. The mapping of the measured electron temperature profiles, soft X-ray emission and interferometric density measurements on the computed magnetic surfaces demonstrates the quality of the equilibrium reconstruction. The procedure for computing flux surface averages is illustrated, and applied to the evaluation of the thermal conductivity profile. The consistency of the evaluated equilibria with Ohm's law is also discussed.

  5. Equilibrium reconstruction for single helical axis reversed field pinch plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martines, E; Lorenzini, R; Momo, B; Terranova, D; Zanca, P; Alfier, A; Bonomo, F; Canton, A; Fassina, A; Franz, P; Innocente, P, E-mail: emilio.martines@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    Single helical axis configurations are emerging as the natural state for high-current reversed field pinch plasmas. These states feature the presence of transport barriers in the core plasma. Here we present a method for computing the equilibrium magnetic surfaces for these states in the force-free approximation, which has been implemented in the SHEq code. The method is based on the superposition of a zeroth-order axisymmetric equilibrium and of a first-order helical perturbation computed according to Newcomb's equation supplemented with edge magnetic field measurements. The mapping of the measured electron temperature profiles, soft x-ray emission and interferometric density measurements on the computed magnetic surfaces demonstrates the quality of the equilibrium reconstruction. The procedure for computing flux surface averages is illustrated, and applied to the evaluation of the thermal conductivity profile. The consistency of the evaluated equilibria with Ohm's law is also discussed.

  6. Coherent structures and anomalous transport in reversed field pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, V.; Drake, J. R.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Bergsåker, H.; Cavazzana, R.; Cecconello, M.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.

    2006-02-01

    The results leading to the identification of coherent structures emerging from the background turbulence in the edge region of the reversed field pinch experiments EXTRAP-T2R and RFX are reviewed. These structures have traits of vortices in velocity field and blobs in density, and the reconstruction of their spatial structure and of their time evolution is discussed focusing on the analysis tools applied. The role of these structures in the particle anomalous transport is addressed, showing that their collisions can contribute up to 50% the total particle losses.This process is shown to be responsible for bursts in particle flux and it is found to set a characteristic collision time, which is in agreement with the statistical properties of laminar times for particle flux bursts.

  7. Near- and Far-field Response to Compact Acoustic Sources in Stratified Convection Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cally, Paul S.

    2013-05-01

    The role of the acoustic continuum associated with compact sources in the Sun's interior wave field is explored for a simple polytropic model. The continuum produces a near-field acoustic structure—the so-called acoustic jacket—that cannot be represented by a superposition of discrete normal modes. Particular attention is paid to monochromatic point sources of various frequency and depth, and to the surface velocity power that results, both in the discrete f- and p-mode spectrum and in the continuum. It is shown that a major effect of the continuum is to heal the surface wave field produced by compact sources, and therefore to hide them from view. It is found that the continuous spectrum is not a significant contributor to observable inter-ridge seismic power.

  8. Near- and Far-Field Response to Compact Acoustic Sources in Stratified Convection Zones

    CERN Document Server

    Cally, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    The role of the acoustic continuum associated with compact sources in the Sun's interior wave field is explored for a simple polytropic model. The continuum produces a near-field acoustic structure -- the so-called `acoustic jacket' -- that cannot be represented by a superposition of discrete normal modes. Particular attention is paid to monochromatic point sources of various frequency and depth, and to the surface velocity power that results, both in the discrete f- and p-mode spectrum and in the continuum. It is shown that a major effect of the continuum is to heal the surface wave field produced by compact sources, and therefore to hide them from view. It is found that the continuous spectrum is not a significant contributor to observable inter-ridge seismic power.

  9. NEAR- AND FAR-FIELD RESPONSE TO COMPACT ACOUSTIC SOURCES IN STRATIFIED CONVECTION ZONES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cally, Paul S., E-mail: paul.cally@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Astrophysics and School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2013-05-01

    The role of the acoustic continuum associated with compact sources in the Sun's interior wave field is explored for a simple polytropic model. The continuum produces a near-field acoustic structure-the so-called acoustic jacket-that cannot be represented by a superposition of discrete normal modes. Particular attention is paid to monochromatic point sources of various frequency and depth, and to the surface velocity power that results, both in the discrete f- and p-mode spectrum and in the continuum. It is shown that a major effect of the continuum is to heal the surface wave field produced by compact sources, and therefore to hide them from view. It is found that the continuous spectrum is not a significant contributor to observable inter-ridge seismic power.

  10. Molecular field theory of reversible unfolding of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Roger

    1978-01-01

    A simple and general model of reversible conformational changes in biopolymers that lends itself to accounting for cooperativity without resort to a detailed description of the elementary steps is presented. It is suggested that the model permits the description of transitions in specific instances in which long-range effects are present and no simplifying feature allows for a more detailed theory in a straightforward way. The proposed phenomenological approach is based on the concept of molecular field which led to the first theory of ferromagnetism. Equations are given for the temperature dependence of optical properties and of the specific heat, from which the cooperativity parameter introduced by the theory can be obtained when the reaction enthalpy of the elementary step or the number of concerted elements is known. In the limit of a strong molecular field, heterogeneity in composition of a melting sequence does not affect the sharpness of the corresponding transition. Accounting for long-range effects allows for all-or-none transitions that are sharper than those derived from the two-state model. The feasibility of applying the molecular field concept is illustrated by comparing the results for poly(A)·2 poly(U) triple helices (which exhibit hysteresis) and those for poly(A)·poly(U) double helices (which separate reversibly). Tertiary structure is considered, among the sources of cooperativity that possibly may be represented in terms of a molecular field. On the basis of recent results for tRNA1val, it is suggested that the proposed approach may be applicable, in particular, to transfer ribonucleic acids. PMID:275844

  11. Trapped Field Characteristics of Stacked YBCO Thin Plates for Compact NMR Magnets: Spatial Field Distribution and Temporal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungyong; Kim, Seok Beom; Ahn, Min Cheol; Voccio, John; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents experimental and analytical results of trapped field characteristics of a stack of square YBCO thin film plates for compact NMR magnets. Each YBCO plate, 40 mm × 40 mm × 0.08 mm, has a 25-mm diameter hole at its center. A total of 500 stacked plates were used to build a 40-mm long magnet. Its trapped field, in a bath of liquid nitrogen, was measured for spatial field distribution and temporal stability. Comparison of measured and analytical results is presented: the effects on trapped field characteristics of the unsaturated nickel substrate and the non-uniform current distribution in the YBCO plate are discussed.

  12. Fusion core start-up, ignition and burn simulations of reversed-field pinch (RFP) reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yuh-Yi

    1988-01-01

    A transient reactor simulation model is developed to investigate and simulate the start-up, ignition and burn of a reversed-field pinch reactor. The simulation is based upon a spatially averaged plasma balance model with field profiles obtained from MHD quasi-equilibrium analysis. Alpha particle heating is estimated from Fokker-Planck calculations. The instantaneous plasma current is derived from a self-consistent circuit analysis for plasma/coil/eddy current interactions. The simulation code is applied to the TITAN RFP reactor design which features a compact, high-power-density reversed-field pinch fusion system. A contour analysis is performed using the steady-state global plasma balance. The results are presented with contours of constant plasma current. A saddle point is identified in the contour plot which determines the minimum value of plasma current required to achieve ignition. An optimized start-up to ignition and burn path can be obtained by passing through the saddle point. The simulation code is used to study and optimize the start-up scenario. In the simulations of the TITAN RFP reactor, the OH-driven superconducting EF coils are found to deviate from the required equilibrium values as the induced plasma current increases. This results in the modification of superconducting EF coils and the addition of a set of EF trim coils. The design of the EF coil system is performed with the simulation code subject to the optimization of trim-coil power and current. In addition, the trim-coil design is subject to the constraints of vertical-field stability index and maintenance access. A power crowbar is also needed to prevent the superconducting EF coils from generating excessive vertical field. A set of basic results from the simulation of TITAN RFP reactor yield a picture of RFP plasma operation in a reactor. Investigations of eddy current are also presented. 145 refs., 37 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Field-reversed configuration maintained by rotating magnetic field with high spatial harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomoto, Michiaki; Kitano, Katsuhisa; Okada, Shigefumi

    2007-10-26

    Field-reversed configurations (FRCs) driven by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) with spatial high harmonics have been studied in the metal flux conserver of the FRC injection experiment. The experimental results show that the fundamental RMF component is observed to penetrate the plasma column, while the high harmonics are screened at the plasma edge due to their slower or reversed rotation. This selective penetration of the RMF provides good compatibility of radial and azimuthal force balances; significant radial inward force mostly from the high-harmonic components, and sufficient azimuthal torque solely provided by the fundamental component.

  14. A Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Translated into a Neutral Gas Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Jun'ichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Ando, Hirotoshi; Arai, Mamiko; Katayama, Seri; Takahashi, Toshiki

    2014-10-01

    A field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a compact toroid dominantly with poloidal magnetic field. Because of its simply-connected configuration, an FRC can be translated axially along a gradient of guide magnetic field, and trapped in a confinement region with quasi-static external magnetic field. FRC translation experiments have been performed several facilities. Translation speed of those translated FRCs is comparable with super-Alfvenic speed of approximately 200 km/s. In this experiments, FRC translation has been performed on the FAT (FRC Amplification via Translation) facility. Achieved translation speed in the case of translation into a confinement chamber maintained as the vacuum state is in the range from 130 to 210 km/s. On the other hand, FRC translation into a statically filled deuterium gas atmosphere has also been performed. In the case of translation into filled neutral gas, FRC translation speed is approximately 80 km/s and the separatrix volume has extremely expanded compared with the case of a vacuum state. The phenomenon suggests the presence of regeneration process of translation kinetic energy back into the internal plasma energy during the translation process. This work was partially supported by ``Nihon University Symbolic Project.'' The authors gratefully acknowledge contributions from Nac Image Technology Inc. on the fast camera measurements.

  15. Magnetic-field-induced shape recovery by reverse phase transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainuma, R; Imano, Y; Ito, W; Sutou, Y; Morito, H; Okamoto, S; Kitakami, O; Oikawa, K; Fujita, A; Kanomata, T; Ishida, K

    2006-02-23

    Large magnetic-field-induced strains have been observed in Heusler alloys with a body-centred cubic ordered structure and have been explained by the rearrangement of martensite structural variants due to an external magnetic field. These materials have attracted considerable attention as potential magnetic actuator materials. Here we report the magnetic-field-induced shape recovery of a compressively deformed NiCoMnIn alloy. Stresses of over 100 MPa are generated in the material on the application of a magnetic field of 70 kOe; such stress levels are approximately 50 times larger than that generated in a previous ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy. We observed 3 per cent deformation and almost full recovery of the original shape of the alloy. We attribute this deformation behaviour to a reverse transformation from the antiferromagnetic (or paramagnetic) martensitic to the ferromagnetic parent phase at 298 K in the Ni45Co5Mn36.7In13.3 single crystal.

  16. Radial modes of slowly rotating compact stars in the presence of magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, N.R. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar (India); Siksha ' O' Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar (India); Mohanta, K.K. [Rairangpur College, Rairangpur, Odisha (India); Sahu, P.K. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2016-09-15

    Compact stars are composed of very high-density hadron matter. When the matter is above nuclear matter density, then there is a chance of different phases of matter such as hadron matter to quark matter. There is a possible phase which, having the quark core surrounded by a mixed phase followed by hadronic matter, may be considered as a hybrid phase inside the stars called hybrid star (HS). The star which consists of only u, d and s quarks is called quark star (QS) and the star which has only hadronic matter is called neutron star (NS). For the equation of state (EOS) of hadronic matter, we have considered the Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) theory and we incorporated the effect of strong magnetic fields. For the EOS of the quark phase we use the simple MIT bag model. We have assumed Gaussian parametrization to make the density dependent for both bag pressure in quark matter and magnetic field. We have constructed the intermediate mixed phase by using the Glendenning conjecture. Eigenfrequencies of radial pulsations of slowly rotating magnetized compact stars (NS, QS, HS) are calculated in a general relativistic formalism given by Chandrasekhar and Friedman. We have studied the effect of central density on the square of the frequencies of the compact stars in the presence of zero and strong magnetic field. (orig.)

  17. Radial modes of slowly rotating compact stars in the presence of magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, N. R.; Mohanta, K. K.; Sahu, P. K.

    2016-09-01

    Compact stars are composed of very high-density hadron matter. When the matter is above nuclear matter density, then there is a chance of different phases of matter such as hadron matter to quark matter. There is a possible phase which, having the quark core surrounded by a mixed phase followed by hadronic matter, may be considered as a hybrid phase inside the stars called hybrid star (HS). The star which consists of only u, d and s quarks is called quark star (QS) and the star which has only hadronic matter is called neutron star (NS). For the equation of state (EOS) of hadronic matter, we have considered the Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) theory and we incorporated the effect of strong magnetic fields. For the EOS of the quark phase we use the simple MIT bag model. We have assumed Gaussian parametrization to make the density dependent for both bag pressure in quark matter and magnetic field. We have constructed the intermediate mixed phase by using the Glendenning conjecture. Eigenfrequencies of radial pulsations of slowly rotating magnetized compact stars (NS, QS, HS) are calculated in a general relativistic formalism given by Chandrasekhar and Friedman. We have studied the effect of central density on the square of the frequencies of the compact stars in the presence of zero and strong magnetic field.

  18. Demountable Toroidal Field Magnets for Use in a Compact Modular Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, F. J.; Goh, J.; Takayasu, M.; Bromberg, L.; Minervini, J. V.; Whyte, D.

    2014-05-01

    A concept of demountable toroidal field magnets for a compact fusion reactor is discussed. The magnets generate a magnetic field of 9.2 T on axis, in a 3.3 m major radius tokamak. Subcooled YBCO conductors have a critical current density adequate to provide this large magnetic field, while operating at 20 K reduces thermodynamic cooling cost of the resistive electrical joints. Demountable magnets allow for vertical replacement and maintenance of internal components, potentially reducing cost and time of maintenance when compared to traditional sector maintenance. Preliminary measurements of contact resistance of a demountable YBCO electrical joint between are presented.

  19. Characterization of field compaction using shrinkage analysis and visual soil examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Alice; Keller, Thomas; Weisskopf, Peter; Schulin, Rainer; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Visual field examination of soil structure can be very useful in extension work, because it is easy to perform, does not require equipment or lab analyses and the result is immediately available. The main limitations of visual methods are subjectivity and variation with field conditions. To provide reliable reference information, methods for objective and quantitative assessment of soil structure quality are still necessary. Soil shrinkage analysis (ShA) (Braudeau et al., 2004) provides relevant parameters for soil functions that allow precise and accurate assessment of soil compaction. To test it, we applied ShA to samples taken from a soil structure observatory (SSO) set up in 2014 on a loamy soil in Zurich, Switzerland to quantify the structural recovery of compacted agricultural soil. The objective in this presentation is to compare the ability of a visual examination method and ShA to assess soil compaction and structural recovery on the SSO field plots. Eighteen undisturbed soil samples were taken in the topsoil (5-10 cm) and 9 samples in the subsoil (30-35 cm) of compacted plots and control. Each sample went through ShA, followed by a visual examination of the sample and analysis of soil organic carbon and texture. ShA combines simultaneous shrinkage with water retention measurements and, in addition to soil properties such as bulk density, coarse and fine porosity, also provides information on hydrostructural stability and plasma and structural porosity. For visual examination the VESS method of Ball et al. (2007) was adapted to core samples previously equilibrated at -100 hPa matric potential. The samples were randomly and anonymously scored to avoid subjectivity and were equilibrated to insure comparable conditions. Compaction decreased the total specific volume, as well as air and water content at all matric potentials. Structural porosity was reduced, while plasma porosity remained unchanged. Compaction also changed the shape of the shrinkage curve: (i

  20. Drift-wave stability in the field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. K.; Fulton, D. P.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.; Schmitz, L.

    2017-08-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations of C-2-like field-reversed configuration (FRC) find that electrostatic drift-waves are locally stable in the core. The stabilization mechanisms include finite Larmor radius effects, magnetic well (negative grad-B), and fast electron short circuit effects. In the scrape-off layer (SOL), collisionless electrostatic drift-waves in the ion-to-electron-scale are destabilized by electron temperature gradients due to the resonance with locally barely trapped electrons. Collisions can suppress this instability, but a collisional drift-wave instability still exists at realistic pressure gradients. Simulation results are in qualitative agreement with C-2 FRC experiments. In particular, the lack of ion-scale instability in the core is not inconsistent with experimental measurements of a fluctuation spectrum showing a depression at ion-scales. The pressure gradient thresholds for the SOL instability from simulations are also consistent with the critical gradient behavior observed in experiments.

  1. Profile stabilization of tilt mode in a Field Reversed Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, J.W.; Tajima, T. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Barnes, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The possibility of stabilizing the tilt mode in Field Reversed Configurations without resorting to explicit kinetic effects such as large ion orbits is investigated. Various pressure profiles, P({Psi}), are chosen, including ``hollow`` profiles where current is strongly peaked near the separatrix. Numerical equilibria are used as input for an initial value simulation which uses an extended Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model that includes viscous and Hall terms. Tilt stability is found for specific hollow profiles when accompanied by high values of separatrix beta, {beta}{sub sep}. The stable profiles also have moderate to large elongation, racetrack separatrix shape, and lower values of 3, average ratio of Larmor radius to device radius. The stability is unaffected by changes in viscosity, but the neglect of the Hall term does cause stable results to become marginal or unstable. Implications for interpretation of recent experiments are discussed.

  2. Gyrokinetic simulation of driftwave instability in field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, D. P.; Lau, C. K.; Schmitz, L.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Tajima, T.; Binderbauer, M. W.

    2016-05-01

    Following the recent remarkable progress in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability control in the C-2U advanced beam driven field-reversed configuration (FRC), turbulent transport has become one of the foremost obstacles on the path towards an FRC-based fusion reactor. Significant effort has been made to expand kinetic simulation capabilities in FRC magnetic geometry. The recently upgraded Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) now accommodates realistic magnetic geometry from the C-2U experiment at Tri Alpha Energy, Inc. and is optimized to efficiently handle the FRC's magnetic field line orientation. Initial electrostatic GTC simulations find that ion-scale instabilities are linearly stable in the FRC core for realistic pressure gradient drives. Estimated instability thresholds from linear GTC simulations are qualitatively consistent with critical gradients determined from experimental Doppler backscattering fluctuation data, which also find ion scale modes to be depressed in the FRC core. Beyond GTC, A New Code (ANC) has been developed to accurately resolve the magnetic field separatrix and address the interaction between the core and scrape-off layer regions, which ultimately determines global plasma confinement in the FRC. The current status of ANC and future development targets are discussed.

  3. Behavior of the reversed field pinch with nonideal boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yung-Lung

    1988-11-01

    The linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic stability of current-driven modes are studied for a reversed field pinch with nonideal boundary conditions. The plasma is bounded by a thin resistive shell surrounded by a vacuum region out to a radius at which a perfectly conducting wall is situated. The distant wall and the thin shell problems are studied by removing either the resistive shell or the conducting wall. Linearly, growth rates of tearing modes and kink modes are calculated by analytical solutions based on the modified Bessel function model for the equilibrium. The effects of variation of the shell resistivity and wall proximity on the growth rates are investigated. The modes that may be important in different parameter regimes and with different boundary conditions are identified. The nonlinear behaviors are studied with a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code. The fluctuations generally rise with increasing distance between the conducting wall and the plasma. The enhanced fluctuation induced v x b electric field primarily oppose toroidal current; hence, loop voltage must increase to sustain the constant. Quasilinear interaction between modes typically associated with the dynamo action is identified as the most probable nonlinear destabilization mechanism. The helicity and energy balance properties of the simulation results are discussed. The interruption of current density along field lines intersecting the resistive shell is shown to lead to surface helicity leakage. This effect is intimately tied to stability, as fluctuation induced v x b electric field is necessary to transport the helicity to the surface. In this manner, all aspects of helicity balance, i.e., injection, transport, and dissipation, are considered self-consistently. The importance of the helicity and energy dissipation by the mean components of the magnetic field and current density is discussed.

  4. Characteristics of the magnetic field distribution on compact NMR magnets using cryocooled HTS bulks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@elec.okayama-u.ac.j [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Takano, R.; Nakano, T.; Imai, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Hahn, S.Y. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, MIT, NW14-3117, 170 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Recently, the performance of high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks such as critical current density, size, and mechanical strength has been improved rapidly. So, various applications using HTS bulks such as motors, bearings and flywheels have been investigated by many research groups. A compact nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet is one of the new applications after a technique to enhance maximum trapped field of the HTS bulk more than 11.7 T (500 MHz {sup 1}H NMR frequency) has been developed. This new compact NMR magnet out of HTS bulks is cost-effective compared with conventional NMR magnets and then expected to be widely used in food and drug industry. In design and manufacture of the compact NMR magnets, spatial field homogeneity of the large trapped magnetic field in HTS bulk annuli is a crucial issue because the behavior of a trapped field is highly non-linear and, as a result, a technique to improve the field homogeneity such as active/passive shimming now becomes more challenging compared with that of the conventional counterparts. This paper presents the magnetic field distributions in single and three assembled HTS bulk annuli measured by a 3-axis and multi-arrayed Hall sensor under two different cryogenic environments: (1) in a bath of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) and (2) dry cooling by a cryocooler. The spatial homogeneity changes with various operating temperatures were investigated and the effect of critical current density enhancement by lowering the operating temperature on the field homogeneity improvement was discussed in detail.

  5. Self-consistent equilibria in cylindrical reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Surdo, C. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. di Energia; Paccagnella, R.; Guo, S. [CNR, Padua (Italy). Istituto Gas Ionizzati

    1995-07-01

    The object of this work is to study the self-consistent magnetofluidstatic equilibria of a 2-region (plasma + gas) reversed-field pinch (RFP) in cylindrical approximation (namely, with vanishing inverse aspect ratio). Differently from what happens in a tokamak, in a RFP a significant part of the plasma current is driven by a dynamo electric field (DEF), in its turn mainly due to plasma turbulence. So, it is worked out a reasonable mathematical model of the above self-consistent equilibria under the following main points it has been: (a) to the lowest order, and according to a standard ansatz, the turbulent DEF say {epsilon}{sup t}, is expressed as a homogeneous transform of the magnetic field B of degree 1, {epsilon}{sup t}=({alpha}) (B), with {alpha}{identical_to}a given 2-nd rank tensor, homogeneous of degree 0 in B and generally depending on the plasma state; (b) {epsilon}{sup t} does not explicitly appear in the plasma energy balance, as it were produced by a Maxwell demon able of extract the corresponding Joule power from the plasma. In particular, it is showed that, if both {alpha} and the resistivity tensor {eta} are isotropic and constant, the magnetic field is force-free with abnormality equal to {alpha}{eta}{sub 0}/{eta}, in the limit of vanishing {beta}; that is, the well-known J.B. Taylor`result is recovered, in this particular conditions, starting from ideas quite different from the usual ones (minimization of total magnetic energy under constrained total elicity). Finally, the general problem is solved numerically under circular (besides cylindrical) symmetry, for simplicity neglecting the existence of gas region (i.e., assuming the plasma in direct contact with the external wall).

  6. Theory of the time reversal cavity for electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carminati, R; Pierrat, R; de Rosny, J; Fink, M

    2007-11-01

    We derive a general expression of the electric dyadic Green function in a time-reversal cavity, based on vector diffraction theory in the frequency domain. Our theory gives a rigorous framework to time-reversal experiments using electromagnetic waves and suggests a methodology to design structures generating subwavelength focusing after time reversal.

  7. Electromagnetic field generation by ATP-induced reverse electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Richard H

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes a mechanism to explain low-level light emission in biology. A biological analog of the electrical circuitry, modeled on the parallel plate capacitor, traversed by a helical structure, required to generate electromagnetic radiation in the optical spectral range, is described. The charge carrier required for the emissions is determined to be an accelerating electron driven by an ATP-induced reverse electron transfer. The radial velocity component, the emission trajectory, of the moving charges traversing helical protein structures in a cyclotron-type mechanism is proposed to be imposed by the ferromagnetic field components of the iron in the iron-sulfur proteins. The redox systems NADH, riboflavin, and chlorophyll were examined with their long-wavelength absorption maxima determining the energetic parameters for the calculations. Potentials calculated from the axial velocity components for the riboflavin and NADH systems were found to equal the standard redox potentials of these systems as measured electrochemically and enzymatically. The mechanics for the three systems determined the magnetic moments, the angular momenta, and the orbital magnetic fluxes to be adiabatic invariant parameters. The De Broglie dual wave-particle equation, the fundamental equation of wave mechanics, and the key idea of quantum mechanics, establishes the wavelengths for accelerating electrons which, divided into a given radial velocity, gives its respective emission frequency. Electrons propelled through helical structures, traversed by biologically available electric and magnetic fields, make accessible to the internal environment the optical spectral frequency range that the solar spectrum provides to the external environment.

  8. Unbounded dynamics and compact invariant sets of one Hamiltonian system defined by the minimally coupled field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, Konstantin E., E-mail: kstarkov@ipn.mx

    2015-06-12

    In this paper we study some features of global dynamics for one Hamiltonian system arisen in cosmology which is formed by the minimally coupled field; this system was introduced by Maciejewski et al. in 2007. We establish that under some simple conditions imposed on parameters of this system all trajectories are unbounded in both of time directions. Further, we present other conditions for system parameters under which we localize the domain with unbounded dynamics; this domain is defined with help of bounds for values of the Hamiltonian level surface parameter. We describe the case when our system possesses periodic orbits which are found explicitly. In the rest of the cases we get some localization bounds for compact invariant sets. - Highlights: • Domain with unbounded dynamics is localized. • Equations for periodic orbits are given in one level set. • Localizations for compact invariant sets are got.

  9. A compact broadband ion beam focusing device based on laser-driven megagauss thermoelectric magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertazzi, B., E-mail: bruno.albertazzi@polytechnique.edu [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); D' Humières, E. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux, Talence 33405 (France); Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lancia, L.; Antici, P. [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Dervieux, V.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Fuchs, J., E-mail: Julien.fuchs@polytechnique.fr [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Böcker, J.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O. [Institut für Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf D-40225 (Germany); Bonlie, J.; Cauble, B.; Shepherd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, P.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux, Talence 33405 (France); Chen, S. N. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Sentoku, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    Ultra-intense lasers can nowadays routinely accelerate kiloampere ion beams. These unique sources of particle beams could impact many societal (e.g., proton-therapy or fuel recycling) and fundamental (e.g., neutron probing) domains. However, this requires overcoming the beam angular divergence at the source. This has been attempted, either with large-scale conventional setups or with compact plasma techniques that however have the restriction of short (<1 mm) focusing distances or a chromatic behavior. Here, we show that exploiting laser-triggered, long-lasting (>50 ps), thermoelectric multi-megagauss surface magnetic (B)-fields, compact capturing, and focusing of a diverging laser-driven multi-MeV ion beam can be achieved over a wide range of ion energies in the limit of a 5° acceptance angle.

  10. Thick Liquid-Walled, Field-Reversed Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R W; Bulmer, R H; Gulec, K; Fogarty, P; Nelson, B; Ohnishi, M; Rensink, M; Rognlien, T D; Santarious, J F; Sze, D K

    2000-09-22

    A thick flowing layer of liquid (e.g., flibe--a molten salt, or Sn{sub 80}Li{sub 20}--a liquid metal) protects the structural walls of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) so that they can last the life of the plant even with intense 14 MeV neutron bombardment from the D-T fusion reaction. The surface temperature of the liquid rises as it passes from the inlet nozzles to the exit or receiver nozzles due to absorption of line and bremsstrahlung radiation, and neutrons. The surface temperature can be reduced by enhancement of convection near the surface to transport hot surface liquid into the cooler interior. This surface temperature must be compatible with a practical heat transport and energy recovery system. The evaporative flux from the wall driven by the surface temperature must also result in an acceptable impurity level in the core plasma. The shielding of the core by the edge plasma is modeled with a 2D transport code for the resulting impurity ions; these ions are either swept out to the distant end tanks, or diffuse to the hot plasma core. An auxiliary plasma between the edge plasma and the liquid wall can further attenuate evaporating flux of atoms and molecules by ionization. The current in this auxiliary plasma might serve as the antenna for the current drive method, which produces a rotating magnetic field. Another method of current drive uses small spheromaks injected along the magnetic fields, which additionally provide fueling along with pellet fueling if necessary.

  11. Edge topology and flows in the reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spizzo, G.; Agostini, M.; Scarin, P.; Vianello, N.; White, R. B.; Cappello, S.; Puiatti, M. E.; Valisa, M.; the RFX-mod Team

    2012-05-01

    Edge topology and plasma flow deeply influence transport in the reversed-field pinch as well as in all fusion devices, playing an important role in many practical aspects of plasma performance, such as access to enhanced confinement regimes, the impact on global power balance and operative limits, such as the density limit (Spizzo G. et al 2010 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 52 095011). A central role is played by the edge electric field, which is determined by the ambipolar constraint guaranteeing quasi-neutrality in a sheath next to the plasma wall. Its radial component is experimentally determined in RFX over the whole toroidal angle by means of a diagnostic set measuring edge plasma potential and flow with different techniques (Scarin P. et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 073002). The measured radial electric field is used to construct the potential in the form Φ(ψp, θ, ζ) (ψp radial coordinate, θ, ζ angles), by means of the Hamiltonian guiding-centre code ORBIT. Simulations show that a proper functional form of the potential can balance the differential radial diffusion of electrons and ions subject to m = 0 magnetic island O- and X-points. Electrons spend more time in the X-points of such islands than in O-points; ions have comparatively larger drifts and their radial motion is more uniform over the toroidal angle. The final spatial distribution of Φ(ψp, θ, ζ) results in a complex 3D pattern, with convective cells next to the wall. Generally speaking, an edge topology dominating parallel transport with a given symmetry brings about an edge potential with the same symmetry. This fact helps us to build a first step of a unified picture of the effect of magnetic topology on the Greenwald limit, and, more generally, on flows in the edge of RFPs and tokamaks.

  12. Transport studies in high-performance field reversed configuration plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Barnes, D. C.; Dettrick, S. A.; Trask, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Hubbard, K.; Korepanov, S.; Thompson, M. C.; Zhai, K.; Tajima, T.

    2016-05-01

    A significant improvement of field reversed configuration (FRC) lifetime and plasma confinement times in the C-2 plasma, called High Performance FRC regime, has been observed with neutral beam injection (NBI), improved edge stability, and better wall conditioning [Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)]. A Quasi-1D (Q1D) fluid transport code has been developed and employed to carry out transport analysis of such C-2 plasma conditions. The Q1D code is coupled to a Monte-Carlo code to incorporate the effect of fast ions, due to NBI, on the background FRC plasma. Numerically, the Q1D transport behavior with enhanced transport coefficients (but with otherwise classical parametric dependencies) such as 5 times classical resistive diffusion, classical thermal ion conductivity, 20 times classical electron thermal conductivity, and classical fast ion behavior fit with the experimentally measured time evolution of the excluded flux radius, line-integrated density, and electron/ion temperature. The numerical study shows near sustainment of poloidal flux for nearly 1 ms in the presence of NBI.

  13. Scaling of sustained ZT-40 M reversed field pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, J. [ed.; Haberstich, A.; Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Caramana, E.J.; DiMarco, J.N.; Erickson, R.M.; Ingraham, J.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Little, E.M.; Massey, R.S.; Phillips, J.A.; Schoenberg, K.F.; Schofield, A.E.; Thomas, K.S.; Watt, R.G.; Weber, P.G.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments aimed at evaluating the scaling properties of the ZT-40M Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) facility were conducted in 1983 at Los Alamos. Sustained discharges were produced at nominal toroidal currents ranging from 60 to 240 kA. The standard fill pressure was kept close to the lower limit of the usable pressure range, and the scaling data were acquired at a fixed time in the discharges while the plasma was in a quasi-steady state. Scalings of the diameter-averaged electron density, electron temperature on axis, product of these two parameters, and of various definitions of the electrical resistivity are presented. Trends of the toroidal voltage, energy containment time, and poloidal beta are shown. The impurity contents, particle containment time, and total radiation losses are described, and results obtained with and without poloidal limiters are compared. In addition, the performance of the facility at higher than standard density and at a constant ratio of the toroidal current over the electron line density is examined.

  14. Resonance and Chaotic Trajectories in Magnetic Field Reversed Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.S. Landsman; S.A. Cohen; M. Edelman; G.M. Zaslavsky

    2005-04-13

    The nonlinear dynamics of a single ion in a field-reversed configuration (FRC) were investigated. FRC is a toroidal fusion device which uses a specific type of magnetic field to confine ions. As a result of angular invariance, the full three-dimensional Hamiltonian system can be expressed as two coupled, highly nonlinear oscillators. Due to the high nonlinearity in the equations of motion, the behavior of the system is extremely complex, showing different regimes, depending on the values of the conserved canonical angular momentum and the geometry of the fusion vessel. Perturbation theory and averaging were used to derive the unperturbed Hamiltonian and frequencies of the two degrees of freedom. The derived equations were then used to find resonances and compare to Poincar{copyright} surface-of-section plots. A regime was found where the nonlinear resonances were clearly separated by KAM [Kolmogorov-Arnold-Mosher] curves. The structure of the observed island chains was explained. The condition for the destruction of KAM curves and the onset of strong chaos was derived, using Chirikov island overlap criterion, and shown qualitatively to depend both on the canonical angular momentum and geometry of the device. After a brief discussion of the adiabatic regime the paper goes on to explore the degenerate regime that sets in at higher values of angular momenta. In this regime, the unperturbed Hamiltonian can be approximated as two uncoupled linear oscillators. In this case, the system is near-integrable, except in cases of a universal resonance, which results in large island structures, due to the smallness of nonlinear terms, which bound the resonance. The linear force constants, dominant in this regime, were derived and the geometry for a large one-to-one resonance identified. The above analysis showed good agreement with numerical simulations and was able to explain characteristic features of the dynamics.

  15. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study: Scoping phase report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN research program is a multi-institutional effort to determine the potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion concept as a compact, high-power-density, and ''attractive'' fusion energy system from economic (cost of electricity, COE), environmental, and operational viewpoints. In particular, a high neutron wall loading design (18 MW/m/sup 2/) has been chosen as the reference case in order to quantify the issue of engineering practicality, to determine the physics requirements and plasma operating mode, to assess significant benefits of compact systems, and to illuminate the main drawbacks. The program has been divided into two phases, each roughly one year in length: the Scoping Phase and the Design Phase. During the scoping phase, the TITAN design team has defined the parameter space for a high mass power density (MPD) RFP reactor, and explored a variety of approaches to the design of major subsystems. Two major design approaches consistent with high MPD and low COE, the lithium-vanadium blanket design and aqueous loop-in-pool design, have been selected for more detailed engineering evaluation in the design phase. The program has retained a balance in its approach to investigating high MPD systems. On the one hand, parametric investigations of both subsystems and overall system performance are carried out. On the other hand, more detailed analysis and engineering design and integration are performed, appropriate to determining the technical feasibility of the high MPD approach to RFP fusion reactors. This report describes the work of the scoping phase activities of the TITAN program. A synopsis of the principal technical findings and a brief description of the TITAN multiple-design approach is given. The individual chapters on Plasma Physics and Engineering, Parameter Systems Studies, Divertor, Reactor Engineering, and Fusion Power Core Engineering have been cataloged separately.

  16. Use of Helical Fields to Allow a Long Pulse Reversed Field Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Boozer and N. Pomphrey

    2008-11-20

    The maintenance of the magnetic configuration of a Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is an unsolved problem. Even a toroidal loop voltage does not suffice to maintain the magnetic configuration in axisymmetry but could if the plasma had helical shaping. The theoretical tools for plasma optimization using helical shaping have advanced, so an RFP could be relatively easily designed for optimal performance with a spatially constant toroidal loop voltage. A demonstration that interesting solutions exist is given.

  17. Surface-potential-based physical compact model for graphene field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfei; Peng, Songang; Wang, Wei; Xu, Guangwei; Ji, Zhuoyu; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Jin, Zhi; Liu, Ming

    2016-08-01

    A surface potential based physical compact model for a graphene field effect transistor is proposed, including Boltzmann transport and thermally activated transport. We verified it by the experiments and Gummel symmetry test, showing good accuracy and continuity over a wide range of operation regions. Coded in Verilog-A, this model provides physics-based consistent DC and AC characteristics, which can be easily embedded into a vendor CAD tool to simulate circuits. Based on this model, a direct insight into the relationship between physical parameters and circuit performances can be achieved.

  18. Development of achromatic full-field x-ray microscopy with compact imaging mirror system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, S.; Emi, Y.; Kino, H.; Sano, Y.; Kohmura, Y.; Tamasaku, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K.

    2013-09-01

    Compact advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez optics are used to construct a microscope that is easy to align and robust against vibrations and thermal drifts. The entire length of the imaging mirror system is 286 mm, which is 34% shorter than the previous model. A spatial resolution test is performed in which magnified bright-field images of a pattern are taken with an X-ray camera at an energy of 10 keV at the BL29XUL beamline of SPring-8. A line-and-space pattern having a 50- nm width could be resolved, although the image contrast is low.

  19. A compact field fluorometer and its application to dye tracing in karst environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Amaël; Rochez, Gaëtan; Van Roy, Jean-Pierre; Dewaide, Lorraine; Hallet, Vincent; De Sadelaer, Geert

    2017-03-01

    Dye tracing is a classic technique in hydrogeology to investigate surface-water or groundwater flow characteristics, and it is useful for many applications including natural or industrial issues. The Fluo-Green field fluorometer has been successfully tested in a karst environment and is specifically suitable for in-cave karst water monitoring. Karst research often uses dyes to obtain information about groundwater flow in unexplored cave passages. The compact device, alternatively named Fluo-G, meets the requirements of cave media: small (10 × 16 × 21 cm), lightweight (0.75 kg without ballast) and simple in conception. It is easy for cavers to set up and handle compared to other sampling methods. The fluorometer records uranine, turbidity and temperature with a user-defined time-step (1 min - 1 day). Very low energy consumption allows 9,000 measurements with six AA batteries. The device was calibrated and tested in the laboratory and in field conditions in Belgian karst systems. Results are in good fit with other sampling methods: in-situ fluorometers and automatic water sampling plus laboratory analysis. Recording high quality data (breakthrough curves) in karst with in-cave monitoring is valuable to improve knowledge of karst systems. Many hydrological and hydrogeological applications can benefit from such a low-cost and compact device, and finding the best compromise between resources and quality data is essential. Several improvements are possible but preliminary field tests are very promising.

  20. A compact field fluorometer and its application to dye tracing in karst environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Amaël; Rochez, Gaëtan; Van Roy, Jean-Pierre; Dewaide, Lorraine; Hallet, Vincent; De Sadelaer, Geert

    2017-08-01

    Dye tracing is a classic technique in hydrogeology to investigate surface-water or groundwater flow characteristics, and it is useful for many applications including natural or industrial issues. The Fluo-Green field fluorometer has been successfully tested in a karst environment and is specifically suitable for in-cave karst water monitoring. Karst research often uses dyes to obtain information about groundwater flow in unexplored cave passages. The compact device, alternatively named Fluo-G, meets the requirements of cave media: small (10 × 16 × 21 cm), lightweight (0.75 kg without ballast) and simple in conception. It is easy for cavers to set up and handle compared to other sampling methods. The fluorometer records uranine, turbidity and temperature with a user-defined time-step (1 min - 1 day). Very low energy consumption allows 9,000 measurements with six AA batteries. The device was calibrated and tested in the laboratory and in field conditions in Belgian karst systems. Results are in good fit with other sampling methods: in-situ fluorometers and automatic water sampling plus laboratory analysis. Recording high quality data (breakthrough curves) in karst with in-cave monitoring is valuable to improve knowledge of karst systems. Many hydrological and hydrogeological applications can benefit from such a low-cost and compact device, and finding the best compromise between resources and quality data is essential. Several improvements are possible but preliminary field tests are very promising.

  1. A compact source condition for modelling focused fields using the pseudospectral time-domain method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Peter R T; Engelke, Daniel; Sampson, David D

    2014-03-10

    The pseudospectral time-domain (PSTD) method greatly extends the physical volume of biological tissue in which light scattering can be calculated, relative to the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. We have developed an analogue of the total-field scattered-field source condition, as employed in FDTD, for introducing focussed illuminations into PSTD simulations. This new source condition requires knowledge of the incident field, and applies update equations, at a single plane in the PSTD grid. Numerical artifacts, usually associated with compact PSTD source conditions, are minimized by using a staggered grid. This source condition's similarity with that used by the FDTD suggests a way in which existing FDTD codes can be easily adapted to PSTD codes.

  2. Recent advances of mid-infrared compact, field deployable sensors: principles and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel, Frank; Gluszek, Aleksander; Hudzikowski, Arkadiusz; Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Wojtas, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    The recent development of compact interband cascade lasers(ICLs) and quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) based trace gas sensors will permit the targeting of strong fundamental rotational-vibrational transitions in the mid-infrared which are one to two orders of magnitude more intense than transitions in the overtone and combination bands in the near-infrared. This has led to the design and fabrication of mid-infrared compact, field deployable sensors for use in the petrochemical industry, environmental monitoring and atmospheric chemistry. Specifically, the spectroscopic detection and monitoring of four molecular species, methane (CH4) [1], ethane (C2H6), formaldehyde (H2CO) [2] and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) [3] will be described. CH4, C2H6 and H2CO can be detected using two detection techniques: mid-infrared tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) using a compact multi-pass gas cell and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). Both techniques utilize state-of-the-art mid-IR, continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback (DFB) ICLs and QCLs. TDLAS was performed with an ultra-compact 54.6m effective optical path length innovative spherical multipass gas cell capable of 435 passes between two concave mirrors separated by 12.5 cm. QEPAS used a small robust absorption detection module (ADM) which consists of a quartz tuning fork (QTF), two optical windows, gas inlet/outlet ports and a low noise frequency pre-amplifier. Wavelength modulation and second harmonic detection were employed for spectral data processing. TDLAS and QEPAS can achieve minimum detectable absorption losses in the range from 10-8 to 10-11cm-1/Hz1/2. Several recent examples of real world applications of field deployable gas sensors will be described. For example, an ICL based TDLAS sensor system is capable of detecting CH4 and C2H6 concentration levels of 1 ppb in a 1 sec. sampling time, using an ultra-compact, robust sensor architecture. H2S detection was realized with a THz QEPAS sensor

  3. Effects of Field Distortions in IH-APF Linac for a Compact Medical Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kapin, Valery; Yamada, Satoru

    2004-01-01

    The project on developing compact medical accelerators for the tumor therapy using carbon ions has been started at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Alternating-phase-focused (APF) linac using an interdigital H-mode (IH) cavity has been proposed for the injector linac. The IH-cavity is a doubly ridged circular resonator loaded by the drift-tubes mounted on ridges with supporting stems. The effects of intrinsic and random field distortions in a practical design of the 4-Mev/u 200-MHz IH-APF linac are considered. The intrinsic field distortions in the IH-cavity are caused by an asymmetry of the gap fields due to presence of the stems and pair of ridges. The random field distortions are caused by drift-tube misalignments and non-regular deviations of the gap voltages from programmed values. The RF fields in the IH-cavity have been calculated using Microwave Studio (MWS) code. The effects of field distortions on beam dynamics have been simulated numerically. The intrinsic field distortions a...

  4. Fast Filtered Imaging of the C-2U Advanced Beam-Driven Field-Reversed Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granstedt, E. M.; Petrov, P.; Knapp, K.; Cordero, M.; Patel, V.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the C-2U program is to sustain a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) for 5+ ms using neutral beam injection, end-biasing, and various particle fueling techniques. Three high-speed, filtered cameras are used to observe visible light emission from deuterium pellet ablation and compact-toroid injection which are used for auxiliary particle fueling. The instruments are also used to view the dynamics of the macroscopic plasma evolution, identify regions of strong plasma-material interactions, and visualize non-axisymmetric perturbations. To achieve the necessary viewing geometry, imaging lenses are mounted in re-entrant viewports, two of which are mounted on bellows for retraction during gettering and removal if cleaning is necessary. Images are coupled from the imaging lens to the camera via custom lens-based optical periscopes. Each instrument contains a remote-controlled filter wheel which is set between shots to select a particular emission line from neutral D or various charge states of He, C, O, or Ti. Measurements of absolute emissivity and estimates of neutral and impurity density will be presented.

  5. Formation and sustainment of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas by spheromak merging and neutral beam injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews a compact toroid reactor concept that addresses critical issues for forming, stabilizing and sustaining a field reversed configuration (FRC) with the use of plasma merging, plasma shaping, conducting shells, neutral beam injection (NBI). In this concept, an FRC plasma is generated by the merging of counter-helicity spheromaks produced by inductive discharges and sustained by the use of neutral beam injection (NBI). Plasma shaping, conducting shells, and the NBI would provide stabilization to global MHD modes. Although a specific FRC reactor design is outside the scope of the present paper, an example of a promising FRC reactor program is summarized based on the previously developed SPIRIT (Self-organized Plasmas by Induction, Reconnection and Injection Techniques) concept in order to connect this concept to the recently achieved the High Performance FRC plasmas obtained by Tri Alpha Energy [Binderbauer et al, Phys. Plasmas 22,056110, (2015)]. This paper includes a brief summary of the previous concept paper by M. Yamada et al, Plasma Fusion Res. 2, 004 (2007) and the recent experimental results from MRX.

  6. A compact field-portable double-pulse laser system to enhance laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Yan, Aidong; Huang, Sheng; Huang, Xi; Chen, Rongzhang; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact double-pulse laser system to enhance laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for field applications. Pumped by high-power vertical-surface emitting lasers, the laser system that produces 16 ns pulse at 12 mJ/pulse with total weight less than 10 kg is developed. The inter-pulse delay can be adjusted from 0 μ s with 0.5 μ s increment. Several LIBS experiments were carried out on NIST standard aluminum alloy samples. Comparing with the single-pulse LIBS, up to 9 times enhancement in atomic emission line was achieved with continuum background emission reduced by 70%. This has led to up to 10 times improvement in the limit of detection. Signal stability was also improved by 128% indicating that a more robust and accurate LIBS measurement can be achieved using a compact double-pulse laser system. This paper presents a viable and field deployable laser tool to dramatically improve the sensitivity and applicability of LIBS for a wide array of applications.

  7. Experimental studies of zonal flow and field in compact helical system plasmaa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Ohshima, S.; Iguchi, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Okamura, S.; Minami, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Ida, K.; Toi, K.; Takahashi, C.; Kojima, M.; Nishimura, S.; Isobe, M.; Suzuki, C.; Akiyama, T.; Ido, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Diamond, P. H.

    2008-05-01

    The experimental studies on zonal flows and turbulence have been carried out in Compact Helical System [K. Matsuoka, S. Kubo, M. Hosokawa et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Proc. 12th Int. Conf., Nice, 1988 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1989, Vol. 2, p. 411] using twin heavy ion beam probes. The paper presents the experimental observations of stationary zonal flow, nonlinear couplings between zonal flow and turbulence, and the role of zonal flow in the improved confinement, together with the recent discovery of zonal magnetic field. The presented experimental results strongly support the new paradigm that the plasma transport should be considered as a system of drift wave and zonal flows, and provides the first direct evidence for turbulence dynamo that the structured magnetic field can be really generated by turbulence.

  8. Formation of Field-reversed-Configuration Plasma with Punctuated-betatron-orbit Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, D. R.; Cohen, S. A.; Genoni, T. C.; Glasser, A. H.

    2010-06-28

    We describe ab initio, self-consistent, 3D, fully electromagnetic numerical simulations of current drive and field-reversed-configuration plasma formation by odd-parity rotating magnetic fields (RMFo). Magnetic-separatrix formation and field reversal are attained from an initial mirror configuration. A population of punctuated-betatron-orbit electrons, generated by the RMFo, carries the majority of the field-normal azimuthal electrical current responsible for field reversal. Appreciable current and plasma pressure exist outside the magnetic separatrix whose shape is modulated by the RMFo phase. The predicted plasma density and electron energy distribution compare favorably with RMFo experiments. __________________________________________________

  9. Field Performance of an Optimized Stack of YBCO Square "Annuli" for a Compact NMR Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungyong; Voccio, John; Bermond, Stéphane; Park, Dong-Keun; Bascuñán, Juan; Kim, Seok-Beom; Masaru, Tomita; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2011-06-01

    The spatial field homogeneity and time stability of a trapped field generated by a stack of YBCO square plates with a center hole (square "annuli") was investigated. By optimizing stacking of magnetized square annuli, we aim to construct a compact NMR magnet. The stacked magnet consists of 750 thin YBCO plates, each 40-mm square and 80- μm thick with a 25-mm bore, and has a Ø10 mm room-temperature access for NMR measurement. To improve spatial field homogeneity of the 750-plate stack (YP750) a three-step optimization was performed: 1) statistical selection of best plates from supply plates; 2) field homogeneity measurement of multi-plate modules; and 3) optimal assembly of the modules to maximize field homogeneity. In this paper, we present analytical and experimental results of field homogeneity and temporal stability at 77 K, performed on YP750 and those of a hybrid stack, YPB750, in which two YBCO bulk annuli, each Ø46 mm and 16-mm thick with a 25-mm bore, are added to YP750, one at the top and the other at the bottom.

  10. The constraint equations for the Einstein-scalar field system on compact manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet-Bruhat, Y; Pollack, D; Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne; Isenberg, James; Pollack, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    We study the constraint equations for the Einstein-scalar field system on compact manifolds. Using the conformal method we reformulate these equations as a determined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. By introducing a new conformal invariant, which is sensitive to the presence of the initial data for the scalar field, we are able to divide the set of free conformal data into subclasses depending on the possible signs for the coefficients of terms in the resulting Einstein-scalar field Lichnerowicz equation. For many of these subclasses we determine whether or not a solution exists. In contrast to other well studied field theories, there are certain cases, depending on the mean curvature and the potential of the scalar field, for which we are unable to resolve the question of existence of a solution. We consider this system in such generality so as to include the vacuum constraint equations with an arbitrary cosmological constant, the Yamabe equation and even (all cases of) the prescribed sca...

  11. The constraint equations for the Einstein-scalar field system on compact manifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne [University of Paris VI, 4 place jussieu, 75005, Paris (France); Isenberg, James [Department of Mathematics, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403-5203 (United States); Pollack, Daniel [Department of Mathematics, University of Washington, Box 354350, Seattle, Washington 98195-4350 (United States)

    2007-02-21

    We study the constraint equations for the Einstein-scalar field system on compact manifolds. Using the conformal method we reformulate these equations as a determined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. By introducing a new conformal invariant, which is sensitive to the presence of the initial data for the scalar field, we are able to divide the set of free conformal data into subclasses depending on the possible signs for the coefficients of terms in the resulting Einstein-scalar field Lichnerowicz equation. For many of these subclasses we determine whether or not a solution exists. In contrast to other well studied field theories, there are certain cases, depending on the mean curvature and the potential of the scalar field, for which we are unable to resolve the question of existence of a solution. We consider this system in such generality so as to include the vacuum constraint equations with an arbitrary cosmological constant, the Yamabe equation and even (all cases of) the prescribed scalar curvature problem as special cases.

  12. Compact electric field sensors based on indirect bonding of lithium niobate to silicon microrings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Reano, Ronald M

    2012-02-13

    An electric field sensor based on the indirect bonding of submicrometer thin films of lithium niobate to silicon microring resonators is presented using benzocyclobutene as an intermediate bonding layer. The hybrid material system combines the electro-optic functionality of lithium niobate with the high-index contrast of silicon waveguides, enabling compact and metal-free electric field sensors. A sensor is designed and fabricated using ion-sliced z-cut lithium niobate as the top cladding of a 20 μm radius silicon microring resonator. The optical quasi transverse magnetic mode is used to access the largest electro-optic coefficient in the lithium niobate. Optical characterization of the hybrid device results in a measured loaded quality factor of 13,000 in the infrared. Operation of the device as an electric field sensor is demonstrated by detecting the fringing fields from a microstrip electrical circuit operating at 1.86 GHz. The demonstrated sensitivity to electric fields is 4.5 V m-1 Hz-1/2.

  13. Solar to hydrogen: Compact and cost effective CPV field for rooftop operation and hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2016-11-25

    Current commercial CPV systems are designed as large units which are targeted to be installed in open desert fields with high DNI availability. It appeared that the CPV is among some of those technologies which gained very little attention of people, with less customers and market. For conventional PV systems, the installations at the rooftop of commercial and residential buildings have a significant share in the total installed capacity of PV systems. That is why for most of the countries, the PV installations at the rooftop of commercial and residential buildings are aimed to be increased to half of total installed PV. On the other hand, there is no commercial CPV system available to be suitable for rooftop operation, giving motivation for the development of CPV field of compact systems. This paper discusses the development of a CPV field for the rooftop operation, comprising of compact CPV system with cost effective but highly accurate solar tracking sensor and wireless master slave control. In addition, the performance of the developed CPV systems is evaluated for production of hydrogen, which can be used as energy carrier or energy storage and a maximum solar to hydrogen efficiency of 18% is obtained. However, due to dynamic nature of the weather data and throughout the day variations in the performance of CPV and electrolyser, the solar to hydrogen performance is proposed to be reported as daily and long term average efficiency. The CPV-Hydrogen system showed daily average conversion efficiency of 15%, with solar to hydrogen production rate of 218 kW h/kg.

  14. Principal physics of rotating magnetic-field current drive of field reversed configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, A. L.; Guo, H. Y.; Miller, K. E.; Milroy, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    After extensive experimentation on the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment rotating magnetic-field (RMF)-driven field reversed configuration (FRC) device [A. L. Hoffman et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)], the principal physics of RMF formation and sustainment of standard prolate FRCs inside a flux conserver is reasonably well understood. If the RMF magnitude Bω at a given frequency ω is high enough compared to other experimental parameters, it will drive the outer electrons of a plasma column into near synchronous rotation, allowing the RMF to penetrate into the plasma. If the resultant azimuthal current is strong enough to reverse an initial axial bias field Bo a FRC will be formed. A balance between the RMF applied torque and electron-ion friction will determine the peak plasma density nm∝Bω/η1/2ω1/2rs, where rs is the FRC separatrix radius and η is an effective weighted plasma resistivity. The plasma total temperature Tt is free to be any value allowed by power balance as long as the ratio of FRC diamagnetic current, I'dia≈2Be/μo, is less than the maximum possible synchronous current, I'sync=⟨ne⟩eωrs2/2. The RMF will self-consistently penetrate a distance δ* governed by the ratio ζ =I'dia/I'sync. Since the FRC is a diamagnetic entity, its peak pressure pm=nmkTt determines its external magnetic field Be≈(2μopm)1/2. Higher FRC currents, magnetic fields, and poloidal fluxes can thus be obtained, with the same RMF parameters, simply by raising the plasma temperature. Higher temperatures have also been noted to reduce the effective plasma resistivity, so that these higher currents can be supported with surprisingly little increase in absorbed RMF power.

  15. Giant temperature dependence of the spin reversal field in magnetoelectric chromia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallarino, Lorenzo; Berger, Andreas; Binek, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field-induced reversal of surface spin polarization for the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet chromia is studied via magnetometry in (0001)-textured thin films of various thicknesses. Reversal solely by magnetic means has been experimentally evidenced in sufficiently thin films. It sets the field-response of chromia films apart from bulk behavior, where switching between time-reversed single domain states requires the simultaneous presence of electric and magnetic fields. In our detailed experiments, we furthermore observe a giant sensitivity of the coercive field on temperature, thus, indicating the potential of magnetoelectric antiferromagnets as promising candidates for energy assisted magnetic recording media.

  16. Giant temperature dependence of the spin reversal field in magnetoelectric chromia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallarino, Lorenzo; Berger, Andreas [CIC Nanogune Consolider, Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Binek, Christian [CIC Nanogune Consolider, Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-01-13

    Magnetic field-induced reversal of surface spin polarization for the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet chromia is studied via magnetometry in (0001)-textured thin films of various thicknesses. Reversal solely by magnetic means has been experimentally evidenced in sufficiently thin films. It sets the field-response of chromia films apart from bulk behavior, where switching between time-reversed single domain states requires the simultaneous presence of electric and magnetic fields. In our detailed experiments, we furthermore observe a giant sensitivity of the coercive field on temperature, thus, indicating the potential of magnetoelectric antiferromagnets as promising candidates for energy assisted magnetic recording media.

  17. Structural and temporal requirements for geomagnetic field reversal deduced from lava flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Brad S; Hoffman, Kenneth A; Coe, Robert S; Brown, Laurie L; Jicha, Brian R; Pringle, Malcolm S; Chauvin, Annick

    2005-03-31

    Reversals of the Earth's magnetic field reflect changes in the geodynamo--flow within the outer core--that generates the field. Constraining core processes or mantle properties that induce or modulate reversals requires knowing the timing and morphology of field changes that precede and accompany these reversals. But the short duration of transitional field states and fragmentary nature of even the best palaeomagnetic records make it difficult to provide a timeline for the reversal process. 40Ar/39Ar dating of lavas on Tahiti, long thought to record the primary part of the most recent 'Matuyama-Brunhes' reversal, gives an age of 795 +/- 7 kyr, indistinguishable from that of lavas in Chile and La Palma that record a transition in the Earth's magnetic field, but older than the accepted age for the reversal. Only the 'transitional' lavas on Maui and one from La Palma (dated at 776 +/- 2 kyr), agree with the astronomical age for the reversal. Here we propose that the older lavas record the onset of a geodynamo process, which only on occasion would result in polarity change. This initial instability, associated with the first of two decreases in field intensity, began approximately 18 kyr before the actual polarity switch. These data support the claim that complete reversals require a significant period for magnetic flux to escape from the solid inner core and sufficiently weaken its stabilizing effect.

  18. Physics-Based Compact Model for CIGS and CdTe Solar Cells: From Voltage-Dependent Carrier Collection to Light-Enhanced Reverse Breakdown: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xingshu; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Raguse, John; Garris, Rebekah; Deline, Chris; Silverman, Timothy

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we develop a physics-based compact model for copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) heterojunction solar cells that attributes the failure of superposition to voltage-dependent carrier collection in the absorber layer, and interprets light-enhanced reverse breakdown as a consequence of tunneling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction. The temperature dependence of the model is validated against both simulation and experimental data for the entire range of bias conditions. The model can be used to characterize device parameters, optimize new designs, and most importantly, predict performance and reliability of solar panels including the effects of self-heating and reverse breakdown due to partial-shading degradation.

  19. Compact model of ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistor for circuit simulation based on multidomain Landau–Kalathnikov theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Hidehiro; Fukuda, Koichi; Hattori, Junichi; Koike, Hanpei; Miyata, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Mitsue; Sakai, Shigeki

    2017-04-01

    We report a new compact model for a ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistor (FeFET) considering multiple ferroelectric domain structures that can be thermally activated. The dynamics of the electric polarization and the thermal activation rate are calculated on the basis of the Landau–Khalatnikov (LK) theory. We implement this compact model in a circuit simulator, SmartSPICE, using Verilog-A language for analog circuit simulations. The device characteristics of FeFETs reported in experiments are well fitted by our compact model. We also perform the circuit simulation for the inverter utilizing FeFETs by using this compact model. Unlike normal inverters composed of MOSFETs, the switching speed of the inverter changes with the voltage pulse before the operation.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of a compact microbeam radiotherapy system based on carbon nanotube field emission technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Eric C; Chang, Sha X

    2012-08-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiotherapy technique that has shown potent antitumor effects with minimal damage to normal tissue in animal studies. This unique form of radiation is currently only produced in a few large synchrotron accelerator research facilities in the world. To promote widespread translational research on this promising treatment technology we have proposed and are in the initial development stages of a compact MRT system that is based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology. We report on a Monte Carlo based feasibility study of the compact MRT system design. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using EGSnrc-based codes. The proposed small animal research MRT device design includes carbon nanotube cathodes shaped to match the corresponding MRT collimator apertures, a common reflection anode with filter, and a MRT collimator. Each collimator aperture is sized to deliver a beam width ranging from 30 to 200 μm at 18.6 cm source-to-axis distance. Design parameters studied with Monte Carlo include electron energy, cathode design, anode angle, filtration, and collimator design. Calculations were performed for single and multibeam configurations. Increasing the energy from 100 kVp to 160 kVp increased the photon fluence through the collimator by a factor of 1.7. Both energies produced a largely uniform fluence along the long dimension of the microbeam, with 5% decreases in intensity near the edges. The isocentric dose rate for 160 kVp was calculated to be 700 Gy∕min∕A in the center of a 3 cm diameter target. Scatter contributions resulting from collimator size were found to produce only small (<7%) changes in the dose rate for field widths greater than 50 μm. Dose vs depth was weakly dependent on filtration material. The peak-to-valley ratio varied from 10 to 100 as the separation between adjacent microbeams varies from 150 to 1000 μm. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the proposed compact MRT system

  1. Electric field and temperature scaling of polarization reversal in silicon doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Dayu; Guan, Yan; Vopson, Melvin Marian; Xu, Jin; Liang, Hailong; Cao,Fei; Dong, Xianlin; Johannes, Johannes; Schenk, Tony; Schroeder, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    HfO2-based binary lead-free ferroelectrics show promising properties for non-volatile memory applications, providing that their polarization reversal behavior is fully understood. In this work, temperature-dependent polarization hysteresis measured over a wide applied field range has been investigated for Si-doped HfO2 ferroelectric thin films. Our study indicates that in the low and medium electric field regimes (E < twofold coercive field, 2Ec), the reversal process is dominated by the ther...

  2. Evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in accretion disks around compact and young stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1994-01-01

    Geometrically thin, optically thick, turbulent accretion disks are believed to surround many stars. Some of them are the compact components of close binaries, while the others are throught to be T Tauri stars. These accretion disks must be magnetized objects because the accreted matter, whether it comes from the companion star (binaries) or from a collapsing molecular cloud core (single young stars), carries an embedded magnetic field. In addition, most accretion disks are hot and turbulent, thus meeting the condition for the MHD turbulent dynamo to maintain and amplify any seed field magnetic field. In fact, for a disk's magnetic field to persist long enough in comparison with the disk viscous time it must be contemporaneously regenerated because the characteristic diffusion time of a magnetic field is typically much shorter than a disk's viscous time. This is true for most thin accretion disks. Consequently, studying magentic fields in thin disks is usually synonymous with studying magnetic dynamos, a fact that is not commonly recognized in the literature. Progress in studying the structure of many accretion disks was achieved mainly because most disks can be regarded as two-dimensional flows in which vertical and radial structures are largely decoupled. By analogy, in a thin disk, one may expect that vertical and radial structures of the magnetic field are decoupled because the magnetic field diffuses more rapidly to the vertical boundary of the disk than along the radius. Thus, an asymptotic method, called an adiabatic approximation, can be applied to accretion disk dynamo. We can represent the solution to the dynamo equation in the form B = Q(r)b(r,z), where Q(r) describes the field distribution along the radius, while the field distribution across the disk is included in the vector function b, which parametrically depends on r and is normalized by the condition max (b(z)) = 1. The field distribution across the disk is established rapidly, while the radial

  3. The conceptual design of a robust, compact, modular tokamak reactor based on high-field superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, D. G.; Bonoli, P.; Barnard, H.; Haakonsen, C.; Hartwig, Z.; Kasten, C.; Palmer, T.; Sung, C.; Sutherland, D.; Bromberg, L.; Mangiarotti, F.; Goh, J.; Sorbom, B.; Sierchio, J.; Ball, J.; Greenwald, M.; Olynyk, G.; Minervini, J.

    2012-10-01

    Two of the greatest challenges to tokamak reactors are 1) large single-unit cost of each reactor's construction and 2) their susceptibility to disruptions from operation at or above operational limits. We present an attractive tokamak reactor design that substantially lessens these issues by exploiting recent advancements in superconductor (SC) tapes allowing peak field on SC coil > 20 Tesla. A R˜3.3 m, B˜9.2 T, ˜ 500 MW fusion power tokamak provides high fusion gain while avoiding all disruptive operating boundaries (no-wall beta, kink, and density limits). Robust steady-state core scenarios are obtained by exploiting the synergy of high field, compact size and ideal efficiency current drive using high-field side launch of Lower Hybrid waves. The design features a completely modular replacement of internal solid components enabled by the demountability of the coils/tapes and the use of an immersion liquid blanket. This modularity opens up the possibility of using the device as a nuclear component test facility.

  4. Scoping study for compact high-field superconducting net energy tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumgaard, R. T.; Greenwald, M.; Freidberg, J. P.; Wolfe, S. M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Brunner, D.; Sorbom, B. N.; Whyte, D. G.

    2016-10-01

    The continued development and commercialization of high temperature superconductors (HTS) may enable the construction of compact, net-energy tokamaks. HTS, in contrast to present generation low temperature superconductors, offers improved performance in high magnetic fields, higher current density, stronger materials, higher temperature operation, and simplified assembly. Using HTS along with community-consensus confinement physics (H98 =1) may make it possible to achieve net-energy (Q>1) or burning plasma conditions (Q>5) in DIII-D or ASDEX-U sized, conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. It is shown that, by operating at high plasma current and density enabled by the high magnetic field (B>10T), the required triple products may be achieved at plasma volumes under 20m3, major radii under 2m, with external heating powers under 40MW. This is at the scale of existing devices operated by laboratories, universities and companies. The trade-offs in the core heating, divertor heat exhaust, sustainment, stability, and proximity to known plasma physics limits are discussed in the context of the present tokamak experience base and the requirements for future devices. The resulting HTS-based design space is compared and contrasted to previous studies on high-field copper experiments with similar missions. The physics exploration conducted with such HTS devices could decrease the real and perceived risks of ITER exploitation, and aid in quickly developing commercially-applicable tokamak pilot plants and reactors.

  5. Third Power of the Reversed Dickson Polynomial over Finite Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Xiang-dong

    2011-01-01

    Let $D_n(1,x)$ be the $n$th reversed Dickson polynomial. The power sums $\\sum_{a\\in\\Bbb F_q}D_n(1,a)^i$, $i=1,2$, have been determined recently. In this paper we give an evaluation of the sum $\\sum_{a\\in\\Bbb F_q}D_n(1,a)^3$. This result implies new necessary conditions for $D_n(1,x)$ to be a permutation polynomial over $\\Bbb F_q$.

  6. Evaluation of multidimensional transport through a field-scale compacted soil liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, T.W.; Werth, C.J.; Valocchi, A.J.; Krapac, I.G.; Toupiol, C.; Stark, T.D.; Daniel, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    A field-scale compacted soil liner was constructed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Illinois State Geological Survey in 1988 to investigate chemical transport rates through low permeability compacted clay liners (CCLs). Four tracers (bromide and three benzoic acid tracers) were each added to one of four large ring infiltrometers (LRIs) while tritium was added to the pond water (excluding the infiltrometers). Results from the long-term transport of Br- from the localized source zone of LRI are presented in this paper. Core samples were taken radially outward from the center of the Br- LRI and concentration depth profiles were obtained. Transport properties were evaluated using an axially symmetric transport model. Results indicate that (1) transport was diffusion controlled; (2) transport due to advection was negligible and well within the regulatory limits of ksat???1 ?? 10-7 cm/s; (3) diffusion rates in the horizontal and vertical directions were the same; and (4) small positioning errors due to compression during soil sampling did not affect the best fit advection and diffusion values. The best-fit diffusion coefficient for bromide was equal to the molecular diffusion coefficient multiplied by a tortuosity factor of 0.27, which is within 8% of the tortuosity factor (0.25) found in a related study where tritium transport through the same liner was evaluated. This suggests that the governing mechanisms for the transport of tritium and bromide through the CCL were similar. These results are significant because they address transport through a composite liner from a localized source zone which occurs when defects or punctures in the geomembrane of a composite system are present. ?? ASCE.

  7. Extended magnetohydrodynamic simulations of field reversed configuration formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field current drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2010-06-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of field reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive have been performed with the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. The Hall term is a zeroth order effect with strong coupling between Fourier components, and recent enhancements to the NIMROD preconditioner allow much larger time steps than was previously possible. Boundary conditions to capture the effects of a finite length RMF antenna have been added, and simulations of FRC formation from a uniform background plasma have been performed with parameters relevant to the translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade experiment at the University of Washington [H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and R. D. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112502 (2007)]. The effects of both even-parity and odd-parity antennas have been investigated, and there is no evidence of a disruptive instability for either antenna type. It has been found that RMF effects extend considerably beyond the ends of the antenna, and that a large n =0 Bθ can develop in the open-field line region, producing a back torque opposing the RMF.

  8. Compact magnetic confinement fusion: Spherical torus and compact torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherical torus (ST and compact torus (CT are two kinds of alternative magnetic confinement fusion concepts with compact geometry. The ST is actually a sub-category of tokamak with a low aspect ratio; while the CT is a toroidal magnetic configuration with a simply-connected geometry including spheromak and field reversed pinch. The ST and CT have potential advantages for ultimate fusion reactor; while at present they can also provide unique fusion science and technology contributions for mainstream fusion research. However, some critical scientific and technology issues should be extensively investigated.

  9. ARC: A compact, high-field, disassemblable fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Palmer, Timothy; Mangiarotti, Franco; Sierchio, Jennifer; Bonoli, Paul; Kasten, Cale; Sutherland, Derek; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Goh, Jon; Sung, Choongki; Whyte, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable, Robust, Compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils with joints to allow disassembly, allowing for removal and replacement of the vacuum vessel as a single component. Inboard-launched current drive of 25 MW LHRF power and 13.6 MW ICRF power is used to provide a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing Fluorine Lithium Beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket acts as a working fluid, coolant, and tritium breeder, and minimizes the solid material that can become activated. The large temperature range over which FLiBe is liquid permits blanket operation at 800-900 K with single phase fluid cooling and allows use of a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity production in the secondary coolant loop.

  10. Long-term tritium transport through field-scale compacted soil liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupiol, C.; Willingham, T.W.; Valocchi, A.J.; Werth, C.J.; Krapac, I.G.; Stark, T.D.; Daniel, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    A 13-year study of tritium transport through a field-scale earthen liner was conducted by the Illinois State Geological Survey to determine the long-term performance of compacted soil liners in limiting chemical transport. Two field-sampling procedures (pressure-vacuum lysimeter and core sampling) were used to determine the vertical tritium concentration profiles at different times and locations within the liner. Profiles determined by the two methods were similar and consistent. Analyses of the concentration profiles showed that the tritium concentration was relatively uniformly distributed horizontally at each sampling depth within the liner and thus there was no apparent preferential transport. A simple one-dimensional analytical solution to the advective-dispersive solute transport equation was used to model tritium transport through the liner. Modeling results showed that diffusion was the dominant contaminant transport mechanism. The measured tritium concentration profiles were accurately modeled with an effective diffusion coefficient of 6 ?? 10-4 mm2/s, which is in the middle of the range of values reported in the literature.

  11. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 1011 cm-3 could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  12. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-Ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 10(11) cm(-3) could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  13. Radiation tolerant compact image sensor using CdTe photodiode and field emitter array (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Neo, Yoichiro; Mimura, Hidenori; Okamoto, Tamotsu; Nagao, Masayoshi; Akiyoshi, Masafumi; Sato, Nobuhiro; Takagi, Ikuji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yasuhito

    2016-10-01

    A growing demand on incident detection is recognized since the Great East Japan Earthquake and successive accidents in Fukushima nuclear power plant in 2011. Radiation tolerant image sensors are powerful tools to collect crucial information at initial stages of such incidents. However, semiconductor based image sensors such as CMOS and CCD have limited tolerance to radiation exposure. Image sensors used in nuclear facilities are conventional vacuum tubes using thermal cathodes, which have large size and high power consumption. In this study, we propose a compact image sensor composed of a CdTe-based photodiode and a matrix-driven Spindt-type electron beam source called field emitter array (FEA). A basic principle of FEA-based image sensors is similar to conventional Vidicon type camera tubes, but its electron source is replaced from a thermal cathode to FEA. The use of a field emitter as an electron source should enable significant size reduction while maintaining high radiation tolerance. Current researches on radiation tolerant FEAs and development of CdTe based photoconductive films will be presented.

  14. Off-equatorial orbits in strong gravitational fields near compact objects -- II: halo motion around magnetic compact stars and magnetized black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kovar, Jiri; Karas, Vladimir; Stuchlik, Zdenek; 10.1088/0264-9381/27/13/135006

    2010-01-01

    Off-equatorial circular orbits with constant latitudes (halo orbits) of electrically charged particles exist near compact objects. In the previous paper, we discussed this kind of motion and demonstrated the existence of minima of the two-dimensional effective potential which correspond to the stable halo orbits. Here, we relax previous assumptions of the pseudo-Newtonian approach for the gravitational field of the central body and study properties of the halo orbits in detail. Within the general relativistic approach, we carry out our calculations in two cases. Firstly, we examine the case of a rotating magnetic compact star. Assuming that the magnetic field axis and the rotation axis are aligned with each other, we study the orientation of motion along the stable halo orbits. In the poloidal plane, we also discuss shapes of the related effective potential halo lobes where the general off-equatorial motion can be bound. Then we focus on the halo orbits near a Kerr black hole immersed in an asymptotically uni...

  15. Investigation of Field-Collected Data Using Diffuse and Specular, Forward and Reverse Radiative Transfer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-100 INVESTIGATION OF FIELD-COLLECTED DATA USING DIFFUSE AND SPECULAR , FORWARD AND REVERSE...RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-100 INVESTIGATION OF FIELD-COLLECTED DATA USING DIFFUSE AND SPECULAR , FORWARD AND REVERSE... specular and diffuse properties of a set of eight materials on diffuse-only and diffuse- specular radiative transfer models in the wavelength range of

  16. Necessary stability condition for field-reversed theta pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, J. R.

    1981-03-01

    Toroidal systems of arbitrary cross section without toroidal magnetic field are analyzed via the double adiabatic fluid equations. Such systems are shown to be unstable if there exists one closed field line on which the average of kapparB/sup 2/ is positive, where kappa is the curvature. A similar criterion is derived for linear systems and is applied to a noncircular z-pinch.

  17. Modeling large reversible electric-field-induced strain in ferroelectric materials using 90° orientation switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG LinXiang; LIU Rong; Roderick V.N.MELNIK

    2009-01-01

    Reversible large electric-field-induced strain caused by reversible orientation switchings in BaTiO3 is modeled using the Landau's theory of phase transition. A triple well free energy function is constructed, Each of its minima is associated with one of the polarization orientations involved, Nonlinear constitu-tive laws accounting for reversible orientation switchings and electrostriction effects are obtained by using thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Hysteretic dynamics of one-dimensional structures is described by coupled nonlinear differential equations. Double hysteretic loops in the electric and me-chanic fields are both successfully modeled. Giant reversible electrostriction is modeled as a conse-quence of reversible orientation switchings via electro-mechanical couplings. Comparisons with ex-perimental results reported in literatures are presented.

  18. Depth-reversal-free three-dimensional display by adjusting the light field alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Songlin; Sang, Xinzhu; Wang, Peng; Guo, Nan; Chen, Zhidong; Yu, Xunbo; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu

    2017-03-01

    A multi-view content generation method for three-dimensional (3D) display without depth-reversed area is demonstrated. The viewing zone periodicity of an autostereoscopic display is utilized to eliminate the depth-reversal by adjusting the light field alignment in the 3D light field. The conditions that a multi-view sequence should satisfies to form a depth-reversal-free sequence are given and detailed processes for converting the multi-view sequence into a depth-reversal-free sequence are presented. Experimental results show that the depth-reversed area is well eliminated, and the smooth motion parallax can be achieved when the viewer moves in front of the display within a 60°viewing angle. The number of presented perspectives can be 8 times more than the viewpoint number of the autostereoscopic display with the help of viewing zones integration.

  19. Modeling large reversible electric-field-induced strain in ferroelectric materials using 90° orientation switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roderick; V.; N.; MELNIK

    2009-01-01

    Reversible large electric-field-induced strain caused by reversible orientation switchings in BaTiO3 is modeled using the Landau’s theory of phase transition. A triple well free energy function is constructed. Each of its minima is associated with one of the polarization orientations involved. Nonlinear constitu- tive laws accounting for reversible orientation switchings and electrostriction effects are obtained by using thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Hysteretic dynamics of one-dimensional structures is described by coupled nonlinear differential equations. Double hysteretic loops in the electric and me- chanic fields are both successfully modeled. Giant reversible electrostriction is modeled as a conse-quence of reversible orientation switchings via electro-mechanical couplings. Comparisons with ex-perimental results reported in literatures are presented.

  20. Ultra-fast ballistic magnetization reversal triggered by a single magnetic field pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horley, Paul P; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jesus [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados S.C., Chihuahua/Monterrey, Av. Miguel de Cervantes 120, 31109 Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Vieira, Vitor R; Dugaev, Vitalii K [Centro de Fisica das Interaccoes Fundamentais, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Gorley, Peter [Department of Physics, Yuri Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, 2 Kotsyubynsky Street, 58012 Chernivtsi (Ukraine); Barnas, Jozef, E-mail: paul.horley@cimav.edu.m [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznan (Poland)

    2009-12-21

    Performance of devices such as magnetic random access memories crucially depends on magnetic switching time. By numerical simulations we show that ultra-fast (in the sub-nanosecond range) magnetic reversal in nanoparticles can be achieved with a single pulse of magnetic field oriented at some specific angles with respect to the magnetic moment. These angles form the areas of ballistic reversal (with no magnetization ringing). We show that the size of these areas increases with decreasing pulse duration, which allows reaching of the sub-nanosecond reversal for a pulse duration of the order of dozen(s) of ps. When changing the magnetic field, the areas of ballistic reversal move along the equator of the unitary sphere, and eventually merge with each other. For appropriate choice of the azimuthal angle, one can reach magnetic reversal along a trajectory located in or out of the easy plane.

  1. Equilibrium poloidal field distributions in reversed-field-pinch toroidal discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.; Mann, L.W.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1982-04-01

    A comparison between the analytic formulae of Shafranov for equilibrium in axisymmetric toroidal reversed field pinch (RFP) systems and fully toroidal numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation is presented as a function of poloidal beta, internal plasma inductance, and aspect ratio. The Shafranov formula for the equilibrium poloidal field distribution is accurate to within 5% for aspect ratios greater than 2, poloidal betas less than 50%, and for plasma current channels that exceed one-third of the minor toroidal radius. The analytic description for the center shift of the innermost flux surface that encloses the plasma current (the Shafranov shift) is accurate to within 15% for aspect ratios greater than 2 and poloidal betas below 50%, provided the shift does not exceed one-tenth of the minor conducting boundary radius. The behavior of the magnetic axis shift as a function of plasma parameters is included. The Shafranov formulae provide a convenient method for describing the equilibrium behavior of an RFP discharge. Examples illustrating the application of the analytic formulae to the Los Alamos ZT-40M RFP experiment are given.

  2. Recent results in the Los Alamos compact torus program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Barnes, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A Compact Toroid is a toroidal magnetic-plasma-containment geometry in which no conductors or vacuum-chamber walls pass through the hole in the torus. Two types of compact toroids are studied experimentally and theoretically at Los Alamos: spheromaks that are oblate in shape and contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, and field-reversed configurations (FRC) that are very prolate and contain poloidal field only.

  3. Study of the reduced magnetic field required for thermally assisted magnetization reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdausi, H. F. Y.; Utari; Purnama, B.

    2016-11-01

    The reduced magnetic field required for thermally magnetization reversal discussed in this paper. Study of thermally assisted magnetization reversal conduct by using micromagnetic simulation. The magnetic dot size of the simulation was 50 nm × 50 nm × 20 nm. The perpendicularly anisotropy constant was 2 × 106 erg/cm3. Initial condition was set single domain configuration. Then a sufficiently thermal pulse was used to get stochastic effect so that the magnetization along to the induce field direction for pico second duration. The results show that the reduced magnetic field mechanism seem to be temporary antiferromagnetic configuration before single domain configuration in alinging along to field direction. The same mechanims observed for modify of thickness dot particles. The require magnetic field of 145 Oe in thermally assisted magnetization reversal open a posibility for MRAM application.

  4. Compact short-pulse laser for near-field range-gated imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutavern, Fred J.; Helgeson, Wesley D.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Yates, George J.; Gallegos, Robert A.; McDonald, Thomas E., Jr.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a compact laser, which produces high power, wide-angle emission for a near-field, range-gated, imaging system. The optical pulses are produced by a 100 element laser diode array (LDA) which is pulsed with a GaAs, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS). The LDA generates 100 ps long, gain-switched, optical pulses at 904 nm when it is driven with 3 ns, 400 A, electrical pulses from a high gain PCSS. Gain switching is facilitated with this many lasers by using a low impedance circuit to drive an array of lasers, which are connected electrically in series. The total optical energy produced per pulse is 100 microjoules corresponding to a total peak power of 100 kW. The entire laser system, including prime power (a nine volt battery), pulse charging, PCSS, and LDA, is the size of a small, hand-held flashlight, System lifetime, which is presently limited by the high gain PCSS, is an active area of research and development. Present limitations and potential improvements will be discussed. The complete range-gated imaging system is based on complementary technologies: high speed optical gating with intensified charge coupled devices (ICCD) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and high gain, PCSS-driven LDAs developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The system is designed for use in highly scattering media such as turbid water or extremely dense fog or smoke. The short optical pulses from the laser and high speed gating of the ICCD are synchronized to eliminate the back-scattered light from outside the depth of the field of view (FOV) which may be as short as a few centimeters. A high speed photodiode can be used to trigger the intensifier gate and set the range-gated FOV precisely on the target. The ICCD and other aspects of the imaging system are discussed in a separate paper.

  5. Sign reversal of Hanle electromagnetically induced absorption with orthogonal circularly polarized optical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, Nibedita; Pattabiraman, M, E-mail: pattu@physics.iitm.ac.i [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2010-12-28

    We study by computation and experiment an electromagnetically induced absorption resonance in the Hanle configuration with a transverse magnetic field on a closed F{sub g} {yields} F{sub e} = F{sub g}+1 transition with co-propagating orthogonal circularly polarized probe and coupling optical fields. At high coupling field intensities, the Hanle resonance changes sign due to a shift in atomic population from Zeeman sublevels associated with a probe field cyclic transition to sublevels associated with a coupling field cyclic transition at zero magnetic field. We also show that a similar sign reversal does not occur for {pi}-polarized and {sigma}-polarized coupling fields.

  6. Guiding-center Hamiltonian figure-8 particles in axisymmetric field-reversed configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mynick, H.E.

    1979-09-01

    The guiding-center Hamiltonian K is derived for so-called figure-8 particles which are present in field-reversed mirror configurations, using a formalism developed previously. For such particles, the gyro-orbit cannot be approximated by a circle, and standard approaches to guiding-center theory are thus totally inapplicable. K manifests this intrinsic difference by a quite different dependence on the gyroaction, and by familiar effects such as mirroring and magnetic-gradient drifts being controlled by the radial derivative of the magnetic field strength B at the point of field-reversal, rather than by B itself, as occurs in standard guiding-center theory.

  7. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Anisotropy of ion temperature in a reversed-field-pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, K.; Hörling, P.; Fall, T.; Brzozowski, J. H.; Brunsell, P.; Hokin, S.; Tennfors, E.; Sallander, J.; Drake, J. R.; Inoue, N.; Morikawa, J.; Ogawa, Y.; Yoshida, Z.

    1997-03-01

    Anomalous heating of ions has been observed in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field-pinch (RFP) plasma. Ions are heated primarily in the parallel direction (with respect to the magnetic field), resulting in an appreciable anisotropy of the ion temperature. This observation suggests that the magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations are dissipated primarily by the ion viscosity.

  8. Probe measurements of the three-dimensional magnetic field structure in a rotating magnetic field sustained field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    A translatable three-axis probe was constructed and installed on the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) experiment. With ninety windings, the probe can simultaneously measure Br, Bθ, and Bz at 30 radial positions, and can be placed at any desired axial position within the field reversed configuration (FRC) confinement chamber. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Measurements were made for odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) antennas and even-parity RMF. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Comparisons will be made to the 3D magnetic structure predicted by NIMROD simulations, with parameters adjusted to match that of the TCSU experiments. The probe provides sufficient data to utilize a Maxwell stress tensor approach to directly measure the torque applied to the FRC's electrons, which combined with a resistive torque model, yields an estimate of the average FRC resistivity.

  9. Passive Superconducting Flux Conservers for Rotating-Magnetic-Field-Driven Field-Reversed Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oz, E.; Myers, C. E.; Edwards, M. R.; Berlinger, B.; Brooks, A.; Cohen, S. A.

    2011-01-05

    The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) experiment employs an odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMFo) current drive and plasma heating system to form and sustain high-Β plasmas. For radial confinement, an array of coaxial, internal, passive, flux-conserving (FC) rings applies magnetic pressure to the plasma while still allowing radio-frequency RMFo from external coils to reach the plasma. The 3 ms pulse duration of the present experiment is limited by the skin time (τfc) of its room-temperature copper FC rings. To explore plasma phenomena with longer characteristic times, the pulse duration of the next-generation PFRC-2 device will exceed 100 ms, necessitating FC rings with (τfc > 300 ms. In this paper we review the physics of internal, discrete, passive FCs and describe the evolution of the PFRC's FC array. We then detail new experiments that have produced higher performance FC rings that contain embedded high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. Several HTS tape winding configurations have been studied and a wide range of extended skin times, from 0.4 s to over 103 s, has been achieved. The new FC rings must carry up to 3 kA of current to balance the expected PFRC-2 plasma pressure, so the dependence of the HTS-FC critical current on the winding configuration and temperature was also studied. From these experiments, the key HTS-FC design considerations have been identified and HTS-FC rings with the desired performance characteristics have been produced.

  10. High field strength following the Kauai R-N geomagnetic reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, H.A. (Occidental College, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The paleomagnetism of superposed lava flows on Kauai, Hawaii shows that the ancient geomagnetic field was unusually strong following a reverse-to-normal polarity transition that occurred about 4 million years ago. Paleointensities were determined by a standard experimental procedure (Thelliers' method) that recreates the process of remanence acquisition in volcanic rocks. This experiment makes it possible to infer the strength of the geomagnetic field present with each lava flow formed, thus producing an accurate picture of the ancient field's behavior after the reversal. Samples from 10 volcanic units yielded virtual dipole moments (VDMs) ranging from 7.4 [times] 10[sup 22] Am[sup 2] to 14.5 [times] 10[sup 22] Am[sup 2] with an average of 11.1[times]10[sup 22] Am[sup 2]. This value is high in comparisons to the average VDM for the past 5 m.y., approximately 8.7[times]10[sup 22] Am[sup 2]. In contrast to the highly variable dipole moment observed following a 15 m.y. old reversal at Steen s Mountain, Oregon, the field following the Kauai transition was relatively steady. Surprisingly, the maximum dipole moments following the two reversals were nearly equal. This similarity hints that high field strength may be a systematic feature of the geodynamo immediately following a polarity reversal.

  11. Damping Dependence of Reversal Magnetic Field on Co-based Nano-Ferromagnetic with Thermal Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ananda Herianto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, hard disk development has used HAMR technology that applies heat to perpendicular media until near Curie temperature, then cools it down to room temperature. The use of HAMR technology is significantly influence by Gilbert damping constants. Damping affects the magnetization reversal and coercivity field. Simulation is used to evaluate magnetization reversal by completing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert explicit equation. A strong ferromagnetic cobalt based material with size 50×50×20 nm3 is used which parameters are anisotropy materials 3.51×106 erg/cm3, magnetic saturation 5697.5 G, exchange constant 1×10-7 erg/cm, and various Gilbert damping from 0.09 to 0.5. To observe the thermal effect, two schemes are used which are Reduced Barrier Writing and Curie Point Writing. As a result, materials with high damping is able to reverse the magnetizations faster and reduce the energy barrier. Moreover, it can lower the minimum field to start the magnetizations reversal, threshold field, and probability rate. The heating near Curie temperature has succeeded in reducing the reversal field to 1/10 compared to writing process in absence of thermal field.

  12. Dual wavelength imaging of a scrape-off layer in an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osin, D.; Schindler, T.

    2016-11-01

    A dual wavelength imaging system has been developed and installed on C-2U to capture 2D images of a He jet in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) of an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. The system was designed to optically split two identical images and pass them through 1 nm FWHM filters. Dual wavelength images are focused adjacent on a large format CCD chip and recorded simultaneously with a time resolution down to 10 μs using a gated micro-channel plate. The relatively compact optical system images a 10 cm plasma region with a spatial resolution of 0.2 cm and can be used in a harsh environment with high electro-magnetic noise and high magnetic field. The dual wavelength imaging system provides 2D images of either electron density or temperature by observing spectral line pairs emitted by He jet atoms in the SOL. A large field of view, combined with good space and time resolution of the imaging system, allows visualization of macro-flows in the SOL. First 2D images of the electron density and temperature observed in the SOL of the C-2U FRC are presented.

  13. Dual wavelength imaging of a scrape-off layer in an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osin, D.; Schindler, T., E-mail: dosin@trialphaenergy.com [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688-7010 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A dual wavelength imaging system has been developed and installed on C-2U to capture 2D images of a He jet in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) of an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. The system was designed to optically split two identical images and pass them through 1 nm FWHM filters. Dual wavelength images are focused adjacent on a large format CCD chip and recorded simultaneously with a time resolution down to 10 μs using a gated micro-channel plate. The relatively compact optical system images a 10 cm plasma region with a spatial resolution of 0.2 cm and can be used in a harsh environment with high electro-magnetic noise and high magnetic field. The dual wavelength imaging system provides 2D images of either electron density or temperature by observing spectral line pairs emitted by He jet atoms in the SOL. A large field of view, combined with good space and time resolution of the imaging system, allows visualization of macro-flows in the SOL. First 2D images of the electron density and temperature observed in the SOL of the C-2U FRC are presented.

  14. Formation of a compact toroid for enhanced efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozgovoy, A. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Romadanov, I. V.; Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    We report here our results on the formation of a plasma configuration with the generic name of compact toroid (CT). A method of compact toroid formation to confine, heat and compress a plasma is investigated. Formation of a compact torus using an additional toroidal magnetic field helps to increase the plasma current to a maintainable level of the original magnetic field. We design the Compact Toroid Challenge (CTC) experiment in order to improve the magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a compact toroid. The level of the magnetic field immersed in the plasma about 70% of the primary field is achieved. The CTC device and scheme of high level capturing of magnetic flux are presented.

  15. Can high fields save the tokamak? The challenge of steady-state operation for low cost compact reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidberg, Jeffrey; Dogra, Akshunna; Redman, William; Cerfon, Antoine

    2016-10-01

    The development of high field, high temperature superconductors is thought to be a game changer for the development of fusion power based on the tokamak concept. We test the validity of this assertion for pilot plant scale reactors (Q 10) for two different but related missions: pulsed operation and steady-state operation. Specifically, we derive a set of analytic criteria that determines the basic design parameters of a given fusion reactor mission. As expected there are far more constraints than degrees of freedom in any given design application. However, by defining the mission of the reactor under consideration, we have been able to determine the subset of constraints that drive the design, and calculate the values for the key parameters characterizing the tokamak. Our conclusions are as follows: 1) for pulsed reactors, high field leads to more compact designs and thus cheaper reactors - high B is the way to go; 2) steady-state reactors with H-mode like transport are large, even with high fields. The steady-state constraint is hard to satisfy in compact designs - high B helps but is not enough; 3) I-mode like transport, when combined with high fields, yields relatively compact steady-state reactors - why is there not more research on this favorable transport regime?

  16. Evaluation of using ferrofluid as an interface material for a field-reversible thermal connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Ahmed S.

    The electrical functionality of an avionics chassis is limited due to heat dissipation limits. The limits arise due to the fact that components in an avionic computer boxes are packed very compactly, with the components mounted onto plug-in cards, and the harsh environment experienced by the chassis limits how heat can be dissipated from the cards. Convective and radiative heat transfer to the ambient are generally not possible. Therefore it is necessary to have heat transferred from the components conducted to the edge of the plug-in cards. The heat then needs to conduct from the card edge to a cold block that not only holds the card in place, but also removes the generated heat by some heat transfer fluid that is circulated through the cold block. The interface between the plug-in card and the cold block typically has a high thermal resistance since it is necessary for the card to have the capability to be re-workable, meaning that the card can be removed and then returned to the chassis. Reducing the thermal resistance of the interface is the objective of the current study and the topic of this thesis. The current design uses a pressure interface between the card and cold block. The contact pressure is increased through the addition of a wedgelock, which is a field-reversible mechanical connector. To use a wedgelock, the cold block has channels milled on the surface with widths that are larger than the thickness of the plug-in card and the un-expanded wedgelock. The card edge is placed in the channel and placed against one of the channel walls. A wedgelock is then placed between the card and the other channel wall. The wedgelock is then expanded by using either a screw or a lever. As the wedgelock expands it fills in the remaining channel gap and bears against the other face of the plug-in card. The majority of heat generated by the components on the plug-in card is forced to conduct from the card into the wall of the cold block, effectively a single sided, dry

  17. Proceedings of the third symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the magnetic fusion energy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemon, R.E. (comp.)

    1981-03-01

    This document contains papers contributed by the participants of the Third Symposium on Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Subjects include reactor aspects of compact toroids, energetic particle rings, spheromak configurations (a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields), and field-reversed configurations (FRC's that contain purely poloidal field).

  18. A Survey of Compact Star Clusters in the S-W Field of the M31 Disk. Structural Parameters. II

    CERN Document Server

    Sableviciute, I; Kodaira, K; Narbutis, D; Stonkute, R; Bridzius, A

    2007-01-01

    The King and the EFF (Elson, Fall & Freeman 1987) analytical models are employed to determine the structural parameters of star clusters using an 1-D surface brightness profile fitting method. The structural parameters are derived and a catalogue is provided for 51 star cluster candidates from the survey of compact star clusters in the South-West field of the M31 disk performed by Kodaira et al. (2004).

  19. Characteristics of trapped magnetic fields in HTS bulk annuli with various axial spaces for compact NMR magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@elec.okayama-u.ac.j [Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 170 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Imai, M.; Takano, R.; Kashima, K.; Hahn, S. [Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 170 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Recently, the performance of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks such as a critical current density, size, and mechanical strength has been improved. In consequence, various applications with HTS bulks such as motors, bearings, and flywheels are being investigated by many research groups; Compact nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet is one of the new applications after a technique to enhance maximum trapped field of an HTS bulk more than 11.7 T, 500 MHz {sup 1}H NMR frequency, has been developed. This new compact NMR magnet out of HTS bulks is far less expensive than those conventional NMR magnets and expected to be widely used in food and drug industry. In design and manufacture of those compact NMR magnets, the issues of spatial homogeneity and temporal stability of trapped magnetic fields in HTS bulk annuli are very important. In this paper, the characteristics of the trapped magnetic fields in a stack of assembled HTS bulk annuli were investigated with various axial spaces between HTS bulks, experimentally and analytically.

  20. Reversible electric field induced spectral hole filling in a doped polymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wei; Hanson, David M.

    1988-09-01

    The effect of a dc electric field on persistent spectral holes in the absorption spectra of perylene doped polyvinyl butyral films has been measured. This effect is not like a typical Stark effect that is obtained with polymer films doped with polar dye molecules. Instead, a new phenomenon of reversible spectral hole filling is observed. This phenomenon is attributed to the elastic deformation of the interaction potentials of the dopant and the polymer associated with reversible field-induced tunneling in the intrinsic two-level systems. A quantitative theory of the phenomenon is proposed.

  1. Magnetic field reversals: the geodynamo, laboratory experiments and models (Lewis Fry Richardson Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauve, S.

    2009-04-01

    I will first compare reversals of Earth's magnetic field known from palaeomagnetic data to the ones observed in a laboratory experiment for the magnetic field generated by a turbulent flow of liquid sodium (VKS experiment). Despite major differences between the flow in Earth's core and in the experiment, both systems display reversals that share a lot of similar properties. I will understand them using a simple model in the framework of low dynamical system theory. Finally, I will discuss what can be learnt from numerical simulations.

  2. Ultra-high geomagnetic field reversal frequency around the Precambrian-Cambrian transition ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, V.; Gallet, Y.; Shatsillo, A.; Kouznetsov, N.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetostratigraphic investigations carried out in Siberia have shown that the middle Cambrian was marked by an extremely high geomagnetic field reversal frequency of about 7 to 10 rev./Myr. The results available for the Lower Cambrian are more uncertain but they may indicate an even higher reversal frequency, which could thus reveal a very unstable nature of the geomagnetic field at this time. Recent magnetostratigraphic results also suggest that the geomagnetic reversal frequency has been extraordinarily high at the end of the Precambrian, thus in agreement with the Lower Cambrian data. We will present a review of these data, and will further describe new results we have obtained from Late Ediacaran-Nemakit-Daldynian sections of the south-western Siberian platform (Enisey range, Teya and Chapa rivers valleys). All these data provide consistent evidences for an ultra-high geomagnetic field reversal frequency, and thus for the exceptional nature of the geomagnetic field, around the Precambrian-Cambrian transition. We will also discuss a number of hypotheses which could explain a temporary destabilization of the geomagnetic field.

  3. Field orientation dependence of magnetization reversal in thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallarino, Lorenzo; Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The magnetization reversal process of hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) (0001) oriented Co and C o90R u10 thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) has been studied as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field angle. Room temperature pure cobalt exhibits two characteristic reversal mechanisms. For angles near in-plane field orientation, the magnetization reversal proceeds via instability of the uniform magnetic state, whereas in the vicinity of the out-of-plane (OP) orientation, magnetization inversion takes place by means of domain nucleation. Temperature dependent measurements enable the modification of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and reveal a gradual disappearance of the domain nucleation process during magnetization reversal for elevated temperatures. Ultimately, this suppression of the domain nucleation process leads to the exclusive occurrence of uniform state instability reversal for all field orientations at sufficiently high temperature. Comparative magnetic measurements of C o90R u10 alloy samples allow the identification and confirmation of the high temperature remanent magnetization state of cobalt as an OP stripe domain state despite the reduction of magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Detailed micromagnetic simulations supplement the experimental results and corroborate the physical understanding of the temperature dependent behavior. Moreover, they enable a comprehensive identification of the complex energy balance in magnetic films with PMA, for which three different magnetic phases occur for sufficiently high anisotropy values, whose coexistence point is tricritical in nature.

  4. Compact Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; Zafalan, I

    2016-01-01

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane.

  5. Compact vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M.A.; Zafalan, I. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane. (orig.)

  6. Low-cost, compact, cooled photomultiplier assembly for use in magnetic fields up to 1400 Gauss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, R. W.; Tashjian, R. A.; Jentner, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    Use of vortex tube for cooling and concentric shielding have produced smaller and more compact unit than was previously available. Future uses of device could include installation in gas chromatographs and mass spectrometers. Additional uses would include measurements and controls in magnetohydrodynamic power generators and fusion reactors.

  7. Application of the fluid dynamics model to the field of fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skocek, Jan; Stang, Henrik;

    Ability to properly simulate a form filling process with steel fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete is a challenging task. Such simulations may clarify the evolution of fibre orientation and distribution which in turn significantly influences final mechanical properties of the cast body. We ...

  8. On the origin of pre-reversal enhancement of the zonal equatorial electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Kelley

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In November 2004, a large and variable interplanetary electric field (IEF was felt in the reference frame of the Earth. This electric field penetrated to the magnetic equator and, when the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO was in the dusk sector, resulted in a reversal of the normal zonal component of the field. In turn, this caused a counter-electrojet (CEJ, a westward current rather than the usual eastward current. At the time of the normal pre-reversal enhancement (PRE of the eastward field, the Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar (ISR observed that the westward component became even more westward. Two of the three current explanations for the PRE depend on the neutral wind patterns. However, this unique event was such that the neutral wind-driven dynamos could not have changed. The implication is that the Haerendel-Eccles mechanism, which involves partial closure of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ after sunset, must be the dominant mechanism for the PRE.

  9. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedqvist, Anders; Rachlew-Källne, Elisabeth

    1998-09-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and 0741-3335/40/9/004/img1 together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented.

  10. Changes in transport and confinement in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, E.; Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.

    1999-09-01

    At the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch a non-intrusive approach has been undertaken to monitor transport driven by magnetic fluctuations. Correlations are presented between fluctuations observed in the core and at the edge of the plasma. The fluctuations are characterized and their effect on the confinement of core electron energy is estimated.

  11. On Polar Magnetic Field Reversal and Surface Flux Transport During Solar Cycle 24

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xudong; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33--2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in October 2013; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60$^\\circ$ latitude) reversed in November 2012 and March 2014, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR ...

  12. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface B{sub tw} reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field 〈B{sub t}〉 increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (〈B{sub t}〉-B{sub tw})/B{sub pw}, where B{sub pw} is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  13. Question of consistent boundary conditions when simulating reversed field pinch dynamics. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    The issue of proper boundary conditions when performing magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the reversed field pinch is examined. Of particular concern is the choice of constant current, which when combined with other commonly used boundary conditions, may, under careless implementation, lead to an inconsistency. It is shown that this may cause erroneous results. Cases both with and without Hall terms are presented.

  14. Electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor for selective reversible ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoltner, Kerstin; Kofler, Johannes; Klug, Andreas; List-Kratochvil, Emil J W

    2013-12-17

    An ion-sensitive electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor for selective and reversible detection of sodium (Na(+) ) down to 10(-6) M is presented. The inherent low voltage - high current operation of these transistors in combination with a state-of-the-art ion-selective membrane proves to be a novel, versatile modular sensor platform.

  15. Metastability of Non-reversible, Mean-Field Potts Model with Three Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landim, C.; Seo, I.

    2016-11-01

    We examine a non-reversible, mean-field Potts model with three spins on a set with N\\uparrow ∞ points. Without an external field, there are three critical temperatures and five different metastable regimes. The analysis can be extended by a perturbative argument to the case of small external fields, and it can be carried out in the case where the external field is in the direction or in the opposite direction to one of the values of the spins. Numerical computations permit to identify other phenomena which are not present in the previous situations.

  16. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  17. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: emmazhang103@gmail.com [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir [BEST Cyclotron Inc (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN–LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  18. Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, C.W.; Shearer, J.W.

    The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.

  19. Geomagnetic Field Reversals and Life on the Earth in Phanerozoic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    Global paleomagnetic and biostratigraphic data are generalized. As a result it is found out that the direct connection between geomagnetic reversals, biozones and maxima of mass extinction of a biota is absent. At the same time it is noted close to a synchronous total picture of consistent changes of biozones and geomagnetic polarity. It is explained by the general source - the Earth's diurnal rotation. The reversal polarity of a geomagnetic field prevailed during the Phanerozoic that is agreed with the Earth's counterclockwise rotation. Change of polarity of a field, most likely, is connected with acceleration or deceleration of rotation speed of the internal core relative to the Earth's mantle. Lack of direct interrelation between changes in the biosphere and geomagnetic field indicate a lack of influence of a field on life evolution on Earth. It follows also from the fact that life on Earth developed from primitive unicellular forms to mammals and the man and diversity of biota was grew against a close condition of a geomagnetic field during ~2,5 billion years and irrespective of numerous geomagnetic reversals. Main conclusion: evolutionary development of life on Earth doesn't depend both on large changes of a geomagnetic field, and on the extreme catastrophic events conducting to mass extinction of a biota.

  20. Reversed propagation dynamics of vortex field in a left-handed material slab

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Hailu

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of angular spectrum representation, a formalism describing reversed propagation dynamics of vortex field in an isotropic left-handed material (LHM) slab is presented. Because of the negative refractive index of LHM slab, the reversed Gouy-phase shift and the reversed Rayleigh length in a paraxial Laguerre-Gaussian beam are proposed. The negative phase velocity and reversed Gouy-phase shift caused inverse screw of wave-front, inverse spiral of Poynting vector, and reversed rotation of optical vortex. It is found that the positive mode ($l>0$) Laguerre-Gaussian beam in LHM will present the same fashion of rotation as the negative mode ($l<0$) one in RHM. It is shown that the phase difference caused by the Gouy-phase shift in regular right-handed material (RHM) can be compensated by that caused by the inverse Gouy phase shift in LHM. If certain matching conditions are satisfied, the intensity and phase distributions of the vortex field at object plane can be completely reconstructed at the image ...

  1. Simulations of a quasi-Taylor state geomagnetic field including polarity reversals on the Earth Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Futoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Honkura, Yoshimori

    2005-07-15

    High-resolution, low-viscosity geodynamo simulations have been carried out on the Earth Simulator, one of the fastest supercomputers, in a dynamic regime similar to that of Earth's core, that is, in a quasi-Taylor state. Our dynamo models exhibit features of the geodynamo not only in spatial and temporal characteristics but also in dynamics. Polarity reversals occurred when magnetic flux patches at high latitudes moved poleward and disappeared; patches with reversed field at low and mid-latitudes then moved poleward.

  2. Multi-path propagation of acoustical wave and time reversal field in a solid plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hao; ZHANG Bixing; WANG Chenghao

    2005-01-01

    The multi-path effect of the acoustical wave in a solid plate is studied. The multireflection and wave conversion of the cylindrical compressional and shear waves, which are excited by an infinite strip on a free surface of the solid plate, are analyzed thoroughly by the far-field approximation method. The concise analytical representations of the cylindrical waves are obtained. The time reversal processing is then applied to the propagation of the cylindrical waves and analyzed theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the waves coming from different array elements and different paths all arrive at the original place after the time reversal operation. It indicates that the time reversal can compensate automatically the wave aberration caused by the multi-path effect. The self-adaptive focusing of the time reversal field is also analyzed quantificationally by the focusing gain and the ratio of the principal to the second lobe. The effects of the focus position and the aperture of the transducer array on the focused field are also investigated. It shows that theoretical and experimental results are consistent to each other very well.

  3. Helicity reversion in high harmonic generation driven by bichromatic counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiaofan; Zhu, Xiaosong; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Qingbin; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the polarization properties of high harmonics generated with the bichromatic counterrotating circularly polarized (BCCP) laser fields by numerically solving time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (TDSE). It is found that, the helicity of the elliptically polarized harmonic emission is reversed at particular harmonic orders. Based on the time-frequency analysis and the classical three-step model, the correspondence between the positions of helicity reversions and the classical trajectories of continuum electrons is established. It is shown that, the electrons ionized at one lobe of laser field can be divided into different groups based on the different lobes they recombine at, and the harmonics generated by adjacent groups have opposite helicities. Our study performs a detailed analysis of high harmonics in terms of electron trajectories and depicts a clear and intuitive physical picture of the HHG process in BCCP laser field.

  4. Enhanced electrocaloric cooling in ferroelectric single crystals by electric field reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yang-Bin; Novak, Nikola; Koruza, Jurij; Yang, Tongqing; Albe, Karsten; Xu, Bai-Xiang

    2016-09-01

    An improved thermodynamic cycle is validated in ferroelectric single crystals, where the cooling effect of an electrocaloric refrigerant is enhanced by applying a reversed electric field. In contrast to the conventional adiabatic heating or cooling by on-off cycles of the external electric field, applying a reversed field is significantly improving the cooling efficiency, since the variation in configurational entropy is increased. By comparing results from computer simulations using Monte Carlo algorithms and experiments using direct electrocaloric measurements, we show that the electrocaloric cooling efficiency can be enhanced by more than 20% in standard ferroelectrics and also relaxor ferroelectrics, like Pb (Mg1 /3 /Nb2 /3)0.71Ti0.29O3 .

  5. Plasma-gun-assisted field-reversed configuration formation in a conical θ-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T. E.; Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.

    2015-04-01

    Injection of plasma via an annular array of coaxial plasma guns during the pre-ionization phase of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation is shown to catalyze the bulk ionization of a neutral gas prefill in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and change the character of outward flux flow during field-reversal from a convective process to a much slower resistive diffusion process. This approach has been found to significantly improve FRC formation in a conical θ-pinch, resulting in a ˜350% increase in trapped flux at typical operating conditions, an expansion of accessible formation parameter space to lower densities and higher temperatures, and a reduction or elimination of several deleterious effects associated with the pre-ionization phase.

  6. Plasma-gun-assisted field-reversed configuration formation in a conical θ-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, T. E., E-mail: tweber@lanl.gov; Intrator, T. P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Smith, R. J. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Injection of plasma via an annular array of coaxial plasma guns during the pre-ionization phase of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation is shown to catalyze the bulk ionization of a neutral gas prefill in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and change the character of outward flux flow during field-reversal from a convective process to a much slower resistive diffusion process. This approach has been found to significantly improve FRC formation in a conical θ-pinch, resulting in a ∼350% increase in trapped flux at typical operating conditions, an expansion of accessible formation parameter space to lower densities and higher temperatures, and a reduction or elimination of several deleterious effects associated with the pre-ionization phase.

  7. Reversible Martensitic Transformation under Low Magnetic Fields in Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, N. M.; Wang, S.; Karaman, I.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic field-induced, reversible martensitic transformations in NiCoMnIn meta-magnetic shape memory alloys were studied under constant and varying mechanical loads to understand the role of coupled magneto-mechanical loading on the transformation characteristics and the magnetic field levels required for reversible phase transformations. The samples with two distinct microstructures were tested along the [001] austenite crystallographic direction using a custom designed magneto-thermo-mechanical characterization device while carefully controlling their thermodynamic states through isothermal constant stress and stress-varying magnetic field ramping. Measurements revealed that these meta-magnetic shape memory alloys were capable of generating entropy changes of 14 J kg−1 K−1 or 22 J kg −1 K−1, and corresponding magnetocaloric cooling with reversible shape changes as high as 5.6% under only 1.3 T, or 3 T applied magnetic fields, respectively. Thus, we demonstrate that this alloy is suitable as an active component in near room temperature devices, such as magnetocaloric regenerators, and that the field levels generated by permanent magnets can be sufficient to completely transform the alloy between its martensitic and austenitic states if the loading sequence developed, herein, is employed. PMID:28091551

  8. Reversible Martensitic Transformation under Low Magnetic Fields in Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, N M; Wang, S; Karaman, I; Chumlyakov, Y I

    2017-01-16

    Magnetic field-induced, reversible martensitic transformations in NiCoMnIn meta-magnetic shape memory alloys were studied under constant and varying mechanical loads to understand the role of coupled magneto-mechanical loading on the transformation characteristics and the magnetic field levels required for reversible phase transformations. The samples with two distinct microstructures were tested along the [001] austenite crystallographic direction using a custom designed magneto-thermo-mechanical characterization device while carefully controlling their thermodynamic states through isothermal constant stress and stress-varying magnetic field ramping. Measurements revealed that these meta-magnetic shape memory alloys were capable of generating entropy changes of 14 J kg(-1) K(-1) or 22 J kg (-1) K(-1), and corresponding magnetocaloric cooling with reversible shape changes as high as 5.6% under only 1.3 T, or 3 T applied magnetic fields, respectively. Thus, we demonstrate that this alloy is suitable as an active component in near room temperature devices, such as magnetocaloric regenerators, and that the field levels generated by permanent magnets can be sufficient to completely transform the alloy between its martensitic and austenitic states if the loading sequence developed, herein, is employed.

  9. Reversible Martensitic Transformation under Low Magnetic Fields in Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, N. M.; Wang, S.; Karaman, I.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic field-induced, reversible martensitic transformations in NiCoMnIn meta-magnetic shape memory alloys were studied under constant and varying mechanical loads to understand the role of coupled magneto-mechanical loading on the transformation characteristics and the magnetic field levels required for reversible phase transformations. The samples with two distinct microstructures were tested along the [001] austenite crystallographic direction using a custom designed magneto-thermo-mechanical characterization device while carefully controlling their thermodynamic states through isothermal constant stress and stress-varying magnetic field ramping. Measurements revealed that these meta-magnetic shape memory alloys were capable of generating entropy changes of 14 J kg-1 K-1 or 22 J kg -1 K-1, and corresponding magnetocaloric cooling with reversible shape changes as high as 5.6% under only 1.3 T, or 3 T applied magnetic fields, respectively. Thus, we demonstrate that this alloy is suitable as an active component in near room temperature devices, such as magnetocaloric regenerators, and that the field levels generated by permanent magnets can be sufficient to completely transform the alloy between its martensitic and austenitic states if the loading sequence developed, herein, is employed.

  10. One Small Reversal for the Field, one Giant Leap for Mankind (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Despite complex factors governing the acquisition of their magnetization, sediments have allowed us to recover the evolution of the dipole field variations during the past 2 Ma. One dominant feature is the existence of multiple periods of very low field intensity associated with either excursions or reversals. It is reasonable to consider that similar characteristics of the field during the brief transitional and excursional periods emerge from the records of lava flows as well as from very fast deposited sea-sediments. They can be easily simulated by the dominance of a time varying non-dipole field emerging after a long and large decrease of the dipole. Similarities between excursions and reversals are reinforced by the fact that all detailed records of excursions exhibit virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) which reach the opposite polarity. In fact, it is impossible to reach the ratio of the number of reversed to intermediate VGPs present in the paleomagnetic records if excursions were not associated with a short period of reversed dipole field. Therefore, most if not all excursions should be regarded as two successive reversals bracketing an aborted polarity interval. A significant exemple is the Laschamp event which can be seen as the youngest excursion of the field immediately after the Mono Lake event which is not so clearly identified. The age of the Laschamp event is now well constrained by multiple datings that converge at 40 ka B.P. The Laschamp is also the best documented event from volcanic and sedimentary records obtained at distinct geographic locations. During this short period we know that the field reversed completely and remained extremely weak at the surface of the planet. No attention has been given so far to the puzzling synchronism between the geomagnetic excursion of Laschamp and the desmise of the Neanderthal population. The Laschamp has been the most dramatic event that was encountered by the Neanderthals over the past 300 thousand years of

  11. Field reversed configuration confinement enhancement through edge biasing and neutral beam injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuszewski, M; Smirnov, A; Thompson, M C; Korepanov, S; Akhmetov, T; Ivanov, A; Voskoboynikov, R; Schmitz, L; Barnes, D; Binderbauer, M W; Brown, R; Bui, D Q; Clary, R; Conroy, K D; Deng, B H; Dettrick, S A; Douglass, J D; Garate, E; Glass, F J; Gota, H; Guo, H Y; Gupta, D; Gupta, S; Kinley, J S; Knapp, K; Longman, A; Hollins, M; Li, X L; Luo, Y; Mendoza, R; Mok, Y; Necas, A; Primavera, S; Ruskov, E; Schroeder, J H; Sevier, L; Sibley, A; Song, Y; Sun, X; Trask, E; Van Drie, A D; Walters, J K; Wyman, M D

    2012-06-22

    Field reversed configurations (FRCs) with high confinement are obtained in the C-2 device by combining plasma gun edge biasing and neutral beam injection. The plasma gun creates an inward radial electric field that counters the usual FRC spin-up. The n = 2 rotational instability is stabilized without applying quadrupole magnetic fields. The FRCs are nearly axisymmetric, which enables fast ion confinement. The plasma gun also produces E × B shear in the FRC edge layer, which may explain the observed improved particle transport. The FRC confinement times are improved by factors 2 to 4, and the plasma lifetimes are extended from 1 to up to 4 ms.

  12. Pilot study for compact microbeam radiation therapy using a carbon nanotube field emission micro-CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadsell, Mike; Cao, Guohua; Zhang, Jian; Burk, Laurel; Schreiber, Torsten; Schreiber, Eric; Chang, Sha; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is defined as the use of parallel, microplanar x-ray beams with an energy spectrum between 50 and 300 keV for cancer treatment and brain radiosurgery. Up until now, the possibilities of MRT have mainly been studied using synchrotron sources due to their high flux (100s Gy/s) and approximately parallel x-ray paths. The authors have proposed a compact x-ray based MRT system capable of delivering MRT dose distributions at a high dose rate. This system would employ carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission technology to create an x-ray source array that surrounds the target of irradiation. Using such a geometry, multiple collimators would shape the irradiation from this array into multiple microbeams that would then overlap or interlace in the target region. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of attaining a high dose rate and parallel microbeam beams using such a system. The microbeam dose distribution was generated by our CNT micro-CT scanner (100 μm focal spot) and a custom-made microbeam collimator. An alignment assembly was fabricated and attached to the scanner in order to collimate and superimpose beams coming from different gantry positions. The MRT dose distribution was measured using two orthogonal radiochromic films embedded inside a cylindrical phantom. This target was irradiated with microbeams incident from 44 different gantry angles to simulate an array of x-ray sources as in the proposed compact CNT-based MRT system. Finally, phantom translation in a direction perpendicular to the microplanar beams was used to simulate the use of multiple parallel microbeams. Microbeams delivered from 44 gantry angles were superimposed to form a single microbeam dose distribution in the phantom with a FWHM of 300 μm (calculated value was 290 μm). Also, during the multiple beam simulation, a peak to valley dose ratio of ~10 was found when the phantom translation distance was roughly 4x the beam width. The first prototype CNT

  13. A Survey of Compact Star Clusters in the South-West Field of the M31 Disk. Structural Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Sableviciute, I; Kodaira, K; Narbutis, D; Stonkute, R; Bridzius, A

    2006-01-01

    We present structural parameters for 51 compact star clusters from the survey of star clusters conducted in the South-West field of the M31 disk by Kodaira et al. (2004). Structural parameters of the clusters were derived by fitting the 2-D King and EFF (Elson, Fall and Freeman 1987) models to the V-band cluster images. Structural parameters derived for two M31 clusters, which are in common with the study based on the HST data (Barmby et al. 2002), are consistent with earlier determination. The M31 star cluster structural parameters in general are compatible with the corresponding Milky Way galaxy and Magellanic Clouds cluster parameters.

  14. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10(-6) Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system.

  15. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10-6 Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system.

  16. Experimental study of humid air reverse diffusion combustion in a turbulent flow field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Bing; ZANG Shusheng; GU Xin

    2007-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the differences between the propane/air turbulent diffusion reactive flows past bluff-body and the propane/humid air turbulent diffusion reactive flows in the same conditions.The velocity distributions of the non-humid reactive flow fields and the humid reactive flow fields were measured by particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques.The temperature fields were measured by high temperature thermocouples,and NOx distributions were obtained by using gas detection instruments.The results show that although humid air reactive flow fields are similar to non-humid flow fields in general,there are some differences in the humid air combustion flow field comparing with the non-humid combustion flow field:the center of the reversed-flow region goes forward;the dimension of the reversed-flow region is smaller;the peak temperature and NOx formation are reduced.It is suggested that humid air combustion is helpful to shorten the axial length of combustors,and reduce the formation of pollutants.

  17. Effects of rf current on critical field for magnetization reversal in spin torque devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenyu; Florez, Sylvia; Katine, Jordan; Carey, Matthew; Folks, Liesl; Terris, Bruce

    2009-03-01

    Current induced switching assisted by rf current has recently been observed in spin torque devices at low temperature [1, 2]. This effect allows control of spin transfer induced magnetization reversal through the frequency of an injected rf current. In this study, the effects of the rf current injection on critical field for magnetization reversal in spin valve junctions have been investigated. Measurements were conducted at room temperature, and the magnetic field was applied along the easy axis of the junction. An rf current was injected into the nanojunction at various frequencies ranging between 1 and 20 GHz. The dynamic resistance, dV/dI, was measured as a function of the rf frequency, power and the dc bias current while ramping the magnetic field. The rf current injection was observed to change the critical field for free layer magnetization reversal when the intrinsic spin-transfer-induced dynamics is frequency-locked with the injected rf. The results will be discussed in the context of macrospin models of spin transfer in metallic spin valve structures. [1] S. H. Florez et al. Phys. Rev. B 78, 184403 (2008) [2] Y.-T. Cui et al. Phys. Rev. B 77, 214440 (2008)

  18. Compact magnetic-field sensor based on optical microfiber Michelson interferometer and Fe3O4 nanofluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ming; Sun, Xiaokang; Han, Meng; Li, Decai

    2013-02-01

    We report a magnetic-field sensor by merging the advantages of optical fiber Michelson interferometers with that of magnetic fluid. Compact and low-cost optical fiber Michelson interferometers were first fabricated by a high-frequency CO(2) laser, and then they were inserted into glass capillaries with water-based Fe(3)O(4) magnetic fluid as sensing elements. The sensing characteristics have been investigated and the experimental results show that the reflective spectrum of the fiber-magnetic sensor linearly shifted with the change of the magnetic-field strength that is perpendicular to the axial of the devices. The fiber-magnetic sensor with interference arm's diameter of 50 μm is most sensitive to the external magnetic field, and the sensitivity is up to 64.9 pm/mT, which is 20 times higher than that of 125 μm diameter.

  19. Reversal Frequency, Core-Mantle Conditions, and the SCOR-field Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    One of the most intriguing results from paleomagnetic data spanning the past 108 yr comes from the work of McFadden et al. (1991) who found that the variation in the rate of polarity reversal is apparently tied to the temporal variation in the harmonic content of the full-polarity field. Their finding indicates that it is the relative importance of the two dynamo families--i.e. the Primary Family (PF), the field antisymmetric about the equator, and the Secondary Family (SF), the field symmetric about the equator--that largely determines reversal frequency. More specifically, McFadden et al. found that as the relative significance of the SF increases, as is observed during the Cenozoic, so too does reversal rate. Such a finding is reminiscent of the seminal work of Allan Cox who some forty years ago proposed that interactions with the non-dipole field may provide the trigger for reversal of the axial dipole (AD) field. Hence, new questions arise: Do the two dynamo family fields interact in this manner, and, if so, how can such an interaction physically occur in the fluid core? Gaussian coefficient terms comprising the PF and SF have degree and order (n + m) that sum to an odd and even number, respectively. The most significant field term in the PF is by far that of the axial dipole (g10). The entire SF, starting with the equatorial dipole terms (g11 and h11) and the axial quadrupole (g20), are constituents of the non-axial dipole (NAD) field. By way of both paleomagnetic transition and geomagnetic data Hoffman and Singer (2008) recently proposed (1) that field sources exist within the shallow core (SCOR-field) associated with fluid motions affected by long-lived core-mantle boundary conditions; (2) that these SCOR-field sources are largely separated from, i.e. in “poor communication” with, deep field convection roll-generated sources; and (3) that the deep sources are largely responsible for the AD field, leaving the SCOR-field to be the primary source for the

  20. Localization of supersymmetric field theories on non-compact hyperbolic three-manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Assel, Benjamin; Murthy, Sameer; Yokoyama, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We study supersymmetric gauge theories with an R-symmetry, defined on non-compact, hyperbolic, Riemannian three-manifolds, focusing on the case of a supersymmetry-preserving quotient of Euclidean AdS$_3$. We compute the exact partition function in these theories, using the method of localization, thus reducing the problem to the computation of one-loop determinants around a supersymmetric locus. We evaluate the one-loop determinants employing three different techniques: an index theorem, the method of pairing of eigenvalues, and the heat kernel method. Along the way, we discuss aspects of supersymmetry in manifolds with a conformal boundary, including supersymmetric actions and boundary conditions.

  1. Reversed light-dark cycle and cage enrichment effects on ethanol-induced deficits in motor coordination assessed in inbred mouse strains with a compact battery of refined tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Elizabeth; Bunning, Mark; Prada, Sofia; Bohlen, Martin; Crabbe, John C; Wahlsten, Douglas

    2011-10-31

    The laboratory environment existing outside the test situation itself can have a substantial influence on results of some behavioral tests with mice, and the extent of these influences sometimes depends on genotype. For alcohol research, the principal issue is whether genotype-related ethanol effects will themselves be altered by common variations in the lab environment or instead will be essentially the same across a wide range of lab environments. Data from 20 inbred strains were used to reduce an original battery of seven tests of alcohol intoxication to a compact battery of four tests: the balance beam and grip strength with a 1.25 g/kg ethanol dose and the accelerating rotarod and open-field activation tests with 1.75 g/kg. The abbreviated battery was then used to study eight inbred strains housed under a normal or reversed light-dark cycle, or a standard or enriched home cage environment. The light-dark cycle had no discernable effects on any measure of behavior or response to alcohol. Cage enrichment markedly improved motor coordination in most strains. Ethanol-induced motor coordination deficits were robust; the well-documented strain-dependent effects of ethanol were not altered by cage enrichment.

  2. Voltage controlled core reversal of fixed magnetic skyrmions without a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Dhritiman; Al-Rashid, Md Mamun; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2016-08-01

    Using micromagnetic simulations we demonstrate core reversal of a fixed magnetic skyrmion by modulating the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of a nanomagnet with an electric field. We can switch reversibly between two skyrmion states and two ferromagnetic states, i.e. skyrmion states with the magnetization of the core pointing down/up and periphery pointing up/down, and ferromagnetic states with magnetization pointing up/down, by sequential increase and decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The switching between these states is explained by the fact that the spin texture corresponding to each of these stable states minimizes the sum of the magnetic anisotropy, demagnetization, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) and exchange energies. This could lead to the possibility of energy efficient nanomagnetic memory and logic devices implemented with fixed skyrmions without using a magnetic field and without moving skyrmions with a current.

  3. Time-reversed particle dynamics calculation with field line tracing at Titan - an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebesi, Zsofia; Erdos, Geza; Szego, Karoly; Juhasz, Antal; Lukacs, Katalin

    2014-05-01

    We use CAPS-IMS Singles data of Cassini measured between 2004 and 2010 to investigate the pickup process and dynamics of ions originating from Titan's atmosphere. A 4th order Runge-Kutta method was applied to calculate the test particle trajectories in a time reversed scenario, in the curved magnetic environment. We evaluated the minimum variance directions along the S/C trajectory for all Cassini flybys during which the CAPS instrument was in operation, and assumed that the field was homogeneous perpendicular to the minimum variance direction. We calculated the magnetic field lines with this method along the flyby orbits and we could determine those observational intervals when Cassini and the upper atmosphere of Titan could be magnetically connected. We used three ion species (1, 2 and 16 amu ions) for time reversed tracking, and also considered the categorization of Rymer et al. (2009) and Nemeth et al. (2011) for further features studies.

  4. Effects of anisotropic thermal conductivity in magnetohydrodynamics simulations of a reversed-field pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofri, M; Malara, F; Veltri, P

    2010-11-19

    A compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the reversed-field pinch is performed including anisotropic thermal conductivity. When the thermal conductivity is much larger in the direction parallel to the magnetic field than in the perpendicular direction, magnetic field lines become isothermal. As a consequence, as long as magnetic surfaces exist, a temperature distribution is observed displaying a hotter confined region, while an almost uniform temperature is produced when the magnetic field lines become chaotic. To include this effect in the numerical simulation, we use a multiple-time-scale analysis, which allows us to reproduce the effect of a large parallel thermal conductivity. The resulting temperature distribution is related to the existence of closed magnetic surfaces, as observed in experiments. The magnetic field is also affected by the presence of an anisotropic thermal conductivity.

  5. Field-scale investigation of infiltration into a compacted soil liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panno, Samuel V.; Herzog, Beverly L.; Cartwright, Keros; Rehfeldt, Kenneth R.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Hensel, Bruce R.

    1991-01-01

    The Illinois State Geological Survey constructed and instrumented an experimental compacted soil liner. Infiltration of water into the liner has been monitored for two years. The objectives of this investigation were to determine whether a soil liner could be constructed to meet the U.S. EPA's requirement for a saturated hydraulic conductivity of less than or equal to 1.0 ?? 10-7 cm/s, to quantify the areal variability of the hydraulic properties of the liner, and to determine the transit time for water and tracers through the liner. The liner measures 8m ?? 15m ?? 0.9m and was designed and constructed to simulate compacted soil liners built at waste disposal facilities. The surface of the liner was flooded to form a pond on April 12, 1988. Since flooding, infiltration has been monitored with four large-ring (LR) and 32 small-ring (SR) infiltrometers, and a water-balance (WB) method that accounted for total infiltration and evaporation. Ring-infiltrometer and WB data were analyzed using cumulative-infiltration curves to determine infiltration fluxes. The SR data are lognormally distributed, and the SR and LR data form two statistically distinct populations. Small-ring data are nearly identical with WB data; because there is evidence of leakage in the LRs, the SR and WB data are considered more reliable.

  6. Organic field-effect transistor circuits with electrode interconnections using reverse stamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sangmoo; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Yun, Minseong; Dindar, Amir; Khan, Talha M.; Wang, Cheng-Yin; Kippelen, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    We discuss a non-vacuum low-cost reverse stamping method for the realization of circuits based on top-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with a bi-layer gate dielectric. This method allows for patterning of high-k inorganic dielectric films produced by atomic layer deposition and consequently of the bilayer gate dielectric layers used in our top-gate OFETs. We demonstrate the fabrication and operation of logic inverters and ring oscillators following this approach.

  7. Reversible quantum optical data storage based on resonant Raman optical field excited spin coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Byoung S

    2008-09-01

    A method of reversible quantum optical data storage is presented using resonant Raman field excited spin coherence, where the spin coherence is stored in an inhomogeneously broadened spin ensemble. Unlike the photon echo method, in the present technique, a 2pi Raman optical rephasing pulse area is used and multimode (parallel) optical channels are available in which the multimode access gives a great benefit to quantum information processors such as quantum repeaters.

  8. Applications of TEMCO to the spheromak and the reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirin, A.A.; Sgro, A.G.

    1986-02-01

    This paper deals with two subjects. One concerns the use of consistent boundary conditions when performing MHD simulations of the reversed field pinch. Of particular concern is the choice of constant current, which when combined with other commonly used boundary conditions, could lead to an inconsistency. The second subject area is that of MHD simulation of the CTX spheromak. A summary of results since the 1984 3-D MHD Workshop is presented.

  9. Final report for the field-reversed configuration power plant critical-issue scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarius, John F.; Mogahed, Elsayed A.; Emmert, Gilbert A.; Khater, Hesham Y.; Nguyen, Canh N.; Ryzhkov, Sergei V.; Stubna, Michael D.; Steinhauer, Loren C.; Miley, George H.

    2001-03-01

    This report describes research in which a team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed a scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis of deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core.

  10. Non-axisymmetric equilibrium reconstruction for stellarators, reversed field pinches and tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, James D. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Anderson, D.T. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Cianciosa, M. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Franz, P. [EURATOM / ENEA, Italy; Harris, J. H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hartwell, G. H. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Hirshman, Steven Paul [ORNL; Knowlton, Stephen F. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Lao, Lang L. [General Atomics, San Diego; Lazarus, Edward Alan [ORNL; Marrelli, L. [Association EURATOM ENEA Fusion, Consorzio RFX, Padua, Italy; Maurer, D. A. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Schmitt, J. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Sontag, A. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Stevenson, B. A. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Terranova, D. [Association EURATOM ENEA Fusion, Consorzio RFX, Padua, Italy

    2013-01-01

    Axisymmetric equilibrium reconstruction using magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium solutions to the Grad Shafranov equation has long been an important tool for interpreting tokamak experiments. This paper describes recent results in non-axisymmetric (three-dimensional) equilibrium reconstruction of nominally axisymmetric plasmas (tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs)), and fully non-axisymmetric plasmas (stellarators). Results from applying the V3FIT code to CTH and HSX stellarator plasmas, RFX-mod RFP plasmas and the DIII-D tokamak are presented.

  11. Resistivity profile effects in numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sätherblom, H.-E.; Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P.

    1996-12-01

    The influence of the resistivity profile on reversed-field pinch (RFP) dynamics is investigated numerically using a three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic code. This investigation is motivated by experimental observations on the EXTRAP-T1 RFP (Nordlund P et al 1994 Int. Conf. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research IAEA-CN-60/A6/C-P-6). Two cases with profiles mainly differing in the edge region, i.e. in the region outside the reversal surface, are simulated. It is found that increasing the resistivity in this region results in a factor of two increase in magnetic fluctuation energy and an equal amount in the fluctuation-induced electric field. In spite of this, the parallel current decreases in the edge region, resulting in a factor two reduction of the field reversal ratio. The dynamics become more irregular and the characteristic timescale is reduced. The final state is characterized by a higher loop voltage, slightly lower values of the total (fluctuating plus mean part) magnetic energy and the magnetic helicity, but almost unchanged Taylor relaxation ratio. The results indicate that the edge region can be important for RFP confinement since cooling of the plasma in this region can lead to an increased fluctuation level and degraded performance.

  12. Overrelaxation phenomena during the formation of reversed-field pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P.

    1995-10-01

    Experiments on the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch (RFP) [Phys. Scr. 49, 224 (1994)] have shown that the formation of the RFP configuration is quite sensitive to the relative programming of the toroidal field and Ohmic heating circuits. In this paper, new measurements of the evolution of the current density profile and of the spectral structure of the fluctuations during the setup phase of RFP plasmas in the T1 experiment are presented. These measurements improve the understanding of the role of different spectral components in the dynamics of RFP formation. Under unfavorable (slow) setup conditions, comparatively high energy is accumulated in m=1 internal kinks prior to reversal of the edge toroidal field. At reversal, nonlinearly driven m=0 modes trigger a rapid broadening of the m=1 spectrum. This behavior is associated with a violent suppression of the current density in the core, leading to an overrelaxation of the discharge involving a hollowing of the parallel current density profile. The setup conditions are found to affect the volt-second consumption and plasma/wall interaction during RFP formation, as well as the flat-top discharge performance.

  13. Time reversal symmetry broken fractional topological phases at zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Tobias; Sela, Eran

    2014-12-01

    We extend the coupled-wire construction of quantum Hall phases, and search for fractional topological insulating states in models of weakly coupled wires at zero external magnetic field. Focusing on systems beyond double copies of fractional quantum Hall states at opposite fields, we find that spin-spin interactions can stabilize a large family of fractional topological phases with broken time reversal invariance. The latter is manifested by spontaneous spin polarization, by a finite Hall conductivity, or by both. This suggests the possibility that fractional topological insulators may be unstable to spontaneous symmetry breaking.

  14. Turbulent energy transfer in electromagnetic turbulence: hints from a Reversed Field Pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Bergsaker, H.

    2005-10-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in a Reversed Field Pinch is addressed. ExB sheared flows and turbulence at the edge tends to organize themeselves near marginal stability, suggesting an underlying energy exchange process between turbulence and mean flow. In MHD this process is well described through the quantity P which represents the energy transfer (per mass and time unit) from turbulence to mean fields. In the edge region of RFP configuration, where magnetic field is mainly poloidal and the mean ExB is consequently toroidal, the quantity P results: P =[ -ρμ0 + ]Vφr where Vφ is the mean ExB toroidal flow, ρ the mean mass density and b and v the fluctuations of velocity and magnetic field respectively. Both the radial profiles and the temporal evolution of P have been measured in the edge region of Extrap-T2R Reversed Field Pinch experiment. The results support the existence of oscillating energy exchange process between fluctuations and mean flow.

  15. Field Performance of an Optimized Stack of YBCO Square “Annuli” for a Compact NMR Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungyong; Voccio, John; Bermond, Stéphane; Park, Dong-Keun; Bascuñán, Juan; Kim, Seok-Beom; Masaru, Tomita; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2011-01-01

    The spatial field homogeneity and time stability of a trapped field generated by a stack of YBCO square plates with a center hole (square “annuli”) was investigated. By optimizing stacking of magnetized square annuli, we aim to construct a compact NMR magnet. The stacked magnet consists of 750 thin YBCO plates, each 40-mm square and 80- μm thick with a 25-mm bore, and has a Ø10 mm room-temperature access for NMR measurement. To improve spatial field homogeneity of the 750-plate stack (YP750) a three-step optimization was performed: 1) statistical selection of best plates from supply plates; 2) field homogeneity measurement of multi-plate modules; and 3) optimal assembly of the modules to maximize field homogeneity. In this paper, we present analytical and experimental results of field homogeneity and temporal stability at 77 K, performed on YP750 and those of a hybrid stack, YPB750, in which two YBCO bulk annuli, each Ø46 mm and 16-mm thick with a 25-mm bore, are added to YP750, one at the top and the other at the bottom. PMID:22081753

  16. A new high performance field reversed configuration operating regime in the C-2 device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuszewski, M.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Barnes, D.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Brown, R.; Bui, D. Q.; Clary, R.; Conroy, K. D.; Deng, B. H.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Garate, E.; Glass, F. J.; Gota, H.; Guo, H.Y.; Gupta, D.; Gupta, S.; Kinley, J. S.; Knapp, K. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); and others

    2012-05-15

    Large field reversed configurations (FRCs) are produced in the C-2 device by combining dynamic formation and merging processes. The good confinement of these FRCs must be further improved to achieve sustainment with neutral beam (NB) injection and pellet fuelling. A plasma gun is installed at one end of the C-2 device to attempt electric field control of the FRC edge layer. The gun inward radial electric field counters the usual FRC spin-up and mitigates the n = 2 rotational instability without applying quadrupole magnetic fields. Better plasma centering is also obtained, presumably from line-tying to the gun electrodes. The combined effects of the plasma gun and of neutral beam injection lead to the high performance FRC operating regime, with FRC lifetimes up to 3 ms and with FRC confinement times improved by factors 2 to 4.

  17. On the enhanced coronal mass ejection detection rate since the solar cycle 23 polar field reversal

    CERN Document Server

    Petrie, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with angular width $> 30^{\\circ}$ have been observed to occur at a higher rate during solar cycle 24 compared to cycle 23, per sunspot number. This result is supported by data from three independent databases constructed using Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) coronagraph images, two employing automated detection techniques and one compiled manually by human observers. According to the two databases that cover a larger field of view, the enhanced CME rate actually began shortly after the cycle 23 polar field reversal, in 2004, when the polar fields returned with a 40\\% reduction in strength and interplanetary radial magnetic field became $\\approx 30\\%$ weaker. This result is consistent with the link between anomalous CME expansion and heliospheric total pressure decrease recently reported by Gopalswamy et al.

  18. Tango in the Mid-Jurassic: 10,000-Yr Geomagnetic Field Reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, M.

    2001-12-01

    A continuous magnetostratigraphic signature of Layer 2A from Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) oceanic crust now is known from two separate paleo-magnetic data sets. Measurement/demagnetization along the length of the entire core at 5-cm intervals generated ~100,000 data points, whereas a suite of 472 discrete samples also were taken from throughout the core. Both data sets display the same magnetization pattern, a series of repeated sinusoidal inclination changes downhole. Six inter-vals of maximum inclination (three positive, three negative) are obser-ved. Maximum inclination intervals of +/-40° are separated by regions of smoothly varying intermediate inclination values. Despite lack of azmuithal orientation of the core, downhole magnetic logging (Larson et al., in prep.) shows full ~360° directional change in the magnetization vector. Therefore, the maximum inclination regions represent polarity intervals of the geomagnetic field, and six polarity intervals in stacked sequence are contained in the upper 400 m thickness of Layer 2A at this site. The time duration spanned by these six reversals was estimated from recent seismic studies of young ocean crustal construction on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Estimates of completion of construction of Layer 2A within 1-3 km from the rise crest and typical EPR half-spreading rates of 5-8 cm/yr suggest that the studied 400 m of ocean crust represents 37,000-60,000 years. The fast construction of EPR crust implies that the Middle Jurassic geomagnetic field was reversing at a phenomenal rate of 5000-10,000 years. These data establish that the `quiet' signature in the oldest portion of the lineated magnetic anomaly patterns in the ocean crust is due to exceedingly rapid reversals of the geomagnetic field, because succes-sive, superposed opposite-polarity magnetic signatures will essentially cancel one another out at the sea surface. The width of the 'quiet' magnetic signature in the western Pacific Ocean implies that the 5000

  19. Thermal Decay and Reversal of Exchange Bias Field of CoFe/PtMn Bilayer after Ga+ Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Guang-Hong; ZHU Yu-Fu; LIN Yue-Bin

    2011-01-01

    @@ An applied field is used to perform Ga+ ion irradiation on a CoFe/PtMn bilayer.Effects of the applied field and energy transfer between Ga+ ions and antiferromagnetic(AFM) atoms on the exchange bias field Hex are investigated.A partially reversed Hex is found in CoFe/PtMn specimens irradiated at a dose of 1 × 1014 ions/cm2 with an applied field anti-parallel to the original exchange bias direction.We believe that the rapid energy transfer and local temperature increase originating from the interaction between Ga+ ions and AFM atoms result in spin reversal and the formation of reversed AFM domains when specimens are irradiated with anti-parallel fields.The decrease in Hex when annealing the film in a negative saturation field indicates a thermal decay process.The AFM moments are reversed by thermal activation over an energy barrier distribution,which may change in some way as the temperature increases.%An applied field is used to perform Ga+ ion irradiation on a CoFe/PtMn bilayer. Effects of the applied field and energy transfer between Ga+ ions and antiferromagnetic (AFM) atoms on the exchange bias field Hex are investigated. A partially reversed Hex is found in CoFe/PtMn specimens irradiated at a dose of 1 × 1014 ions/cm2 with an applied field anti-parallel to the original exchange bias direction. We believe that the rapid energy transfer and local temperature increase originating from the interaction between Ga+ ions and AFM atoms result in spin reversal and the formation of reversed AFM domains when specimens are irradiated with anti-parallel fields. The decrease in Hex when annealing the film in a negative saturation field indicates a thermal decay process. The AFM moments are reversed by thermal activation over an energy barrier distribution, which may change in some way as the temperature increases.

  20. Direct current electric field assembly of colloidal crystals displaying reversible structural color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Aayush A; Ganesan, Mahesh; Jocz, Jennifer; Solomon, Michael J

    2014-08-26

    We report the application of low-voltage direct current (dc) electric fields to self-assemble close-packed colloidal crystals in nonaqueous solvents from colloidal spheres that vary in size from as large as 1.2 μm to as small as 0.1 μm. The assemblies are created rapidly (∼2 min) from an initially low volume fraction colloidal particle suspension using a simple capacitor-like electric field device that applies a steady dc electric voltage. Confocal microscopy is used to observe the ordering that is produced by the assembly method. This spatial evidence for ordering is consistent with the 6-fold diffraction patterns identified by light scattering. Red, green, and blue structural color is observed for the ordered assemblies of colloids with diameters of 0.50, 0.40, and 0.29 μm, respectively, consistent with spectroscopic measurements of reflectance. The diffraction and spectrophotometry results were found to be consistent with the theoretical Bragg's scattering expected for closed-packed crystals. By switching the dc electric field from on to off, we demonstrate reversibility of the structural color response on times scales ∼60 s. The dc electric field assembly method therefore represents a simple method to produce reversible structural color in colloidal soft matter.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of noninductive helicity injection in the reversed-field pinch and tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    Numerical computation is used to investigate resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) and in tokamak-like configurations driven solely by direct current (DC) helicity injection. A Lundquist number (S) scan of RFP turbulence without plasma pressure produces the weak scaling of S{sup -0.18} for the root-mean-square magnetic fluctuation level for 2.5x10{sup 3}{le}S{le}4x10{sup 4}. The temporal behavior of fluctuations and the reversal parameter becomes more regular as S is increased, acquiring a {open_quotes}sawtooth{close_quotes} shape at the largest value of S. Simulations with plasma pressure and anisotropic thermal conduction demonstrate energy transport resulting from parallel heat fluctuations. To investigate means of improving RFP energy confinement, three forms of current profile modification are tested. Radio frequency (RF) current drive is modeled with an auxiliary electron force, and linear stability calculations are used.

  2. Exploiting spatiotemporal degrees of freedom for far field subwavelength focusing using time reversal in fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Dupré, Matthieu; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2016-01-01

    Materials which possess a high local density of states varying at a subwavelength scale theoretically permit to focus waves onto focal spots much smaller than the free space wavelength. To do so metamaterials -manmade composite media exhibiting properties not available in nature- are usually considered. However this approach is limited to narrow bandwidths due to their resonant nature. Here, we prove that it is possible to use a fractal resonator alongside time reversal to focus microwaves onto $\\lambda/15$ subwavelength focal spots from the far field, on extremely wide bandwidths. We first numerically prove that this approach can be realized using a multiple channel time reversal mirror, that utilizes all the degrees of freedom offered by the fractal resonator. Then we experimentally demonstrate that this approach can be drastically simplified by coupling the fractal resonator to a complex medium, here a cavity, that efficiently converts its spatial degrees of freedom into temporal ones. This allows to achie...

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of noninductive helicity injection in the reversed-field pinch and tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Numerical computation is used to investigate resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) and in tokamak-like configurations driven solely by direct current (DC) helicity injection. A Lundquist number (S) scan of RFP turbulence without plasma pressure produces the weak scaling of S-0.18 for the root-mean-square magnetic fluctuation level for 2.5x103≤S≤4x104. The temporal behavior of fluctuations and the reversal parameter becomes more regular as S is increased, acquiring a "sawtooth" shape at the largest value of S. Simulations with plasma pressure and anisotropic thermal conduction demonstrate energy transport resulting from parallel heat fluctuations. To investigate means of improving RFP energy confinement, three forms of current profile modification are tested. Radio frequency (RF) current drive is modeled with an auxiliary electron force, and linear stability calculations are used.

  4. Equation of motion for relativistic compact binaries with the strong field point particle limit: Third post-Newtonian order

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, Y

    2004-01-01

    An equation of motion for relativistic compact binaries is derived through the third post-Newtonian (3 PN) approximation of general relativity. The strong field point particle limit and multipole expansion of the stars are used to solve iteratively the harmonically relaxed Einstein equations. We take into account the Lorentz contraction on the multipole moments defined in our previous works. We then derive a 3 PN acceleration of the binary orbital motion of the two spherical compact stars based on a surface integral approach which is a direct consequence of local energy momentum conservation. Our resulting equation of motion admits a conserved energy (neglecting the 2.5 PN radiation reaction effect), is Lorentz invariant and is unambiguous: there exist no undetermined parameter reported in the previous works. We shall show that our 3 PN equation of motion agrees physically with the Blanchet and Faye 3 PN equation of motion if $\\lambda = - 1987/3080$, where $\\lambda$ is the parameter which is undetermined with...

  5. Compact radio sources and jet-driven AGN feedback in the early Universe: Constraints from integral-field spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvadba, N P H; De Breuck, C; Gilbert, A; Van Breugel, W

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the impact of radio jets during the formation epoch of their massive host galaxies, we present an analysis of two massive, log(M_stel/ M_sun)~10.6 and 11.3, compact radio galaxies at z=3.5, TNJ0205+2242 and TNJ0121+1320. Their small radio sizes (R<= 10 kpc) are most likely a sign of youth. We compare their radio properties and gas dynamics with those in well extended radio galaxies at high redshift, which show strong evidence for powerful, jet-driven outflows of significant gas masses (M 10^9-10 M_sun). Our analysis combines rest-frame optical integral-field spectroscopy with existing radio imaging, CO emission line spectra, and rest-frame UV spectroscopy. [OIII]5007 line emission is compact in both galaxies and lies within the region defined by the radio lobes. For TNJ0205+2242, the Ly-alpha profile narrows significantly outside the jet radius, indicating the presence of a quiescent halo. TNJ0121+1320 has two components separated by ~10 kpc and a velocity offset of ~300 km s^-1. If motions ...

  6. Controlling fluctuations and transport in the reversed field pinch with edge current drive and plasma biasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, D.J.G.

    1998-09-01

    Two techniques are employed in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to test and control different aspects of fluctuation induced transport in the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Auxiliary edge currents are driven along the magnetic field to modify magnetic fluctuations, and the particle and energy transport associated with them. In addition, strong edge flows are produced by plasma biasing. Their effect on electrostatic fluctuations and the associated particle losses is studied. Both techniques are accomplished using miniature insertable plasma sources that are biased negatively to inject electrons. This type of emissive electrode is shown to reliably produce intense, directional current without significant contamination by impurities. The two most important conclusions derived from these studies are that the collective modes resonant at the reversal surface play a role in global plasma confinement, and that these modes can be controlled by modifying the parallel current profile outside of the reversal surface. This confirms predictions based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that auxiliary current drive in the sense to flatten the parallel current profile can be successful in controlling magnetic fluctuations in the RFP. However, these studies expand the group of magnetic modes believed to cause transport in MST and suggest that current profile control efforts need to address both the core resonant magnetic modes and those resonant at the reversal surface. The core resonant modes are not significantly altered in these experiments; however, the distribution and/or amplitude of the injected current is probably not optimal for affecting these modes. Plasma biasing generates strong edge flows with shear and particle confinement likely improves in these discharges. These experiments resemble biased H modes in other magnetic configurations in many ways. The similarities are likely due to the common role of electrostatic fluctuations in edge transport.

  7. Molecular adhesion solutions for integral field spectroscopy and compact static FTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, C.; Prieto, E.; Cagnat, J. F.; Laurent, F.; Ancourt, G.

    2004-06-01

    This paper deals with the following projects: Image slicer prototype for JWST (ESA/LAM) optically tested at ambient and cryogenic temperature (30K). Vibration tests have also been performed. Image slicer design and technical solution for the SNAP (SuperNovae Acceleration Probe NASA/CNES?). Other image slicer designs and prototypes allowing cost reduction. Cube à échelette: Static FTS. A compact reflective assembly design will be presented. This paper aims to show technical and industrial inputs to be taken into account for stacked mirrors design and development. CYBERNETIX has a strong experience of precision optics assembled via molecular adhesion and for 3 years has manufactured 6 prototypes of image slicer subsystems (prototypes of NIRSPEC-IFU, IFS for JWST, MUSE...) in collaboration with the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM) and the Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon (CRAL) and échelettes for CNES. After a brief presentation of the principle of manufacturing and assembly, we will focus on the different performances achieved in our prototypes. Different environmental tests have shown the withstanding of these assemblies to vibration and cryogenic temperatures (30K).

  8. Compact, cost-effective and field-portable microscope prototype based on MISHELF microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Martín; Picazo-Bueno, José Ángel; Granero, Luis; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    We report on a reduced cost, portable and compact prototype design of lensless holographic microscope with an illumination/detection scheme based on wavelength multiplexing, working with single hologram acquisition and using a fast convergence algorithm for image processing. All together, MISHELF (initials coming from Multi-Illumination Single-Holographic-Exposure Lensless Fresnel) microscopy allows the recording of three Fresnel domain diffraction patterns in a single camera snap-shot incoming from illuminating the sample with three coherent lights at once. Previous implementations have proposed an illumination/detection procedure based on a tuned (illumination wavelengths centered at the maximum sensitivity of the camera detection channels) configuration but here we report on a detuned (non-centered ones) scheme resulting in prototype miniaturization and cost reduction. Thus, MISHELF microscopy in combination with a novel and fast iterative algorithm allows high-resolution (μm range) phase-retrieved (twin image elimination) quantitative phase imaging of dynamic events (video rate recording speed). The performance of this microscope prototype is validated through experiments using both amplitude (USAF resolution test) and complex (live swine sperm cells and flowing microbeads) samples. The proposed method becomes in an alternative instrument improving some capabilities of existing lensless microscopes. PMID:28233829

  9. Compact, cost-effective and field-portable microscope prototype based on MISHELF microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Martín; Picazo-Bueno, José Ángel; Granero, Luis; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2017-02-01

    We report on a reduced cost, portable and compact prototype design of lensless holographic microscope with an illumination/detection scheme based on wavelength multiplexing, working with single hologram acquisition and using a fast convergence algorithm for image processing. All together, MISHELF (initials coming from Multi-Illumination Single-Holographic-Exposure Lensless Fresnel) microscopy allows the recording of three Fresnel domain diffraction patterns in a single camera snap-shot incoming from illuminating the sample with three coherent lights at once. Previous implementations have proposed an illumination/detection procedure based on a tuned (illumination wavelengths centered at the maximum sensitivity of the camera detection channels) configuration but here we report on a detuned (non-centered ones) scheme resulting in prototype miniaturization and cost reduction. Thus, MISHELF microscopy in combination with a novel and fast iterative algorithm allows high-resolution (μm range) phase-retrieved (twin image elimination) quantitative phase imaging of dynamic events (video rate recording speed). The performance of this microscope prototype is validated through experiments using both amplitude (USAF resolution test) and complex (live swine sperm cells and flowing microbeads) samples. The proposed method becomes in an alternative instrument improving some capabilities of existing lensless microscopes.

  10. Resistive wall modes in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.

    2003-10-01

    Resistive wall modes (RWM) in the reversed field pinch are studied and a detailed comparison of experimental growth rates and linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory is made. RWM growth rates are experimentally measured in the thin shell device EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1 (2001)]. Linear MHD calculations of RWM growth rates are based on experimental equilibria. Experimental and linear MHD RWM growth rate dependency on the equilibrium profiles is investigated experimentally by varying the pinch parameter Θ=Bθ(a)/ in the range Θ=1.5-1.8. Quantitative agreement between experimental and linear MHD growth rates is seen. The dominating RWMs are the internal on-axis modes (having the same helicity as the central equilibrium field). At high Θ, external nonresonant modes are also observed. For internal modes experimental growth rates decrease with Θ while for external modes, growth rates increase with Θ. The effect of RWMs on the reversed-field pinch plasma performance is discussed.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Coupled Molten Steel Flow and Temperature Fields in Compact Strip Production Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xu-feng; ZHANG Jie-yu; DU Wei-dong; ZHAI Qi-jie; LI Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the casting manufacture practice of steel slabs by CSP technology, the flow and the temperature fields of the funnel mould and the secondary cooling segment were simulated using the commercial code,CFX4. Compared with other physical investigations, the correlative data of the present simulation results are in good agreement with them. Therefore, a more comprehensive survey for metallurgy characteristic of the flow and the temperature fields in CSP continuous casting process can be achieved.

  12. Post-acceleration of laser driven protons with a compact high field linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Turchetti, Giorgio; Bolton, Paul R.

    2013-05-01

    We present a start-to-end 3D numerical simulation of a hybrid scheme for the acceleration of protons. The scheme is based on a first stage laser acceleration, followed by a transport line with a solenoid or a multiplet of quadrupoles, and then a post-acceleration section in a compact linac. Our simulations show that from a laser accelerated proton bunch with energy selection at ~ 30MeV, it is possible to obtain a high quality monochromatic beam of 60MeV with intensity at the threshold of interest for medical use. In the present day experiments using solid targets, the TNSA mechanism describes accelerated bunches with an exponential energy spectrum up to a cut-off value typically below ~ 60MeV and wide angular distribution. At the cut-off energy, the number of protons to be collimated and post-accelerated in a hybrid scheme are still too low. We investigate laser-plasma acceleration to improve the quality and number of the injected protons at ~ 30MeV in order to assure efficient post-acceleration in the hybrid scheme. The results are obtained with 3D PIC simulations using a code where optical acceleration with over-dense targets, transport and post-acceleration in a linac can all be investigated in an integrated framework. The high intensity experiments at Nara are taken as a reference benchmarks for our virtual laboratory. If experimentally confirmed, a hybrid scheme could be the core of a medium sized infrastructure for medical research, capable of producing protons for therapy and x-rays for diagnosis, which complements the development of all optical systems.

  13. Measurements accounting for the impediment of ion spin-up in rotating magnetic field driven field reversed configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deards, C. L. [Lockheed Martin, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale, California 93599 (United States); Hoffman, A. L.; Steinhauer, L. C. [Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 14700 NE 95th Street, Suite 100, Redmond, Washington 98052 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Improved vacuum hygiene, wall conditioning, and reduced recycling in the rotating magnetic field (RMF) driven translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade (TCSU) field reversed configuration experiment have made possible a more accurate assessment of the forces affecting ion spin-up. This issue is critical in plasmas sustained by RMFs, such as TCSU since ion spin-up can substantially reduce or cancel the RMF current drive effect. Several diagnostics are brought to bear, including a 3-axis translatable magnetic probe allowing the first experimental measurement of the end shorting effect. These results show that the ion rotation is determined by a balance between electron-ion friction, the end shorting effect, and ion drag against neutrals.

  14. Measurements accounting for the impediment of ion spin-up in rotating magnetic field driven field reversed configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deards, C. L.; Hoffman, A. L.; Steinhauer, L. C.

    2011-11-01

    Improved vacuum hygiene, wall conditioning, and reduced recycling in the rotating magnetic field (RMF) driven translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade (TCSU) field reversed configuration experiment have made possible a more accurate assessment of the forces affecting ion spin-up. This issue is critical in plasmas sustained by RMFs, such as TCSU since ion spin-up can substantially reduce or cancel the RMF current drive effect. Several diagnostics are brought to bear, including a 3-axis translatable magnetic probe allowing the first experimental measurement of the end shorting effect. These results show that the ion rotation is determined by a balance between electron-ion friction, the end shorting effect, and ion drag against neutrals.

  15. Transient loss of plasma from a theta pinch having an initially reversed magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the transient loss of plasma from a 25-cm-long theta pinch initially containing a reversed trapped magnetic field are presented. The plasma, amenable to MHD analyses, was a doubly ionized helium plasma characterized by an ion density N/sub i/ = 2 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and an ion temperature T/sub i/ = 15 eV at midcoil and by N/sub i/ = 0.5 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub i/ = 6 eV at a position 2.5 cm beyond the end of the theta coil.

  16. Reynolds and Maxwell stress measurements in the reversed field pinch experiment Extrap-T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2005-08-01

    The complete Reynolds stress (RS) has been measured in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. The RS exhibits a strong gradient in the region where a high E × B shear takes place. Experimental results show this gradient to be almost entirely due to the electrostatic contribution. This has been interpreted as experimental evidence of flow generation via turbulence mechanism. The scales involved in flow generation are deduced from the frequency decomposition of RS tensor. They are found related to magnetohydrodynamic activity but are different with respect to the scales responsible for turbulent transport.

  17. Pressure driven tearing and interchange modes in the reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the magneto-hydro-dynamic stability of pressure driven modes in the reversed field pinch has been analyzed. It is shown that at low and intermediate β's, i.e., typically for values below 20-25%, the tearing parity is dominant, while only at very high β, well above the achieved experimental values, at least part of the modes are converted to ideal interchange instabilities. Before their transition to ideal instabilities, according to their Lundquist number scaling, they can be classified as resistive-g modes.

  18. Fast-Particle-Driven Alfvenic Modes in a Reversed Field Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koliner, J. J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Forest, C. B. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Sarff, J. S. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Anderson, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Liu, D [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Nomberg, M. D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Waksman, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Lin, L. [University of California, Los Angeles; Brower, D. L. [University of California, Los Angeles; Ding, W. X. [University of California, Los Angeles; Spong, Donald A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Alfvenic modes are observed due to neutral beam injection for the first time in a reversed field pinch plasma. Modeling of the beam deposition and slowing down shows that the velocity and radial localization are high. This allows instability drive from inverse Landau damping of a bump-on-tail in the parallel distribution function or from free energy in the fast ion density gradient. Mode switching from a lower frequency toroidal mode number n = 5 mode that scales with beam injection velocity to a higher frequency n = 4 mode with Alfvenic scaling is observed.

  19. Coherent perfect absorbers for transient, periodic or chaotic optical fields: time-reversed lasers beyond threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, S

    2012-01-01

    Recent works [Y.D. Chong {\\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 105}, 053901 (2010); W. Wan {\\it et al.}, Science {\\bf 331}, 889 (2011)] have shown that the time-reversed process of lasing at threshold realizes a coherent perfect absorber (CPA). In a CPA, a lossy medium in an optical cavity with a specific degree of dissipation, equal in modulus to the gain of the lasing medium, can perfectly absorb coherent optical waves at discrete frequencies that are the time-reversed counterpart of the lasing modes. Here the concepts of time-reversal of lasing and CPA are extended for optical radiation emitted by a laser operated in an arbitrary (and generally highly-nonlinear) regime, i.e. for transient, chaotic or periodic coherent optical fields. We prove that any electromagnetic signal $E(t)$ generated by a laser system \\textbf{S} operated in an arbitrary regime can be perfectly absorbed by a CPA device $\\bf{S'}$ which is simply realized by placing inside \\textbf{S} a broadband linear absorber (attenuator) of appropriat...

  20. Electric-field-controlled spin reversal in a quantum dot with ferromagnetic contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, J. R.; Paaske, J.; Lindelof, P. E.

    2008-05-01

    Manipulation of the spin states of a quantum dot by purely electrical means is a highly desirable property of fundamental importance for the development of spintronic devices such as spin filters, spin transistors and single spin memories as well as for solid-state qubits. An electrically gated quantum dot in the Coulomb blockade regime can be tuned to hold a single unpaired spin-1/2, which is routinely spin polarized by an applied magnetic field. Using ferromagnetic electrodes, however, the quantum dot becomes spin polarized by the local exchange field. Here, we report on the experimental realization of this tunnelling-induced spin splitting in a carbon-nanotube quantum dot coupled to ferromagnetic nickel electrodes with a strong tunnel coupling ensuring a sizeable exchange field. As charge transport in this regime is dominated by the Kondo effect, we can use this sharp many-body resonance to read off the local spin polarization from the measured bias spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the exchange field can be compensated by an external magnetic field, thus restoring a zero-bias Kondo resonance, and we demonstrate that the exchange field itself, and hence the local spin polarization, can be tuned and reversed merely by tuning the gate voltage.

  1. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorbom, B.N., E-mail: bsorbom@mit.edu; Ball, J.; Palmer, T.R.; Mangiarotti, F.J.; Sierchio, J.M.; Bonoli, P.; Kasten, C.; Sutherland, D.A.; Barnard, H.S.; Haakonsen, C.B.; Goh, J.; Sung, C.; Whyte, D.G.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • ARC reactor designed to have 500 MW fusion power at 3.3 m major radius. • Compact, simplified design allowed by high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • ARC has innovative plasma physics solutions such as inboardside RF launch. • High temperature superconductors allow high magnetic fields and jointed magnets. • Liquid immersion blanket and jointed magnets greatly simplify tokamak reactor design. - Abstract: The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor is the product of a conceptual design study aimed at reducing the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a ∼200–250 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q{sub p} ≈ 13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ∼63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ∼23 T peak field on coil achievable with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External current drive is provided by two innovative inboard RF launchers using 25 MW of lower hybrid and 13.6 MW of ion cyclotron fast wave power. The resulting efficient current drive provides a robust, steady state core plasma far from disruptive limits. ARC uses an all-liquid blanket, consisting of low pressure, slowly flowing fluorine lithium beryllium (FLiBe) molten salt. The liquid blanket is low-risk technology and provides effective neutron moderation and shielding, excellent

  2. Theoretical studies of non inductive current drive in compact toroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farengo, R; Lifschitz, AF; Caputi, KI; Arista, NR; Clemente, RA

    2002-01-01

    Three non inductive current drive methods that can be applied to compact toroids axe studied. The use of neutral beams to drive current in field reversed configurations and spheromaks is studied using a Monte Carlo code that includes a complete ionization package and follows the exact particle orbit

  3. Calculation of flow distribution in air reverse circulation bit interior fluid field by simplifying air flow model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuqing HAO; Hongwei HUANG; Kun YIN

    2007-01-01

    By simplifying the characters in the air reverse circulation bit interior fluid field, the authors used air dynamics and fluid mechanics to calculate the air distribution in the bit and obtained an equation of flow distribution with a unique resolution. This study will provide help for making certain the bit parameters of the bit structure effectively and study the air reverse circulation bit interior fluid field character deeply.

  4. ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Sorbom, B N; Palmer, T R; Mangiarotti, F J; Sierchio, J M; Bonoli, P; Kasten, C; Sutherland, D A; Barnard, H S; Haakonsen, C B; Goh, J; Sung, C; Whyte, D G

    2014-01-01

    The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design study aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q_p~13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ~63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ~23 T peak field on coil with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External cu...

  5. Measurements of Electric Field Fluctuations Using a Capacitive Probe on the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S.; McCollam, K. J.; Triana, J. C.; Li, H.; Ding, W. X.; Liu, W.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental measurements and extended MHD computation reveal that both flow and current density fluctuations are important for the magnetic relaxation of RFP plasmas via tearing fluctuations. Motivated by these results, we have developed a multi-electrode capacitive probe for radial profile measurements of the electrostatic potential deep in the plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac plasma potential via electrodes insulated from the plasma using an annular boron nitride dielectric (also the particle shield), provided the secondary emission is sufficiently large (Te>20 eV). The probe has ten sets of four capacitors with 1.5 cm radial separation. At each radius, four capacitors are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid. This probe has been inserted up to 15 cm from the wall in 200 kA deuterium plasmas. The fluctuation amplitudes increase during the sawtooth crash and the power spectrum broadens (similar to the behavior of magnetic field fluctuations). The frequency bandwidth allows measurements of the radial coherence and phase of the fluctuations associated with rotating tearing modes up to the Alfvénic range. A next-step goal is measurement of the total dynamo emf, ~ /B0 , to complement ongoing measurements of the Hall dynamo emf, / ne , using a deep-insertion magnetic probe. M. Tan is supported by ITER-China Program. Work is supported by US DOE.

  6. Geomechanical modeling of reservoir compaction, surface subsidence, and casing damage at the Belridge diatomite field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FREDRICH,JOANNE T.; DEITRICK,G.L.; ARGUELLO JR.,JOSE G.; DEROUFFIGNAC,E.P.

    2000-05-01

    Geologic, and historical well failure, production, and injection data were analyzed to guide development of three-dimensional geomechanical models of the Belridge diatomite field, California. The central premise of the numerical simulations is that spatial gradients in pore pressure induced by production and injection in a low permeability reservoir may perturb the local stresses and cause subsurface deformation sufficient to result in well failure. Time-dependent reservoir pressure fields that were calculated from three-dimensional black oil reservoir simulations were coupled uni-directionally to three-dimensional non-linear finite element geomechanical simulations. The reservoir models included nearly 100,000 gridblocks (100--200 wells), and covered nearly 20 years of production and injection. The geomechanical models were meshed from structure maps and contained more than 300,000 nodal points. Shear strain localization along weak bedding planes that causes casing dog-legs in the field was accommodated in the model by contact surfaces located immediately above the reservoir and at two locations in the overburden. The geomechanical simulations are validated by comparison of the predicted surface subsidence with field measurements, and by comparison of predicted deformation with observed casing damage. Additionally, simulations performed for two independently developed areas at South Belridge, Sections 33 and 29, corroborate their different well failure histories. The simulations suggest the three types of casing damage observed, and show that although water injection has mitigated surface subsidence, it can, under some circumstances, increase the lateral gradients in effective stress, that in turn can accelerate subsurface horizontal motions. Geomechanical simulation is an important reservoir management tool that can be used to identify optimal operating policies to mitigate casing damage for existing field developments, and applied to incorporate the effect of

  7. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, L., E-mail: lschmitz@ucla.edu; Peebles, W. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ruskov, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Tuszewski, M.; Douglass, J.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρ{sub s} ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3–5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10{sup 13} ≤ n{sub e} ≤ 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  8. Influence of thermal agitation on the electric field induced precessional magnetization reversal with perpendicular easy axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the influence of thermal agitation on the electric field induced precessional magnetization switching probability with perpendicular easy axis by solving the Fokker-Planck equation numerically with finite difference method. The calculated results show that the thermal agitation during the reversal process crucially influences the switching probability. The switching probability can be achieved is only determined by the thermal stability factor Δ of the free layer, it is independent on the device dimension, which is important for the high density device application. Ultra-low error rate down to the order of 10−9 can be achieved for the device of thermal stability factor Δ of 40. Low damping factor α material should be used for the free layer for high reliability device applications. These results exhibit potential of electric field induced precessional magnetization switching with perpendicular easy axis for ultra-low power, high speed and high density magnetic random access memory (MRAM applications.

  9. Influence of thermal agitation on the electric field induced precessional magnetization reversal with perpendicular easy axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hongguang, E-mail: chenghg7932@gmail.com; Deng, Ning [Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-12-15

    We investigated the influence of thermal agitation on the electric field induced precessional magnetization switching probability with perpendicular easy axis by solving the Fokker-Planck equation numerically with finite difference method. The calculated results show that the thermal agitation during the reversal process crucially influences the switching probability. The switching probability can be achieved is only determined by the thermal stability factor Δ of the free layer, it is independent on the device dimension, which is important for the high density device application. Ultra-low error rate down to the order of 10{sup −9} can be achieved for the device of thermal stability factor Δ of 40. Low damping factor α material should be used for the free layer for high reliability device applications. These results exhibit potential of electric field induced precessional magnetization switching with perpendicular easy axis for ultra-low power, high speed and high density magnetic random access memory (MRAM) applications.

  10. Symmetric dynamic behaviour of a superconducting proximity array with respect to field reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankhorst, M.; Poccia, N.

    2017-01-01

    As the complexity of strongly correlated systems and high temperature superconductors increases, so does also the essential complexity of defects found in these materials and the complexity of the supercurrent pathways. It can be therefore convenient to realize a solid-state system with regular supercurrent pathways and without the disguising effects of disorder in order to capture the essential characteristics of a collective dynamics. Using a square array of superconducting islands placed on a normal metal, we observe a state in which magnetic field-induced vortices are frozen in the dimples of the egg crate potential by their strong repulsion interaction. In this system a dynamic vortex Mott insulator transition has been previously observed. In this work, we will show the symmetric dynamic behaviour with respect to field reversal and we will compare it with the asymmetric behaviour observed at the dynamic vortex Mott transition.

  11. Drift-kink instability induced by beam ions in field-reversed configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Kazumi; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Sato, Tetsuya [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    The drift-kink instability in field-reversed configurations with a beam component is investigated by means of a three-dimensional particle simulation. The unstable mode with the toroidal mode number n=4 grows with the rate {gamma} {approx} 0.1 - 1.0{omega}{sub ci} for a strong beam current and deforms the plasma profile along the beam orbit in the vicinity of the field-null line. This mode is nonlinearly saturated as a result of the relaxation of current profile. Both the saturation level and the growth rate tend to increase as the ratio of the beam current to the plasma current I{sub b}/I{sub p} increases. It is also found that there is a threshold value of the beam velocity {upsilon}{sub b} {approx} {upsilon}{sub Ti} (ion thermal velocity) for the excitation of the instability. (author)

  12. Reversal of Magnetisation in Ising Ferromagnet by the Field Having Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Abyaya; Acharyya, Muktish

    2016-11-01

    We have studied the reversal of magnetisation in Ising ferromagnet by the field having gradient along a particular direction. We employed the Monte Carlo simulation with Metropolis single spin flip algorithm. The average lifetime of the metastable state was observed to increase with the magnitude of the gradient of applied field. In the high gradient regime, the system was observed to show two distinct region of up and down spins. The interface or the domain wall was observed to move as one increases the gradient. The displacement of the mean position of the interface was observed to increase with the gradient as hyperbolic tangent function. The roughness of the interface was observed to decay exponentially as the gradient increases. The number of spin flip per site was observed to show a discontinuity in the vicinity of the domain wall. The amount of the discontinuity was found to diverge with the system size as a power law fashion with an exponent 5/3.

  13. Ion rotational velocity of a field-reversed configuration plasma measured by neutral beam probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Y.; Tanjyo, M.; Ohi, S.; Goto, S.; Ishimura, T.

    1987-01-01

    The ion rotational angular velocity ..cap omega.. and the ion temperature T/sub i/ of a translated field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma are measured using neutral beam probe spectroscopy. The value of ..cap omega.. is --(1.0--1.2) x ..cap omega..* at the onset time of the n = 2 rotational instability, where ..cap omega..* is the ion diamagnetic frequency for a rigid-rotor equilibrium. The ion rotational direction is the same as the ion diamagnetic direction. The value of ..cap omega.. is smaller than the angular frequency ..omega../sub re/ of the n = 2 instability, which can yield experimental evidence of the ion kinetic effects on the n = 2 instability in the FRC plasma. When the octupole field is applied to the plasma in order to suppress the n = 2 deformation, ..cap omega.. is slightly reduced. The ion temperature T/sub i/ is --70 eV at the onset time of the n = 2 instability.

  14. Observations of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in a reversed field pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnoli, G.; Bergsâker, H.; Tennfors, E.; Zonca, F.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Cecconello, M.; Antoni, V.; Cavazzana, R.; Malmberg, J.-A.

    2005-04-01

    High frequency peaks in the spectra of magnetic field signals have been detected at the edge of Extrap-T2R [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello, J. R. Drake, R. M. Gravestijn, A. Hedqvist, and J.-A. Malmberg, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 43, 1457 (2001)]. The measured fluctuation is found to be mainly polarized along the toroidal direction, with high toroidal periodicity n and Alfvénic scaling (f∝B/√mini ). Calculations for a reversed field pinch plasma predict the existence of an edge resonant, high frequency, high-n number toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode with the observed frequency scaling. In addition, gas puffing experiments show that edge density fluctuations are responsible for the rapid changes of mode frequency. Finally a coupling with the electron drift turbulence is proposed as drive mechanism for the eigenmode.

  15. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L; Ruskov, E; Deng, B H; Gota, H; Gupta, D; Tuszewski, M; Douglass, J; Peebles, W A; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2014-11-01

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρs ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3-5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10(13) ≤ ne ≤ 1 × 10(14) cm(-3), and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  16. Error Field Assessment from Driven Rotation of Stable External Kinks at EXTRAP-T2R Reversed Field Pinch

    CERN Document Server

    Volpe, F A; Brunsell, P R; Drake, J R; Olofsson, K E J

    2013-01-01

    A new non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch. Stable and marginally stable external kink modes of toroidal mode number n=10 and n=8, respectively, were generated, and their rotation sustained, by means of rotating magnetic perturbations of the same n. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the kink modes were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude. This behavior was used to precisely infer the amplitude and approximately estimate the toroidal phase of the EF. A subsequent scan permitted to optimize the toroidal phase. The technique was tested against deliberately applied as well as intrinsic error fields of n=8 and 10. Corrections equal and opposite to the estimated error fields were applied. The efficacy of the error compensation was indicated by the increased discharge duration and more uniform mo...

  17. Forming Reversible Gels with Triblock Polyelectrolytes: a Field-theoretic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audus, Debra; Fredrickson, Glenn

    2011-03-01

    Recently, two research groups have formed reversible gels using triblock polyelectrolytes (Lemmers et al. 2010; Hunt et al., in preparation). This gel formation is driven by a phenomenon called complex coacervation, in which two oppositely charged homopolymers in solution phase separate into a polymer rich phase, known as a coacervate, and a solution phase. If instead, the polymers are triblocks with a neutral midblock and charged end blocks, under appropriate conditions they will microphase separate into micelles with cores of coacervated charged groups and coronas of neutral midblocks. These neutral midblocks act as bridges between the micelles, thereby creating a gel. One of the advantages of forming gels in this way is that the coacervate domains, and thus the gel, can be easily tuned by varying parameters such as pH, salt concentration and temperature. In order to understand the microstructures and solution sensitivity of these reversible gels, we have numerically simulated field-theoretic models of triblock polyelectrolyte mixtures in an implicit solvent. Because coacervation is driven by charge correlations, the usual mean-field assumption fails, and it is necessary to study the model beyond the level of SCFT.

  18. Applying "domino" model to study dipolar geomagnetic field reversals and secular variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peqini, Klaudio; Duka, Bejo

    2014-05-01

    Aiming to understand the physical processes underneath the reversals events of geomagnetic field, different numerical models have been conceived. We considered the so named "domino" model, an Ising-Heisenberg model of interacting magnetic spins aligned along a ring [Mazaud and Laj, EPSL, 1989; Mori et al., arXiv:1110.5062v2, 2012]. We will present here some results which are slightly different from the already published results, and will give our interpretation on the differences. Following the empirical studies of the long series of the axial magnetic moment (dipolar moment or "magnetization") generated by the model varying all model parameters, we defined the set of parameters that supply the longest mean time between reversals. Using this set of parameters, a short time series (about 10,000 years) of axial magnetic moment was generated. After de-noising the fluctuation of this time series, we compared it with the series of dipolar magnetic moment values supplied by CALS10K.1b model for the last 10000 years. We found similar behavior of the both series, even if the "domino" model could not supply a full explanation of the geomagnetic field SV. In a similar way we will compare a 14000 years long series with the dipolar magnetic moment obtained by the model SHA.DIF.14k [Pavón-Carrasco et al., EPSL, 2014].

  19. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, A; Vermijs, G; Solignac, A; Koo, J; Kohlhepp, J T; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2016-03-04

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface.

  20. Reynolds stress flow shear and turbulent energy transfer in reversed field pinch configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Nicola; Spolaore, Monica; Serianni, Gianluigi; Regnoli, Giorgio; Spada, Emanuele; Antoni, Vanni; Bergsåker, Henric; Drake, James R.

    2003-10-01

    The role of Reynolds Stress tensor on flow generation in turbulent fluids and plasmas is still an open question and the comprehension of its behavior may assist the understanding of improved confinement scenario. It is generally believed that shear flow generation may occur by an interaction of the turbulent Reynolds stress with the shear flow. It is also generally believed that this mechanism may influence the generation of zonal flow shears. The evaluation of the complete Reynolds Stress tensor requires contemporary measurements of its electrostatic and magnetic part: this requirement is more restrictive for Reversed Field Pinch configuration where magnetic fluctuations are larger than in tokamak . A new diagnostic system which combines electrostatic and magnetic probes has been installed in the edge region of Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch. With this new probe the Reynolds stress tensor has been deduced and its radial profile has been reconstructed on a shot to shot basis exploring differen plasma conditions. These profiles have been compared with the naturally occurring velocity flow profile, in particular during Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive experiment, where a strong variation of ExB flow radial profile has been registered. The study of the temporal evolution of Reynolds stress reveals the appearance of strong localized bursts: these are considered in relation with global MHD relaxation phenomena, which naturally occur in the core of an RFP plasma sustaining its configuration.

  1. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, A.; Vermijs, G.; Solignac, A.; Koo, J.; Kohlhepp, J. T.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-03-01

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface.

  2. Reversed field pinch operation with intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.; Hedqvist, A.; Yadikin, D.; Drake, J. R.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-11-01

    Discharges in the thin shell reversed field pinch (RFP) device EXTRAP T2R without active feedback control are characterized by growth of non-resonant m = 1 unstable resistive wall modes (RWMs) in agreement with linear MHD theory. Resonant m = 1 tearing modes (TMs) exhibit initially fast rotation and the associated perturbed radial fields at the shell are small, but eventually TMs wall-lock and give rise to a growing radial field. The increase in the radial field at the wall due to growing RWMs and wall-locked TMs is correlated with an increase in the toroidal loop voltage, which leads to discharge termination after 3-4 wall times. An active magnetic feedback control system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R. A two-dimensional array of 128 active saddle coils (pair-connected into 64 independent m = 1 coils) is used with intelligent shell feedback control to suppress the m = 1 radial field at the shell. With feedback control, active stabilization of the full toroidal spectrum of 16 unstable m = 1 non-resonant RWMs is achieved, and TM wall locking is avoided. A three-fold extension of the pulse length, up to the power supply limit, is observed. Intelligent shell feedback control is able to maintain the plasma equilibrium for 10 wall times, with plasma confinement parameters sustained at values comparable to those obtained in thick shell devices of similar size.

  3. Neutral beam excitation of Alfven continua in the madison symmetric torus reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliner, Jonathan Jay

    Alfven continua and Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) have been generated for reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma equilibria in Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). Data gathered from the extensive suite of diagnostics on MST was used to generate equilibria using MSTFIT and VMEC. Three dimensional equilibria for spontaneous helical states were generated using the equilibrium reconstruction code V3FIT. The reduced-MHD codes AE3D and STELLGAP were run on all generated equilibria to calculate the continua and AEs. All continuum solutions contain a toroidicity-induced Alfven gap at 200-400 kHz, within which AE solutions appear by coupling of m=0,1 at medium n. The first observation of beam-driven instabilities on the RFP was performed using MST magnetics during neutral beam injection (NBI). Spatially coherent bursts with n=5,m=1 were observed in plasmas with edge safety factor q_a=0. The bursts oscillate at 65 kHz, and reach maximum amplitude and decay away within 100 mus. These bursts persist for the duration of NBI. Secondary n=-1 and n=4 bursts are coupled in time, reaching maximum amplitude with 50 mus after the n=5 peak amplitude. While the n=5 bursts scale weakly with the electron density n_e and strongly with the beam velocity v_beam, the n=4 bursts scale with the Alfven speed v_A. The burst frequencies are well below those of the calculated AEs and the modes are driven even with v_ beam plasmas. In reversed plasmas, the temporally changing q profile changes the burst resonances, bringing n=6 into resonance halfway through the sawtooth cycle. The n=5 mode switches from its frequency in non-reversed plasmas to a higher frequency at the end of the sawtooth cycle. In deeply reversed plasmas, the bursts are weaker and display chirping behavior as the plasma reversal increases. During the transition to a helical state, the bursts increase in frequency as q on-axis changes, altering the parallel wavenumber k_||. When the helical state is established, the bursts terminate.

  4. Compact solar UV burst triggered in a magnetic field with a fan-spine topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitta, L. P.; Peter, H.; Young, P. R.; Huang, Y.-M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Solar ultraviolet (UV) bursts are small-scale features that exhibit intermittent brightenings that are thought to be due to magnetic reconnection. They are observed abundantly in the chromosphere and transition region, in particular in active regions. Aims: We investigate in detail a UV burst related to a magnetic feature that is advected by the moat flow from a sunspot towards a pore. The moving feature is parasitic in that its magnetic polarity is opposite to that of the spot and the pore. This comparably simple photospheric magnetic field distribution allows for an unambiguous interpretation of the magnetic geometry leading to the onset of the observed UV burst. Methods: We used UV spectroscopic and slit-jaw observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to identify and study chromospheric and transition region spectral signatures of said UV burst. To investigate the magnetic topology surrounding the UV burst, we used a two-hour-long time sequence of simultaneous line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and performed data-driven 3D magnetic field extrapolations by means of a magnetofrictional relaxation technique. We can connect UV burst signatures to the overlying extreme UV (EUV) coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Results: The UV burst shows a variety of extremely broad line profiles indicating plasma flows in excess of ±200 km s-1 at times. The whole structure is divided into two spatially distinct zones of predominantly up- and downflows. The magnetic field extrapolations show a persistent fan-spine magnetic topology at the UV burst. The associated 3D magnetic null point exists at a height of about 500 km above the photosphere and evolves co-spatially with the observed UV burst. The EUV emission at the footpoints of coronal loops is correlated with the evolution of the underlying UV burst. Conclusions: The magnetic field around the null point is sheared by

  5. Dynamics of a reconnection-driven runaway ion tail in a reversed field pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. K.; Kim, J.; Bonofiglo, P. J.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Sears, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    While reconnection-driven ion heating is common in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, the underlying mechanisms for converting magnetic to kinetic energy remain not fully understood. Reversed field pinch discharges are often characterized by rapid ion heating during impulsive reconnection, generating an ion distribution with an enhanced bulk temperature, mainly perpendicular to magnetic field. In the Madison Symmetric Torus, a subset of discharges with the strongest reconnection events develop a very anisotropic, high energy tail parallel to magnetic field in addition to bulk perpendicular heating, which produces a fusion neutron flux orders of magnitude higher than that expected from a Maxwellian distribution. Here, we demonstrate that two factors in addition to a perpendicular bulk heating mechanism must be considered to explain this distribution. First, ion runaway can occur in the strong parallel-to-B electric field induced by a rapid equilibrium change triggered by reconnection-based relaxation; this effect is particularly strong on perpendicularly heated ions which experience a reduced frictional drag relative to bulk ions. Second, the confinement of ions varies dramatically as a function of velocity. Whereas thermal ions are governed by stochastic diffusion along tearing-altered field lines (and radial diffusion increases with parallel speed), sufficiently energetic ions are well confined, only weakly affected by a stochastic magnetic field. High energy ions traveling mainly in the direction of toroidal plasma current are nearly classically confined, while counter-propagating ions experience an intermediate confinement, greater than that of thermal ions but significantly less than classical expectations. The details of ion confinement tend to reinforce the asymmetric drive of the parallel electric field, resulting in a very asymmetric, anisotropic distribution.

  6. Nanoscale magnetization reversal caused by electric field-induced ion migration and redistribution in cobalt ferrite thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinxin; Zhu, Xiaojian; Xiao, Wen; Liu, Gang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Ding, Jun; Li, Run-Wei

    2015-04-28

    Reversible nanoscale magnetization reversal controlled merely by electric fields is still challenging at the moment. In this report, first-principles calculation indicates that electric field-induced magnetization reversal can be achieved by the appearance of unidirectional magnetic anisotropy along the (110) direction in Fe-deficient cobalt ferrite (CoFe(2-x)O4, CFO), as a result of the migration and local redistribution of the Co(2+) ions adjacent to the B-site Fe vacancies. In good agreement with the theoretical model, we experimentally observed that in the CFO thin films the nanoscale magnetization can be reversibly and nonvolatilely reversed at room temperature via an electrical ion-manipulation approach, wherein the application of electric fields with appropriate polarity and amplitude can modulate the size of magnetic domains with different magnetizations up to 70%. With the low power consumption (subpicojoule) characteristics and the elimination of external magnetic field, the observed electric field-induced magnetization reversal can be used for the construction of energy-efficient spintronic devices, e.g., low-power electric-write and magnetic-read memories.

  7. The LOFT mission: new perspectives in the research field of (accreting) compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzo, E; van der Klis, M; Watts, A; Barret, D; Wilms, J; Uttley, P; Herder, J W den; Feroci, M

    2013-01-01

    LOFT, the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing, is one of five ESA M3 candidate missions. It will address the Cosmic Vision theme: "Matter under Extreme Conditions". By coupling for the first time a huge collecting area for the detection of X-ray photons with CCD-quality spectral resolution (15 times bigger in area than any previously flown X-ray instrument and >100 times bigger for spectroscopy than any similar-resolution instrument), the instruments on-board LOFT have been designed to (i) determine the properties of ultradense matter by reconstructing its Equation of State through neutron star mass and radius measurements of unprecedented accuracy; (ii) measure General Relativity effects in the strong field regime in the stationary spacetimes of neutron stars and black holes of all masses down to a few gravitational radii. Besides the above two themes, LOFT's observations will be devoted to "observatory science", providing new insights in a number of research fields in high energy astrophysics (e.g. Gamma-ray...

  8. The LOFT mission: new perspectives in the research field of (accreting compact objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozzo E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available LOFT, the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing, is one of five ESA M3 candidate missions. It will address the Cosmic Vision theme: “Matter under Extreme Conditions”. By coupling for the first time a huge collecting area for the detection of X-ray photons with CCD-quality spectral resolution (15 times bigger in area than any previously flown X-ray instrument and >100 times bigger for spectroscopy than any similar-resolution instrument, the instruments onboard LOFT have been designed to (i determine the properties of ultradense matter by reconstructing its Equation of State through neutron star mass and radius measurements of unprecedented accuracy; (ii measure General Relativity effects in the strong field regime in the stationary spacetimes of neutron stars and black holes of all masses down to a few gravitational radii. Besides the above two themes, LOFT’s observations will be devoted to “observatory science”, providing new insights in a number of research fields in high energy astrophysics (e.g. Gamma-ray Bursts. The assessment study phase of LOFT, which ended in September 2013, demonstrated that the mission is low risk and the required Technology Readiness Level can be easily reached in time for a launch by the end of 2022.

  9. A compact field guide to the study of microsaccades: Challenges and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Martina; Rucci, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Following a period of quiescence at the end of last century, the study of microsaccades has now regained strong impetus and broad attention within the vision research community. This wave of interest, partly fueled by the advent of user-friendly high-resolution eyetrackers, has attracted researchers and led to novel ideas. Old hypothesis have been revisited and new ones formulated. This article is designed to serve as a practical guide for researchers in the field. Because of the history of the field and the difficulty of measuring very small eye movements, the study of microsaccades presents peculiar challenges. Here, we summarize some of the main challenges and describe methods for assessing and improving the quality of the recordings. Furthermore, we examine how these experimental challenges have influenced analysis of the visual functions of microsaccades and critically review current evidence on three long-debated proposals: the maintenance of fixation, the prevention of visual fading, and the exploration of fine spatial detail. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A VLT VIMOS integral field spectroscopic study of perturbed blue compact galaxies: UM 420 and UM 462

    CERN Document Server

    James, B L; Barlow, M J

    2009-01-01

    We report on optical integral field spectroscopy of two unrelated blue compact galaxies mapped with the 13 x 13 arcsec^2 VIMOS integral field unit at a resolution of 0.33 x 0.33 arcsec^2. Continuum and background subtracted emission line maps in the light of [O III] 5007, H-alpha, and [N II] 6584 are presented. Both galaxies display signs of ongoing perturbation and/or interaction. UM 420 is resolved for the first time to be a merging system composed of two starbursting components with an 'arm-like' structure associated with the largest component. UM 462 which is a disrupted system of irregular morphology is resolved into at least four starbursting regions. Maps of the H-alpha radial velocity and FWHM are discussed. No underlying broad line region was detected from either galaxy as the emission lines are well-fitted with single Gaussian profiles only. Electron temperatures and densities as well as the abundances of helium, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulphur were computed from spectra integrated over the whole gala...

  11. Rethermalization of a field-reversed configuration plasma in translation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himura, Haruhiko; Okada, Shigefumi; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Goto, Seiichi

    1995-01-01

    A translation experiment of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma is performed on the FIX machine [Shiokawa and Goto, Phys. Fluids B 5, 534 (1993)]. The translated FRC bounces between magnetic mirror fields at both ends of a confinement region. The plasma loses some of its axial kinetic energy when it is reflected by the magnetic mirror field, and eventually settles down in the confinement region. In this reflection process, the plasma temperature rises significantly. Such plasma rethermalization has been observed in OCT-L1 experiments [Ito et al., Phys. Fluids 30, 168 (1987)], but rarely in FRX-C/T experiments [Rej et al., Phys. Fluids 29, 852 (1986)]. It is found that the rethermalization depends on the relation between the plasma temperature and the translation velocity. The rethermalization occurs only in the case where the translation velocity exceeds the sound velocity. This result implies the rethermalization is caused by a shock wave induced within the FRC when the plasma is reflected by the magnetic mirror field.

  12. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-01

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of td≈10τw is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  13. Hall effect on a Merging Formation Process of a Field-Reversed Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminou, Yasuhiro; Guo, Xuehan; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    2015-11-01

    Counter-helicity spheromak merging is one of the formation methods of a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). In counter-helicity spheromak merging, two spheromaks with opposing toroidal fields merge together, through magnetic reconnection events and relax into a FRC, which has no or little toroidal field. This process contains magnetic reconnection and a relaxation phenomena, and the Hall effect has some essential effects on these process because the X-point in the magnetic reconnection or the O-point of the FRC has no or little magnetic field. However, the Hall effect as both global and local effect on counter-helicity spheromak merging has not been elucidated. In this poster, we conducted 2D/3D Hall-MHD simulations and experiments of counter-helicity spheromak merging. We find that the Hall effect enhances the reconnection rate, and reduces the generation of toroidal sheared-flow. The suppression of the ``slingshot effect'' affects the relaxation process. We will discuss details in the poster.

  14. Magnetized Reverse Shock: Density-fluctuation-induced Field Distortion, Polarization Degree Reduction, and Application to GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing; Li, Hui; Stone, James M.

    2017-08-01

    The early optical afterglow emission of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) shows a high linear polarization degree (PD) of tens of percent, suggesting an ordered magnetic field in the emission region. The light curves are consistent with being of a reverse shock (RS) origin. However, the magnetization parameter, σ, of the outflow is unknown. If σ is too small, an ordered field in the RS may be quickly randomized due to turbulence driven by various perturbations so that the PD may not be as high as observed. Here we use the “Athena++” relativistic MHD code to simulate a relativistic jet with an ordered magnetic field propagating into a clumpy ambient medium, with a focus on how density fluctuations may distort the ordered magnetic field and reduce PD in the RS emission for different σ values. For a given density fluctuation, we discover a clear power-law relationship between the relative PD reduction and the σ value of the outflow. Such a relation may be applied to estimate σ of the GRB outflows using the polarization data of early afterglows.

  15. Recent Results on Field Reversed Configurations from the Translation, Confinement and Sustainment Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭后扬

    2005-01-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) offers an attractive alternative approach to magnetically confined fusion because of its extremely highβ, simple linear geometry, and natural divertor for helium ash removal. Multi-hundred eV and high density FRCs have been produced using the standard Field Reversed Theta Pinch (RFTP) method, with a confinement scaling that leads to fusion conditions. These FRCs are, however, limited to only tens of mWb fluxes and sub-msec lifetime. Recent progress has been made in building up the flux and sustaining the FRC current using Rotating Magnetic Fields (RMF) in the Translation, Sustainment, and Confinement (TCS) facility at the University of Washington. TCS has demonstrated formation and steadystate sustainment of standard, flux-confined, prolate FRCs. The RMF also provides stability for the n = 2 rotational mode, which is the dominant global instability observed experimentally.Simple calculations show that a strong radially inward force imposed by the RMF increases proportionally to any local outward deformation of the plasma crosssection. Evidence of this hasbeen experimentally demonstrated, and the effects of various RMF antenna geometries studied.High temperature FRCs could also be produced in TCS by translating high energy plasmoids formed in the normal theta pinch manner into the confinement chamber containing the RMF antennas. Extremely interesting results were obtained for this translation and capture process. The plasmoids can survive the violent dynamics of supersonic reflections off magnetic mirror structures, producing a stable high-β, near-FRC state with substantial flux conversion from toroidal to poloidal. This is a tribute not only to the robustness of FRCs, but also to the tendency of an FRC to assume a preferred state for a magnetized plasma. The magnetic helicity, as inferred by a simple interpretive model, is approximately preserved, possibly conforming to a high-β relaxation principle.

  16. Error field assessment from driven rotation of stable external kinks at EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, F. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.

    2013-04-01

    A new non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch. Stable and marginally stable external kink modes of toroidal mode number n = 10 and n = 8, respectively, were generated, and their rotation sustained, by means of rotating magnetic perturbations of the same n. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the kink modes were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude. This behaviour was used to precisely infer the amplitude and approximately estimate the toroidal phase of the EF. A subsequent scan permitted to optimize the toroidal phase. The technique was tested against deliberately applied as well as intrinsic EFs of n = 8 and 10. Corrections equal and opposite to the estimated error fields were applied. The efficacy of the error compensation was indicated by the increased discharge duration and more uniform mode rotation in response to a uniformly rotating perturbation. The results are in good agreement with theory, and the extension to lower n, to tearing modes and to tokamaks, including ITER, is discussed.

  17. Novel compact photoacoustic imaging system to explore the applications in the medical imaging field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisawa, Kaku; Wada, Takatsugu; Hayakawa, Toshiro; Ishihara, Miya

    2017-04-01

    PhotoAcoustic (PA) imaging is a promising imaging method using the pulsed-laser light source and ultrasound detector. PA image shows the features of optical contrast in biological tissue with ultrasound-like depth and resolution. In the human body, Hemoglobin of the blood is strong optical absorber, so the high-contrast blood distribution (vascular) image is obtained by PA imaging. Recently, FUJIFILM has developed the PA imaging system to explore its application in medical imaging field. In this system, the fusion of PA and conventional ultrasound image is realized, for example, ultrasound Doppler image is superposed to the PA and B-mode image. The system features and some results of clinical studies will be introduced.

  18. The Split-field Etalon Doppler Imager (SEDI) - A Compact Thermosphere Wind Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, A.; Whalen, S.; Stromberg, E. M.; Swenson, C.; Fish, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamics of the Earth's thermosphere remains an important target for scientific exploration. The primary energy input is solar EUV but during solar events additional energy is deposited into the high-latitude thermosphere in the form of Joule heating and particle precipitation, driving global changes in thermosphere temperature profiles and circulation. Thermosphere wind and temperature profiles are important factors for understanding the dynamic response of the earth system to solar storms, for building and maintaining global weather and climate models, and for making operational space weather predictions. We report progress in miniaturized sensor technology for orbital monitoring of wind and neutral temperature profiles in the upper thermosphere, 200 - 350 km. These profiles are sensed using the atomic oxygen airglow at 630.0 nm. The split-field etalon Doppler imager (SEDI) focuses forward and aft scenes of the earth limb onto a single EMCCD focal plane through a single Fabry-Perot etalon (Figure 1). The size of the SEDI optical system is 14 x 18 x 7 cm. The instrument has no moving parts and is easily packaged in a 6U CubeSat. Strips of the dual interferogram are analyzed with respect to fringe width and radial phase to yield profiles of the neutral temperature and Doppler shift. Instrument calibration is maintained on-orbit using the 630.4 nm reference line from a neon glow lamp. The prediction of Doppler sensitivity vs. tangent height against the limb is plotted in Figure 2 for a profiling resolution of 5 km. Forward-view Doppler profiles are combined with aft-view profiles collected approximately 5 minutes later to create localized 2D wind profiles. A constellation of SEDI CubeSats could provide global monitoring of the thermosphere wind field and its dynamics.; Figure 1. Layout of the SEDI instrument. ; Figure 2. Doppler sensitivity of the SEDI instrument.

  19. Nature of size effects in compact models of field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torkhov, N. A., E-mail: trkf@mail.ru [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Scientific-Research Institute of Semiconductor Devices, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Babak, L. I.; Kokolov, A. A.; Salnikov, A. S.; Dobush, I. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Novikov, V. A., E-mail: novikovvadim@mail.ru; Ivonin, I. V. [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-07

    Investigations have shown that in the local approximation (for sizes L < 100 μm), AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures satisfy to all properties of chaotic systems and can be described in the language of fractal geometry of fractional dimensions. For such objects, values of their electrophysical characteristics depend on the linear sizes of the examined regions, which explain the presence of the so-called size effects—dependences of the electrophysical and instrumental characteristics on the linear sizes of the active elements of semiconductor devices. In the present work, a relationship has been established for the linear model parameters of the equivalent circuit elements of internal transistors with fractal geometry of the heteroepitaxial structure manifested through a dependence of its relative electrophysical characteristics on the linear sizes of the examined surface areas. For the HEMTs, this implies dependences of their relative static (A/mm, mA/V/mm, Ω/mm, etc.) and microwave characteristics (W/mm) on the width d of the sink-source channel and on the number of sections n that leads to a nonlinear dependence of the retrieved parameter values of equivalent circuit elements of linear internal transistor models on n and d. Thus, it has been demonstrated that the size effects in semiconductors determined by the fractal geometry must be taken into account when investigating the properties of semiconductor objects on the levels less than the local approximation limit and designing and manufacturing field effect transistors. In general, the suggested approach allows a complex of problems to be solved on designing, optimizing, and retrieving the parameters of equivalent circuits of linear and nonlinear models of not only field effect transistors but also any arbitrary semiconductor devices with nonlinear instrumental characteristics.

  20. Nature of size effects in compact models of field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkhov, N. A.; Babak, L. I.; Kokolov, A. A.; Salnikov, A. S.; Dobush, I. M.; Novikov, V. A.; Ivonin, I. V.

    2016-03-01

    Investigations have shown that in the local approximation (for sizes L GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures satisfy to all properties of chaotic systems and can be described in the language of fractal geometry of fractional dimensions. For such objects, values of their electrophysical characteristics depend on the linear sizes of the examined regions, which explain the presence of the so-called size effects—dependences of the electrophysical and instrumental characteristics on the linear sizes of the active elements of semiconductor devices. In the present work, a relationship has been established for the linear model parameters of the equivalent circuit elements of internal transistors with fractal geometry of the heteroepitaxial structure manifested through a dependence of its relative electrophysical characteristics on the linear sizes of the examined surface areas. For the HEMTs, this implies dependences of their relative static (A/mm, mA/V/mm, Ω/mm, etc.) and microwave characteristics (W/mm) on the width d of the sink-source channel and on the number of sections n that leads to a nonlinear dependence of the retrieved parameter values of equivalent circuit elements of linear internal transistor models on n and d. Thus, it has been demonstrated that the size effects in semiconductors determined by the fractal geometry must be taken into account when investigating the properties of semiconductor objects on the levels less than the local approximation limit and designing and manufacturing field effect transistors. In general, the suggested approach allows a complex of problems to be solved on designing, optimizing, and retrieving the parameters of equivalent circuits of linear and nonlinear models of not only field effect transistors but also any arbitrary semiconductor devices with nonlinear instrumental characteristics.

  1. Quadrupole stabilization of the n = 2 rotational instability of a field-reversed theta-pinch plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohi, S.; Minato, T.; Kawakami, Y.; Tanjyo, M.; Okada, S.; Ito, Y.; Kako, M.; Got, S.; Ishimura, T.; It, H.

    1983-09-19

    The n = 2 rotational instability is the most dangerous gross instability in a field-reversed theta pinch. It is demonstrated for the first time that the instability is completely suppressed by superposing a quadrupole field which is much smaller than the axial confinement field at the separatrix. The experimental threshold intensity of the field for stabilization is about 2.5 times less than that predicted by theoretical stability analysis.

  2. Quality assessment of reverse engineering process based on full-field true-3D optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Sitnik, Robert

    2000-08-01

    In the paper the sequential steps of reverse engineering based on the data gathered by full-field optical system are discussed. Each step is concerned from the point of view of its influence on the final quality of the shape of manufactured object. At first the modern shape measurement system based on the combination of fringe projection, Grey code and experimental calibration is presented. The system enables the determination of absolute coordinates of the object measured from many directions. The dependence of the quality of the cloud of points on the type of object and the measurement procedure is discussed. Then the methods of transferring the experimental data into CAD/CAM/CAE system are presented. The quality of the virtual object in the form of closed triangular mesh is analyzed. Basing on this virtual object the copy of initial body is produced and measured. The accuracy of the object manufactured is determined and the main sources of errors are discussed. The modifications of the system and algorithms that minimize the errors are proposed. The reverse engineering sequence is presented is illustrated by several examples.

  3. The correlation between geomagnetic field reversals, Hawaiian volcanism, and the motion of the Pacific plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dong

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between geomagnetic field reversals and volcanism is investigated, according to the speculated consequence on volcanoes of the transient electric currents in the geodynamo, through Joule's heating, before and after every reversal event. We evaluate the temporal variation during the last ~ 70 Ma both of the magma emplacement rate Q(t from the Hawaii hot spot, and of the speed v(t of the Pacific plate, by means of the observed volumes of islands and seamounts along the Hawaii/Emperor Seamounts chain, and their respective radiometric datings. Results confirm expectations. A justification of the volcanic crises that lead to the generation of the large igneous provinces during the last ~ 250 Ma also emerged. We describe in detail the complex pattern of the timings of the different effects. Joule's power is generally responsible for ~ 75-80% of magmatism, and friction power only for ~ 20-25%; but, on some occasions almost ~ 100% is fuelled by friction alone. The visco-elastic coupling between lithosphere and asthenosphere results ~ 96% viscous, and ~ 4% elastic.

  4. HerMES : SPIRE detection of high redshift massive compact galaxies in GOODS-N field

    CERN Document Server

    Cava, A; Perez-Fournon, I; Buitrago, F; Trujillo, I; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Auld, R; Bock, J; Brisbin, D; Burgarella, D; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Chanial, P; Cirasuolo, M; Clements, D L; Conselice, C J; Cooray, A; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Ferrero, P; Franceschini, A; Glenn, J; Solares, E A Gonzalez; Griffin, M; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Marchetti, L; Morrison, G E; Mortier, A M J; Oliver, S J; Page, M J; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Raymond, G; Rigopoulou, D; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Smith, A J; Symeonidis, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Vieira, J D; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Wright, G

    2010-01-01

    We have analysed the rest-frame far infrared (FIR) properties of a sample of massive (Mstar > 10^11Msun) galaxies at 2field using the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE, Griffin et al. 2010) instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. To conduct this analysis we take advantage of the data from the HerMES key program. The sample comprises 45 massive galaxies with structural parameters characterised with HST NICMOS-3. We study detections at submm Herschel bands, together with Spitzer 24{\\mu}m data, as a function of the morphological type, mass and size. We find that 26/45 sources are detected at MIPS-24{\\mu}m and 15/45 (all MIPS-24{\\mu}m detections) are detected at SPIRE-250{\\mu}m, with disk-like galaxies more easily detected. We derive star formation rates (SFR) and specific star formation rates (sSFR) by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) of our sources, taking into account non-detections for SPIRE and syst...

  5. The characteristics of spatial homogeneity and strength of magnetic field for compact NMR magnets using stacked HTS bulks with various gap lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@elec.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kimoto, T.; Imai, M.; Yano, Y.; Joo, J.H. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Okayama University, 3-1-1, Tsushima Naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Hahn, S.; Iwasa, Y. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 170 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Tomita, M. [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38, Hikari-cho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    A compact nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnet is one of the new applications after a technique to enhance maximum trapped field of an high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk. In design of a compact NMR magnet which consists of the stacked HTS bulk annuli, the issues of strength, spatial homogeneity and temporal stability by trapped magnetic fields are very important. This paper presents a study on the effects of magnetization field strength and gap length between stacked bulks for the compact HTS bulk NMR applications. Four-stacked HTS bulk magnet with ID 20 mm and OD 60 mm was prepared to investigate the optimized configuration. The thickness of each HTS bulk is 5 mm, and the gap lengths from 0 mm to 10 mm were used as parameters in analysis and experiment, respectively. Four-stacked HTS bulk magnets with various gap lengths were tested at two different background magnetic fields of 0.5 T and 2 T at 77 K. The optimized axial gap length was found out by analytical results, and the better magnetic field homogeneity and temporal decay property of trapped magnetic field were obtained by lower magnetization field in this experiments.

  6. Improvement of the magnetic configuration in the reversed field pinch through successive bifurcationsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, R.; Agostini, M.; Alfier, A.; Antoni, V.; Apolloni, L.; Auriemma, F.; Barana, O.; Baruzzo, M.; Bettini, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonomo, F.; Brombin, M.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Masi, G.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Franz, P.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Grando, L.; Guo, S. C.; Innocente, P.; Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Martini, S.; Martines, E.; Milani, F.; Moresco, M.; Novello, L.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, L.; Pizzimenti, A.; Pomaro, N.; Predebon, I.; Puiatti, M. E.; Rostagni, G.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spizzo, G.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Toigo, V.; Valisa, M.; Veltri, P.; Vianello, N.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zuin, M.

    2009-05-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) is a magnetic configuration alternative to the tokamak that can be considered for a second generation of reactors. In this paper new remarkable results obtained in the RFP experiment RFX-mod are presented, showing that an internal transport barrier delimitates a large fraction of the plasma volume in a RFP when the current is raised to ˜1.5 MA. The formation of this transport barrier is related to a profound, spontaneous modification of the magnetic topology. Due to the occurrence of a saddle node bifurcation the plasma enters in the single helical axis state, which is theoretically known to be more resilient to chaos. This bifurcation is driven by the amplitude of the helical perturbation which dominates the mode spectrum.

  7. High-flux first-wall design for a small reversed-field pinch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cort, G. E.; Graham, A. L.; Christensen, K. E.

    To achieve the goal of a commercially economical fusion power reactor, small physical size and high power density should be combined with simplicity (minimized use of high technology systems). The Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is a magnetic confinement device that promises to meet these requirements with power densities comparable to those in existing fission power plants. To establish feasibility of such an RFP reactor, a practical design for a first wall capable of withstanding high levels of cyclic neutron wall loadings is needed. Associated with the neutron flux in the proposed RFP reactor is a time averaged heat flux of 4.5 MW/sq m with a conservatively estimated transient peak approximately twice the average value. The design for a modular first wall made from a high-strength copper alloy that will meet these requirements of cyclic thermal loading is presented. The heat removal from the wall is by subcooled water flowing in straight tubes at high linear velocities.

  8. Impurity profiles and radial transport in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.

    1999-05-01

    Radially resolved spectroscopy has been used to measure the radial distribution of impurity ions (O III-O V and C III-CVI) in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch (RFP). The radial profile of the emission is reconstructed from line emission measured along five lines of sight. The ion density profile is the fitted quantity in the reconstruction of the brightness profile and is thus obtained directly in this process. These measurements are then used to adjust the parameters in transport calculations in order to obtain consistency with the observed ion density profiles. Comparison between model and measurements show that a radial dependence in the diffusion is needed to explain the measured ion densities.

  9. Experiments and modelling of active quasi-single helicity regime generation in a reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2009-07-01

    The interaction of a static resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) with a tearing mode (TM) is becoming a relevant topic in fusion plasma physics. RMPs can be generated by active coils and then used to affect the properties of TMs and of the corresponding magnetic islands. This paper shows how the feedback system of the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch (RFP) can produce a RMP that affects a rotating TM and stimulate the transition to the so-called quasi-single helicity (QSH) regime, a RFP plasma state characterized by a magnetic island surrounded by low magnetic chaos. The application of the RMP can increase the QSH probability up to 10% and enlarge the size of the corresponding island. Part of the experimental results are supported by a theoretical study that models the effect of the active coils on the magnetic island.

  10. A titanium hydride gun for plasma injection into the T2-reversed field pinch device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. V.; Hellblom, K. G.

    1999-02-01

    A study of a plasma gun (modified Bostic type) with titanium hydride electrodes has been carried out. The total number of released hydrogen atoms was in the range 1016-1018 and the maximum plasma flow velocity was 2.5×105 m s-1. The ion density near the gun edge reached 1.8×1020 m-3 and the electron temperature was around 40 eV as estimated from probe measurements. No species other than hydrogen or titanium were seen in the plasma line radiation. The plasma injector was successfully used for gas pre-ionization in the Extrap T2 reversed-field pinch device (ohmic heating toroidal experiment (OHTE)).

  11. Field-Reversed Configuration Power Plant Critical-Issue Scoping Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarius, J. F.; Mogahed, E. A.; Emmert, G. A.; Khater, H. Y.; Nguyen, C. N.; Ryzhkov, S. V.; Stubna, M. D.

    2000-03-31

    A team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed an engineering scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis for deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core. For the engineering conceptual design of the fusion core, the project team focused on intermediate-term technology. For example, one decision was to use steele structure. The FRC systems analysis led to a fusion power plant with attractive features including modest size, cylindrical symmetry, good thermal efficiency (52%), relatively easy maintenance, and a high ratio of electric power to fusion core mass, indicating that it would have favorable economics.

  12. ZTI: Preliminary characterization of an ignition class reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathke, C. G.; Krakowski, R. A.; Miller, R. L.; Werley, K. A.

    A preliminary cost-optimized conceptual design of an intermediate-step, ignition-class reverse-field pinch (RFP) device (ZTI) for the study of alpha-particle physics in a deuterium (DT) plasma is reported. The ZTI design reflects potentially significant cost savings relative to similar ignition-class tokamaks for device parameters that reside on the path to a viable commercial RFP reactor. Reductions in both device costs and number of steps to commercialization portend a significantly reduced development cost for fusion. The methodology and result and coupling realistic physics, engineering, and cost models through a multi-dimensional optimizer are reported for ZTI, which is a device that would follow the 2 to 4 MAzth on an approximately greater than 1996 to 98 timescale.

  13. Self-ignition of an advanced fuel field-reversed configuration reactor by fusion product heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, M.; Ohi, S.; Okamoto, M.; Momota, H.; Wakabayashi, J.

    1987-09-01

    A self-ignition of a deuterium-deuterium (D-D)-/sup 3/He fuel field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma by fusion product heating is studied by using the point plasma model, where an FRC plasma equilibrium is taken into account. It is numerically demonstrated that the D-D-/sup 3/He plasma can be evolved from a deuterium-tritium burning plasma in a controlled manner by means of a compression-decompression control as well as a fueling control. It is also indicated that the increase of a trapped flux is effective for suppressing the excessive elongation of a plasma during the transition. The proposed method may provide a solution to the problem on plasma heating to attain a D-D-/sup 3/He self-ignition.

  14. Field-Reversed Configuration Formation Scheme Utilizing a Spheromak and Solenoid Induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Belova, E. V.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Ren, B.; McGeehan, B.; Inomoto, M.

    2008-06-12

    A new field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation technique is described, where a spheromak transitions to a FRC with inductive current drive. The transition is accomplished only in argon and krypton plasmas, where low-n kink modes are suppressed; spheromaks with a lighter majority species, such as neon and helium, either display a terminal tilt-mode, or an n=2 kink instability, both resulting in discharge termination. The stability of argon and krypton plasmas through the transition is attributed to the rapid magnetic diffusion of the currents that drive the kink-instability. The decay of helicity during the transition is consistent with that expected from resistivity. This observation indicates a new scheme to form a FRC plasma, provided stability to low-n modes is maintained, as well as a unique situation where the FRC is a preferred state.

  15. Sheared E×B flow and plasma turbulence viscosity in a Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in Reversed Field Pinch configuration is addressed. The momentum balance equation for a compressible plasma is considered and the terms involved are measured in the outer region of Extrap-T2R RFP device. It results that electrostatic fluctuations determine the plasma flow through the electrostatic component of Reynolds Stress tensor. This term involves spatial and temporal scales comparable to those of MHD activity. The derived experimental perpendicular viscosity is consistent with anomalous diffusion, the latter being discussed in terms of electrostatic turbulence background and coherent structures emerging from fluctuations. The results indicate a dynamical interplay between turbulence, anomalous transport and mean E×B profiles. The momentum balance has been studied also in non-stationary condition during the application of Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive, which is known to reduce the amplitude of MHD modes.

  16. Coherent structure diffusivity in the edge region of Reversed Field Pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolaore, M.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Bergsåker, H.; Cavazzana, R.; Drake, J. R.; Martines, E.; Regnoli, G.; Serianni, G.; Vianello, N.

    2005-01-01

    Coherent structures emerging from the background turbulence have been detected by electrostatic measurements in the edge region of two Reversed Field Pinch experiments, RFX (Padua) and Extrap-T2R (Stockholm). Measurements have been performed by arrays of Langmuir probes which allowed simultaneous measurements of temperature, potential and density to be carried out. These structures have been interpreted as a dynamic balance of dipolar and monopolar vortices, whose relative population are found to depend on the local mean E × B flow shear. The contribution to the anomalous transport of these structures has been investigated and it has been found that the corresponding diffusion coeffcient accounts up to 50% of the total diffusivity. The experimental findings indicate that the diffusion coeffcient associated to the coherent structures depends on the relative population of the two types of vortices and is minimum when the two populations are equal. An interpretative model is proposed to explain this feature.

  17. Advanced Biasing Experiments on the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew; Korepanov, Sergey; Garate, Eusebio; Yang, Xiaokang; Gota, Hiroshi; Douglass, Jon; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Uchizono, Nolan; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    The C-2 experiment seeks to study the evolution, heating and sustainment effects of neutral beam injection on field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. Recently, substantial improvements in plasma performance were achieved through the application of edge biasing with coaxial plasma guns located in the divertors. Edge biasing provides rotation control that reduces instabilities and E × B shear that improves confinement. Typically, the plasma gun arcs are run at ~ 10 MW for the entire shot duration (~ 5 ms), which will become unsustainable as the plasma duration increases. We have conducted several advanced biasing experiments with reduced-average-power plasma gun operating modes and alternative biasing cathodes in an effort to develop an effective biasing scenario applicable to steady state FRC plasmas. Early results show that several techniques can potentially provide effective, long-duration edge biasing.

  18. Acoustic Longitudinal Field NIF Optic Feature Detection Map Using Time-Reversal & MUSIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K

    2006-02-09

    We developed an ultrasonic longitudinal field time-reversal and MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) based detection algorithm for identifying and mapping flaws in fused silica NIF optics. The algorithm requires a fully multistatic data set, that is one with multiple, independently operated, spatially diverse transducers, each transmitter of which, in succession, launches a pulse into the optic and the scattered signal measured and recorded at every receiver. We have successfully localized engineered ''defects'' larger than 1 mm in an optic. We confirmed detection and localization of 3 mm and 5 mm features in experimental data, and a 0.5 mm in simulated data with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. We present the theory, experimental results, and simulated results.

  19. Morphologically Aligned Cation-Exchange Membranes by a Pulsed Electric Field for Reverse Electrodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Young; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Ju-Hyuk; Kim, Seok; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2015-07-21

    A low-resistance ion-exchange membrane is essential to achieve the high-performance energy conversion or storage systems. The formation methods for low-resistance membranes are various; one of the methods is the ion channel alignment of an ion-exchange membrane under a direct current (DC) electric field. In this study, we suggest a more effective alignment method than the process with the DC electric field. First, an ion-exchange membrane was prepared under a pulsed electric field [alternating current (AC) mode] to enhance the effectiveness of the alignment. The membrane properties and the performance in reverse electrodialysis (RED) were then examined to assess the membrane resistance and ion selectivity. The results show that the membrane electrical resistance (MER) had a lower value of 0.86 Ω cm(2) for the AC membrane than 2.13 Ω cm(2) observed for the DC membrane and 4.30 Ω cm(2) observed for the pristine membrane. Furthermore, RED achieved 1.34 W/m(2) of maximum power density for the AC membrane, whereas that for the DC membrane was found to be 1.14 W/m(2) [a RED stack assembled with CMX, used as a commercial cation-exchange membrane (CEM), showed 1.07 W/m(2)]. Thereby, the novel preparation process for a remarkable low-resistance membrane with high ion selectivity was demonstrated.

  20. Detection and Analysis of X Ray Emission from the Princeton-Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosh, Alexandra; Swanson, Charles; Jandovitz, Peter; Cohen, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The PFRC is an odd-parity rotating-magnetic-field-driven field-reversed-configuration magnetic confinement experiment. Studying X rays produced via electron Bremsstrahlung with neutral particles is crucial to the further understanding of the energy and particle confinement of the PFRC. The data on the x rays are collected using a detector system comprised of two, spatially scannable Amptek XR-100 CR detectors and a Amptek XR-100 SDD detector that view the plasma column at two axial locations, one in the divertor and one near the axial midplane. These provide X-ray energy and arrival-time information. (Data analysis requires measurement of each detector's efficiency, a parameter that is modified by window transmission. Detector calibrations were performed with a custom-made X-ray tube that impinged 1-microamp 1-5 kV electron beams onto a carbon target.) From the analyzed data, the average electron energy, effective temperature, and electron density can be extracted. Spatial scans then allow the FRC's internal energy to be measured. We present recent measurements of the Bremsstrahlung spectrum from 0.8 to 6 keV and the inferred electron temperature in the PFRC device as functions of heating power, magnetic field and fill gas pressure. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. NEAR-FIELD SOURCE LOCALIZATION METHOD AND APPLICATION USING THE TIME REVERSAL MIRROR TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yongqing; Jiang Yulei; Liu Zhanya

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop the acoustic keyboard for Personal Computer (PC),it is necessary to seek high-precision near-field source localization algorithm for identifying the keyboard characters.First of all,the focusing property of Time Reversal Mirror (TRM) is introduced,and then a mathematical model of microphone array receiving typing sound is established according to the realization of acoustic keyboard from which the TRM localization algorithm is carried out.The results through computer simulation show that the localization Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) performance of the algorithm can reach 10-3,which demonstrates that the algorithm possesses a high accuracy for the actual near-field acoustic source localization,with potential of developing the computer acoustic keyboard.Furthermore,for the purpose of testing its effect on actual near-field source localization,we organize three experiments for acoustic keyboard characters localization.The experiment results show that the positioning error of TRM algorithm is less than 1 cm within a provided acoustic keyboard region.This will provide theoretical guidance for the further research of computer acoustic keyboard.

  2. Spectroscopic measurement of the MHD dynamo in the MST reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, James Tharp [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The author has directly observed the coupling of ion velocity fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations to produce an MHD dynamo electric field in the interior of the MST reversed field pinch. Chord averaged ion velocity fluctuations were measured with a fast spectroscopic diagnostic which collects line radiation from intrinsic carbon impurities simultaneously along two lines of sight. The chords employed for the measurements resolved long wavelength velocity fluctuations of several km/s at 8-20 kHz as tiny, fast Doppler shifts in the emitted line profile. During discrete dynamo events the velocity fluctuations, like the magnetic fluctuations, increase dramatically. The toroidal and poloidal chords with impact parameters of 0.3 a and 0.6 a respectively, resolved fluctuation wavenumbers with resonance surfaces near or along the lines of sight indicating a radial velocity fluctuation width for each mode which spans only a fraction of the plasma radius. The phase between the measured toroidal velocity fluctuations and the magnetic fluctuations matches the predictions of resistive MHD while the poloidal velocity fluctuations exhibit a phase consistent with the superposition of MHD effects and the advection of a mean flow gradient past the poloidal line of sight. Radial velocity fluctuations resolved by a chord through the center of the plasma were small compared to the poloidal and toroidal fluctuations and exhibited low coherence with the magnetic fluctuations. The ensembled nonlinear product of the ion velocity fluctuations and fluctuations in the magnetic field indicates a substantial dynamo electric field which peaks during the periods of spontaneous flux generation.

  3. Surface brightness profiles of blue compact dwarf galaxies in the GOODS-N and GOODS-S field

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jianhui; Jiang, Ning; Yan, Wei; Gao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties of the underlying hosts of 34 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies with deep near-infrared (NIR) photometry. The BCD sample is selected from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey in the Great observatories origins Deep Survey North and South fields. We extract the surface brightness profile (SBP) in the optical F 435W and NIR F 160W bands. The SBPs of BCDs in the H band reach 26 mag arcsec^-2 at the 3\\sigma level, which is so far the deepest NIR imaging of BCDs. Then we fit the SBPs with one- and two- component Sersic models. About half of the BCDs favour the two-component model which significantly improves the fit quality. The effective radii of the underlying hosts of BCDs in the B band are smaller than those of early-type dwarfs (dEs) and dwarf irregulars at a fixed luminosity. This discrepancy is similar to findings in many previous works. However, the difference in structural parameters between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies seems to be less sig...

  4. HATS-9b AND HATS-10b: TWO COMPACT HOT JUPITERS IN FIELD 7 OF THE K2 MISSION

    CERN Document Server

    Brahm, R; Hartman, J D; Bakos, G Á; Bayliss, D; Penev, K; Zhou, G; Ciceri, S; Rabus, M; Espinoza, N; Mancini, L; de Val-Borro, M; Bhatti, W; Sato, B; Tan, T G; Csubry, Z; Buchhave, L; Henning, T; Schmidt, B; Suc, V; Noyes, R W; Papp, I; Lázár, J; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets by the HATSouth survey. HATS-9b orbits an old (10.8 $\\pm$ 1.5 Gyr) V=13.3 G dwarf star, with a period P = 1.9153 d. The host star has a mass of 1.03 M$_{\\odot}$, radius of 1.503 R$_\\odot$ and effective temperature 5366 $\\pm$ 70 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.837 M$_J$, and radius of 1.065 R$_J$ yielding a mean density of 0.85 g cm$^{-3}$ . HATS-10b orbits a V=13.1 G dwarf star, with a period P = 3.3128 d. The host star has a mass of 1.1 M$_\\odot$, radius of 1.11 R$_\\odot$ and effective temperature 5880 $\\pm$ 120 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.53 M$_J$, and radius of 0.97 R$_J$ yielding a mean density of 0.7 g cm$^{-3}$ . Both planets are compact in comparison with planets receiving similar irradiation from their host stars, and lie in the nominal coordinates of Field 7 of K2 but only HATS-9b falls on working silicon. Future characterisation of HATS-9b with the exquisite photometric precision of the Kepler telescope may provid...

  5. Internal Transport Barrier Broadening through Subdominant Mode Stabilization in Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, R.; Auriemma, F.; Fassina, A.; Martines, E.; Terranova, D.; Sattin, F.

    2016-05-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) device RFX-mod features strong internal transport barriers when the plasma accesses states with a single dominant helicity. Such transport barriers enclose a hot helical region with high confinement whose amplitude may vary from a tiny one to an amplitude encompassing an appreciable fraction of the available volume. The transition from narrow to wide thermal structures has been ascribed so far to the transport reduction that occurs when the dominant mode separatrix, which is a preferred location for the onset of stochastic field lines, disappears. In this Letter we show instead that the contribution from the separatrix disappearance, by itself, is marginal and the main role is instead played by the progressive stabilization of secondary modes. The position and the width of the stochastic boundary encompassing the thermal structures have been estimated by applying the concept of a 3D quasiseparatrix layer, developed in solar physics to treat reconnection phenomena without true separatrices and novel to toroidal laboratory plasmas. Considering the favorable scaling of secondary modes with the Lundquist number, these results open promising scenarios for RFP plasmas at temperatures higher than the presently achieved ones, where lower secondary modes and, consequently, larger thermal structures are expected. Furthermore, this first application of the quasiseparatrix layer to a toroidal plasma indicates that such a concept is ubiquitous in magnetic reconnection, independent of the system geometry under investigation.

  6. Distance dependence of magnetic field effect inside confined environment of reverse micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Manas Kumar; Basu, Samita

    2013-06-01

    In this article, we emphasize on the distance dependence of the magnetic field effect (MFE) on the donoracceptor (D-A) pair inside the confined environment of AOT/H2O/n-heptane reverse micellar (RMs) system. For this study N, N-dimethyl aniline (DMA) is used as an electron donor while the protonated form of Acr is treated as an electron acceptor. We report of the occurrence of an associated excited state proton transfer with the photoinduced electron transfer between Acr and DMA forming corresponding radical pair (RP) and radical ion pairs (RIP). The fate of these reaction products has been tested in the presence of an external magnetic field (˜0.08T) by varying the size of the RMs. The MFE between Acr and DMA has been compared to the results with the earlier reported interactions between Acr and TEA (Chemical Physics Letters, 2011, 506, 205-210). We accentuate the importance of the localization of the D and A inside the RMs, and the intervening distance between the pair to be the critical component for observing substantial MFE.

  7. Locked modes in two reversed-field pinch devices of different size and shell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yagi, Y.; Koguchi, H.

    2000-10-01

    The behavior of locked modes in two reversed-field pinch devices, the Toroidal Pinch Experiment (TPE-RX) [Y. Yagi et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, 2552 (1999)] and Extrap T2 [J. R. Drake et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1996, Montreal (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1996), Vol. 2, p. 193] is analyzed and compared. The main characteristics of the locked mode are qualitatively similar. The toroidal distribution of the mode locking shows that field errors play a role in both devices. The probability of phase locking is found to increase with increasing magnetic fluctuation levels in both machines. Furthermore, the probability of phase locking increases with plasma current in TPE-RX despite the fact that the magnetic fluctuation levels decrease. A comparison with computations using a theoretical model estimating the critical mode amplitude for locking [R. Fitzpatrick et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 3878 (1999)] shows a good correlation with experimental results in TPE-RX. In Extrap T2, the magnetic fluctuations scale weakly with both plasma current and electron densities. This is also reflected in the weak scaling of the magnetic fluctuation levels with the Lundquist number (˜S-0.06). In TPE-RX, the corresponding scaling is ˜S-0.18.

  8. Neutral Beam Injection System for the C-2W Field Reversed Configuration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaevsky, Alexander; Ivanov, Alexander; Kolmogorov, Vyacheslav; Smirnov, Artem; Korepanov, Sergey; Binderbauer, Michl; TAE Team; BINP Team

    2016-10-01

    C-2U Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) experiment proved substantial reduction in turbulence-driven losses via tangential neutral beam injection (NBI) coupled with electrically biased plasma guns at the plasma ends. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, advanced beam-driven FRCs were produced and sustained for times significantly longer (more than 5 ms) than all characteristic plasma decay times without beams. To further improve FRC sustainment and demonstrate the FRC ramp-up, the C-2U experimental device is undergoing a major upgrade. The upgrade, C-2W, will have a new NBI system producing a record total hydrogen beam power of 20 + MW in a 30ms pulse. The NBI system consists of eight positive-ion based injectors featuring flexible, modular design. Four out of eight NBI injectors have a capability to switch the beam energy during a shot from the initial 15 keV to 40 keV at a constant beam current. This feature allows to increase the beam energy and thereby optimize the beam-plasma coupling during the magnetic field ramp up. This presentation provides an overview of the C-2W NBI system, including the design of the switchable energy injectors, layout of the power supply system, and results of the prototype testing.

  9. Langmuir probe diagnostic suite in the C-2 field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, T.; Sun, X.; Armstrong, S.; Knapp, K.; Slepchenkov, M.

    2014-11-01

    Several in situ probes have been designed and implemented into the diagnostic array of the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy [M. Tuszewski et al. (the TAE Team), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)]. The probes are all variations on the traditional Langmuir probe. They include linear arrays of triple probes, linear arrays of single-tipped swept probes, a multi-faced Gundestrup probe, and an ion-sensitive probe. The probes vary from 5 to 7 mm diameter in size to minimize plasma perturbations. They also have boron nitride outer casings that prevent unwanted electrical breakdown and reduce the introduction of impurities. The probes are mounted on motorized linear-actuators allowing for programmatic scans of the various plasma parameters over the course of several shots. Each probe has a custom set of electronics that allows for measurement of the desired signals. High frequency ( > 5MHz) analog optical-isolators ensure that plasma parameters can be measured at sub-microsecond time scales while providing electrical isolation between machine and data acquisition systems. With these probes time-resolved plasma parameters (temperature, density, spatial potential, flow, and electric field) can be directly/locally measured in the FRC jet and edge/scrape-off layer.

  10. Fusion Ash Separation in the Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Joseph; Yeh, Meagan; McGreivy, Nick; Cohen, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) concept relies on low-neutron production by D-3He fusion to enable small, safe nuclear-fusion reactors to be built, an approach requiring rapid and efficient extraction of fusion ash and energy produced by D-3He fusion reactions. The ash exhaust stream would contain energetic (0.1-1 MeV) protons, T, 3He, and 4He ions and nearly 1e5 cooler (ca. 100 eV) D ions. The T extracted from the reactor would be a valuable fusion product in that it decays into 3He, which could be used as fuel. If the T were not extracted it would be troublesome because of neutron production by the D-T reaction. This paper discusses methods to separate the various species in a PFRC reactor's exhaust stream. First, we discuss the use of curved magnetic fields to separate the energetic from the cool components. Then we discuss exploiting material properties, specifically reflection, sputtering threshold, and permeability, to allow separation of the hydrogen from the helium isotopes. DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. Reverse blocking characteristics and mechanisms in Schottky-drain AlGaN/GaN HEMT with a drain field plate and floating field plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mao; Wei-Bo, She; Cui, Yang; Jin-Feng, Zhang; Xue-Feng, Zheng; Chong, Wang; Yue, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel AlGaN/GaN HEMT with a Schottky drain and a compound field plate (SD-CFP HEMT) is presented for the purpose of better reverse blocking capability. The compound field plate (CFP) consists of a drain field plate (DFP) and several floating field plates (FFPs). The physical mechanisms of the CFP to improve the reverse breakdown voltage and to modulate the distributions of channel electric field and potential are investigated by two-dimensional numerical simulations with Silvaco-ATLAS. Compared with the HEMT with a Schottky drain (SD HEMT) and the HEMT with a Schottky drain and a DFP (SD-FP HEMT), the superiorities of SD-CFP HEMT lie in the continuous improvement of the reverse breakdown voltage by increasing the number of FFPs and in the same fabrication procedure as the SD-FP HEMT. Two useful optimization laws for the SD-CFP HEMTs are found and extracted from simulation results. The relationship between the number of the FFPs and the reverse breakdown voltage as well as the FP efficiency in SD-CFP HEMTs are discussed. The results in this paper demonstrate a great potential of CFP for enhancing the reverse blocking ability in AlGaN/GaN HEMT and may be of great value and significance in the design and actual manufacture of SD-CFP HEMTs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61204085, 61334002, 61306017, 61474091, 61574112, and 61574110).

  12. Reversal mechanisms and interactions in magnetic systems: coercivity versus switching field and thermally assisted demagnetization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cebollada, F.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a comparative analysis of the magnetic interactions and reversal mechanisms of two different systems: NdFeB-type alloys with grain sizes in the single domain range and Fe-SiO2 nanocomposites with Fe concentrations above and below the percolation threshold. We evidence that the use of the coercivity as the main parameter to analyse them might be misleading due to the convolution of both reversible and irreversible magnetization variations. We show that the switching field and thermally assisted demagnetization allow a better understanding of these mechanisms since they involve just irreversible magnetization changes. Specifically, the experimental analysis of the coercivity adquisition process for the NdFeB-type system suggests that the magnetization reversal is nucleated at the spin misalignments present due to intergranular exchange interactions. On the other hand, the study of the magnetic viscosity and of the isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM and direct field demagnetization (DCD remanence curves indicates that the dipolar interactions are responsible for the propagation of the switching started at individual particles.

    En este artículo presentamos un análisis comparativo de la influencia de la microestructura a través de las interacciones magnéticas en los mecanismos de inversión de la magnetización en dos sistemas diferentes: aleaciones tipo NdFeB con tamaños de grano en el rango de monodominio y nanocompuestos de Fe-SiO2 con concentraciones de Fe tanto por encima como por debajo del umbral de percolación. Ponemos de manifiesto que el uso del campo coercitivo como parámetro de análisis puede llevar a equívocos debido a la coexistencia de variaciones reversibles e irreversibles de la magnetización. También mostramos que el campo de conmutación y la desimanación térmicamente asistida permiten una mejor comprensión de dichos mecanismos ya que reflejan exclusivamente cambios irreversibles de

  13. Investigation of the Three-Dimensional Structure of a Rotating Magnetic Field Driven Field-Reversed Configuration using Internal Magnetic Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velas, Katherine M.

    The Translation, Confinement, Sustainment Upgrade device (TCSU) used a rotating magnetic field (RMF) to form and sustain plasma in a field-reversed configuration (FRC). The physics of RMF current drive can be modeled in terms of the torque acting on the FRC. A fully translatable three-axis internal magnetic probe was built and used to generate a full r-z map of the magnetic field in the FRC and open field line region. Probe measurements are used to calculate the torques acting on the FRC formed using even-parity and odd-parity RMF antenna configurations. Odd-parity current drive was found to be more efficient and yields a plasma with lower resistivity than in even-parity current drive. An extrapolation method was developed to generate 3D magnetic field line plots which show that unlike in even-parity, field lines in odd-parity sustained FRCs make multiple transits of the FRC. Analysis using the three-axis probe data has greatly expanded our understanding of the physics of RMF driven FRCs.

  14. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang

    2013-10-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) modes with fishbone-like structures are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection into MST reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to large fast ion beta and stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of these instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport and interaction with global tearing modes. Internal magnetic field fluctuations associated with the EP modes are directly observed for the first time by Faraday-effect polarimetry (frequency ~ 90 kHz and amplitude ~ 2 G). Simultaneously measured density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving and asymmetric spatial structure that peaks near the core where fast ions reside and shifts outward as the instability evolves. Furthermore, the EP mode frequencies appear at ~k∥VA , consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growing phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop (~ 15 %) when the EP modes peak, indicating the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced (× 2) with the onset of multiple nonlinearly-interacting EP modes. The fast ions also impact global tearing modes, reducing their amplitudes by up to 65%. This mode reduction is lessened following the EP-bursts, further evidence for fast ion redistribution that weakens the suppression mechanism. Possible tearing mode suppression mechanisms will be discussed. Work supported by US DoE.

  15. Field reversing magnetotail current sheets: earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J.

    1986-09-01

    This dissertation examines the field reversing magnetotail current sheets at the earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner. In the near earth study a new analysis technique is developed to calculate the detailed current density distributions within the cross tail current sheet for the first time. This technique removes the effects of a variable sheet velocity by inverting intersatellite timings between the co-orbiting satellites ISEE-1 and -2. Case studies of three relatively geomagnetically quiet crossings are made; sheet thicknesses and peak current densities are approx.1-5 x 10/sup 4/ km and approx.5-50 nA/m/sup 2/. Current density distributions reveal a high density central region, lower density shoulders, and considerable fine structure throughout. In the Venus study another new analysis technique is developed to reconstruct the average tail configuration from a correlation between field magnitude and draping angle in a large statistical data set. In the comet study, high resolution magnetic field and plasma electron data from the ICE traversal of Giacobini-Zinner are combined for the first time to determine the tail/current sheet geometry and calculate certain important but unmeasured local ion and upstream properties. Pressure balance across the tail gives ion temperatures and betas of approx.1.2 x 10/sup 5/ K and approx.40 in the center of the current sheet to approx.1 x 10/sup 6/ K and approx.3 in the outer lobes. Axial stress balance shows that the velocity shear upstream near the nucleus is >6 (approx.1 at ICE), and that a region of strongly enhanced mass loading (ion source rate approx.24 times that upstream from lobes) exists upstream from the current sheet. The integrated downtail mass flux is approx.2.6 x 10/sup 26/ H/sub 2/O+/sec, which is only approx.1% of the independently determined total cometary efflux. 79 refs., 37 figs.

  16. Some new approaches to the study of the Earth's magnetic field reversals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Consolini

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Paleomagnetic studies clearly show that the polarity of the magnetic fi eld has been subject to reversals. It is generally assumed that polarity intervals are exponentially distributed. Here, the geomagnetic polarity reversal record, for the past 166 Ma, is analysed and a new approach to the study of the reversals is presented. In detail, the occurrence of 1/f-noise in the Power Spectral Density (PSD, relative to geomagnetic fi eld reversals, the existence of a Zipf's law behaviour for the cumulative distribution of polarity intervals, and the occurrence of punctuated equilibrium, as shown by a sort of Devil's staircase for the reversal time series, are investigated. Our results give a preliminary picture of the dynamical state of the geomagnetic dynamo suggesting that the geodynamo works in a marginally stable out-of-equilibrium confi guration, and that polarity reversals are equivalent to a sort of phase transition between two metastable states.

  17. Compact Orthoalgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Wilce, A

    2004-01-01

    We initiate a study of topological orthoalgebras (TOAs), concentrating on the compact case. Examples of TOAs include topological orthomodular lattices, and also the projection lattice of a Hilbert space. As the latter example illustrates, a lattice-ordered TOA need not be a topological lattice. However, we show that a compact Boolean TOA is a topological Boolean algebra. Using this, we prove that any compact regular TOA is atomistic, and has a compact center. We prove also that any compact TOA with isolated 0 is of finite height. We then focus on stably ordered TOAs: those in which the upper-set generated by an open set is open. These include both topological orthomodular lattices and interval orthoalgebras -- in particular, projection lattices. We show that the topology of a compact stably-ordered TOA with isolated 0 is determined by that of of its space of atoms.

  18. One-wave optical time-reversal mirror by actively coupling arbitrary light fields into a single-mode reflector

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, KyeoReh; Park, Jung-Hoon; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Rewinding the arrow of time via phase conjugation is an intriguing phenomena made possible by the wave property of light. To exploit this phenomenon, many diverse research fields have pursed the realization of an ideal phase conjugation mirror, but the ideal phase conjugation mirror - an optical system that requires a single-input and a single-output beam, like natural conventional mirrors - has never been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a one-wave optical time-reversal mirror using a spatial light modulator and a single-mode reflector. Our method is simple, alignment free, and fast while allowing unlimited power throughput in the time reversed wave, which have not been simultaneously demonstrated before. Using our method, we demonstrate high throughput time-reversal full-field light delivery through highly scattering biological tissue and multimode fibers, even for quantum dot fluorescence.

  19. Spark-plasma-sintering magnetic field assisted compaction of Co{sub 80}Ni{sub 20} nanowires for anisotropic ferromagnetic bulk materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouar, Nassima; Schoenstein, Frédéric; Mercone, Silvana; Farhat, Samir; Jouini, Noureddine [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux, CNRS, LSPM—UPR 3407, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne-Paris-Cité, 99 Avenue J.-B. Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Villeroy, Benjamin [Institut de Chimie et des Matériaux Paris Est, CNRS, ICMPE—UMR 7182, Equipe de Chimie Métallurgique des Terres Rares, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais Cedex (France); Leridon, Brigitte [Laboratoire de Physique et d’Étude des Matériaux, LPEM, ESPCI-ParisTech, CNRS, UPMC, 10 rue Vauquelin, F-75231 Paris Cedex 5 (France)

    2013-10-28

    We developed a two-step process showing the way for sintering anisotropic nanostructured bulk ferromagnetic materials. A new reactor has been optimized allowing the synthesis of several grams per batch of nanopowders via a polyol soft chemistry route. The feasibility of the scale-up has been successfully demonstrated for Co{sub 80}Ni{sub 20} nanowires and a massic yield of ∼97% was obtained. The thus obtained nanowires show an average diameter of ∼6 nm and a length of ∼270 nm. A new bottom-up strategy allowed us to compact the powder into a bulk nanostructured system. We used a spark-plasma-sintering technique under uniaxial compression and low temperature assisted by a permanent magnetic field of 1 T. A macroscopic pellet of partially aligned nanowire arrays has been easily obtained. This showed optimized coercive properties along the direction of the magnetic field applied during compaction (i.e., the nanowires' direction)

  20. Control of nonlinear systems using periodic parametric perturbations with application to a reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Kevin Andrew

    In this thesis, the possibility of controlling low- and high-dimensional chaotic systems by periodically driving an accessible system parameter is examined. This method has been carried out on several numerical systems and the MST Reversed Field Pinch. The numerical systems investigated include the logistic equation, the Lorenz equations, the Rossler equations, a coupled lattice of logistic equations, a coupled lattice of Lorenz equations, the Yoshida equations, which model tearing mode fluctuations in a plasma, and a neural net model for magnetic fluctuations on MST. This method was tested on the MST by sinusoidally driving a magnetic flux through the toroidal gap of the device. Numerically, periodic drives were found to be most effective at producing limit cycle behavior or significantly reducing the dimension of the system when the perturbation frequency was near natural frequencies of unstable periodic orbits embedded in the attractor of the unperturbed system. Several different unstable periodic orbits have been stabilized in this way for the low-dimensional numerical systems, sometimes with perturbation amplitudes that were less than 5% of the nominal value of the parameter being perturbed. In high- dimensional systems, limit cycle behavior and significant decreases in the system dimension were also achieved using perturbations with frequencies near the natural unstable periodic orbit frequencies. Results for the MST were not this encouraging, most likely because of an insufficient drive amplitude, the extremely high dimension of the plasma behavior, large amounts of noise, and a lack of stationarity in the transient plasma pulses.

  1. Current profile redistribution driven by neutral beam injection in a reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, E.; Anderson, J. K.; Brower, D. L.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ding, W. X.; Johnson, C. A.; Lin, L.

    2016-05-01

    Neutral beam injection in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas on the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] drives current redistribution with increased on-axis current density but negligible net current drive. Internal fluctuations correlated with tearing modes are observed on multiple diagnostics; the behavior of tearing mode correlated structures is consistent with flattening of the safety factor profile. The first application of a parametrized model for island flattening to temperature fluctuations in an RFP allows inferrence of rational surface locations for multiple tearing modes. The m = 1, n = 6 mode is observed to shift inward by 1.1 ± 0.6 cm with neutral beam injection. Tearing mode rational surface measurements provide a strong constraint for equilibrium reconstruction, with an estimated reduction of q0 by 5% and an increase in on-axis current density of 8% ± 5%. The inferred on-axis current drive is consistent with estimates of fast ion density using TRANSP [Goldston et al., J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)].

  2. Spontaneous quasi single helicity regimes in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.

    2007-11-01

    In recent years, good progress toward a better understanding and control of the plasma performance in reversed-field pinch devices has been made. These improvements consist both of the discovery of spontaneous plasma regimes, termed the quasi single helicity (QSH) regime, in which part of the plasma core is no longer stochastic, and of the development of techniques for active control of plasma instabilities. In this paper, a systematic study of spontaneous QSH in the EXTRAP T2R device [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] is presented. In this device, QSH states can occur spontaneously and it is associated with magnetic and thermal structures. A statistical analysis to determine the most favorable experimental conditions to have a transition to the QSH regime will be presented. The results described here are useful to understand the underlying properties of QSH regimes in view of future applications of the QSH active control in EXTRAP T2R; they are also important to have a comparison with the QSH studied in other devices.

  3. Scaling of confinement and profiles in the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch the diagnostic techniques for the measurement of electron density and temperature include; Thomson scattering which gives values at three radial positions in the core (r/a = 0, 0.28, 0.56), Langmuir probes which give values at the edge (r/a > 0.9) and interferometry which gives a line-averaged density. The empirical scaling of electron density and temperature including profile information with global plasma parameters has been studied. The density profile is subject to large variations, with an average parabolic shape when the density is low and flatter shapes when the density is increased. The change in the profile shape can be attributed to a shift in the penetration length of neutrals from the vicinity of the wall. The temperature scales roughly as I/n1/2 where I is the plasma current and n is the density. The temperature profile is always quite flat with lower variations and there is a tendency for a flatter profile at higher temperatures.

  4. Measurements of hot electrons in the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, A.; Bergsåker, H.

    1998-02-01

    The presence of an anisotropic energetic electron population in the edge region is a characteristic feature of reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas. In the Extrap T1 RFP, the anisotropic, parallel heat flux in the edge region measured by calorimetry was typically several hundred 0741-3335/40/2/011/img1. To gain more insight into the origin of the hot electron component and to achieve time resolution of the hot electron flow during the discharge, a target probe with a soft x-ray monitor was designed, calibrated and implemented. The x-ray emission from the target was measured with a surface barrier detector covered with a set of different x-ray filters to achieve energy resolution. A calibration in the range 0.5-2 keV electron energy was performed on the same target and detector assembly using a 0741-3335/40/2/011/img2 cathode electron gun. The calibration data are interpolated and extrapolated numerically. A directional asymmetry of more than a factor of 100 for the higher energy electrons is observed. The hot electrons are estimated to constitute 10% of the total electron density at the edge and their energy distribution is approximated by a half-Maxwellian with a temperature slightly higher than the central electron temperature. Scalings with plasma current, as well as correlations with local 0741-3335/40/2/011/img3 measurements and radial dependences, are presented.

  5. Self-Organisation and Intermittent Coherent Oscillations in the EXTRAP T2 Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Sallander, E.; Drake, J. R.

    Many reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiments exhibit a coherent oscillatory behaviour that is characteristic of discrete dynamo events and is associated with intermittent current profile self-organisation phenomena. However, in the vast majority of the discharges in the resistive shell RFP experiment EXTRAP T2, the dynamo activity does not show global, coherent oscillatory behaviour. The internally resonant tearing modes are phase-aligned and wall-locked resulting in a large localised magnetic perturbation. Equilibrium and plasma parameters have a level of high frequency fluctuations but the average values are quasi-steady. For some discharges, however, the equilibrium parameters exhibit the oscillatory behaviour characteristic of the discrete dynamo events. For these discharges, the trend observed in the tearing mode spectra, associated with the onset of the discrete relaxation event behaviour, is a relative higher amplitude of m = 0 mode activity and relative lower amplitude of the m = 1 mode activity compared with their average values. Global plasma parameters and model profile calculations for sample discharges representing the two types of relaxation dynamics are presented.

  6. Modeling of the merging of two colliding field reversed configuration plasmoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanqiong; Wang, Xiaoguang; Li, Lulu; Yang, Xianjun

    2016-06-01

    The field reversed configuration (FRC) is one of the candidate plasma targets for the magneto-inertial fusion, and a high temperature FRC can be formed by using the collision-merging technology. Although the merging process and mechanism of FRC are quite complicated, it is thinkable to build a simple model to investigate the macroscopic equilibrium parameters including the density, the temperature and the separatrix volume, which may play an important role in the collision-merging process of FRC. It is quite interesting that the estimates of the related results based on our simple model are in agreement with the simulation results of a two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic code (MFP-2D), which has being developed by our group since the last couple of years, while these results can qualitatively fit the results of C-2 experiments by Tri-alpha energy company. On the other hand, the simple model can be used to investigate how to increase the density of the merged FRC. It is found that the amplification of the density depends on the poloidal flux-increase factor and the temperature increases with the translation speed of two plasmoids.

  7. Current profile redistribution driven by neutral beam injection in a reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Johnson, C. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Physics, Auburn University 206 Allison Laboratory, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Neutral beam injection in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas on the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] drives current redistribution with increased on-axis current density but negligible net current drive. Internal fluctuations correlated with tearing modes are observed on multiple diagnostics; the behavior of tearing mode correlated structures is consistent with flattening of the safety factor profile. The first application of a parametrized model for island flattening to temperature fluctuations in an RFP allows inferrence of rational surface locations for multiple tearing modes. The m = 1, n = 6 mode is observed to shift inward by 1.1 ± 0.6 cm with neutral beam injection. Tearing mode rational surface measurements provide a strong constraint for equilibrium reconstruction, with an estimated reduction of q{sub 0} by 5% and an increase in on-axis current density of 8% ± 5%. The inferred on-axis current drive is consistent with estimates of fast ion density using TRANSP [Goldston et al., J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)].

  8. Reversed field pinch experiments. Final report, November 24, 1991--November 23, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, S.

    1995-03-01

    The Reversatron reversed field pinch (RFP) is an experiment to investigate the effect of boundary conditions on plasma confinement. Earlier RFP experiments, particularly ZT-40 and Los Alamos and Eta Beta II at Padua, had found an improvement in confinement when the vacuum chamber wall was surrounded by a conducting shell. The data showed a longer discharge duration and a reduction in the applied loop voltage. The latter determines the energy input to the plasma, thus a lower loop voltage (with relatively constant plasma parameters) indicated improved energy confinement. The Reversatron RFP was designed to allow the conducting wall to be easily changed so that differing electrical boundary conditions could be compared in the same device. Specifically, it was proposed to measure the growth rates and wavenumbers of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities as a function of the boundary conditions and to determine their effect on plasma confinement. These measurements were made and reported in a series of publications (Appendices) in Physics of Fluids B and in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion.

  9. Mode- and plasma rotation in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brzozowski, J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    Mode rotation studies in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch, EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1 (2001)] are presented. The phase relations and nonlinear coupling of the resonant modes are characterized and compared with that expected from modeling based on the hypothesis that mode dynamics can be described by a quasi stationary force balance including electromagnetic and viscous forces. Both m=0 and m=1 resonant modes are studied. The m=1 modes have rotation velocities corresponding to the plasma flow velocity (20-60 km/s) in the core region. The rotation velocity decreases towards the end of the discharge, although the plasma flow velocity does not decrease. A rotating phase locked m=1 structure is observed with a velocity of about 60 km/s. The m=0 modes accelerate throughout the discharges and reach velocities as high as 150-250 km/s. The observed m=0 phase locking is consistent with theory for certain conditions, but there are several conditions when the dynamics are not described. This is not unexpected because the assumption of quasi stationarity for the mode spectra is not fulfilled for many conditions. Localized m=0 perturbations are formed in correlation with highly transient discrete dynamo events. These perturbations form at the location of the m=1 phase locked structure, but rotate with a different velocity as they spread out in the toroidal direction.

  10. Feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.

    2005-09-01

    An array of saddle coils having Nc=16 equally spaced positions along the toroidal direction has been installed for feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]. Using feedback, multiple nonresonant RWMs are simultaneously suppressed for three to four wall times. Feedback stabilization of RWMs results in a significant prolongation of the discharge duration. This is linked to a better sustainment of the plasma and tearing mode toroidal rotation with feedback. Due to the limited number of coils in the toroidal direction, pairs of modes with toroidal mode numbers n ,n' that fulfill the condition ∣n-n'∣=Nc are coupled by the feedback action from the discrete coil array. With only one unstable mode in a pair of coupled modes, the suppression of the unstable mode is successful. If two modes are unstable in a coupled pair, two possibilities exist: partial suppression of both modes or, alternatively, complete stabilization of one target mode while the other is left unstable.

  11. Edge resonant fluctuations and particle transport in a reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, A.

    1998-12-01

    Electrostatic fluctuations are measured in the Extrap T2 reversed-field pinch [J. R. Drake et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1996 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1997), Vol. 2, pp. 193-199] using a Langmuir probe array. The electrostatic fluctuation, driven particle transport ΓnΦ is derived and found to constitute a large fraction of the total particle transport. The spectral density of all measured quantities exhibits a peak in the frequency range 100-250 kHz, which originates from fluctuations that are resonant close to the edge [n=-(40-80)]. This peak contains only about 10-20% of the total fluctuation power, but is shown to dominate ΓnΦ. The main reason for this is the high toroidal mode number as compared with internally resonant magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations. The edge resonant fluctuations also features a higher coherence (γ=0.5) and close to 90° phase shift between density and potential fluctuations.

  12. Numerical studies of the reversed-field pinch at high aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sätherblom, H.-E.; Drake, J. R.

    1998-10-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration at an aspect ratio of 8.8 is studied numerically by means of the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code DEBS [D. D. Schnack et al., J. Comput. Phys. 70, 330 (1987)]. This aspect ratio is equal to that of the Extrap T1 experiment [S. Mazur et al., Nucl. Fusion 34, 427 (1994)]. A numerical study of a RFP with this level of aspect ratio requires extensive computer achievements and has hitherto not been performed. The results are compared with previous studies [Y. L. Ho et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 3407 (1995)] of lower aspect ratio RFP configurations. In particular, an evaluation of the extrapolation to the aspect ratio of 8.8 made in this previous study shows that the extrapolation of the spectral spread, as well as most of the other findings, are confirmed. An important exception, however, is the magnetic diffusion coefficient, which is found to decrease with aspect ratio. Furthermore, an aspect ratio dependence of the magnetic energy and of the helicity of the RFP is found.

  13. Simulation of drift wave instability in field-reversed configurations using global magnetic geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, D. P.; Lau, C. K.; Lin, Z.; Tajima, T.; Holod, I.; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Minimizing transport in the field-reversed configuration (FRC) is essential to enable FRC-based fusion reactors. Recently, significant progress on advanced beam-driven FRCs in C-2 and C-2U (at Tri Alpha Energy) provides opportunities to study transport properties using Doppler backscattering (DBS) measurements of turbulent fluctuations and kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of driftwaves in realistic equilibria via the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC). Both measurements and simulations indicate relatively small fluctuations in the scrape-off layer (SOL). In the FRC core, local, single flux surface simulations reveal strong stabilization, while experiments indicate quiescent but finite fluctuations. One possible explanation is that turbulence may originate in the SOL and propagate at very low levels across the separatrix into the core. To test this hypothesis, a significant effort has been made to develop A New Code (ANC) based on GTC physics formulations, but using cylindrical coordinates which span the magnetic separatrix, including both core and SOL. Here, we present first results from global ANC simulations.

  14. Modeling of Resistive Wall Modes in Tokamak and Reversed Field Pinch Configurations of KTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rui; Zhu, Ping; Bai, Wei; Lan, Tao; Liu, Wandong

    2016-10-01

    Resistive wall mode is believed to be one of the leading causes for macroscopic degradation of plasma confinement in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFP). In this study, we evaluate the linear RWM instability of Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) in both tokamak and RFP configurations. For the tokamak configuration, the extended MHD code NIMROD is employed for calculating the dependence of the RWM growth rate on the position and conductivity of the vacuum wall for a model tokamak equilibrium of KTX in the large aspect-ratio approximation. For the RFP configuration, the standard formulation of dispersion relation for RWM based on the MHD energy principle has been evaluated for a cylindrical α- Θ model of KTX plasma equilibrium, in an effort to investigate the effects of thin wall on the RWM in KTX. Full MHD calculations of RWM in the RFP configuration of KTX using the NIMROD code are also being developed. Supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant Nos. 2014GB124002, 2015GB101004, 2011GB106000, and 2011GB106003.

  15. Diagnosing the high density FRX-L Field Reversed Configuration plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurden, G. A.; Intrator, T. P.; Renneke, R. M.; Dorf, L. A.; Farrell, M. W.; Gray, T. K.; Hsu, S. C.; Lynn, A. G.; Ruden, E. L.

    2006-10-01

    The FRX-L plasma is a high pressure, high density, field reversed configuration (FRC), at n ˜1x10^16-1x10^17 cm-3, and hundreds of eV electron temperature. In order to study formation, equilibrium, transport, flow, and confinement issues, we have a suite of diagnostics. Standard plasma diagnostics include B-dot probes, magnetic flux loops, single and multi-channel visible spectroscopy, optical light tomography arrays, up to 8 filtered visible fibers (546 nm or 486 nm) and an 8-chord side-on HeNe interferometer. Recent diagnostic additions include AXUV bolometers, VUV spectroscopy using a methly salicylate fluorescer converter and optical multichannel analyzer (OMA), eight simultaneous axial views of visible spectra with a 0.3 meter spectrometer and Princeton Instruments PI-Max camera, two-foil end-on surface barrier diode soft x-ray measurements, a hard x-ray/neutron plastic scintillator/ PMT, and indium activation foils to detect time-integrated absolute DD neutron emission. We also discuss plans for a soft x-ray framing camera, using end-on optical access and consisting of a pinhole/fluorescer geometry coupled to a high resolution DiCam camera.

  16. Comparison of Mode-Locking Phenomena in RFX and TPE-RX Reversed Field Pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzonella, T.; Martini, S.; Zanca, P.; Yagi, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Nilsson, J.-A. B.

    1999-11-01

    Phase- and wall-locking of MHD dynamo modes (LDM), resulting in non-axisymmetric perturbations of the plasma surface, are frequently observed in RFP’s. Such behavior is well accounted for by resistive MHD theory as the result of the non-linear coupling of many dinamo modes. It is predicted by theory that the amplitudes, and the threshold conditions for wall locking of the above modes depend on the characteristics of one or more conducting walls, such as the shielding time for the magnetic perturbation and the proximity to the plasma. In this work we study the LDM in two RFP’s similar in size (RFX: R/a = 2/0.46 m, TPE-RX: R/a = 1.72/0.45 m), but with different conducting shell and vacuum vessel/first wall systems. The LDM is analyzed in terms of its n,m spectra, of its amplitude scaling with plasma parameters such as current and density, and of the influence of localized field errors on its formation and position. The non-axisymmetric perturbations of the plasma surface are also presented, along with the influence of LDM on plasma toroidal loop voltage, reversal and pinch parameters. The non-locked pulses obtained in TPE-RX are compared with low LDM amplitude pulses obtained in RFX using the Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive technique.

  17. Reversible switching of ferromagnetism in ZnCuO nanorods by electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Changwei, E-mail: Changweizou@hotmail.com; Wang, Hongjun; Liang, Feng; Shao, Lexi [Department of Physics and Development Center for New Materials Engineering and Technology in Universities of Guangdong, Lingnan Normal University, Zhanjiang 524048 (China)

    2015-04-06

    The reproducible switching of ferromagnetism in ZnCuO nanorods by applying a reversible electric field has been realized. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images showed a hexagonal wurtzite structure with no detectable trace of secondary phase or precipitation of Cu impurity in the ZnCuO nanorods. The Cu concentrations in the ZnCuO nanorods were tested by energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and found to be about 2.7 at. %. The switching mechanism is confirmed in terms of the formation and rupture of conductive filaments, with oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}) localized mainly on surface of the ZnCuO nanorods. Subsequently, the variation of V{sub O} concentration during the resistive switching process modulates the ferromagnetism of the ZnCuO nanorods. The saturation magnetization at low resistance state is apparently 6.4 times larger than that at high resistance state for an Au/ZnCuO/ITO structure. An indirect double-exchange model has been used to explain the ferromagnetism in ZnCuO nanorods.

  18. Fast ion confinement and stability in a neutral beam injected reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J. K.; Almagri, A. F.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Mirnov, V. V.; Morton, L. A.; Nornberg, M. D.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Belykh, V.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Tsidulko, Y. A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Lin, L. [University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Liu, D. [University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    The behavior of energetic ions is fundamentally important in the study of fusion plasmas. While well-studied in tokamak, spherical torus, and stellarator plasmas, relatively little is known in reversed field pinch plasmas about the dynamics of fast ions and the effects they cause as a large population. These studies are now underway in the Madison Symmetric Torus with an intense 25 keV, 1 MW hydrogen neutral beam injector (NBI). Measurements of the time-resolved fast ion distribution via a high energy neutral particle analyzer, as well as beam-target neutron flux (when NBI fuel is doped with 3–5% D{sub 2}) both demonstrate that at low concentration the fast ion population is consistent with classical slowing of the fast ions, negligible cross-field transport, and charge exchange as the dominant ion loss mechanism. A significant population of fast ions develops; simulations predict a super-Alfvénic ion density of up to 25% of the electron density with both a significant velocity space gradient and a sharp radial density gradient. There are several effects on the background plasma including enhanced toroidal rotation, electron heating, and an altered current density profile. The abundant fast particles affect the plasma stability. Fast ions at the island of the core-most resonant tearing mode have a stabilizing effect, and up to 60% reduction in the magnetic fluctuation amplitude is observed during NBI. The sharp reduction in amplitude, however, has little effect on the underlying magnetic island structure. Simultaneously, beam driven instabilities are observed as repetitive ∼50 μs bursts which coincide with fast particle redistribution; data indicate a saturated core fast ion density well below purely classical predictions.

  19. Propagation characteristics of a focused laser beam in a strontium barium niobate photorefractive crystal under reverse external electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q L; Liang, B L; Wang, Y; Deng, G Y; Jiang, Y H; Zhang, S H; Fu, G S; Simmonds, P J

    2014-10-01

    The propagation characteristics of a focused laser beam in a SBN:75 photorefractive crystal strongly depend on the signal-to-background intensity ratio (R=Is/Ib) under reverse external electric field. In the range 20>R>0.05, the laser beam shows enhanced self-defocusing behavior with increasing external electric field, while it shows self-focusing in the range 0.03>R>0.01. Spatial solitons are observed under a suitable reverse external electric field for R=0.025. A theoretical model is proposed to explain the experimental observations, which suggest a new type of soliton formation due to "enhancement" not "screening" of the external electrical field.

  20. Room-Temperature Large and Reversible Modulation of Photoluminescence by in Situ Electric Field in Ergodic Relaxor Ferroelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hailing; Wu, Xiao; Peng, Deng Feng; Kwok, K W

    2017-10-04

    Ferroelectric oxides with luminescent ions hold great promise in future optoelectronic devices because of their unique photoluminescence and inherent ferroelectric properties. Intriguingly, the photoluminescence performance of ferroelectric ceramics could be modulated by an external electric field. However, researchers face a current challenge of the diminutive extent and degree of reversibility of the field-driven modification that hinder their use in room-temperature practical applications. Within the scope of current contribution in rare-earth-doped bismuth sodium titanate relaxors, the most important information to be noted is the shifting of the depolarization temperature toward room temperature and the resulting considerable enhancement in ergodicity, as evidenced by the dielectric properties, polarization, and strain hysteresis, as well as the in situ Raman/X-ray diffraction studies. After the introduction of 1 mol % Eu, the induced composition and charge disorders disrupt the original long-range ferroelectric macrodomains into randomly dynamic and weakly correlated polar nanoregions, which facilitates a reversible transformation between polar nanoregions and unstable ferroelectric state under an electric field, engendering a large strain. By virtue of this, both the extent and degree of reversibility of photoluminescence modulation are enhanced (∼60%) considerably, and room-temperature in situ tunable photoluminescence response is then achieved under electric field. These should be helpful for the realization of regulating the physical couplings (photoluminescent-ferroelectrics) in multifunctional inorganic ferroelectrics with a high ergodic state by reversibly tuning the structural symmetry.

  1. Reversible and irreversible temperature-induced changes in exchange-biased planar Hall effect bridge (PHEB) magnetic field sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, G.; Lundtoft, N.C.; Østerberg, F.W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the changes of planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors upon exposure to temperatures between 25° C and 90°C. From analyses of the sensor response vs. magnetic fields we extract the exchange bias field Hex, the uniaxial anisotropy field HK and the anisotropic...... magnetoresistance (AMR) of the exchange biased thin film at a given temperature and by comparing measurements carried out at elevated temperatures T with measurements carried out at 25° C after exposure to T, we can separate the reversible from the irreversible changes of the sensor. The results are not only...

  2. Far infrared laser polarimetry and far forward scattering diagnostics for the C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, B H; Kinley, J S; Knapp, K; Feng, P; Martinez, R; Weixel, C; Armstrong, S; Hayashi, R; Longman, A; Mendoza, R; Gota, H; Tuszewski, M

    2014-11-01

    A two-chord far infrared (FIR) laser polarimeter for high speed sub-degree Faraday rotation measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration experiment is described. It is based on high power proprietary FIR lasers with line width of about 330 Hz. The exceptionally low intrinsic instrument phase error is characterized with figures of merit. Significant toroidal magnetic field with rich dynamics is observed. Simultaneously obtained density fluctuation spectra by far forward scattering are presented.

  3. Quantitative plasma spectroscopy in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedqvist, Anders

    1999-10-01

    The subject addressed in this thesis is quantitative plasma spectroscopy. Measurements of electron temperature and impurity ion density, performed at EXTRAP-T2, are aimed to investigate the effects of operating a reversed- field pinch with a resistive shell and a graphite wall. The spectroscopic measurements are analyzed with a collisional-radiative model and a consistency check is performed for the measurements and the model itself. The resistive shell results in wall-locked modes, enhanced plasma-wall interaction and degraded confinement. Measurements of vacuum ultraviolet resonant transitions of carbon and oxygen show that the local heating of the wall, at the position of the locking, leads to influxes of hydrogen and impurities, resulting in a cold and resistive plasma. Effects on the local scale are also observed. Spatially-resolved measurements of line emission originating from charge exchange collisions are used to investigate the change in neutral hydrogen profile. Temporal correlations between soft x-ray emission and poloidal loop voltage at the position of the wall-locked modes are observed and in connection, a decrease in central electron temperature, indicating there is a direct energy loss channel between the center and the edge. The hydrogen recycling properties of the graphite wall are investigated in an isotope exchange experiment. The density of the hydrogen isotopes are measured from spectral line emission and compared with recycling models. In charge exchange collisions between fully stripped chlorine and thermal deuterium, observed in JET plasmas, only a single n-level is populated. This is different from most ions and may be used to test models for calculating charge exchange collision cross-sections.

  4. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  5. On Reverse Stackelberg Game and Optimal Mean Field Control for a Large Population of Thermostatically Controlled Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Sen; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2016-07-08

    This paper studies a multi-stage pricing problem for a large population of thermostatically controlled loads. The problem is formulated as a reverse Stackelberg game that involves a mean field game in the hierarchy of decision making. In particular, in the higher level, a coordinator needs to design a pricing function to motivate individual agents to maximize the social welfare. In the lower level, the individual utility maximization problem of each agent forms a mean field game coupled through the pricing function that depends on the average of the population control/state. We derive the solution to the reverse Stackelberg game by connecting it to a team problem and the competitive equilibrium, and we show that this solution corresponds to the optimal mean field control that maximizes the social welfare. Realistic simulations are presented to validate the proposed methods.

  6. High sensitivity far infrared laser diagnostics for the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, B. H., E-mail: bdeng@trialphaenergy.com; Beall, M.; Schroeder, J.; Settles, G.; Feng, P.; Kinley, J. S.; Gota, H.; Thompson, M. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A high sensitivity multi-channel far infrared laser diagnostics with switchable interferometry and polarimetry operation modes for the advanced neutral beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is described. The interferometer achieved superior resolution of 1 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} at >1.5 MHz bandwidth, illustrated by measurement of small amplitude high frequency fluctuations. The polarimetry achieved 0.04° instrument resolution and 0.1° actual resolution in the challenging high density gradient environment with >0.5 MHz bandwidth, making it suitable for weak internal magnetic field measurements in the C-2U plasmas, where the maximum Faraday rotation angle is less than 1°. The polarimetry resolution data is analyzed, and high resolution Faraday rotation data in C-2U is presented together with direct evidences of field reversal in FRC magnetic structure obtained for the first time by a non-perturbative method.

  7. High sensitivity far infrared laser diagnostics for the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, B. H.; Beall, M.; Schroeder, J.; Settles, G.; Feng, P.; Kinley, J. S.; Gota, H.; Thompson, M. C.

    2016-11-01

    A high sensitivity multi-channel far infrared laser diagnostics with switchable interferometry and polarimetry operation modes for the advanced neutral beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is described. The interferometer achieved superior resolution of 1 × 1016 m-2 at >1.5 MHz bandwidth, illustrated by measurement of small amplitude high frequency fluctuations. The polarimetry achieved 0.04° instrument resolution and 0.1° actual resolution in the challenging high density gradient environment with >0.5 MHz bandwidth, making it suitable for weak internal magnetic field measurements in the C-2U plasmas, where the maximum Faraday rotation angle is less than 1°. The polarimetry resolution data is analyzed, and high resolution Faraday rotation data in C-2U is presented together with direct evidences of field reversal in FRC magnetic structure obtained for the first time by a non-perturbative method.

  8. Coherent isotropic averaging in zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance. II. Cubic sequences and time-reversal of spin couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llor, A.; Olejniczak, Z.; Pines, A. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1995-09-08

    We present a special case of the theory of coherent isotropic averaging in zero-field NMR, given in part I of this work. In a zero external field, combinations of the magnetic-field pulses restricted to {pi}/2 rotations along the three coordinate axes can selectively average internal spin Hamiltonians while preserving the intrinsic invariance of the spectrum with respect to the sample orientation. Compared with the general case, the limits of the allowed scaling factors of first- and second-rank interactions are slightly reduced. For instance, time reversal is possible for second-rank tensors with a {minus}1/5 scaling factor, instead of {minus}1/4 in general. Finite pulse compensations are analyzed and experimental illustrations are given for two optimum time-reversal sequences. The cubic sequences, though less efficient than the icosahedral sequences, are technically more feasible and may be used in zero-field experiments such as decoupling (by rank or nuclear species), time reversal or multipolar experiments (the zero-field equivalent of multiple-quantum NMR). {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Limit equation for vacuum Einstein constraints with a translational Killing vector field in the compact hyperbolic case

    CERN Document Server

    Gicquaud, Romain

    2014-01-01

    We construct solutions to the constraint equations in general relativity using the limit equation criterion introduced by Dahl, Humbert and the first author. We focus on solutions over compact 3-manifolds admitting a $\\bS^1$-symmetry group. When the quotient manifold has genus greater than 2, we obtain strong far from CMC results.

  10. Giant reversible rotating cryomagnetocaloric effect in KEr (MoO4)2 induced by a crystal-field anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkáč, V.; Orendáčová, A.; Čižmár, E.; Orendáč, M.; Feher, A.; Anders, A. G.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetocaloric properties of KEr(MoO4)2 single crystals were investigated using magnetization and specific heat measurements in the magnetic field applied along the easy and hard axis. Large conventional magnetocaloric effect was found around 10 K (-Δ Smax =14 J/kg K for 5 T) in the field applied along the easy axis. What is more, a huge magnetic anisotropy in the a b plane leads to a large anisotropy of magnetocaloric effect, -Δ SR ,max =10 and 13 J/kg K obtained by a simple rotating of the single crystal within the a b plane in the constant magnetic field 2 and 5 T, respectively. Large Δ SR values with no hysteresis losses and rather wide working temperature spans imply that KEr(MoO4)2 may serve as a promising candidate for the implementation of a compact rotary magnetic cryorefrigerator.

  11. Equation of motion for relativistic compact binaries with the strong field point particle limit the second and half post-Newtonian order

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, Y; Asada, H; Itoh, Yousuke; Futamase, Toshifumi; Asada, Hideki

    2001-01-01

    We study the equation of motion appropriate to an inspiralling binary star system whose constituent stars have strong internal gravity. We use the post-Newtonian approximation with the strong field point particle limit by which we can introduce into general relativity a notion of a point-like particle with strong internal gravity without using Dirac delta distribution. Besides this limit, to deal with strong internal gravity we express the equation of motion in surface integral forms and calculate these integrals explicitly. As a result we obtain the equation of motion for a binary of compact bodies accurate through the second and half post-Newtonian (2.5 PN) order. This equation is derived in the harmonic coordinate. Our resulting equation perfectly agrees with Damour and Deruelle 2.5 PN equation of motion. Hence it is found that the 2.5 PN equation of motion is applicable to a relativistic compact binary.

  12. Engineering of high purity ultra-long optical needle field through reversing the electric dipole array radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiming; Chen, Weibin; Zhan, Qiwen

    2010-10-11

    We report a new method to create high purity longitudinally polarized field with extremely long depth of focus in the focal volume of a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens. Through reversing the radiated field from an electric dipole array situated near the focus of the high-NA lens, the required incident field distribution in the pupil plane for the creation of an ultra-long optical needle field can be found. Numerical examples demonstrate that an optical needle field with a depth of focus up to 8λ is obtainable. Throughout the depth of focus, this engineered focal field maintains a diffraction limited transverse spot size (<0.43λ) with high longitudinal polarization purity. From the calculated pupil plane distribution, a simplified discrete complex pupil filter can be designed and significant improvements over the previously reported complex filters are clearly demonstrated.

  13. Time reversal, back propagation, matched field processors, correlation receivers, and the principles of radar/sonar signal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggeroer, Arthur

    2002-05-01

    Time reversal and backpropagation have been demonstrated in several experiments. Similarly, while matched field processing (MFP) differs in terms of implentation-experimental vs computed replicas-both have two common properties: (i) they are based on a single, spatially coherent signal; and (ii) the conjugate transpose of the Green's function and replica correlation are identical for self-adjoint systems. Hence, the principles for focusing and ambiguity plane properties of these processors are virtually identical to those for correlation receivers. The principles of optimal signal design for correlation receivers were the subject of much research for radar/sonar systems four decades ago and many of them seem to have been neglected in the analysis of time reversal, back propagation, and matched field processors. For example, time reversal from a point, a line array, or a random array of scatterers are duals of an impulse, a frequency modulated, and a pseudo-random noise signal, respectively. The equivalence and consequences of the time-bandwidth products for signals and array length wave number spread are demonstrated. The impact of sidelobes and multipath spread can be predicted. The generalizations of the important radar/sonar uncertainty principle, however, have yet been not demonstrated. This presentation reviews these optimal signal design principles and applies them to time reversal and MFP.

  14. Jet outflow and open field line measurements on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftman, D.; Gupta, D.; Roche, T.; Thompson, M. C.; Giammanco, F.; Conti, F.; Marsili, P.; Moreno, C. D.

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge and control of the axial outflow of plasma particles and energy along open-magnetic-field lines are of crucial importance to the stability and longevity of the advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma. An overview of the diagnostic methods used to perform measurements on the open field line plasma on C-2U is presented, including passive Doppler impurity spectroscopy, microwave interferometry, and triple Langmuir probe measurements. Results of these measurements provide the jet ion temperature and axial velocity, electron density, and high frequency density fluctuations.

  15. Improvement of dose distribution in breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field Linac-MR unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaeeli, A. D., E-mail: ali-esmaeeli-d@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, 41476-54919 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, S. R. [Department of Medical Physics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14174 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pouladian, M.; Bagheri, S. [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, 14778-93855 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Monfared, A. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Methods: Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.25–1.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateral beam. Results: For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%–58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%–38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V{sub 20} for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%–77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Conclusions: Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.

  16. A Survey of Compact Star Clusters in the South-West Field of the M31 Disk. UBVRI Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Narbutis, D; Kodaira, K; Sableviciute, I; Stonkute, R; Bridzius, A

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of UBVRI broad-band aperture CCD photometry of 51 compact star clusters located in the South-West part of the M31 disk. The mean rms errors of all measured star cluster colors are less than 0.02 mag. In color vs. color diagrams the star clusters show significantly tighter sequences when compared with the photometric data from the compiled catalog of the M31 star clusters published by Galleti et al. (2004).

  17. Magnetization Reversal by Electric-Field Decoupling of Magnetic and Ferroelectric Domain Walls in Multiferroic-Based Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skumryev, V.; Laukhin, V.; Fina, I.; Martí, X.; Sánchez, F.; Gospodinov, M.; Fontcuberta, J.

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate that the magnetization of a ferromagnet in contact with an antiferromagnetic multiferroic (LuMnO3) can be speedily reversed by electric-field pulsing, and the sign of the magnetic exchange bias can switch and recover isothermally. As LuMnO3 is not ferroelastic, our data conclusively show that this switching is not mediated by strain effects but is a unique electric-field driven decoupling of the ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic domain walls. Their distinct dynamics are essential for the observed magnetic switching.

  18. A pressure-driven model for the quasi periodical oscillations of the Single Helical States in Reversed Field Pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    In this work a model that could explain the experimentally observed quasi periodical oscillations in electron temperature and perturbed magnetic field in a Reversed Field Pinch is discussed. An ohmically heated plasma in which an interplay between thermal conduction and heat transport, on one side, and the magneto-hydro-dynamical stability, on the other side, is studied. It is shown that, by making some simple and physically reasonable assumptions, a set of equations can be obtained showing a variety of periodical or quasi periodical oscillations for the relevant dynamical variables.

  19. Non-equilibrium reversible dynamics of work production in four-spin system in a magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Ivanchenko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A closed system of the equations for the local Bloch vectors and spin correlation functions is obtained by decomplexification of the Liouville-von Neumann equation for 4 magnetic particles with the exchange interaction that takes place in an arbitrary time-dependent external magnetic field. The analytical and numerical analysis of the quantum thermodynamic variables is carried out depending on separable mixed initial state and the magnetic field modulation. Under unitary evolution, non-equilibrium reversible dynamics of power production in the finite environment is investigated.

  20. Introduction: Reversing Language Shift in Indigenous America: Collaborations and Views from the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Teresa L.; Watahomigie, Lucille J.; Yamamoto, Akira Y.

    1999-01-01

    Indigenous languages are being displaced at an alarming rate. The ramifications of language loss to the speakers' culture and to the wider culture, and its connection to issues of repression and acculturation are discussed. Reversing language shift is the practice of social justice and requires collaboration between indigenous communities and…

  1. Multi-scale petrophysical and geomechanical characterization of full core from the Groningen Field to understand mechanical stratigraphy and compaction behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijs, Rob; Hol, Sander; Marcelis, Fons; Ishmukhametova, Gulfiia; van der Linden, Arjan; Zuiderwijk, Pedro; Makurat, Axel

    2016-04-01

    The Groningen gas field in The Netherlands is one of the largest onshore gas reserves known. Advancing production from the field has resulted in field-scale deformation with surface subsidence and accompanied local seismicity. Part of the deformation is associated with compaction of the Permian reservoir. While depletion-induced reservoir compaction is expected to be controlled locally by grain-scale physical mechanisms such as sub-critical cracking or particle re-arrangement and intergranular pressure solution creep, understanding of the intra-reservoir variability of these mechanisms is still limited, though crucial for predicting the coupling between production, rock deformation, and surface effects. To aid an improved understanding of fundamental processes and scaling effects, approximately 200 meters of core over the reservoir section was taken from a well in the Groningen Field, drilled in July 2015 close to the village of Zeerijp. Using this material, we have performed detailed laboratory investigations and will continue to do so in significant numbers, to compare the results obtained with well- and field-scale observations. In this contribution, we present several exemplary mechanical data sets for the reservoir and caprock, and compare these data with well-scale petrophysical and mechanical information, notably sonic, scratch and visual geological details with the aim to arrive at a multi-scale description of petrophysical and geomechanical rock properties. Our first comparison reveals a strong contrast in compressibility and strength between the reservoir and caprock, as well as a contribution of inelastic strain to the total strain response of the tested rock samples. We will discuss the observed mechanical stratigraphy in considering regional and field scale deformation patterns.

  2. Dilution jet experiments in compact combustor configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, I.; Zizelman, J.

    1984-01-01

    This project concerns the effects of cooling jets on the velocity and temperature fields in a compact reverse flow combustor. The work is motivated by the need to limit the temperatures of post combustion gases in jet engines to values within the endurance capabilities of turbine blades. The application requires not only that the temperature be kept sufficiently low but also that a suitably tailored temperature profile be provided at the combustor exit, with higher temperatures generally permissible at the blade tip than at the blade root because of higher centrifugal loads at the root. Flows in reverse flow combustor accelerate both longitudinally because of area changes and transversely because of flow turning. The current project started with flow visualization experiments in water, using aqueous solutions of zinc bromide to model the relatively higher density of cooling jets.

  3. A Neural Network Approach on Reverse Engineering Surface Reasoning in the Manufacturing Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper applied the neural network technology to surfacereasoning in reverse engineering and established the neural network computation model. One of the main advantages of reasoning solid surface using neural network is that no knowledge about surface is needed, and the limited measured points on the surface will do sufficiently. This paper listed the related reasoning cases, including the elementary analytical surfaces and freeform surfaces, discussed the various issues occurring during reasoning process and proved the feasibility and efficiency of this approach from theory and practical computing cases. The results show that a neural network is an excellent aided analysis means for surface reasoning in reversing engineering and possesses practical use for the surface that is complex, incomplete and partially worn-out or damaged.

  4. Gauge fields emerging from time-reversal symmetry breaking for spin-5/2 fermions in a honeycomb lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szirmai, G.; Szirmai, E. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Zamora, A. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Lewenstein, M. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Lluis Companys 23, E-08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    We propose an experimentally feasible setup with ultracold alkaline-earth-metal atoms to simulate the dynamics of U(1) lattice gauge theories in 2 + 1 dimensions with a Chern-Simons term. To this end we consider the ground-state properties of spin-5/2 alkaline-earth-metal fermions in a honeycomb lattice. We use the Gutzwiller projected variational approach in the strongly repulsive regime in the case of filling 1/6. The ground state of the system is a chiral spin-liquid state with 2{pi}/3 flux per plaquette, which violates time-reversal invariance. We demonstrate that due to the breaking of time-reversal symmetry the system exhibits quantum Hall effect and chiral edge states. We relate the experimentally accessible spin fluctuations to the emerging gauge-field dynamics. We discuss also properties of the lowest energy competing orders.

  5. The Finslerian compact star model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahaman, Farook; Paul, Nupur [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); De, S.S. [University of Calcutta, Department of Applied Mathematics, Kolkata (India); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Jafry, M.A.K. [Shibpur Dinobundhoo Institution, Department of Physics, Howrah, West Bengal (India)

    2015-11-15

    We construct a toy model for compact stars based on the Finslerian structure of spacetime. By assuming a particular mass function, we find an exact solution of the Finsler-Einstein field equations with an anisotropic matter distribution. The solutions are revealed to be physically interesting and pertinent for the explanation of compact stars. (orig.)

  6. Using Polar Coronal Hole Area Measurements to Determine the Solar Polar Magnetic Field Reversal in Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, N.; Webber, S.A. Hess; Pesnell, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of solar polar coronal hole (PCH) areas since the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows how the polar regions have evolved during Solar Cycle 24. We present PCH areas from mid-2010 through 2013 using data from the Atmospheric Imager Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instruments onboard SDO. Our analysis shows that both the northern and southern PCH areas have decreased significantly in size since 2010. Linear fits to the areas derived from the magnetic-field properties indicate that, although the northern hemisphere went through polar-field reversal and reached solar-maximum conditions in mid-2012, the southern hemisphere had not reached solar-maximum conditions in the polar regions by the end of 2013. Our results show that solar-maximum conditions in each hemisphere, as measured by the area of the polar coronal holes and polar magnetic field, will be offset in time.

  7. Statistical analysis of the mass-to-flux ratio in turbulent cores: effects of magnetic field reversals and dynamo amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Bertram, Erik; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2011-01-01

    We study the mass-to-flux ratio (M/\\Phi) of clumps and cores in simulations of supersonic, magnetohydrodynamical turbulence for different initial magnetic field strengths. We investigate whether the (M/\\Phi)-ratio of core and envelope, R = (M/\\Phi)_{core}/(M/\\Phi)_{envelope} can be used to distinguish between theories of ambipolar diffusion and turbulence-regulated star formation. We analyse R for different Lines-of-Sight (LoS) in various sub-cubes of our simulation box. We find that, 1) the average and median values of |R| for different times and initial magnetic field strengths are typically greater, but close to unity, 2) the average and median values of |R| saturate at average values of |R| ~ 1 for smaller magnetic fields, 3) values of |R| < 1 for small magnetic fields in the envelope are caused by field reversals when turbulence twists the field lines such that field components in different directions average out. Finally, we propose two mechanisms for generating values |R| ~< 1 for the weak and st...

  8. Direct observation ofλ-DNA molecule reversal movement within microfluidic channels under electric field with single molecule imaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨凤云; 王凯歌; 孙聃; 赵伟; 王海青; 何鑫; 王归仁; 白晋涛

    2016-01-01

    The electrodynamic characteristics of single DNA molecules moving within micro-/nano-fl uidic channels are impor-tant in the design of biomedical chips and bimolecular sensors. In this study, the dynamic properties ofλ-DNA molecules transferring along the microchannels driven by the external electrickinetic force were systemically investigated with the single molecule fl uorescence imaging technique. The experimental results indicated that the velocity of DNA molecules was strictly dependent on the value of the applied electric field and the diameter of the channel. The larger the external electric field, the larger the velocity, and the more significant deformation of DNA molecules. More meaningfully, it was found that the moving directions of DNA molecules had two completely different directions: (i) along the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was smaller than a certain threshold value;(ii) opposite to the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was greater than the threshold electric field intensity. The reversal movement of DNA molecules was mainly determined by the competition between the electrophoresis force and the infl uence of electro-osmosis fl ow. These new findings will theoretically guide the practical application of fl uidic channel sensors and lab-on-chips for precisely manipulating single DNA molecules.

  9. Mean-field and Monte Carlo studies of the magnetization-reversal transition in the Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Arkajyoti [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Bidhannagar, Calcutta (India)]. E-mail: arko@cmp.saha.ernet.in; Chakrabarti, Bikas K. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Bidhannagar, Calcutta (India)]. E-mail: bikas@cmp.saha.ernet.in

    2000-06-16

    Detailed mean-field and Monte Carlo studies of the dynamic magnetization-reversal transition in the Ising model in its ordered phase under a competing external magnetic field of finite duration have been presented here. An approximate analytical treatment of the mean-field equations of motion shows the existence of diverging length and time scales across this dynamic transition phase boundary. These are also supported by numerical solutions of the complete mean-field equations of motion and the Monte Carlo study of the system evolving under Glauber dynamics in both two and three dimensions. Classical nucleation theory predicts different mechanisms of domain growth in two regimes marked by the strength of the external field, and the nature of the Monte Carlo phase boundary can be comprehended satisfactorily using the theory. The order of the transition changes from a continuous to a discontinuous one as one crosses over from coalescence regime (stronger field) to a nucleation regime (weaker field). Finite-size scaling theory can be applied in the coalescence regime, where the best-fit estimates of the critical exponents are obtained for two and three dimensions. (author)

  10. A multi-channel capacitive probe for electrostatic fluctuation measurement in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Stone, Douglas R.; Triana, Joseph C.; Almagri, Abdulgader F.; Fiksel, Gennady; Ding, Weixing; Sarff, John S.; McCollam, Karsten J.; Li, Hong; Liu, Wandong

    2017-02-01

    A 40-channel capacitive probe has been developed to measure the electrostatic fluctuations associated with the tearing modes deep into Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac component of the plasma potential via the voltage induced on stainless steel electrodes capacitively coupled with the plasma through a thin annular layer of boron nitride (BN) dielectric (also serves as the particle shield). When bombarded by the plasma electrons, BN provides a sufficiently large secondary electron emission for the induced voltage to be very close to the plasma potential. The probe consists of four stalks each with ten cylindrical capacitors that are radially separated by 1.5 cm. The four stalks are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid so that at each radial position, there are four electrodes forming a square grid. Every two adjacent radial sets of four electrodes form a cube. The fluctuating electric field can be calculated by the gradient of the plasma potential fluctuations at the eight corners of the cube. The probe can be inserted up to 15 cm (r/a = 0.7) into the plasma. The capacitive probe has a frequency bandwidth from 13 Hz to 100 kHz, amplifier-circuit limit, sufficient for studying the tearing modes (5-30 kHz) in the MST reversed-field pinch.

  11. Observation of Electron Bernstein Wave Heating in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzman, Andrew; Anderson, Jay; Dubois, Ami; Almagri, Abdulgader; Nonn, Paul; McCollam, Karsten; Chapman, Brett; Goetz, John; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    We report the first observation of electron Bernstein wave heating in the MST RFP. Similar to a high density stellarator, the RFP is inaccessible to electromagnetic ECRH. The plasma current and |B|operating range of MST allows a 5.5 GHz RF source (100kW, 4ms pulse) to heat on the fundamental and up to 4th harmonic EC resonances. With an x-ray diagnostic most sensitive to edge electrons located +12 degrees toroidally from the antenna, the measured emission is a strong function of predicted heating inside versus outside the Bt =0 reversal layer of the RFP. Measured during a scan of plasma current, distinct edges in a plot of emissivity versus predicted deposition layer align with the deposition layers crossing of this reversal layer and confirm EBW heating on the fundamental through 4th EC harmonic. Additional confirmation of the absorption location has been demonstrated by using auxiliary poloidal current drive to reduce electron diffusion rates and sweep the location of the Bt =0 surface across a static RF absorption location in RFP discharges. In these discharges EBW enhancement of the 15-40keV x-ray energies has been observed. Work supported by USDOE.

  12. Profile study of shear stabilization of the lower hybrid drift instability in the reverse-field screw pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerwin, R.

    1976-10-01

    A criterion due to N. Krall for magnetic shear stabilization of the Lower-Hybrid Drift Instability is applied to model profiles of the Reverse-Field Screw Pinch configuration. Conditions that can virtually eliminate this instability are found numerically, for gentle density profiles. However, shear-stabilization proves to be ineffective for sharper (but still reasonable-looking) profiles. If such profiles have to be lived with, it becomes necessary to rely either on finite-beta stabilization or on the fact that this instability possesses a threshold related to ion gyro-resonance.

  13. Properties of the edge plasma in the rebuilt Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Bergsåker, H.; Antoni, V.; Drake, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    The edge region of the rebuilt Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment has been investigated using Langmuir probes. Radial profiles of main plasma parameters are obtained and compared with those of the previous device Extrap-T2. The spontaneous setting up of a double shear layer of E×B toroidal velocity is confirmed. The particle flux induced by electrostatic fluctuations is calculated and the resulting effective diffusion coefficient is consistent with the Bohm estimate. A close relationship between electrostatic fluctuations at the edge and non-linear coupling of MHD modes in the core is found.

  14. Mean-field studies of time reversal breaking states in super-heavy nuclei with the Gogny force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robledo, L. M., E-mail: luis.robledo@uam.es [Departamento Física Teórica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Recent progress on the description of time reversal breaking (odd mass and multi-quasiparticle excitation) states in super-heavy nuclei within a mean field framework and using several flavors of the Gogny interaction is reported. The study includes ground and excited states in selected odd mass isotopes of nobelium and mendelevium as well as high K isomeric states in {sup 254}No. These are two and four-quasiparticle excitations that are treated in the same self-consistent HFB plus blocking framework as the odd mass states.

  15. Effects of plasma collisionality on power balance and magnetic fluctuations in the T1 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, G.; Brzozowski, J. H.; Hörling, P.; Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P.; Drake, J. R.

    1996-05-01

    The effects of plasma collisionality on power balance and magnetic fluctuations have been studied on the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch. A characteristic minimum in loop voltage is observed as the plasma collisionality decreases. The minimum is caused by an increase in the anomalous input power and coincides with a change of scaling of the magnetic fluctuations and a rapid increase of the electron mean free path. However, the increase of anomalous input power in the low collisional regime appears to have little influence on the total amount of energy stored in the plasma.

  16. Functional integrity of flexible n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors on a reversibly bistable platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaraj, Nasir; Hussain, Aftab M.; Torres Sevilla, Galo A.; Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Rojas, Jhonathan P.; Aljedaani, Abdulrahman B.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2015-10-01

    Flexibility can bring a new dimension to state-of-the-art electronics, such as rollable displays and integrated circuit systems being transformed into more powerful resources. Flexible electronics are typically hosted on polymeric substrates. Such substrates can be bent and rolled up, but cannot be independently fixed at the rigid perpendicular position necessary to realize rollable display-integrated gadgets and electronics. A reversibly bistable material can assume two stable states in a reversible way: flexibly rolled state and independently unbent state. Such materials are used in cycling and biking safety wristbands and a variety of ankle bracelets for orthopedic healthcare. They are often wrapped around an object with high impulsive force loading. Here, we study the effects of cumulative impulsive force loading on thinned (25 μm) flexible silicon-based n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor devices housed on a reversibly bistable flexible platform. We found that the transistors have maintained their high performance level up to an accumulated 180 kN of impact force loading. The gate dielectric layers have maintained their reliability, which is evidenced by the low leakage current densities. Also, we observed low variation in the effective electron mobility values, which manifests that the device channels have maintained their carrier transport properties.

  17. Functional integrity of flexible n-channel metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors on a reversibly bistable platform

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir

    2015-10-26

    Flexibility can bring a new dimension to state-of-the-art electronics, such as rollable displays and integrated circuit systems being transformed into more powerful resources. Flexible electronics are typically hosted on polymeric substrates. Such substrates can be bent and rolled up, but cannot be independently fixed at the rigid perpendicular position necessary to realize rollable display-integrated gadgets and electronics. A reversibly bistable material can assume two stable states in a reversible way: flexibly rolled state and independently unbent state. Such materials are used in cycling and biking safety wristbands and a variety of ankle bracelets for orthopedic healthcare. They are often wrapped around an object with high impulsive force loading. Here, we study the effects of cumulative impulsive force loading on thinned (25 μm) flexible silicon-based n-channel metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor devices housed on a reversibly bistable flexible platform. We found that the transistors have maintained their high performance level up to an accumulated 180 kN of impact force loading. The gate dielectric layers have maintained their reliability, which is evidenced by the low leakage current densities. Also, we observed low variation in the effective electron mobility values, which manifests that the device channels have maintained their carrier transport properties.

  18. Baryon currents in QCD with compact dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Lucini, B; Pica, C; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Pica, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    On a compact space with non-trivial cycles, for sufficiently small values of the radii of the compact dimensions, SU(N) gauge theories coupled with fermions in the fundamental representation spontaneously break charge conjugation, time reversal and parity. We show at one loop in perturbation theory that physical signature for this phenomenon is a non-zero baryonic current wrapping around the compact directions. The persistence of this current beyond the perturbative regime is checked by lattice simulations.

  19. Defect study by sub-second relaxation of the internal field after polarization reversal in lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Jung Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Ro, Ji Hyun; Cha, Myoung Sik [Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    The difficulty in measuring the fast response of the coercive field in lithium-niobate (LN) crystals after polarization reversal was overcome by using the partial poling method. The measurement revealed two distinct relaxations of the internal field in LN crystals. Their physical origins are discussed using a non-stoichiometric defect model of LN based on the fact that the functional form of the experimental data was found to be a stretched exponential. The magnitude of the internal field was expected to be proportional to the defect concentration, which was verified using samples with reduced defect concentrations which were fabricated using the vapor transport equilibration method. This experimental method may be used as a useful defect characterization technique. The inherent coercive field of stoichiometric LN was expected to be 1.1 {approx} 1.5 kV/mm by subtracting the total contributions of the internal field and the wall-velocity-dependent terms from the measured poling field of congruent LN ({approx} 21 kV/mm)

  20. Intermediate regime of charged particle scattering in the field-reversal configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shustov, P. I., E-mail: p.shustov@gmail.com; Yushkov, E. V. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Profsouznaya st., 84/32, GSP-7, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Artemyev, A. V., E-mail: artemyev@iki.rssi.ru [Space Research Institute, RAS, Profsouznaya st., 84/32, GSP-7, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate the charged particle scattering in the magnetic field configuration with stretched magnetic field lines. This scattering results from the violation of the adiabaticity of charged particle motion in the region with the strong gradient of the magnetic field. We consider the intermediate regime of charged particle dynamics, when the violation of the adiabaticity is significant enough, but particle motion is not chaotic. We demonstrate and describe the significant scattering of particles with large adiabatic invariants (magnetic moment). We discuss a possible application of obtained results for description of the peculiarities of pitch-angle diffusion of relativistic electrons in the Earth radiation belts.

  1. Near Field sorption Data Bases for Compacted MX-80 Bentonite for Performance Assessment of a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in Opalinus Clay Host Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.; Baeyens, B

    2003-08-01

    Bentonites of various types and compacted forms are being investigated in many countries as backfill materials in high-level radioactive waste disposal concepts. Nagra is currently considering an Opalinus clay (OPA) formation in the Zuercher Weinland as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. A compacted MX-80 bentonite is foreseen as a potential backfill material. Performance assessment studies will be performed for this site and one of the requirements for such an assessment are sorption data bases (SDB) for the bentonite near-field. The purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to develop the SDB. One of the pre-requisites for developing a SDB is a water chemistry for the compacted bentonite porewater. For a number of reasons mentioned in the report, and discussed in more detail elsewhere, this is not a straightforward task. There are considerable uncertainties associated with the major ion concentrations and in particular with the system pH and Eh. The MX-80 SDB was developed for a reference bentonite porewater (pH = 7.25) which was calculated using the reference OPA porewater. In addition, two further SDBs are presented for porewaters calculated at pH values of 6.9 and 7.9 corresponding to lower and upper bound values calculated for the range of groundwater compositions anticipated for the OPA host rock. 'In house' sorption isotherm data were measured for Cs(I), Ni(II), Eu(III), Th(IV), Se(IV) and 1(-1) on the 'as received' MX-80 material equilibrated with a simulated porewater composition. Complementary 'in house' sorption edge and isotherm measurements on conditioned Na/Ca montmorillonites were also available for many of these radionuclides. These data formed the core of the SDB. Nevertheless, some of the required sorption data still had to be obtained from the open literature. An important part of this report is concerned with describing selection procedures and the modifications

  2. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  3. Compact plane illumination plugin device to enable light sheet fluorescence imaging of multi-cellular organisms on an inverted wide-field microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zeyi; Lee, Juhyun; Jiang, Hao; Dong, Siyan; Jen, Nelson; Hsiai, Tzung; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We developed a compact plane illumination plugin (PIP) device which enabled plane illumination and light sheet fluorescence imaging on a conventional inverted microscope. The PIP device allowed the integration of microscope with tunable laser sheet profile, fast image acquisition, and 3-D scanning. The device is both compact, measuring approximately 15 by 5 by 5 cm, and cost-effective, since we employed consumer electronics and an inexpensive device molding method. We demonstrated that PIP provided significant contrast and resolution enhancement to conventional microscopy through imaging different multi-cellular fluorescent structures, including 3-D branched cells in vitro and live zebrafish embryos. Imaging with the integration of PIP greatly reduced out-of-focus contamination and generated sharper contrast in acquired 2-D plane images when compared with the stand-alone inverted microscope. As a result, the dynamic fluid domain of the beating zebrafish heart was clearly segmented and the functional monitoring of the heart was achieved. Furthermore, the enhanced axial resolution established by thin plane illumination of PIP enabled the 3-D reconstruction of the branched cellular structures, which leads to the improvement on the functionality of the wide field microscopy. PMID:26819828

  4. Analysis techniques for diagnosing runaway ion distributions in the reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Bonofiglo, P. J.; Sears, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    An advanced neutral particle analyzer (ANPA) on the Madison Symmetric Torus measures deuterium ions of energy ranges 8-45 keV with an energy resolution of 2-4 keV and time resolution of 10 μs. Three different experimental configurations measure distinct portions of the naturally occurring fast ion distributions: fast ions moving parallel, anti-parallel, or perpendicular to the plasma current. On a radial-facing port, fast ions moving perpendicular to the current have the necessary pitch to be measured by the ANPA. With the diagnostic positioned on a tangent line through the plasma core, a chord integration over fast ion density, background neutral density, and local appropriate pitch defines the measured sample. The plasma current can be reversed to measure anti-parallel fast ions in the same configuration. Comparisons of energy distributions for the three configurations show an anisotropic fast ion distribution favoring high pitch ions.

  5. Origin of the magnetic-field controlled polarization reversal in multiferroic TbMn2 O 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, N.; Meier, D.; Pisarev, R. V.; Park, S.; Cheong, S.-W.; Fiebig, M.

    2011-03-01

    The interplay of multi-dimensional complex magnetic order parameters leads to interesting effects like magnetically induced ferroelectricity. A particular interesting example is TbMn 2 O5 because of the associated magnetic-field controllable electric polarization. By optical second harmonic generation we show that the gigantic magnetoelectric effect originates in three independent ferroelectric contributions. Two of these are manganese-generated. The third contribution is related to the magnetism of the Tb 3+ sublattice and has not been identified so far. It mediates the remarkable magnetic-field induced polarization reversal. This model is verified by experiments on the isostructural YMn 2 O5 where Y3+ ions are nonmagnetic and only two polarization contributions are present and no magnetoelectric coupling is observed. These results underline the importance of the 3 d - 4 f -interaction for the intricate magnetoelectric coupling in the class of isostructural RMn 2 O5 compounds. This work was supported by the DFG through SFB 608.

  6. Comparison of confinement in resistive-shell reversed-field pinch devices with two different magnetic shell penetration times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravestijn, R. M.; Drake, J. R.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew, E.

    2004-01-01

    A loop voltage is required to sustain the reversed-field pinch (RFP) equilibrium. The configuration is characterized by redistribution of magnetic helicity but with the condition that the total helicity is maintained constant. The magnetic field shell penetration time, tgrs, has a critical role in the stability and performance of the RFP. Confinement in the EXTRAP device has been studied with two values of tgrs, first (EXTRAP-T2) with tgrs of the order of the typical relaxation cycle timescale and then (EXTRAP-T2R) with tgrs much longer than the relaxation cycle timescale, but still much shorter than the pulse length. Plasma parameters show significant improvements in confinement in EXTRAP-T2R. The typical loop voltage required to sustain comparable electron poloidal beta values is a factor of 3 lower in the EXTRAP-T2R device. The improvement is attributed to reduced magnetic turbulence.

  7. Measurements and modeling of transport and impurity radial profiles in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldkepp, M.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Dux, R.; Menmuir, S.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-09-01

    Radial impurity profiles of oxygen in the rebuilt reversed field pinch EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] have been measured with a multichannel spectrometer. Absolute ion densities for oxygen peak between 1-4×1010cm-3 for a central electron density of 1×1013cm-3. Transport simulations with the one-dimensional transport code STRAHL with a diffusion coefficient of 20m2 s-1 yield density profiles similar to those measured. Direct measurement of the ion profile evolution during pulsed poloidal current drive suggests that the diffusion coefficient is reduced by a factor ˜2 in the core but remains unaffected toward the edge. Core transport is not significantly affected by the radial magnetic field growth seen at the edge in discharges without feedback control. This indicates that the mode core amplitude remains the same while the mode eigenfunction increases at the edge.

  8. Simulation of Far-Field Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging with Two-Color One-Photon Excitation of Reversible Photoactivatable Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chen; QIAO Ling-Ling; MAO Zheng-Le

    2011-01-01

    We propose to achieve far-field super-resolution imaging by using offset two-color one-photon (2C1P) excitation of reversible photoactivatable fluorescence proteins. Due to the distinctive photoswitching performance of the proteins, such as dronpa, the fluorescence emission will only come from the overlapped region of activation beam and excitation beam. The analysis solution of rate equation shows that the resolution of offset 2C1P microscope is "engineered" by laser power of excitation and activation beams and the power ratio between them. Superior lateral and transverse resolution is theoretically demonstrated compared with conventional fluorescence scanning microscopy.%@@ We propose to achieve far-field super-resolution imaging by using offset two-color one-photon(2C1P) excitation of reversible photoactivatable fluorescence proteins.Due to the distinctive photoswitching performance of the proteins,such as dronpa,the fluorescence emission will only come from the overlapped region of activation beam and excitation beam.The analysis solution of rate equation shows that the resolution of offset 2C1P microscope is "engineered" by laser power of excitation and activation beams and the power ratio between them.Superior lateral and transverse resolution is theoretically demonstrated compared with conventional fluorescence scanning microscopy.

  9. 紧致空间中辐射场的统计性质%Statistical Properties of Radiation Fields in a Compact Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常哲; 关成波

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss radiation fields in a compact space of finite size instead of that in a cavity for investigating the coupled atom-radiation field system. Representations of T(1) × SO(4) group are used to give a formulation for kinematics of the radiation fields. The explicit geometrical parameter dependence of statistical properties of radiation fields is obtained. Our results show remarkable differences from those of the black-body radiation system in free space.%通过对有限紧致空间中辐射场的研究来讨论腔中的原子-辐射场耦合系统.利用T(1)×SO(4)群的表示,给出了辐射场的单粒子波函数以及相应的色散关系.由此详细讨论了紧致空间中辐射场的玻色-爱因斯坦统计.发现其性质与空间的几何性质(曲率半径)有显著的依赖关系,并表现与通常黑体辐射系统的显著差异.

  10. Reverse design of a bull's eye structure based on the plasmonic far-field pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Akira; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2013-09-09

    We present a novel concept on designing a bull's eye structure for a single-wavelength optical source. The plasmonic far-field around a subwavelength aperture on a thin gold film is calculated by finite-difference time-domain method. Based on the annular field intensity distribution on the film surface, we present a method for determining a fairly optimal first groove radius and a periodicity of the grooves that show enhanced transmission. By additionally fine-tuning groove width and groove depth, we have achieved a transmission factor of 9.74. Our novel method has high potential in applications such as silicon infrared sensors.

  11. Explicit Compact Surface-Potential and Drain-Current Models for Generic Asymmetric Double-Gate Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaomin; Zhou, Xing; Chandrasekaran, Karthik; Rustagi, Subhash C.; See, Guan Huei

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, explicit surface potentials for undoped asymmetric-double-gate (a-DG) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) suitable for compact model development are presented for the first time. The model is physically derived from Poisson’s equation in each region of operation and adopted in a unified regional approach. The proposed model is physically scalable with oxide/channel thicknesses and has been verified with generic implicit solutions for independent gate biases as well as for different gate/oxide materials. The model is extendable to silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and symmetric-DG (s-DG) MOSFETs. Finally, a continuous, explicit drain-current equation has been derived on the basis of the developed explicit surface-potential solutions.

  12. Third-and-a-half order post-Newtonian equations of motion for relativistic compact binaries using the strong field point particle limit

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, Yousuke

    2009-01-01

    We report our rederivation of the equations of motion for relativistic compact binaries through the third-and-a-half post-Newtonian (3.5 PN) order approximation to general relativity using the strong field point particle limit to describe self-gravitating stars instead of the Dirac delta functional. The computation is done in harmonic coordinates. Our equations of motion describe the orbital motion of the binary consisting of spherically symmetric non-rotating stars. The resulting equations of motion fully agree with the 3.5 PN equations of motion derived in the previous works. We also show that the locally defined energy of the star has a simple relation with its mass up to the 3.5 PN order.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Neutral Entrainment Effect on Field-Reversed Configuration Thruster Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    efficiently accelerated by the electromagnetic field. On the contrary, the electron impact ionization, being a highly endothermic reaction, takes away...The authors used, in part, the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment, which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number

  14. Study of the Synchronous Operation of an Annular Field Reversed Configuration Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-05

    coil theta pinch (CSS) [42], multi-pole geometry ( Extrap ) [35], and rotating magnetic field (Rotamak) [24]. In total, developing a lower voltage...orbit-limited current collection. Physics of Fluids, 16(5):629–36, 1973. [35] B. Lehnert. The extrap concept. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in

  15. Direct observation of λ-DNA molecule reversal movement within microfluidic channels under electric field with single molecule imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengyun, Yang; Kaige, Wang; Dan, Sun; Wei, Zhao; Hai-qing, Wang; Xin, He; Gui-ren, Wang; Jin-tao, Bai

    2016-07-01

    The electrodynamic characteristics of single DNA molecules moving within micro-/nano-fluidic channels are important in the design of biomedical chips and bimolecular sensors. In this study, the dynamic properties of λ-DNA molecules transferring along the microchannels driven by the external electrickinetic force were systemically investigated with the single molecule fluorescence imaging technique. The experimental results indicated that the velocity of DNA molecules was strictly dependent on the value of the applied electric field and the diameter of the channel. The larger the external electric field, the larger the velocity, and the more significant deformation of DNA molecules. More meaningfully, it was found that the moving directions of DNA molecules had two completely different directions: (i) along the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was smaller than a certain threshold value; (ii) opposite to the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was greater than the threshold electric field intensity. The reversal movement of DNA molecules was mainly determined by the competition between the electrophoresis force and the influence of electro-osmosis flow. These new findings will theoretically guide the practical application of fluidic channel sensors and lab-on-chips for precisely manipulating single DNA molecules. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378083), the International Cooperation Foundation of the National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2011DFA12220), the Major Research Plan of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91123030), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province of China (Grant Nos. 2010JS110 and 2013SZS03-Z01).

  16. Using archaeomagnetic field models to constrain the physics of the core: robustness and preferred locations of reversed flux patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra-Nova, Filipe; Amit, Hagay; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2016-09-01

    Archaeomagnetic field models cover longer timescales than historical models and may therefore resolve the motion of geomagnetic features on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) in a more meaningful statistical sense. Here we perform a detailed appraisal of archaeomagnetic field models to infer some aspects of the physics of the outer core. We characterize and compare the identification and tracking of reversed flux patches (RFPs) in order to assess the RFPs robustness. We find similar behaviour within a family of models but differences among different families, suggesting that modelling strategy is more influential than data set. Similarities involve recurrent positions of RFPs, but no preferred direction of motion is found. The tracking of normal flux patches shows similar qualitative behaviour confirming that RFPs identification and tracking is not strongly biased by their relative weakness. We also compare the tracking of RFPs with that of the historical field model gufm1 and with seismic anomalies of the lowermost mantle to explore the possibility that RFPs have preferred locations prescribed by lower mantle lateral heterogeneity. The archaeomagnetic field model that most resembles the historical field is interpreted in terms of core dynamics and core-mantle thermal interactions. This model exhibits correlation between RFPs and low seismic shear velocity in co-latitude and a shift in longitude. These results shed light on core processes, in particular we infer toroidal field lines with azimuthal orientation below the CMB and large fluid upwelling structures with a width of about 80° (Africa) and 110° (Pacific) at the top of the core. Finally, similar preferred locations of RFPs in the past 9 and 3 kyr of the same archaeomagnetic field model suggest that a 3 kyr period is sufficiently long to reliably detect mantle control on core dynamics. This allows estimating an upper bound of 220-310 km for the magnetic boundary layer thickness below the CMB.

  17. DYNAMICS OF THE GEOMAGNETIC FIELD AND REVERSALS IN THE SATELLITE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of changing the polarity of the geomagnetic field in the satellite model. It is assumed that the central core of the earth magnetized and surrounded by a number of satellites, each of which has a magnetic moment. Satellites interact with a central core and one another by means of gravity and through a magnetic field. It is shown that satellites distributed in orbit around a central core in such a system. It displays two models, one of which on the outer orbit satellites interact with each other and with a central body - the core and satellites, located on the inner orbit. The central body can make sudden upheavals in the fall at the core of one or more satellites, which leads to the excitation of vibrations in the satellite system, located on the outer orbit. It is shown that the duration of phase with constant polarity and upheaval time depends on the magnitude of the disturbance torque and core asymmetry. The second model contains two magnets subsystems and the central core. The rapid change of the geomagnetic field polarity detected on the basis of paleomagnetic data is modeled based on the Euler theory describing the rigid body rotation. In this model, there are modes with a quick flip of the body while maintaining the angular momentum. If the body has a magnetic moment, when there is a change coup magnetic field polarity. This leads to the excitation of vibrations in the satellite subsystems that are on the inner and outer orbits. Numerical simulation of the dynamics of the system consisting of the core and 10-13 satellites was run to determine the period of constant polarity magnetic field

  18. On the Diversity of Compact Objects within Supernova Remnants. I: A Parametric Model for Magnetic Field Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Adam

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of X-ray and radio observations has revealed in the past decade a growing diversity of neutron stars (NSs) with properties spanning orders of magnitude in magnetic field strength and ages, and with emission processes explained by a range of mechanisms dictating their radiation properties. However, serious difficulties exist with the magneto-dipole model of isolated neutron star fields and their inferred ages, such as a large range of observed braking indices ($n$, with values often $<$3) and a mismatch between the neutron star and associated supernova remnant (SNR) ages. This problem arises primarily from the assumptions of a constant magnetic field with $n$=3, and an initial spin period that is much smaller than the observed current period. It has been suggested that a solution to this problem involves magnetic field evolution, with some NSs having magnetic fields buried within the crust by accretion of fall-back supernova material following their birth. In this work we explore a parametric pheno...

  19. Storm time equatorial plasma bubble zonal drift reversal due to disturbance Hall electric field over the Brazilian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.; Denardini, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of equatorial ionospheric plasma bubbles over Brazilian sector during two magnetic storm events are investigated in this work. The observations were made at varying phases of magnetic disturbances when the bubble zonal drift velocity was found to reverse westward from its normally eastward velocity. Calculation of the zonal drift based on a realistic low-latitude ionosphere modeled by the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model showed on a quantitative basis a clear competition between vertical Hall electric field and disturbance zonal winds on the variations observed in the zonal velocity of the plasma bubble. The Hall electric field arising from enhanced ratio of field line-integrated conductivities, ΣH/ΣP, is most often generated by an increase in the integrated Hall conductivity, arising from enhanced energetic particle precipitation in the South American Magnetic Anomaly region for which evidence is provided from observation of anomalous sporadic E layers over Cachoeira Paulista and Fortaleza. Such sporadic E layers are also by themselves evidence for the development of the Hall electric field that modifies the zonal drift.

  20. Resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell (τw=6 ms) reversed field pinch are described. A nonresonant mode (m=1,n=-10) with the same handedness as the internal field grows nearly exponentially with an average growth time of about 2.6 ms (less than 1/2 of the shell time) consistent with linear stability theory. The externally nonresonant unstable modes (m=1,n>0), predicted by linear stability theory, are observed to have only low amplitudes (in the normal low-Θ operation mode of the device). The radial field of the dominant internally resonant tearing modes (m=1,n=-15 to n=-12) remain low due to spontaneous fast mode rotation, corresponding to angular phase velocities up to 280 krad/s. Phase aligned mode structures are observed to rotate toroidally with an average angular velocity of 40 krad/s, in the opposite direction of the plasma current. Toward the end of the discharge, the radial field of the internally resonant modes grows as the modes slow down and become wall-locked, in agreement with nonlinear computations. Fast rotation of the internally resonant modes has been observed only recently and is attributed to a change of the front-end system (vacuum vessel, shell, and TF coil) of the device.

  1. Electric field controlled strain induced reversible switching of magnetization in Galfenol nanomagnets delineated on PMN-PT substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Hasnain; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    We report a non-volatile converse magneto-electric effect in elliptical Galfenol (FeGa) nanomagnets of ~300 nm lateral dimensions and ~10nm thickness delineated on a PMN-PT substrate. This effect can be harnessed for energy-efficient non-volatile memory. The nanomagnets are fabricated with e-beam lithography and sputtering. Their major axes are aligned parallel to the direction in which the substrate is poled and they are magnetized in this direction with a magnetic field. An electric field in the opposite direction generates compressive strain in the piezoelectric substrate which is partially transferred to the nanomagnets and rotates their magnetization away from the major axes to metastable orientations. There they remain after the field is removed, resulting in non-volatility. Reversing the electric field generates tensile strain which returns the magnetization to the original state. The two states can encode two binary bits which can be written using the correct voltage polarity, resulting in non-toggle behavior. Scaled memory fashioned on this effect can exhibit write energy dissipation of only ~2 aJ. Work is supported by NSF under ECCS-1124714 and CCF-1216614. Sputtering was carried out at NIST Gaithersburg.

  2. Field-reversed bubble in deep plasma channels for high quality electron acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Pukhov, A; Tueckmantel, T; Thomas, J; Kostyukov, I Yu

    2014-01-01

    We study hollow plasma channels with smooth boundaries for laser-driven electron acceleration in the bubble regime. Contrary to the uniform plasma case, the laser forms no optical shock and no etching at the front. This increases the effective bubble phase velocity and energy gain. The longitudinal field has a plateau that allows for mono-energetic acceleration. We observe as low as 10^{-3} r.m.s. relative witness beam energy uncertainty in each cross-section and 0.3% total energy spread. By varying plasma density profile inside a deep channel, the bubble fields can be adjusted to balance the laser depletion and dephasing lengths. Bubble scaling laws for the deep channel are derived. Ultra-short pancake-like laser pulses lead to the highest energies of accelerated electrons per Joule of laser pulse energy.

  3. A reverse taxonomic approach to assess macrofaunal distribution patterns in abyssal Pacific polymetallic nodule fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Janssen

    Full Text Available Heightened interest in the exploitation of deep seafloor minerals is raising questions on the consequences for the resident fauna. Assessing species ranges and determination of processes underlying current species distributions are prerequisites to conservation planning and predicting faunal responses to changing environmental conditions. The abyssal central Pacific nodule belt, located between the Clarion and Clipperton Fracture Zones (CCZ, is an area prospected for mining of polymetallic nodules. We examined variations in genetic diversity and broad-scale connectivity of isopods and polychaetes across the CCZ. Faunal assemblages were studied from two mining claims (the eastern German and French license areas located 1300 km apart and influenced by different productivity regimes. Using a reverse taxonomy approach based on DNA barcoding, we tested to what extent distance and large-scale changes in environmental parameters lead to differentiation in two macrofaunal taxa exhibiting different functions and life-history patterns. A fragment of the mitochondrial gene Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit 1 (COI was analyzed. At a 97% threshold the molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs corresponded well to morphological species. Molecular analyses indicated high local and regional diversity mostly because of large numbers of singletons in the samples. Consequently, variation in composition of genotypic clusters between sites was exceedingly large partly due to paucity of deep-sea sampling and faunal patchiness. A higher proportion of wide-ranging species in polychaetes was contrasted with mostly restricted distributions in isopods. Remarkably, several cryptic lineages appeared to be sympatric and occurred in taxa with putatively good dispersal abilities, whereas some brooding lineages revealed broad distributions across the CCZ. Geographic distance could explain variation in faunal connectivity between regions and sites to some extent, while assumed

  4. Field theory of bicritical and tetracritical points. IV. Critical dynamics including reversible terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, R; Holovatch, Yu; Moser, G

    2012-02-01

    This article concludes a series of papers [Folk, Holovatch, and Moser, Phys. Rev. E 78, 041124 (2008); 78, 041125 (2008); 79, 031109 (2009)] where the tools of the field theoretical renormalization group were employed to explain and quantitatively describe different types of static and dynamic behavior in the vicinity of multicritical points. Here we give the complete two-loop calculation and analysis of the dynamic renormalization-group flow equations at the multicritical point in anisotropic antiferromagnets in an external magnetic field. We find that the time scales of the order parameters characterizing the parallel and perpendicular ordering with respect to the external field scale in the same way. This holds independent whether the Heisenberg fixed point or the biconical fixed point in statics is the stable one. The nonasymptotic analysis of the dynamic flow equations shows that due to cancellation effects the critical behavior is described, in distances from the critical point accessible to experiments, by the critical behavior qualitatively found in one-loop order. Although one may conclude from the effective dynamic exponents (taking almost their one-loop values) that weak scaling for the order parameter components is valid, the flow of the time-scale ratios is quite different, and they do not reach their asymptotic values.

  5. U(1) Gauge Field in 6D Space-Time With Compact Noncommutative Dimensions: A Coherent State Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Nasseri, M; Souri, M

    2012-01-01

    We consider the U(1) gauge field defined over a six dimensional space-time with extra dimensions compactified on a noncommutative toroidal orbifold, within the context of coherent state approach to the noncommutative spaces. We demonstrate that the fuzzines of extra dimensions can lead to the canceling of the part of electrostatic interaction mediated by the massive KK modes.

  6. Development of a Thomson scattering system and its use in a rotating magnetic field driven field-reversed configurations plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kiyong

    The Thomson scattering system has been utilized on the Translation Confinement & Sustainment Upgrade (TCSU) experiment to measure the electron temperature and density. The system uses five polychromators from General Atomics attached with three pre-amplifier modules from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to measure five spatial points during a single plasma discharge. The diagnostic consisting of various mechanical and optical components is introduced, followed by the calibration procedure of the system. For validating measurements, the electron temperature and the relative density obtained from Thomson scattering are compared with measurements from the Langmuir probe. Both measurements are in good agreement. A power scan was conducted by applying different voltages to the rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive to observe the scaling properties of temperature and density for even-parity and odd-parity RMF operations. Also, a discrepancy is observed when comparing the density based on pressure-balance with localized measurements. Further analysis indicates a possibility of an ion-temperature-gradient, presumably due to ion cyclotron heating, present during steady-state operation.

  7. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Locus Polymorphisms and Cancer Risk: A Field Synopsis and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Daunia; Pooley, Karen A.; Landi, Maria T.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Baird, Duncan M.; Prescott, Jennifer; De Vivo, Immaculata; Nitti, Donato

    2012-01-01

    Background Several recent studies have provided evidence that polymorphisms in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene sequence are associated with cancer development, but a comprehensive synopsis is not available. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available molecular epidemiology data regarding the association between TERT locus polymorphisms and predisposition to cancer. Methods A systematic review of the English literature was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, Cancerlit, Google Scholar, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases for studies on associations between TERT locus polymorphisms and cancer risk. Random-effects meta-analysis was performed to pool per-allele odds ratios for TERT locus polymorphisms and risk of cancer, and between-study heterogeneity and potential bias sources (eg, publication and chasing bias) were assessed. Because the TERT locus includes the cleft lip and palate transmembrane 1-like (CLPTM1L) gene, which is in linkage disequilibrium with TERT, CLPTM1L polymorphisms were also analyzed. Cumulative evidence for polymorphisms with statistically significant associations was graded as “strong,” “moderate,” and “weak” according to the Venice criteria. The joint population attributable risk was calculated for polymorphisms with strong evidence of association. Results Eighty-five studies enrolling 490 901 subjects and reporting on 494 allelic contrasts were retrieved. Data were available on 67 TERT locus polymorphisms and 24 tumor types, for a total of 221 unique combinations of polymorphisms and cancer types. Upon meta-analysis, a statistically significant association with the risk of any cancer type was found for 22 polymorphisms. Strong, moderate, and weak cumulative evidence for association with at least one tumor type was demonstrated for 11, 9, and 14 polymorphisms, respectively. For lung cancer, which was the most studied tumor type, the estimated joint population attributable risk for three

  8. Effects of Static Magnetic Fields on the Visual Cortex: reversible Visual Deficits and Reduction of Neuronal Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila, Jordi; Cudeiro, Javier; Rivadulla, Casto

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation techniques have been successfully used to modulate brain activity, have become a highly useful tool in basic and clinical research and, recently, have attracted increased attention due to their putative use as a method for neuro-enhancement. In this scenario, transcranial static magnetic stimulation (SMS) of moderate strength might represent an affordable, simple, and complementary method to other procedures, such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation or direct current stimulation, but its mechanisms and effects are not thoroughly understood. In this study, we show that static magnetic fields applied to visual cortex of awake primates cause reversible deficits in a visual detection task. Complementary experiments in anesthetized cats show that the visual deficits are a consequence of a strong reduction in neural activity. These results demonstrate that SMS is able to effectively modulate neuronal activity and could be considered to be a tool to be used for different purposes ranging from experimental studies to clinical applications.

  9. Diagnostic suite of the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. C.; Gota, H.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M.

    2016-11-01

    The C-2U experiment at Tri Alpha Energy studies the evolution of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection. Data on the FRC plasma performance are provided by a comprehensive suite of diagnostics that includes magnetic sensors, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, neutral particle analyzers, and fusion product detectors. While many of these diagnostic systems were inherited from the preceding experiment C-2, C-2U has a variety of new and upgraded diagnostic systems: multi-chord far-infrared polarimetry, multiple fast imaging cameras with selectable atomic line filters, proton detector arrays, and 100 channel bolometer units capable of observing multiple regions of the spectrum simultaneously. In addition, extensive ongoing work focuses on advanced methods of measuring separatrix shape and plasma current profile that will facilitate equilibrium reconstruction and active control of the FRC plasma.

  10. Diagnostic suite of the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M. C., E-mail: mthompson@trialphaenergy.com; Gota, H.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The C-2U experiment at Tri Alpha Energy studies the evolution of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection. Data on the FRC plasma performance are provided by a comprehensive suite of diagnostics that includes magnetic sensors, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, neutral particle analyzers, and fusion product detectors. While many of these diagnostic systems were inherited from the preceding experiment C-2, C-2U has a variety of new and upgraded diagnostic systems: multi-chord far-infrared polarimetry, multiple fast imaging cameras with selectable atomic line filters, proton detector arrays, and 100 channel bolometer units capable of observing multiple regions of the spectrum simultaneously. In addition, extensive ongoing work focuses on advanced methods of measuring separatrix shape and plasma current profile that will facilitate equilibrium reconstruction and active control of the FRC plasma.

  11. Reversed-field pinch dynamics and transport studies. Quarterly progress report, third quarter, 20 October 1983-20 January 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, D.D.

    1984-03-20

    Progress in RFP dynamics and transport studies is described. A three-dimensional, incompressible MHD code has been developed, and is being checked against known results. It is computationally more efficient than the existing code, and will be used extensively if compressibility is determined to be unimportant. Post-processor codes to analyze data generated by the nonlinear code have been developed. Three-dimensional computer runs at low theta(=B/sub theta/(a)/) have found the development of a substantial stochastic core, with good flux surfaces being retained in the outer part of the discharge. Runs at high theta have shown complete stochasticity, with reappearance of outer flux surfaces as the modes saturate and relax. Anomalous maintenance of positive toroidal flux arising from a poloidal electric field at the field reversal surface induced by MHD fluctuations (dynamo) has been observed. These results have been documented in a publication. Statistical analysis of stochastic magnetic field regions to assess transport coefficients is underway. Analytic studies of the RFP dynamo are continuing. We are attempting to find steady state solutions with flow to the resistive MHD equations. Necessary conditions for the existance of the dynamo have been identified. A reduced model to simulate phenomena that occur on the relaxation time scale, such as F-theta current drive, has been derived, and a numerical algorithm formulated.

  12. Reversible Luminescence Modulation upon an Electric Field on a Full Solid-State Device Based on Lanthanide Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaohui; Shang, Jie; Pan, Liang; Tan, Hongwei; Chen, Bin; Liu, Gang; Huang, Gang; Bernot, Kevin; Guillou, Olivier; Li, Run-Wei

    2016-06-22

    Switching luminescence of lanthanide-based molecules through an external electric field is considered as a promising approach toward novel functional molecule-based devices. Classic routes use casted films and liquid electrolyte as media for redox reactions. Such protocol, even if efficient, is relatively hard to turn into an effective solid-state device. In this work, we explicitly synthesize lanthanide-based dimers whose luminescent behavior is affected by the presence of Cu(2+) ions. Excellent evaporability of the dimers and utilization of Cu(2+)-based solid-state electrolyte makes it possible to reproduce solution behavior at the solid state. Reversible modulation of Cu(2+) ions transport can be achieved by an electric field in a solid-state device, where lanthanide-related luminescence is driven by an electric field. These findings provide a proof-of-concept alternative approach for electrically driven modulation of solid-state luminescence and show promising potential for information storage media in the future.

  13. Effect of electric field on the performance of soil electro-bioremediation with a periodic polarity reversal strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, E; Villaseñor, J; Cañizares, P; Rodrigo, M A

    2016-03-01

    In this work, it is studied the effect of the electric fields (within the range 0.0-1.5 V cm(-1)) on the performance of electrobioremediation with polarity reversal, using a bench scale plant with diesel-spiked kaolinite with 14-d long tests. Results obtained show that the periodic changes in the polarity of the electric field results in a more efficient treatment as compared with the single electro-bioremediation process, and it does not require the addition of a buffer to keep the pH within a suitable range. The soil heating was not very important and it did not cause a change in the temperature of the soil up to values incompatible with the life of microorganisms. Low values of water transported by the electro-osmosis process were attained with this strategy. After only 14 d of treatment, by using the highest electric field studied in this work (1.5 V cm(-1)), up to 35.40% of the diesel added at the beginning of the test was removed, value much higher than the 10.5% obtained by the single bioremediation technology in the same period.

  14. A study of the possible relation of the cardiac arrhythmias occurrence to the polarity reversal of the solar magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromichalaki, H.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Theodoropoulou, A.; Paouris, E.; Apostolou, Th.

    2017-01-01

    The biological human system is probably affected by the solar and geomagnetic disturbances as well as the cosmic ray variations. In this work, the relation between the solar activity and cosmic ray variations and the cardiac arrhythmias over the time period 1997-2009 covering the solar cycle 23, is studied. The used medical data set refers to 4741 patients with cardiac arrhythmias and 2548 of whom were diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, obtained from the 2nd Cardiological Clinic of the General Hospital of Nicaea, Piraeus, in Greece. The smoothing method on a 365-day basis and the Pearson r-coefficient were used in order to compare these records with the number of sunspots, flares, solar proton events, coronal mass ejections and cosmic ray intensity. Applying a moving correlation function to ±1500 days, it is suggested that a change of the correlation sign between the medical data and each one of the above parameters occurs during a time interval of about 2-3 years. This interval corresponds to the time span of the polarity reversal of the solar magnetic field of this solar cycle, which always takes place around the solar cycle maximum. After then a correlation analysis was carried out corresponding to the rise (1997-2001) and the decay (2002-2009) phases of the solar cycle 23. It is noticeable that the polarity reversal of the solar magnetic field coincides with the period where the sign of the correlation between the incidence of arrhythmias and the occurrence number of the solar eruptive events and the cosmic ray intensity, changes sign. The results are comparable with those obtained from the previous solar cycle 22 based on medical data from another country.

  15. Effects of multiple resistive shells and transient electromagnetic torque on the dynamics of mode locking in reversed field pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. C.; Chu, M. S.

    2002-11-01

    The effects of multiple resistive shells and transient electromagnetic torque on the dynamics of mode locking in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas are studied. Most RFP machines are equipped with one or more metal shells outside of the vacuum vessel. These shells have finite resistivities. The eddy currents induced in each of the shells contribute to the braking electromagnetic (EM) torque which slows down the plasma rotation. In this work we study the electromagnetic torque acting on the plasma (tearing) modes produced by a system of resistive shells. These shells may consist of several nested thin shells or several thin shells enclosed within a thick shell. The dynamics of the plasma mode is investigated by balancing the EM torque from the resistive shells with the plasma viscous torque. Both the steady state theory and the time-dependent theory are developed. The steady state theory is shown to provide an accurate account of the resultant EM torque if (dω/dt)ω-2≪1 and the time scale of interest is much longer than the response (L/R) time of the shell. Otherwise, the transient theory should be adopted. As applications, the steady state theory is used to evaluate the changes of the EM torque response from the resistive shells in two variants of two RFP machines: (1) modification from Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) [Gnesotto et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 25, 335 (1995)] to the modified RFX: both of them are equipped with one thin shell plus one thick shell; (2) modification from Extrap T2 to Extrap T2R [Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]: both of them are equipped with two thin shells. The transient theory has been applied numerically to study the time evolution of the EM torque during the unlocking of a locked tearing mode in the modified RFX.

  16. Continuous reversal of Hanle resonances of counter-propagating pulse and continuous-wave field

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrijević, Jelena; Jelenković, Branislav M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study propagation dynamics of the two counter-propagating lasers, the continuous-wave (CW) laser and the pulse of another laser, when both lasers are tuned to the $F_{g}=2 \\rightarrow F_{e}=1$ transition in $^{87}$Rb, and therefore can develop Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in Rb vapor. We calculate transmission of both lasers as a function of applied magnetic field, and investigate how the propagation of the pulse affects the transmission of the CW laser. And vice versa, we have found conditions when the Gaussian pulse can either pass unchanged, or be significantly absorbed in the vacuum Rb cell. This configuration is therefore suitable for the convenient control of the pulse propagation and the system is of interest for optically switching of the laser pulses. In terms of the corresponding shapes of the coherent Hanle resonances, this is equivalent to turning the coherent resonance from Hanle EIT into electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) peak. There is the range...

  17. Global confinement in the MST (Madison Symmetric Torus) reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.; Chartas, G.; Cudzinovic, M.; Den Hartog, D.; Dexter, R.; Hokin, S.; Holly, D.; Klevans, E.; Nebel, R.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.; Sprott, C.; Starr, G.; Stoneking, M.; Veerasingam, R.; Watts, C.

    1990-10-01

    Global confinement measured in the first six months of MST full design operation is summarized. Central electron temperature and enhancement of resistivity over the Z = 1 Spitzer value are similar to other RFP experiments for the same value of I/N. As in several other RFP experiments, energy confinement time and poloidal beta are found to decrease with increasing plasma current, with maximum values of {tau}{sub E} {approximately} 1 ms and {beta}{sub p} {approximately} 10%. Particle transport may be approximated with a diffusion coefficient D {approximately} 40 m{sup 2}/s for a discharge studied with a 1-d particle-neutral code. A more elaborate code, incorporating heat and impurity transport, indicates an increase of Z{sub eff} with I/N. This code also reveals that the toroidal magnetic field decays resistively between discrete dynamo events, at the rate given by the measured global resistivity. Edge suprathermal electrons are observed as on other RFPs, with temperatures comparable to the central electron temperature and carrying a current density at least 15% of the total measured with an insertable magnetic coil array. Radial magnetic profiles measured with this array may be matched with a Modified Polynomial Function Model equilibrium for a value of {beta}{sub p} which is a factor of two larger than measured, but which is required due to the large values of {Theta} for a given F found in MST discharges ({Theta} = 1.85 at F= {minus}0.15). 15 refs., 14 figs.

  18. Feasibility study of microwave electron heating on the C-2 field-reversed configuration device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xyang@trialphaenergy.com; Ceccherini, Francesco; Dettrick, Sean; Binderbauer, Michl [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 92688 (United States); Koehn, Alf [IGVP, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Petrov, Yuri [CompX, P.O. Box 2672, Del Mar, CA 92014 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Different microwave heating scenarios for the C-2 plasmas have been investigated recently with use of both the Genray ray-racing code and the IPF-FDMC full-wave code, and the study was focused on the excitation of the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) with O-mode launch. For a given antenna position on C-2 and the fixed 2D plasma density and equilibrium field profiles, simulations have been done for six selected frequencies (2.45 GHz, 5 GHz, 8 GHz, 18 GHz, 28 GHz, and 50 GHz). Launch angles have been optimized for each case in order to achieve high coupling efficiencies to the EBW by the O-X-B mode conversion process and high power deposition. Results show that among those six frequencies, the case of 8 GHz is the most promising scenario, which has both high mode conversion efficiency (90%) and the relatively deeper power deposition.

  19. MHD control experiments in the Extrap T2R Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelli, L.; Bolzonella, T.; Brunsell, P.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.; Franz, P.; Gregoratto, D.; Manduchi, G.; Martin, P.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Piovesan, P.; Spizzo, G.; Yadikin, D.; Zanca, P.

    2004-11-01

    We report here on MHD active control experiments performed in the Extrap T2R device, which has been recently equipped with a set of 32 feedback controlled saddle coils couples. Experiments aiming at selectively exciting a resonant resistive instability in order to actively induce Quasi Single Helicity states will be presented. Open loop experiments have in fact shown that a spectrum with one dominant mode can be excited in a high aspect ratio device like T2R. In addition, evidences of controlled braking of tearing modes, which spontaneously rotate in T2R, have been gathered, allowing the determination of a threshold for mode wall locking. Different feedback control schemes have been implemented. In particular, mode suppression schemes proved successful in delaying resistive wall modes growth and in increasing the discharge duration: this suggests a hybrid mode control scenario, in which RWM are suppressed and QSH is induced. Radiation imaging and internal magnetic field reconstructions performed with the ORBIT code will be presented.

  20. Nonvolatile, reversible electric-field controlled switching of remanent magnetization in multifunctional ferromagnetic/ferroelectric hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandlmaier, A.; Geprägs, S.; Woltersdorf, G.; Gross, R.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.

    2011-08-01

    In spin-mechanics, the magnetoelastic coupling in ferromagnetic/ferroelectric hybrid devices is exploited in order to realize an electric-voltage control of magnetization orientation. To this end, different voltage-induced elastic strain states are used to generate different magnetization orientations. In our approach, we take advantage of the hysteretic expansion and contraction of a commercial piezoelectric actuator as a function of electrical voltage to deterministically select one of two electro-remanent elastic strain states. We investigate the resulting magnetic response in a nickel thin film/piezoelectric actuator hybrid device at room temperature, using simultaneous magneto-optical Kerr effect and magnetotransport measurements. The magnetic properties of the hybrid can be consistently described in a macrospin model, i.e., in terms of a single magnetic domain. At zero external magnetic field, the magnetization orientation in the two electro-remanent strain states differs by 15°, which corresponds to a magnetoresistance change of 0.5%. These results demonstrate that the spin-mechanics scheme indeed enables a nonvolatile electrically read- and writable memory bit where the information is encoded in a magnetic property.

  1. Electromagnetic field treatment protects against and reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendash, Gary W; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Mori, Takashi; Mamcarz, Malgorzata; Lin, Xiaoyang; Runfeldt, Melissa; Wang, Li; Zhang, Guixin; Sava, Vasyl; Tan, Jun; Cao, Chuanhai

    2010-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, there is no definitive evidence that high-frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure is a risk to human health. To the contrary, this report presents the first evidence that long-term EMF exposure directly associated with cell phone use (918 MHz; 0.25 w/kg) provides cognitive benefits. Both cognitive-protective and cognitive-enhancing effects of EMF exposure were discovered for both normal mice and transgenic mice destined to develop Alzheimer's-like cognitive impairment. The cognitive interference task utilized in this study was designed from, and measure-for-measure analogous to, a human cognitive interference task. In Alzheimer's disease mice, long-term EMF exposure reduced brain amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition through Abeta anti-aggregation actions and increased brain temperature during exposure periods. Several inter-related mechanisms of EMF action are proposed, including increased Abeta clearance from the brains of Alzheimer's disease mice, increased neuronal activity, and increased cerebral blood flow. Although caution should be taken in extrapolating these mouse studies to humans, we conclude that EMF exposure may represent a non-invasive, non-pharmacologic therapeutic against Alzheimer's disease and an effective memory-enhancing approach in general.

  2. Earthward electric field and its reversal in the near-Earth current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    Using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations (radial distance r from 9 to 35 Earth radii, RE), we investigate ion and electron contributions to the cross-tail current density in the magnetotail current sheet. We analyze plasma pressure measurements (including the contribution from high-energy particles) and estimate the magnitudes of ion and electron diamagnetic drifts. In the downtail, r > 15RE, region, ion (electron) diamagnetic drifts are shown to provide more than 50% (less than 25%) of the cross-tail current density at the neutral plane, Bx=0. Conversely, in the near-Earth region, r≤15RE, the ion (electron) diamagnetic drift contribution to the cross-tail current density is 20% (50%). The directly measured duskward (dawnward) component of the ion (electron) velocity, vyi (-vye), where y is the GSM direction, is very small (quite large) in the downtail region but large (small) in the near-Earth region. This systematic discrepancy between the expected values of vyi, -vye (based on estimates of diamagnetic drifts) and the direct measurements of the velocity, vyi, -vye, is consistent with a contribution to the total velocity by an E × B drift caused by an electric field oriented parallel to the x axis, Ex. To decrease the ion (increase the electron) total drift to agree with the measured flows in the downtail region and increase (decrease) this total drift to match the measurements in the near-Earth region, this Ex would need to be directed earthward at r > 15RE and tailward at r≤15RE. Such an Ex distribution is consistent with the equatorial projection of the Harang discontinuity.

  3. Enhanced magnetic field probe array for improved excluded flux calculations on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, T., E-mail: troche@trialphaenergy.com; Thompson, M. C.; Mendoza, R.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Romero, J.; Douglass, J. [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    External flux conserving coils were installed onto the exterior of the C-2U [M. W. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)] confinement vessel to increase the flux confinement time of the system. The 0.5 in. stainless steel vessel wall has a skin time of ∼5 ms. The addition of the external copper coils effectively increases this time to ∼7 ms. This led to better-confined/longer-lived field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The fringing fields generated by the external coils have the side effect of rendering external field measurements invalid. Such measurements were key to the previous method of excluded flux calculation [M. C. Thompson et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D709 (2012)]. A new array of B-dot probes and Rogowski coils were installed to better determine the amount of flux leaked out of the system and ultimately provide a more robust measurement of plasma parameters related to pressure balance including the excluded flux radius. The B-dot probes are surface mountable chip inductors with inductance of 33 μH capable of measuring the DC magnetic field and transient field, due to resistive current decay in the wall/coils, when coupled with active integrators. The Rogowski coils measure the total change in current in each external coil (150 A/2 ms). Currents were also actively driven in the external coils. This renders the assumption of total flux conservation invalid which further complicates the analysis process. The ultimate solution to these issues and the record breaking resultant FRC lifetimes will be presented.

  4. Possibility of Ionospheric Cause of FACs and Convection Field in the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere System: The Harang Reversal, Premidnight Upward-FAC, and the Ionospheric Hall Polarization Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamizo, A.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2016-12-01

    Whereas it is generally thought that Birkeland Currents (FACs) are generated in the magnetosphere and that the ionospheric convection reflects the magnetospheric convection, we present a possibility that the ionosphere drives FACs and the convection field in the M-I system. We apply this idea to the Harang Reversal (HR) for demonstration. By using an ionospheric potential solver we calculate the electrostatic field for given distributions of FACs and conductance. The result shows that a conspicuous structure resembling HR is generated even for a symmetric distribution of the R1-type FACs and that the Hall polarization field is produced at the equatorward boundary of the auroral region as the primary currents diverge/converge at the conductance gradient there, which causes the potential deformation (HR). Conventionally HR has been considered to be of the magnetospheric origin, and a ring current model actually produces the corresponding structure in the magnetosphere [e.g., Erickson et al., 1991]. Observationally the divE equivalent to HR is consistent with the premidnight upward-FAC seen in Iijima and Potemra's diagram. A recent theoretical study [Ohtani et al., 2016] proposes that HR is a required structure for the interchange stability of the magnetotail in the presence of the R1 and R2-FAC systems including a premidnight upward-FAC. Returning to our result, the important point is that HR is reproduced at the conductance edge by the ionospheric polarization field, for which the primary field originates from the R1-FACs distributed far from that region. We also suggest: (i) In a more realistic finite ΣA, the total ionospheric polarization is partly released by a FAC, which may be a part of the premidnight upward-FAC. (ii) However, existing simulation models do not allow this type of current closure, and accordingly they may enhance the HR structure in the magnetosphere. This discussion should hold generally and would promote the global M-I coupling studies to the

  5. Enhanced magnetic field probe array for improved excluded flux calculations on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, T.; Thompson, M. C.; Mendoza, R.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Romero, J.; Douglass, J.

    2016-11-01

    External flux conserving coils were installed onto the exterior of the C-2U [M. W. Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)] confinement vessel to increase the flux confinement time of the system. The 0.5 in. stainless steel vessel wall has a skin time of ˜5 ms. The addition of the external copper coils effectively increases this time to ˜7 ms. This led to better-confined/longer-lived field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The fringing fields generated by the external coils have the side effect of rendering external field measurements invalid. Such measurements were key to the previous method of excluded flux calculation [M. C. Thompson et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D709 (2012)]. A new array of B-dot probes and Rogowski coils were installed to better determine the amount of flux leaked out of the system and ultimately provide a more robust measurement of plasma parameters related to pressure balance including the excluded flux radius. The B-dot probes are surface mountable chip inductors with inductance of 33 μH capable of measuring the DC magnetic field and transient field, due to resistive current decay in the wall/coils, when coupled with active integrators. The Rogowski coils measure the total change in current in each external coil (150 A/2 ms). Currents were also actively driven in the external coils. This renders the assumption of total flux conservation invalid which further complicates the analysis process. The ultimate solution to these issues and the record breaking resultant FRC lifetimes will be presented.

  6. Influence of time dependent longitudinal magnetic fields on the cooling process, exchange bias and magnetization reversal mechanism in FM core/AFM shell nanoparticles: a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Yusuf; Akıncı, Ümit

    2016-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we have investigated the dynamic phase transition properties of magnetic nanoparticles with ferromagnetic core coated by an antiferromagnetic shell structure. Effects of field amplitude and frequency on the thermal dependence of magnetizations, magnetization reversal mechanisms during hysteresis cycles, as well as on the exchange bias and coercive fields have been examined, and the feasibility of applying dynamic magnetic fields on the particle have been discussed for technological and biomedical purposes.

  7. Twenty-channel bolometer array for studying impurity radiation and transport in the TCS field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostora, M. R.; Hsu, S. C.; Wurden, G. A.

    2006-10-01

    A bolometer array diagnostic has been developed for the University of Washington Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment (TCS) field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment in order to measure radially resolved total radiated power per unit length of the FRC. This will provide radiation energy loss information, useful in power balance and impurity studies. The 20-element photodiode bolometer will be mounted at the midplane of the TCS cylindrical vacuum chamber to view the rotating magnetic field (RMF) generated FRC plasma. Key features of this new bolometer array are (1) extensive electrical shielding against the RMF, (2) robust electrical isolation, (3) trans-impedance amplifiers using a microcoax interface at the array and a fiber optic interface to the screen room, and (4) a custom glass-on-metal socket for the 20-element photodiode chip to ensure high vacuum compatibility. The bolometer array can be retracted behind a gate valve using a stepper motor to protect it during vacuum chamber bakeout. The slit assembly housing is interchangeable to provide flexibility for the viewing sightlines.

  8. High Performance Metal Oxide Field-Effect Transistors with a Reverse Offset Printed Cu Source/Drain Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young Hun; Won, Ju-Yeon; Yoo, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Choi, Rino; Jeong, Jae Kyeong

    2016-01-20

    Nonvacuum and photolithography-free copper (Cu) films were prepared by reverse offset printing. The mechanical, morphological, structural, and chemical properties of the Cu films annealed at different temperatures were examined in detail. The Ostwald ripening-induced coalescence and grain growth in the printing Cu films were enhanced with increasing annealing temperature in N2 ambient up to 400 °C. Simultaneously, unwanted chemical impurities such as oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon in the Cu films decreased as the annealing temperature increased. The high electrical conductivity (∼6.2 μΩ·cm) of the printing Cu films annealed at 400 °C is attributed to the enlargement of the grain size and reduction of the incorporation of impurities. A printing Cu film was adopted as a source/drain (S/D) electrode in solution processable zinc tin oxide (ZTO) field-effect transistors (FETs), where the ZTO film was prepared by simple spin-coating. The ZTO FETs fabricated at a contact annealing temperature of 250 °C exhibited a promising field-effect mobility of 2.6 cm(2)/(V s), a threshold voltage of 7.0 V, and an ION/OFF modulation ratio of 2 × 10(5).

  9. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on three dimensional equilibria in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munaretto, S., E-mail: smunaretto@wisc.edu; Chapman, B. E.; Nornberg, M. D.; Boguski, J.; DuBois, A. M.; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1150 University Ave, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The orientation of 3D equilibria in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed-field pinch can now be controlled with a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP). Absent the RMP, the orientation of the stationary 3D equilibrium varies from shot to shot in a semi-random manner, making its diagnosis difficult. Produced with a poloidal array of saddle coils at the vertical insulated cut in MST's thick conducting shell, an m = 1 RMP with an amplitude b{sub r}/B ∼ 10% forces the 3D structure into any desired orientation relative to MST's diagnostics. This control has led to improved diagnosis, revealing enhancements in both the central electron temperature and density. With sufficient amplitude, the RMP also inhibits the generation of high-energy (>20 keV) electrons, which otherwise emerge due to a reduction in magnetic stochasticity in the core. Field line tracing reveals that the RMP reintroduces stochasticity to the core. A m = 3 RMP of similar amplitude has little effect on the magnetic topology or the high-energy electrons.

  10. Evaluation of flow fields on bubble removal and system performance in an ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis stack

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2013-11-01

    Ammonium bicarbonate has recently been demonstrated to be an excellent thermolytic solution for energy generation in reverse electrodialysis (RED) stacks. However, operating RED stacks at room temperatures can promote gaseous bubble (CO2, NH3) accumulation within the stack, reducing overall system performance. The management and minimization of bubbles formed in RED flow fields is an important operational issue which has yet to be addressed. Flow fields with and without spacers in RED stacks were analyzed to determine how both fluid flow and the buildup and removal of bubbles affected performance. In the presence of a spacer, the membrane resistance increased by ~50Ω, resulting in a decrease in power density by 30% from 0.140Wm-2 to 0.093Wm-2. Shorter channels reduced concentration polarization affects, and resulted in 3-23% higher limiting current density. Gas accumulation was minimized through the use of short vertically aligned channels, and consequently the amount of the membrane area covered by bubbles was reduced from ~20% to 7% which caused a 12% increase in power density. As ammonium bicarbonate RED systems are scaled up, attention to channel aspect ratio, length, and alignment will enable more stable performance. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  12. Compact Spreader Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  13. Deriving a complete set of eigendistributions for a gravitational wave equation describing the quantized interaction of gravity with a Yang-Mills field in case the Cauchy hypersurface is non-compact

    CERN Document Server

    Gerhardt, Claus

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper we quantized the interaction of gravity with a Yang-Mills and Higgs field and obtained as a result a gravitational wave equation in a globally hyperbolic spacetime. Assuming that the Cauchy hypersurfaces are compact we proved a spectral resolution for the wave equation by applying the method of separation of variables. In this paper we extend the results to the case when the Cauchy hypersurfaces are non-compact by considering a Gelfand triplet and applying the nuclear spectral theorem.

  14. Flow cytometric assessment of microbial abundance in the near-field area of seawater reverse osmosis concentrate discharge

    KAUST Repository

    Van Der Merwe, Riaan

    2014-06-01

    The discharge of concentrate and other process waters from seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plant operations into the marine environment may adversely affect water quality in the near-field area surrounding the outfall. The main concerns are the increase in salt concentration in receiving waters, which results in a density increase and potential water stratification near the outfall, and possible increases in turbidity, e.g., due to the discharge of filter backwash waters. Changes in ambient water quality may affect microbial abundance in the area, for example by hindering the photosynthesis process or disrupting biogenesis. It is widely accepted that marine biodiversity is lower in more extreme conditions, such as high salinity environments. As aquatic microbial communities respond very rapidly to changes in their environment, they can be used as indicators for monitoring ambient water quality. The objective of this study was to assess possible changes in microbial abundance as a result of concentrate discharge into the near-field area (<. 25. m) surrounding the outfall of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) SWRO plant. Flow cytometric (FCM) analysis was conducted in order to rapidly determine microbial abundance on a single-cell level in 107 samples, taken by diving, from the discharge area, the intake area and two control sites. FCM analysis combined the measurement of distinct scatter of cells and particles, autofluorescence of cyanobacteria and algae, and fluorescence after staining of nucleic acids with SYBR® Green for a total bacterial count. The results indicate that changes in microbial abundance in the near-field area of the KAUST SWRO outfall are minor and appear to be the result of a dilution effect rather than a direct impact of the concentrate discharge. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Error Field Assessment from Driven Mode Rotation: Results from Extrap-T2R Reversed-Field-Pinch and Perspectives for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, F. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.

    2012-10-01

    A new ITER-relevant non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch. Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) were generated and their rotation sustained by rotating magnetic perturbations. In particular, stable modes of toroidal mode number n=8 and 10 and unstable modes of n=1 were used in this experiment. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the RWMs were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude (in the case of unstable modes, the observed oscillation was superimposed to the mode growth). This behavior was used to infer the amplitude and toroidal phase of n=1, 8 and 10 EFs. The method was first tested against known, deliberately applied EFs, and then against actual intrinsic EFs. Applying equal and opposite corrections resulted in longer discharges and more uniform mode rotation, indicating good EF compensation. The results agree with a simple theoretical model. Extensions to tearing modes, to the non-uniform plasma response to rotating perturbations, and to tokamaks, including ITER, will be discussed.

  16. New Light in Star-Forming Dwarf Galaxies: The PMAS Integral Field View of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy Mrk 409

    CERN Document Server

    Cairos, L M; Papaderos, P; Kehrig, C; Weilbacher, P; Roth, M M; Zurita, C

    2009-01-01

    We present an integral field spectroscopic study of the central 2x2 kpc^2 of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Mrk 409, observed with the Potsdam MultiAperture Spectrophotometer. This study focuses on the morphology, two-dimensional chemical abundance pattern, excitation properties and kinematics of the ionized interstellar medium in the starburst component. We also investigate the nature of the extended ring of ionized gas emission surrounding the bright nuclear starburst region of Mrk 409. PMAS spectra of selected regions along the ring, interpreted with evolutionary and population synthesis models, indicate that their ionized emission is mainly due to a young stellar population with a total mass of ~1.5x10^6 M_sun, which started forming almost coevally ~10 Myr ago. This stellar component is likely confined to the collisional interface of a spherically expanding, starburst-driven super-bubble with denser, swept-up ambient gas, ~600 pc away from the central starburst nucleus. The spectroscopic properties of the ...

  17. TIGER: A data analysis pipeline for testing the strong-field dynamics of general relativity with gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Agathos, Michalis; Li, Tjonnie G F; Broeck, Chris Van Den; Veitch, John; Vitale, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    The direct detection of gravitational waves with upcoming second-generation gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Virgo will allow us to probe the genuinely strong-field dynamics of general relativity (GR) for the first time. We present a data analysis pipeline called TIGER (Test Infrastructure for GEneral Relativity), which is designed to utilize detections of compact binary coalescences to test GR in this regime. TIGER is a model-independent test of GR itself, in that it is not necessary to compare with any specific alternative theory. It performs Bayesian inference on two hypotheses: the GR hypothesis $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm GR}$, and $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm modGR}$, which states that one or more of the post-Newtonian coefficients in the waveform are not as predicted by GR. By the use of multiple sub-hypotheses of $\\mathcal{H}_{\\rm modGR}$, in each of which a different number of parameterized deformations of the GR phase are allowed, an arbitrarily large number of 'testing parameters' can be used with...

  18. The Morphologies of Massive Galaxies at 1Field: Compact Bulges, and the Rise and Fall of Massive Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, V A; Cirasuolo, M; McLure, R J; Targett, T A; Bell, E F; Croton, D J; Dekel, A; Faber, S M; Ferguson, H C; Grogin, N A; Kocevski, D D; Koekemoer, A M; Koo, D C; Lai, K; Lotz, J M; McGrath, E J; Newman, J A; van der Wel, A

    2012-01-01

    We have used deep, HST, near-IR imaging to study the morphological properties of the most massive galaxies at high z, modelling the WFC3/IR H-band images of the ~200 galaxies in the CANDELS-UDS field with 1 10^11 M_sun. We have used both single-Sersic and bulge+disk models, have investigated the errors/biases introduced by uncertainties in the background and the PSF, and have obtained formally-acceptable model fits to >90% of the galaxies. Our results indicate that these massive galaxies at 1 2 the compact bulges display effective radii a factor ~4 smaller than local ellipticals of comparable mass. These trends appear to extend to the bulge components of disk-dominated galaxies, and vice versa. We also find that, while such massive galaxies at low z are bulge-dominated, at 1 2 they are mostly disk-dominated. The majority of the disk-dominated galaxies are actively forming stars, but this is also true for many of the bulge-dominated systems. Interestingly, however, while most of the quiescent galaxies are b...

  19. A detailed record of paleomagnetic field change from Searles Lake, California: 2. The Gauss/Matuyama polarity reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Coe, Robert S.; Liddicoat, Joseph C.

    1999-06-01

    This new study of the Gauss/Matuyama transition from Searles Lake, California conjoined with other records from the western United States, provides interesting insights into the structure of the reversing magnetic field. The present study employs improved measurement and data reduction techniques, multiple parallel strings of samples, and a finer sampling interval than was used in the original study by Liddicoat[1982]. Particularly crucial to this investigation was the use of overprint directions to reconstruct declinations, required because the core was rotary drilled. The results of this technique were corroborated by employing an independent method that uses anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility to resolve a sediment fabric: the fabric facilitated the alignment of core segments. The new record reveals that the main swing of the transition occurs over a significantly shorter time span than was found in the original study. In addition, it brings out several small scale variations that were absent in the old record, some of which take the form of relatively rapid jumps in direction that punctuate more steadily varying changes. This alternating steady and rapid field change is similar to behavior observed in volcanic records, which argues that such behavior is not merely an artifact of episodic volcanism. The Searles Lake record is strongly nonzonal and is defined in the Northern Hemisphere by a swath of virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) stretching from northern Eurasia to west Africa and to the northwest Pacific. Glen et al. [1994] showed that a collection (spanning >15 Myr) of western North American transition and excursion records displays this same pattern, indicating that the VGP swath is a persistent feature of the transitional field. In addition, the compilation reveals that the swath extends into the Southern Hemisphere, outlining a region marked by an absence of poles that is centered on the Indian Ocean. The fact that this pattern is offset from a similar

  20. Chaos and simple determinism in reversed field pinch plasmas: Nonlinear analysis of numerical simulation and experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Christopher A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-09-01

    In this dissertation the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas is investigated. To properly assess this possibility, data from both numerical simulations and experiment are analyzed. A large repertoire of nonlinear analysis techniques is used to identify low dimensional chaos in the data. These tools include phase portraits and Poincare sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and short term predictability. In addition, nonlinear noise reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are the DEBS code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM) model, which models drift wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental date were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low dimensional chaos or low simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system.

  1. Time-resolved ion energy distribution measurements using an advanced neutral particle analyzer on the MST reversed-field pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilerman, S; Anderson, J K; Reusch, J A; Liu, D; Fiksel, G; Polosatkin, S; Belykh, V

    2012-10-01

    An advanced neutral particle analyzer (ANPA) capable of simultaneously measuring hydrogen and deuterium ions of energies up to 45 keV has recently been developed for use on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The charge-to-mass separation allows for separate analysis of bulk deuterium ions and hydrogen ions injected with a 1 MW, 25 keV neutral beam. Orientation of the ANPA allows sampling of different regions of ion velocity space; a radial viewport favors collection of ions with high v(perpendicular)∕|v| while a recently installed tangential viewport favors ions with high v(||)∕|v|, such as those from the core-localized fast ion population created by the neutral beam. Signals are observed in the ANPA's highest energy channels during periodic magnetic reconnection events, which are drivers of anisotropic, non-Maxwellian ion energization in the reversed-field pinch. ANPA signal strength is dependent on the background neutral density, which also increases during magnetic reconnection events, so careful analysis must be performed to identify the true change in the ion distribution. A Monte Carlo neutral particle tracing code (NENE) is used to reconstruct neutral density profiles based on D(α) line emission, which is measured using a 16-chord filtered photodiode array.

  2. Fast imaging diagnostics on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granstedt, E. M.; Petrov, P.; Knapp, K.; Cordero, M.; Patel, V.

    2016-11-01

    The C-2U device employed neutral beam injection, end-biasing, and various particle fueling techniques to sustain a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. As part of the diagnostic suite, two fast imaging instruments with radial and nearly axial plasma views were developed using a common camera platform. To achieve the necessary viewing geometry, imaging lenses were mounted behind re-entrant viewports attached to welded bellows. During gettering, the vacuum optics were retracted and isolated behind a gate valve permitting their removal if cleaning was necessary. The axial view incorporated a stainless-steel mirror in a protective cap assembly attached to the vacuum-side of the viewport. For each system, a custom lens-based, high-throughput optical periscope was designed to relay the plasma image about half a meter to a high-speed camera. Each instrument also contained a remote-controlled filter wheel, set between shots to isolate a particular hydrogen or impurity emission line. The design of the camera platform, imaging performance, and sample data for each view is presented.

  3. Flexible ambipolar organic field-effect transistors with reverse-offset-printed silver electrodes for a complementary inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junsu; Kim, Minseok; Yeom, Seung-Won; Ha, Hyeon Jun; Song, Hyenggun; Jhon, Young Min; Kim, Yun-Hi; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-06-01

    We report ambipolar organic field-effect transistors and complementary inverter circuits with reverse-offset-printed (ROP) Ag electrodes fabricated on a flexible substrate. A diketopyrrolopyrrole-based co-polymer (PDPP-TAT) was used as the semiconductor and poly(methyl methacrylate) was used as the gate insulator. Considerable improvement is observed in the n-channel electrical characteristics by inserting a cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) as the electron-injection/hole-blocking layer at the interface between the semiconductors and the electrodes. The saturation mobility values are 0.35 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the p-channel and 0.027 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the n-channel. A complementary inverter is demonstrated based on the ROP process, and it is selectively controlled by the insertion of Cs2CO3 onto the n-channel region via thermal evaporation. Moreover, the devices show stable operation during the mechanical bending test using tensile strains ranging from 0.05% to 0.5%. The results confirm that these devices have great potential for use in flexible and inexpensive integrated circuits over a large area.

  4. Study of the confinement properties in a reversed-field pinch with mode rotation and gas fuelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Drake, J. R.

    2002-08-01

    An extensive investigation of the global confinement properties in different operating scenarios in the rebuilt EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiment is reported here. In particular, the role of a fast gas puff valve system, used to control plasma density, on confinement is studied. Without gas puffing, the electron density decays below 0.5×1019 m-3. The poloidal beta varies between 5% and 15%, decreasing at large I/N. The energy confinement time ranges from 70 to 225 μs. With gas puffing, the density is sustained at ne≈1.5×1019 m-3. However, a general slight deterioration of the plasma performances is observed for the same values of I/N: the plasma becomes cooler and more radiative. The poloidal beta is comparable to that in the scenarios without puff but the energy confinement time drops ranging from 60 to 130 μs. The fluctuation level and the energy confinement time have been found to scale with the Lundquist number as S-0.05+/-0.07 and S0.5+/-0.1, respectively. Mode rotation is typical for all the discharges and rotation velocity is observed to increase with increasing electron diamagnetic velocity.

  5. Fast imaging diagnostics on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granstedt, E. M., E-mail: egranstedt@trialphaenergy.com; Petrov, P.; Knapp, K.; Cordero, M.; Patel, V. [Tri Alpha Energy, P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The C-2U device employed neutral beam injection, end-biasing, and various particle fueling techniques to sustain a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. As part of the diagnostic suite, two fast imaging instruments with radial and nearly axial plasma views were developed using a common camera platform. To achieve the necessary viewing geometry, imaging lenses were mounted behind re-entrant viewports attached to welded bellows. During gettering, the vacuum optics were retracted and isolated behind a gate valve permitting their removal if cleaning was necessary. The axial view incorporated a stainless-steel mirror in a protective cap assembly attached to the vacuum-side of the viewport. For each system, a custom lens-based, high-throughput optical periscope was designed to relay the plasma image about half a meter to a high-speed camera. Each instrument also contained a remote-controlled filter wheel, set between shots to isolate a particular hydrogen or impurity emission line. The design of the camera platform, imaging performance, and sample data for each view is presented.

  6. Compact Q-balls

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; da Rocha, R

    2016-01-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  7. Design of a high-temperature first wall/blanket for a d-d compact Reversed-Field-Pinch reactor (CRFPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabiri, A.E.; Glancy, J.E.

    1983-05-01

    A high-temperature first wall/blanket which would take full advantage of the absence of tritium breeding in a d-d reactor was designed. This design which produces steam at p = 7 MPa and T = 538/sup 0/C at the blanket exit eliminates the requirement for a separate steam generator. A steam cycle with steam-to-steam reheat yielding about 37.5 percent efficiency is compatible with this design.

  8. Operation of a 400MHz NMR magnet using a (RE:Rare Earth)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting coil: Towards an ultra-compact super-high field NMR spectrometer operated beyond 1GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Y; Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Kominato, K; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Jin, X; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2014-10-18

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS) are the key technology to achieve super-high magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers with an operating frequency far beyond 1GHz (23.5T). (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO, RE: rare earth) conductors have an advantage over Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x (Bi-2223) and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-x (Bi-2212) conductors in that they have very high tensile strengths and tolerate strong electromagnetic hoop stress, thereby having the potential to act as an ultra-compact super-high field NMR magnet. As a first step, we developed the world's first NMR magnet comprising an inner REBCO coil and outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils. The magnet was successfully charged without degradation and mainly operated at 400MHz (9.39T). Technical problems for the NMR magnet due to screening current in the REBCO coil were clarified and solved as follows: (i) A remarkable temporal drift of the central magnetic field was suppressed by a current sweep reversal method utilizing ∼10% of the peak current. (ii) A Z2 field error harmonic of the main coil cannot be compensated by an outer correction coil and therefore an additional ferromagnetic shim was used. (iii) Large tesseral harmonics emerged that could not be corrected by cryoshim coils. Due to those harmonics, the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectra are ten-fold lower than those for a conventional LTS NMR magnet. As a result, a HSQC spectrum could be achieved for a protein sample, while a NOESY spectrum could not be obtained. An ultra-compact 1.2GHz NMR magnet could be realized if we effectively take advantage of REBCO conductors, although this will require further research to suppress the effect of the screening current.

  9. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force....

  10. Time-lapse walkaway VSP imaging using reverse-time migration in the angle domain for monitoring CO2 injection at the SACROC EOR field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L.; Huang, H.

    2012-12-01

    Time-lapse walkaway vertical seismic profiling (VSP) surveys can reveal important reservoir changes caused by CO2 injection. We study the capability of time-lapse walkaway VSP imaging using reverse-time migration in the angle-domain for monitoring CO2 injection. During the Phase II project of the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration, one baseline and one repeat walkaway VSP surveys were conducted in 2008 and 2009, respectively, at the SACROC enhanced oil recovery (EOR) field for monitoring CO2 injection. The datasets were acquired by Baker Atlas in collaboration with Kinder Morgan. In this study, we apply reverse-time migration in the angle domain to the time-lapse walkaway VSP datasets from the SACROC EOR field, and conduct detailed analyses of common-image gathers. Our migration results demonstrate that reverse-time migration in the angle domain produces images of time-lapse walkaway VSP data with a better image quality compared to those obtained using conventional reverse-time migration. The time-lapse image difference along the bottom of the reservoir where CO2 is injected is much more significant than that along the top of the reservoir. This is partially because we use the same baseline velocity model for migrations of both datasets. The reservoir velocity decreases during CO2 injection, leading to slightly change in the migration image location along the bottom of the reservoir for the repeat VSP data.

  11. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Marisa

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse logistics. The thesis brings insights on reverse logistics decision-making and it lays down theoretical principles for reverse logistics as a research field.In particular it puts together a framework ...

  12. A Field-Tailored Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Assay for High Sensitivity Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemleu, Sylvie; Guelig, Dylan; Eboumbou Moukoko, Carole; Essangui, Estelle; Diesburg, Steven; Mouliom, Abas; Melingui, Bernard; Manga, Jeanne; Donkeu, Christiane; Epote, Annie; Texier, Gaëtan; LaBarre, Paul; Burton, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Highly sensitive and field deployable molecular diagnostic tools are critically needed for detecting submicroscopic, yet transmissible levels of malaria parasites prevalent in malaria endemic countries worldwide. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed and evaluated in comparison with thick blood smear microscopy, an antigen-based rapid diagnostic test (RDT), and an in-house RT-PCR targeting the same RT-LAMP transcript. The optimized assay detected Plasmodium falciparum infections in as little as 0.25ng of total parasite RNA, and exhibited a detection limit of 0.08 parasites/ μL when tested directly on infected whole blood lysates, or ~0.0008 parasites/ μL when using RNA extracts. Assay positivity was observed as early as eight minutes from initiation of the RT-LAMP and in most cases the reaction was complete before twenty minutes. Clinical evaluation of the assay on 132 suspected malaria cases resulted in a positivity rate of 90% for RT-LAMP using extracted RNA, and 85% when using whole blood lysates. The positivity rates were 70% for P. falciparum-specific RDT, 83% for RT-PCR, and 74% for thick blood smear microscopy (Mean parasite density = 36,986 parasites/ μL). Concordance rates between the developed RT-LAMP and comparator tests were greater than 75%, the lowest being with light microscopy (78%, McNemar’s test: P = 0.0002), and the highest was with RT-PCR (87%, McNemar’s test: P = 0.0523). Compared to reference RT-PCR, assay sensitivity was 90% for RT-LAMP on whole blood, and 96% for RT-LAMP using corresponding RNA extracts. Electricity-free heaters were further developed and evaluated in comparison with a battery-operated isothermal amplification machine for use with the developed test in resource-limited settings. Taken together, the data highlight the benefits of targeting high abundant RNA transcripts in molecular diagnosis, as well as the potential usefulness of the developed RT-LAMP-assay in

  13. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  14. Edge-tailored graphene oxide nanosheet-based field effect transistors for fast and reversible electronic detection of sulfur dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fangping; Wang, Dong; Liu, Rui; Pei, Xianfeng; Zhang, Ting; Jin, Jian

    2013-01-21

    Graphene oxide was tailored into GO nanosheets with periodic acid treatment. Interestingly, the latter have a superior sensing performance for the fast and reversible detection of SO(2) compared with the former at room temperature. Its sensing mechanism was proposed from the structural changes of the GO nanosheets during the sensing and recovering processes.

  15. Tuning the field-induced magnetic transition in a layered cobalt phosphonate by reversible dehydration-hydration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting-Hai; Liao, Yi; Zheng, Li-Min; Dinnebier, Robert E; Su, Yan-Hui; Ma, Jing

    2009-06-07

    A layered cobalt phosphonate, Co(2-pmp)(H(2)O)(2) (1) (2-pmpH(2) = 2-pyridylmethylphosphonic acid) is reported, which provides the first example of metamagnetic cobalt system that shows reversible changes in both structures and magnetic behaviors upon dehydration-hydration process.

  16. Studies on the response of resistive-wall modes to applied magnetic perturbations in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoratto, D.; Drake, J. R.; Yadikin, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Paccagnella, R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Bolzonella, T.; Marchiori, G.; Cecconello, M.

    2005-09-01

    Arrays of magnetic coils and sensors in the EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43 1457 (2001)] reversed-field pinch have been used to investigate the plasma response to an applied resonant magnetic perturbation in the range of the resistive-wall modes (RWMs). Measured RWM growth rates agree with predictions of a cylindrical ideal-plasma model. The linear growth of low-n marginally stable RWMs is related to the so-called resonant-field amplification due to a dominant ∣n∣=2 machine error field of about 2 G. The dynamics of the m =1 RWMs interacting with the applied field produced by the coils can be accurately described by a two-pole system. Estimated poles and residues are given with sufficient accuracy by the cylindrical model with a thin continuous wall.

  17. Association of pattern reversal VEP parameters with the mean defect of Humphrey visual field in patients of primary open angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Ruchi; Singh, Ramji; Singh, Smita; Bokariya, Pradeep

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic, progressive bilateral optic neuropathy which disturbs the structural or functional integrity of the optic nerve that causes characteristic atrophic changes in it, which leads to specific visual field defects over time with loss of visual function. Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in India and is fast emerging as a major cause of bilateral blindness. This rural hospital based study was conducted to evaluate whether glaucomatous visual field defects particularly the mean defect of Humphrey visual field could be related to VEP parameters of patients having POAG. Visual field by Humphrey perimeter and simultaneous recordings of pattern reversal visual evoked potential (PRVEP) were assessed in 100 patients with POAG. There was a significant (P VEP changes observed by us in POAG patients were consistent with the progressing mean defect quantitatively. Therefore, it can be concluded that the VEP parameters can be useful quantitative indices in the evaluation of glaucomatous visual function damage.

  18. On Compact Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping WANG; Jiong Sheng LI

    2005-01-01

    Let G be a finite simple graph with adjacency matrix A, and let P(A) be the convex closure of the set of all permutation matrices commuting with A. G is said to be compact if every doubly stochastic matrix which commutes with A is in P(A). In this paper, we characterize 3-regular compact graphs and prove that if G is a connected regular compact graph, G - v is also compact, and give a family of almost regular compact connected graphs.

  19. Compactness in Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakasho Kazuhisa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we mainly formalize in Mizar [2] the equivalence among a few compactness definitions of metric spaces, norm spaces, and the real line. In the first section, we formalized general topological properties of metric spaces. We discussed openness and closedness of subsets in metric spaces in terms of convergence of element sequences. In the second section, we firstly formalize the definition of sequentially compact, and then discuss the equivalence of compactness, countable compactness, sequential compactness, and totally boundedness with completeness in metric spaces.

  20. Introduction to reversible computing

    CERN Document Server

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2013-01-01

    Few books comprehensively cover the software and programming aspects of reversible computing. Filling this gap, Introduction to Reversible Computing offers an expanded view of the field that includes the traditional energy-motivated hardware viewpoint as well as the emerging application-motivated software approach. Collecting scattered knowledge into one coherent account, the book provides a compendium of both classical and recently developed results on reversible computing. It explores up-and-coming theories, techniques, and tools for the application of rever

  1. Reverse Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was focused on the analysis of the concept of reverse logistics and actual reverse processes which are implemented in mining industry and finding solutions for the optimization of reverse logistics in this sphere. The objective of this paper was the assessment of the development of reverse logistics in mining industry on the example of potash production. The theoretical part was based on reverse logistics and mining waste related literature and provided foundations for further...

  2. Reversible Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell

    2004-01-01

    The study aims is to describe how the inclusion and exclusion of materials and calculative devices construct the boundaries and distinctions between statistical facts and artifacts in economics. My methodological approach is inspired by John Graunt's (1667) Political arithmetic and more recent work...... within constructivism and the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). The result of this approach is here termed reversible statistics, reconstructing the findings of a statistical study within economics in three different ways. It is argued that all three accounts are quite normal, albeit...... in different ways. The presence and absence of diverse materials, both natural and political, is what distinguishes them from each other. Arguments are presented for a more symmetric relation between the scientific statistical text and the reader. I will argue that a more symmetric relation can be achieved...

  3. Multipole structure of compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Quevedo, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the applications of general relativity in relativistic astrophysics in order to solve the problem of describing the geometric and physical properties of the interior and exterior gravitational and electromagnetic fields of compact objects. We focus on the interpretation of exact solutions of Einstein's equations in terms of their multipole moments structure. In view of the lack of physical interior solutions, we propose an alternative approach in which higher multipoles should be taken into account.

  4. Compaction behavior of isomalt after roll compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-09-27

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist.

  5. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kleinebudde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist.

  6. Accurate Predictions of Mean Geomagnetic Dipole Excursion and Reversal Frequencies, Mean Paleomagnetic Field Intensity, and the Radius of Earth's Core Using McLeod's Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Conrad, Joy

    1996-01-01

    The geomagnetic spatial power spectrum R(sub n)(r) is the mean square magnetic induction represented by degree n spherical harmonic coefficients of the internal scalar potential averaged over the geocentric sphere of radius r. McLeod's Rule for the magnetic field generated by Earth's core geodynamo says that the expected core surface power spectrum (R(sub nc)(c)) is inversely proportional to (2n + 1) for 1 less than n less than or equal to N(sub E). McLeod's Rule is verified by locating Earth's core with main field models of Magsat data; the estimated core radius of 3485 kn is close to the seismologic value for c of 3480 km. McLeod's Rule and similar forms are then calibrated with the model values of R(sub n) for 3 less than or = n less than or = 12. Extrapolation to the degree 1 dipole predicts the expectation value of Earth's dipole moment to be about 5.89 x 10(exp 22) Am(exp 2)rms (74.5% of the 1980 value) and the expected geomagnetic intensity to be about 35.6 (mu)T rms at Earth's surface. Archeo- and paleomagnetic field intensity data show these and related predictions to be reasonably accurate. The probability distribution chi(exp 2) with 2n+1 degrees of freedom is assigned to (2n + 1)R(sub nc)/(R(sub nc). Extending this to the dipole implies that an exceptionally weak absolute dipole moment (less than or = 20% of the 1980 value) will exist during 2.5% of geologic time. The mean duration for such major geomagnetic dipole power excursions, one quarter of which feature durable axial dipole reversal, is estimated from the modern dipole power time-scale and the statistical model of excursions. The resulting mean excursion duration of 2767 years forces us to predict an average of 9.04 excursions per million years, 2.26 axial dipole reversals per million years, and a mean reversal duration of 5533 years. Paleomagnetic data show these predictions to be quite accurate. McLeod's Rule led to accurate predictions of Earth's core radius, mean paleomagnetic field

  7. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  8. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  9. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  10. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  11. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  12. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  13. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  14. Model building with non-compact cosets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croon, Djuna Lize

    2016-11-01

    We explore Goldstone boson potentials in non-compact cosets of the form SO (n , 1) / SO (n). We employ a geometric approach to find the scalar potential, and focus on the conditions under which it is compact in the large field limit. We show that such a potential is found for a specific misalignment of the vacuum. This result has applications in different contexts, such as in Composite Higgs scenarios and theories for the Early Universe. We work out an example of inflation based on a non-compact coset which makes predictions which are consistent with the current observational data.

  15. Associated electron and proton transfer between Acridine and Triethylamine in AOT reverse micelles probed by laser flash photolysis with magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Manas Kumar; Basu, Samita

    2011-04-01

    Laser flash photolysis with magnetic field (MF ˜0.08 T) has been used to study interaction between Acridine (Acr) and Triethylamine (TEA) in reverse micelles with w0 = 2.5-40. Dynamic protonation equilibrium exists between 3Acr and 3AcrH +. The intermediates indicate excited-state proton transfer (PT) between 3AcrH + and TEA. However, application of MF highlights the formation of geminate radical ion pairs (RIPs) with triplet spin-correlation, a signature of latent photoinduced electron transfer between 3AcrH + and TEA co-exists with PT. Magnetic field effect (MFE) is prominent for smaller w0 showing importance of optimum separation between RIP to maximize MFE, whereas PT remains unaltered.

  16. Control of ion gyroscale fluctuations via electrostatic biasing and sheared E×B flow in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L.; Ruskov, E.; Deng, B. H.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.; Gota, H.; Tuszewski, M.

    2016-03-01

    Control of radial particle and thermal transport is instrumental for achieving and sustaining well-confined high-β plasma in a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Radial profiles of low frequency ion gyro-scale density fluctuations (0.5≤kρs≤40), consistent with drift- or drift-interchange modes, have been measured in the scrape-off layer (SOL) and core of the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC), together with the toroidal E×B velocity. It is shown here that axial electrostatic SOL biasing controls and reduces gyro-scale density fluctuations, resulting in very low FRC core fluctuation levels. When the radial E×B flow shearing rate decreases below the turbulence decorrelation rate, fluctuation levels increase substantially, concomitantly with onset of the n=2 instability and rapid loss of diamagnetism. Low turbulence levels, improved energy/particle confinement and substantially increased FRC life times are achieved when E×B shear near the separatrix is maintained via axial SOL biasing using an annular washer gun.

  17. Magnetic Field-Induced Reverse Martensitic Transformation and Thermal Transformation Arrest Phenomenon of Ni41Co9Mn39Sb11 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Y. Umetsu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate behavior of magnetic field-induced reverse martensitic transformation for Ni-Co-Mn-Sb, magnetization experiments up to a static magnetic field of 18 T and a pulsed magnetic field of 40 T were carried out. In the thermomagnetization curves for Ni41Co9Mn39Sb11 alloy, the equilibrium transformation temperature T0 was observed to decrease with increasing applied magnetic field, μ0H, at a rate of dT0/dμ0H = 4.6 K/T. The estimated value of entropy change evaluated from the Clausius-Clapeyron relation was about 14.1 J/(K·kg, which was in good agreement with the value obtained by differential scanning calorimetric measurements. For the isothermal magnetization curves, metamagnetic behavior associated with the magnetic field-induced martensitic transformation was observed. The equilibrium magnetic field, μ0H0 = (μ0HAf + μ0HMs/2, of the martensitic transformation tended to be saturated at lower temperature; that is, transformation arrest phenomenon was confirmed for the Ni-Co-Mn-Sb system, analogous with the Ni(Co-Mn-Z (Z = In, Sn, Ga, Al alloys. Temperature dependence of the magnetic field hysteresis, μ0Hhys = μ0HAf − μ0HMs, was analyzed based on the model for the plastic deformation introduced by the dislocations. The behavior can be explained by the model and the difference of the sweeping rate of the applied magnetic field was well reflected by the experimental results.

  18. Compaction properties of isomalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K.; Engelhart, Jeffrey J. P.; Eissens, Anko C.

    2009-01-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispoma

  19. Compact Information Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    network traffic, information retrieval, and databases are faced with very large, inherently high-dimensional, or naturally streaming datasets. This...proposal aims at developing mathematically rigorous and general- purpose statistical methods based on stable random projections, to achieve compact...detections (e.g., DDoS attacks), machine learning, databases , and search. Fundamentally, compact data representations are highly beneficial because they

  20. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties.