WorldWideScience

Sample records for field reflectance spectra

  1. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emissions of Vegetation Canopies From High Resolution Field Reflectance Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; Corp, L. A.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva

    2006-01-01

    A two-year experiment was performed on corn (Zea mays L.) crops under nitrogen (N) fertilization regimes to examine the use of hyperspectral canopy reflectance information for estimating chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) and vegetation production. Fluorescence of foliage in the laboratory has proven more rigorous than reflectance for correlation to plant physiology. Especially useful are emissions produced from two stable red and far-red chlorophyll ChlF peaks centered at 685V10 nm and 735V5 nm. Methods have been developed elsewhere to extract steady state solar induced fluorescence (SF) from apparent reflectance of vegetation canopies/landscapes using the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principal. Our study utilized these methods in conjunction with field-acquired high spectral resolution canopy reflectance spectra obtained in 2004 and 2005 over corn crops, as part of an ongoing multi-year experiment at the USDA/Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, MD. A spectroradiometer (ASD-FR Fieldspec Pro, Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc., Boulder, CO) was used to measure canopy radiances 1 m above plant canopies with a 22deg field of view and a 0deg nadir view zenith angle. Canopy and plant measurements were made at the R3 grain fill reproductive stage on 3-4 replicate N application plots provided seasonal inputs of 280, 140, 70, and 28 kg N/ha. Leaf level measurements were also made which included ChlF, photosynthesis, and leaf constituents (photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C), and N contents). Crop yields were determined at harvest. SIF intensities for ChlF were derived directly from canopy reflectance spectra in specific narrowband regions associated with atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 and 760 nm. The red/far-red S F ratio derived from these field reflectance spectra successfully discriminated foliar pigment levels (e.g., total chlorophyll, Chl) associated with N application rates in both corn crops. This canopy-level spectral ratio was also

  2. Subsurface electric field effect on excitonic reflection spectra of CdSe monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrev, A.S.; Novikov, B.V.; Cherednichenko, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Changes in exciton reflection spectra of CdSe monocrystals under bombardment with 2-3.5 keV electrons at T=4.2 K have been experimentally investigated. Under the same conditions measured was a relative value of surface photo e.m.f. depending on a dose of electron bombardment. A structure, resulted from the Stark well for excitons near surface and bound state in it - mechanical surface exciton, has been detected in nonirradiated crystals. Correlation between changes in the value of photo e.m.f. and the exciton reflection spectrum contour in the process of irradiation has been traced. It is shown that a number of peculiarities in experimental exciton reflection spectra is not explained with the model of the Thomas and Hopfield ''dead layer''. The Kiselev model is used to explain the results [ru

  3. Reflections on Conformal Spectra

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    We use modular invariance and crossing symmetry of conformal field theory to reveal approximate reflection symmetries in the spectral decompositions of the partition function in two dimensions in the limit of large central charge and of the four-point function in any dimension in the limit of large scaling dimensions Δ0 of external operators. We use these symmetries to motivate universal upper bounds on the spectrum and the operator product expansion coefficients, which we then derive by independent techniques. Some of the bounds for four-point functions are valid for finite Δ0 as well as for large Δ0. We discuss a similar symmetry in a large spacetime dimension limit. Finally, we comment on the analogue of the Cardy formula and sparse light spectrum condition for the four-point function. (based on 1510.08772 with Kim & Ooguri). This seminar will be given via videolink

  4. A whole image approach using field measurements for transforming EO1 Hyperion hyperspectral data into canopy reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Nelson, G.

    2005-01-01

    To maximize the spectral distinctiveness (information) of the canopy reflectance, an atmospheric correction strategy was implemented to provide accurate estimates of the intrinsic reflectance from the Earth Observing 1 (EO1) satellite Hyperion sensor signal. In rendering the canopy reflectance, an estimate of optical depth derived from a measurement of downwelling irradiance was used to drive a radiative transfer simulation of atmospheric scattering and attenuation. During the atmospheric model simulation, the input whole-terrain background reflectance estimate was changed to minimize the differences between the model predicted and the observed canopy reflectance spectra at 34 sites. Lacking appropriate spectrally invariant scene targets, inclusion of the field and predicted comparison maximized the model accuracy and, thereby, the detail and precision in the canopy reflectance necessary to detect low percentage occurrences of invasive plants. After accounting for artifacts surrounding prominent absorption features from about 400nm to 1000nm, the atmospheric adjustment strategy correctly explained 99% of the observed canopy reflectance spectra variance. Separately, model simulation explained an average of 88%??9% of the observed variance in the visible and 98% ?? 1% in the near-infrared wavelengths. In the 34 model simulations, maximum differences between the observed and predicted reflectances were typically less than ?? 1% in the visible; however, maximum reflectance differences higher than ?? 1.6% (reflectance differences remained less than ??3% for 68% of the comparisons (??1 standard deviation) and less than ??6% for 95% of the comparisons (??2 standard deviation). Higher reflectance differences in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths were most likely associated with problems in the comparison, not in the model generation. ?? 2005 US Government.

  5. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzold, D.E.; Goward, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the mid latitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 μm, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future. (author)

  6. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  7. Laboratory and field measurements of upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of suspended James River sediments near Hopewell, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whilock, C. H.; Witte, W. G.; Gurganus, E. A.; Usry, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Spectral reflectance characteristics of suspended Bermuda Hundred and Bailey Bay bottom sediments taken from the Hopewell, Va., area were measured in the laboratory for water mixture total suspended solids concentrations between 4 and 173 parts per million. Field spectral reflectance measurements were made of the James River waters near Bermuda Hundred on two occasions. The results of these tests indicate that both Bermuda Hundred and Bailey Bay suspended sediments produce their strongest reflectance in the green and red regions of the spectrum.

  8. Soil emissivity and reflectance spectra measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrino, Jose A.; Mattar, Cristian; Pardo, Pablo; Jimenez-Munoz, Juan C.; Hook, Simon J.; Baldridge, Alice; Ibanez, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of the laboratory reflectance and emissivity spectra of 11 soil samples collected on different field campaigns carried out over a diverse suite of test sites in Europe, North Africa, and South America from 2002 to 2008. Hemispherical reflectance spectra were measured from 2.0 to 14 μm with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to determine the mineralogical phases of the soil samples. Emissivity spectra were obtained from the hemispherical reflectance measurements using Kirchhoff's law and compared with in situ radiance measurements obtained with a CIMEL Electronique CE312-2 thermal radiometer and converted to emissivity using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. The CIMEL has five narrow bands at approximately the same positions as the ASTER. Results show a root mean square error typically below 0.015 between laboratory emissivity measurements and emissivity measurements derived from the field radiometer.

  9. A climatology of visible surface reflectance spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoogman, Peter; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sun, Qingsong; Schaaf, Crystal; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We present a high spectral resolution climatology of visible surface reflectance as a function of wavelength for use in satellite measurements of ozone and other atmospheric species. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is planned to measure backscattered solar radiation in the 290–740 nm range, including the ultraviolet and visible Chappuis ozone bands. Observation in the weak Chappuis band takes advantage of the relative transparency of the atmosphere in the visible to achieve sensitivity to near-surface ozone. However, due to the weakness of the ozone absorption features this measurement is more sensitive to errors in visible surface reflectance, which is highly variable. We utilize reflectance measurements of individual plant, man-made, and other surface types to calculate the primary modes of variability of visible surface reflectance at a high spectral resolution, comparable to that of TEMPO (0.6 nm). Using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirection Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/albedo product and our derived primary modes we construct a high spatial resolution climatology of wavelength-dependent surface reflectance over all viewing scenes and geometries. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment–2 (GOME-2) Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) product provides complementary information over water and snow scenes. Preliminary results using this approach in multispectral ultraviolet+visible ozone retrievals from the GOME-2 instrument show significant improvement to the fitting residuals over vegetated scenes. - Highlights: • Our goals was visible surface reflectance for satellite trace gas measurements. • Captured the range of surface reflectance spectra through EOF analysis. • Used satellite surface reflectance products for each given scene to anchor EOFs. • Generated a climatology of time/geometry dependent surface reflectance spectra. • Demonstrated potential to

  10. REFLECTION SPECTRA OF SKIN IN VITILIGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zhulmina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a disease with unknown etiology, which is characterized by skin depigmentation areas due to melanocyte death. Lack of clear understanding of pathogenic disease processes justifies the difficulty of choosing efficient treatment methods. Repigmentation is slow and not always complete. One of the key indicators in practical dermatology is objective assessment of skin cover condition for further diagnostics, definition of therapy and dynamics of the disease.The purpose of this study is to assess skin reflection spectrum in depigmentation areas, marginal layer and visible healthy skin before and after treatment of patients with vitiligo.21 patients having vitiligo were under observation; the patients were treated in the hospital of skin and venereal diseases of the Siberian State Medical University. The authors applied noninvasive method of spectrophotometry for the first time in order to study skin reflection spectrum of patients with vitiligo. Noninvasive medical spectrophotometry is based on dependence factor of integral optical properties of biological tissues and fluids in the conditions of homeostasis and in case of pathology. In order to assess the efficiency of skin disease treatment the patients were exposed to skin spectrophotometry before the beginning of the treatment and after the treatment itself with further measurements of the reflection spectrum integral criteria. The measurements were made in depigmentation area, on the boundary with healthy skin and in remote from depigmentation area of healthy skin.Obtained results indicate the difference of skin reflection spectra in the areas under investigation. Moreover, positive dynamics of the treatment associated with the decrease in the value of reflection spectrum integral criteria in the diseased area. There were no statistically important differences of the integral criteria, calculated based on measurement results of reflection spectra on the boundary of depigmentation area

  11. Reflections on the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, James M.

    2003-01-01

    Reflections on the field of special education offer six ideas: (1) the value of science; (2) the continuing value of separate and special education for some students; (3) the continuing importance of prevention; (4) the importance of academic instruction; (5) the importance of social justice for the poor; and (6) a renewed emphasis on human…

  12. Classification of specialty seed meals from NIR reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy was used to identify alternative seed meals proposed for food and feed formulations. Spectra were collected from cold pressed Camelina (Camelina sativa), Coriander (Coriandrum sativum), and Pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) meals. Additional spectra were collected ...

  13. A climatology of visible surface reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoogman, Peter; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Sun, Qingsong; Schaaf, Crystal; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We present a high spectral resolution climatology of visible surface reflectance as a function of wavelength for use in satellite measurements of ozone and other atmospheric species. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is planned to measure backscattered solar radiation in the 290-740 nm range, including the ultraviolet and visible Chappuis ozone bands. Observation in the weak Chappuis band takes advantage of the relative transparency of the atmosphere in the visible to achieve sensitivity to near-surface ozone. However, due to the weakness of the ozone absorption features this measurement is more sensitive to errors in visible surface reflectance, which is highly variable. We utilize reflectance measurements of individual plant, man-made, and other surface types to calculate the primary modes of variability of visible surface reflectance at a high spectral resolution, comparable to that of TEMPO (0.6 nm). Using the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirection Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)/albedo product and our derived primary modes we construct a high spatial resolution climatology of wavelength-dependent surface reflectance over all viewing scenes and geometries. The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) product provides complementary information over water and snow scenes. Preliminary results using this approach in multispectral ultraviolet+visible ozone retrievals from the GOME-2 instrument show significant improvement to the fitting residuals over vegetated scenes.

  14. Seedling Canopy Reflectance Spectra, 1992-1993 (ACCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The reflectance spectra of Douglas-fir and bigleaf maple seedling canopies were measured. Canopies varied in fertilizer treatment and leaf area density...

  15. HARDERSEN IRTF ASTEROID NIR REFLECTANCE SPECTRA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset includes average near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectra for 68 main-belt asteroids that were observed at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF),...

  16. Infrared reflectance spectra: effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, J. E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-10-01

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 - 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  17. Reflectance variability of surface coatings reveals characteristic eigenvalue spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.; Barros, Rui

    2012-10-01

    We have examined the trial-to-trial variability of the reflectance spectra of surface coatings containing effect pigments. Principal component analysis of reflectances was done at each detection angle separately. A method for classification of principal components is applied based on the eigenvalue spectra. It was found that the eigenvalue spectra follow characteristic power laws and depend on the detection angle. Three different subsets of principal components were examined to separate the relevant spectral features related to the pigments from other noise sources. Reconstruction of the reflectance spectra by taking only the first subset indicated that reflectance variability was higher at near-specular reflection, suggesting a correlation with the trial-to-trial deposition of effect pigments. Reconstruction by using the second subset indicates that variability was higher at short wavelengths. Finally, reconstruction by using only the third subset indicates that reflectance variability was not totally random as a function of the wavelength. The methods employed can be useful in the evaluation of color variability in industrial paint application processes.

  18. Reflections on Visual Field Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth D. Tunnell

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes ongoing visual field research by focusing on its self-reflective and auto-ethnographic components. Photographs and field notes are presented and personal encounters from the field are described. Recognizing the symbiotic order of the personal and political, the author details confrontations and emotions from ongoing efforts at recording visually.

  19. Reflections on Visual Field Research

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth D. Tunnell

    2012-01-01

    This article describes ongoing visual field research by focusing on its self-reflective and auto-ethnographic components. Photographs and field notes are presented and personal encounters from the field are described. Recognizing the symbiotic order of the personal and political, the author details confrontations and emotions from ongoing efforts at recording visually.

  20. The influence of particle size on infrared reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2014-06-01

    Reflectance spectra of solids are influenced by the absorption coefficient and index of refraction as well as particle size and morphology. In the infrared, spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: in general, the upwardgoing peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from surface scattering, which are rays that have reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks result from either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated into the sample to be absorbed or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signal reflected from solids usually encompasses all these effects which include dependencies on particle size, morphology and sample density. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 - 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. The bulk materials were ground and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions: 0-45, 45-90, 90-180, 180-250, 250-500, and >500 microns. The directional-hemispherical spectra were recorded using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere to measure the reflectance for all of the particle-size fractions. We have studied both organic and inorganic materials, but this paper focuses on inorganic salts, NaNO3, in particular. Our studies clearly show that particle size has an enormous influence on the measured reflectance spectra for bulk materials and that successful identification requires sufficient representative reflectance data so as to include the particle size(s) of interest. Origins of the effects are discussed.

  1. Influence of fluctuating strain on exciton reflection spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1982-01-01

    , for example, between crossed polarizers or from ellipsometric measurements. Assuming the phase fluctuations to obey a Gaussian distribution, σ can be expressed in a simple way in terms of the degree of polarization or the depolarization of the reflected light. σ is then derived in terms of the standard......The influence of an internal distribution of strain on the exciton reflection spectra is investigated. The resulting fluctuating optical constants give rise to a fluctuating phase of reflectivity. The standard deviation σ of these phase fluctuations is the quantity which can be observed...... to derive the dependence of the phase of reflectivity on the direction of the fluctuating optical axis. The results obtained for σ are compared with the experimental depolarization spectra of ZnO. The only fitting parameter is the common standard deviation of the strain components. It is found...

  2. Prediction of pork quality attributes from near infrared reflectance spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geesink, G.H.; Schreutelkamp, F.H.; Frankhuizen, R.; Vedder, H.W.; Faber, N.M.; Kranen, R.W.; Gerritzen, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is one of the most promising techniques for large-scale meat quality evaluation. We investigated the potential of NIRS-based models to predict drip loss and shear force of pork samples. Near infrared reflectance spectra (1000¿2500 nm), water-holding capacity, shear

  3. Negative power spectra in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Ford, L.H.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the spatial power spectra associated with fluctuations of quadratic operators in field theory, such as quantum stress tensor components. We show that the power spectrum can be negative, in contrast to most fluctuation phenomena where the Wiener-Khinchin theorem requires a positive power spectrum. We show why the usual argument for positivity fails in this case, and discuss the physical interpretation of negative power spectra. Possible applications to cosmology are discussed. -- Highlights: → Wiener-Khinchin theorem usually implies a positive power spectrum of fluctuations. → We show this is not always the case in quantum field theory. → Quantum stress tensor fluctuations can have a negative power spectrum. → Negative power interchanges correlations and anticorrelations.

  4. Quantitative analysis of planetary reflectance spectra with principal components analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. E.; Smith, M. O.; Adams, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is presented for quantitative analysis of planetary reflectance spectra as mixtures of particles on microscopic and macroscopic scales using principal components analysis. This technique allows for determination of the endmembers being mixed, their abundance, and the scale of mixing, as well as other physical parameters. Eighteen lunar telescopic reflectance spectra of the Copernicus crater region, from 600 nm to 1800 nm in wavelength, are modeled in terms of five likely endmembers: mare basalt, mature mare soil, anorthosite, mature highland soil, and clinopyroxene. These endmembers were chosen from a similar analysis of 92 lunar soil and rock samples. The models fit the data to within 2 percent rms. It is found that the goodness of fit is marginally better for intimate mixing over macroscopic mixing.

  5. Analyzing reflectance spectra of human skin in legal medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenki, Liudmila; Sterzik, Vera; Schulz, Katharina; Bohnert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Our current research in the framework of an interdisciplinary project focuses on modelling the dynamics of the hemoglobin reoxygenation process in post-mortem human skin by reflectance spectrometry. The observations of reoxygenation of hemoglobin in livores after postmortem exposure to a cold environment relate the reoxygenation to the commonly known phenomenon that the color impression of livores changes from livid to pink under low ambient temperatures. We analyze the spectra with respect to a physical model describing the optical properties of human skin, discuss the dynamics of the reoxygenation, and propose a phenomenological model for reoxygenation. For additional characterization of the reflectance spectra, the curvature of the local minimum and maximum in the investigated spectral range is considered. There is a strong correlation between the curvature of specra at a wavelength of 560 nm and the concentration of O2-Hb. The analysis is carried out via C programs, as well as MySQL database queries in Java EE, JDBC, Matlab, and Python.

  6. The Effects of Accretion Disk Geometry on AGN Reflection Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Corbin James; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2017-08-01

    Despite being the gravitational engines that power galactic-scale winds and mega parsec-scale jets in active galaxies, black holes are remarkably simple objects, typically being fully described by their angular momenta (spin) and masses. The modelling of AGN X-ray reflection spectra has proven fruitful in estimating the spin of AGN, as well as giving insight into their accretion histories and the properties of plasmas in the strong gravity regime. However, current models make simplifying assumptions about the geometry of the reflecting material in the accretion disk and the irradiating X-ray corona, approximating the disk as an optically thick, infinitely thin disk of material in the orbital plane. We present results from the new relativistic raytracing suite, Fenrir, that explore the effects that disk thickness may have on the reflection spectrum and the accompanying reverberation signatures. Approximating the accretion disk as an optically thick, geometrically thin, radiation pressure dominated disk (Shakura & Sunyaev 1973), one finds that the disk geometry is non-negligible in many cases, with significant changes in the broad Fe K line profile. Finally, we explore the systematic errors inherent in approximating the disk as being infinitely thin when modeling reflection spectrum, potentially biasing determinations of black hole and corona properties.

  7. [Monitoring of Crack Propagation in Repaired Structures Based on Characteristics of FBG Sensors Reflecting Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shen-fang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Lei; Huang, Hong-mei

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the security of aircraft repaired structures, a method of crack propagation monitoring in repaired structures is put forward basing on characteristics of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) reflecting spectra in this article. With the cyclic loading effecting on repaired structure, cracks propagate, while non-uniform strain field appears nearby the tip of crack which leads to the FBG sensors' reflecting spectra deformations. The crack propagating can be monitored by extracting the characteristics of FBG sensors' reflecting spectral deformations. A finite element model (FEM) of the specimen is established. Meanwhile, the distributions of strains which are under the action of cracks of different angles and lengths are obtained. The characteristics, such as main peak wavelength shift, area of reflecting spectra, second and third peak value and so on, are extracted from the FBGs' reflecting spectral which are calculated by transfer matrix algorithm. An artificial neural network is built to act as the model between the characteristics of the reflecting spectral and the propagation of crack. As a result, the crack propagation of repaired structures is monitored accurately and the error of crack length is less than 0.5 mm, the error of crack angle is less than 5 degree. The accurately monitoring problem of crack propagation of repaired structures is solved by taking use of this method. It has important significance in aircrafts safety improvement and maintenance cost reducing.

  8. A system for the obtention and analysis of diffuse reflection spectra from biological tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Cadena, A. de; La Rosa, J. de; Stolik, S.

    2012-01-01

    The diffuse reflection spectroscopy is a technique with is possible to study biological tissue. In the field of the biomedical applications is useful for diagnostic purposes, since is possible to analyze biological tissue in a non invasive way. also, can be used with therapeutical purposes, for example in photodynamic therapy or laser surgery because with this technique it can be determined the biological effects produced by these treatments. In this paper is shown the development of a system to obtain and analyze diffuse reflection spectra of biological tissues, using a LED as a light source, that emits light between 400-700nm. The system has an interface for the regulation of the emittance of the LED. For diffuse reflectance spectra analysis, we use an HR4000CG-UV-NIR spectrometer. (Author)

  9. Attenuated total reflection angular spectra of a system of alternating plasma-dielectric layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, G J; Scott, G D

    1978-11-15

    The attenuated total reflection (ATR) angular spectra of a five-film system have been observed. Successive layers of Ag-LiF-Ag-LiF-Ag are evaporated onto the base of a glass prism. Surface plasma wave resonances corresponding to coupled oscillations at the plasma-dielectric interfaces were found for p-polarization. Guided light modes coupled between the two dielectric layers were observed in both p- and s-polarized spectra. If guided mode reflectance resonances occur at less than the critical angle they have associated with them resonance transmissions. In general the ATR resonances of the five-film system occur as doublets, which form a splitting of the resonances of a single dielectric slab bounded by Ag layers. The resonant oscillations are demonstrated by detailed calculations of the Poynting vector field and electric field oscillations, which also help in understanding the source of discrepancies between experimental and calculated ATR spectra. These discrepancies are thought to be due largely to the surface roughness of evaporated LiF films. The roughness is modeled as thin cermet layers at the LiF-Ag interfaces, and the optical constants of the cermets are calculated by the Maxwell Garnett theory. When the ATR spectra are then computed with the pseudolayers inserted, much improved agreement with experiment can be obtained.

  10. Simulations of Effects of Nanophase Iron Space Weather Products on Lunar Regolith Reflectance Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Cerezo, J.; Penttilä, A.; Kohout, T.; Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Muinonen, K.

    2018-01-01

    Lunar soil spectra differ from pulverized lunar rocks spectra by reddening and darkening effects, and shallower absorption bands. These effects have been described in the past as a consequence of space weathering. In this work, we focus on the effects of nanophase iron (npFe0) inclusions on the experimental reflectance spectra of lunar regolith particles. The reflectance spectra are computed using SIRIS3, a code that combines ray optics with radiative-transfer modeling to simulate light scattering by different types of scatterers. The imaginary part of the refractive index as a function of wavelength of immature lunar soil is derived by comparison with the measured spectra of the corresponding material. Furthermore, the effect of adding nanophase iron inclusions on the reflectance spectra is studied. The computed spectra qualitatively reproduce the observed effects of space weathered lunar regolith.

  11. Plant phenolics and absorption features in vegetation reflectance spectra near 1.66 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2015-12-01

    Past laboratory and field studies have quantified phenolic substances in vegetative matter from reflectance measurements for understanding plant response to herbivores and insect predation. Past remote sensing studies on phenolics have evaluated crop quality and vegetation patterns caused by bedrock geology and associated variations in soil geochemistry. We examined spectra of pure phenolic compounds, common plant biochemical constituents, dry leaves, fresh leaves, and plant canopies for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to plant phenolics. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that a narrow feature at 1.66 μm is persistent in spectra of manzanita, sumac, red maple, sugar maple, tea, and other species. This feature was consistent with absorption caused by aromatic Csbnd H bonds in the chemical structure of phenolic compounds and non-hydroxylated aromatics. Because of overlapping absorption by water, the feature was weaker in fresh leaf and canopy spectra compared to dry leaf measurements. Simple linear regressions of feature depth and feature area with polyphenol concentration in tea resulted in high correlations and low errors (% phenol by dry weight) at the dry leaf (r2 = 0.95, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 56), fresh leaf (r2 = 0.79, RMSE = 2.1%, n = 56), and canopy (r2 = 0.78, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 13) levels of measurement. Spectra of leaves, needles, and canopies of big sagebrush and evergreens exhibited a weak absorption feature centered near 1.63 μm, short ward of the phenolic compounds, possibly consistent with terpenes. This study demonstrates that subtle variation in vegetation spectra in the shortwave infrared can directly indicate biochemical constituents and be used to quantify them. Phenolics are of lesser abundance compared to the major plant constituents but, nonetheless, have important plant functions and ecological significance. Additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the spectral influences

  12. CCD reflectance spectra of selected asteroids. I - Presentation and data analysis considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Mcfadden, Lucy A.

    1992-01-01

    Narrowband reflectance spectra have been acquired which contribute to the library of asteroid data in the visible and near-IR spectral regions. The spectra support the existence of aqueous alteration products on asteroids located in the outer part of the main asteroid belt out to at least 4 AU. No evidence for features similar to the spectral features of ordinary chondrite meteorites was found in the spectra of asteroids located near the 3:1 Kirkwood Gap chaotic zone.

  13. Observations of discrete energy loss effects in spectra of positrons reflected from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, J.M.; Hulett, L.D.; Pendyala, S.

    1980-01-01

    Surfaces of tungsten and silicon have been bombarded with monoenergetic beams of positrons and electrons. Spectra of reflected particles show energy loss tails with discrete peaks at kinetic energies about 15 eV lower than that of the elastic peaks. In the higher energy loss range for tungsten, positron spectra show fine structure that is not apparent in the electron spectra. This suggests that the positrons are losing energy through mechanisms different from that of the electrons

  14. Visible and Near-Infrared Leaf Reflectance Spectra, 1992-1993 (ACCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visible/NIR reflectance spectra data for both fresh and dry leaf samples were collected to determine the relationship of foliar chemical concentrations with...

  15. LBA-ECO LC-07 Reflectance Spectra and Water Quality of Amazon Basin Floodplain Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes bidirectional reflectance (BDR) spectra and water-quality data of floodplain lakes of the Solimoes and Negro Rivers in the central Amazon...

  16. LBA-ECO LC-07 Reflectance Spectra and Water Quality of Amazon Basin Floodplain Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set includes bidirectional reflectance (BDR) spectra and water-quality data of floodplain lakes of the Solimoes and Negro Rivers in the central...

  17. Asteroid surface materials: mineralogical characterizations from reflectance spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffey, M.J.; McCord, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    The interpretation of diagnostic parameters in the spectral reflectance data for asteroids provides a means of characterizing the mineralogy and petrology of asteroid surface materials. An interpretive technique based on a quantitative understanding of the functional relationship between the optical properties of a mineral assemblage and its mineralogy, petrology and chemistry can provide a considerably more sophisticated characterization of a single material than any matching or classification technique for those objects bright enough to allow spectral reflectance measurements. Albedos derived from radiometry and polarization data for individual asteroids can be used with spectral data to establish the spectral albedo, to define the optical density of the surface material and, in general to constrain mineralogical interpretations. (Auth.)

  18. Full wave-field reflection coefficient inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    This paper develops a Bayesian inversion for recovering multilayer geoacoustic (velocity, density, attenuation) profiles from a full wave-field (spherical-wave) seabed reflection response. The reflection data originate from acoustic time series windowed for a single bottom interaction, which are processed to yield reflection coefficient data as a function of frequency and angle. Replica data for inversion are computed using a wave number-integration model to calculate the full complex acoustic pressure field, which is processed to produce a commensurate seabed response function. To address the high computational cost of calculating short range acoustic fields, the inversion algorithms are parallelized and frequency averaging is replaced by range averaging in the forward model. The posterior probability density is interpreted in terms of optimal parameter estimates, marginal distributions, and credibility intervals. Inversion results for the full wave-field seabed response are compared to those obtained using plane-wave reflection coefficients. A realistic synthetic study indicates that the plane-wave assumption can fail, producing erroneous results with misleading uncertainty bounds, whereas excellent results are obtained with the full-wave reflection inversion.

  19. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier-Transform spectra of selected organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, S.H.; Caton, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    Diffuse reflectance infrared spectra of a variety of different organic compounds have been determined. Profiles of the spectra along with the location and relative intensity of the principal bands have been included for each compound studied. In addition both diffuse reflectance and transmittance infrared spectra were obtained for the same samples, and the spectral results were compared. Although some minor variations are observed between a diffuse reflectance spectrum and the corresponding transmittance spectrum, the diffuse reflectance is quite useful and may be a superior technique for the study of many samples because it possesses an inherently higher signal-to-noise response, requires less sample preparation and allows a very wide range of samples (solids, liquids of low volatility, neat sample, or sample diluted in a reflecting medium) to be studied under very similar conditions.

  20. Baseline Correction of Diffuse Reflection Near-Infrared Spectra Using Searching Region Standard Normal Variate (SRSNV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkawa, Takuma; Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Kato, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Daitaro; Murayama, Kodai; Komiyama, Makoto; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2015-12-01

    An alternative baseline correction method for diffuse reflection near-infrared (NIR) spectra, searching region standard normal variate (SRSNV), was proposed. Standard normal variate (SNV) is an effective pretreatment method for baseline correction of diffuse reflection NIR spectra of powder and granular samples; however, its baseline correction performance depends on the NIR region used for SNV calculation. To search for an optimal NIR region for baseline correction using SNV, SRSNV employs moving window partial least squares regression (MWPLSR), and an optimal NIR region is identified based on the root mean square error (RMSE) of cross-validation of the partial least squares regression (PLSR) models with the first latent variable (LV). The performance of SRSNV was evaluated using diffuse reflection NIR spectra of mixture samples consisting of wheat flour and granular glucose (0-100% glucose at 5% intervals). From the obtained NIR spectra of the mixture in the 10 000-4000 cm(-1) region at 4 cm intervals (1501 spectral channels), a series of spectral windows consisting of 80 spectral channels was constructed, and then SNV spectra were calculated for each spectral window. Using these SNV spectra, a series of PLSR models with the first LV for glucose concentration was built. A plot of RMSE versus the spectral window position obtained using the PLSR models revealed that the 8680–8364 cm(-1) region was optimal for baseline correction using SNV. In the SNV spectra calculated using the 8680–8364 cm(-1) region (SRSNV spectra), a remarkable relative intensity change between a band due to wheat flour at 8500 cm(-1) and that due to glucose at 8364 cm(-1) was observed owing to successful baseline correction using SNV. A PLSR model with the first LV based on the SRSNV spectra yielded a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.999 and an RMSE of 0.70%, while a PLSR model with three LVs based on SNV spectra calculated in the full spectral region gave an R2 of 0.995 and an RMSE of

  1. On the impact of particle size on the characteristics of specular and diffuse reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, U.; Schmidt, B.; Dabrowski, B.; Hoenicke, L.; Kloskowski, D.

    2017-09-01

    The remote identification of minerals or rocks by reflectance measurements uses the fact that reflectance spectra in the UV-VIS-NIR and thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength regions contain a number of diagnostic features. Among these features particle size play an important role. We report on the characteristics of NIR measurements of pure minerals of well-defined grain sizes relevant for remote sensing studies of soils in specular and diffuse reflectance.

  2. Reflectance Spectra of Peacock Feathers and the Turning Angles of Melanin Rods in Barbules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Toshio

    2018-02-01

    I analyzed the association between the reflectance spectra and melanin rod arrangement in barbules of the eyespot of peacock feathers. The reflectance spectra from the yellow-green feather of the eyespot indicated double peaks of 430 and 540 nm. The maximum reflectance spectrum of the blue feather was 480 nm, and that of the dark blue feather was 420 nm. The reflectance spectra from brown feathers indicated double peaks of 490 and 610 nm. Transmission electron microscopic analysis confirmed that melanin rods were arranged fanwise in the outer layer toward the barbule tips. In addition, using polarized light microscope, I attempted to determine whether the turning angles of melanin rods in the barbules reflected different colors. The turning angle of the polarizing axis of the barbules was supported by that of the melanin rods, observed using transmission electron microscopic images. To compare the turning angle of melanin rods in the respective barbules, I calculated the opening width of the fanwise melanin rods by dividing the width of the barbules by the turning angle of the polarizing axis of barbules and obtained a positive correlation between the reflectance spectra and opening width of the fanwise melanin rods. Moreover, the widely spreading reflection from the barbules may occur because of the fanwise melanin rod arrangement.

  3. Plant phenolics and absorption features in vegetation reflectance spectra near 1.66 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Skidmore, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Past laboratory and field studies have quantified phenolic substances in vegetative matter from reflectance measurements for understanding plant response to herbivores and insect predation. Past remote sensing studies on phenolics have evaluated crop quality and vegetation patterns caused by bedrock geology and associated variations in soil geochemistry. We examined spectra of pure phenolic compounds, common plant biochemical constituents, dry leaves, fresh leaves, and plant canopies for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to plant phenolics. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that a narrow feature at 1.66 μm is persistent in spectra of manzanita, sumac, red maple, sugar maple, tea, and other species. This feature was consistent with absorption caused by aromatic C-H bonds in the chemical structure of phenolic compounds and non-hydroxylated aromatics. Because of overlapping absorption by water, the feature was weaker in fresh leaf and canopy spectra compared to dry leaf measurements. Simple linear regressions of feature depth and feature area with polyphenol concentration in tea resulted in high correlations and low errors (% phenol by dry weight) at the dry leaf (r2 = 0.95, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 56), fresh leaf (r2 = 0.79, RMSE = 2.1%, n = 56), and canopy (r2 = 0.78, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 13) levels of measurement. Spectra of leaves, needles, and canopies of big sagebrush and evergreens exhibited a weak absorption feature centered near 1.63 μm, short ward of the phenolic compounds, possibly consistent with terpenes. This study demonstrates that subtle variation in vegetation spectra in the shortwave infrared can directly indicate biochemical constituents and be used to quantify them. Phenolics are of lesser abundance compared to the major plant constituents but, nonetheless, have important plant functions and ecological significance. Additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the

  4. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS USING AUTOCORRELATION OF SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borra, E. F.; Deschatelets, D. [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique. Université Laval (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    We present a novel technique that uses the autocorrelation of the spectrum of a star to measure the line broadening caused by the modulus of its average surface magnetic field. The advantage of the autocorrelation comes from the fact that it can detect very small spectral line broadening effects because it averages over many spectral lines and therefore gives an average with a very high signal-to-noise ratio. We validate the technique with the spectra of known magnetic stars and obtain autocorrelation curves that are in full agreement with published magnetic curves obtained with Zeeman splitting. The autocorrelation also gives less noisy curves so that it can be used to obtain very accurate curves. We degrade the resolution of the spectra of these magnetic stars to lower spectral resolutions where the Zeeman splitting is undetectable. At these resolutions, the autocorrelation still gives good quality curves, thereby showing that it can be used to measure magnetic fields in spectra where the Zeeman splitting is significantly smaller than the width of the spectral line. This would therefore allow observing magnetic fields in very faint Ap stars with low-resolution spectrographs, thereby greatly increasing the number of known magnetic stars. It also demonstrates that the autocorrelation can measure magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars as well as weak magnetic fields that give a Zeeman splitting smaller than the intrinsic width of the spectral lines. Finally, it shows that the autocorrelation can be used to find unknown magnetic stars in low-resolution spectroscopic surveys.

  5. Effects of Space Weathering on Reflectance Spectra of Ureilites: First Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Gillis-Davis, J.; Cloutis, E.; Applin, D.; Takir, D.; Hibbitts, C.; Christoffersen, R.; Fries, M.; Klima, R.; Decker, S.

    2018-01-01

    Ureilites are differentiated meteorites (ultramafic rocks interpreted to be mantle residues) that contain as much carbon as the most carbon-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CCs). Reflectance spectra of ureilites are similar to those of some CCs. Hence, ureilitic asteroids may accidentally be categorized as primitive because their spectra could resemble those of C-complex asteroids, which are thought to be CC-like. We began spectral studies of progressively laser-weathered ureilites with the goals of predicting UV-VIS-IR spectra of ureilitic asteroids, and identifying features that could distinguish differentiated from primitive dark asteroids. Space weathering has not previously been studied for ureilites, and, based on space weathering studies of CCs and other C-rich materials, it could significantly alter their reflectance spectra.

  6. Similarity analysis of spectra obtained via reflectance spectrometry in legal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenki, Liudmila; Sterzik, Vera; Bohnert, Michael

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, a series of reflectance spectra of postmortem lividity, pallor, and putrefaction-affected skin for 195 investigated cases in the course of cooling down the corpse has been collected. The reflectance spectrometric measurements were stored together with their respective metadata in a MySQL database. The latter has been managed via a scientific information repository. We propose similarity measures and a criterion of similarity that capture similar spectra recorded at corpse skin. We systematically clustered reflectance spectra from the database as well as their metadata, such as case number, age, sex, skin temperature, duration of cooling, and postmortem time, with respect to the given criterion of similarity. Altogether, more than 500 reflectance spectra have been pairwisely compared. The measures that have been used to compare a pair of reflectance curve samples include the Euclidean distance between curves and the Euclidean distance between derivatives of the functions represented by the reflectance curves at the same wavelengths in the spectral range of visible light between 380 and 750 nm. For each case, using the recorded reflectance curves and the similarity criterion, the postmortem time interval during which a characteristic change in the shape of reflectance spectrum takes place is estimated. The latter is carried out via a software package composed of Java, Python, and MatLab scripts that query the MySQL database. We show that in legal medicine, matching and clustering of reflectance curves obtained by means of reflectance spectrometry with respect to a given criterion of similarity can be used to estimate the postmortem interval.

  7. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. III. A Complete Grid of Ionized Reflection Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J.; Dauser, T.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; McClintock, J. E.; Wilms, J.; Ekmann, W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code xillver that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic data base. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index Gamma of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter zeta at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A(sub Fe) relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are: 1.2 total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in xspec. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of xillver.

  8. Variable valence ion spectra in a crystal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiordanescu, V.

    1979-01-01

    Using the Cadmium chloride as a host lattice, the optical spectra and RES of Mnsup(2+) were studied and the following results were obtained: a) By controlled dopings, the absorbtion and excitation spectra of ion Mnsup(2+) in CdCl 2 within the concentration range between 0.01 M and 25 M were plotted. Thus, the band structure for small concentrations was pointed out to differ from the structure observed for high concentrations. In the literature, this effect has not been observed on similar compounds, due to the small intensity values of the absorbtion spectra. b) Considering that for CdCl 2 :Mnsup(2+) 0.1 M, the optical spectra correspond to the isolated ion in the lattice, the energy levels were evaluated using electrostatic and spin-orbit terms in a perturbation calculation of the crystal field approximation. c) The calculation of parameter a which represents the effect of the cubic field in the spjn Hamiltonian of Mnsup(2+), is closer to the experjmental value -0.5.10 -4 cm -1 of the crystal field Dq and zeta parameters are used, respectively, parameters of the spin-orbit interaction obtained under b). d) The coupling effects of spins into more concentrated crystals with Mn 2+ are a function of temperature. The emjssion yield was given a quasi-cantitative evaluation in thjs paper as a function of temperature and concentratjon on the basis of which the isolated centers of Mn 2+ were found to display ectra whose intensity vary with temperature according to the Laporte forbidden transitions and spin rule theory, and the clusters including Mn 2+ - Mn 2+ pairs provide spectra whose intensity vary with the strength of the spin-spin coupling. (author)

  9. Simulation of attenuated total reflection infrared absorbance spectra: applications to automotive clear coat forensic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Barry K; Fasasi, Ayuba; Mirjankar, Nikhil; Nishikida, Koichi; Campbell, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated total reflection (ATR) is a widely used sampling technique in infrared (IR) spectroscopy because minimal sample preparation is required. Since the penetration depth of the ATR analysis beam is quite shallow, the outer layers of a laminate or multilayered paint sample can be preferentially analyzed with the entire sample intact. For this reason, forensic laboratories are taking advantage of ATR to collect IR spectra of automotive paint systems that may consist of three or more layers. However, the IR spectrum of a paint sample obtained by ATR will exhibit distortions, e.g., band broadening and lower relative intensities at higher wavenumbers, compared with its transmission counterpart. This hinders library searching because most library spectra are measured in transmission mode. Furthermore, the angle of incidence for the internal reflection element, the refractive index of the clear coat, and surface contamination due to inorganic contaminants can profoundly influence the quality of the ATR spectrum obtained for automotive paints. A correction algorithm to allow ATR spectra to be searched using IR transmission spectra of the paint data query (PDQ) automotive database is presented. The proposed correction algorithm to convert transmission spectra from the PDQ library to ATR spectra is able to address distortion issues such as the relative intensities and broadening of the bands, and the introduction of wavelength shifts at lower frequencies, which prevent library searching of ATR spectra using archived IR transmission data.

  10. Multivariate Data Analysis on Tissue Diffuse Reflectance Spectra for Diagnostic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Shanthi; Malarvizhi, S.

    2011-10-01

    Currently, clinical diagnosis of skin disease is generally accomplished by visual inspection under white light illumination. Aside from physical examination, the diagnosis of most of these lesions is invasive, time-consuming, and costly, often requiring surgical excision or biopsy followed by pathological investigations. Several approaches have been tried to improve dermatological diagnosis. Optical means of characterizing tissues have gained importance due to its noninvasive nature. Diffuse reflectance spectra are unique for normal and diseased tissues. Spectral characteristics of the tissue spectra provide useful information to identify various chromophores present in them, because different chromophores have different spectroscopic responses to electromagnetic waves of certain energy bands. An optical fiber spectrometer is set up for collection of diffuse reflectance data from different skin conditions. The method involves exposure of skin surface to white light produced by an incandescent source. These back scattered photons emerging from various layers of tissue are detected by spectrometer resulting in diffuse reflectance data. PCA can be considered as "the mother of all methods in multivariate data analysis". PCA is performed for data reduction and to obtain specific signature from the spectra to differentiate normal and the diseased skin. The proposed principal component analysis method is able to enhance the peculiar characteristics of the diseased diffuse reflectance spectra. Principal component analysis shows that the spectra from normal and diseased tissues are distinct from each other. PCA is recommended as an exploratory tool to uncover unknown trends in the data. A preliminary study, using PCA on the reparability of the spectra of normal and diseased tissue within each patient shows promise that this method is sensitive to changes in tissue brought upon by the onset of disease.

  11. Reconstruction of fiber grating refractive-index profiles from complex bragg reflection spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D W; Yang, C C

    1999-07-20

    Reconstruction of the refractive-index profiles of fiber gratings from their complex Bragg reflection spectra is experimentally demonstrated. The amplitude and phase of the complex reflection spectrum were measured with a balanced Michelson interferometer. By integrating the coupled-mode equations, we built the relationship between the complex coupling coefficient and the complex reflection spectrum as an iterative algorithm for reconstructing the index profile. This method is expected to be useful for reconstructing the index profiles of fiber gratings with any apodization, chirp, or dc structures. An apodized chirped grating and a uniform grating with a depression of index modulation were used to demonstrate the technique.

  12. Integral parameters of crystal field for RE spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustov, E.F.; Maketov, T.K.; Prgevudsky, A.K.; Steczko, G.

    1980-01-01

    The integral parameters of the crystal field are introduced for the interpretation of the spectra of RE ions in various crystals. The main formula of the method, the expression of the parameters for various states of Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Tb, Er, Tu, and Yb are determined. Integral parameters of A 2 , A 4 , A 6 and parameter of the spin-orbit interaction xi are calculated for 40 laser crystals with Nd, Er. An interpretation of the symmetry of the Eu 3+ centres of the NaBaZn silicate glass is given using integral parameters A 2 , A 4 . (author)

  13. Estimation of Phytoplankton Accessory Pigments From Hyperspectral Reflectance Spectra: Toward a Global Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, A. P.; Boss, E.; Cetinić, I.; Slade, W.

    2017-12-01

    Phytoplankton community composition in the ocean is complex and highly variable over a wide range of space and time scales. Able to cover these scales, remote-sensing reflectance spectra can be measured both by satellite and by in situ radiometers. The spectral shape of reflectance in the open ocean is influenced by the particles in the water, mainly phytoplankton and covarying nonalgal particles. We investigate the utility of in situ hyperspectral remote-sensing reflectance measurements to detect phytoplankton pigments by using an inversion algorithm that defines phytoplankton pigment absorption as a sum of Gaussian functions. The inverted amplitudes of the Gaussian functions representing pigment absorption are compared to coincident High Performance Liquid Chromatography measurements of pigment concentration. We determined strong predictive capability for chlorophylls a, b, c1+c2, and the photoprotective carotenoids. We also tested the estimation of pigment concentrations from reflectance-derived chlorophyll a using global relationships of covariation between chlorophyll a and the accessory pigments. We found similar errors in pigment estimation based on the relationships of covariation versus the inversion algorithm. An investigation of spectral residuals in reflectance data after removal of chlorophyll-based average absorption spectra showed no strong relationship between spectral residuals and pigments. Ultimately, we are able to estimate concentrations of three chlorophylls and the photoprotective carotenoid pigments, noting that further work is necessary to address the challenge of extracting information from hyperspectral reflectance beyond the information that can be determined from chlorophyll a and its covariation with other pigments.

  14. The effects of atmospheric pressure on infrared reflectance spectra of Martian analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Pratt, Stephen F.; Patterson, William

    1993-01-01

    The use of terrestrial samples as analogs of Mars soils are complicated by the Martian atmosphere. Spectral features due to the Martian atmosphere can be removed from telescopic spectra of Mars and ISM spectra of Mars, but this does not account for any spectral differences resulting from atmospheric pressure or any interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. We are examining the effects of atmospheric pressure on reflectance spectra of powdered samples in the laboratory. Contrary to a previous experiment with granite, no significant changes in albedo or the Christiansen feature were observed from 1 bar pressure down to a pressure of 8 micrometers Hg. However, reducing the atmospheric pressure does have a pronounced affect on the hydration features, even for samples retained in a dry environment for years.

  15. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Hidden Objects, Part I: Interpretation of the Reflection-Absorption-Scattering Fractions in Near-Infrared (NIR) Spectra of Polyethylene Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantsev, Alexey L; Rodionova, Oxana Ye; Skvortsov, Alexej N

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of a sample covered by an interfering layer is required in many fields, e.g., for process control, biochemical analysis, and many other applications. This study is based on the analysis of spectra collected by near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Each spectrum is a composition of a useful, target spectrum and a spectrum of an interfering layer. To recover the target spectrum, we suggest using a new phenomenological approach, which employs the multivariate curve resolution (MCR) method. In general terms, the problem is very complex. We start with a specific problem of analyzing a system, which consists of several layers of polyethylene (PE) film and underlayer samples with known spectral properties. To separate information originating from PE layers and the target, we modify the system versus both the number of the PE layers as well as the reflectance properties of the target sample. We consider that the interfering spectrum of the layer can be modeled using three components, which can be tentatively called transmission, absorption, and scattering contributions. The novelty of our approach is that we do not remove the reflectance and scattering effects from the spectra, but study them in detail aiming to use this information to recover the target spectrum.

  16. Effect of reflection and refraction on NEXAFS spectra measured in TEY mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Elena; Sokolov, Andrey

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure in the vicinity of the K-absorption edge of oxygen for HfO 2 over a wide range of incidence angles is analyzed by simultaneous implementation of the total-electron-yield (TEY) method and X-ray reflection spectroscopy. It is established that the effect of refraction on the TEY spectrum is greater than that of reflection and extends into the angular region up to angles 2θ c . Within angles that are less than the critical angle, both the reflection and refraction strongly distort the shape of the TEY spectrum. Limitations of the technique for the calculation of optical constants from the reflection spectra using the Kramers-Kronig relation in the limited energy region in the vicinity of thresholds are discussed in detail.

  17. [The evaluation of hydrocarbon potential generation for source rocks by near-infrared diffuse reflection spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Jia; Xu, Xiao-Xuan; Song, Ning; Wu, Zhong-Chen; Zhou, Xiang; Chen, Jin; Cao, Xue-Wei; Wang, Bin

    2011-04-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) diffuse reflection spectra were compared and evaluated for hydrocarbon potential generation of source rocks. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance often exhibits significant differences in the spectra due to the non-homogeneous distribution of the particles, so the signal-to-noise ratio of NIR is much lower than MIR It is too difficult to get accurate results by NIR without using a strong spectral preprocessing method to remove systematic noise such as base-line variation and multiplicative scatter effects. In the present paper, orthogonal signal correction (OSC) and an improved algorithm of it, i.e. direct orthogonal signal correction (DOSC), are used as different methods to preprocess both the NIR and MIR spectra of the hydrocarbon source rocks. Another algorithm, wavelet multi-scale direct orthogonal signal correction (WMDOSC), which is a combination of discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and DOSC, is also used as a preprocessing method. Then, the calibration model of hydrocarbon source rocks before and after pretreatment was established by interval partial least square (iPLS). The experimental results show that WMDOSC is more successfully applied to preprocess the NIR spectra data of the hydrocarbon source rocks than other two algorithms, and NIR performed as good as MIR in the analysis of hydrocarbon potential generation of source rocks with WMDOSC-iPLS pretreatment calibration model.

  18. [Maize Hybrid Seed Purity Identification Based on Near Infrared Reflectance (NIR) and Transmittance (NIT) Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian-xin; Jia, Shi-qiang; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Sheng-yi; Ran, Hang; Yan, Yan-lu; An, Dong

    2015-12-01

    This article explore the feasibility of using Near Infrared Reflectance (NIR) and Transmittance (NIT) Spectroscopy (908.1-1677.2 nm wavelength range) to identify maize hybrid purity, and compare the performance of NIR and NIT spectroscopy. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Linear Discriminant Analysis (OLDA) were used to reduce the dimension of spectra which have been pretreated by first derivative and vector normalization. The hybrid purity identification model of Nonghua101 and Jingyu16 were built by SVM. Models based on NIR spectra obtained correct identification rate as 100% and 90% for Nonghua101 and Jingyu16 respectively. But NIR spectra were greatly influenced by the placement of seeds, and there existed significant difference between NIR spectra of embryo and non-embryo side. Models based on NIT spectroscopy yielded correct identification rate as 98% both for Nonghua101 and Jingyu16. NIT spectra of embryo and non-embryo side were highly similar. The results indicate that it is feasible to identify maize hybrid purity based on NIR and NIT spectroscopy, and NIT spectroscopy is more suitable to analyze single seed kernel than NIR spectroscopy.

  19. New vegetation indices for remote measurement of chlorophylls based on leaf directional reflectance spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccioni, A; Agati, G; Mazzinghi, P

    2001-08-15

    Directional reflectance (R) spectra from 380 to 780 nm for nadir illuminated leaves of four different plants (croton, Codiaeum variegatum; spotted eleagnus, Eleagnus pungens Maculata; Japanese pittosporum, Pittosporum tobira and Benjamin fig, Ficus benjamina Starlight) were acquired at a viewing angle of 30 degrees from the nadir direction. Chlorophyll-a and -b content of leaves covered a range of 1-60 and 0.5-21 microg/cm(2), respectively. In contrast with previous results from hemispherical reflectance measurements, directional reflectance data does not correlate well with chlorophyll concentration. This is mainly due to the external reflectance (R(E)) at the leaf epidermis, caused by the mismatch of the refractive index at the air-epidermis and epidermis-inner layer boundary. The external reflectance can be identified with the blue flat reflectance between 380 and 480 nm. The inner reflectance (R(I)), obtained by subtracting the external reflectance from the measured spectra, was found to be linearly related to the logarithm of the chlorophyll content. Good fitting of the log (Chl) versus R(I)(lambda) curves were obtained for R(I) in the green band (around 550 nm) and close to the inflection point in the red edge (around 700 nm). The coefficient of determination, r(2), of curve fitting improved (up to 0.97) when the normalised inner reflectance NR(I)(lambda)=R(I)(lambda)/R(I)(lambda(0)), with lambda(0)>or=750 nm, was used instead of the absolute reflectance. The best indices for Chl, Chl-a and Chl-b determination were R(I)(542)/R(I)(750), R(I)(706)/R(I)(750) and R(I)(556)/R(I)(750), respectively. However, since the content of Chl-a relative to Chl-b was almost constant for the plants investigated, the two last indices must be further validated on leaves with a high variability in the Chl-a:Chl-b ratio. The error in the determination of chlorophyll content was found to be of the order of 10%. This value was lower than those obtained by applying the vegetation

  20. Correcting attenuated total reflection-fourier transform infrared spectra for water vapor and carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Susanne Wrang; Kohler, Achim; Adt, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is a valuable technique for characterization of biological samples, providing a detailed fingerprint of the major chemical constituents. However, water vapor and CO(2) in the beam path often cause interferences in the spectra, which can hamper...... the data analysis and interpretation of results. In this paper we present a new method for removal of the spectral contributions due to atmospheric water and CO(2) from attenuated total reflection (ATR)-FT-IR spectra. In the IR spectrum, four separate wavenumber regions were defined, each containing...... of the growing yeast biofilm, the gas correction revealed otherwise hidden variations of relevance for modeling the growth dynamics. As the presented method improved the interpretation of the principle component analysis (PCA) models, it has proven to be a valuable tool for filtering atmospheric variation in ATR...

  1. Absorption spectra of superconducting qubits driven by bichromatic microwave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jiazheng; Jooya, Hossein Z.; Sun, Guozhu; Fan, Yunyi; Wu, Peiheng; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.; Han, Siyuan

    2017-11-01

    We report experimental observation of two distinct quantum interference patterns in the absorption spectra when a transmon superconducting qubit is subjected to a bichromatic microwave field with the same Rabi frequencies. Within the two-mode Floquet formalism with no dissipation processes, we propose a graph-theoretical representation to model the interaction Hamiltonian for each of these observations. This theoretical framework provides a clear visual representation of various underlying physical processes in a systematic way beyond rotating-wave approximation. The presented approach is valuable to gain insights into the behavior of multichromatic field driven quantum two-level systems, such as two-level atoms and superconducting qubits. Each of the observed interference patterns is represented by appropriate graph products on the proposed color-weighted graphs. The underlying mechanisms and the characteristic features of the observed fine structures are identified by the transitions between the graph vertices, which represent the doubly dressed states of the system. The good agreement between the numerical simulation and experimental data confirms the validity of the theoretical method. Such multiphoton interference may be used in manipulating the quantum states and/or generate nonclassical microwave photons.

  2. Near-infrared Reflectance Spectra Of 135 Hertha, 224 Oceana, 516 Amherstia, And 872 Holda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardersen, Paul S.; Gaffey, M. J.; Abell, P. A.

    2006-09-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectra of M-asteroids 135 Hertha, 224 Oceana, 516 Amherstia, and 872 Holda display spectral and mineralogical diversity that is becoming the norm for the M-asteroid taxonomic group. 224 Oceana exhibits a traditionally featureless M-asteroid spectrum, moderately reddish slope, and an IRAS albedo of 17%. Canonical interpretations include a NiFe metal-rich surface or a surface similar to that of the enstatite chondrites. 516 Amherstia, with an IRAS albedo of 16%, displays absorption features centered at 0.93- and 1.92-microns superimposed on an overall reddish slope. This suggests a surface with a single mafic silicate (i.e., pyroxene, Wo10±4Fs31±5) and NiFe metal. The Band I and II absorptions are 5% and 2% deep, respectively. Amherstia's features are similar to, but somewhat more intense and Fe-rich than, other M-asteroid spectra as discussed in Hardersen et al. (2005). 872 Holda displays a generally featureless NIR reflectance spectrum with the exception of a very broad and weak ( 2% depth) absorption that ranges from 0.5 to 1.2-microns. 872 Holda's overall spectrum is similar to that of synthetic troilite, but differs from spectra of meteoritic troilite as discussed in Cloutis and Burbine (1999). If troilite is present on Holda's surface, then a potential interpretation is a mixture of NiFe metal and troilite as seen in iron meteorites. The NIR reflectance spectrum for 135 Hertha will also be discussed and compared to this asteroid's 52-color survey spectrum, which indicates the presence of a weak 0.9-micron absorption feature. Of the 20 M-asteroid spectra that have been examined by this team thus far, 10 M-asteroids display the presence of low-Fe pyroxene absorption features at 0.9 microns, 3 suggest the presence of spinel, 2 indicate the presence of olivine, one suggests the possible presence of troilite, and 4 display featureless spectra that suggest a variety of potential interpretations.

  3. Rapid assessment of soluble solids content in navel orange by near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yande; Luo, Ji; Chen, Xingmiao; Ying, Yibin

    2006-10-01

    The potential of using Near Infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to assess soluble solids content (SSC) of intact navel orange was examined. A total 40 samples were used to develop the calibration and prediction models. NIR spectral data were collected in the spectral region between 350 nm and 2500 nm and its second derivative spectra was used for this study. Different scattering correction algorithms (no preprocessing and multiplicative scattering correction (MSC) were compared. Calibration models based on different spectral ranges, different derivatives and different kinds of statistical models including partial least square (PLS) and principle component regression (PCR) were also compared in this research. The best results of PLS models with the second derivative spectra are r=0.929, RMSEC=0.517 and RMSEP=0.592, in the wavelength range of 361-2488 nm. The segment length used to derivate the spectra influences the calibration model and the results are better when the segment lengths and gap sizes are lower in Norris derivate filter. The results show that this method is feasible for rapid assessing SSC of the navel orange.

  4. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive and nondestructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FT-IR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed: one developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a uniform distribution of Low EC mass samples (EC normalized error (21 %). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. Only the normalized error is higher for the FT-IR EC measurements than for collocated TOR. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by the ratios OC/EC and ammonium/EC to determine the impact of OC and ammonium on EC prediction. We conclude that FT-IR analysis with

  5. Particle reflection along the magnetic field in nonlinear magnetosonic pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Yukiharu

    2017-11-01

    Reflection of electrons and positrons in oblique, nonlinear magnetosonic pulses is theoretically analyzed. With the use of the parallel pseudo potential F, which is the integral of the parallel electric field along the magnetic field, a simple equation for reflection conditions is derived, which shows that reflection along the magnetic field is caused by two forces: one arising from the parallel pseudo potential multiplied by the particle charge and the other from the magnetic mirror effect. The two forces push electrons in the opposite directions. In compressive solitons, in which the magnetic field is intensified, electrons with large magnetic moments can be reflected by the magnetic mirror effect, whereas in rarefactive solitons, in which the magnetic field is weaker than outside, electrons with small magnetic moments can be reflected by the parallel pseudo potential. Although F is basically positive and large in shock waves, it occasionally becomes negative in some regions behind the shock front in nonstationary wave evolution. These negative spikes of F can reflect electrons. In contrast to the case of electrons, the two forces push positrons in the same direction. For this reason, compressive solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma reflect a large fraction of positrons compared with electrons, whereas rarefactive solitons will reflect no positrons. A shock wave can reflect a majority of positrons with its large F. However, in a pure electron-positron plasma, in which F becomes zero, positron reflection will rarely occur.

  6. NAVIGATING LIVED EXPERIENCE: REFLECTIONS FROM THE FIELD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Farrall

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article I use an autoethnographic approach to reflect on my experiences in Egypt—in which I came to live alongside converts to Islam and interact with adherents to militant salafist belief systems, as well as those who had disengaged from them. I outline how I came to have these lived experiences before explaining how they caused me to reexamine my understanding of radicalization and deradicalization in the militant salafist context, and to consider radicalization as a form of conversion.

  7. Final report of QUIESST WP 2 – Extrapolation of near field Reflection Index data to far field reflection performance indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgendorf, D.; Roo, F. de; Wessels, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Sound reflectivity is one of the intrinsic acoustical characteristics of noise barriers. It describes which percentage of an incident sound field is reflected back towards the opposite side of the road. The reflectivity is determined by the absorption properties of the material of the barrier as

  8. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  9. Study on the effect of blood content on diffuse reflectance spectra of basal cell carcinoma skin tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Miaoqing; He, Qingli

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectrum as a noninvasive method has been widely used to study the optical properties of cutaneous skin tissue. In this work, we optimized an eight-layered optical model of basal cell carcinoma skin tissue to study its optical properties. Based on the model, the diffuse reflectance spectra were reconstructed in visible wavelength range by Monte Carlo methods. After different blood contents were added to the optical model, the contribution of blood to diffuese reflectance spectra was investigated theoretically. The ratios of basal cell carcinoma skin and normal skin tissue were also calculated for both experimental result and rebuilt results to testify the theoretical reasonability of the model and methods.

  10. Cluster analysis of near-infrared reflectance spectra of asteroid Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inasawa, Tomoki; Kitazato, Kohei; Hirata, Naru; Demura, Hirohide

    2017-10-01

    The data from the analysis of samples returned by Hayabusa spacecraft have provided conclusive evidence regarding mineral composition and space weathering of near-Earth S-type asteroid Itokawa. To apply these information to the Hayabusa remote sensing data towards revealing the formation history of Itokawa, we made a more precise near-infrared spectral map of Itokawa than the previous ones from the Hayabusa NIRS data and performed its cluster analysis. The NIRS instrument had acquired more than 80,000 spatially resolved 0.75 to 2.20 microns reflectance spectra from the surface of Itokawa. We used PCA and k-means clustering for cluster analysis and found that at least three different types of surface areas would exist on Itokawa.

  11. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence polymer spectra: classification by taxonomy statistic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Cristina; Boeykens, Susana; Bonadeo, H

    2002-07-19

    The aim of this work is to explore the use of chemometric tools for the classification of synthetic and natural polymers with a mean molecular weight greater than 10(6). Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) spectra were obtained and analyzed in order to retrieve matrix information and to illustrate the calibration procedure. The intensities of the coherent and incoherent scattered peaks were specially selected for this purpose. The polymers studied were aqueous solutions of scleroglucan, polyacrilamide, polyoxyethylene oxide, glucomannan, 2,3,6-tri-o-ethylamylose and xhantan, in concentrations upto 1% (m/m). matlab software was used for numerical calculations. Using a combination of principal component analysis and cluster analysis, the differences in composition of various analyzed polymers can be visualized.

  12. Hyperspectral optical imaging of human iris in vivo: characteristics of reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Pereira, Luís M.; Correia, Hélder T.; Nascimento, Sérgio M. C.

    2011-07-01

    We report a hyperspectral imaging system to measure the reflectance spectra of real human irises with high spatial resolution. A set of ocular prosthesis was used as the control condition. Reflectance data were decorrelated by the principal-component analysis. The main conclusion is that spectral complexity of the human iris is considerable: between 9 and 11 principal components are necessary to account for 99% of the cumulative variance in human irises. Correcting image misalignments associated with spontaneous ocular movements did not influence this result. The data also suggests a correlation between the first principal component and different levels of melanin present in the irises. It was also found that although the spectral characteristics of the first five principal components were not affected by the radial and angular position of the selected iridal areas, they affect the higher-order ones, suggesting a possible influence of the iris texture. The results show that hyperspectral imaging in the iris, together with adequate spectroscopic analyses provide more information than conventional colorimetric methods, making hyperspectral imaging suitable for the characterization of melanin and the noninvasive diagnosis of ocular diseases and iris color.

  13. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 μg m-3, concentration value based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.03 μg m-3) and reasonable normalized error (21 %). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment

  14. The Effect of Field Spectral Reflectance Measurement Distance to the Spectral Reflectance of Rhizophora stylosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, M.; Ningam, M. U. L.; Alqorina, F.

    2017-12-01

    Mapping mangrove species from remote sensing data through its spectral reflectance pattern collected in the field is challenging. There are high variations in light condition, leaf orientation, canopy structure, background objects and measurement distance when measuring mangrove spectral reflectance in the field. Spectral measurement distance to the object is one of the most important aspects controlling the result of spectral reflectance pattern. This research is aimed to assess the effect of spectral reflectance pattern of Rhizophora stylosa collected at various distances. Specific objectives of this research are to collect samples of mangrove spectral reflectance pattern in the field, to assess the effect of the observation scale to the result of the spectral reflectance pattern, and to characterize the mangrove spectral reflectance pattern resulted from different observation scales. Spectral reflectance data collection in the field was conducted using JAZ EL-350 field spectrometer at 2cm, 50cm, 1m, 2m, and 5m distance and was conducted in Karimunjawa Island, Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. A visual comparison of the spectral reflectance curve was conducted to understand the effect of measurement distance. The results of this study indicate that the difference in the measurement distance of Rhizophora stylosa species was highly influential to the resulting spectral reflectance curve. The spectral reflectance curve recorded at close range to the leaf (i.e. 2 cm) has the lowest curve variation, as well as the furthest distance (i.e. 5 m). This study is a basic study that supports the development of the use of remote sensing imagery for mangrove species mapping.

  15. Atomistic modeling of IR action spectra under circularly polarized electromagnetic fields: toward action VCD spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Florent

    2015-03-01

    The nonlinear response and dissociation propensity of an isolated chiral molecule, camphor, to a circularly polarized infrared laser pulse was simulated by molecular dynamics as a function of the excitation wavelength. The results indicate similarities with linear absorption spectra, but also differences that are ascribable to dynamical anharmonic effects. Comparing the responses between left- and right-circularly polarized pulses in terms of dissociation probabilities, or equivalently between R- and S-camphor to a similarly polarized pulse, we find significant differences for the fingerprint C = O amide mode, with a sensitivity that could be sufficient to possibly enable vibrational circular dichroism as an action technique for probing molecular chirality and absolute conformations in the gas phase. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effects of Space Weathering on Reflectance Spectra of Ureilites: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Gillis-Davis, J.; Cloutis, E.; Applin, D.; Hibbits, C.; Klima, R.; Christoffersen, R.; Fries, M.; Decker, S.

    2017-07-01

    Space weathering and spectral studies of three ureilitic samples show that space weathering causes significant changes in UV-VIS-IR spectra and Raman spectra. Changes due to amorphization of carbon could disguise ureilitic asteroids as CC-like.

  17. Effects of mercury on visible/near-infrared reflectance spectra of mustard spinach plants (Brassica rapa P.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunagan, Sarah C. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University, 265 Church Street, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States)]. E-mail: sdunagan@wesleyan.edu; Gilmore, Martha S. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University, 265 Church Street, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States)]. E-mail: mgilmore@wesleyan.edu; Varekamp, Johan C. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University, 265 Church Street, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States)]. E-mail: jvarekamp@wesleyan.edu

    2007-07-15

    Mustard spinach plants were grown in mercury-spiked and contaminated soils collected in the field under controlled laboratory conditions over a full growth cycle to test if vegetation grown in these soils has discernible characteristics in visible/near-infrared (VNIR) spectra. Foliar Hg concentrations (0.174-3.993 ppm) of the Mustard spinach plants were positively correlated with Hg concentration of soils and varied throughout the growing season. Equations relating foliar Hg concentration to spectral reflectance, its first derivative, and selected vegetation indices were generated using stepwise multiple linear regression. Significant correlations are found for limited wavelengths for specific treatments and dates. Ratio Vegetation Index (RVI) and Red Edge Position (REP) values of plants in Hg-spiked and field-contaminated soils are significantly lower relative to control plants during the early and middle portions of the growth cycle which may be related to lower chlorophyll abundance or functioning in Hg-contaminated plants. - Some spectral characteristics of leaves of Brassica rapa P. may be associated with foliar mercury content.

  18. Crustal geomagnetic field - Two-dimensional intermediate-wavelength spatial power spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier spatial power spectra of equivalent magnetization values are presented for a region that includes a large portion of the western United States. The magnetization values were determined by inversion of POGO satellite data, assuming a magnetic crust 40 km thick, and were located on an 11 x 10 array with 300 km grid spacing. The spectra appear to be in good agreement with values of the crustal geomagnetic field spatial power spectra given by McLeod and Coleman (1980) and with the crustal field model given by Serson and Hannaford (1957). The spectra show evidence of noise at low frequencies in the direction along the satellite orbital track (N-S). indicating that for this particular data set additional filtering would probably be desirable. These findings illustrate the value of two-dimensional spatial power spectra both for describing the geomagnetic field statistically and as a guide for diagnosing possible noise sources.

  19. Measurements of reflectance spectra of ion-bombarded ice and application to surfaces in the outer Solar System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shaughnessy, D.J.; Boring, J.W.; Johnson, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    A number of the icy satellites of the outer planets exhibit interesting hemispherical differences in brightness which have been attributed to enhanced bombardment by the local plasma of one hemisphere. The plasma bombardment is thought to erode the icy surfaces and implant species, thereby altering the surface reflectance spectra, as well as producing fresh plasma. Here we present the first results of laboratory measurements of the wavelength dependence of the alteration of the visible reflectance spectra of H 2 O ice irradiated by keV ions. When the implanted species is chemically neutral, absorption is slightly enhanced below 0.55 μm. For an incident species containing sulphur, a strong absorption feature is produced at 0.4 μm corresponding (probably) to S 3 . This occurs at too large a wavelength to account for the absorption feature observed at Europa by Voyager and therefore casts doubt on the recent interpretations of the reflectance data of Europa. (author)

  20. Defects in UV-vis-NIR reflectance spectra as method for forgery detections in writing documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somma, F; Aloe, P; Schirripa Spagnolo, G

    2010-11-01

    Documents have taken up a very important place in our society. Frauds committed in connection with documents are not at all uncommon, and, in fact, represent a very large domain of the forensic science called 'questioned documents'. In the field of forensic examination of questioned documents, the legitimacy of an ink entry is often an essential question. A common type of forgery consists in materially altering an existing writing or adding a new writing. These changes can be characterized by means of optical spectroscopy. The aim of this work is to perform the UV-vis-NIR reflectance spectrophotometry to analyze a range of blue and black commercial ballpoint pens, in order to investigate the discriminating abilities of the different inks found on the same document.

  1. FT-IR reflection spectra of single crystals: resolving phonons of different symmetry without using polarised radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    METODIJA NAJDOSKI

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR reflection spectra, asquired at nearnormal incidence, were recorded from single crystals belonging to six crystal systems: CsCr(SO42.12H2O (alum, cubic, K2CuCl2·2H2O (Mitscherlichite, tetragonal, CaCO3 (calcite, hexagonal, KHSO4 (mercallite, orthorhombic, CaSO4·2H2O (gypsum, monoclinic and CuSO4·5H2O (chalcantite, triclinic. The acquired IR reflection spectra were further transformed into absorption spectra, employing the Kramers-Kronig transformation. Except for the cubic alums, the spectra strongly depend on the crystal face from which they were recorded; this is a consequence of anisotropy. Phonons of a given symmetry (E-species, in tetragonal/hexagonal and B-species, in monoclinic crystals may be resolved without using a polariser. The spectrum may be simplified in the case of an orthorhombic crystal, as well. The longitudinal-optical (LO and transversal-optical (TO mode frequencies were calculated in the case of optically isotropic and the simplified spectra of optically uniaxial crystals.

  2. Spectral reflectance measurement methodologies for TUZ Golu field campaign

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Boucher, Y

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available are Spectralon or Spectralon-like panels, thus their behavior is close to the behavior of a Lambertian surface. Except for very large solar or viewing angles, it is not mandatory to introduce a BRDF correction for the reflectance factor of the reference... CIMEL 313 field multispectral radiometer: 5 bands in the blue, green, red, near IR (800-900nm) and SWIR (1550-1700), with a 10? field of view. 3. PRESENTATION OF REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENT METHODOLOGIES The pixel size of most satellite sensors...

  3. Evolutionary Spectra Estimation of Field Measurement Typhoon Processes Using Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Dong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a wavelet-based method for estimating evolutionary power spectral density (EPSD of nonstationary stochastic oscillatory processes and its application to field measured typhoon processes. The EPSD, which is deduced in a closed form based on the definition of the EPSD and the algorithm of the continuous wavelet transform, can be formulated as a sum of squared moduli of the wavelet functions in time domain modulated by frequency-dependent coefficients that relate to the squared values of wavelet coefficients and two wavelet functions with different time shifts. A parametric study is conducted to examine the efficacy of the wavelet-based estimation method and the accuracy of different wavelets. The results indicate that all of the estimated EPSDs have acceptable accuracy in engineering application and the Morlet transform can provide desirable estimations in both time and frequency domains. Finally, the proposed method is adopted to investigate the time-frequency characteristics of the Typhoon Matsa measured in bridge site. The nonstationary energy distribution and stationary frequency component during the whole process are found. The work in this paper may promote an improved understanding of the nonstationary features of typhoon winds.

  4. Link functions and Matérn kernel in the estimation of reflectance spectra from RGB responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Ville; Mirhashemi, Arash; Alho, Juha

    2013-11-01

    We evaluate three link functions (square root, logit, and copula) and Matérn kernel in the kernel-based estimation of reflectance spectra of the Munsell Matte collection in the 400-700 nm region. We estimate reflectance spectra from RGB camera responses in case of real and simulated responses and show that a combination of link function and a kernel regression model with a Matérn kernel decreases spectral errors when compared to a Gaussian mixture model or kernel regression with the Gaussian kernel. Matérn kernel produces performance similar to the thin plate spline model, but does not require a parametric polynomial part in the model.

  5. Sulfur Hazes in Giant Exoplanet Atmospheres: Impacts on Reflected Light Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Peter; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Robinson, Tyler D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lewis, Nikole K., E-mail: pgao@caltech.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Recent work has shown that sulfur hazes may arise in the atmospheres of some giant exoplanets, due to the photolysis of H{sub 2}S. We investigate the impact such a haze would have on an exoplanet’s geometric albedo spectrum and how it may affect the direct imaging results of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope ( WFIRST ), a planned NASA space telescope. For temperate (250 K <  T {sub eq} < 700 K) Jupiter-mass planets, photochemical destruction of H{sub 2}S results in the production of ∼1 ppmv of S{sub 8} between 100 and 0.1 mbar, which, if cool enough, will condense to form a haze. Nominal haze masses are found to drastically alter a planet’s geometric albedo spectrum: whereas a clear atmosphere is dark at wavelengths between 0.5 and 1 μ m, due to molecular absorption, the addition of a sulfur haze boosts the albedo there to ∼0.7, due to scattering. Strong absorption by the haze shortward of 0.4 μ m results in albedos <0.1, in contrast to the high albedos produced by Rayleigh scattering in a clear atmosphere. As a result, the color of the planet shifts from blue to orange. The existence of a sulfur haze masks the molecular signatures of methane and water, thereby complicating the characterization of atmospheric composition. Detection of such a haze by WFIRST is possible, though discriminating between a sulfur haze and any other highly reflective, high-altitude scatterer will require observations shortward of 0.4 μ m, which is currently beyond WFIRST ’s design.

  6. Mercury's Surface Magnetic Field Determined from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Solar wind protons observed by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury exhibit signatures of precipitation loss to Mercury's surface. We apply proton-reflection magnetometry to sense Mercury's surface magnetic field intensity in the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The results are consistent with a dipole field offset to the north and show that the technique may be used to resolve regional-scale fields at the surface. The proton loss cones indicate persistent ion precipitation to the surface in the northern magnetospheric cusp region and in the southern hemisphere at low nightside latitudes. The latter observation implies that most of the surface in Mercury's southern hemisphere is continuously bombarded by plasma, in contrast with the premise that the global magnetic field largely protects the planetary surface from the solar wind.

  7. Reflection of slow ions: effect of anisotropy of scattering on energy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukanic, J.; Simovic, R.

    1997-01-01

    Transport calculations based on linear Boltzmann equation have been carried out analytically for the reflection of low energy light ions from heavy targets. The collision integral of the ion transport equation is replaced by P3 approximation in angle. For power potentials the influence of the anisotropy of scattering on universal path length distribution of reflected particles is investigated. (author)

  8. Manifestation of Crystal Lattice Distortions in the IR Reflection Spectra of Abrasion-Treated ZnSe Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, V. E.; Dunaev, A. A.; Mamalimov, R. I.; Pakhomov, P. M.; Khizhnyak, S. D.; Chmel, A. E.

    2017-07-01

    The Fourier IR reflection spectra of ZnSe ceramics prepared by hot pressing (HP), physical vapor deposition (PVD), and PVD combined with hot isostatic pressing (HIP) are presented. The optical constants of polished and dry-ground specimens were used for comparison. The grinding treatment simulated the erosion of the outer surface of optical elements made of zinc selenide under the influence of solid dust particles and deposits. In the polished specimens residual stresses showed up in the IR reflection spectra of the ZnSePVD and ZnSeHIP ceramics, which had well-defined orientation of grains, but were not present in the spectra of the ZnSeHIP ceramics as a result of mutual compensation of the stresses in the randomly oriented grains of the material. The stresses, which appeared as a shift of the absorption bands calculated by the Kramers-Kronig method, increased significantly after abrasive treatment of the specimens. For all the treated ceramics the intensity of the absorption bands resulting from the anharmonicity of the vibrations in the distorted crystal lattice increased by several times. The last effect also depends on the production prehistory of the ceramics.

  9. Can a one-layer optical skin model including melanin and inhomogeneously distributed blood explain spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna; Pettersson, Anders; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2011-02-01

    Model based analysis of calibrated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can be used for determining oxygenation and concentration of skin chromophores. This study aimed at assessing the effect of including melanin in addition to hemoglobin (Hb) as chromophores and compensating for inhomogeneously distributed blood (vessel packaging), in a single-layer skin model. Spectra from four humans were collected during different provocations using a twochannel fiber optic probe with source-detector separations 0.4 and 1.2 mm. Absolute calibrated spectra using data from either a single distance or both distances were analyzed using inverse Monte Carlo for light transport and Levenberg-Marquardt for non-linear fitting. The model fitting was excellent using a single distance. However, the estimated model failed to explain spectra from the other distance. The two-distance model did not fit the data well at either distance. Model fitting was significantly improved including melanin and vessel packaging. The most prominent effect when fitting data from the larger separation compared to the smaller separation was a different light scattering decay with wavelength, while the tissue fraction of Hb and saturation were similar. For modeling spectra at both distances, we propose using either a multi-layer skin model or a more advanced model for the scattering phase function.

  10. Microcavity-coupled fiber Bragg grating with tunable reflection spectra and speed of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Han, Ya; Liu, Qian; Liu, Yan-Ge; Zhang, Weigang; Chou, Keng C

    2018-04-15

    After a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is fabricated, the reflection spectrum of the FBG is generally not tunable without mechanical deformation or temperature adjustment. Here we present a microcavity-coupled FBG with both a tunable reflection lineshape and dispersion using electromagnetically induced transparency. The Fano interference of light in the FBG and the microcavity allows for dramatic modification of the reflection spectrum. The phase of the reflected spectrum is continuously tunable between 0 and 2π to produce various Fano lineshapes. The dispersion of the output light is adjustable from normal dispersion to abnormal dispersion, consequently providing an adjustable speed of light. Additionally, it allows the FBG to switch from a notch filter to a bandpass filter at the resonant wavelength, which is not possible in a conventional uniform FBG.

  11. A theoretical and experimental analysis of modulated laser fields and power spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning; Jacobsen, G.

    1982-01-01

    A general theoretical description of modulated laser fields and power spectra for a current modulated single-mode laser is derived, taking into account both the intensity and frequency modulation (IM and FM) of the emitted light. The theory relies on an explicit knowledge of the modulus as well...

  12. INTERPRETATION OF MOSSBAUER SPECTRA OF PARAMAGNETIC MATERIALS IN A MAGNETIC FIELD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, F.; Dekker, A. J.

    1965-01-01

    A formula is discussed for the hfs of Mossbauer spectra applicable also to situations in which the magnetic field at the nucleus fluctuates with a frequency comparable to the nuclear precession frequency. This formula can explain e.g. the essential features of recent experimental data on hydrated

  13. Infrared reflection spectra of multilayer epitaxial heterostructures with embedded InAs and GaAs layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seredin, P. V.; Domashevskaya, E. P.; Lukin, A. N.; Arsent'ev, I. N.; Vinokurov, D. A.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the thickness of embedded InAs and GaAs layers on the infrared reflection spectra of lattice vibrations for AlInAs/InAs/AlInAs, InGaAs/GaAs/InGaAs, and AlInAs/InGaAs/GaAs/InGaAs/AlInAs multilayer epitaxial heterostructures grown by MOC hydride epitaxy on InP (100) substrates is studied. Relative stresses emerging in the layers surrounding the embedded layers with variation in the number of monolayers from which the quantum dots are formed and with variation the thickness of the layers themselves surrounding the embedded layers are evaluated.

  14. Audibility of individual reflections in a complete sound field, III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Søren

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on the influence of individual reflections on the auditory localization of a loudspeaker in a small room. The sound field produced by a single loudspeaker positioned in a normal listening room has been simulated using an electroacoustic setup. The setup models the direct sound......-independent absorption coefficients of the room surfaces, and (2) a loudspeaker with directivity according to a standard two-way system and absorption coefficients according to real materials. The results have shown that subjects can distinguish reliably between timbre and localization, that the spectrum level above 2 k...

  15. Subsurface irradiance reflectance spectra of inland waters differing in morphometry and hydrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkeboer, M.; Dekker, A.; Gons, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    A database has been established for relating subsurface irradiance reflectance, i.e. water ’colour‘, to the optical properties and water quality parameters of more than 120 Dutch inland water bodies. The concentrations of total chlorophyll-a (TChl-a = chlorophyll-a plus phaeopigment), total

  16. Integrating Field Spectra and Worldview-2 Data for Grapevine Productivity in Different Irrigation Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaitiyiming, M.; Bozzolo, A.; Wulamu, A.; Wilkins, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Precision farming requires high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution remote sensing data to detect plant physiological changes. The higher spatial resolution is particularly as important as the spectral resolution for crop monitoring. It is important to develop data integration techniques between field or airborne hyperspectral data with spaceborne broad band multispectral images for plant productivity monitoring. To investigate varying rootstock and irrigation interactions, different irrigation treatments are implemented in a vineyard experimental site either i) unirrigated ii) full replacement of evapotranspiration (ET) iii) irrigated at 50 % of the potential ET. In summer 2014, we collected leaf and canopy spectra of the vineyard using field spectroscopy along with other plant physiological and nutritional variables. In this contribution, we integrate the field spectra and the spectral wavelengths of WorldView-2 to develop a predictive model for plant productivity,i.e., fruit quality and yield. First, we upscale field and canopy spectra to WorldView-2 spectral bands using radiative transfer simulations (e.g., MODTRAN). Then we develop remote sensing techniques to quantify plant productivity in different scenarios water stress by identifying the most effective and sensitive wavelengths, and indices that are capable of early detection of plant health and estimation of crop nutrient status. Finally we present predictive models developed from partial least square regression (PLSR) for plant productivity using spectral wavelengths and indices derived from integrated field and satellite remote sensing data.

  17. Study on the Reflection Spectra of One Dimensional Plasma Photonic Crystals Having Exponentially Graded Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.; Singh, Vivek; Singh, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The transfer matrix method is used to study the effect of the permittivity profile on the reflectivity of a one dimensional plasma photonic crystal having exponentially graded material. The analysis shows that the proposed structure works as a perfect mirror within a certain frequency range. These frequency ranges can be completely controlled by the permittivity profile of a graded dielectric layer. As expected we observed that these frequency ranges are also controlled by plasma parameters. (plasma technology)

  18. First-Order Parametric Model of Reflectance Spectra for Dyed Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-19

    diffuse reflectance for the purpose of simulating the spectral response of military textiles containing different types and concentrations of near...which provides for both their inverse and direct modeling1. The dyes considered contain spectral features that are of interest to the U.S. Navy for...can be in terms of formulations based on the Beer -Lambert Law or its approximation, which is adopted for the parametric model considered here [8,9

  19. Clinical system model for monitoring the physiological status of jaundice by extracting bilirubin components from skin diffuse reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Alla S.; Clark, Joseph; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a medical condition which occurs in newborns as a result of an imbalance between the production and elimination of bilirubin. The excess bilirubin in the blood stream diffuses into the surrounding tissue leading to a yellowing of the skin. As the bilirubin levels rise in the blood stream, there is a continuous exchange between the extra vascular bilirubin and bilirubin in the blood stream. Exposure to phototherapy alters the concentration of bilirubin in the vascular and extra vascular regions by causing bilirubin in the skin layers to be broken down. Thus, the relative concentration of extra vascular bilirubin is reduced leading to a diffusion of bilirubin out of the vascular region. Diffuse reflectance spectra from human skin contains physiological and structural information of the skin and nearby tissue. A diffuse reflectance spectrum must be captured before and after blanching in order to isolate the intravascular and extra vascular bilirubin. A new mathematical model is proposed with extra vascular bilirubin concentration taken into consideration along with other optical parameters in defining the diffuse reflectance spectrum from human skin. A nonlinear optimization algorithm has been adopted to extract the optical properties (including bilirubin concentration) from the skin reflectance spectrum. The new system model and nonlinear algorithm have been combined to enable extraction of Bilirubin concentrations within an average error of 10%.

  20. Method for determining the optical constants of thin dielectric films with variable thickness using only their shrunk reflection spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Perez, J.J.; Gonzalez-Leal, J.M.; Marquez, E.; Minkov, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Thickness inhomogeneities in thin films have a large influence on their optical transmission and reflection spectra. If not taken into account, this may lead to rather large calculated values for the absorption coefficient or the erroneous presence of an absorption-band tail, as well as to significant errors in the calculated values of the refractive index and the film thickness. The effect of thickness variation on the optical reflection spectrum of a thin dielectric film covering a thick non-absorbing substrate, is analysed in detail in this paper, and analytical expressions are presented for such a reflection spectrum and its upper and lower envelopes. A method is suggested for determining the refractive index n(λ) and the extinction coefficient k(λ), as well as the average thickness and the thickness variation, of a thin dielectric film with variable thickness, by using only the two envelopes of the corresponding shrunk reflection spectrum. This method is used for the geometrical and optical characterization of thermally-evaporated amorphous chalcogenide films, deposited on glass substrates. (author)

  1. Mineralogy and chemistry of Ti-bearing lunar soils: Effects on reflectance spectra and remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Ecaterina O.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Carpenter, Paul

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents results of coordinated ultraviolet and visible wavelength reflectance measurements, X-ray diffraction analyses of mineral components, and micro X-ray fluorescence analyses of Ti concentrations of 13 lunar soil samples (remote sensing observations of the Moon and other airless bodies. We find that measured ilmenite weight percent correlates highly with measured TiO2 concentrations. Thus, the ilmenite content is a good predictor of TiO2 concentration. Ilmenite is the main contributor of TiO2 for soils with greater than about 2 wt.% TiO2, so we take the effects of TiO2 on reflectance spectra to be essentially those of ilmenite. Constraining the data set to eight mature Apollo soils, we find that among the UV/VIS ratios from laboratory-measured spectra, the 321/415 nm ratio shows the best correlation with TiO2 and ilmenite. Moreover, for soils with similar maturity in the submature to mature range, those with higher TiO2 have higher 321/415 UV/VIS ratios. Finally, the correlation between TiO2 content and 321/415 ratio in samples measured in the lab appears weaker than for the same relationship using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) spectral data for the 321/415 ratio of Apollo ground-truth sites. The correlation between lab-derived 321/415 ratios and TiO2 content for measured samples improves when low-maturity samples are excluded from the dataset, implying that the LROC WAC spectra at 400 m/pix spatial resolution senses mostly mature soil.

  2. SPEXTRA: Optimal extraction code for long-slit spectra in crowded fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisyan, A. N.; Vinokurov, A. S.; Solovieva, Yu. N.; Sholukhova, O. N.; Kostenkov, A. E.; Fabrika, S. N.

    2017-10-01

    We present a code for the optimal extraction of long-slit 2D spectra in crowded stellar fields. Its main advantage and difference from the existing spectrum extraction codes is the presence of a graphical user interface (GUI) and a convenient visualization system of data and extraction parameters. On the whole, the package is designed to study stars in crowded fields of nearby galaxies and star clusters in galaxies. Apart from the spectrum extraction for several stars which are closely located or superimposed, it allows the spectra of objects to be extracted with subtraction of superimposed nebulae of different shapes and different degrees of ionization. The package can also be used to study single stars in the case of a strong background. In the current version, the optimal extraction of 2D spectra with an aperture and the Gaussian function as PSF (point spread function) is proposed. In the future, the package will be supplemented with the possibility to build a PSF based on a Moffat function. We present the details of GUI, illustrate main features of the package, and show results of extraction of the several interesting spectra of objects from different telescopes.

  3. Localization and mass spectra of various matter fields on Weyl thin brane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Tao-Tao; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Yu-Peng [Lanzhou University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou (China); Xie, Qun-Ying [Lanzhou University, School of Information Science and Engineering, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-06-15

    It has been shown that the thin brane model in a five-dimensional Weyl gravity can deal with the wrong-signed Friedmann-like equation in the Randall-Sundrum-1 (RS1) model. In the Weyl brane model, there are also two branes with opposite brane tensions, but the four-dimensional graviton (the gravity zero mode) is localized near the negative tension brane, while our four-dimensional universe is localized on the positive tension brane. In this paper, we consider the mass spectra of various bulk matter fields (i.e., scalar, vector, and fermion fields) on the Weyl brane. It is shown that the zero modes of those matter fields can be localized on the positive tension brane under some conditions. The mass spectra of the bulk matter fields are equidistant for the higher excited states, and relatively sparse for the lower excited states. The size of the extra dimension determines the gap of the mass spectra. We also consider the correction to the Newtonian potential in this model and it is proportional to 1/r{sup 3}. (orig.)

  4. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. I. Full-disk properties: 350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Bellucci, G.; Tosi, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Formisano, V.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Hansen, G.; Hibbitts, K.; Showalter, M.; Newman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Saturn's icy satellites are among the main scientific objectives of the Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment. This paper contains a first systematic and comparative analysis of the full-disk spectral properties of Dione, Enceladus, Epimetheus, Hyperion, Iapetus, Mimas, Phoebe, Rhea and Tethys as observed by VIMS from July 2004 to June 2005. The disk integrated properties (350-5100 nm reflectance spectra and phase curves at 550-2232 nm) and images of satellites are reported and discussed in detail together with the observed geometry. In general, the spectra in the visible spectral range are almost featureless and can be classified according to the spectral slopes: from the bluish Enceladus and Phoebe to the redder Iapetus, Hyperion and Epimetheus. In the 1000-1300 nm range the spectra of Enceladus, Tethys, Mimas and Rhea are characterized by a negative slope, consistent with a surface largely dominated by water ice, while the spectra of Iapetus, Hyperion and Phoebe show a considerable reddening pointing out the relevant role played by darkening materials present on the surface. In between these two classes are Dione and Epimetheus, which have a flat spectrum in this range. The main absorption bands identified in the infrared are the 1520, 2020, 3000 nm H2O/OH bands (for all satellites), although Iapetus dark terrains show mostly a deep 3000 nm band while the 1520 and 2020 nm bands are very faint. In this spectral range, the Iapetus spectrum is characterized by a strong reddening. The CO2 band at 4260 nm and the Fresnel ice peak around 3100 nm are evident only on Hyperion, Phoebe and Iapetus. The phase curves at 550 and at 2232 nm are reported for all the available observations in the 0??-144?? range; Rhea shows an opposition surge at visible wavelengths in the 0.5??-1.17?? interval. The improvement on the retrieval of the full-disk reflectance spectra can be appreciated by a direct comparison with ground-based telescopic data available

  5. Online Monitoring of Laser-Generated XUV Radiation Spectra by Surface Reflectivity Measurements with Particle Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hoffmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we present a wavelength-sensitive method for the detection of extreme ultraviolet (XUV photon energies between 30 eV and 120 eV. The method is based on 45° reflectivity from either a cesium iodide-coated or an uncoated metal surface, which directs the XUV beam onto an electron or ion detector and its signal is used to monitor the XUV beam. The benefits of our approach are a spectrally sensitive diagnosis of the XUV radiation at the interaction place of time-resolved XUV experiments and the detection of infrared leak light though metal filters in high-harmonic generation (HHG experiments. Both features were tested using spectrally shaped XUV pulses from HHG in a capillary, and we have achieved excellent agreement with XUV spectrometer measurements and reflectivity calculations. Our obtained results are of interest for time-resolved XUV experiments presenting an additional diagnostic directly in the interaction region and for small footprint XUV beamline diagnostics.

  6. Numerical simulation of the forbidden Bragg reflection spectra observed in ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, E. N.; Dmitrienko, V. E.; Oreshko, A. P.; Beutier, G.; Collins, S. P.

    2010-09-01

    Thermal motion induced (TMI) scattering is a unique probe of changes in electronic states with atomic displacements in crystals. We show that it provides a novel approach to extract atomic correlation functions. Using numerical calculations, we are able to reproduce the temperature-dependent energy spectrum of the 115 'forbidden' Bragg reflection in ZnO. Our previous experimental studies showed that the intensity growth of such reflections over a wide range of temperatures is accompanied by a dramatic change in the resonant spectral lineshape. This is the result of the interplay between the temperature-independent (TI) and temperature-dependent TMI contributions. Here, we confirm that the TI part of the resonant structure factor can be associated with the dipole-quadrupole contribution to the structure factor and show that the temperature-dependent part arises from the zinc and oxygen vibrations, which provide additional temperature-dependent dipole-dipole tensor components to the structure factor. By fitting the experimental data at various temperatures we have determined the temperature dependences of autocorrelation langux2(Zn)rang and correlation langux(O)ux(Zn)rang functions.

  7. Sound field in long rooms with diffusely reflecting boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picaut, Judicaël; Simon, Laurent; Polack, Jean-Dominique

    1999-01-01

    A diffusion equation is used to predict the sound propagation in long rooms with diffusely reflecting boundaries. The model is defined by two parameters, the coefficient of diffusion depending on the mean free path, and an exchange coefficient expressing wall absorption. The diffusion equation...... is solved for time-varying sources and in stationary state. Analytical expressions of the sound attenuation and reverberation in infinite, semi-infinite and finite long rooms are quite in accordance with numerical simulations of diffuse sound field. It is also shown that the diffusion model allows...... to predict experimental observations: the decay curves are not linear, the reverberation time increases with the source-receiver distance, and sound attenuation is linear along corridors. The dependence of the coefficient of diffusion with the degree of wall diffusion is also discussed....

  8. LO-TO splittings, effective charges and interactions in electro-optic meta-nitroaniline crystal as studied by polarized IR reflection and transmission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, M. M.; Le Calvé, N.; Romain, F.; Pasquier, B.

    1994-10-01

    The polarized IR reflection spectra of the meta-nitroaniline ( m-NA) single crystal along the a, b and c crystallographic axes as well as the b and c polarized transmission spectra have been measured in the 100-400 cm -1 region. The LO-TO splitting values have been calculated from the reflection spectra by fitting them with the four parameter dielectric function. The dipole moment derivatives, relevant to dynamic effective charges, of the vibrations have also been calculated and used to check the applicability of the oriented gas model (OGM) to reflection spectra. The discrepancies from the OGM have been discussed in terms of vibronic couplings, weak hydrogen bondings (HB) and intramolecular charge transfer.

  9. A singularity extraction technique for computation of antenna aperture fields from singular plane wave spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, Cecilia; Breinbjerg, Olav; Frandsen, Aksel

    2008-01-01

    An effective technique for extracting the singularity of plane wave spectra in the computation of antenna aperture fields is proposed. The singular spectrum is first factorized into a product of a finite function and a singular function. The finite function is inverse Fourier transformed...... numerically using the Inverse Fast Fourier Transform, while the singular function is inverse Fourier transformed analytically, using the Weyl-identity, and the two resulting spatial functions are then convolved to produce the antenna aperture field. This article formulates the theory of the singularity...

  10. The influence of magnetic field geometry on magnetars X-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viganò, D; Pons, J A; Miralles, J A; Parkins, N; Zane, S; Turolla, R

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the analysis of the X-ray spectra of magnetically powered neutron stars or magnetars is one of the most valuable tools to gain insight into the physical processes occurring in their interiors and magnetospheres. In particular, the magnetospheric plasma leaves a strong imprint on the observed X-ray spectrum by means of Compton up-scattering of the thermal radiation coming from the star surface. Motivated by the increased quality of the observational data, much theoretical work has been devoted to develop Monte Carlo (MC) codes that incorporate the effects of resonant Compton scattering (RCS) in the modeling of radiative transfer of photons through the magnetosphere. The two key ingredients in this simulations are the kinetic plasma properties and the magnetic field (MF) configuration. The MF geometry is expected to be complex, but up to now only mathematically simple solutions (self-similar solutions) have been employed. In this work, we discuss the effects of new, more realistic, MF geometries on synthetic spectra. We use new force-free solutions [14] in a previously developed MC code [9] to assess the influence of MF geometry on the emerging spectra. Our main result is that the shape of the final spectrum is mostly sensitive to uncertain parameters of the magnetospheric plasma, but the MF geometry plays an important role on the angle-dependence of the spectra.

  11. Changes in Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra as Blood Dries Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinming; Wang, Qi; Li, Bing; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Chengzhi; Yao, Yao; Huang, Ping; Wang, Zhenyuan

    2017-05-01

    The time since deposition (TSD) of a bloodstain is a valuable piece of evidence for forensic scientists to determine the time at which a crime took place. The objective of this study was to determine whether attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy could be used to estimate the TSD of a bloodstain in a relatively early period (from 0 min to the time required for the bloodstain to dry out). For this purpose, we used ATR-FTIR to study the variation in absorbance at certain wavelengths as rat and human blood sample dried out. The absorbance at 3308/cm (A3308) was found to have a close correlation with the TSD during this time period, and the changes in A3308 during the drying of rat and human blood drops under the same controlled conditions showed similar results. The current study indicates that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy has potential as a tool for estimating TSD at early time periods of blood deposition. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. The effect of electric field maximum on the Rabi flopping and generated higher frequency spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Yueping; Cui Ni; Xiang Yang; Li Ruxin; Gong Shangqing; Xu Zhizhan

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the electric field maximum on the Rabi flopping and the generated higher frequency spectra properties by solving Maxwell-Bloch equations without invoking any standard approximations. It is found that the maximum of the electric field will lead to carrier-wave Rabi flopping (CWRF) through reversion dynamics which will be more evident when the applied field enters the sub-one-cycle regime. Therefore, under the interaction of sub-one-cycle pulses, the Rabi flopping follows the transient electric field tightly through the oscillation and reversion dynamics, which is in contrast to the conventional envelope Rabi flopping. Complete or incomplete population inversion can be realized through the control of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP). Furthermore, the generated higher frequency spectra will be changed from distinct to continuous or irregular with the variation of the CEP. Our results demonstrate that due to the evident maximum behavior of the electric field, pulses with different CEP give rise to different CWRFs, and then different degree of interferences lead to different higher frequency spectral features.

  13. Impact of Sulfur Hazes on the Reflected Light Spectra of Giant Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peter; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Robinson, Tyler D.; Lewis, Nikole K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has shown that photochemical hazes composed of elemental sulfur and its allotropes may arise in the atmospheres of warm and temperate giant exoplanets due to the photolysis of H2S. We investigate the impact such a haze would have on an exoplanet's geometric albedo spectrum using a suite of established radiative-convective, cloud, and albedo models, and how this may impact future direct imaging missions, such as WFIRST. For Jupiter-massed planets, photochemical destruction of H2S results in the production of ~1 ppmv of S8 between 100 and 0.1 mbar. The S8 mixing ratio is largely independent of the stellar UV flux, vertical mixing rates, and atmospheric temperature for expected ranges of those values, such that the S8 haze mass is dependent only on the S8 supersaturation, controlled by the local temperature. Nominal haze masses are found to drastically alter a planet's geometric albedo spectrum: whereas a clear atmosphere is dark at wavelengths between 0.5 and 1 μm due to molecular absorption, the addition of a sulfur haze boosts the albedo there to ~0.7 due to its purely scattering nature. Strong absorption by the haze shortward of 0.4 μm results in albedos Jupiter-like planets. For this reason colors are unlikely to provide definitive identification of warm Jupiter-like planets. The albedo change due to a sulfur haze is largely independent of the location of the haze in the atmosphere, but is a strong function of the haze optical depth as controlled by its column number density and mean particle size, though the absorption feature at short wavelengths remains robust. Detection of such a haze by future direct imaging missions like WFIRST is possible, though discriminating between a sulfur haze and any other reflective material, such as water ice, will require observations shortward of 0.4 μm, which is currently beyond WFIRST's grasp.

  14. Principal component analysis for the forensic discrimination of black inkjet inks based on the Vis-NIR fibre optics reflection spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gál, Lukáš; Oravec, Michal; Gemeiner, Pavol; Čeppan, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Nineteen black inkjet inks of six different brands were examined by fibre optics reflection spectroscopy in Visible and Near Infrared Region (Vis-NIR FORS) directly on paper with a view to achieving good resolution between them. These different inks were tested on nineteen different inkjet printers from three brands. Samples were obtained from prints by reflection probe. Processed reflection spectra in the range 500-1000 nm were used as samples in principal component analysis. Variability between spectra of the same ink obtained from different prints, as well as between spectra of square areas and lines was examined. For both spectra obtained from square areas and lines reference, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) models were created. According to these models, the inkjet inks were divided into clusters. PCA method is able to separate inks containing carbon black as main colorant from the other inks using other colorants. Some spectra were recorded from another piece of printer and used as validation samples. Spectra of validation samples were projected onto reference PCA models. According to position of validation samples in score plots it can be concluded that PCA based on Vis-NIR FORS can reliably differentiate inkjet inks which are included in the reference database. The presented method appears to be a suitable tool for forensic examination of questioned documents containing inkjet inks. Inkjet inks spectra were obtained without extraction or cutting sample with possibility to measure out of the laboratory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Intrinsic dendritic filtering gives low-pass power spectra of local field potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindén, Henrik; Pettersen, Klas H; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2010-01-01

    The local field potential (LFP) is among the most important experimental measures when probing neural population activity, but a proper understanding of the link between the underlying neural activity and the LFP signal is still missing. Here we investigate this link by mathematical modeling...... of contributions to the LFP from a single layer-5 pyramidal neuron and a single layer-4 stellate neuron receiving synaptic input. An intrinsic dendritic low-pass filtering effect of the LFP signal, previously demonstrated for extracellular signatures of action potentials, is seen to strongly affect the LFP power...... spectra, even for frequencies as low as 10 Hz for the example pyramidal neuron. Further, the LFP signal is found to depend sensitively on both the recording position and the position of the synaptic input: the LFP power spectra recorded close to the active synapse are typically found to be less low...

  16. Ar 3p photoelectron sideband spectra in two-color XUV + NIR laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minemoto, Shinichirou; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Kazma; Komatsubara, Wataru; Majima, Takuya; Mizuno, Tomoya; Owada, Shigeki; Sakai, Hirofumi; Togashi, Tadashi; Yoshida, Shintaro; Yabashi, Makina; Yagishita, Akira

    2018-04-01

    We performed photoelectron spectroscopy using femtosecond XUV pulses from a free-electron laser and femtosecond near-infrared pulses from a synchronized laser, and succeeded in measuring Ar 3p photoelectron sideband spectra due to the two-color above-threshold ionization. In our calculations of the first-order time-dependent perturbation theoretical model based on the strong field approximation, the photoelectron sideband spectra and their angular distributions are well reproduced by considering the timing jitter between the XUV and the NIR pulses, showing that the timing jitter in our experiments was distributed over the width of {1.0}+0.4-0.2 ps. The present approach can be used as a method to evaluate the timing jitter inevitable in FEL experiments.

  17. On the frequency spectra of the core magnetic field Gauss coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesur, Vincent; Wardinski, Ingo; Baerenzung, Julien; Holschneider, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    From monthly mean observatory data spanning 1957-2014, geomagnetic field secular variation values were calculated by annual differences. Estimates of the spherical harmonic Gauss coefficients of the core field secular variation were then derived by applying a correlation based modelling. Finally, a Fourier transform was applied to the time series of the Gauss coefficients. This process led to reliable temporal spectra of the Gauss coefficients up to spherical harmonic degree 5 or 6, and down to periods as short as 1 or 2 years depending on the coefficient. We observed that a k-2 slope, where k is the frequency, is an acceptable approximation for these spectra, with possibly an exception for the dipole field. The monthly estimates of the core field secular variation at the observatory sites also show that large and rapid variations of the latter happen. This is an indication that geomagnetic jerks are frequent phenomena and that significant secular variation signals at short time scales - i.e. less than 2 years, could still be extracted from data to reveal an unexplored part of the core dynamics.

  18. Mineralogical Mapping using Field and Image Based Spectra in Parts of Delhi-Aravalli Fold Belt, Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmuda Khatun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to retrieve reflectance utilizing the raw (radiance data from EO-1 Hyperion dataset and to evaluate its application potential in mineral exploration in parts of Delhi-Aravalli Fold Belt region of western India. The area is marked by basement Precambrian gneissic rocks, overlain by supra crustal cover of the Aravalli Super group, Delhi Super group, Vindhyan Super group and younger rocks. These rocks are highly metamorphosed, structurally deformed and show sporadic occurrences of important ore minerals deposits of metallic (Pb, Zn, Cu and non metallic minerals (Apatite and Marbles. This paper involves generation of hyperspectral image spectra and field spectra to identify spectral characteristics of minerals. FLAASH (expansion atmospheric correction model was applied to retrieve reflectance image from the radiance data. Preprocessing techniques involved selection of good spectral bands, correction of missing lines and pixels before application of FLAASH atmospheric model. Using image processing techniques suitable for hyperspectral image analysis (Spectral Angle Mapper, MNF, End-member matching, Hyperion data over Udaipur, Dungarpur and Chittorgarh districts was analysed and minerals were identified such as rectorite, pyrope, dolomite, montmorillonite, erionite, talc, phologopite, pyrrohite, hematite,olivine, diopside, pyrite, tephrite, lepidolite, andalusite and Fe-rich chlorite. The end member map generated by using advance techniques like SAM was validated using ground truth and spot sample collected, therein, was further analyzed using spectro radiometer in VNIR range. Keeping view on the ubiquitous hydrothermal origin of base metals, special emphasis was put to clay-mica group of minerals as they often proxy for the zone of alteration. This lead to defining the exact zone of hydrothermal alteration throwing light on proximity with igneous intrusion and type associated of metal. Application of such technology

  19. Field evaluation of reflective insulation in south east Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Khar San; Yarbrough, David W.; Lim, Chin Haw; Salleh, Elias

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this research was to obtain thermal performance data for reflective insulations in a South East Asia environment. Thermal resistance data (RSI, m2 ṡ K/W) for reflective insulations are well established from 1-D steady-state tests, but thermal data for reflective insulation in structures like those found in South East Asia are scarce. Data for reflective insulations in South East Asia will add to the worldwide database for this type of energy-conserving material. RSI were obtained from heat flux and temperature data of three identical structures in the same location. One unit did not have insulation above the ceiling, while the second and third units were insulated with reflective insulation with emittance less than 0.05. RSI for the uninsulated test unit varied from 0.37 to 0.40 m2 ṡ K/W. RSI for a single-sheet reflective insulation (woven foil) varied from 2.15 to 2.26 m2 ṡ K/W, while bubble-foil insulation varied from 2.69 to 3.09 m2 ṡ K/W. The range of RSI values resulted from differences in the spacing between the reflective insulation and the roof. In addition, the reflective insulation below the roof lowered attic temperatures by as much as 9.7° C. Reductions in ceiling heat flux of 80 to 90% relative to the uninsulated structure, due to the reflective insulation, were observed.

  20. Scaled-Absorption and Recurrence Spectra of Argon in an Electric Field Using Two Photon Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. D.; Huang, W.; Flores-Rueda, H.; Morgan, T. J.

    2001-05-01

    For multi-electron atoms in an electric field, low angular momentum Rydberg electrons strongly interact with the atomic core causing scattering which can be associated with the presence of chaos. The photoabsorption spectra exhibits extraordinary complex structure but is still in principle interpretable semiclassically using closed orbit theory and semiclassical S-matrix theory [1]. Previously we measured the scaled-photoabsorption and recurrence spectra of argon in an electric field, using single uv-photon excitation from a metastable state [2]. We have extended these measurements to two photon excitation from the same initial state, which allows access to different angular momentum states. The effect of multi-photon excitation on the structure of the recurrence spectrum and its subsequent semiclassical interpretation will be presented. Work supported by the National Science Foundation. [1] B. E. Granger and C. H. Greene, Phys.Rev.A 62, 12511 (2000) [2] H. Flores-Rueda, J. D. Wright, W. Huang, T. J. Morgan, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 94 (2000)

  1. RESEARCH OF THE ENTRANCE ANGLE EFFECT ON THE REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF THE STAINLESS STEEL SURFACE OXIDIZED BY PULSED LASER RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Veiko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.Oxide films on the metal surfaces can be obtained both by surface-uniform infrared heating and local laser treatment e.g. by sequence of nanosecond laser pulses. Due to interference in created films the coloration of treated area is observed. The present work shows the results of spectrophotometric measurements for various light entrance angles in the range of 10-60°. Method. AISI 304 stainless steel plates were oxidized by two methods: in muffle furnace FM - 10 (Т= 500-600° С, t = 5-7 min. and at line-by-line scanning by sequence of nanosecond laser pulses (λ = 1.06 μm, τ =100 ns, r = 25 μm,q=2.91∙107 W/cm2, Nx = 30, Ny = 1. Surface research in optical resolution was realized by Carl Zeiss Axio Imager A1M. Reflectance spectra were obtained with spectrophotometer Lambda Perkin 1050 with integrating sphere at different fixed light incidence angles. Topographic features were detected by scanning probe microscopy investigation with NanoEducator equipment. Main Results. The quantitative surface geometry characteristics of AISI 304 stainless steel patterns treated by different methods are obtained. It was found that the increase of light entrance angle has no influence on the form of reflection coefficient dependence from a wavelength, but a blue-shift occurs especially for the case of laser treatment. This difference can be caused by surface topology formed by laser heating and variety of oxide film thickness. This effect results in more significant change in observed sample color for laser treatment then for infrared heating. Practical Relevance. The results obtained in the present work can be used to implement a new element of product protection against forgery with the product marking.

  2. Reflections on the Field of Educational Management Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, John

    1999-01-01

    Explores educational management studies as an intellectual field. Draws on Bernstein and Bourieu's theorization of "field" to identify its specialized discourse, field positions and their objective relations, and the location of field occupants (the academic, the practitioner, and the entrepreneur). This configuration shapes educational…

  3. The effect of grain size and phosphorous-doping of polycrystalline 3C-SiC on infrared reflectance spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooyen, I.J. van, E-mail: Isabella.vanRooyen@inl.gov [Fuel Performance and Design Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Engelbrecht, J.A.A. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Henry, A.; Janzen, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping 58183 (Sweden); Neethling, J.H. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Rooyen, P.M. van [Philip M van Rooyen Network Consultants, Midlands Estates (South Africa)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IR is investigated as a technique to measure grain size and P-doping of polycrystalline SiC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infrared plasma minima can be used to determine doping levels in 3C-SiC for doping levels greater than 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A linear relationship is found between FWHM and the inverse of grain size of 3C-SiC irrespective of P-doping level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is further found that {omega}{sub p} is not influenced by the grain size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P-doping level has no significant effect on the linear relationship between grain size and surface roughness. - Abstract: The effect of P-doping and grain size of polycrystalline 3C-SiC on the infrared reflectance spectra is reported. The relationship between grain size and full width at half maximum (FWHM) suggest that the behavior of the 3C-SiC with the highest phosphorous doping level (of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} at. cm{sup -3}) is different from those with lower doping levels (<6.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} at. cm{sup -3}). It is also further demonstrated that the plasma resonance frequency ({omega}{sub p}) is not influenced by the grain size.

  4. The effect of grain size and phosphorous-doping of polycrystalline 3C–SiC on infrared reflectance spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Engelbrecht, J.A.A.; Henry, A.; Janzén, E.; Neethling, J.H.; Rooyen, P.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► IR is investigated as a technique to measure grain size and P-doping of polycrystalline SiC. ► Infrared plasma minima can be used to determine doping levels in 3C–SiC for doping levels greater than 5 × 10 17 cm −3 . ► A linear relationship is found between FWHM and the inverse of grain size of 3C–SiC irrespective of P-doping level. ► It is further found that ω p is not influenced by the grain size. ► P-doping level has no significant effect on the linear relationship between grain size and surface roughness. - Abstract: The effect of P-doping and grain size of polycrystalline 3C–SiC on the infrared reflectance spectra is reported. The relationship between grain size and full width at half maximum (FWHM) suggest that the behavior of the 3C–SiC with the highest phosphorous doping level (of 1.2 × 10 19 at. cm −3 ) is different from those with lower doping levels ( 18 at. cm −3 ). It is also further demonstrated that the plasma resonance frequency (ω p ) is not influenced by the grain size.

  5. Field Red Horizontal Branch Star Chemical Compositions from High Resolution Infrared Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneden, Chris; Afsar, Melike; Bozkurt, Zeynep; Bocek-Topcu, Gamze; Mace, Gregory N.; Kim, Hwihyun; Kaplan, Kyle; Kidder, Benjamin; McLane, Jacob

    2017-06-01

    We have observed three field red horizontal branch stars with the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS). The high resolution (R~45000) high signal-to-noise (S/N > 200) spectra obtained with IGRINS cover the complete H-band (1.50-1.80 micron) and K-band (1.90-2.45 micron). We analyzed hundreds of lines of the ubiquitous OH, CN, and CO molecular bands, and found more than 80 lines of atomic species that were useful for abundance work. A combination of good laboratory transition probabilities (when available) and ones derived from reverse solar analyses were employed. Our transition data were checked through studies of the Arcturus Atlas spectrum. We derived abundances from synthetic spectra instead of from equivalent widths. With IGRINS data we were able to extract metallicities and abundance ratios for more than 20 elements, including several not detectable or poorly represented in optical wavelength regions. Our abundances from IGRINS spectra are in excellent accord with those derived from optical spectrum studies. These results are directly applicable to calibrations of results from lower-resolution and/or S/N infrared spectral surveys. IGRINS observations will give high reolution spectroscopic access to heavily obscured normal red giants and other cool stars with unusual element mixes.This work used the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS) that was developed under a collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) with the financial support of the US National Science Foundation (NSF; grant AST-1229522), of the University of Texas at Austin, and of the Korean GMT Project of KASI. Our project also has been supported by NSF grants AST~1211585 and AST~1616040, by the University of Texas Rex G. Baker, Jr. Centennial Research Endowment, and by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, project No. 112T929).

  6. Reflectance Spectra of Synthetic Ortho- and Clinoenstatite in the UV, VIS, and IR for Comparison with Fe-poor Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Kathrin; Arnold, Gabriele; Hiesinger, Harald; Rohrbach, Arno

    2016-04-01

    Major rock forming minerals like pyroxenes are very common in the solar system and show characteristic absorption bands due to Fe2+ in the VIS and NIR [e.g., 1, 2]. The Fe-free endmember enstatite is also a common mineral on planetary surfaces like asteroids and probably Mercury [3] and a major constituent of meteorites like aubrites [4] and enstatite chondrites [5]. Reflectance spectra of these meteorites as well as the enstatite-rich or generally Fe-poor asteroids like the asteroidal targets of the Esa Rosetta mission (2867) Steins [6] and (21) Lutetia [7] are often featureless in the VIS and NIR lacking the absorption features associated with iron incorporated into the crystal structure of silicates. Fe-bearing orthopyroxenes show diagnostic absorption bands at ˜1 μm and ˜2 μm. While systematic changes in positions and depths of these bands with changes in Fe- and Ca-content of orthopyroxenes have been extensively studied [e.g., 2, 8], almost Fe-free enstatite is so far only spectroscopically investigated by [2]. For a better understanding of these Fe-poor bodies the availability of laboratory spectra of Fe-free silicates as analog materials are crucial but terrestrial samples of enstatite usually contain several mol% of FeO with pure enstatite being extremely rare. For easy availability of larger amounts of pure enstatite we developed a technique for synthesis of enstatite. These enstatite samples can be used as analog materials for laboratory studies for e.g. producing mixtures with other mineral samples. Enstatite has 3 stable polymorphs with clinoenstatite, orthoenstatite, and protoenstatite being stable at low (600° C), and high (>1000° C) temperatures [9]. Orthoenstatite and protoenstatite are orthorhombic, while clinoenstatite is monoclinic. Orthoenstatite is abundant in terrestrial rocks and in meteorites. Clinoenstatite is known from meteorites [5, 9]. Both polymorphs of enstatite therefore exist on the parent bodies of aubrites and enstatite

  7. Frustrated antiferromagnets at high fields: Bose-Einstein condensation in degenerate spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackeli, G.; Zhitomirsky, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Quantum phase transition at the saturation field is studied for a class of frustrated quantum antiferromagnets. The considered models include (i) the J 1 -J 2 frustrated square-lattice antiferromagnet with J 2 =(1/2)J 1 and (ii) the nearest-neighbor Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a face centered cubic lattice. In the fully saturated phase the magnon spectra for the two models have lines of degenerate minima. Transition into a partially magnetized state is treated via a mapping to a dilute gas of hard-core bosons and by complementary spin-wave calculations. Momentum dependence of the exact four-point boson vertex removes the degeneracy of the single-particle excitation spectra and selects the ordering wave vectors at (π,π) and (π,0,0) for the two models. We predict a unique form for the magnetization curve ΔM=S-M≅μ (d-1)/2 (logμ) (d-1) , where μ is a distance from the quantum critical point

  8. Wide-field microscopic FRET imaging using simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mengyan; Zhang, Lili; Xie, Shusen; Chen, Tongsheng

    2016-07-11

    Simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra (ExEm unmixing) has the inherent ability to resolve donor emission, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-sensitized acceptor emission and directly excited acceptor emission. We here develop an ExEm unmixing-based quantitative FRET measurement method (EES-FRET) independent of excitation intensity and detector parameter setting. The ratio factor (rK), predetermined using a donor-acceptor tandem construct, of total acceptor absorption to total donor absorption in excitation wavelengths used is introduced for determining the concentration ratio of acceptor to donor. We implemented EES-FRET method on a wide-field microscope to image living cells expressing tandem FRET constructs with different donor-acceptor stoichiometry.

  9. Periodic mean-field solutions and the spectra of discrete bosonic fields: Trace formula for Bose-Hubbard models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engl, Thomas; Urbina, Juan Diego; Richter, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    We consider the many-body spectra of interacting bosonic quantum fields on a lattice in the semiclassical limit of large particle number N . We show that the many-body density of states can be expressed as a coherent sum over oscillating long-wavelength contributions given by periodic, nonperturbative solutions of the, typically nonlinear, wave equation of the classical (mean-field) limit. To this end, we construct the semiclassical approximation for both the smooth and oscillatory parts of the many-body density of states in terms of a trace formula starting from the exact path integral form of the propagator between many-body quadrature states. We therefore avoid the use of a complexified classical limit characteristic of the coherent state representation. While quantum effects such as vacuum fluctuations and gauge invariance are exactly accounted for, our semiclassical approach captures quantum interference and therefore is valid well beyond the Ehrenfest time where naive quantum-classical correspondence breaks down. Remarkably, due to a special feature of harmonic systems with incommensurable frequencies, our formulas are generically valid also in the free-field case of noninteracting bosons.

  10. Examining the Content of Preservice Teachers' Reflections of Early Field Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes an exploratory study that examined the content of preservice elementary teachers' reflections of their documented early field experiences of science teaching in authentic contexts. The study used an early field experience model that was focused on the objective of profiling an elementary science teacher as the practical merit of reflection. Preservice elementary teachers individually and collaboratively reflected on their early field experiences and used the resulting reflections to construct profiles of an elementary science teacher respectively in synthesis papers. Data sources included journal entries and synthesis papers resulting from individual and collaborative reflections. Thematic analysis revealed that profiles of an elementary science teacher constructed from both individual and collaborative reflections were based on the roles of teacher as a guide and teacher as a mediator. Analysis further revealed that classroom management and discipline and safety were the key foci factored within individual reflections while what promotes learning and the difference between what is effective and ineffective scaffolding respectively, served as the foci within collaborative reflections. Also, collaborative reflection provided a structured approach to reflection as it drew preservice elementary teachers into collective dialogue and negotiation capturing the tensions they faced when trying to make sense of the practice of other teachers. Implications include the need to frame early field experiences with objectives that are understood by all parties involved in early field experiences; and, the need to instill the importance of observation, documentation, and reflection which collectively sum up preservice teachers' early field experiences.

  11. Detecting higher spin fields through statistical anisotropy in the CMB and galaxy power spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Kehagias, Alex; Liguori, Michele; Riotto, Antonio; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Tansella, Vittorio

    2018-01-01

    Primordial inflation may represent the most powerful collider to test high-energy physics models. In this paper we study the impact on the inflationary power spectrum of the comoving curvature perturbation in the specific model where massive higher spin fields are rendered effectively massless during a de Sitter epoch through suitable couplings to the inflaton field. In particular, we show that such fields with spin s induce a distinctive statistical anisotropic signal on the power spectrum, in such a way that not only the usual g2 M-statistical anisotropy coefficients, but also higher-order ones (i.e., g4 M,g6 M,…,g(2 s -2 )M and g(2 s )M) are nonvanishing. We examine their imprints in the cosmic microwave background and galaxy power spectra. Our Fisher matrix forecasts indicate that the detectability of gL M depends very weakly on L : all coefficients could be detected in near future if their magnitudes are bigger than about 10-3.

  12. Resolution Improvements in in Vivo1H NMR Spectra with Increased Magnetic Field Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruetter, Rolf; Weisdorf, Sally A.; Rajanayagan, Vasantham; Terpstra, Melissa; Merkle, Hellmut; Truwit, Charles L.; Garwood, Michael; Nyberg, Scott L.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-11-01

    The measurement of cerebral metabolites using highly homologous localization techniques and similar shimming methods was performed in the human brain at 1.5 and 4 T as well as in the dog and rat brain at 9.4 T. In rat brain, improved resolution was achieved by shimming all first- and second-order shim coils using a fully adiabatic FASTMAP sequence. The spectra showed a clear improvement in spectral resolution for all metabolite resonances with increased field strength. Changes in cerebral glutamine content were clearly observed at 4 T compared to 1.5 T in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. At 9.4 T, glutamine H4 at 2.46 ppm was fully resolved from glutamate H4 at 2.37 ppm, as was the potential resonance from γ-amino-butyric acid at 2.30 ppm and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate at 2.05 ppm. Singlet linewidths were found to be as low as 6 Hz (0.015 ppm) at 9.4 T, indicating a substantial decrease in ppm linewidth with field strength. Furthermore, the methylene peak of creatine was partially resolved from phosphocreatine, indicating a close to 1:1 relationship in gray matter. We conclude that increasing the magnetic field strength increases spectral resolution also for1H NMR, which can lead to more than linear sensitivity gains.

  13. Detection of natural and stress-induced variability in reflectance spectra of apple trees using hyperspectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delalieux, Stephanie; Keulemans, Wannes; van Aardt, Jan; Schrevens, Eddie; Coppin, Pol

    2005-10-01

    Early detection of biotic and abiotic stresses and subsequent steering of agricultural systems using hyperspectral sensors potentially could contribute to the pro-active treatment of production-limiting factors. Venturia inaequalis (apple scab) is an important biotic factor that can reduce yield in apple orchards. Previous hyperspectral research focused on (i) determining if Venturia inaequalis leaf infections could be differentiated from healthy leaves and (ii) investigating at which developmental stage Venturia inaequalis infection could be detected. Logistical regression and partial least squares discriminant analysis were used to select the hyperspectral bands that best define differences among treatments. It was clear that hyperspectral data provide the contiguous, high spectral resolution data that are needed to detect subtle changes in reflectance values between healthy and stressed vegetation. The research was extended to include tree-based modeling as an alternative classification method. Results suggested that good predictability could be achieved when classifying infected plants based on this supervised classification technique. It was concluded that the spectral domain around 1600 nm was best suited to discriminate between infected and non-infected leaves immediately after infection, while the visible spectral region became more important at a well-developed infection stage. Research was focused on young leaves, because of the decreased incidence of infection in older leaves, the so-called 'ontogenic resistance'. Additional research was performed to gain a better understanding of the processes occurring during the first days after leaf unfolding and to evaluate the natural spectral variability among leaves. An undisturbed 20-day growth profile was examined to assess variations in the reflectance spectra due to physiological changes at the different growth stages of the leaves. Results suggested that an accurate distinction could be made between

  14. Predicting foliar biochemistry of tea (Camellia sinensis) using reflectance spectra measured at powder, leaf and canopy levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Meng; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Schlerf, Martin; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Yanfang; Zeng, Rong; Fei, Teng

    2013-04-01

    Some biochemical compounds are closely related with the quality of tea (Camellia sinensis (L.)). In this study, the concentration of these compounds including total tea polyphenols, free amino acids and soluble sugars were estimated using reflectance spectroscopy at three different levels: powder, leaf and canopy, with partial least squares regression. The focus of this study is to systematically compare the accuracy of tea quality estimations based on spectroscopy at three different levels. At the powder level, the average r2 between predictions and observations was 0.89 for polyphenols, 0.81 for amino acids and 0.78 for sugars, with relative root mean square errors (RMSE/mean) of 5.47%, 5.50% and 2.75%, respectively; at the leaf level, the average r2 decreased to 0.46-0.81 and the relative RMSE increased to 4.46-7.09%. Compared to the results yielded at the leaf level, the results from canopy spectra were slightly more accurate, yielding average r2 values of 0.83, 0.77 and 0.56 and relative RMSE of 6.79%, 5.73% and 4.03% for polyphenols, amino acids and sugars, respectively. We further identified wavelength channels that influenced the prediction model. For powder and leaves, some bands identified can be linked to the absorption features of chemicals of interest (1648 nm for phenolic, 1510 nm for amino acids, 2080 nm and 2270 nm for sugars), while more indirectly related wavelengths were found to be important at the canopy level for predictions of chemical compounds. Overall, the prediction accuracies achieved at canopy level in this study are encouraging for future study on tea quality estimated at the landscape scale using airborne and space-borne sensors.

  15. Efficient anomalous reflection through near-field interactions in metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalabi, H.; Ra'di, Y.; Sounas, D. L.; Alù, A.

    2017-08-01

    Gradient metasurfaces have been extensively used in the past few years for advanced wave manipulation over a thin surface. These metasurfaces have been mostly designed based on the generalized laws of reflection and refraction. However, it was recently revealed that metasurfaces based on this approach tend to suffer from inefficiencies and complex design requirements. We have recently proposed a different approach to the problem of efficient beam steering using a surface, based on bianisotropic particles in a periodic array. Here, we show highly efficient reflective metasurfaces formed by pairs of isotropic dielectric rods, which can offer asymmetrical scattering of normally incident beams with unitary efficiency. Our theory shows that moderately broadband anomalous reflection can be achieved with suitably designed periodic arrays of isotropic nanoparticles. We also demonstrate practical designs using TiO2 cylindrical nanorods to deflect normally incident light toward a desired direction. The proposed structures may pave the way to a broader range of light management opportunities, with applications in energy harvesting, signaling, and communications.

  16. LAMOST OBSERVATIONS IN THE KEPLER FIELD. I. DATABASE OF LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cat, P. De; Ren, A. B.; Yang, X. H. [Royal observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussel (Belgium); Fu, J. N. [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, 19 Avenue Xinjiekouwai, Beijing 100875 (China); Shi, J. R.; Luo, A. L.; Yang, M.; Wang, J. L.; Zhang, H. T.; Shi, H. M.; Zhang, W. [Key Lab for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Dong, Subo [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Road 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing, 100871 (China); Catanzaro, G.; Frasca, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Corbally, C. J. [Vatican Observatory Research Group, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Gray, R. O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608 (United States); Żakowicz, J. Molenda- [Astronomical Institute of the University of Wrocław, ul. Kopernika 11, 51-622 Wrocław (Poland); Uytterhoeven, K. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Briquet, M. [Institut d’Astrophysique et de Géophysique, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 19C, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Bruntt, H., E-mail: Peter.DeCat@oma.be [Stellar Astrophysics Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); and others

    2015-09-15

    The nearly continuous light curves with micromagnitude precision provided by the space mission Kepler are revolutionizing our view of pulsating stars. They have revealed a vast sea of low-amplitude pulsation modes that were undetectable from Earth. The long time base of Kepler light curves allows for the accurate determination of the frequencies and amplitudes of pulsation modes needed for in-depth asteroseismic modeling. However, for an asteroseismic study to be successful, the first estimates of stellar parameters need to be known and they cannot be derived from the Kepler photometry itself. The Kepler Input Catalog provides values for the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity, but not always with sufficient accuracy. Moreover, information on the chemical composition and rotation rate is lacking. We are collecting low-resolution spectra for objects in the Kepler field of view with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (lamost, Xinglong observatory, China). All of the requested fields have now been observed at least once. In this paper, we describe those observations and provide a useful database for the whole astronomical community.

  17. Influence of hurricane wind field in the structure of directional wave spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; García-Nava, Hector; Osuna, Pedro; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    Three numerical experiments using the spectral wave prediction model SWAN were carried out to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the directional and frequency distributions of hurricane wave energy. One particular objective is to evaluate the effect of the translation speed of the hurricane and the presence of concentric eye walls, on both the wave growth process and the shape of the directional wave spectrum. The HRD wind field of Hurricane Dean on August 20 at 7:30 was propagated at two different velocities (5 and 10 m/s). An idealized concentric eye wall (a Gaussian function that evolve in time along a path in the form of an Archimedean spiral) was imposed to the wind field. The white-capping formulation of Westhuysen et al. (2007) was selected. The wave model represents fairly well the directionality of the energy and the shape of the directional spectra in the hurricane domain. The model results indicate that the forward movement of the storm influences the development of the waves, consistent with field observations. Additionally the same experiments were carried out using the Wave Watch III model with the source terms formulation proposed by Ardhuin et al., 2010, with the aim of making comparisons between the physical processes that represent each formulation, and the latest results will be addressed. References Ardhuin, F., Rogers, E., Babanin, A. V., Filipot, J.-F., Magne, R., Roland, A., van der Westhuysen, A., et al. (2010). Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 40(9), 1917-1941. doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1 Van der Westhuysen, A. J., Zijlema, M., & Battjes, J. A. (2007). Nonlinear saturation-based whitecapping dissipation in SWAN for deep and shallow water. Coast. Eng., 54(2), 151-170. doi:10.1016/j.coastaleng.2006.08.006

  18. Judaism and health: reflections on an emerging scholarly field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jeff; Prince, Michele F

    2011-12-01

    This paper surveys the field of Judaism and health. The authors trace the history of discourse on health and healing within Judaism, from the biblical and rabbinic eras to contemporary research and writing on Jewish bioethics, pastoral care, communal services, and aging, including congregational and community programming related to health and illness and the emergence of the Jewish healing movement. The work of the Kalsman Institute on Judaism and Health is described, focusing on efforts to unite these various threads into a scholarly field emphasizing basic and applied research on the instrumental functions of Jewish religious life for health and well-being.

  19. Reflections on Museums as Effective Field Sites for Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Megan; Ensminger, David; Incandela, Colleen; Moisan, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    A unique partnership among six museums and Loyola University Chicago's "Teaching Learning and Leading with Schools and Communities" teacher preparation program provided cross-disciplinary field sites for understanding and witnessing developmental and learning theories. Pre-service teacher candidates were able to identify constructs and…

  20. Reflections on the mediostructure in special-field dictionaries. also ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because this very special type of question can only be answered systematically with reference to a theory of the mediostructure, some necessary terms are firstly introduced by means of illustrative analyses of special-field dictionary articles giving cross-references, such as e.g. homogeneously externally orientated dictionary ...

  1. Patterns of change in the size spectra of numbers and diversity of the North Sea fish assemblage, as reflected in surveys and models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, J.; Gislason, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    Trends were analysed over two decades in the size spectra of numbers and diversity of the North Sea fish assemblage. Tn trawl survey data, the abundance spectrum was smoothly linear each year. Bath slopes and intercepts increased significantly over the period, reflecting the effects of fishing...... with the abundance spectrum suggests that the fish community structure has remained Fairly stable over the period, despite significant increases in harvesting on component populations. To explore the hypothesis that the regulation of the community structure arises from trophic interactions, the same community...... were very similar. Annual abundance spectra were linear and slopes increased significantly and fairly smoothly over the 20 years? indicating significant effects of fishing on the size composition of the exploited fish assemblage. The annual diversity spectra were more dome-shaped than in the survey...

  2. Family psychology: Past and future reflections on the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Ross D

    2017-04-01

    Prominent issues in the field of family psychology during my term as editor (1998-2003) of this journal were briefly noted, including a focus on marital issues, divorce, remarriage and family conflict. Parenting, attachment and parent-child relationships were also significant topics in this period. Special sections of the journal focused on cultural variations, families and the law, families and religion, and family routines and rituals. Several neglected issues that need more attention in the future were noted. These include the need to recognize the embeddedness of families in socioecological contexts, the importance of monitoring the impact of secular changes on families, and the value and limitations of viewing family psychology as a separate field. Other topics for a future agenda include the challenge of defining "family" in the midst of changing family forms, the effects of technological change on families, and the challenges of integrating biological research into the family psychology agenda. A multilevel bio-social approach to family research was recommended. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. FROM FIELD DO TABLE: REFLECTIONS ON FAMILY FARMING AND GASTRONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto do Nascimento e Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the assumption that there is an interaction between the rural environment and the gastronomic segment, what leads to the discussion of the territorial identity formation in which the relation between the field and the table goes beyond the simple act of planting, cultivating, reaping, trading and eating. It makes part of a set of strategies and politics able to assist the promotion of rural development and, consequently, the family-based agriculture maintenance in rural environment. The conception of rural environment is argued since the territorial perspective in which the familiar agriculture is understood as a way of life, related to the diversification of activities, among them the food production.

  4. Classification of sugar beet and volunteer potato reflection spectra with a neural network and statistical discriminant analysis to select discriminative wavelengths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, A.T.; Hofstee, J.W.; Zande, van de J.C.; Meuleman, J.; Henten, van E.J.

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the reflectance properties of volunteer potato and sugar beet and to assess the potential of separating sugar beet and volunteer potato at different fields and in different years, using spectral reflectance characteristics. With the ImspectorMobile,

  5. Distinguishing nitrogen fertilization levels in field corn (Zea mays L.) with actively induced fluorescence and passive reflectance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurtrey, J.E. III; Chappelle, E.W.; Kim, M.S.; Meisinger, J.J.; Corp, L.A

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is an active sensing technique capable of capturing immediate and specific indications of changes in plant physiology and metabolism as they relate to the concentration and photosynthetic activity of the plant pigments. Reflectance is a passive sensing technique that can capture differences in the concentration of the primary plant pigments. Fluorescence and reflectance were compared for their ability to measure levels of plant stress that are of agronomic importance in corn (Zea mays L.) crops. Laboratory LIF and reflectance spectra were made on excised leaves from field grown corn. Changes in the visible region of the spectrum were compared between groups of plants fertilized with seven different levels of nitrogen (N) fertilization. A pulsed nitrogen laser emitting photons at a wavelength of 337 nm was used as a fluorescence excitation source. Differences in maximum intensity of fluorescence occurred at 440 nm, 525 nm, 685 nm, and 740 nm. Significant separations were found between levels of N fertilization at several LIF wavelength ratios. Several reflectance algorithms also produced significant separations between certain levels of N fertilization

  6. Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B. [Posgrado en CBAP, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Carretera Tepic-Compostela km 9. C.P. 63780. Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico); Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Posgrado en CBAP, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Carretera Tepic-Compostela km 9. C.P. 63780. Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r{sup 2} rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

  7. Polarization contrast in fluorescence scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Polarization contrast is presented in fluorescence images of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer obtained with a scanning near-field optical microscope operated in reflection. A tapered optical fiber is used both to excite and to collect the fluorescence. The lateral resolution in the reflection

  8. Longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and their manifestation in interference microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakin, D V; Ryabukho, V P

    2013-01-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of the longitudinal correlation properties of an optical field with broad angular and frequency spectra and manifestations of these properties in interference microscopy are presented. The joint and competitive influence of the angular and frequency spectra of the object-probing field on the longitudinal resolution and on the amplitude of the interference microscope signals from the interfaces between the media inside a multilayer object is demonstrated. The method of compensating the so-called defocusing effect that arises in the interference microscopy using objectives with a large numerical aperture is experimentally demonstrated, which consists in using as a light source in the interference microscope an illuminating interferometer with a frequency-broadband light source. This method of compensation may be used as the basis of simultaneous determination of geometric thickness and refractive index of media forming a multilayer object. (optical fields)

  9. Rapid, nondestructive estimation of surface polymer layer thickness using attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy and synthetic spectra derived from optical principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, B André; Guiney, Linda M; Loose, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a rapid, nondestructive analytical method that estimates the thickness of a surface polymer layer with high precision but unknown accuracy using a single attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) measurement. Because the method is rapid, nondestructive, and requires no sample preparation, it is ideal as a process analytical technique. Prior to implementation, the ATR FT-IR spectrum of the substrate layer pure component and the ATR FT-IR and real refractive index spectra of the surface layer pure component must be known. From these three input spectra a synthetic mid-infrared spectral matrix of surface layers 0 nm to 10,000 nm thick on substrate is created de novo. A minimum statistical distance match between a process sample's ATR FT-IR spectrum and the synthetic spectral matrix provides the thickness of that sample. We show that this method can be used to successfully estimate the thickness of polysulfobetaine surface modification, a hydrated polymeric surface layer covalently bonded onto a polyetherurethane substrate. A database of 1850 sample spectra was examined. Spectrochemical matrix-effect unknowns, such as the nonuniform and molecularly novel polysulfobetaine-polyetherurethane interface, were found to be minimal. A partial least squares regression analysis of the database spectra versus their thicknesses as calculated by the method described yielded an estimate of precision of ±52 nm.

  10. Stationary bound-state massive scalar field configurations supported by spherically symmetric compact reflecting stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2017-12-15

    It has recently been demonstrated that asymptotically flat neutral reflecting stars are characterized by an intriguing no-hair property. In particular, it has been proved that these horizonless compact objects cannot support spatially regular static matter configurations made of scalar (spin-0) fields, vector (spin-1) fields and tensor (spin-2) fields. In the present paper we shall explicitly prove that spherically symmetric compact reflecting stars can support stationary (rather than static) bound-state massive scalar fields in their exterior spacetime regions. To this end, we solve analytically the Klein-Gordon wave equation for a linearized scalar field of mass μ and proper frequency ω in the curved background of a spherically symmetric compact reflecting star of mass M and radius R{sub s}. It is proved that the regime of existence of these stationary composed star-field configurations is characterized by the simple inequalities 1 - 2M/R{sub s} < (ω/μ){sup 2} < 1. Interestingly, in the regime M/R{sub s} << 1 of weakly self-gravitating stars we derive a remarkably compact analytical equation for the discrete spectrum {ω(M,R_s, μ)}{sup n=∞}{sub n=1} of resonant oscillation frequencies which characterize the stationary composed compact-reflecting-star-linearized-massive-scalar-field configurations. Finally, we verify the accuracy of the analytically derived resonance formula of the composed star-field configurations with direct numerical computations. (orig.)

  11. Room-temperature near-field reflection spectrocopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Madsen, Steen

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the properties of near-field reflection spectroscopy in different polarization and detection modes using uncoated fiber probes. The results show, that cross-polarized detection suppresses to a large extent far-field contributions. Using the fiber dithering as a modulation source fo...

  12. Reflections on Teaching and Learning for Sustainability from the Cascadia Sustainability Field School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Cameron; Sotoudehnia, Maral; Erickson-McGee, Paige

    2015-01-01

    A complex and contested concept, sustainability presents a great challenge to teachers and learners. Field study is a potentially promising venue to unpack the problematics of sustainability in practice. This paper reflects on the Cascadia Sustainability Field School, offered through the University of Victoria, Canada, providing an overview of the…

  13. Polarization resolved imaging with a reflection near-field optical microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Xiao, Mufei; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using a rigorous microscopic point-dipole description of probe-sample interactions, we study imaging with a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope. Optical content, topographical artifacts, sensitivity window-i.e., the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical c...

  14. Defects in regular nanosystems and interference spectra at reemission of electromagnetic field attosecond pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matveev V.I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defects in nanostructured targets on interference spectra at the reemission of attosecond electromagnetic pulses has been considered. General expressions have been obtained for calculations of spectral distributions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional multiatomic nanosystems consisting of identical complex atoms with defects such as bends, vacancies, and breaks. Changes in interference spectra by a linear chain with several removed atoms (chain with breaks and by a linear chain with a bend have been calculated as examples allowing a simple analytical representation. Generalization to two- and three-dimensional nanosystems has been developed.

  15. No hair for spherically symmetric neutral reflecting stars: Nonminimally coupled massive scalar fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2017-10-01

    Recent no-hair theorems have revealed the intriguing fact that horizonless stars with compact reflecting surfaces cannot support non-linear matter configurations made of scalar, vector, and tensor fields. In the present paper we extend the regime of validity of these no-hair theorems by explicitly proving that spherically symmetric compact reflecting stars cannot support static configurations made of massive scalar fields with non-minimal coupling to gravity. Interestingly, our no-hair theorem is valid for generic values of the dimensionless field-curvature coupling parameter ξ.

  16. No hair for spherically symmetric neutral reflecting stars: Nonminimally coupled massive scalar fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Hod

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent no-hair theorems have revealed the intriguing fact that horizonless stars with compact reflecting surfaces cannot support non-linear matter configurations made of scalar, vector, and tensor fields. In the present paper we extend the regime of validity of these no-hair theorems by explicitly proving that spherically symmetric compact reflecting stars cannot support static configurations made of massive scalar fields with non-minimal coupling to gravity. Interestingly, our no-hair theorem is valid for generic values of the dimensionless field-curvature coupling parameter ξ.

  17. Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Embree

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideally, editorials are written one to two months before publication in the Journal. It was my turn to write this one. I had planned to write the first draft the evening after my clinic on Tuesday, September 11. It didn't get done that night or during the next week. Somehow, the topic that I had originally chosen just didn't seem that important anymore as I, along my friends and colleagues, reflected on the changes that the events of that day were likely to have on our lives.

  18. Linear optical absorption spectra of mesoscopic structures in intense THz fields: Free-particle properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    We theoretically study the effect of THz radiation on the linear optical absorption spectra of semiconductor structures. A general theoretical framework, based on nonequilibrium Green functions, is formulated and applied to the calculation of linear optical absorption spectrum for several...... stable steps appear in the absorption spectrum when conditions for dynamical localization are met. [S0163-1829(95)03412-2]....

  19. Multiplexing 32,000 spectra onto 8 detectors: the HARMONI field splitting, image slicing, and wavelength selecting optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Freeman, David; Kosmalski, Johan

    2012-09-01

    HARMONI, the High Angular Resolution Monolithic Optical & Near-infrared Integral field spectrograph is one of two first-light instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Over a 256x128 pixel field-of-view HARMONI will simultaneously measure approximately 32,000 spectra. Each spectrum is about 4000 spectral pixels long, and covers a selectable part of the 0.47-2.45 μm wavelength range at resolving powers of either R≍4000, 10000, or 20000. All 32,000 spectra are imaged onto eight HAWAII4RG detectors using a multiplexing scheme that divides the input field into four sub-fields, each imaged onto one image slicer that in turn re-arranges a single sub-field into two long exit slits feeding one spectrograph each. In total we require eight spectrographs, each with one HAWAII4RG detector. A system of articulated and exchangeable fold-mirrors and VPH gratings allows one to select different spectral resolving powers and wavelength ranges of interest while keeping a fixed geometry between the spectrograph collimator and camera avoiding the need for an articulated grating and camera. In this paper we describe both the field splitting and image slicing optics as well as the optics that will be used to select both spectral resolving power and wavelength range.

  20. Predicting foliar biochemistry of tea (Camellia sinensis) using reflectance spectra measured at powder, leaf and canopy levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bian, B.M.; Skidmore, A.K.; Schlerf, M.; Wang, T.; Liu, X.; Zeng, R.; Fei, T.

    2013-01-01

    Some biochemical compounds are closely related with the quality of tea (Camellia sinensis (L.)). In this study, the concentration of these compounds including total tea polyphenols, free amino acids and soluble sugars were estimated using reflectance spectroscopy at three different levels: powder,

  1. Integrating in situ reef-top reflectance spectra with Landsat TM imagery to aid shallow-tropical benthic habitat mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purkis, S.J.; Pasterkamp, R.

    2004-01-01

    This manuscript presents the use of hyperspectral in situ reflectance measurements evaluated above the water surface to train a supervised classification of a simultaneously acquired Landsat 5 TM image. The optical signature of a submerged reef substrate is both attenuated and augmented by the

  2. Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, the machine techniques of the present day have invaded the latter fields as well, ... of operation of modern machines. ..... Man and Slave. The problem, and it is a moral problem, with which we are here faced is very close to one of the great problems of slavery. Let us grant that slayery is bad because it is cruel. It is,.

  3. Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    arrangement gave preferential treatment to the "better classes" which could afford better schooling for ... common people. Hermann Einstein, it seems) showed a marked inclination for math- ematics, and would have liked to pursue studies in this or some related field. ... meaning nature that could refuse nothing to anyone.

  4. Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With their vision and foresight, these two great scientists realized the importance of this new and expanding field of radio physics and electronics ..... electronics, magnetron fabrication, and ionospheric investigations from artificial satellite beacon studies were carried out with significant achievements, which were duly recog-.

  5. Manipulation of structural color reflection in graphene oxide dispersions using electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Ho; Shen, Tian-Zi; Song, Jang-Kun

    2015-07-27

    Aqueous graphene oxide (GO) dispersions with a photonic crystal structure are carefully prepared to produce structural color reflection. We fabricate a simple reflective GO cell with a unique electrode design and demonstrate that the resulting structural color reflection is electrically erasable and rewritable. GO concentration and the direction of the electric field are vital factors in the development of the device. The resulting device works well, although it exhibits a rather slow response time; in particular, the spontaneous recovery time from dark to bright color reflection requires tens of minutes. Through the application of a horizontal electric field parallel to the substrate, the recovery time can be improved, resulting in a recovery period of 3 min. Although many unsolved issues remain, the findings in GO dispersion may provide a new possibility for color filter-less bi-stable color displays with low power consumption.

  6. Using visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for predicting soil properties based on regression with peaks parameters as derived from continuum-removed spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasat, Radim; Klement, Ales; Jaksik, Ondrej; Kodesova, Radka; Drabek, Ondrej; Boruvka, Lubos

    2014-05-01

    Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VNIR-DRS) provides a rapid and inexpensive tool for simultaneous prediction of a variety of soil properties. Usually, some sophisticated multivariate mathematical or statistical methods are employed in order to extract the required information from the raw spectra measurement. For this purpose especially the Partial least squares regression (PLSR) and Support vector machines (SVM) are the most frequently used. These methods generally benefit from the complexity with which the soil spectra are treated. But it is interesting that also techniques that focus only on a single spectral feature, such as a simple linear regression with selected continuum-removed spectra (CRS) characteristic (e.g. peak depth), can often provide competitive results. Therefore, we decided to enhance the potential of CRS taking into account all possible CRS peak parameters (area, width and depth) and develop a comprehensive methodology based on multiple linear regression approach. The eight considered soil properties were oxidizable carbon content (Cox), exchangeable (pHex) and active soil pH (pHa), particle and bulk density, CaCO3 content, crystalline and amorphous (Fed) and amorphous Fe (Feox) forms. In four cases (pHa, bulk density, Fed and Feox), of which two (Fed and Feox) were predicted reliably accurately (0.50 0.80). Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge the financial support of the Ministry of Agriculture of the Czech Republic (grant No. QJ1230319).

  7. Full-field transmission-type angle-deviation optical microscope with reflectivity-height transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ming-Hung; Tan, Chen-Tai; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Yang, Ya-Hsin

    2015-10-01

    This full-field transmission-type three-dimensional (3D) optical microscope is constructed based on the angle deviation method (ADM) and the algorithm of reflectivity-height transformation (RHT). The surface height is proportional to the deviation angle of light passing through the object. The angle deviation and surface height can be measured based on the reflectivity closed to the critical angle using a parallelogram prism and two CCDs.

  8. Dielectric and fluorescent samples imaged by scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Dielectric fluorescent samples are imaged by scanning near- field optical microscopy in reflection. A non-metallized tapered fibre tip is used both as an emitter and a detector. Shear force feedback controls the distance between the tip and the sample and gives simultaneously a topographic image of the surface. A direct correlation with the optical image is obtained. We demonstrate that this reflection setup is suitable for dielectric samples. Images in fluorescence have been obtained o­n Lan...

  9. Determination of the Ability to Measure Traces of Water in Dehydrated Residues of Waste Water by IR Diffuse Reflectance Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratsenka, S. V.; Voropai, E. S.; Belkin, V. G.

    2018-01-01

    Rapid measurement of the moisture content of dehydrated residues is a critical problem, the solution of which will increase the efficiency of treatment facilities and optimize the process of applying flocculants. The ability to determine the moisture content of dehydrated residues using a meter operating on the IR reflectance principle was confirmed experimentally. The most suitable interference filters were selected based on an analysis of the obtained diffuse reflectance spectrum of the dehydrated residue in the range 1.0-2.7 μm. Calibration curves were constructed and compared for each filter set. A measuring filter with a transmittance maximum at 1.19 μm and a reference filter with a maximum at 1.3 μm gave the best agreement with the laboratory measurements.

  10. Processing of phase pure and dense bulk EuTiO.sub.3./sub. ceramics and their infrared reflectivity spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kachlik, M.; Máca, K.; Goian, Veronica; Kamba, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 74, MAY (2012), s. 16-18 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD202/09/H041; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0682 Grant - others:GAUK(CZ) SVV-2011-263303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : functional ceramics, * europium titanate * sintering * infrared reflectivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.224, year: 2012

  11. Effect of an electromagnetic field on the spectra and elliptic flow of particles

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Bohao; Wang, Zeyan

    2017-01-01

    In 2+1 dimensions, the evolution of flow under the influence of an external electromagnetic field is simulated. The external electromagnetic field is exponentially decaying with time. Under the same initial conditions, flow evolution with and without the external electromagnetic field is compared. It was found that the production of particles was enhanced when the external electromagnetic field was present. As the strength of the electromagnetic field increased, more particles were produced. ...

  12. Alfven Wave Reflection Model of Field-Aligned Currents at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.; Slavin, James

    2010-01-01

    An Alfven Wave Reflection (AWR) model is proposed that provides closure for strong field-aligned currents (FACs) driven by the magnetopause reconnection in the magnetospheres of planets having no significant ionospheric and surface electrical conductance. The model is based on properties of the Alfven waves, generated at high altitudes and reflected from the low-conductivity surface of the planet. When magnetospheric convection is very slow, the incident and reflected Alfven waves propagate along approximately the same path. In this case, the net field-aligned currents will be small. However, as the convection speed increases. the reflected wave is displaced relatively to the incident wave so that the incident and reflected waves no longer compensate each other. In this case, the net field-aligned current may be large despite the lack of significant ionospheric and surface conductivity. Our estimate shows that for typical solar wind conditions at Mercury, the magnitude of Region 1-type FACs in Mercury's magnetosphere may reach hundreds of kilo-Amperes. This AWR model of field-aligned currents may provide a solution to the long-standing problem of the closure of FACs in the Mercury's magnetosphere. c2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. WREP: A wavelet-based technique for extracting the red edge position from reflectance spectra for estimating leaf and canopy chlorophyll contents of cereal crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Cheng, Tao; Zhou, Kai; Zheng, Hengbiao; Yao, Xia; Tian, Yongchao; Zhu, Yan; Cao, Weixing

    2017-07-01

    Red edge position (REP), defined as the wavelength of the inflexion point in the red edge region (680-760 nm) of the reflectance spectrum, has been widely used to estimate foliar chlorophyll content from reflectance spectra. A number of techniques have been developed for REP extraction in the past three decades, but most of them require data-specific parameterization and the consistence of their performance from leaf to canopy levels remains poorly understood. In this study, we propose a new technique (WREP) to extract REPs based on the application of continuous wavelet transform to reflectance spectra. The REP is determined by the zero-crossing wavelength in the red edge region of a wavelet transformed spectrum for a number of scales of wavelet decomposition. The new technique is simple to implement and requires no parameterization from the user as long as continuous wavelet transforms are applied to reflectance spectra. Its performance was evaluated for estimating leaf chlorophyll content (LCC) and canopy chlorophyll content (CCC) of cereal crops (i.e. rice and wheat) and compared with traditional techniques including linear interpolation, linear extrapolation, polynomial fitting and inverted Gaussian. Our results demonstrated that WREP obtained the best estimation accuracy for both LCC and CCC as compared to traditional techniques. High scales of wavelet decomposition were favorable for the estimation of CCC and low scales for the estimation of LCC. The difference in optimal scale reveals the underlying mechanism of signature transfer from leaf to canopy levels. In addition, crop-specific models were required for the estimation of CCC over the full range. However, a common model could be built with the REPs extracted with Scale 5 of the WREP technique for wheat and rice crops when CCC was less than 2 g/m2 (R2 = 0.73, RMSE = 0.26 g/m2). This insensitivity of WREP to crop type indicates the potential for aerial mapping of chlorophyll content between growth seasons

  14. Profile of male-field dependent (FD) prospective teacher's reflective thinking in solving contextual mathematical problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustan, S.; Juniati, Dwi; Siswono, Tatag Yuli Eko

    2017-08-01

    Reflective thinking is an important component in the world of education, especially in professional education of teachers. In learning mathematics, reflective thinking is one way to solve mathematical problem because it can improve student's curiosity when student faces a mathematical problem. Reflective thinking is also a future competence that should be taught to students to face the challenges and to respond of demands of the 21st century. There are many factors which give impact toward the student's reflective thinking when student solves mathematical problem. One of them is cognitive style. For this reason, reflective thinking and cognitive style are important things in solving contextual mathematical problem. This research paper describes aspect of reflective thinking in solving contextual mathematical problem involved solution by using some mathematical concept, namely linear program, algebra arithmetic operation, and linear equations of two variables. The participant, in this research paper, is a male-prospective teacher who has Field Dependent. The purpose of this paper is to describe aspect of prospective teachers' reflective thinking in solving contextual mathematical problem. This research paper is a descriptive by using qualitative approach. To analyze the data, the researchers focus in four main categories which describe prospective teacher's activities using reflective thinking, namely; (a) formulation and synthesis of experience, (b) orderliness of experience, (c) evaluating the experience and (d) testing the selected solution based on the experience.

  15. Polarization resolved imaging with a reflection near-field optical microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Xiao, Mufei; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using a rigorous microscopic point-dipole description of probe-sample interactions, we study imaging with a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope. Optical content, topographical artifacts, sensitivity window-i.e., the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical...... contrast-and symmetry properties are considered for optical images obtained in constant-distance mode for different polarization configurations. We demonstrate that images obtained in cross-polarized detection mode are free of background and topographical artifacts and that the cross-circular polarization...... configuration is preferable to the cross-linear one, since it ensures more isotropic (in the surface plane) near-field imaging of surface features. The numerical results are supported with experimental near-field images obtained by using a reflection microscope with an uncoated fiber tip....

  16. Depth enhancement of multi-layer light field display using polarization dependent internal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Na-Young; Lim, Hong-Gi; Lee, Sung-Keun; Kim, Yong-Soo; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2013-12-02

    A technique to enhance the depth range of the multi-layer light field three-dimensional display is proposed. A set of the optical plates are stacked in front of the conventional multi-layer light field display, creating additional internal reflection for one polarization state. By switching between two orthogonal polarization states in synchronization with the displayed three-dimensional images, the depth range of the display can be doubled. The proposed method is verified experimentally, confirming its feasibility.

  17. Electromagnetic Waves Reflectance of Graphene -- Magnetic Semiconductor Superlattice in Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Bychkov, Igor V.; Shavrov, Vladimir G.

    2014-01-01

    Electrodynamic properties of the graphene - magnetic semiconductor - graphene superlattice placed in magnetic field have been investigated theoretically in Faraday geometry with taking into account dissipation processes. Frequency and field dependences of the reflectance, transmittance and absorbtance of electromagnetic waves by such superlattice have been calculated for different numbers of periods of the structure and different sizes of the periods with using a transfer matrix method. The p...

  18. METHODS OF ANALYSIS AND CLASSIFICATION OF THE COMPONENTS OF GRAIN MIXTURES BASED ON MEASURING THE REFLECTION AND TRANSMISSION SPECTRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem O. Donskikh*

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers methods of classification of grain mixture components based on spectral analysis in visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges using various measurement approaches - reflection, transmission and combined spectrum methods. It also describes the experimental measuring units used and suggests the prototype of a multispectral grain mixture analyzer. The results of the spectral measurement were processed using neural network based classification algorithms. The probabilities of incorrect recognition for various numbers of spectral parts and combinations of spectral methods were estimated. The paper demonstrates that combined usage of two spectral analysis methods leads to higher classification accuracy and allows for reducing the number of the analyzed spectral parts. A detailed description of the proposed measurement device for high-performance real-time multispectral analysis of the components of grain mixtures is given.

  19. Exceptionally slow rise in differential reflectivity spectra of excitons in GaN: effect of excitation-induced dephasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanton, C.J.; Kenrow, J.; El Sayed, K.; Jho, Y.D.; Kim, D.S.; Song, J.J.; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Femtosecond differential reflectivity spectroscopy (DRS) and four-wave mixing (FWM) experiments were performed simultaneously to study the initial temporal dynamics of the exciton line-shapes in GaN epilayers. Beats between the A-B excitons were found only for positive time delay in both DRS and FWM experiments. The rise time at negative time delay for the DRS was much slower than the FWM signal or differential transmission spectroscopy at the exciton resonance. A numerical solution of a six band semiconductor Bloch equation model including nonlinearities at the Hartree-Fock level shows that this slow rise in the DRS results from excitation induced dephasing, that is, the strong density dependence of the dephasing time which changes with the laser excitation energy.

  20. Effects of prompting in reflective learning tools: Findings from experimental field, lab, and online studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina eRenner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reflective learning is an important type of learning both in formal and informal situations—in school, higher education, at the workplace, and in everyday life. People may benefit from technical support for reflective learning, in particular when supporting each other by reflecting not only upon their own but also upon other people’s problems. We refer to this collective approach where people come together to think about experiences and find solutions to problems as collaborative reflection. We present three empirical studies about the effects of prompting in reflective learning tools in such situations where people reflect on others’ issues. In Study 1 we applied a three-stage within-group design in a field experiment, where 39 participants from two organizations received different types of prompts while they used a reflection app. We found that prompts that invited employees to write down possible solutions led to more comprehensive comments on their colleagues’ experiences. In Study 2 we used a three-stage between-group design in a laboratory experiment, where 78 university students were invited to take part in an experiment about the discussion of problems at work or academic studies in online forums. Here we found that short, abstract prompts showed no superiority to a situation without any prompts with respect to quantity or quality of contributions. Finally, Study 3 featured a two-stage between-group design in an online experiment, where 60 participants received either general reflection instructions or detailed instructions about how to reflect on other people’s problems. We could show that detailed reflection instructions supported people in producing more comprehensive comments that included more general advice. The results demonstrate that to increase activity and to improve quality of comments with prompting tools require detailed instructions and specific wording of the prompts.

  1. Effects of Prompting in Reflective Learning Tools: Findings from Experimental Field, Lab, and Online Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Bettina; Prilla, Michael; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Reflective learning is an important type of learning both in formal and informal situations-in school, higher education, at the workplace, and in everyday life. People may benefit from technical support for reflective learning, in particular when supporting each other by reflecting not only upon their own but also upon other people's problems. We refer to this collective approach where people come together to think about experiences and find solutions to problems as "collaborative reflection." We present three empirical studies about the effects of prompting in reflective learning tools in such situations where people reflect on others' issues. In Study 1 we applied a three-stage within-group design in a field experiment, where 39 participants from two organizations received different types of prompts while they used a reflection app. We found that prompts that invited employees to write down possible solutions led to more comprehensive comments on their colleagues' experiences. In Study 2 we used a three-stage between-group design in a laboratory experiment, where 78 university students were invited to take part in an experiment about the discussion of problems at work or academic studies in online forums. Here we found that short, abstract prompts showed no superiority to a situation without any prompts with respect to quantity or quality of contributions. Finally, Study 3 featured a two-stage between-group design in an online experiment, where 60 participants received either general reflection instructions or detailed instructions about how to reflect on other people's problems. We could show that detailed reflection instructions supported people in producing more comprehensive comments that included more general advice. The results demonstrate that to increase activity and to improve quality of comments with prompting tools require detailed instructions and specific wording of the prompts.

  2. Field-scale sensitivity of vegetation discrimination to hyperspectral reflectance and coupled statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manevski, Kiril; Jabloun, Mohamed; Gupta, Manika

    2016-01-01

    a more powerful input to a nonparametric analysis for discrimination at the field scale, when compared with unaltered reflectance and parametric analysis. However, the discrimination outputs interact and are very sensitive to the number of observations - an important implication for the design......Remote sensing of land covers utilizes an increasing number of methods for spectral reflectance processing and its accompanying statistics to discriminate between the covers’ spectral signatures at various scales. To this end, the present chapter deals with the field-scale sensitivity...... of the vegetation spectral discrimination to the most common types of reflectance (unaltered and continuum-removed) and statistical tests (parametric and nonparametric analysis of variance). It is divided into two distinct parts. The first part summarizes the current knowledge in relation to vegetation...

  3. Reflective practice and vocational training: theoretical approaches in the field of Health and Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Netto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Theoretical reflection that uses Reflexivity as a theoretical reference and its objective is to approach Donald Schön's reflective thinking, interrelating it with the innovative curriculum. Method: The writings of Schön and other authors who addressed the themes in their works were used. Results: The innovative curriculum as an expression of dissatisfaction with the fragmentation paradigm may favor reflective practice, since it is necessary to mobilize reflexivity for actions and contexts that are unpredictable in the field of health promotion. Conclusions: The innovative curriculum favors and is favored by a reflective practice and the development of competencies for the promotion of health. Implications for practice: The findings apply to the practice of nurses to deal with the conditioning and determinants of the health-disease process.

  4. Exchange and crystal field effects in the ESR spectra of Eu2+ in LaB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, J. G. S.; Urbano, R. R.; Venegas, P. A.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Rettori, C.; Fisk, Z.; Oseroff, S. B.

    2007-09-01

    Electron spin resonance of Eu2+ ( 4f7 , S=7/2 ) in a La hexaboride (LaB6) single crystal shows a single anisotropic Dysonian resonance. From the observed negative g shift of the resonance, it is inferred that the Eu2+ ions are covalent exchange coupled to the B2p -like host conduction electrons. From the anisotropy of the spectra (linewidth and field for resonance), we found that the S ground state of Eu2+ ions experience a cubic crystal field of a negative fourth order crystal field parameter (CFP), b4=-11.5(2.0)Oe , in agreement with the negative fourth order CFP, A4 , found for the non- S ground state R hexaborides. These results support covalency as the dominant contribution to the fourth order CFP for the whole R hexaboride family.

  5. The Sociology of Youth: A Reflection on Its Contribution to the Field and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyn, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    This article expands on a piece in the inaugural "Sociology of Youth Newsletter," edited by Steven Threadgold (Wyn 2010). The present article provides an opportunity to engage in a more critical exploration of the issues that youth sociology in Australia contributes to the wider field of sociology and to reflect on challenges that it…

  6. Reflecting on the Challenges of Informal Contexts: Early Field Experiences with Technology in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Nick; Obery, Amanda; Cornish, Jamie; Grimberg, Bruna Irene; Hartshorn, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Early field experiences, or those that come early in a teacher's preparation before more formalized opportunities like practicum and student teaching, can provide a venue for pre service teachers to practice technology-specific instructional decision-making and reflective practice. Although research exists on the potential roles of field…

  7. Dielectric and fluorescent samples imaged by scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Dielectric fluorescent samples are imaged by scanning near- field optical microscopy in reflection. A non-metallized tapered fibre tip is used both as an emitter and a detector. Shear force feedback controls the distance between the tip and the sample and gives simultaneously a topographic image of

  8. Rethinking Research Supervision: Some Reflections from the Field of Employment Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Cecilie; Durán-Palma, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This essay offers some reflections for the theory and practice of research supervision drawn from the field of employment relations. It argues that rethinking supervision in terms of the employment relationship can advance dialogue and debate about supervision. This is twofold. (1) Reframing supervision in terms of the employment relationship can…

  9. Transient field behavior in an electromagnetic pulse from neutral-beam reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    A neutral beam of electrons and positrons catches up to an electromagnetic pulse moving in a medium with refractive index n. The neutral beam is reflected and deposits some of its energy in a current region in the tail of the pulse. The location, size, and shape of the transient-induced electric fields in the current region are modeled using current densities from uniform averaged fields. The electric field in the current region is predicted to rise linearly with time, with a doubling time determined by the beam parameters and the initial local electromagnetic field. A coordinate frame comoving with the pulse is used to determine the extent of and conditions within the current region. In this comoving frame the Lorentz-transformed electric field is zero, but there is an enhanced Lorentz-transformed magnetic field. The extent of the current region is found from the radius of the semicircular charged-particle orbits in the comoving frame

  10. Library of high-resolution UES echelle spectra of F, G, K and M field dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, D.; Martin, E. L.

    1998-03-01

    We present a library of Utrecht echelle spectrograph (UES) observations of a sample of F, G, K and M field dwarf stars covering the spectral range from 4800 \\ Angstroms to 10600 \\ Angstroms with a resolution of 55000. These spectra include some of the spectral lines most widely used as optical and near-infrared indicators of chromospheric activity such as Hβ , Mg i b triplet, Na i D1, D2, He i D3, Hα , and Ca ii IRT lines, as well as a large number of photospheric lines which can also be affected by chromospheric activity. The spectra have been compiled with the aim of providing a set of standards observed at high-resolution to be used in the application of the spectral subtraction technique to obtain the active-chromosphere contribution to these lines in chromospherically active single and binary stars. This library can also be used for spectral classification purposes. A digital version with all the spectra is available via ftp and the World Wide Web (WWW) in both ASCII and FITS formats. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrof\\'{\\i

  11. On the determination of the spin of the black hole in Cyg X-1 from X-ray reflection spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, A. C.; Wilkins, D. R.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Cackett, E. M.; Nowak, M. A.; Pooley, G. G.; Pottschmidt, K.; Sanders, J. S.; Ross, R. R.; Wilms, J.

    2012-07-01

    The spin of Cygnus X-1 is measured by fitting reflection models to Suzaku data covering the energy band 0.9-400 keV. The inner radius of the accretion disc is found to lie within 2 gravitational radii (rg=GM/c2), and a value of ? is obtained for the dimensionless black hole spin. This agrees with recent measurements using the continuum fitting method by Gou et al. and of the broad iron line by Duro et al. The disc inclination is measured at ?, which is consistent with the recent optical measurement of the binary system inclination by Orosz et al. of 27°± 0?8. We pay special attention to the emissivity profile caused by irradiation of the inner disc by the hard power-law source. The X-ray observations and simulations show that the index q of that profile deviates from the commonly used, Newtonian, value of 3 within 3rg, steepening considerably within 2rg, as expected in the strong gravity regime.

  12. On the Determination of the Spin of the Black Hole in Cyg X-1 from X-Ray Reflection Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, A. C.; Wilkins, D.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Cackett, E. M.; Nowak, M. A.; Pooley, G.; Pottschmidt, K.; Sanders, J. S.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The spin of Cygnus X-I is measured by fitting reflection models to Suzaku data covering the energy band 0.9-400 keY. The inner radius of the accretion disc is found to lie within 2 gravitational radii (rg = GM/c(exp 2)) and a value for the dimensionless black hole spin is obtained of 0.97(sup .0.14) (sup -0.02). This agrees with recent measurements using the continuum fitting method by Gou et al. and of the broad iron line by Duro et al. The disc inclination is measured at 23.7(sup +6.7) (sup -5.4) deg. which is consistent with the recent optical measurement of the binary system inclination by Orosz et al of 27+/- 0.8 deg. We pay special attention to the emissivity profile caused by irradiation of the inner disc by the hard power-law source. 1be X-ray observations and simulations show that the index q of that profile deviates from the commonly used, Newtonian, value of 3 within 3r(sub g), steepening considerably within 2r(sub g). as expected in the strong gravity regime.

  13. On the frequency and field linewidth conversion of ferromagnetic resonance spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Yajun; Svedlindh, Peter; Liang Chin, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Both frequency swept and field swept ferromagnetic resonance measurements have been carried out for a number of different samples with negligible, moderate and significant extrinsic frequency independent linewidth contribution to analyze the correlation between the experimentally measured frequency and field linewidths. Contrary to the belief commonly held by many researchers, it is found that the frequency and field linewidth conversion relation does not hold for all cases. Instead it holds only for samples with negligible frequency independent linewidth contributions. For samples with non-negligible frequency independent linewidth contribution, the field linewidth values converted from the measured frequency linewidth are larger than the experimentally measured field linewidth. A close examination of the literature reveals that previously reported results support our findings, with successful conversions related to samples with negligible frequency independent linewidth contributions and unsuccessful conversions related to samples with significant frequency independent linewidth. The findings are important in providing guidance in ferromagnetic resonance linewidth conversions. (paper)

  14. Bent and bent(4) spectra of Boolean functions over finite fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anbar Meidl, Nurdagül; Meidl, Wilfried

    2017-01-01

    to the conventional Walsh transform, and hence a 0-bent4 function is bent. In this article we generalize the concept of partially bent functions to the transforms V-f(c). We show that every quadratic function is partially bent, and hence it is plateaued with respect to any of the transforms V-f(c). In detail we...... analyse two quadratic monomials. The first has values as small as possible in its spectra with respect to all transforms V-f(c), and the second has a flat spectrum for a large number of c. Moreover, we show that every quadratic function is c-bent4 for at least three distinct c. In the last part we analyse...... a cubic monomial. We show that it is c-bent(4) only for c = 1, the function is then called negabent, which shows that non-quadratic functions exhibit a different behaviour. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  15. Polarization contrast in reflection near-field optical microscopy with uncoated fibre tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using cross-hatched, patterned semiconductor surfaces and round 20-nm-thick gold pads on semiconductor wafers, we investigate the imaging characteristics of a reflection near-field optical microscope with an uncoated fibre tip for different polarization configurations and light wavelengths....... Is is shown that cross-polarized detection allows one to effectively suppress far-field components in the detected signal and to realise imaging of optical contrast on the sub-wavelength scale. The sensitivity window of our microscope, i.e. the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical...

  16. Magnetic fields and star formation: evidence from imaging polarimetry of the Serpens Reflection Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren-Smith, R.F.; Draper, P.W.; Scarrott, S.M.

    1987-08-01

    CCD imaging of the Serpens bipolar reflection nebula shows it to be surrounded by dark material having spiral density structure. Multi-colour polarization mapping also reveals details of the surrounding magnetic field, indicating that this also has spiral structure. These observations are discussed along with current ideas about the role of magnetic fields during star formation. An interpretation involving the non-axisymmetric magnetically braked collapse of a protostellar cloud is proposed and a resulting magnetic field configuration is described which can account for the observations. Evidence is also discussed for the formation of a binary star system within the nebula, resulting from the fragmentation of a magnetized protostellar disc.

  17. The use of IR, magnetism, reflectance, and mass spectra together with thermal analyses in structure investigation of codeine phosphate complexes of d-block elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, M. A.; El-shahat, M. F.; Abdullah, S. M.

    2005-06-01

    Codeine is an analgesic with uses similar to morphines, but it is of much less effect, i.e., it had a mild sedative effect; codeine is usually used as the phosphate form (Cod.P) and is often administrated by mouth with aspirin of paracetamol. Due to its serious use, if it is in large dose, attention is paid in this research to the synthesis and stereochemistry of new iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc complexes of this drug in both solution and the solid states. The spectra of these complexes in solution and the study of their stoichiometry refer to the formation of 1:1 ratio of metal (M) to ligand (L). The steriochemical structures of the solid complexes were studied on the basis of their analytical, spectroscopic, magnetic, and thermal data. Infrared spectra proved the presence of M sbnd O bonds. Magnetic susceptibility and solid reflectance spectral measurements were used to infer the structures. The prepared complexes were found to have the general formulae [ML(OH) x(H 2O) y](H 2O) zH 3PO 4, M: Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II), x = 1, y = 0, z = 0; M: Fe(II), x = 1, y = 2, z = 1; Fe(III), x = 2, y = 1, z = 0; Co(III), x = 0, y = 2, z = 1; Zn(II), x = 1, y = 0, z = 3; and L: (Cod.P) of the general formula C 18H 24NO 7P (anhydrate). Octahedral, tetrahedral, and square planer structures were proposed for these complexes depending upon the magnetic and reflectance data and were confirmed by detailed mass and thermal analyses comparative studies.

  18. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  19. Study of Spectral Reflectance Time Series and Vegetative Indices of Sugar Beet Fields Using MODIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bazrafshan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing technology is widely used in environmental and agricultural research, and nowadays it has become a valuable and reliable source of information for the management of crop production and assessment of global supply and demands for these products. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using MODIS data and vegetation indices based on sugar beet growth monitoring. For this purpose, MODIS 8-day red and near infrared surface reflectance data at 250 m spatial resolution (MOD09Q1 collection 5 was used. Imagery data was acquired from mid-May to the end of December 2011 from the sugar beet fields located in Eqlid, Fars province, Iran. Results showed that although red and near infrared reflectance differences were relatively small at the beginning of sugar beet growing season, these differences were enhanced with canopy development and ground cover. The most red absorption and near infrared reflectance were in the maximum ground cover, and the most dramatic declines in the near infrared reflectance and relative increase in red reflectance were observed at harvest time. It was found that the RVI is able to show the status of red absorption and reflection during the growth of sugar beet canopy. The SR and NDVI change patterns demonstrated how to grow sugar beet over the growing season. Thus in the existing climate and crop management conditions in Fars province and Iran, MODIS data and vegetation indices can be used to monitor changes in canopy growth of such crops as sugar beet.

  20. Reflections about the capitalism influences in the field of Library Science and Information science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Deliberali Maimone

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduces the relation among the different stages of the teaching of Library Science and Information Science in Brazil and the capitalism. To demonstrate these relations, the capitalist way of production and its respective stages are shown, contextualizing its influence over the area and study of the information professional. The relations between Capitalism and Library Science teach allows us to develop reflections regarding the models and contents of the courses offered in this field. Such an understanding of the articulation way of the curricular parameters reflects the conceptions and values in a temporal period. At last, terminological questions are made to exemplify the comparisons mentioned.

  1. Relaxation of strongly coupled electron and phonon fields after photoemission and high-energy part of ARPES spectra of cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasnikova, A. E.; Zhileeva, E. A.; Moseykin, D. V.

    2018-03-01

    An approach to considering systems with a high concentration of correlated carriers and strong long-range electron–phonon interaction and to calculating the high-energy part of the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) spectra of such systems is suggested. Joint relaxation of strongly coupled fields—a field of correlated electrons and phonon field—after photoemission is studied to clarify the nature of characteristic features observed in the high-energy part of the ARPES spectra of cuprate superconductors. Such relaxation occurs in systems with strong predominantly long-range electron–phonon interaction at sufficiently high carrier concentration due to the coexistence of autolocalized and delocalized carriers. A simple method to calculate analytically a high-energy part of the ARPES spectrum arising is proposed. It takes advantage of using the coherent states basis for the phonon field in the polaron and bipolaron states. The approach suggested yields all the high-energy spectral features like broad Gaussian band and regions of ‘vertical dispersion’ being in good quantitative agreement with the experiments on cuprates at any doping with both types of carriers. Demonstrated coexistence of autolocalized and delocalized carriers in superconducting cuprates changes the idea about their ground state above the superconducting transition temperature that is important for understanding transport and magnetic properties. High density of large-radius autolocalized carriers revealed may be a key to the explanation of charge ordering in doped cuprates.

  2. Study of turbulent spectra of the geomagnetic field using the data of the THEMIS satellite mission and ground magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, V. A.; Stepanova, M. V.; Valdivia, J. A.; Antonova, E. E.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulent fluctuations of the geomagnetic field have been studied using the data of the THEMIS satellite mission and and ground magnetometer data from auroral and sub-auroral station including of the SAMBA magnetometer chain, located in Chile and in the Antarctic peninsula. It was found that turbulent spectra obtained at the same geomagnetic field line on the ground level in both hemispheres and near the equatorial plane are generally similar. Using the Local Intermittency Measure technique it was also established that the observed turbulence has an intermittent behavior. The MLT and longitudinal dependence were found to be stronger near midnight inside the auroral zone, which corresponds to the satellite location at 12-18 Earth radii to the tail.

  3. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: extending the predictions to different years and different sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggente, Matteo; Dillner, Ann M.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) are major components of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), which has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality, climate change, and reduced visibility. Typically OC and EC concentrations are measured using thermal-optical methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) from samples collected on quartz filters. In this work, we estimate TOR OC and EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE Teflon) filters using partial least square regression (PLSR) calibrated to TOR OC and EC measurements for a wide range of samples. The proposed method can be integrated with analysis of routinely collected PTFE filter samples that, in addition to OC and EC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the functional group composition of the organic aerosol. We have used the FT-IR absorbance spectra and TOR OC and EC concentrations collected in the Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network (USA). We used 526 samples collected in 2011 at seven sites to calibrate the models, and more than 2000 samples collected in 2013 at 17 sites to test the models. Samples from six sites are present both in the calibration and test sets. The calibrations produce accurate predictions both for samples collected at the same six sites present in the calibration set (R2 = 0.97 and R2 = 0.95 for OC and EC respectively), and for samples from 9 of the 11 sites not included in the calibration set (R2 = 0.96 and R2 = 0.91 for OC and EC respectively). Samples collected at the other two sites require a different calibration model to achieve accurate predictions. We also propose a method to anticipate the prediction error; we calculate the squared Mahalanobis distance in the feature space (scores determined by PLSR) between new spectra and spectra in the calibration set. The squared Mahalanobis distance provides a crude method for assessing the

  4. Numerical solutions of several reflected shock-wave flow fields with nonequilibrium chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R. K.; Presley, L. L.; Williams, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    The method of characteristics for a chemically reacting gas is used in the construction of the time-dependent, one-dimensional flow field resulting from the normal reflection of an incident shock wave at the end wall of a shock tube. Nonequilibrium chemical reactions are allowed behind both the incident and reflected shock waves. All the solutions are evaluated for oxygen, but the results are generally representative of any inviscid, nonconducting, and nonradiating diatomic gas. The solutions clearly show that: (1) both the incident- and reflected-shock chemical relaxation times are important in governing the time to attain steady state thermodynamic properties; and (2) adjacent to the end wall, an excess-entropy layer develops wherein the steady state values of all the thermodynamic variables except pressure differ significantly from their corresponding Rankine-Hugoniot equilibrium values.

  5. Analysis of Electric Field Propagation in Anisotropically Absorbing and Reflecting Waveplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnio, B. N.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2018-04-01

    Analytical expressions are derived for half-wave plates (HWPs) and quarter-wave plates (QWPs) based on uniaxial crystals. This general analysis describes the behavior of anisotropically absorbing and reflecting waveplates across the electromagnetic spectrum, which allows for correction to the commonly used equations determined assuming isotropic absorptions and reflections. This analysis is crucial to the design and implementation of HWPs and QWPs in the terahertz regime, where uniaxial crystals used for waveplates are highly birefringent and anisotropically absorbing. The derived HWP equations describe the rotation of linearly polarized light by an arbitrary angle, whereas the QWP analysis focuses on manipulating a linearly polarized electric field to obtain any ellipticity. The HWP and QWP losses are characterized by determining equations for the total electric field magnitude transmitted through these phase-retarding elements.

  6. Influence of Non-uniform Temperature Field on Spectra of Fibre Bragg Grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Zhou; Xing-Fang, He; Xiao-Yong, Fang; Jie, Yuan; Li-Qun, Yin; Mao-Sheng, Cao

    2009-01-01

    We simulate the spectrum characteristics of fibre Bragg grating (FBG) with non-uniform temperature using the transmission matrix method, and the results are analysed. It is found that firstly the modulated coefficient of average refractive index is a very important parameter that influences the spectrum characteristic of the fibre Bragg grating, and secondly the spectrum curves are different in different temperature fields at the same parameter. Hence, we can determine the metrical temperature by analysing the spectrum of fibre Bragg grating

  7. Near-field/far-field array manifold of an acoustic vector-sensor near a reflecting boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue Ivan; Lau, Siu-Kit; Wong, Kainam Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The acoustic vector-sensor (a.k.a. the vector hydrophone) is a practical and versatile sound-measurement device, with applications in-room, open-air, or underwater. It consists of three identical uni-axial velocity-sensors in orthogonal orientations, plus a pressure-sensor-all in spatial collocation. Its far-field array manifold [Nehorai and Paldi (1994). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 42, 2481-2491; Hawkes and Nehorai (2000). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 48, 2981-2993] has been introduced into the technical field of signal processing about 2 decades ago, and many direction-finding algorithms have since been developed for this acoustic vector-sensor. The above array manifold is subsequently generalized for outside the far field in Wu, Wong, and Lau [(2010). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 58, 3946-3951], but only if no reflection-boundary is to lie near the acoustic vector-sensor. As for the near-boundary array manifold for the general case of an emitter in the geometric near field, the far field, or anywhere in between-this paper derives and presents that array manifold in terms of signal-processing mathematics. Also derived here is the corresponding Cramér-Rao bound for azimuth-elevation-distance localization of an incident emitter, with the reflected wave shown to play a critical role on account of its constructive or destructive summation with the line-of-sight wave. The implications on source localization are explored, especially with respect to measurement model mismatch in maximum-likelihood direction finding and with regard to the spatial resolution between coexisting emitters.

  8. Vibrational spectra of trimethyl gallium species in relation to the force field and methyl group internal rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, D. C.; McQuillan, G. P.; Duncan, J. L.; Shephard, N.; Munro, B.; Fawcett, V.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    Infrared and Raman spectra are reported for Ga(CH 3) 3, Ga(CD 3) 3 and Ga(CHD 2) 3 in the gas phase. These were also examined in the i.r. spectrum in the solid phase at 78 K. The new Raman spectra of the CHD 2 species strongly support earlier i.r. evidence for CH force constant variation during free internal rotation of the methyl groups, from the presence of two bands at 2940 (vs) and 2922 cm -1 (w) identified as due to ν avis and ν †is respectively. The observed a' and e' frequencies of the d0 and d9 species are used to obtain a force field in which three interaction constants are well defined. The best value of the Ga-C stretching force constant is 2.356(28) mdyn Å -1. In the crystal phase at 78 K, the e' modes due to δ s Me and ν as GaC 3 are split, indicating a site group symmetry lower than C3. Gallium and carbon isotope frequency shifts are predicted.

  9. ‘Postage-stamp PIV’: small velocity fields at 400 kHz for turbulence spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell W.; Spitzer, Seth M.

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry recently has been demonstrated in high-speed flows using a pulse-burst laser at repetition rates reaching 50 kHz. Turbulent behavior can be measured at still higher frequencies if the field of view is greatly reduced and lower laser pulse energy is accepted. Current technology allows image acquisition at 400 kHz for sequences exceeding 4000 frames but for an array of only 128  ×  120 pixels, giving the moniker of ‘postage-stamp PIV’. The technique has been tested far downstream of a supersonic jet exhausting into a transonic crossflow. Two-component measurements appear valid until 120 kHz, at which point a noise floor emerges whose magnitude is dependent on the reduction of peak locking. Stereoscopic measurement offers three-component data for turbulent kinetic energy spectra, but exhibits a reduced signal bandwidth and higher noise in the out-of-plane component due to the oblique camera images. The resulting spectra reveal two regions exhibiting power-law dependence describing the turbulent decay. The frequency response of the present measurement configuration exceeds nearly all previous velocimetry measurements in high speed flow.

  10. Multichannel wide-field microscopic FRET imaging based on simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, M; Mai, Z; Yang, F; Lin, F; Wei, L; Chen, T

    2018-01-01

    Simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra (ExEm unmixing) has inherent ability resolving spectral crosstalks, two key issues of quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurement, of both the excitation and emission spectra between donor and acceptor without additional corrections. We here set up a filter-based multichannel wide-field microscope for ExEm unmixing-based FRET imaging (m-ExEm-spFRET) containing a constant system correction factor (f sc ) for a stable system. We performed m-ExEm-spFRET with four- and two-wavelength excitation respectively on our system to quantitatively image single living cells expressing FRET tandem constructs, and obtained accurate FRET efficiency (E) and concentration ratio of acceptor to donor (R C ). We also performed m-ExEm-spFRET imaging for single living cells coexpressing CFP-Bax and YFP-Bax, and found that the E values were about 0 for control cells and about 28% for staurosporin-treated cells when R C were larger than 1, indicating that staurosporin induced significant oligomerisation. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Analysis on spectra of hydroacoustic field in sonar cavity of the sandwich elastic wall structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuetao, W.; Rui, H.; Weike, W.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of the mechanical self - noise in sonar array cavity are studied by using the elastic flatbed - filled rectangular cavity parameterization model. Firstly, the analytic derivation of the vibration differential equation of the single layer, sandwich elastic wall plate structure and internal fluid coupling is carried out, and the modal method is used to solve it. Finally, the spectral characteristics of the acoustic field of rectangular cavity of different elastic wallboard materials are simulated and analyzed, which provides a theoretical reference for the prediction and control of sonar mechanical self-noise. In this paper, the sandwich board as control inside the dome background noise of a potential means were discussed, the dome background noise of qualitative prediction analysis and control has important theoretical significance.

  12. Lightning electromagnetic radiation field spectra in the interval from 0.2 to 20 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, J. C.; Bailey, J. C.; Leteinturier, C.; Krider, E. P.

    1990-11-01

    New Fourier transforms of wideband time-domain electric fields (E) produced by lightning (recorded at the Kennedy Space Center during the summers of 1985 and 1987) were recorded in such a way that several different events in each lightning flash could be captured. Average HF spectral amplitudes for first return strokes, stepped-leader steps, and 'characteristic pulses' are given for significantly more events, at closer ranges, and with better spectral resolution than in previous literature reports. The method of recording gives less bias toward the first large event in the flash and thus yields a large sample of a wide variety of lightning processes. As a result, reliable composite spectral amplitudes are obtained for a number of different processes in cloud-to-ground lightning over the frequency interval from 0.2 to 20 MHz.

  13. Lightning electromagnetic radiation field spectra in the interval from 0.2 to 20 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, J. C.; Bailey, J. C.; Leteinturier, C.; Krider, E. P.

    1990-01-01

    New Fourier transforms of wideband time-domain electric fields (E) produced by lightning (recorded at the Kennedy Space Center during the summers of 1985 and 1987) were recorded in such a way that several different events in each lightning flash could be captured. Average HF spectral amplitudes for first return strokes, stepped-leader steps, and 'characteristic pulses' are given for significantly more events, at closer ranges, and with better spectral resolution than in previous literature reports. The method of recording gives less bias toward the first large event in the flash and thus yields a large sample of a wide variety of lightning processes. As a result, reliable composite spectral amplitudes are obtained for a number of different processes in cloud-to-ground lightning over the frequency interval from 0.2 to 20 MHz.

  14. Reflective thinking in solving an algebra problem: a case study of field independent-prospective teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustan, S.; Juniati, Dwi; Yuli Eko Siswono, Tatag

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, reflective thinking is one of the important things which become a concern in learning mathematics, especially in solving a mathematical problem. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the student used reflective thinking when solved an algebra problem. The subject of this research is one female student who has field independent cognitive style. This research is a descriptive exploratory study with data analysis using qualitative approach to describe in depth reflective thinking of prospective teacher in solving an algebra problem. Four main categories are used to analyse the reflective thinking in solving an algebra problem: (1) formulation and synthesis of experience, (2) orderliness of experience, (3) evaluating the experience and (4) testing the selected solution based on the experience. The results showed that the subject described the problem by using another word and the subject also found the difficulties in making mathematical modelling. The subject analysed two concepts used in solving problem. For instance, geometry related to point and line while algebra is related to algebra arithmetic operation. The subject stated that solution must have four aspect to get effective solution, specifically the ability to (a) understand the meaning of every words; (b) make mathematical modelling; (c) calculate mathematically; (d) interpret solution obtained logically. To test the internal consistency or error in solution, the subject checked and looked back related procedures and operations used. Moreover, the subject tried to resolve the problem in a different way to compare the answers which had been obtained before. The findings supported the assertion that reflective thinking provides an opportunity for the students in improving their weakness in mathematical problem solving. It can make a grow accuracy and concentration in solving a mathematical problem. Consequently, the students will get the right and logic answer by reflective thinking.

  15. Optical spectra and crystal field of Am{sup 3+} and Cm{sup 3+} in the cubic elpasolite crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbanel`, Yu.A.; Chudnovskaya, G.P.; Dushin, R.B.; Kolin, V.V.; Kotlin, V.P.; Nekhoroshkov, S.N.; Pen`kin, M.V. [Khlopin (V.G.) Radium Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Absorption and luminescence spectra of the elpasolite (Fm3m) crystals Cs{sub 2}NaLnCl{sub 6}:An{sup 3+} (where Ln = Yb, Lu; An = Am, Cm) have been studied at room, liquid nitrogen and helium (4.2 or 12 K) temperatures. Some electronic sublevels have been localized based on the vibronic structure analysis and assigned as a result of the crystal-field (CF) calculations. Low-temperature phase transitions have been revealed in the Cs{sub 2}NaYbCl{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}NaLuCl{sub 6} crystals within the 77-4.2 K range. The CF parameters have been estimated for the CmCl{sub 6}{sup 3-} complex and calculated (using both the relativistic and nonrelativistic versions of the CF theory) for the AmCl{sub 6}{sup 3-} complex. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of vibration spectra and of valence force fields of the dimethyl sulfoxide and of its addition compounds with boron trifluoride and bivalent palladium halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranquille, Michel

    1975-01-01

    In its first part, this research thesis addresses vibration spectra and valence force fields of the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) molecule: report of published results obtained by various techniques (microwave, X ray, NMR, slow neutron or vibration spectroscopy), discussion and analysis of vibration spectra, determination of thermodynamic values, determination of normal vibration modes. The second part addresses the study of vibration spectra of coordination compounds of DMSO: influence of water on DMSO vibration spectra, DMSO coordination compounds with boron trifluoride or with palladium halides. The third part addresses the study of valence force fields and of normal modes of vibration of DMSO coordination compounds (same compounds as above), and the fourth part reports the comparison of some DMSO properties in function of the complexing site

  17. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-05

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  18. Estimation of diffusion coefficients in bitumen solvent mixtures as derived from low field NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Y.; Bryan, J.; Kantzas, A.

    2005-01-01

    Use of solvents for the extraction of heavy oil and bitumen appears to be an increasingly feasible technology. Both vapour extraction and direct solvent injection are considered for conventional exploration and production schemes, while solvent dilution of bitumen is a standard technique in oil sands mining. Mass transfer between solvent and bitumen is a poorly understood process. In some cases, it is totally ignored compared to viscous force effects. In other cases, phenomenological estimations of diffusion and dispersion coefficients are used. Low field NMR has been used successfully in determining both solvent content and viscosity reduction in heavy oil and bitumen mixtures with various solvents. As a solvent comes into contact with a heavy oil or bitumen sample, the mobility of hydrogen bearing molecules of both solvent and oil changes. These changes are detectable through changes in the NMR relaxation characteristics of both solvent and oil. Relaxation changes can then be correlated to mass flux and concentration changes. Based on Fick's Second Law, a diffusion coefficient, which is independent of concentration, was calculated against three oils and six solvents. (author)

  19. Real-time calculation and visualization of spectra in field-cycled dynamic nuclear polarization spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuanmu; Shet, Keerthi; Li, Haihong; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Zweier, Jay L

    2006-04-01

    Field-cycled dynamic nuclear polarization (FC-DNP), which is based on the Overhauser effect, provides a new way to perform in vivo measurements of free radicals in biological systems. Since it measures the alterations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal in the presence of paramagnetic molecules, a customized program is usually needed in FC-DNP experiments to extract spectral information from the acquired NMR signals. While this program can be designed to calculate the spectrum after all the NMR signals are collected, the batch-processing mode inevitably causes delay and is not convenient for in vivo applications. In this paper, we report the development of a real-time DNP spectrum calculation and visualization program, called RT_DNP, for FC-DNP experiments. A dynamic data exchange (DDE) client was implemented to enable real-time receipt of the system information and the NMR signals from a commercial NMR console. The received NMR signals and experimental parameters were then used to calculate the DNP spectrum during the data acquisition. The real-time DNP spectrum calculation and visualization program was tested in experiments. A seamless integration of the program into a commercial NMR console has been achieved.

  20. Characterizing LEDAPS surface reflectance products by comparisons with AERONET, field spectrometer, and MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiersperger, Tom; Scaramuzza, Pat; Leigh, Larry; Shrestha, S.; Gallo, Kevin; Jenkerson, Calli B.; Dwyer, John L.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides a baseline quality check on provisional Landsat Surface Reflectance (SR) products as generated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center using Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS) software. Characterization of the Landsat SR products leveraged comparisons between aerosol optical thickness derived from LEDAPS and measured by Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), as well as reflectance correlations with field spectrometer and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Results consistently indicated similarity between LEDAPS and alternative data products in longer wavelengths over vegetated areas with no adjacent water, while less reliable performance was observed in shorter wavelengths and sparsely vegetated areas. This study demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of the atmospheric correction methodology used in LEDAPS, confirming its successful implementation to generate Landsat SR products.

  1. Application of the Polynomial-Based Least Squares and Total Least Squares Models for the Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra of Binary Mixtures of Hydroxyl Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Peng; Peng, Silong; Zhao, Yuhui; Tang, Liang

    2016-03-01

    An analysis of binary mixtures of hydroxyl compound by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) and classical least squares (CLS) yield large model error due to the presence of unmodeled components such as H-bonded components. To accommodate these spectral variations, polynomial-based least squares (LSP) and polynomial-based total least squares (TLSP) are proposed to capture the nonlinear absorbance-concentration relationship. LSP is based on assuming that only absorbance noise exists; while TLSP takes both absorbance noise and concentration noise into consideration. In addition, based on different solving strategy, two optimization algorithms (limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (LBFGS) algorithm and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm) are combined with TLSP and then two different TLSP versions (termed as TLSP-LBFGS and TLSP-LM) are formed. The optimum order of each nonlinear model is determined by cross-validation. Comparison and analyses of the four models are made from two aspects: absorbance prediction and concentration prediction. The results for water-ethanol solution and ethanol-ethyl lactate solution show that LSP, TLSP-LBFGS, and TLSP-LM can, for both absorbance prediction and concentration prediction, obtain smaller root mean square error of prediction than CLS. Additionally, they can also greatly enhance the accuracy of estimated pure component spectra. However, from the view of concentration prediction, the Wilcoxon signed rank test shows that there is no statistically significant difference between each nonlinear model and CLS. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Selecting the optimum number of partial least squares components for the calibration of attenuated total reflectance-mid-infrared spectra of undesigned kerosene samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Carracedo, M P; Andrade, J M; Rutledge, D N; Faber, N M

    2007-03-07

    Selecting the correct dimensionality is critical for obtaining partial least squares (PLS) regression models with good predictive ability. Although calibration and validation sets are best established using experimental designs, industrial laboratories cannot afford such an approach. Typically, samples are collected in an (formally) undesigned way, spread over time and their measurements are included in routine measurement processes. This makes it hard to evaluate PLS model dimensionality. In this paper, classical criteria (leave-one-out cross-validation and adjusted Wold's criterion) are compared to recently proposed alternatives (smoothed PLS-PoLiSh and a randomization test) to seek out the optimum dimensionality of PLS models. Kerosene (jet fuel) samples were measured by attenuated total reflectance-mid-IR spectrometry and their spectra where used to predict eight important properties determined using reference methods that are time-consuming and prone to analytical errors. The alternative methods were shown to give reliable dimensionality predictions when compared to external validation. By contrast, the simpler methods seemed to be largely affected by the largest changes in the modeling capabilities of the first components.

  3. The effect of radiation-thermal treatment on the physicochemical properties of the Ni-Mo/Al2O3 hydrotreatment catalyst. II. UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra of surface compounds after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovetskii, Yu.I.; Miroshinichenko, I.I.; Lunin, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-thermal damage of the surface and the active metal phases of hydrodesulfurization Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalysts by a fast electron beam of up to 2.0 MeV energy was studied. UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra of the industrial and model coked systems after radiation-thermal treatment were measured. 14 refs., 2 figs

  4. Reflected ray retrieval from radio occultation data using radio holographic filtering of wave fields in ray space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, Michael E.; Cardellach, Estel; Lauritsen, Kent B.

    2018-03-01

    Linear and non-linear representations of wave fields constitute the basis of modern algorithms for analysis of radio occultation (RO) data. Linear representations are implemented by Fourier Integral Operators, which allow for high-resolution retrieval of bending angles. Non-linear representations include Wigner Distribution Function (WDF), which equals the pseudo-density of energy in the ray space. Representations allow for filtering wave fields by suppressing some areas of the ray space and mapping the field back from the transformed space to the initial one. We apply this technique to the retrieval of reflected rays from RO observations. The use of reflected rays may increase the accuracy of the retrieval of the atmospheric refractivity. Reflected rays can be identified by the visual inspection of WDF or spectrogram plots. Numerous examples from COSMIC data indicate that reflections are mostly observed over oceans or snow, in particular over Antarctica. We introduce the reflection index that characterizes the relative intensity of the reflected ray with respect to the direct ray. The index allows for the automatic identification of events with reflections. We use the radio holographic estimate of the errors of the retrieved bending angle profiles of reflected rays. A comparison of indices evaluated for a large base of events including the visual identification of reflections indicated a good agreement with our definition of reflection index.

  5. Neutron reflection and refraction on matter with a rotating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, A.I.; Kozlov, A.V.

    1997-01-01

    The general approach to the problem of neutron interaction with a sample of matter in the presence of rotating magnetic field as a part of the task dealing with nonstationary quantum effects in neutron optics is discussed. The plane neutron wave scattering by a matter is considered. Basing on the expression for a time-dependent potential for neutrons with the energy E incident to the matter normally to the sample surface the formulae describing the interaction of neutrons with a matter are derived. Consideration is started with the problem of reflection, and it is supposed for simplicity that the sample is semi-infinite one. The expressions for intensities of reflected waves are obtained using the Schroedinger equations for the neutron in vacuum and in a matter respectively. The curves characterizing the dependence of usual (with falling angle parallel to the surface component of the wave vector which as a result does not change) and unusual (appeared after spin-flip process which is reflected at the angle differing from the initial one) reflected wave intensities on the normal-to-boundary velocity are given. It is shown that in the case considered it is possible to achieve waves with remarkable space separation. The intensity of the unusual wave is about 20-25% of the intensity of the initial wave, so observation of the phenomenon should present no difficulty if the usual techniques of neutron reflectometry are applied. The conclusion is made that the separating ability of the magnetic separator based on the effect discussed is more preferable as compared with that of the diffraction grating

  6. The infrared spectra and structure of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and its oxyanion: an ab initio force field treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binev, I. G.; Stamboliyska, B. A.; Binev, Y. I.

    1996-05-01

    The structures of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) (I) and its oxyanion (II) have been studied by means of infrared spectra and ab initio 3-21 G force field calculations. The 3100-1100 cm -1 region bands of both the aspirin molecule and its oxyanion have been assigned. The theoretical infrared data for the free aspirin anion are in good agreement with the experimental data for aspirin alkali-metal salts in dimethyl sulfoxide- d6. The theoretical geometrical parameters for the isolated aspirin molecule are close to the literature X-ray diffraction data for its dimer in the solid state, except for those of the carboxy group, which participates directly in hydrogen bond formation. The changes in both the spectral and geometrical parameters, caused by the conversion of the aspirin molecule into the anion, are essential, but they are localized mainly within the carboxy group and the adjacent C-Ph bond. This is also true for the changes in the corresponding bond indices and electronic charges.

  7. Separation of Intra- and Extramyocellular Lipid Signals in Proton MR Spectra by Determination of Their Magnetic Field Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidle, G.; Machann, J.; Claussen, C. D.; Schick, F.

    2002-02-01

    In skeletal musculature intramyocellular (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) are stored in compartments of different geometry and experience different magnetic field strengths due to geometrical susceptibility effects. The effect is strong enough to-at least partly-separate IMCL and EMCL contributions in 1H MR spectroscopy, despite IMCL and EMCL consisting of the same substances. The assessment of intramyocellular lipid stores in skeletal musculature by 1H MR spectroscopy plays an important role for studying physiological and pathological aspects of lipid metabolism. Therefore, a method using mathematical tools of Fourier analysis is developed to obtain the magnetic field distribution (MFD) from the measured spectra by deconvolution. A reference lipid spectrum is required which was recorded in tibial yellow bone marrow. It is shown that the separation of IMCL contributions can be performed more precisely-compared to other methods-based on the MFD. Examples of deconvolution in model systems elucidate the principle. Applications of the proposed approach on in vivo examinations in m. soleus and m. tibialis anterior are presented. Fitting the IMCL part of the MFD by a Gaussian lineshape with a linewidth kept fixed with respect to the linewidth of creatine and with the assumption of a smooth but not necessarily symmetrical shape for the EMCL part, the only free fit parameter, the amplitude of the IMCL part, is definite and subtraction leads to the EMCL part in the MFD. This procedure is especially justified for the soleus muscle showing a severely asymmetrical distribution which might lead to a marked overestimation of IMCL using common line fitting procedures.

  8. Dynamical characteristics of an electromagnetic field under conditions of total reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr Ya

    2018-04-01

    The dynamical characteristics of electromagnetic fields include energy, momentum, angular momentum (spin) and helicity. We analyze their spatial distributions near the planar interface between two transparent and non-dispersive media, when the incident monochromatic plane wave with arbitrary polarization is totally reflected, and an evanescent wave is formed in the medium with lower optical density. Based on the recent arguments in favor of the Minkowski definition of the electromagnetic momentum in a material medium (Philbin 2011 Phys. Rev. A 83 013823; Philbin and Allanson 2012 86 055802; Bliokh et al 2017 Phys. Rev. Lett. 119 073901), we derive the explicit expressions for the dynamical characteristics in both media, with special attention to their behavior at the interface. In particular, the ‘extraordinary’ spin and momentum components orthogonal to the plane of incidence are described, and a canonical (spin-orbital) momentum decomposition is performed that contains no singular terms. The field energy, helicity, the spin momentum and orbital momentum components are everywhere regular but experience discontinuities at the interface; the spin components parallel to the interface appear to be continuous, which testifies to the consistency of the adopted Minkowski picture. The results supply a meaningful example of the electromagnetic momentum decomposition, with separation of spatial and polarization degrees of freedom, in inhomogeneous media, and can be used in engineering the structured fields designed for optical sorting, dispatching and micromanipulation.

  9. The Sandmeier Field Goniometer: A Measurement Tool for Bi-Directional Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mark; Brown, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Recent activities at the Remote Sensing Program at Stennis Space Center have identified the need to properly verify and validate data provided by the remote sensing community. One important variable, which effects remote sensing data is bi-directional reflectance distribution (BRDF). In order to quantify the effects of BRDF on man-made and natural ground targets, the Stennis Verification & Validation (V&V) team commissioned the Systems Engineering Division at NASA Ames Research Center to develop a Field Goniometer for use at the V&V Large Target Range and for various ground truthing missions. The Swiss Field Goniometer (FIGOS) was used as a benchmark instrument to design the new state of the art Sandmeier Field Goniometer (SGF), named after Stefan Sandmeier, developer of FIGOS. After establishing requirements for the SFG, design efforts began in early May 1998. The design of the SFG was completed in September 1998. Manufacturing, construction, and testing was completed in May 1999. The SFG was shipped to NASA SSC and fully operational by June 1999.

  10. REFLECTIVE LEARNING IN SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION IN THE FIELD OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slabbert, Ilze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available is very much part of social work education. A qualitative study was proposed with final-year social work students at a selected university in South Africa doing a course in the field of substance abuse. The participants completed a reflective exercise on abstaining from an aspect/habit/substance in their own lives for three weeks. Six themes emerged, namely abstinence from: depressants, stimulants, opioids, food, social media and bad habits. Findings indicated that students gained an insight into possible harmful patterns in their own lives as well as into the complexity of life-long abstinence in prospective clients’ lives. Recommendations are provided for social work education, practice and research.

  11. Shape from specular reflection in calibrated environments and the integration of spatial normal fields

    KAUST Repository

    Balzer, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    Reflections of a scene in a mirror surface contain information on its shape. This information is accessible by measurement through an optical metrology technique called deflectometry. The result is a field of normal vectors to the unknown surface having the remarkable property that it equally changes in all spatial directions, unlike normal maps occurring, e.g., in Shape from Shading. Its integration into a zero-order reconstruction of the surface thus deserves special attention. We develop a novel algorithm for this purpose which is relatively straightforward to implement yet outperforms existing ones in terms of efficiency and robustness. Experimental results on synthetic and real data complement the theoretical discussion. © 2011 IEEE.

  12. Some reflections on my career, publishing, and contributing significantly to a field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parasuraman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author provides an overview and a retrospective analysis of his over three-decade-long academic career and the evolution of his research during the course of that career. Within the broad overview and analysis of his career, he singles out and elaborates on his fifteen-year collaborative research on service quality (with colleagues Valarie Zeithaml and Len Berry, in order to illustrate the nature of a programmatic research stream on an important topic and the significant impact that such a research stream can have on a discipline’s knowledge base and practice. The author also derives a number of personal lessons from his reflections about his career and research, and discusses the implications of those lessons for researchers. He concludes the article with some general observations and recommendations about making significant contributions to a field.

  13. Statistical Analysis of the Reflectivity of a Heliostats Field. Application to the CRS Heliostats Field of the Plataforma Solar de Almeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Reche, J.

    2003-01-01

    Reflectivity measuring in a heliostats field of a solar central tower is a task that should be performed periodically. The reflectivity of the field is a value that should be known to evaluate the system, moreover it plays an important role in several simulation codes which are useful for the daily operation of the system. When the size of the heliostats field increases (tens of heliostats) it is necessary to find a method, due to operability reasons, that allows us to offer a reflectivity value measuring only in few facets guaranteeing that the statistical error of this value is within a reasonable range. In this report a statistical analysis of the reflectivity in a heliostats field is presented. The analysis was particularized for the CRS heliostats field of the Plataforma Solar de Almeria. The results of the present study allow us to guarantee a reflectivity value of the heliostats field with a statistical error below 1% measuring only 12 facets (instead of the 1116 facets that compose the field). (Author) 6 refs

  14. Will algorithms modified with soil and weather information improve in-field reflectance-sensing corn nitrogen applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) needs to support corn (Zea mays L.) production can be highly variable within fields. Canopy reflectance sensing for assessing crop N health has been implemented on many farmers’ fields to side-dress or top-dress variable-rate N application, but at times farmers report the performance of...

  15. First Year Teacher of First Year Teachers: A Reflection on Teacher Training in the Field of Piano Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgersma, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    While there is a great deal of scholarly inquiry focusing on student teaching experiences in the field of classroom education, there are few resources devoted to student teaching in the context of the applied music lesson. In this article, a teacher educator in the field of piano pedagogy uses self-study to combine reflection on personal…

  16. Universal Signatures of Quantum Critical Points from Finite-Size Torus Spectra: A Window into the Operator Content of Higher-Dimensional Conformal Field Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Michael; Whitsitt, Seth; Henry, Louis-Paul; Sachdev, Subir; Läuchli, Andreas M

    2016-11-18

    The low-energy spectra of many body systems on a torus, of finite size L, are well understood in magnetically ordered and gapped topological phases. However, the spectra at quantum critical points separating such phases are largely unexplored for (2+1)D systems. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we accurately calculate and analyze the low-energy torus spectrum at an Ising critical point which provides a universal fingerprint of the underlying quantum field theory, with the energy levels given by universal numbers times 1/L. We highlight the implications of a neighboring topological phase on the spectrum by studying the Ising* transition (i.e. the transition between a Z_{2} topological phase and a trivial paramagnet), in the example of the toric code in a longitudinal field, and advocate a phenomenological picture that provides qualitative insight into the operator content of the critical field theory.

  17. Subsurface mapping in the Iberian Pyrite Belt using seismic reflection profiling and potential-field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, João; Inverno, Carlos; Matos, João Xavier; Rosa, Carlos; Granado, Isabel; Branch, Tim; Represas, Patrícia; Carabaneanu, Livia; Matias, Luís; Sousa, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) hosts world-class massive sulphide deposits, such as Neves-Corvo in Portugal and Rio Tinto in Spain. In Portugal, the Palaeozoic Volcanic-Sedimentary Complex (VSC) hosts these ore deposits, extending from the Grândola-Alcácer region to the Spanish border with a NW-SE to WNW-ESE trend. In the study area, between the Neves-Corvo mine region and Alcoutim (close to the Spanish border), the VSC outcrops only in a small horst near Alcoutim. Sparse exploration drill-hole data indicate that the depth to the top of the VSC varies from several 100 m to about 1 km beneath the Mértola Formation Flysch cover. Mapping of the VSC to the SE of Neves-Corvo mine is an important exploration goal and motivated the acquisition of six 2D seismic reflection profiles with a total length of approximately 82 km in order to map the hidden extension of the VSC. The data, providing information deeper than 10 km at some locations, were integrated in a 3D software environment along with potential-field, geological and drill-hole data to form a 3D structural framework model. Seismic data show strong reflections that represent several long Variscan thrust planes that smoothly dip to the NNE. Outcropping and previously unknown Late Variscan near-vertical faults were also mapped. Our data strongly suggest that the structural framework of Neves-Corvo extends south-eastwards to Alcoutim. Furthermore, the VSC top is located at depths that show the existence within the IPB of new areas with good potential to develop exploration projects envisaging the discovery of massive sulphide deposits of the Neves-Corvo type.

  18. Computer simulation techniques for acoustical design of rooms - How to treat reflections in sound field simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a number of problems related to sound reflections, and possible solutions or approximations that can be used in computer models. The problems include: specular and diffuse reflections, early and late reflections, curved surfaces, convex and concave surfaces, diffraction due to ...

  19. Modelling of SH- and P-SV-wave fields and seismic microzonation based on response spectra for Talchir basin, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, W.K.; Yanger Walling, M.; Vaccari, F.; Tripathy, T.; Panza, G.F.

    2008-02-01

    The P-SV- and SH-wave field in the Talchir basin is simulated along eight profiles: four profiles strike across the basin and the other four are along the basin. The hybrid method, which combines two computational techniques, modal Summation and finite differences, is used to produce multiphase synthetic seismograms. An M = 6 earthquake is considered, with hypocenter along the North Orissa Boundary Fault (NOBF) at a depth of 5 km and with the focal mechanisms parameters: dip = 90 deg., strike = 160 deg. and rake = 180 deg. The peak acceleration (AMAX) along each profile is determined considering the maximum acceleration obtained at the horizontal components. The response spectra ratio (RSR) as a function of frequency is computed for the eight profiles and the higher amplification is seen to increase in correspondence with the thicker sedimentary cover, especially for the radial component. Higher site amplification for all the profiles is observed in the frequency range from 0.5 to 1.4 Hz. To validate the obtained site-effects, the sources, for the profiles across the basin, are placed near to the southern end of the profile and the site amplifications are recomputed. Even if the spatial distribution of AMAX is mainly controlled by the epicentral distance, i.e. the geometrical spreading prevails on local soil effects, the RSR shows a pattern that can be easily correlated with the local site conditions. The RSR at the intersection of the profiles is dependent not only upon the local lithology and sediment thickness but also upon the epicentral distance. The Talchir basin is classified into three zones based on the RSR values: low RSR zone (1.0 - 1.9), intermediate RSR zone (2.0 - 2.8) and high RSR zone (2.9 - 5.2). The PGA estimated for the bedrock model by Bhatia et al. (1999) for the study region is around 0.05 to 0.10 g while the Indian seismic zonation map estimated it to be in the range from 0.1 to 0.2g. In the present study, that considers the effects of

  20. The optical spectra of 24 mu m galaxies in the cosmos field. I. Spitzer MIPS bright sources in the zCOSMOS-bright 10k catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caputi, K. I.; Lilly, S. J.; Aussel, H.; Sanders, D.; Frayer, D.; Le Fevre, O.; Renzini, A.; Zamorani, G.; Scodeggio, M.; Contini, T.; Scoville, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Hasinger, G.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Floc'h, E.; Maier, C.; Mainieri, V.; Mignoli, M.; Salvato, M.; Schiminovich, D.; Silverman, J.; Surace, J.; Tasca, L.; Abbas, U.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bottini, D.; Capak, P.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Halliday, C.; Ilbert, O.; Kampczyk, P.; Kartaltepe, J.; Kneib, J. -P.; Knobel, C.; Kovac, K.; Lamareille, F.; Leauthaud, A.; Le Borgne, J. F.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H.; Meneux, B.; Oesch, P.; Pello, R.; Perez-Montero, E.; Porciani, C.; Ricciardelli, E.; Scaramella, R.; Scarlata, C.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Walcher, J.; Zamojski, M.; Zucca, E.

    2008-01-01

    We study zCOSMOS-bright optical spectra for 609 Spitzer MIPS 24 mu m-selected galaxies with S-24 (mu m) > 0: 30 mJy and I <22.5 (AB mag) over 1.5 deg(2) of the COSMOS field. From emission-line diagnostics we find the following: (1) SFRs derived from the observed H alpha lambda 6563 and H beta lambda

  1. Infrared spectra of CF(2)=CHD and CF(2)=CD(2): scaled quantum-chemical force fields and an equilibrium structure for 1,1-difluoroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Donald C; Law, Mark M; Groner, Peter; Conrad, Andrew R; Tubergen, Michael J; Feller, David; Moore, Michael C; Craig, Norman C

    2010-09-02

    Infrared (IR) spectra in the gas phase are reported for CF(2)=CHD and CF(2)=CD(2) in the region 350-4000 cm(-1). Ab initio calculations of an harmonic force-field and anharmonicity constants have been made with an MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ model. These enable a number of Fermi resonances in each species to be analyzed and a complete set of "observed" harmonic frequencies to be derived. The latter are combined with similar data for CF(2)=CH(2) in a scaling of the model harmonic force field to both anharmonic and harmonic frequencies. Inspection of the scale factors reveals minor defects of the model, evident in the out-of-plane wagging modes and in the CF stretch/CF stretch interaction force constant. Fermi resonance treatments involved in all isotopomers studied are compatible with the overall force-field refinement results. The treatment leaves a small anomaly in the (13)C shift on nu(1). Improved microwave spectra are reported for five isotopic species, and a semiexperimental equilibrium structure for F(2)C=CH(2) is determined and compared favorably with the structure obtained from new high-level ab initio calculations. Centrifugal distortion constants are predicted for the five isotopic species, and those for F(2)C=CH(2) are compared with values fit to microwave spectra.

  2. Comparability of red/near-infrared reflectance and NDVI based on the spectral response function between MODIS and 30 other satellite sensors using rice canopy spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weijiao; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Xiuzhen; Wang, Fumin; Shi, Jingjing

    2013-11-26

    Long-term monitoring of regional and global environment changes often depends on the combined use of multi-source sensor data. The most widely used vegetation index is the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is a function of the red and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The reflectance and NDVI data sets derived from different satellite sensor systems will not be directly comparable due to different spectral response functions (SRF), which has been recognized as one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the multi-sensor data analysis. This study quantified the influence of SRFs on the red and NIR reflectances and NDVI derived from 31 Earth observation satellite sensors. For this purpose, spectroradiometric measurements were performed for paddy rice grown under varied nitrogen levels and at different growth stages. The rice canopy reflectances were convoluted with the spectral response functions of various satellite instruments to simulate sensor-specific reflectances in the red and NIR channels. NDVI values were then calculated using the simulated red and NIR reflectances. The results showed that as compared to the Terra MODIS, the mean relative percentage difference (RPD) ranged from -12.67% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, -8.52% to -0.23% for the NIR reflectance, and -9.32% to 3.10% for the NDVI. The mean absolute percentage difference (APD) compared to the Terra MODIS ranged from 1.28% to 36.30% for the red reflectance, 0.84% to 8.71% for the NIR reflectance, and 0.59% to 9.32% for the NDVI. The lowest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for Landsat5 TM for the red reflectance, CBERS02B CCD for the NIR reflectance and Landsat4 TM for the NDVI. In addition, the largest APD between MODIS and the other 30 satellite sensors was observed for IKONOS for the red reflectance, AVHRR1 onboard NOAA8 for the NIR reflectance and IKONOS for the NDVI. The results also indicated that AVHRRs onboard NOAA7-17 showed

  3. Within, but not between hands interactions in vibrotactile detection thresholds reflect somatosensory receptive field organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eTamè

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Detection of a tactile stimulus on one finger is impaired when a concurrent stimulus (masker is presented on an additional finger of the same or the opposite hand. This phenomenon is known to be finger-specific at the within-hand level. However, whether this specificity is also maintained at the between-hand level is not known. In four experiments, we addressed this issue by combining a Bayesian adaptive staircase procedure (QUEST with a two-interval forced choice (2IFC design in order to establish threshold for detecting 200ms, 100Hz sinusoidal vibrations applied to the index or little fingertip of either hand (targets. We systematically varied the masker finger (index, middle, ring, or little finger of either hand, while controlling the spatial location of the target and masker stimuli. Detection thresholds varied consistently as a function of the masker finger when the latter was on the same hand (Experiments 1 and 2, but not when on different hands (Experiments 3 and 4. Within the hand, detection thresholds increased for masker fingers closest to the target finger (i.e., middle>ring when the target was index. Between the hands, detection thresholds were higher only when the masker was present on any finger as compared to when the target was presented in isolation. The within hand effect of masker finger is consistent with the segregation of different fingers at the early stages of somatosensory processing, from the periphery to the primary somatosensory cortex (SI. We propose that detection is finger-specific and reflects the organisation of somatosensory receptive fields in SI within, but not between the hands.

  4. Numerical simulation of the sound reflection effects of noise barriers in near and far field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgendorf, D.; Roo, F. de; Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Jean, P.; Ecotière, D.; Dutilleux, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the first stages of the development of a new test method for evaluating the reflectivity performance of noise barriers. The reflectivity performance describes the increase in sound level at a receiver due to the presence of the noise barrier. First the current test method for

  5. FIRST ULTRAVIOLET REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF PLUTO AND CHARON BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH: DETECTION OF ABSORPTION FEATURES AND EVIDENCE FOR TEMPORAL CHANGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, S. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Shinn, A. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Cunningham, N. J.; Hain, M. J., E-mail: astern@swri.edu [Nebraska Wesleyan University, 5000 Saint Paul Avenue, Lincoln, NE 68504 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    We have observed the mid-UV spectra of both Pluto and its large satellite, Charon, at two rotational epochs using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) in 2010. These are the first HST/COS measurements of Pluto and Charon. Here we describe the observations and our reduction of them, and present the albedo spectra, average mid-UV albedos, and albedo slopes we derive from these data. These data reveal evidence for a strong absorption feature in the mid-UV spectrum of Pluto; evidence for temporal change in Pluto's spectrum since the 1990s is reported, and indirect evidence for a near-UV spectral absorption on Charon is also reported.

  6. Operation of a scanning near field optical microscope in reflection in combination with a scanning force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Faulkner, T.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1992-01-01

    Images obtained with a scanning near field optical microscope (SNOM) operating in reflection are presented. We have obtained the first results with a SiN tip as optical probe. The instrument is simultaneously operated as a scanning force microscope (SFM). Moreover, the instrument incorporates an

  7. Electromagnetic waves reflection, transmission and absorption by graphene - magnetic semiconductor - graphene sandwich-structure in magnetic field: Faraday geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Bychkov, Igor V.; Shavrov, Vladimir G.

    2014-01-01

    Electrodynamic properties of the graphene - magnetic semiconductor - graphene sandwich-structure have been investigated theoretically with taking into account the dissipation processes. Influence of graphene layers on electromagnetic waves propagation in graphene - semi-infinte magnetic semiconductor and graphene - magnetic semiconductor - graphene sandwich-structure has been analyzed. Frequency and field dependences of the reflectance, transmittance and absorbtance of electromagnetic waves b...

  8. Angular spectra of the intrinsic galaxy ellipticity field, their observability and their impact on lensing in tomographic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Björn Malte; Merkel, Philipp M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes intrinsic ellipticity correlations between galaxies, their statistical properties, their observability with future surveys and their interference with weak gravitational lensing measurements. Using an angular-momentum-based, quadratic intrinsic alignment model we derive correlation functions of the ellipticity components and project them to yield the four non-zero angular ellipticity spectra C^ɛ _E(ℓ), C^ɛ _B(ℓ), C^ɛ _C(ℓ) and C^ɛ _S(ℓ) in their generalization to tomographic surveys. For a Euclid-like survey, these spectra would have amplitudes smaller than the weak lensing effect on non-linear structures, but would constitute an important systematics. Computing estimation biases for cosmological parameters derived from an alignment-contaminated survey suggests biases of +5σw for the dark energy equation of state parameter w, -20σ _{Ω _m} for the matter density Ωm and -12σ _{σ _8} for the spectrum normalization σ8. Intrinsic alignments yield a signal that is easily observable with a survey similar to Euclid: while not independent, significances for estimates of each of the four spectra reach values of tens of σ if weak lensing and shape noise are considered as noise sources, which suggests relative uncertainties on alignment parameters at the percent level, implying that galaxy alignment mechanisms can be investigated by future surveys.

  9. State-of-the art comparability of corrected emission spectra. 2. Field laboratory assessment of calibration performance using spectral fluorescence standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch-Genger, Ute; Bremser, Wolfram; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Spieles, Monika; Hoffmann, Angelika; DeRose, Paul C; Zwinkels, Joanne C; Gauthier, François; Ebert, Bernd; Taubert, R Dieter; Voigt, Jan; Hollandt, Jörg; Macdonald, Rainer

    2012-05-01

    In the second part of this two-part series on the state-of-the-art comparability of corrected emission spectra, we have extended this assessment to the broader community of fluorescence spectroscopists by involving 12 field laboratories that were randomly selected on the basis of their fluorescence measuring equipment. These laboratories performed a reference material (RM)-based fluorometer calibration with commercially available spectral fluorescence standards following a standard operating procedure that involved routine measurement conditions and the data evaluation software LINKCORR developed and provided by the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This instrument-specific emission correction curve was subsequently used for the determination of the corrected emission spectra of three test dyes, X, QS, and Y, revealing an average accuracy of 6.8% for the corrected emission spectra. This compares well with the relative standard uncertainties of 4.2% for physical standard-based spectral corrections demonstrated in the first part of this study (previous paper in this issue) involving an international group of four expert laboratories. The excellent comparability of the measurements of the field laboratories also demonstrates the effectiveness of RM-based correction procedures.

  10. Sub-wavelength imaging by depolarization in a reflection near-field optical microscope using an uncoated fiber probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steen; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We present a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope utilizing counter-directional light propagation in an uncoated fiber probe, cross-polarized detection and shear-force feedback. Topographical and near-field optical imaging with a scanning speed of up to 10 mu m/s and a lateral...... resolution better than 40 nm are demonstrated with a latex projection test sample. Determination of the optical resolution as well as correlation between topographical and near-field optical images are discussed. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V....

  11. Evaluation of six modified binders for retardation of crack reflection through laboratory studies and field work.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rust, FC

    1992-08-01

    Full Text Available Large amounts of money are spent annually on sealing or overlaying cracked road pavements, however, the reflection of cracks through these materials is a problem experienced worldwide. In countries with well-developed road infrastructures where...

  12. Structure, modified scaled quantum mechanical force field and a priori prediction of vibrational spectra and their assignment and exponential scaling of frequencies of triphenylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Indrajit

    2003-01-01

    The structure, force field and vibrational spectra of triphenylene are studied by B3LYP/6-31G(5d) level of theory. The results are compared to those of the related system, phenanthrene. The scale factors in non-redundant local coordinates obtained after fitting the DFT frequencies to the experimental numbers of phenanthrene-d 0 and -d 10 are transferred to predict the spectra and assignment of triphenylene for in-plane modes. The frequencies based on scaling methodology due to Lee et al. are also obtained. These frequencies are compared with the predicted numbers based on scale factors from phenanthrene. Probable assignment for out-of-plane modes is proposed based on simple scaling of Scott and Random (scale factor 0.9614) as well as by scaling methodology by Lee et al

  13. Calculated Hanle transmission and absorption spectra of the 87Rb D1 line with residual magnetic field for arbitrarily polarized light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Moon, Han Seb

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a theoretical study on the transmission spectra of an arbitrarily polarized laser beam through a rubidium cell with or without a buffer gas in Hanle-type coherent population trapping (CPT). This study examined how laser polarization, transverse magnetic field, and collisions with buffer gas affects the spectrum. The transmission spectrum due to CPT and the absorption spectrum due to the level crossing absorption (LCA) were calculated according to the laser polarization. The results show that the LCA is strongly dependent on the transverse magnetic field and interaction time of the atoms with a laser light via collisions with the buffer gas. In addition, the spectral shape of the calculated Hanle spectrum is closely related to the direction between the (stray) transverse magnetic field and polarization of the laser.

  14. EPR spectroscopy of MRI-related Gd(III) complexes: simultaneous analysis of multiple frequency and temperature spectra, including static and transient crystal field effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, S; Borel, A; Helm, L; Belorizky, E; Fries, P H; Merbach, A E

    2001-03-21

    For the first time, a very general theoretical method is proposed to interpret the full electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra at multiple temperatures and frequencies in the important case of S-state metal ions complexed in liquid solution. This method is illustrated by a careful analysis of the measured spectra of two Gd3+ (S = 7/2) complexes. It is shown that the electronic relaxation mechanisms at the origin of the EPR line shape arise from the combined effects of the modulation of the static crystal field by the random Brownian rotation of the complex and of the transient zero-field splitting. A detailed study of the static crystal field mechanism shows that, contrarily to the usual global models involving only second-order terms, the fourth and sixth order terms can play a non-negligible role. The obtained parameters are well interpreted in the framework of the physics of the various underlying relaxation processes. A better understanding of these mechanisms is highly valuable since they partly control the efficiency of paramagnetic metal ions in contrast agents for medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  15. Anisotropy of x-ray reflectivity: chemical and structural effects on K-shell excitations in hexagonal BN crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Filatova, E O

    2002-01-01

    The experimental investigation of the B and N K-reflection spectra using both s-polarized synchrotron radiation and unpolarized radiation for different crystal orientations with respect to the electric field vector E was carried out. The absorption spectra calculated from the reflection spectra using Kramers-Kronig analysis are presented. A strong orientation dependence of both reflection and absorption spectra is exhibited. Analysis of the orientation dependences of the x-ray reflection and absorption spectra near both edges strongly supports a possibility of tracing the role of each excitation canal in the formation of fine structure. The high sensitivity of the reflection spectra fine structure to the vibronic interaction connected with Jahn-Teller distortions as well to the core-hole relaxation is discussed. A very strong dependence of the absolute values of the reflectivity on planar crystal anisotropy was discovered.

  16. A time-dependent density-functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field method study of vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junfeng; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Cao, Zexing

    2014-07-07

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations have been used to determine equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies of the ground state and several singlet low-lying excited states of coumarin. Vertical and adiabatic transition energies of S1, S2, and S3 have been estimated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF/PT2. Calculations predict that the dipole-allowed S1 and S3 states have a character of (1)(ππ*), while the dipole-forbidden (1)(nπ*) state is responsible for S2. The vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin have been simulated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF calculations within the Franck-Condon approximation, respectively. The simulated vibronic spectra show good agreement with the experimental observations available, which allow us to reasonably interpret vibronic features in the S0→S1 and S0→S3 absorption and the S0←S1 emission spectra. Based on the calculated results, activity, intensity, and density of the vibronic transitions and their contribution to the experimental spectrum profile have been discussed.

  17. Logging into the Field—Methodological Reflections on Ethnographic Research in a Pluri-Local and Computer-Mediated Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Mónika Greschke

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to introduce an ethnic group inhabiting a common virtual space in the World Wide Web (WWW, while being physically located in different socio-geographical contexts. Potentially global in its geographical extent, this social formation is constituted by means of interrelating virtual-global dimensions with physically grounded parts of the actors' lifeworlds. In addition, the communities' social life relies on specific communicative practices joining mediated forms of communication with co-presence based encounters. Ethnographic research in a pluri-local and computer-mediated field poses a set of problems which demand thorough reflection as well as a search for creative solutions. How can the boundaries of the field be determined? What does "being there" signify in such a case? Is it possible to enter the field while sitting at my own desk, just by visiting the respective site in the WWW, simply observing the communication going on without even being noticed by the subjects in the field? Or does "being in the field" imply that I ought to turn into a member of the studied community? Am I supposed to effectively live with the others for a while? And then, what can "living together" actually mean in that case? Will I learn enough about the field simply by participating in its virtual activities? Or do I have to account for the physically grounded dimensions of the actors' lifeworlds, as well? Ethnographic research in a pluri-local and computer-mediated field in practice raises a lot of questions regarding the ways of entering the field and being in the field. Some of them will be discussed in this paper by means of reflecting research experiences gained in the context of a recently concluded case study. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0703321

  18. Reflection Spectra of the Black Hole Binary Candidate MAXI J1535-571 in the Hard State Observed by NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanjun; Harrison, Fiona A.; García, Javier A.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Fürst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Miller, Jon M.; Parker, Michael L.; Tomsick, John A.; Walton, Dominic J.

    2018-01-01

    We report on a Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observation of the recently discovered bright black hole candidate MAXI J1535-571. NuSTAR observed the source on MJD 58003 (five days after the outburst was reported). The spectrum is characteristic of a black hole binary in the hard state. We observe clear disk reflection features, including a broad Fe Kα line and a Compton hump peaking around 30 keV. Detailed spectral modeling reveals a narrow Fe Kα line complex centered around 6.5 keV on top of the strong relativistically broadened Fe Kα line. The narrow component is consistent with distant reflection from moderately ionized material. The spectral continuum is well described by a combination of cool thermal disk photons and a Comptonized plasma with the electron temperature {{kT}}{{e}}=19.7+/- 0.4 keV. An adequate fit can be achieved for the disk reflection features with a self-consistent relativistic reflection model that assumes a lamp-post geometry for the coronal illuminating source. The spectral fitting measures a black hole spin a> 0.84, inner disk radius {R}{in}r}{ISCO}, and a lamp-post height h={7.2}-2.0+0.8 {r}{{g}} (statistical errors, 90% confidence), indicating no significant disk truncation and a compact corona. Although the distance and mass of this source are not currently known, this suggests the source was likely in the brighter phases of the hard state during this NuSTAR observation.

  19. Improving the performance of infrared reflective night curtains for warming field plots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Larsen, Klaus S.; de Dato, Giovanbattista D.

    2013-01-01

    the curtains and (iii) reducing the lateral wind speed. We provide experimentally based replies to the major concerns raised in the literature about the passive nighttime warming method. We show (a) that using IR-reflective curtains during night does in fact not result in nighttime warming only...

  20. Judgments of noticeable differences in sound fields of concert halls caused by intensity variations in early reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Toshiyuki

    2002-01-01

    In concert halls early reflections combine with the direct sound and with reverberation to determine the subjective rating of a room's acoustics. Of interest is how variations in the amplitudes of these early reflections are related to the subjectively just-noticeable differences (jnd) in several important acoustical parameters for their wide range encountered in existing halls. Investigated were four subjective parameters, apparent source width (ASW), loudness, intimacy and clarity, which are related to the physical measurements, [1-IACCE3], G, ITDG, and C80, defined mathematically in Beranek [Concert and Opera Halls: How They Sound (Acoustical Society of America, New York, 1996)]. Forty-eight types of sound fields were chosen in which to make variations in the amplitudes of early reflections and were reproduced electro-acoustically by multiple loudspeakers in an anechoic chamber. The results indicate that ASW and loudness are more sensitive to changes in the levels of early reflections, and were the primary parameters investigated. Although the number of subjects available with enough experience in listening classical music is limited and the measured jnd is an initial estimation, the jnd of [1-IACCE3] is measured as 0.065+/-0.015 in variations of sound field structures and the jnd of G was measured as 0.25+/-0.15 dB, which is consistent with the results of previous studies.

  1. Magnetic field sensor based on anti-resonant reflecting guidance in the magnetic gel-coated hollow core fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R; Jiang, Y; Zhao, Yang

    2014-11-01

    A compact all-fiber magnetic field sensor based on the magnetic gel coated hollow core fiber (HCF) has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A double-layered Fabry-Perot resonator is formed by coating a magnetic gel layer on the surface of the HCF. Anti-resonant reflecting guidance of light can be achieved in the HCF, and leaky mode is induced at resonant wavelength of the double-layered Fabry-Perot resonator, which results in lossy dips in the transmission spectrum of the HCF. Due to the tunable magneto-elastic effect, the shape of the magnetic gel is deformed with the external magnetic field, which results in a change of the resonate condition for the double-layered Fabry-Perot resonator. The magnetic field can be measured by interrogating the wavelength of the lossy dip. The experimental results show that a magnetic field sensitivity of 245  pm/Oe is achieved.

  2. Identifying fecal matter contamination in produce fields using multispectral reflectance imaging under ambient solar illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    An imaging device to detect fecal contamination in fresh produce fields could allow the producer to avoid harvesting fecal-contaminated produce. E.coli O157:H7 outbreaks have been associated with fecal-contaminated leafy greens. In this study, in-field spectral profiles of bovine fecal matter, soil,...

  3. Regional prediction of soil organic carbon content over temperate croplands using visible near-infrared airborne hyperspectral imagery and synchronous field spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudour, E.; Gilliot, J. M.; Bel, L.; Lefevre, J.; Chehdi, K.

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed at identifying the potential of Vis-NIR airborne hyperspectral AISA-Eagle data for predicting the topsoil organic carbon (SOC) content of bare cultivated soils over a large peri-urban area (221 km2) with both contrasted soils and SOC contents, located in the western region of Paris, France. Soil types comprised haplic luvisols, calcaric cambisols and colluvic cambisols. Airborne AISA-Eagle data (400-1000 nm, 126 bands) with 1 m-resolution were acquired on 17 April 2013 over 13 tracks. Tracks were atmospherically corrected then mosaicked at a 2 m-resolution using a set of 24 synchronous field spectra of bare soils, black and white targets and impervious surfaces. The land use identification system layer (RPG) of 2012 was used to mask non-agricultural areas, then calculation and thresholding of NDVI from an atmospherically corrected SPOT image acquired the same day enabled to map agricultural fields with bare soil. A total of 101 sites sampled either in 2013 or in the 3 previous years and in 2015 were identified as bare by means of this map. Predictions were made from the mosaic AISA spectra which were related to topsoil SOC contents by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR). Regression robustness was evaluated through a series of 1000 bootstrap data sets of calibration-validation samples, considering 74 sites outside cloud shadows only, and different sampling strategies for selecting calibration samples. Validation root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were comprised between 3.73 and 4.49 g Kg-1 and were ∼4 g Kg-1 in median. The most performing models in terms of coefficient of determination (R2) and Residual Prediction Deviation (RPD) values were the calibration models derived either from Kennard-Stone or conditioned Latin Hypercube sampling on smoothed spectra. The most generalizable model leading to lowest RMSE value of 3.73 g Kg-1 at the regional scale and 1.44 g Kg-1 at the within-field scale and low bias was the cross-validated leave

  4. BETA SPECTRA. I. Negatrons spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Malonda, A.; Garcia-Torano, E.

    1978-01-01

    Using the Fermi theory of beta decay, the beta spectra for 62 negatrons emitters have been computed introducing a correction factor for unique forbidden transitions. These spectra are plotted vs. energy, once normal i sed, and tabulated with the related Fermi functions. The average and median energies are calculated. (Author)

  5. A bi-layer model for nondestructive prediction of soluble solids content in apple based on reflectance spectra and peel pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xi; Li, Jiangbo; Wang, Qingyan; Fan, Shuxiang; Huang, Wenqian

    2018-01-15

    Hyperspectral imaging technology was used to investigate the effect of various peel colors on soluble solids content (SSC) prediction model and build a SSC model insensitive to the color distribution of apple peel. The SSC and peel pigments were measured, effective wavelengths (EWs) of SSC and pigments were selected from the acquired hyperspectral images of the intact and peeled apple samples, respectively. The effect of pigments on the SSC prediction was studied and optimal SSC EWs were selected from the peel-flesh layers spectra after removing the chlorophyll and anthocyanin EWs. Then, the optimal bi-layer model for SSC prediction was built based on the finally selected optimal SSC EWs. Results showed that the correlation coefficient of prediction, root mean square error of prediction and selected bands of the bi-layer model were 0.9560, 0.2528 and 41, respectively, which will be more acceptable for future online SSC prediction of various colors of apple. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reflections on the nature of the concepts of field in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, C.

    2012-12-01

    This paper is a short introduction on the analysis of the concepts of field in physics, showing their different natures. It comprises a study on the development of observers based on observational realism, a physical epistemology in development, on the basis of analytical psychology. This epistemology incorporates and justify the proposition of R. Carnap, of separating observational and theoretical domains of a theory, and gives a criterion for this separation. The basis of three theories are discussed, where concepts of field emerge. We discuss the different origins and meanings of these fields, from an epistemological point of view, in their respective theories. The aim of this paper is to form a basis of discussion to be applied in the analysis of other theories where concepts of field are present, to reach a better understanding of the contemporary programs of unification. We would like to clarify if these programs are intended for unification of fields as elements of the physical reality, fields as explanations for the observations, unification of their theories, or other possible cases.

  7. Coherent artifact suppression in line-field reflection confocal microscopy using a low spatial coherence light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changgeng; Cao, Hui; Choma, Michael A

    2016-10-15

    Line-field reflection confocal microscopy (LF-RCM) has the potential to add a dimension of parallelization to traditional confocal microscopy while reducing the need for two-axis beam scanning. LF-RCM systems often employ light sources with a high degree of spatial coherence. This high degree of spatial coherence potentially leads to unwanted coherent artifact in the setting of nontrivial sample scattering. Here, we (a) confirm that a coherent artifact is a nontrivial problem in LF-RCM when using spatially coherent light, and (b) demonstrate that such a coherent artifact can be mitigated through the use of reduced spatial coherence line-field sources. We demonstrate coherent noise suppression in a full-pupil line-field confocal microscope using a large number of mutually incoherent emitters from a vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL) array. The coherent noise from a highly scattering sample is significantly suppressed by the use of this synthesized reduced spatial coherence light source compared to a fully coherent light source. Lastly, with scattering samples, the axial confocality of line-field confocal microscopy is compromised independent of the source spatial coherence, as demonstrated by our experimental result. Our results highlight the importance of spatial coherence engineering in parallelized reflection confocal microscopy.

  8. Three inorganic-organic hybrids of bismuth(III) iodide complexes containing substituted 1,2,4-triazole organic components with charaterizations of diffuse reflectance spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Xu Ling; Guo Guocong; Huang Jinshun

    2006-01-01

    The reactions of two kinds of substituted 1,2,4-triazoles with BiI 3 yielded three inorganic-organic hybrids: [HL1] 4 [Bi 6 I 22 ].[L1] 4 .4H 2 O (1) (L1=3-(1,2,4-triazole-4-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole); [HL2] 4 [Bi 6 I 22 ].6H 2 O (2); [HL2] 2 [Bi 2 I 8 ].[L2] 2 (3) (L2=(m-phenol)-1,2,4-triazole). Both 1 and 2 have polynuclear anions of [Bi 6 I 22 ] 4- to build up the inorganic layers and substituted 1,2,4-triazoles as the organic layers. Hybrid 3 consists of two BiI 5 square pyramids as inorganic layers. There exist hydrogen bondings and I...;I interactions in the structures of 1, 2 and 3. Optical absorption spectra of 1, 2 and 3 reveal the presence of sharp optical gaps of 1.77, 1.77 and 2.07 eV, respectively, suggesting that these materials behave as semiconductors. - Graphical abstract: The reactions of two kinds of the substituted 1,2,4-triazoles with BiI 3 yielded three layered inorganic-organic hybrids [HL1] 4 [Bi 6 I 22 ].[L1] 4 .4H 2 O (1), [HL2] 4 [Bi 6 I 22 ].6H 2 O (2), [HL2] 2 [Bi 2 I 8 ].[L2] 2 (3) with optical gaps of 1.77, 1.77 and 2.07 eV, respectively. The structures of 1-3 are constructed from inorganic layers of polynuclear anions of bismuth iodine and organic layers of the substituted 1,2,4-triazoles

  9. The capabilities of total reflection X-ray fluorescence in the polymeric analytical field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the capabilities of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) as analytical technique specially focused in high-viscosity polymer dispersions. Appropriate sample preparation procedures are described taking into account the time stability of these dispersions. Special remarks considering different ways for drying samples in order to obtain the most uniform deposited film are investigated focusing on the behavior of aqueous and viscous systems. Due to the difficulty found for obtaining a homogeneous mixture between sample and internal standard in such systems, the use of Compton incoherent scattering is discussed as an alternative procedure for trace quantification in high viscous systems without any mixing processes

  10. The capabilities of total reflection X-ray fluorescence in the polymeric analytical field*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Cristina

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the capabilities of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) as analytical technique specially focused in high-viscosity polymer dispersions. Appropriate sample preparation procedures are described taking into account the time stability of these dispersions. Special remarks considering different ways for drying samples in order to obtain the most uniform deposited film are investigated focusing on the behavior of aqueous and viscous systems. Due to the difficulty found for obtaining a homogeneous mixture between sample and internal standard in such systems, the use of Compton incoherent scattering is discussed as an alternative procedure for trace quantification in high viscous systems without any mixing processes.

  11. Electronic structure and core-level spectra of light actinide dioxides in the dynamical mean-field theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolorenč, Jindřich; Shick, Alexander; Lichtenstein, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 8 (2015), "085125-1"-"085125-10" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-05872J Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electronic-structure calculations * dynamical mean-field theory * Mott insulators * actinides * oxides * photoemission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  12. Local thermal behaviour of a massive scalar field near a reflecting wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenci, V.A. De [Instituto de Física e Química, Universidade Federal de Itajubá,Itajubá, MG 37500-903 (Brazil); Gomes, L.G.; Moreira, E.S. Jr. [Instituto de Matemática e Computação, Universidade Federal de Itajubá,Itajubá, MG 37500-903 (Brazil)

    2015-03-19

    The mean square fluctuation and the expectation value of the stress-energy-momentum tensor of a neutral massive scalar field at finite temperature are determined near an infinite plane Dirichlet wall, and also near an infinite plane Neumann wall. The flat background has an arbitrary number of dimensions and the field is arbitrarily coupled to the vanishing curvature. It is shown that, unlike vacuum contributions, thermal contributions are free from boundary divergences, and that the thermal behaviour of the scalar field near a Dirichlet wall differs considerably from that near a Neumann wall. Far from the wall the study reveals a local version of dimensional reduction, namely, corrections to familiar blackbody expressions are linear in the temperature, with the corresponding coefficients given only in terms of vacuum expectation values in a background with one less dimension. It is shown that such corrections are “classical” (i.e., not dependent on Planck’s constant) only if the scalar field is massless. A natural conjecture that arises is that the “local dimensional reduction” is universal since it operates for massless and massive fields alike and regardless of the boundary conditions.

  13. SU-F-T-217: A Comprehensive Monte-Carlo Study of Out-Of-Field Secondary Neutron Spectra in a Scanned-Beam Proton Therapy Treatment Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englbrecht, F; Parodi, K [LMU Munich, Department of Medical Physics, Garching / Munich, Bavaria (Germany); Trinkl, S; Mares, V; Ruehm, W; Wielunski, M [Helmholtz Zentrum Munich, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg, Bavaria (Germany); Wilkens, J [Technical University of Munich, Department of Physics, Munich, Germany, Garching, Bavaria (Germany); Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Hillbrand, M [Rinecker Proton Therapy Center, Munich, Bavaria (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To simulate secondary neutron radiation-fields produced at different positions during phantom irradiation inside a scanning proton therapy gantry treatment room. Further, to identify origin, energy distribution and angular emission as function of proton beam energy. Methods: GEANT4 and FLUKA Monte-Carlo codes were used to model the relevant parts of the treatment room in a gantry-equipped pencil beam scanning proton therapy facility including walls, floor, metallic gantry-components, patient table and the homogeneous PMMA target. The proton beams were modeled based on experimental beam ranges in water and spot shapes in air. Neutron energy spectra were simulated at 0°, 45°, 90° and 135° relative to the beam axis at 2m distance from isocenter, as well as 11×11 cm2 fields for 75MeV, 140MeV, 200MeV and for 118MeV with 5cm PMMA range-shifter. The total neutron energy distribution was recorded for these four positions and proton energies. Additionally, the room-components generating secondary neutrons in the room and their contributions to the total spectrum were identified and quantified. Results: FLUKA and GEANT4 simulated neutron spectra showed good general agreement in the whole energy range of 10{sup −}9 to 10{sup 2} MeV. Comparison of measured spectra with the simulated contributions of the various room components helped to limit the complexity of the room model, by identifying the dominant contributions to the secondary neutron spectrum. The iron of the bending magnet and counterweight were identified as sources of secondary evaporation-neutrons, which were lacking in simplified room models. Conclusion: Thorough Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed to complement Bonner-sphere spectrometry measurements of secondary neutrons in a clinical proton therapy treatment room. Such calculations helped disentangling the origin of secondary neutrons and their dominant contributions to measured spectra, besides providing a useful validation of widely

  14. Reflectance and Emissivity Spectra of Graphite as Potential Darkening Agent for Mercury from the UV to the TIR and its Comparison to Remote Sensing Measurements from MESSENGER and MERTIS on BepiColombo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.; Hiesinger, H.

    2016-12-01

    For long time Mercury was considered a planet very similar to the Moon. Both are small rocky bodies in the inner solar system with thin exospheres and no large scale traces of recent geological activity. However Mercury's surface reflects much less sunlight than the Moon. Trying to explain the reasons for this difference, significant abundances of iron and titanium (and their oxides) were proposed for the Hermean surface. But the NASA MESSENGER instruments found only small abundances of iron, confirming earlier ground-based spectroscopy observations, and virtually no titanium. Therefore neither of the elements can account for this diversity. New analysis of MESSENGER data acquired for the darkest regions of Mercury's surface suggest that the unknown darkening material could be carbon, in particular as the mineral graphite (Peplowski et al., 2016) whose abundance in the darker regions is predicted to be 1 to 3 wt% higher than the surroundings. At the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) of the Institute of Planetary Research (DLR, Berlin) we measured reflectance spectra for several phase angles of graphite, from UV to TIR spectral range (0.2 to 20 µm). Samples have been measured fresh and then after successive steps of heating at 400°C in vacuum for 8 hours. Following the same procedure, reflectance spectra of Komatiite (chosen as Mercury surface simulant, after Maturilli et al., 2014) was measured alone and mixed with few % of graphite to reproduce the results from Peplowski et al (2016). The results from this experiment can be compared to the data acquired from the MDIS and the MASCS instrument onboard the NASA MESSENGER mission. The same set of samples has been measured in emissivity, in vacuum (< 0.8 mbar) for successive cycles of several surface temperatures from 100°C to 400°C in the TIR spectral range (1 to 18 µm) in preparation for the emissivity spectra that will be collected by the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS), a

  15. Room-temperature near-field reflection spectroscopy of single quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Marcher; Madsen, Steen

    1997-01-01

    . This technique suppresses efficiently the otherwise dominating far-field background and reduces topographic artifacts. We demonstrate its performance on a thin, strained near-surface CdS/ZnS single quantum well at room temperature. The optical structure of these topographically flat samples is due to Cd......We report on a novel optical near-field technique to measure the local polarizability of a topographically flat sample with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm. Using an uncoated fiber probe, we implement a cross-polarization detection of the optical signal at the fiber dither frequency...

  16. Validation of MODIS-derived bidirectional reflectivity retrieval algorithm in mid-infrared channel with field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo-Hui; Wu, Hua-; Li, Zhao-Liang; Nerry, Françoise

    2012-07-30

    This work addressed the validation of the MODIS-derived bidirectional reflectivity retrieval algorithm in mid-infrared (MIR) channel, proposed by Tang and Li [Int. J. Remote Sens. 29, 4907 (2008)], with ground-measured data, which were collected from a field campaign that took place in June 2004 at the ONERA (Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales) center of Fauga-Mauzac, on the PIRRENE (Programme Interdisciplinaire de Recherche sur la Radiométrie en Environnement Extérieur) experiment site [Opt. Express 15, 12464 (2007)]. The leaving-surface spectral radiances measured by a BOMEM (MR250 Series) Fourier transform interferometer were used to calculate the ground brightness temperatures with the combination of the inversion of the Planck function and the spectral response functions of MODIS channels 22 and 23, and then to estimate the ground brightness temperature without the contribution of the solar direct beam and the bidirectional reflectivity by using Tang and Li's proposed algorithm. On the other hand, the simultaneously measured atmospheric profiles were used to obtain the atmospheric parameters and then to calculate the ground brightness temperature without the contribution of the solar direct beam, based on the atmospheric radiative transfer equation in the MIR region. Comparison of those two kinds of brightness temperature obtained by two different methods indicated that the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) between the brightness temperatures estimated respectively using Tang and Li's algorithm and the atmospheric radiative transfer equation is 1.94 K. In addition, comparison of the hemispherical-directional reflectances derived by Tang and Li's algorithm with those obtained from the field measurements showed that the RMSE is 0.011, which indicates that Tang and Li's algorithm is feasible to retrieve the bidirectional reflectivity in MIR channel from MODIS data.

  17. Reflections on ethical problems encountered in field research on Mexican male homosexuality: 1968 to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, J

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents field research on the major ethical problems in the study of male homosexuality in Mexico from 1968 up to the present and describes a solution to these problems. Ethical concerns about the psychological and social well-being of respondents are heightened in when the focus of a study is on a highly private, sensitive and sanctioned human behavior such as sexual relations. The ethics of a gay man conducting participant observation studies of male homosexuality tend particularly to be open to special scrutiny and suspicion. Most of the major ethical concerns about the study of male homosexuality are related to 1) the methods used by the researcher to collect participant-observation and interview data and 2) the possibility that the dissemination of study findings by the researcher to the outside world may lead to unwanted adverse effects on project respondents and on the population they represent. The use of the participant-observer in gathering of data in the field presents a serious ethical problem that must be addressed by sex researchers. Thus, future researchers contemplating ethnographic participant observation studies in the field must take into account the reality that it is extremely unlikely that they will be able to separate their private sex lives completely from their research.

  18. Achromatic and high-resolution full-field X-ray microscopy based on total-reflection mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Emi, Yoji; Kino, Hidetoshi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2015-04-20

    We developed an achromatic and high-resolution full-field X-ray microscope based on advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics that comprises two pairs of elliptical mirrors and hyperbolic mirrors utilizing the total reflection of X-rays. Performance tests to investigate the spatial resolution and chromatic aberration were performed at SPring-8. The microscope clearly resolved the pattern with ~100-nm feature size. Imaging the pattern by changing the X-ray energy revealed achromatism in the wide energy range of 8-11 keV.

  19. Infrared and Raman spectra of bicyclic molecules using scaled noncorrelated and correlated {ital ab initio} force fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, W.B. [Department of Chemistry, Oral Roberts University, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74171 (United States); Magdo, I. [Gedeon Richter Ltd., Molecular Design Unit, P.O. Box 27, H-1475, Budapest (Hungary); Klots, T.D. [Bartlesville Thermodynamic Group, BDM Petroleum Technologies, P.O. Box 2543, Bartlesville, Oklahoma 74005 (United States)

    1999-03-01

    This paper reports the application of a scaled {ital ab initio} calculated harmonic force field to predict the frequencies, infrared intensities, Raman intensities, and depolarization ratios of benzofuran, benzothiophene, indole, benzothiazole, and benzoxazole. The theoretical calculations were made using the Hartree{endash}Fock HF/3-21G{sup {asterisk}} and HF/6-31G{sup {asterisk}} basis sets and density-functional theory (DFT)B3-LYP/6-31G{sup {asterisk}} levels. The equilibrium calculated force constants are scaled according to the method of Pulay and compared with the experimentally determined frequencies, intensities, and depolarization ratios to assess the accuracy and fit of the theoretical calculation. Methods for quantitative comparison of intensities were developed. The double numerical differentiation algorithm of Komornicki and McIver was analyzed and used to calculate the Raman intensities for the (DFT)B3-LYP/6-31G{sup {asterisk}} model. The (DFT)B3-LYP/6-31G{sup {asterisk}} model is approaching the harmonic limit in the planar and nonplanar refinement of these bicyclics with wave number fits of 5 and 4 cm{sup {minus}1}, respectively. It reduces the need for scale factors and increases their transfer accuracy, largely because the scale factors values cluster near unity. The Komornicki and McIver algorithm is still a viable method for calculating Raman intensity information for methods that do not have analytic routines programmed. The main shortcoming to this method may lie in the tighter self-consistent field (SCF) convergence criterion possibly needed to calculate Raman intensities for the totally symmetric modes of large molecules. The (DFT)B3-LYP/6-31G{sup {asterisk}} model was superior for calculating the planar intensities, but equal to the HF methods for predicting the nonplanar intensities. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Neutron reflectivity studies of electric field driven structural transformations of surfactants

    CERN Document Server

    Majewski, J; Burgess, I; Zamlynny, V; Szymanski, G; Lipkowski, J; Satija, S

    2002-01-01

    We employed electrochemical methods together with in situ neutron reflectometry to describe the aggregation of organic surfactant molecules at a solid-liquid interface. The neutron reflectometry allowed us to determine the surface coverage, thickness, roughness and the relative positions of the aggregates. We found that the applied electric field may be used to reversibly manipulate the architecture of the organic molecules: from uniform monolayers to adsorbed hemi-micelles. These studies are expected to provide a new insight into the roles played by entropic and electrostatic forces in complex fluids or biomaterials. (orig.)

  1. Worldwide distribution of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence instrumentation and its different fields of application: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockenkämper, Reinhold; von Bohlen, Alex

    2014-09-01

    A survey was carried out with users and manufacturers of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence instrumentation in order to demonstrate the worldwide distribution of TXRF equipment and the different fields of applications. In general, TXRF users come from universities and scientific institutes, from working places at synchrotron beam-lines, or laboratories in semiconductor fabs. TXRF instrumentation is distributed in more than 50 countries on six continents and is applied at about 200 institutes and laboratories. The number of running desktop instruments amounts to nearly 300 units. About 60 beamlines run working places dedicated to TXRF. About 300 floor-mounted instruments are estimated to be used in about 150 fabs of the semiconductor industry. In total, 13 different fields of applications could be registered statistically from three different aspects.

  2. Optical Properties of β-RDX Thin Films Deposited on Gold and Stainless Steel Substrates Calculated from Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Caballero, José L; Aparicio-Bolaño, Joaquín A; Figueroa-Navedo, Amanda M; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P

    2017-08-01

    The optical properties for crystalline films of the highly energetic material (HEM) hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine, which is also known as RDX, deposited on gold (Au) and stainless steel (SS) substrates are presented. RDX has two important stable conformational polymorphs at room temperature: α-RDX and β-RDX. The optical properties obtained in the present work correspond to thin film samples of predominantly β-RDX polymorph. The infrared spectroscopic intensities measured showed significant differences in the β-RDX crystalline films deposited on the two substrates with respect to the calculated real part of refractive index. The β-RDX/Au crystalline films have a high dynamic response, which is characterized by the asymmetric stretching mode of the axial nitro groups, whereas for the β-RDX/SS crystalline films, the dynamic response was mediated by the -N-NO 2 symmetric stretch mode. This result provides an idea of how the electric field vector propagates through the β-RDX crystalline films deposited on the two substrates.

  3. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in TPT. These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by fluorescent emission. Here we examine the fluorescence spectra of highlighter inks using green and violet laser pointers. We use an RSpec Explorer spectrometer to obtain spectra and compare the emission spectra of blue, green, yellow, orange, pink, and purple highlighters. The website Compound Interest details the chemical composition of highlighter inks; in addition, the site discusses how some base dye colors can be combined to produce the variety commercially available colors. Spectra obtained in this study were qualitatively consistent with the Compound Interest site. We discuss similarities and differences between various highlighter colors and conclude with the relevance of such studies to physics students.

  4. Functional visual fields: a cross-sectional UK study to determine which visual field paradigms best reflect difficulty with mobility function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhi, Hikmat; Latham, Keziah; Myint, Joy; Crossland, Michael

    2017-11-20

    To develop an appropriate method of assessing visual field (VF) loss which reflects its functional consequences, this study aims to determine which method(s) of assessing VF best reflect mobility difficulty. This cross-sectional observational study took place within a single primary care setting. Participants attended a single session at a University Eye Clinic, Cambridge, UK, with data collected by a single researcher (HS), a qualified optometrist. 50 adult participants with peripheral field impairment were recruited for this study. Individuals with conditions not primarily affecting peripheral visual function, such as macular degeneration, were excluded from the study. Participants undertook three custom and one standard binocular VF tests assessing VF to 60°, and also integrated monocular threshold 24-2 visual fields (IVF). Primary VF outcomes were average mean threshold, percentage of stimuli seen and VF area. VF outcomes were compared with self-reported mobility function assessed with the Independent Mobility Questionnaire, and time taken and patient acceptability were also considered. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves determined which tests best predicted difficulty with mobility tasks. Greater VF loss was associated with greater self-reported mobility difficulty with all field paradigms (R 2 0.38-0.48, all Pmobility tasks in ROC analysis. Mean duration of the tests ranged from 1 min 26 s (±9 s) for kinetic assessment to 9 min 23 s (±24 s) for IVF. The binocular VF tests extending to 60° eccentricity all relate similarly to self-reported mobility function, and slightly better than integrated monocular VFs. A kinetic assessment of VF area is quicker than and as effective at predicting mobility function as static threshold assessment. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Within-field and regional-scale accuracies of topsoil organic carbon content prediction from an airborne visible near-infrared hyperspectral image combined with synchronous field spectra for temperate croplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Gilliot, Jean-Marc; Bel, Liliane; Lefevre, Josias; Chehdi, Kacem

    2016-04-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of the TOSCA-PLEIADES-CO of the French Space Agency and benefited data from the earlier PROSTOCK-Gessol3 project supported by the French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME). It aimed at identifying the potential of airborne hyperspectral visible near-infrared AISA-Eagle data for predicting the topsoil organic carbon (SOC) content of bare cultivated soils over a large peri-urban area (221 km2) with intensive annual crop cultivation and both contrasted soils and SOC contents, located in the western region of Paris, France. Soils comprise hortic or glossic luvisols, calcaric, rendzic cambisols and colluvic cambisols. Airborne AISA-Eagle images (400-1000 nm, 126 bands) with 1 m-resolution were acquired on 17 April 2013 over 13 tracks. Tracks were atmospherically corrected then mosaicked at a 2 m-resolution using a set of 24 synchronous field spectra of bare soils, black and white targets and impervious surfaces. The land use identification system layer (RPG) of 2012 was used to mask non-agricultural areas, then calculation and thresholding of NDVI from an atmospherically corrected SPOT4 image acquired the same day enabled to map agricultural fields with bare soil. A total of 101 sites, which were sampled either at the regional scale or within one field, were identified as bare by means of this map. Predictions were made from the mosaic AISA spectra which were related to SOC contents by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR). Regression robustness was evaluated through a series of 1000 bootstrap data sets of calibration-validation samples, considering those 75 sites outside cloud shadows only, and different sampling strategies for selecting calibration samples. Validation root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were comprised between 3.73 and 4.49 g. Kg-1 and were ~4 g. Kg-1 in median. The most performing models in terms of coefficient of determination (R²) and Residual Prediction Deviation (RPD) values were the

  6. Fully automated laboratory and field-portable goniometer used for performing accurate and precise multiangular reflectance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Justin D.; Bachmann, Charles M.; Ambeau, Brittany L.; Faulring, Jason W.; Ruiz Torres, Andres J.; Badura, Gregory; Myers, Emily

    2017-10-01

    Field-portable goniometers are created for a wide variety of applications. Many of these applications require specific types of instruments and measurement schemes and must operate in challenging environments. Therefore, designs are based on the requirements that are specific to the application. We present a field-portable goniometer that was designed for measuring the hemispherical-conical reflectance factor (HCRF) of various soils and low-growing vegetation in austere coastal and desert environments and biconical reflectance factors in laboratory settings. Unlike some goniometers, this system features a requirement for "target-plane tracking" to ensure that measurements can be collected on sloped surfaces, without compromising angular accuracy. The system also features a second upward-looking spectrometer to measure the spatially dependent incoming illumination, an integrated software package to provide full automation, an automated leveling system to ensure a standard frame of reference, a design that minimizes the obscuration due to self-shading to measure the opposition effect, and the ability to record a digital elevation model of the target region. This fully automated and highly mobile system obtains accurate and precise measurements of HCRF in a wide variety of terrain and in less time than most other systems while not sacrificing consistency or repeatability in laboratory environments.

  7. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in "TPT". These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by…

  8. Effects of a strong magnetic field on internal gravity waves: trapping, phase mixing, reflection and dynamical chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Papaloizou, John C. B.

    2018-04-01

    The spectrum of oscillation modes of a star provides information not only about its material properties (e.g. mean density), but also its symmetries. Spherical symmetry can be broken by rotation and/or magnetic fields. It has been postulated that strong magnetic fields in the cores of some red giants are responsible for their anomalously weak dipole mode amplitudes (the "dipole dichotomy" problem), but a detailed understanding of how gravity waves interact with strong fields is thus far lacking. In this work, we attack the problem through a variety of analytical and numerical techniques, applied to a localised region centred on a null line of a confined axisymmetric magnetic field which is approximated as being cylindrically symmetric. We uncover a rich variety of phenomena that manifest when the field strength exceeds a critical value, beyond which the symmetry is drastically broken by the Lorentz force. When this threshold is reached, the spatial structure of the g-modes becomes heavily altered. The dynamics of wave packet propagation transitions from regular to chaotic, which is expected to fundamentally change the organisation of the mode spectrum. In addition, depending on their frequency and the orientation of field lines with respect to the stratification, waves impinging on different parts of the magnetised region are found to undergo either reflection or trapping. Trapping regions provide an avenue for energy loss through Alfvén wave phase mixing. Our results may find application in various astrophysical contexts, including the dipole dichotomy problem, the solar interior, and compact star oscillations.

  9. Feminist Publications and the Transnational Politics of Translation: Reflections from the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia de Lima Costa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the theoretical presuppositions of the travels of feminist theories across the North–South axis, arguing that to theorize in feminism implies to engage in translation, i.e., to translate concepts and terms from one disciplinary field into the analytical categories of another in a process that Spivak characterizes as ‘active transaction of meanings’, i.e., the act of putting one theory in contact or transaction with another (or several others when reading a literary or social text. In the slippages of this encounter of languages, texts, and meanings, and as a result of necessarily faithless translations, other maps of knowledge become possible. However, for theories and concepts to circulate, the existence of material apparatuses (such as feminist publications organizing their translation and dissemination becomes necessary. From my particular position as a former co-editor of Revista Estudos Feministas between 1998-2002, I raise some considerations about the practices of mediation exercised by this publication in its translation of feminist theories.

  10. Toward re-thinking science education in terms of affective practices: reflections from the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayumova, Shakhnoza; Tippins, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    , colleges of education, schools, and curriculum place not enough emphasis on affective and bodily dimensions of teaching and learning. Instead, the privilege seems to be given to reason, evidence, and rationalities, which continue to reinforce dominant ways of knowing and experiencing. The separation of mind and body, reason and emotion, effect and affect in teaching and research might bear unintended and negative consequences for many children and teachers who are engaged in bodily and affective forms of learning science. In this forum we wish to expand on the discussion to consider the interdependent nature of learning, experience, and affect by drawing on our work with science teachers and culturally and linguistically diverse students, juxtaposed alongside Zembylas' reflections, to further theorize the affective turn in science education.

  11. River solute fluxes reflecting active hydrothermal chemical weathering of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, S.; Evans, William C.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few decades numerous studies have quantified the load of dissolved solids in large rivers to determine chemical weathering rates in orogenic belts and volcanic areas, mainly motivated by the notion that over timescales greater than ~100kyr, silicate hydrolysis may be the dominant sink for atmospheric CO2, thus creating a feedback between climate and weathering. Here, we report the results of a detailed study during water year 2007 (October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007) in the major rivers of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) which hosts Earth's largest "restless" caldera and over 10,000 thermal features. The chemical compositions of rivers that drain thermal areas in the YPVF differ significantly from the compositions of rivers that drain non-thermal areas. There are large seasonal variations in river chemistry and solute flux, which increases with increasing water discharge. The river chemistry and discharge data collected periodically over an entire year allow us to constrain the annual solute fluxes and to distinguish between low-temperature weathering and hydrothermal flux components. The TDS flux from Yellowstone Caldera in water year 2007 was 93t/km2/year. Extensive magma degassing and hydrothermal interaction with rocks accounts for at least 82% of this TDS flux, 83% of the cation flux and 72% of the HCO3- flux. The low-temperature chemical weathering rate (17t/km2/year), calculated on the assumption that all the Cl- is of thermal origin, could include a component from low-temperature hydrolysis reactions induced by CO2 ascending from depth rather than by atmospheric CO2. Although this uncertainty remains, the calculated low-temperature weathering rate of the young rhyolitic rocks in the Yellowstone Caldera is comparable to the world average of large watersheds that drain also more soluble carbonates and evaporates but is slightly lower than calculated rates in other, less-silicic volcanic regions. Long-term average fluxes at

  12. Multiple Andreev-reflection in superconducting weak-links in the interaction with external microwave-fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, U.; Keck, K.

    1996-01-01

    We present calculated current-voltage characteristics (CVCs) of NS- and SNS-contacts, where the carrier transport is characterised by single and multiple Andreev-reflection (AR) in the presence of an external microwave field. Based on the Tien-Gordon model of multiphoton-assisted electron tunneling we describe the microwave field by an ac-voltage potential. This additional potential is added in the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations (BdGE) which describe inhomogeneous superconductors and in this way NS-phase boundaries. These modified BdGE are solved by single particle wave-functions, which contain the multiphoton emission and absorption processes of the quasi-particles (QPs). With this ansatz we obtain an extension of the BTK-theory for NS-contacts and the OTBK-theory for SNS-contacts. We show, that the calculated CVCs for NS-contacts are in the case of a vanishing probability for AR identical with the characteristics obtained with the Tien-Gordon model. For SNS-contacts we show theoretically that features in the CVCs appear at voltages V=(2Δ)/(ne)+m/n (ℎω)/e (n,m integers). This equation was initially found experimentally by Hoffmann-Soerensen et al. We are now able to explain their results and show that investigations of the interaction of multiple AR with an external microwave field give clear evidence for the occurrence of multiple AR in the junction. (orig.)

  13. Worldwide distribution of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence instrumentation and its different fields of application: A survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockenkämper, Reinhold, E-mail: reinhold.klockenkaemper@isas.de; Bohlen, Alex von

    2014-09-01

    A survey was carried out with users and manufacturers of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence instrumentation in order to demonstrate the worldwide distribution of TXRF equipment and the different fields of applications. In general, TXRF users come from universities and scientific institutes, from working places at synchrotron beam-lines, or laboratories in semiconductor fabs. TXRF instrumentation is distributed in more than 50 countries on six continents and is applied at about 200 institutes and laboratories. The number of running desktop instruments amounts to nearly 300 units. About 60 beamlines run working places dedicated to TXRF. About 300 floor-mounted instruments are estimated to be used in about 150 fabs of the semiconductor industry. In total, 13 different fields of applications could be registered statistically from three different aspects. - Highlights: • According to the survey world maps show the distribution of TXRF equipment. • Nearly 700 individual units are running actually in 57 countries of 6 continents. • Users work at 200 universities, 60 synchrotron-beamlines, and 150 semiconductor fabs. • 13 fields of applications (e.g. environmental, chemical) are evaluated statistically. • Manufacturers, conference members and authors lead to 3 different pie-charts.

  14. Reflection and transmission characteristics of a layer obeying the two-pressure field poroelastic phenomenological model of Berryman and Wang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachkouch, F; Franklin, H; Tinel, A

    2018-07-01

    The characteristics of the reflection and transmission by a fluid-loaded double porosity layer are studied. The medium obeys the two-pressure field poroelastic phenomenological model of Berryman and Wang. The open pore hydraulic conditions applied at the interfaces yield factorized expressions for the coefficients exhibiting on the one hand a separation allowing to distinguish between symmetrical and antisymmetrical motions and on the other hand the way each of the three dilatational waves associate with the shear wave. The numerical study done for a layer of Berea sandstone saturated by water shows clearly the role of each of the dilatational waves. There are peculiarities such as the absence of the fundamental antisymmetrical mode (zero order) and a singular behaviour of the symmetrical fundamental mode. The low frequency approximation for this latter is derived from the proposed formulas and compared with the numerical results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of Coulomb potential on peak structures arising in momentum and low-energy photoelectron spectra produced in strong-field ionization of laser-irradiated atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyak, P. E.; Usachenko, V. I.

    2018-03-01

    The phenomenon of pronounced peak structure(s) of longitudinal momentum distributions as well as a spike-like structure of low-energy spectra of photoelectrons emitted from laser-irradiated Ar and Ne atoms in a single ionization process is theoretically studied in the tunneling and multiphoton regimes of ionization. The problem is addressed assuming only the direct above-threshold ionization (ATI) as a physical mechanism underlying the phenomenon under consideration (viz. solely contributing to observed photoelectron momentum distributions (PMD)) and using the Coulomb-Volkov (CV) ansatz within the frame of conventional strong-field approximation (SFA) applied in the length-gauge formulation. The developed CV-SFA approach also incorporates the density functional theory essentially exploited for numerical composition of initial (laser-free) atomic state(s) constructed from atomic orbitals of Gaussian type. Our presented CV-SFA based (and laser focal-volume averaged) calculation results proved to be well reproducing both the pronounced double-peak and/or ATI-like multi-peak structure(s) experimentally observed in longitudinal PMD under conditions of tunneling and/or multiphoton regime, respectively. In addition, our CV-SFA results presented for tunneling regime also suggest and remarkably reproduce a pronounced structure observed in relevant experiments as a ‘spike-like’ enhanced maximum arising in low-energy region (around the value of about 1 eV) of photoelectron spectra. The latter consistency allows to identify and interpret these results as the so-called low-energy structure (LES) since the phenomenon proved to appear as the most prominent if the influence of Coulomb potential on photoelectron continuum states is maximally taken into account under calculations (viz. if the parameter Z in CV’s functions is put equal to 1). Moreover, the calculated LES proved to correspond (viz., established as closely related) to the mentioned double-peak structure arising

  16. A comparative study of MP2, B3LYP, RHF and SCC-DFTB force fields in predicting the vibrational spectra of N-acetyl-L-alanine-N'-methyl amide: VA and VCD spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Jalkanen, Karl J.; Elstner, M.

    1999-01-01

    Recently we have looked for spectroscopic probes for secondary structural elements in the vibrational spectra of N-acetyl-L-alanine N'-methyl amide (NALANMA), L-alanine (LA), N-acetyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine N'-methyl amide (NALALANMA) and L-alanyl-L-alanine (LALA). Our goal has been to identify spect...

  17. Trying and Reflecting: Two Novice Teacher Educators' First Attempts at Guiding Pre-Service Teachers' Reflection on Literacy Field Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Danielle V.; Gelfuso, Andrea; Sweeney, Sherridon

    2018-01-01

    In Democracy and Education, Dewey aligns trying and undergoing as experience. Undergoing the consequences of trying by reflecting entails noticing and naming the details of the connections between the activity and the consequences. In this paper, we explore two novice teacher educators' first attempts at guiding pre-service teachers (PSTs)…

  18. Solar Energetic Particle Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. M.; Boezio, M.; Bravar, U.; Bruno, A.; Christian, E. R.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Martucci, M.; Mergè, M.; Munini, R.; Ricci, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Stochaj, S.

    2017-12-01

    We report updated event-integrated spectra from several SEP events measured with PAMELA. The measurements were made from 2006 to 2014 in the energy range starting at 80 MeV and extending well above the neutron monitor threshold. The PAMELA instrument is in a high inclination, low Earth orbit and has access to SEPs when at high latitudes. Spectra have been assembled from these high-latitude measurements. The field of view of PAMELA is small and during the high-latitude passes it scans a wide range of asymptotic directions as the spacecraft orbits. Correcting for data gaps, solid angle effects and improved background corrections, we have compiled event-integrated intensity spectra for twenty-eight SEP events. Where statistics permit, the spectra exhibit power law shapes in energy with a high-energy exponential roll over. The events analyzed include two genuine ground level enhancements (GLE). In those cases the roll-over energy lies above the neutron monitor threshold ( 1 GV) while the others are lower. We see no qualitative difference between the spectra of GLE vs. non-GLE events, i.e., all roll over in an exponential fashion with rapidly decreasing intensity at high energies.

  19. Exposure to 1.8 GHz electromagnetic fields affects morphology, DNA-related Raman spectra and mitochondrial functions in human lympho-monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalvia, M; Scrima, R; Perna, G; Piccoli, C; Capitanio, N; Biagi, P F; Schiavulli, L; Ligonzo, T; Centra, M; Casamassima, G; Ermini, A; Capozzi, V

    2018-01-01

    Blood is a fluid connective tissue of human body, where it plays vital functions for the nutrition, defense and well-being of the organism. When circulating in peripheral districts, it is exposed to some physical stresses coming from outside the human body, as electromagnetic fields (EMFs) which can cross the skin. Such fields may interact with biomolecules possibly inducing non thermal-mediated biological effects at the cellular level. In this study, the occurrence of biochemical/biological modifications in human peripheral blood lympho-monocytes exposed in a reverberation chamber for times ranging from 1 to 20 h to EMFs at 1.8 GHz frequency and 200 V/m electric field strength was investigated. Morphological analysis of adherent cells unveiled, in some of these, appearance of an enlarged and deformed shape after EMFs exposure. Raman spectra of the nuclear compartment of cells exposed to EMFs revealed the onset of biochemical modifications, mainly consisting in the reduction of the DNA backbone-linked vibrational modes. Respirometric measurements of mitochondrial activity in intact lympho-monocytes resulted in increase of the resting oxygen consumption rate after 20 h of exposure, which was coupled to a significant increase of the FoF1-ATP synthase-related oxygen consumption. Notably, at lower time-intervals of EMFs exposure (i.e. 5 and 12 h) a large increase of the proton leak-related respiration was observed which, however, recovered at control levels after 20 h exposure. Confocal microscopy analysis of the mitochondrial membrane potential supported the respiratory activities whereas no significant variations in the mitochondrial mass/morphology was observed in EMFs-exposed lympho-monocytes. Finally, altered redox homeostasis was shown in EMFs-exposed lympho-monocytes, which progressed differently in nucleated cellular subsets. This results suggest the occurrence of adaptive mechanisms put in action, likely via redox signaling, to compensate for early impairments

  20. Disentangling overlapping high-field EPR spectra of organic radicals: Identification of light-induced polarons in the record fullerene-free solar cell blend PBDB-T:ITIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landeghem, Melissa; Maes, Wouter; Goovaerts, Etienne; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2018-03-01

    We present a combined high-field EPR and DFT study of light-induced radicals in the bulk heterojunction blend of PBDB-T:ITIC, currently one of the highest efficiency non-fullerene donor:acceptor combinations in organic photovoltaics. We demonstrate two different approaches for disentangling the strongly overlapping high-field EPR spectra of the positive and negative polarons after charge separation: (1) relaxation-filtered field-swept EPR based on the difference in T1 spin-relaxation times and (2) field-swept EDNMR-induced EPR by exploiting the presence of 14N hyperfine couplings in only one of the radical species, the small molecule acceptor radical. The approach is validated by light-induced EPR spectra on related blends and the spectral assignment is underpinned by DFT computations. The broader applicability of the spectral disentangling methods is discussed.

  1. Statistical Analysis of the Reflectivity of a Heliostats Field. Application to the CR S Heliostats Field of the Plataforma Solar de Almeria; Analisis Estadistico de la Reflectividad de un Campo de Heliostatos CRS de la Plataforma Solar de Almeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Reche, J.

    2003-07-01

    Reflectivity measuring in a heliostats field of a solar central tower is a task that should performed periodically. The reflectivity of the field is a value that should be known to evaluate the system, moreover it plays an important role in several simulation codes which are useful for the daily operation of the system. When the size of the heliostats field increases (terns of heliostats) it is necessary to find a method, due to operability reasons, that allows us to offer a reflectivity value measuring only in fe facets guaranteeing that the statistical error of this value is within a reasonable range. In this report a statistical analysis of the reflectivity in a heliostats field is presented. The analysis was particularized for the CRS heliostats field of the Plataforma Solar de Almeria. The results of the present study allow us to guarantee a reflectivity value of the heliostats field with a statistical error below 1% measuring only 12 facets (instead of the 1116 facets that compose the field). (Author) 6 refs.

  2. 3D Seismic Reflection Amplitude and Instantaneous Frequency Attributes in Mapping Thin Hydrocarbon Reservoir Lithofacies: Morrison NE Field and Morrison Field, Clark County, KS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raef, Abdelmoneam; Totten, Matthew; Vohs, Andrew; Linares, Aria

    2017-12-01

    Thin hydrocarbon reservoir facies pose resolution challenges and waveform-signature opportunities in seismic reservoir characterization and prospect identification. In this study, we present a case study, where instantaneous frequency variation in response to a thin hydrocarbon pay zone is analyzed and integrated with other independent information to explain drilling results and optimize future drilling decisions. In Morrison NE Field, some wells with poor economics have resulted from well-placement incognizant of reservoir heterogeneities. The study area in Clark County, Kanas, USA, has been covered by a surface 3D seismic reflection survey in 2010. The target horizon is the Viola limestone, which continues to produce from 7 of the 12 wells drilled within the survey area. Seismic attributes extraction and analyses were conducted with emphasis on instantaneous attributes and amplitude anomalies to better understand and predict reservoir heterogeneities and their control on hydrocarbon entrapment settings. We have identified a higher instantaneous frequency, lower amplitude seismic facies that is in good agreement with distinct lithofacies that exhibit better (higher porosity) reservoir properties, as inferred from well-log analysis and petrographic inspection of well cuttings. This study presents a pre-drilling, data-driven approach of identifying sub-resolution reservoir seismic facies in a carbonate formation. This workflow will assist in placing new development wells in other locations within the area. Our low amplitude high instantaneous frequency seismic reservoir facies have been corroborated by findings based on well logs, petrographic analysis data, and drilling results.

  3. Reflecting on the PRET A Rapporter Framework Via a Field Study of Adolescents? Perceptions of Technology and Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Edwards

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PRET A Rapporter (PRETAR was developed to explicitly structure user-centered evaluation studies to ensure all necessary elements are individually and independently considered. Its creators see its benefit as twofold: for study design and in retrospective evaluations. We evaluate PRETAR’s potential by applying it retrospectively to one of our eHealth field studies in which we investigated the design requirements for mobile technologies that would support and motivate adolescents to exercise opportunistically. We also use PRETAR to evaluate the key literature for this eHealth study. This shows that typically the research methodology is under-reported. Then we document the study in terms of its purpose, resources, ethical concerns, data collection and analysis techniques, and manner of reporting the study. Finally, our reflection on the use of PRETAR leads us to propose that four different modes of the framework should be applied during the course of a study, that is, when reviewing, planning, conducting, and discussing.

  4. 50-nm-resolution full-field X-ray microscope without chromatic aberration using total-reflection imaging mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yasuda, Shuhei; Yamada, Jumpei; Okada, Hiromi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2017-04-13

    X-ray spectromicroscopy with a full-field imaging technique is a powerful method for chemical analysis of heterogeneous complex materials with a nano-scale spatial resolution. For imaging optics, an X-ray reflective optical system has excellent capabilities with highly efficient, achromatic, and long-working-distance properties. An advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry that combines four independent mirrors with elliptic and hyperbolic shapes in both horizontal and vertical directions was developed for this purpose, although the complexity of the system has a limited applicable range. Here, we present an optical system consisting of two monolithic imaging mirrors. Elliptic and hyperbolic shapes were formed on a single substrate to achieve both high resolution and sufficient stability. The mirrors were finished with a ~1-nm shape accuracy using elastic emission machining. The performance was tested at SPring-8 with a photon energy of approximately 10 keV. We could clearly resolve 50-nm features in a Siemens star without chromatic aberration and with high stability over 20 h. We applied this system to X-ray absorption fine structure spectromicroscopy and identified elements and chemical states in specimens of zinc and tungsten micron-size particles.

  5. 50-nm-resolution full-field X-ray microscope without chromatic aberration using total-reflection imaging mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yasuda, Shuhei; Yamada, Jumpei; Okada, Hiromi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2017-04-01

    X-ray spectromicroscopy with a full-field imaging technique is a powerful method for chemical analysis of heterogeneous complex materials with a nano-scale spatial resolution. For imaging optics, an X-ray reflective optical system has excellent capabilities with highly efficient, achromatic, and long-working-distance properties. An advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry that combines four independent mirrors with elliptic and hyperbolic shapes in both horizontal and vertical directions was developed for this purpose, although the complexity of the system has a limited applicable range. Here, we present an optical system consisting of two monolithic imaging mirrors. Elliptic and hyperbolic shapes were formed on a single substrate to achieve both high resolution and sufficient stability. The mirrors were finished with a ~1-nm shape accuracy using elastic emission machining. The performance was tested at SPring-8 with a photon energy of approximately 10 keV. We could clearly resolve 50-nm features in a Siemens star without chromatic aberration and with high stability over 20 h. We applied this system to X-ray absorption fine structure spectromicroscopy and identified elements and chemical states in specimens of zinc and tungsten micron-size particles.

  6. Intradot spin-flip Andreev reflection tunneling through a ferromagnet-quantum dot-superconductor system with ac field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Hongyan; Zhou Shiping

    2008-01-01

    We investigate Andreev reflection (AR) tunneling through a ferromagnet-quantum dot-superconductor (F-QD-S) system in the presence of an external ac field. The intradot spin-flip scattering in the QD is involved. Using the nonequilibrium Green function and BCS quasiparticle spectrum for superconductor, time-averaged AR conductance is formulated. The competition between the intradot spin-flip scattering and photon-assisted tunneling dominates the resonant behaviors of the time-averaged AR conductance. For weak intradot spin-flip scattering strengths, the AR conductance shows a series of equal interval resonant levels. However, the single-peak at main resonant level develops into a well-resolved double-peak resonance at a strong intradot spin-flip scattering strength. Remarkable, multiple-photon-assisted tunneling that generates photonic sideband peaks with a variable interval has been found. In addition, the AR conductance-bias voltage characteristic shows a transition between the single-peak to double-peak resonance as the ratio of the two tunneling strengths varies

  7. Depth-dependent Vertical-to-Horizontal (V/H) Ratios of Free-Field Ground Motion Response Spectra for Deeply Embedded Nuclear Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Braverman, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Miranda, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rosario, M. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Costantino, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report documents the results of a study to determine the depth-dependent V/H ratios of ground motion response spectra in the free field. The V/H ratios reported herein were developed from a worldwide database of surface and downhole acceleration recordings obtained from 45 vertical array stations. This database was specifically compiled for this project, and includes information from a diversity of active tectonic regions (California, Alaska, Taiwan, Japan), site conditions (rock to soft soil), ground motion intensity levels (PGAs between 0.01 g and 0.50 g), magnitudes (between ML 2.78 and JMA 8.1), epicentral distances (between 3.2 km and 812 km), and source depths (between 1.2 km and 112 km), as well as sensors at surface and at a wide range of depths relevant to the project. To study the significance of the depth effect, V/H ratios from all the records were sorted into a number of depth bins relevant to the project, and statistics (average, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, 16th, 50th, and 84th percentiles) of the V/H ratios within each bin were computed. Similar analyses were repeated, controlling for different site conditions, ground motion intensity levels, array locations, and source depths, to study their relative effect on the V/H ratios. Our findings confirm the importance of the depth effect on the V/H ratios. The research findings in this report can be used to provide guidance on the significance of the depth effect, and the extent to which this effect should be considered in the seismic design of deeply embedded SMR structures and NPP structures in general.

  8. Quantitative Estimation of Carbonate Rock Fraction in Karst Regions Using Field Spectra in 2.0–2.5 μm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjian Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the important roles of carbonate rock fraction in karst rocky desertification areas and their potential for indicating damage to vegetation, improved knowledge is desired to assess the application of spectroscopy and remote sensing to characterizing and quantifying the biophysical constituents of karst landscapes. In this study, we examined the spectra of major surface constituents in karst areas for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to carbonate rock fraction. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that there are overlapping spectral absorption in 2.149–2.398 μm by soils and non-photosynthetic vegetation. These overlapping features complicated the carbonate absorption feature near 2.340 μm in synthetic mixed spectra. To remove the overprint signal, two hyperspectral carbonate rock indices (HCRIs were developed. Compared to the absorption features including depths, areas, and KRDSIs (karst rocky desertification synthesis indices, linear regression of HCRIs with carbonate rock fraction in linear synthetic mixtures resulted in higher correlations and lower errors. This study demonstrates that spectral variation of the surface constituents spectra in 2.270–2.398 μm region can indicate carbonate rock fraction and be used to quantify them. Still, additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the spectral influences from carbonate petrography relative to carbonate mineralogy, components and physical state of rock surface.

  9. A BAND SELECTION METHOD FOR SUB-PIXEL TARGET DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES BASED ON LABORATORY AND FIELD REFLECTANCE SPECTRAL COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sharifi hashjin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developing target detection algorithms has received growing interest in hyperspectral images. In comparison to the classification field, few studies have been done on dimension reduction or band selection for target detection in hyperspectral images. This study presents a simple method to remove bad bands from the images in a supervised manner for sub-pixel target detection. The proposed method is based on comparing field and laboratory spectra of the target of interest for detecting bad bands. For evaluation, the target detection blind test dataset is used in this study. Experimental results show that the proposed method can improve efficiency of the two well-known target detection methods, ACE and CEM.

  10. Earthquake-faulting-related deformation in soil evidenced in S-wave shallow reflection data: Field results from Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, João; Ghose, R.; Alves, D.; Leote, J

    2016-01-01

    Expressions of ductile, soft-sediment deformations induced by ground movements due to past earthquakes are difficult to recognize in near-surface soils. We have carried out shallow S-wave reflection studies in a seismically active area located northeast of metropolitan Lisbon, Portugal. Identifying

  11. Updated Army Cook Staffing Model to Reflect Workloads Generated by Current Field Feeding Operations, Group Rations, and Kitchens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirejczyk, Harry J

    2006-01-01

    ...: the Unitized Group Ration-A (UGR-A) and the Unitized Group Ration-Heat/Serve (UGR-H/S). These fieldings were designed to increase the frequency and quality of group hot meals and reduce the cook workloads generated by field feeding operations...

  12. Shot- and angle-domain wave-equation traveltime inversion of reflection data: Synthetic and field data examples

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2015-05-26

    Full-waveform inversion requires the accurate simulation of the dynamics and kinematics of wave propagation. This is difficult in practice because the amplitudes cannot be precisely reproduced for seismic waves in the earth. Wave-equation reflection traveltime tomography (WT) is proposed to avoid this problem by directly inverting the reflection-traveltime residuals without the use of the high-frequency approximation. We inverted synthetic traces and recorded seismic data for the velocity model by WT. Our results demonstrated that the wave-equation solution overcame the high-frequency approximation of ray-based tomography, was largely insensitive to the accurate modeling of amplitudes, and mitigated problems with ambiguous event identification. The synthetic examples illustrated the effectiveness of the WT method in providing a highly resolved estimate of the velocity model. A real data example from the Gulf of Mexico demonstrated these benefits of WT, but also found the limitations in traveltime residual estimation for complex models.

  13. Rydberg and π-π* transitions in film surfaces of various kinds of nylons studied by attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations: peak shifts in the spectra and their relation to nylon structure and hydrogen bondings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisawa, Yusuke; Yasunaga, Manaka; Sato, Harumi; Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-10-09

    Attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet (ATR-FUV) spectra in the 145-260 nm region were measured for surfaces (thickness 50-200 nm) of various kinds of nylons in cast films to explore their electronic transitions in the FUV region. ATR-FUV spectra show two major bands near 150 and 200 nm in the surface condensed phase of nylons. Transmittance (Tr) spectra were also observed in particular for the analysis of valence excitations. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT/CAM-B3LYP) calculations were carried out using the model systems to provide the definitive assignments of their absorption spectra and to elucidate their peak shifts in several nylons, in particular, focusing on their crystal alignment structures and intermolecular hydrogen bondings. Two major bands of nylon films near 150 and 200 nm are characterized as σ-Rydberg 3p and π-π* transitions of nylons, respectively. These assignments are also coherent with those of liquid n-alkanes (n = 5-14) and liquid amides observed previously. The Rydberg transitions are delocalized over the hydrocarbon chains, while the π-π* transitions are relatively localized at the amide group. Differences in the peak positions and intensity were found in both ATR- and Tr-FUV spectra for different nylons. A red-shift of the π-π* amide band in the FUV spectra of nylon-6 and nylon-6/6 models in α-form is attributed to the crystal structure pattern and the intermolecular hydrogen bondings, which result in the different delocalization character of the π-π* transitions and transition dipole coupling.

  14. Calculation of back-reflected intensities of a Na-atom beam by standing evanescent E-M field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.; Goodman, P.; Smith, A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for the computation of the back-scattered intensities of atomic beams, diffracted from the evanescent field generated outside an optical plate by internal counter-propagating laser beams. The method derives from a procedure developed for the similar but importantly differing problem of Low Energy Electron Diffraction, (Lynch and Smith, 1983). Modifications to that theory required for the present problem bring the equations closer to the RHEED solution proposed by Ichimiya (1983). Results from multi-slicing from the same narrow field depth (2 Aangstroems) in this strong field case show the success and also limitations of the program in its present form. Computation to greater depth in the strong field leads to numerical instabilities due to the incorporation of very large tunnelling terms. This requires the application of boundary conditions at each slice rather than the end of the multi-slice calculation. 7 refs., 3 figs

  15. MODEL FOR CALCULATING EFFECTIVE PARAMETERS OF MATRIX COMPOSITES FROM BI-ISOTROPIC PARTICLES WITH REGARD MULTIPLE REFLECTIONS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Erofeenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for calculation of the effective material parameters of matrix composites, consisting of magnetodielectric conducting matrix with a set of bi-isotropic spherical fractions, is developed. Under the calculations of parameters, taking into account a multiple scattering of the field between particles, a new type of addition theorems, connecting basic spherical electromagnetic fields relating to different particles, is used. The developed method allows to calculate the effective parameters for the composites with sufficiently dense ensemble of the fractions.

  16. Reflection Positivity and Monotonicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, Gordon; Jaffe, Arthur Michael

    2008-01-01

    We prove general reflection positivity results for both scalar fields and Dirac fields on a Riemannian manifold, and comment on applications to quantum field theory. As another application, we prove the inequality \\(C_D \\leq C_N\\) between Dirichlet and Neumann covariance operators on a manifold with a reflection.

  17. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Reflection has moved from the margins to the mainstream in supervision. Notions of reflection have become well established since the late 1980s. These notions have provided useful framing devices to help conceptualize some important processes in guidance and counseling. However, some applications...... of these notions have distorted their original connotations and taken an excessively instrumentalistic and individualistic approach to their use. This paper will argue that we are, in the 2000s, seeing a questioning of an overly instrumentalistic and individualistic view of learning and development previously...... associated with reflection and an exploration of alternative conceptions that view reflection within the context of settings which have a more group- and team-based orientation. Drawing on an action research project on health care supervision, the paper questions whether we should reject earlier views...

  18. Nuclear Spectra from Skyrmions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manton, N.

    2009-01-01

    For some time now, the Skyrme model has been studied as an effective nonlinear field theory in nuclear physics. Its classical, stable soliton solutions, called Skyrmions, have a conserved topological charge which is identified with baryon number. A quantized Skyrmion models a nucleus. Skyrmions with baryon number a multiple of four are structurally similar to the cluster structures well-known in the a-particle model. The most convenient quantization scheme treats a Skyrmion as a rigid body in space and isospin space, and quantizes just the collective rotational motion. Some selected vibrational modes of Skyrmions may be included too. This approach has been applied previously to Skyrmions up to baryon number about 6, by Braaten and Carson, Kopeliovich, Walhout, and others. Recently, Battye, Manton, Sutcliffe and Wood have calculated the moment of inertia tensors in space and isospace for Skyrmions up to baryon number 12. The allowed spin and isospin states have been found, and the energy spectra calculated. These spectra agree quite well with experimental spectra of several light nuclei, including 6 L i, 8 B e, 1 2C , and their various isotopes. However, for this to work, the length scale needs to be set rather larger than the traditional value determined by Adkins and Nappi using the nucleon and delta resonance masses. The most interesting theoretical feature of these calculations is that isospin and spin excitations are treated in a uniform way. There are quite subtle constraints on the possible spin and isospin values, because of the classical symmetries of each Skyrmion. Manton and his students, and Battye and Sutcliffe, have published a number of papers on classical and quantized Skyrmions in journals and on the arXiv. They are also jointly contributing an invited chapter on Skyrmions and Nuclei to the book The Multifaceted Skyrmion, currently being edited by G. Brown and M. Rho.(author)

  19. Reflection Positive Doubles

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffe, Arthur; Janssens, Bas

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce reflection positive doubles, a general framework for reflection positivity, covering a wide variety of systems in statistical physics and quantum field theory. These systems may be bosonic, fermionic, or parafermionic in nature. Within the framework of reflection positive doubles, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for reflection positivity. We use a reflection-invariant cone to implement our construction. Our characterization allows for a direct interpretation in t...

  20. SE-590 Lab-Measured Reflectances (OTTER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laboratory hemispherical reflectance spectra measurements taken to eliminate the effects of atmosphere, understory, exposed soils, mixed species and canopy...

  1. Different spectra with the same neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Ortiz R, J. M.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Martinez B, M. R.; Hernandez A, B.; Ortiz H, A. A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Mercado, G. A., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.co [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Matematicas, Jardin Juarez No. 147, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    Using as source term the spectrum of a {sup 239}Pu-Be source several neutron spectra have been calculated using Monte Carlo methods. The source term was located in the centre of spherical moderators made of light water, heavy water and polyethylene of different diameters. Also a {sup 239}Pu-Be source was used to measure its neutron spectrum, bare and moderated by water. The neutron spectra were measured at 100 cm with a Bonner spheres spectrometer. Monte Carlo calculations were used to calculate the neutron spectra of bare and water-moderated spectra that were compared with those measured with the spectrometer. Resulting spectra are similar to those found in power plants with PWR, BWR and Candu nuclear reactors. Beside the spectra the dosimetric features were determined. Using moderators and a single neutron source can be produced neutron spectra alike those found in workplaces, this neutron fields can be utilized to calibrate neutron dosimeters and area monitors. (Author)

  2. Different spectra with the same neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.; Ortiz R, J. M.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Martinez B, M. R.; Hernandez A, B.; Ortiz H, A. A.; Mercado, G. A.

    2010-01-01

    Using as source term the spectrum of a 239 Pu-Be source several neutron spectra have been calculated using Monte Carlo methods. The source term was located in the centre of spherical moderators made of light water, heavy water and polyethylene of different diameters. Also a 239 Pu-Be source was used to measure its neutron spectrum, bare and moderated by water. The neutron spectra were measured at 100 cm with a Bonner spheres spectrometer. Monte Carlo calculations were used to calculate the neutron spectra of bare and water-moderated spectra that were compared with those measured with the spectrometer. Resulting spectra are similar to those found in power plants with PWR, BWR and Candu nuclear reactors. Beside the spectra the dosimetric features were determined. Using moderators and a single neutron source can be produced neutron spectra alike those found in workplaces, this neutron fields can be utilized to calibrate neutron dosimeters and area monitors. (Author)

  3. First year medical student attitudes about advocacy in medicine across multiple fields of discipline: analysis of reflective essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Valerie G; Fritz, Cassandra D L; Vela, Monica B

    2015-12-01

    Advocacy is often described as a pillar of the medical profession. However, the impact of advocacy training on medical students' identity as advocates in the medical profession is not well-described. We sought to introduce an advocacy curriculum to a mandatory Health Care Disparities (HCD) course for 88 first year medical students. The 2013 HCD added advocacy curriculum that included: guest lecturers' perspectives on their advocacy experience; reflective essay assignments assessing self-identify as an advocate; advocacy-specific lectures and large group discussions; and participation in small group community projects. A mixed methods approached was used to evaluate 88 first year medical students' advocacy themed reflective essays, independently coded by three investigators, and Likert-response questions were compared to published benchmarked items. The IRB exempted this study. Analysis of student essays revealed that students were better able to identify as an advocate in medicine. The survey also revealed that 86% post-course vs. 73% precourse agreed/strongly agreed with the statement: "I consider myself an advocate" (p=0.006). Exposing all medical students to advocacy within medicine may help shape and define their perceived professional role. Future work will explore adding advocacy and leadership skill training to the HCD course.

  4. Choosing a Field: How Graduate Student Choices of Field Sites Reflect Different Ideas of "Real" Anthropology in Colombia and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macia, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the decisions and motivations of graduate students in cultural anthropology when defining the field sites and topics of their final projects. The decisions among students at the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia are contrasted with those at the University of Pittsburgh in the United States. A review of recent final projects…

  5. Product-services as a research field: past, present and future. Reflections from a decade of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tukker, A.; Tischner, U.

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade many researchers, institutes and programs in the EU paid attention to product-service systems (PSS). Given this massive effort, it is time to take stock. Is PSS research a theoretical field in its own right? Is the PSS concept indeed the road to the Factor 10 world? Is it the road

  6. The relationship of field burn severity measures to satellite-derived Burned Area Reflectance Classification (BARC) maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Hudak; Penelope Morgan; Carter Stone; Pete Robichaud; Terrie Jain; Jess Clark

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from ongoing research on spatial variability of fire effects on soils and vegetation from the Black Mountain Two and Cooney Ridge wildfires, which burned in western Montana during the 2003 fire season. Extensive field fractional cover data were sampled to assess the efficacy of quantitative satellite image-derived indicators of burn...

  7. ASSESSING INTRA- AND INTER-FIELD VARIABILITY OF CORN NITROGEN FERTILIZER NEED USING GROUND-BASED REFLECTANCE SENSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since soil types within and between corn (Zea mays L.) fields can be highly variable, the amount of nitrogen (N) provided by those different soil types to support production can also be highly variable. Ideally, the amount of N fertilizer added during a given growing season should be both climate-se...

  8. MSW Foundation Students in the Field: Reflections on the Nature and Quality of Group Work Assignments and Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPorte, Heidi Heft; Sweifach, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Commentators find that education in social group work has diminished over the past three decades, creating a shortage in group work-trained field instructors. The role of instructing group work students may appear relatively easy; however, quality instruction requires careful planning, time, energy, and specialized knowledge. Without knowledge and…

  9. SpectraCam®: A new polarized hyperspectral imaging system for repeatable and reproducible in vivo skin quantification of melanin, total hemoglobin, and oxygen saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkengne, A; Robic, J; Seroul, P; Gueheunneux, S; Jomier, M; Vie, K

    2018-02-01

    An accurate way to determine skin pigmentation is to acquire the spectral reflectance of a skin sample and to quantify chromophores by reverse calculation from physical models of light propagation. Therefore, we tested a new hyperspectral imaging device and software suite, the SpectraCam ® system, and evaluated its accuracy to quantify skin chromophores. Validation of the SpectraCam ® system was performed by, firstly, comparing the known and the acquired reflectance spectra of color phantoms. Repeatability and reproducibility were then evaluated by two operators who performed acquisitions at different time points and compared the acquired reflectance spectra. The specificity of the system was tested by quantitative analysis of single chromophore variation models: lentigo and pressure relief. Finally, we tested the ability of the SpectraCam ® system to detect variations in chromophore in the eye region due to the daily application of a new anti-dark circle cosmetic product. The SpectraCam ® system faithfully acquires the reflectance spectra of color phantoms (r 2 >0.90). The skin reflectance spectra acquired by different operators at different times are highly repeatable (r 2 >0.94) and reproducible (r 2 >0.99). The SpectraCam ® system can also produce qualitative maps that reveal local variations in skin chromophore or underlying structures such as blood vessels. The system is precise enough to detect melanin variation in lentigo or total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation variations upon pressure relief. It is also sensitive enough to detect a decrease in melanin in the eye region due to the application of an anti-dark circle cosmetic product. The SpectraCam ® system proves to be rapid and produces high-resolution data encompassing a large field of view. It is a robust hyperspectral imaging system that quantifies melanin, total hemoglobin, and oxygen saturation and is well adapted to cosmetic research. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  10. A Bird's-Eye View of Alzheimer's Disease Research: Reflecting Different Perspectives of Indexers, Authors, or Citers in Mapping the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dahee; Kim, Won Chul; Charidimou, Andreas; Song, Min

    2015-01-01

    During the last 30 years, Alzheimer's disease (AD) research, aiming to understand the pathophysiology and to improve the diagnosis, management, and, ultimately, treatment of the disease, has grown rapidly. Recently, some studies have used simple bibliometric approaches to investigate research trends and advances in the field. In our study, we map the AD research field by applying entitymetrics, an extended concept of bibliometrics, to capture viewpoints of indexers, authors, or citers. Using the full-text documents with reference section retrieved from PubMed Central, we constructed four types of networks: MeSH-MeSH (MM), MeSH-Citation-MeSH (MCM), Keyphrase-Keyphrase (KK), and Keyphrase-Citation-Keyphrase (KCK) networks. The working hypothesis was that MeSH, keyphrase, and citation relationships reflect the views of indexers, authors, and/or citers, respectively. In comparative network and centrality analysis, we found that those views are different: indexers emphasize amyloid-related entities, including methodological terms, while authors focus on specific biomedical terms, including clinical syndromes. The more dense and complex networks of citing relationships reported in our study, to a certain extent reflect the impact of basic science discoveries in AD. However, none of these could have had clinical relevance for patients without close collaboration between investigators in translational and clinical-related AD research (reflected in indexers and authors' networks). Our approach has relevance for researches in the field, since they can identify relations between different developments which are not otherwise evident. These developments combined with advanced visualization techniques, might aid the discovery of novel interactions between genes and pathways or used as a resource to advance clinical drug development.

  11. Linking canopy reflectance to crop structure and photosynthesis to capture and interpret spatiotemporal dimensions of per-field photosynthetic productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Jeong, Seungtaek; Ko, Jonghan; Tenhunen, John

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen and water availability alter canopy structure and physiology, and thus crop growth, yielding large impacts on ecosystem-regulating/production provisions. However, to date, explicitly quantifying such impacts remains challenging partially due to lack of adequate methodology to capture spatial dimensions of ecosystem changes associated with nitrogen and water effects. A data fitting, where close-range remote-sensing measurements of vegetation indices derived from a handheld instrument and an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system are linked to in situ leaf and canopy photosynthetic traits, was applied to capture and interpret inter- and intra-field variations in gross primary productivity (GPP) in lowland rice grown under flooded conditions (paddy rice, PD) subject to three nitrogen application rates and under rainfed conditions (RF) in an East Asian monsoon region of South Korea. Spatial variations (SVs) in both GPP and light use efficiency (LUEcabs) early in the growing season were enlarged by nitrogen addition. The nutritional effects narrowed over time. A shift in planting culture from flooded to rainfed conditions strengthened SVs in GPP and LUEcabs. Intervention of prolonged drought late in the growing season dramatically intensified SVs that were supposed to seasonally decrease. Nevertheless, nitrogen addition effects on SV of LUEcabs at the early growth stage made PD fields exert greater SVs than RF fields. SVs of GPP across PD and RF rice fields were likely related to leaf area index (LAI) development less than to LUEcabs, while numerical analysis suggested that considering strength in LUEcabs and its spatial variation for the same crop type tends to be vital for better evaluation in landscape/regional patterns of ecosystem photosynthetic productivity at critical phenology stages.

  12. Appraisal of artificial screening techniques of tomato to accurately reflect field performance of the late blight resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowska, Marzena; Nowicki, Marcin; Kłosińska, Urszula; Maciorowski, Robert; Kozik, Elżbieta U

    2014-01-01

    Late blight (LB) caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans continues to thwart global tomato production, while only few resistant cultivars have been introduced locally. In order to gain from the released tomato germplasm with LB resistance, we compared the 5-year field performance of LB resistance in several tomato cultigens, with the results of controlled conditions testing (i.e., detached leaflet/leaf, whole plant). In case of these artificial screening techniques, the effects of plant age and inoculum concentration were additionally considered. In the field trials, LA 1033, L 3707, L 3708 displayed the highest LB resistance, and could be used for cultivar development under Polish conditions. Of the three methods using controlled conditions, the detached leaf and the whole plant tests had the highest correlation with the field experiments. The plant age effect on LB resistance in tomato reported here, irrespective of the cultigen tested or inoculum concentration used, makes it important to standardize the test parameters when screening for resistance. Our results help show why other reports disagree on LB resistance in tomato.

  13. Appraisal of artificial screening techniques of tomato to accurately reflect field performance of the late blight resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Nowakowska

    Full Text Available Late blight (LB caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans continues to thwart global tomato production, while only few resistant cultivars have been introduced locally. In order to gain from the released tomato germplasm with LB resistance, we compared the 5-year field performance of LB resistance in several tomato cultigens, with the results of controlled conditions testing (i.e., detached leaflet/leaf, whole plant. In case of these artificial screening techniques, the effects of plant age and inoculum concentration were additionally considered. In the field trials, LA 1033, L 3707, L 3708 displayed the highest LB resistance, and could be used for cultivar development under Polish conditions. Of the three methods using controlled conditions, the detached leaf and the whole plant tests had the highest correlation with the field experiments. The plant age effect on LB resistance in tomato reported here, irrespective of the cultigen tested or inoculum concentration used, makes it important to standardize the test parameters when screening for resistance. Our results help show why other reports disagree on LB resistance in tomato.

  14. Reflection of hierarchical medium structures of different scales in the space time data of wave fields distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The last decades are characterized by active development of Earth's sciences. The modern research methods and technologies give the opportunity to obtain new data about the Earth's structure and processes, which occur in its interior. The conception development about the nonlinear geodynamics practically coincides with research of nonlinear processes in different parts of physics. In geology soliton and auto wave conceptions are developed, principles of synergetic and self organization become be used, in geodynamics the macro quantum behavior of large mass matter, which are in critical state, in geophysics the auto wave nature of geophysical fields is researched in a frame of a new structural model with hierarchical inclusions. It is very significant to define the time of reaction lagging, in spite of the influence on the massif can be assumed as elastic. The unique model which can explain that effect is a model of the massif with a hierarchic structure. We developed a mathematical algorithm using integral and integral-differential equations for 2-D model for two problems in a frequency domain: diffraction a sound wave and linear polarized transverse wave through a arbitrary hierarchy rank inclusion plunged in an N-layered medium. That algorithm differs from the fractal model approach by a freer selecting of heterogeneities position of each rank. And the second, the problem is solved in the dynamical approach. The higher the amount of the hierarchic ranks the more is the degree of nonlinearity of the massive response and the longer can be the time of massive reaction lag of the influence. For research of hierarchic medium we had developed an iterative algorithm for electromagnetic and seismic fields in the problem setting similar to analyze higher for layered-block models with homogeneous inclusions. We had developed an iterative algorithm of inverse problem solution for the same models, using the approach of three stage interpretation. For that we had developed a

  15. Numerical simulation of the temperature, electron density, and electric field distributions near the ionospheric reflection height after turn-on of a powerful HF wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldrew, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    The time variation of the electron temperature profile in the ionosphere following turn-on of a powerful 1-s HF pulse is determined numerically from the energy balance equation. Using this and the equations of motion and continuity for a plasma, the effect of heating and the pondermotive force of a powerful HF wave on the electron density and electric field distributions are determined by numerical simulation. The temperature variation and ponderomotive force modify the density distribution, and this new density distribution, in turn, modifies the electric field distribution of the HF wave. The density deviations grow for a few hundred milliseconds after HF turn-on and then begin to fluctuate in time. At all heights the wave number of the density deviations is approximately twice the wave number of the HF wave. For electric fields near reflection of about 6.0 V/m, the electric field distribution becomes complicated, apparently depending on Bragg scattering of the HF wave from the density deviations. Density impulses propagate away (up and down) from electric field maxima, at the ion thermal velocity, at both turn-on and turn-off of the HF wave

  16. Double photoionisation spectra of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Eland, John

    2017-01-01

    This book contains spectra of the doubly charged positive ions (dications) of some 75 molecules, including the major constituents of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and prototypes of major chemical groups. It is intended to be a new resource for research in all areas of molecular spectroscopy involving high energy environments, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial. All the spectra have been produced by photoionisation using laboratory lamps or synchrotron radiation and have been measured using the magnetic bottle time-of-flight technique by coincidence detection of correlated electron pairs. Full references to published work on the same species are given, though for several molecules these are the first published spectra. Double ionisation energies are listed and discussed in relation to the molecular electronic structure of the molecules. A full introduction to the field of molecular double ionisation is included and the mechanisms by which double photoionisation can occur are examined in detail. A p...

  17. Decomposition of spectra using maximum autocorrelation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of generating a low dimensional representation of the variation present in a set of spectra, e.g. reflection spectra recorded from a series of objects. The resulting low dimensional description may subseque ntly be input through variable selection schemes into cla......This paper addresses the problem of generating a low dimensional representation of the variation present in a set of spectra, e.g. reflection spectra recorded from a series of objects. The resulting low dimensional description may subseque ntly be input through variable selection schemes...... into classification or regression type analyses. A featured method for low dimensional representation of multivariate datasets is Hotellings principal components transform. We will extend the use of principal components analysis incorporating new information into the algorithm. This new information consists...

  18. Spectral and partial-wave decomposition of time-dependent wave functions on a grid: Photoelectron spectra of H and H2+ in electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Kjeldsen, T. K.; Madsen, L. B.

    2007-01-01

    We present a method for spectral (bound and continuum) and partial-wave analysis of a three-dimensional time-dependent wave function, defined on a grid, without projecting onto the field-free eigenstates of the system. The method consists of propagating the time-dependent Schroedinger equation to obtain its autocorrelation function C(t)= after the end of the interaction, at time T, of the system with an external time-dependent field. The Fourier spectrum of this correlation function is directly related to the expansion coefficients of the wave function on the field-free bound and continuum energy eigenstates of the system. By expanding on a spherical harmonics basis we show how to calculate the contribution of the various partial waves to the total photoelectron energy spectrum

  19. Mechanical and chemical processes affecting the chalk during burial, insights from combined reflection seismics, well data and field work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph

    2014-01-01

    works have been performed with astronomical calibration based on stable isotope stratigraphy, wireline logs as well as several palaeontological proxies and detailed sedimentological analysis. Since a couple of decades, a specific kind of fractures has been described in the Chalk of Denmark, the so...... along the fractures (the compaction bands). The link between these different features has been realised thanks to the simultaneous analyses of large-scale geophysical data and small-scale core and field geological observations, providing a better understanding of the complex processes of lithification...

  20. Vicarious calibration of the solar reflection channels of radiometers onboard satellites through the field campaigns with measurements of refractive index and size distribution of aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, K.

    A comparative study on vicarious calibration for the solar reflection channels of radiometers onboard satellite through the field campaigns between with and without measurements of refractive index and size distribution of aerosols is made. In particular, it is noticed that the influence due to soot from the cars exhaust has to be care about for the test sites near by a heavy trafficked roads. It is found that the 0.1% inclusion of soot induces around 10% vicarious calibration error so that it is better to measure refractive index properly at the test site. It is found that the vicarious calibration coefficients with the field campaigns at the different test site, Ivanpah (near road) and Railroad (distant from road) shows approximately 10% discrepancy. It seems that one of the possible causes for the difference is the influence due to soot from cars exhaust.

  1. Cropland Field Monitoring: MMV Page 1 Montana Cropland Enrolled Farm Fields Carbon Sequestration Field Sampling, Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification: Application of Visible-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (VNIR) and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Spangler; Ross Bricklemyer; David Brown

    2012-03-15

    There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laboratory based soil characterization typically requires significant soil processing, which is time and resource intensive. This severely limits application for large-region soil characterization. Thus, development of rapid and accurate methods for characterizing soils are needed to map soil properties for precision agriculture applications, improve regional and global soil carbon (C) stock and flux estimates and efficiently map sub-surface metal contamination, among others. The greatest gains for efficient soil characterization will come from collecting soil data in situ, thus minimizing soil sample transportation, processing, and lab-based measurement costs. Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VisNIR) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are two complementary, yet fundamentally different spectroscopic techniques that have the potential to meet this need. These sensors have the potential to be mounted on a soil penetrometer and deployed for rapid soil profile characterization at field and landscape scales. Details of sensor interaction, efficient data management, and appropriate statistical analysis techniques for model calibrations are first needed. In situ or on-the-go VisNIR spectroscopy has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive tool for intensively mapping soil texture and organic carbon (SOC). While lab-based VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for estimating various soil properties, few experiments have compared the predictive accuracy of on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Eight north central Montana wheat fields were intensively interrogated using on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Lab-based spectral data consistently provided more accurate predictions than on-the-go data. However, neither in situ

  2. Do Mendeley reader counts reflect the scholarly impact of conference papers? An investigation of Computer Science and Engineering fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aduku, K.J.; Thelwall, M.; Kousha, K.

    2016-07-01

    Counts of Mendeley readers may give useful evidence about the impact of research. Although several studies have indicated that there are significant positive correlations between counts of Mendeley readers and citation counts for journal articles, it is not known how the pattern of association may vary between journal articles and conference papers. To fill this gap, Mendeley readership data and Scopus citation counts were extracted for both journal articles and conference papers published in 2011 in four fields for which conferences are important; Computer Science Applications, Computer Software, Building & Construction Engineering and Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering. Mendeley readership counts were found to correlate moderately with citation counts for both journal articles and conference papers in Computer Science Applications and Computer Software. Nevertheless, the correlations were much lower between Mendeley readers and citation counts for conference papers than for journal articles in Building & Construction Engineering and Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering. Hence, there seems to be disciplinary differences in the usefulness of Mendeley readership counts as impact indicators for conference papers, even between fields for which conferences are important. (Author)

  3. Wavelet Analysis of Soil Reflectance for the Characterization of Soil Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavelet analysis has proven to be effective in many fields including signal processing and digital image analysis. Recently, it has been adapted to spectroscopy, where the reflectance of various materials is measured with respect to wavelength (nm) or wave number (cm-1). Spectra can cover broad wave...

  4. Dissenting in Reflective Conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    a methodological reflective approach that provides space for taking seriously uncertainties experienced in the field as these can be a catalyst for learning and sharpening our theoretical and empirical skills as action researchers. Through first-person inquiry, we investigate how our reflective conversations...... gradually evolved into second-person inquiry. We argue that enacting second-person reflective conversations renders alternative strategies for handling uncertainties through articulation of the tacit assumptions within particular empirical situations. Finally, we argue that reflective conversations should...

  5. W(310) cold-field emission characteristics reflecting the vacuum states of an extreme high vacuum electron gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Boklae; Shigeru, Kokubo; Oshima, Chuhei

    2013-01-01

    An extremely high vacuum cold-field electron emission (CFE) gun operating at pressures ranging from ~10(-8) Pa to ~10(-10) Pa was constructed. Only the CFE current emitting from W(310) surfaces revealed the existence of a "stable region" with high current angular density just after tip flash heating. In the "stable region," the CFE current was damped very slowly. The presence of non-hydrogen gas eliminated this region from the plot. Improvement of the vacuum prolonged the 90% damping time of the CFE current from ~10 min to 800 min. The current angular density I' of CFE current was 60 and 250 μA/sr in the "stable region" for total CFE currents of 10 and 50 μA, respectively. These results were about three times larger than I' when measured after the complete damping of the CFE current. The CFE gun generated bright scanning transmission electron microscopy images of a carbon nanotube at 30 kV.

  6. [The role of civil society in building the field of Food and Nutrition in Brazil: elements for reflection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlandy, Luciene

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion of Food and Nutrition (FN) issues on the public agenda has gained progressive relevance in Brazil and the civil society (CS) has an important role in this process. This article examines how CS affects policies in this field based on a historical perspective of their influence in political arenas of the Federal Government. The analysis was based on the following questions: (1) the political and institutional participatory approaches; (2) the related issues and political demands; (3) the implications of this process in developing public policies. The research instruments have combined literature review and documentary analysis. It was concluded that the role of the civil society was crucial for the consolidation of the National Policy of FN and the National Policy of Food and Nutrition Security. The institutional engineering and the profile of social organizations were very different, ranging from social movements to policy networks. The topics on the agenda have changed over the period studied, with the strengthening of ethnic, racial and gender issues. The gains of this process depend on public sector capacity to regulate and support the functioning of these institutional arenas and to involve governmental segments that actually has decision making power.

  7. Investigation of energy stability, geometric structure, force fields, and vibrational spectra of LiNaF2, LiMgF3, and LiAlF4 molecules by means of MO LCAO SCF method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliznev, V.V.; Solomonik, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    By the MO LCAO SCF method with Huzinaga-Dumming and McLean-Chandler two-exponent basis sets, supplemented by d-functions on the Period III atoms, ab initio calculations have been performed for the equilibrium geometric parameters, coefficients of the quadratic force field, vibrational frequencies and intensities in the IR spectra, dipole moments, ionization potentials (according to the Koopmans theorem), Mulliken populations, and enthalpy and entropy of complexation of the molecules LiNaF 2 , LiMgF 3 , and LiAlF 4 . A study has been made of the effects on the calculated results when the basis is extended by inclusion of polarization and diffuse functions on the fluorine atoms. The calculated characteristics are compared with the available experimental data. A reassignment has been performed for certain frequencies in the IR spectrum of LiNaF 2 , as assigned previously by S.J. Syvin, B.N. Syvin, and A Snelson, J. Phys. Chem., 74, No. 25, 4338 (1970). Certain frequencies of low-intensity vibrations have been predicted in the IR spectra, frequencies not yet found experimentally

  8. Properties of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae are the closest analog in the interstellar medium to studies of cometary dust in our solar system. The presence of a bright star near the reflection nebula dust provides the opportunity to study both the reflection and emission characteristics of interstellar dust. At 0.1 to 1 micrometer, the reflection nebula emission is due to starlight scattered by dust. The albedo and scattering phase function of the dust is determined from observations of the scattered light. At 50 to 200 micrometers, thermal emission from the dust in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field is observed. The derived dust temperature determines the relative values of the absorption coefficient of the dust at wavelengths where the stellar energy is absorbed and at far infrared wavelengths where the absorbed energy is reradiated. These emission mechanisms directly relate to those seen in the near and mid infrared spectra of comets. In a reflection nebula the dust is observed at much larger distances from the star than in our solar system, so that the equilibrium dust temperature is 50 K rather than 300 K. Thus, in reflection nebulae, thermal emission from dust is emitted at 50 to 200 micrometer

  9. [Mo2(CN)11]:5- A detailed description of ligand-field spectra and magnetic properties by first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Marc F A; Clima, S; Chibotaru, L F; Ceulemans, A

    2005-10-06

    An ab initio multiconfigurational approach has been used to calculate the ligand-field spectrum and magnetic properties of the title cyano-bridged dinuclear molybdenum complex. The rather large magnetic coupling parameter J for a single cyano bridge, as derived experimentally for this complex by susceptibility measurements, is confirmed to a high degree of accuracy by our CASPT2 calculations. Its electronic structure is rationalized in terms of spin-spin coupling between the two constituent hexacyano-monomolybdate complexes. An in-depth analysis on the basis of Anderson's kinetic exchange theory provides a qualitative picture of the calculated CASSCF antiferromagnetic ground-state eigenvector in the Mo dimer. Dynamic electron correlations as incorporated into our first-principles calculations by means of the CASPT2 method are essential to obtain quantitative agreement between theory and experiment.

  10. The low temperature oxidation of Athabasca oil sand asphaltene observed from {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, and pulsed field gradient spin-echo proton n.m.r. spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desando, M.A.; Lahanjar, G.; Ripmeester, J.A.; Zupancic, I. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Division of Chemistry

    1999-01-01

    Carbon-13 and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of chemically derivatized, by phase transfer methylation and trifluoroacetylation, Athabasca oil sand asphaltene, reveal a broad site distribution of different types of hydroxyl-containing functional groups, viz., carboxylic acids, phenols, and alcohols. The low temperature air oxidation of asphaltene, at ca. 130{degree}C for 3 days, generates a few additional carboxyl and phenolic groups. These results are consistent with a mechanism in which diaryl methylene and ether moieties react with oxygen. Self-diffusion coefficients, from the pulsed field gradient spin-echo proton magnetic resonance technique, suggest that low temperature oxidation does not appreciably alter the average particle size and diffusion properties of asphaltene in deuterochloroform. 55 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. CLASH-VLT: DISSECTING THE FRONTIER FIELDS GALAXY CLUSTER MACS J0416.1-2403 WITH ∼800 SPECTRA OF MEMBER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestra, I.; Sartoris, B.; Girardi, M.; Nonino, M.; Biviano, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131, Trieste (Italy); Mercurio, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Grillo, C. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Rosati, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122, Ferrara (Italy); Ettori, S.; Vanzella, E. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Ogrean, G. A.; Weeren, R. J. van [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Koekemoer, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Medezinski, E.; Zitrin, A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Merten, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Tozzi, P. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Umetsu, K., E-mail: balestra@oats.inaf.it [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); and others

    2016-06-01

    We present VIMOS-Very Large Telescope (VLT) spectroscopy of the Frontier Fields cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 ( z  = 0.397). Taken as part of the CLASH-VLT survey, the large spectroscopic campaign provided more than 4000 reliable redshifts over ∼600 arcmin{sup 2}, including ∼800 cluster member galaxies. The unprecedented sample of cluster members at this redshift allows us to perform a highly detailed dynamical and structural analysis of the cluster out to ∼2.2 r {sub 200} (∼4 Mpc). Our analysis of substructures reveals a complex system composed of a main massive cluster ( M {sub 200} ∼ 0.9 × 10{sup 15} M {sub ⊙} and σ{sub V,r200} ∼ 1000 km s{sup −1}) presenting two major features: (i) a bimodal velocity distribution, showing two central peaks separated by Δ V {sub rf} ∼ 1100 km s{sup −1} with comparable galaxy content and velocity dispersion, and (ii) a projected elongation of the main substructures along the NE–SW direction, with a prominent sub-clump ∼600 kpc SW of the center and an isolated BCG approximately halfway between the center and the SW clump. We also detect a low-mass structure at z  ∼ 0.390, ∼10′ south of the cluster center, projected at ∼3 Mpc, with a relative line-of-sight velocity of Δ V{sub rf} ∼ −1700 km s{sup −1}. The cluster mass profile that we obtain through our dynamical analysis deviates significantly from the “universal” NFW, being best fit by a Softened Isothermal Sphere model instead. The mass profile measured from the galaxy dynamics is found to be in relatively good agreement with those obtained from strong and weak lensing, as well as with that from the X-rays, despite the clearly unrelaxed nature of the cluster. Our results reveal an overall complex dynamical state of this massive cluster and support the hypothesis that the two main subclusters are being observed in a pre-collisional phase, in agreement with recent findings from radio and deep X-ray data. In this article, we

  12. Assignment of quasi-Landau levels in magneto-oscillatory spectra in cuprous oxide to classical unstable trajectories of hydrogen type atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammura, Kiyotaka; Sakai, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Misu, Akira

    1998-05-01

    It is found, for the first time in the field of solid state spectroscopy, that quasi-Landau levels in magneto-oscillatory spectra in cuprous oxide reflect “classical non-integrability.” Cuprous oxide is well known to exhibit excitonic absorption spectra of typical wannier type near the absorption edge in yellow spectral region. Magneto-oscillatory spectra are observed in the region above the limiting energy of the exciton series in magnetic fields. The spectra are measured at liquid helium temperature with right and left circularly polarized light in magnetic fields up to 4.5 T generated by a superconducting magnet. The observed spectra look like “Landau levels” corresponding to the optical transitions between states of the hole in a valence band and those of the electron in a conduction band without Coulomb attraction between them qualitatively, but never coincide with the Landau levels quantitatively. By calculating inverse Fourier transform of the observed spectra (IFFT spectra), three peaks are found in the auto-correlation function of the excited excitonic state. These spectra are interpreted as those of a hydrogen type atom with the effective masses of the electron-hole pair in homogeneous magnetic field, which is known to be a typical non-integrable system in classical mechanics. Instead of obtaining the quantum mechanical motions of wave packet, the classical trajectories are numerically calculated. First peak of the IFFT spectra is assigned to the trajectories on which the wave packet circulates and returns to approximately to the starting point after the duration corresponding to the first peak. Immediately after that, the trajectories are rapidly apart from the starting point on account of their instability, which reflects the classical non-integrability of the system.

  13. Spectra of Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.E.; Haemers, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    This book gives an elementary treatment of the basic material about graph spectra, both for ordinary, and Laplace and Seidel spectra. The text progresses systematically, by covering standard topics before presenting some new material on trees, strongly regular graphs, two-graphs, association

  14. Spectra of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, Budi; Arumbinang, Haryono.

    1981-01-01

    Emission spectra of alkali atoms has been determined by using spectrometer at the ultraviolet to infra red waves range. The spectra emission can be obtained by absorption spectrophotometric analysis. Comparative evaluations between experimental data and data handbook obtained by spark method were also presented. (author tr.)

  15. Temperature-reflection I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGady, David A.

    2017-01-01

    that T-reflection is unrelated to time-reversal. Finally, we study the interplay between T-reflection and perturbation theory in the anharmonic harmonic oscillator in quantum mechanics and in Yang-Mills in four-dimensions. This is the first in a series of papers on temperature-reflections.......In this paper, we revisit the claim that many partition functions are invariant under reflecting temperatures to negative values (T-reflection). The goal of this paper is to demarcate which partition functions should be invariant under T-reflection, and why. Our main claim is that finite......-temperature path integrals for quantum field theories (QFTs) should be T-reflection invariant. Because multi-particle partition functions are equal to Euclidean path integrals for QFTs, we expect them to be T-reflection invariant. Single-particle partition functions though are often not invariant under T...

  16. Effect of Palagonite Dust Deposition on the Automated Detection of Carbonate Vis/NIR Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Martha S.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Castano, Rebecca; Bornstein, Benjamin; Greenwood, James

    2004-01-01

    Currently Mars missions can collect more data than can be returned. Future rovers of increased mission lifetime will benefit from onboard autonomous data processing systems to guide the selection, measurement and return of scientifically important data. One approach is to train a neural net to recognize spectral reflectance characteristics of minerals of interest. We have developed a carbonate detector using a neural net algorithm trained on 10,000 synthetic Vis/NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra. The detector was able to correctly identify carbonates in the spectra of 30 carbonate and noncarbonate field samples with 100% success. However, Martian dust coatings strongly affect the spectral characteristics of surface rocks potentially masking the underlying substrate rock. In this experiment, we measure Vis/NIR spectra of calcite coated with different thicknesses of palagonite dust and evaluate the performance of the carbonate detector.

  17. Automated Endmember Selection for Nonlinear Unmixing of Lunar Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, M. P.; Grumpe, A.; Wöhler, C.; Mall, U.

    2013-09-01

    An important aspect of the analysis of remotely sensed lunar reflectance spectra is their decomposition into intimately mixed constituents. While some methods rely on unmixing of the observed reflectance spectra [1] or on the identification of minerals by extracting the depths and positions of mineral-specific absorption troughs [2, 3], these approaches do not allow for an automated selection of the (a priori unknown) endmembers from a large set of possible constituents. In this study, a non-linear spectral unmixing approach combined with an automated endmember selection scheme is proposed. This method is applied to reflectance spectra of the SIR-2 point spectrometer [4] carried by the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft.

  18. Polarization Spectra of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present simulated spectra of the flux and degree of polarization of starlight that is reflected by extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). In particular the polarization depends strongly on the structure of the planetary atmosphere, and appears to be a valuable tool for the characterization of EGPs.

  19. Wave Reflections from Breakwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    reflector (e.g., Thornton and Calhoun 1972; Mansard and Funke 1980; Yokoki et al. 1992). The interpretation of these measurements is complicated owing to...breaks down at the frequency where the wavelength is equal to twice the sensor spacing. Mansard and Funke (1980) overcame this problem by applying a...Wave Data." J. Phys. Oceanogr., 9(2), 373-381. Mansard , E. P. D. and E. R. Funke, 1980: "The Measurement of Incident and Reflected Spectra Using a

  20. A comparison of the performance of a fundamental parameter method for analysis of total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectra and determination of trace elements, versus an empirical quantification procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    W(egrzynek, Dariusz; Hołyńska, Barbara; Ostachowicz, Beata

    1998-01-01

    The performance has been compared of two different quantification methods — namely, the commonly used empirical quantification procedure and a fundamental parameter approach — for determination of the mass fractions of elements in particulate-like sample residues on a quartz reflector measured in the total reflection geometry. In the empirical quantification procedure, the spectrometer system needs to be calibrated with the use of samples containing known concentrations of the elements. On the basis of intensities of the X-ray peaks and the known concentration or mass fraction of an internal standard element, by using relative sensitivities of the spectrometer system the concentrations or mass fractions of the elements are calculated. The fundamental parameter approach does not require any calibration of the spectrometer system to be carried out. However, in order to account for an unknown mass per unit area of a sample and sample nonuniformity, an internal standard element is added. The concentrations/mass fractions of the elements to be determined are calculated during fitting a modelled X-ray spectrum to the measured one. The two quantification methods were applied to determine the mass fractions of elements in the cross-sections of a peat core, biological standard reference materials and to determine the concentrations of elements in samples prepared from an aqueous multi-element standard solution.

  1. Predicting Soil Salinity with Vis-NIR Spectra after Removing the Effects of Soil Moisture Using External Parameter Orthogonalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Pan, Xianzhang; Wang, Changkun; Li, Yanli; Shi, Rongjie

    2015-01-01

    Robust models for predicting soil salinity that use visible and near-infrared (vis-NIR) reflectance spectroscopy are needed to better quantify soil salinity in agricultural fields. Currently available models are not sufficiently robust for variable soil moisture contents. Thus, we used external parameter orthogonalization (EPO), which effectively projects spectra onto the subspace orthogonal to unwanted variation, to remove the variations caused by an external factor, e.g., the influences of soil moisture on spectral reflectance. In this study, 570 spectra between 380 and 2400 nm were obtained from soils with various soil moisture contents and salt concentrations in the laboratory; 3 soil types × 10 salt concentrations × 19 soil moisture levels were used. To examine the effectiveness of EPO, we compared the partial least squares regression (PLSR) results established from spectra with and without EPO correction. The EPO method effectively removed the effects of moisture, and the accuracy and robustness of the soil salt contents (SSCs) prediction model, which was built using the EPO-corrected spectra under various soil moisture conditions, were significantly improved relative to the spectra without EPO correction. This study contributes to the removal of soil moisture effects from soil salinity estimations when using vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and can assist others in quantifying soil salinity in the future.

  2. Predicting Soil Salinity with Vis–NIR Spectra after Removing the Effects of Soil Moisture Using External Parameter Orthogonalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Pan, Xianzhang; Wang, Changkun; Li, Yanli; Shi, Rongjie

    2015-01-01

    Robust models for predicting soil salinity that use visible and near-infrared (vis–NIR) reflectance spectroscopy are needed to better quantify soil salinity in agricultural fields. Currently available models are not sufficiently robust for variable soil moisture contents. Thus, we used external parameter orthogonalization (EPO), which effectively projects spectra onto the subspace orthogonal to unwanted variation, to remove the variations caused by an external factor, e.g., the influences of soil moisture on spectral reflectance. In this study, 570 spectra between 380 and 2400 nm were obtained from soils with various soil moisture contents and salt concentrations in the laboratory; 3 soil types × 10 salt concentrations × 19 soil moisture levels were used. To examine the effectiveness of EPO, we compared the partial least squares regression (PLSR) results established from spectra with and without EPO correction. The EPO method effectively removed the effects of moisture, and the accuracy and robustness of the soil salt contents (SSCs) prediction model, which was built using the EPO-corrected spectra under various soil moisture conditions, were significantly improved relative to the spectra without EPO correction. This study contributes to the removal of soil moisture effects from soil salinity estimations when using vis–NIR reflectance spectroscopy and can assist others in quantifying soil salinity in the future. PMID:26468645

  3. An extension of the Czjzek model for the distributions of electric field gradients in disordered solids and an application to NMR spectra of {sup 71}Ga in chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Caer, Gerard [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR UR1-CNRS 6251, Universite de Rennes I, Campus de Beaulieu, Batiment 11A, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Bureau, Bruno [Equipe Verres et Ceramiques, UMR-CNRS 6226 Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Massiot, Dominique, E-mail: gerard.le-caer@univ-rennes1.f, E-mail: bruno.bureau@univ-rennes1.f, E-mail: dominique.massiot@cnrs-orleans.f [Centre de Recherches sur les Materiaux a Hautes Temperatures, UPR 4212 CNRS, 1D avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2010-02-17

    First, the basis and the characteristics of the Czjzek model for the distribution of electric field gradient (EFG) tensor in disordered solids, some of which are still unnoticed, are depicted. That model results from the statistical invariance by rotation of the structure of the considered disordered solid and from the applicability of a central limit theorem to the EFG tensor. These two conditions, which are physically realistic for a wealth of disordered solids, simplify tremendously the derivation of the EFG distribution but at the cost of a complete loss of structural information about the investigated solid. Next, we describe a simple extension of it which is intended to mimic a well-defined local environment, with given values of the asymmetry parameter and of the principal component V{sub zz} of the EFG tensor, perturbed by the disorder of more remote atoms. The effect of disorder is rendered by a Gaussian (Czjzek) noise with an adjustable weight relative to V{sub zz}. The number of free parameters is limited to three, as compared to a sole scale factor for the Czjzek model. Its characteristics are described as a function of the given asymmetry parameter and of the strength of the noise. The aim is to lead to a practical tool which may help to retrieve, as far as possible, the information about the local environment perturbed by disorder from hyperfine measurements and notably from NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei. As an example, that extension is applied to some static NMR spectra of {sup 71}Ga in covalent glasses. Calculated static {sup 71}Ga NMR lineshapes are shown as a function of the parameters of the extended model.

  4. Changes in reflectance anisotropy of wheat crop during different phenophases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunagaria, Manoj M.; Patel, Haridas R.

    2017-04-01

    The canopy structure of wheat changes significantly with growth stages and leads to changes in reflectance anisotropy. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function characterises the reflectance anisotropy of the targets, which can be approximated. Spectrodirectional reflectance measurements on wheat crop were acquired using a field goniometer system. The bidirectional reflectance spectra were acquired at 54 view angles to cover the hemispheric span up to 60° view zenith. The observations were made during early growth stages till maturity of the crop. The anisotropy was not constant for all wavelengths and anisotropic factors clearly revealed spectral dependence, which was more pronounced in near principal plane. In near infrared, wheat canopy expressed less reflectance anisotropy because of higher multiple scattering. The broad hotspot signature was noticeable in reflectance of canopy whenever view and solar angles were close. Distinct changes in bidirectional reflectance distribution function were observed during booting to flowering stages as the canopy achieves more uniformity, height and head emergence. The function clearly reveals bowl shape during heading to early milking growth stages of the crop. Late growth stages show less prominent gap and shadow effects. Anisotropy index revealed that wheat exhibits changes in reflectance anisotropy with phenological development and with spectral bands.

  5. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  6. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 96LCA04 in Lakes Mabel and Starr, Central Florida, August 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Swancar, Amy; Tihansky, Ann B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2008-01-01

    In August of 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys of Lakes Mabel and Starr, central Florida, as part of the Central Highlands Lakes project, which is part of a larger USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, observer's logbook; and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. For detailed information about the hydrologic setting of Lake Starr and the interpretation of some of these seismic reflection data, see Swancar and others (2000) at http://fl.water.usgs.gov/publications/Abstracts/wri00_4030_swancar.html. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 96LCA04 tells us the data were collected in 1996 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the fourth field activity for that project in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The boomer plate is an acoustic energy source that consists of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when

  7. Reflectance Reference Targets (OTTER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Spectral reflectance measurements of flat field targets as reference points representative of pseudo-invariant targets as measured by Spectron SE590...

  8. Reflectance Reference Targets (OTTER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral reflectance measurements of flat field targets as reference points representative of pseudo-invariant targets as measured by Spectron SE590 spectrophotometer

  9. SAWYER ASTEROID SPECTRA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains 94 optical asteroid spectra obtained by Scott Sawyer as part of his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Texas at Austin. Observational...

  10. Reflective photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Goeke, Ronald S.

    2018-03-06

    A photovoltaic module includes colorized reflective photovoltaic cells that act as pixels. The colorized reflective photovoltaic cells are arranged so that reflections from the photovoltaic cells or pixels visually combine into an image on the photovoltaic module. The colorized photovoltaic cell or pixel is composed of a set of 100 to 256 base color sub-pixel reflective segments or sub-pixels. The color of each pixel is determined by the combination of base color sub-pixels forming the pixel. As a result, each pixel can have a wide variety of colors using a set of base colors, which are created, from sub-pixel reflective segments having standard film thicknesses.

  11. Archive of Digital Boomer and CHIRP Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 08LCA03 in Lake Panasoffkee, Florida, May 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; McBride, W. Scott; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2009-01-01

    In May of 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys in Lake Panasoffkee, located in central Florida, as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer and Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse (CHIRP)* seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles and geospatially corrected interactive profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. *Due to poor data acquisition conditions associated with the lake bottom sediments, only two CHIRP tracklines were collected during this field activity. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 08LCA03 tells us the data were collected in 2008 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the third field activity for that study in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The naming convention used for each seismic line is as follows: yye##a, where 'yy' are the last two digits of the year in which the data were collected, 'e' is a 1-letter abbreviation for the equipment type (for example, b for boomer and c

  12. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 02LCA02 in Lakes Ada, Crystal, Jennie, Mary, Rice, and Sylvan, Central Florida, July 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2008-01-01

    In July of 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) conducted geophysical surveys in Lakes Ada, Crystal, Jennie, Mary, Rice, and Sylvan, central Florida, as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 02LCA02 tells us the data were collected in 2002 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the second field activity for that study in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The boomer plate is an acoustic energy source that consists of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when discharged emits a short acoustic pulse, or shot, which propagates through the water, sediment column, or rock beneath. The acoustic energy is reflected at density boundaries (such as the seafloor, sediment, or rock layers beneath the

  13. Investigating and analyzing prospective teacher's reflective thinking in solving mathematical problem: A case study of female-field dependent (FD) prospective teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustan, S.; Juniati, Dwi; Siswono, Tatag Yuli Eko

    2017-05-01

    In the last few years, reflective thinking becomes very popular term in the world of education, especially in professional education of teachers. One of goals of the educational personnel and teacher institutions create responsible prospective teachers and they are able reflective thinking. Reflective thinking is a future competence that should be taught to students to face the challenges and to respond of demands of the 21st century. Reflective thinking can be applied in mathematics becauseby reflective thinking, students can improve theircuriosity to solve mathematical problem. In solving mathematical problem is assumed that cognitive style has an impact on prospective teacher's mental activity. As a consequence, reflective thinking and cognitive style are important things in solving mathematical problem. The subject, in this research paper, isa female-prospective teacher who has fielddependent cognitive style. The purpose of this research paperis to investigate the ability of prospective teachers' reflective thinking in solving mathematical problem. This research paper is a descriptive by using qualitativeapproach. To analyze the data related to prospectiveteacher's reflective thinking in solving contextual mathematicalproblem, the researchers focus in four main categories which describe prospective teacher's activities in using reflective thinking, namely; (a) formulation and synthesis of experience, (b) orderliness of experience, (c) evaluating the experience and (d) testing the selected solution based on the experience.

  14. Crystallographically-based analysis of the NMR spectra of maghemite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiers, K.M.; Cashion, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    All possible iron environments with respect to nearest neighbour vacancies in vacancy-ordered and vacancy-disordered maghemite have been evaluated and used as the foundation for a crystallographically-based analysis of the published NMR spectra of maghemite. The spectral components have been assigned to particular configurations and excellent agreement obtained in comparing predicted spectra with published spectra taken in applied magnetic fields. The broadness of the published NMR lines has been explained by calculations of the magnetic dipole fields at the various iron sites and consideration of the supertransferred hyperfine fields. - Highlights: ► Analysis of 57 Fe NMR of maghemite based on vacancy ordering and nearest neighbour vacancies. ► Assignment of NMR spectral components based on crystallographic analysis of unique iron sites. ► Strong agreement between predicted spectra and published spectra taken in applied magnetic fields. ► Maghemite NMR spectral broadening due to various iron sites and supertransferred hyperfine field.

  15. Soil profile organic carbon prediction with Visible Near Infrared Reflec-tance spectroscopy based on a national database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Fan; Knadel, Maria; Peng, Yi

    This study focuses on the application of the Danish national soil Visible Near Infrared Re-flectance spectroscopy (NIRs) database for predicting SOC in a field. The Conditioned Latin hypercube sam-pling (cLHS) method was used for the selection of 120 soil profiles based on DualEM21s and DEM data...... (ele-vation, slope, profile curvature). All the soil profile cores were taken by a 1 m long hydraulic auger with plastic liners inside. A Labspec 5100 equipped with a contact probe was used to acquire spectra at (350-2500 nm) in each 5 cm depth interval. The results show that after the removal...... of moisture effect using an external parameter orthogonalisation algorithm, most of the spectra collected at field moisture content can be projected in the National spectra library. Moreover, the prediction of SOC improved compared to the model based on absorbance spectra....

  16. Parameterization of rotational spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chunmei; Liu Tong

    1992-01-01

    The rotational spectra of the strongly deformed nuclei with low rotational frequencies and weak band mixture are analyzed. The strongly deformed nuclei are commonly encountered in the rare-earth region (e. g., 150 220). A lot of rotational band knowledge are presented

  17. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  18. Reflected Glory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  19. Shock-reflected electrons and X-ray line spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dzifčáková, Elena; Vandas, Marek; Karlický, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 603, July (2017), A17/1-A17/8 E-ISSN 1432-0746 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-16447S; GA ČR GAP209/12/0103; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19376S; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-06065S; GA ČR GA15-17490S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-13277S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * flares * line formation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy , Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 5.014, year: 2016

  20. Improving interpretation of infrared spectra for OM characterization by subtraction of spectra from incinerated samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Ruth H.; Gerke, Horst H.; Leue, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Non-destructive methods such as diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) have been applied to characterize organic matter (OM) at intact structural surfaces among others. However, it is often difficult to distinguish effects of organic components on DRIFT signal intensities from those of mineral components. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate DRIFT spectra from intact earthworm burrow walls and coated cracks to improve the interpretation of C-H and C=O bands. We compared DRIFT and transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of entire samples that were from the same pedogenetic soil horizon, but different in mineral composition and texture (i.e., glacial till versus loess). Spectra of incinerated samples were subtracted from the original spectra. Transmission FTIR and DRIFT spectra were almost identical for entire soil samples. However, the DRIFT spectra were affected by the bulk mode bands (i.e., wavenumbers 2000 to 1700 cm-1) that affected spectral resolution and reproducibility. The ratios between C-H and C=O band intensities as indicator for OM quality obtained with DRIFT were smaller than those obtained from transmission FTIR. A spectral subtraction procedure was found to reduce effects of mineral absorption bands on DRIFT spectra allowing an improved interpretation. DRIFT spectroscopy as a non-destructive method for analyzing OM composition at intact surfaces in structured soils could be calibrated with information obtained with the more detailed transmission FTIR and complementary methods.

  1. Personal Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Personal Reflections. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 6 Issue 3 March 2001 pp 90-93 Personal Reflections. Why did I opt for Career in Science? Jayant V Narlikar · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 9 Issue 8 August 2004 pp 89-89 ...

  2. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  3. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 08LCA01 in 10 Central Florida Lakes, March 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2009-01-01

    In March of 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) conducted geophysical surveys in Lakes Avalon, Big, Colby, Helen, Johns, Prevatt, Searcy, Saunders, Three Island, and Trout, located in central Florida, as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU) (Cohen and Stockwell, 2005). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 08LCA01 tells us the data were collected in 2008 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the first field activity for that study in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The naming convention used for each seismic line is as follows: yye##a, where yy is the last two digits of the year in which the data were collected, e is a 1-letter abbreviation for the equipment type (for example, b for boomer), ## is a 2-digit number representing a specific track, and a is a letter representing the section of a line

  4. Quantifying Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, Gordon Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents 1st semester student reflections on “learning to learn” in a team-based PBL environment with quantitative and qualitative student reflective feedback on the learning gains of 60 Architectural Technology and Construction Management students at VIA University College, Denmark....... It contrasts the students’ self-assessment in a range of ‘product’ skills such as Revit, Structural Design, Mathematics of construction, Technical Installations; as well as ‘process’ competencies such as ‘Working in a team’, Sharing knowledge, Maintaining a portfolio and Reflecting ON learning and FOR learning......´ These are all based on Blooms taxonomy and levels of competence and form a major part of individual student and group learning portfolios. Key Words :Project-Based learning, Reflective Portfolios, Self assessment, Defining learning gains, Developing learning strategies , Reflections on and for learning...

  5. Catheter based mid-infrared reflectance and reflectance generated absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2013-10-29

    A method of characterizing conditions in a tissue, by (a) providing a catheter that has a light source that emits light in selected wavenumbers within the range of mid-IR spectrum; (b) directing the light from the catheter to an area of tissue at a location inside a blood vessel of a subject; (c) collecting light reflected from the location and generating a reflectance spectra; and (d) comparing the reflectance spectra to a reference spectra of normal tissue, whereby a location having an increased number of absorbance peaks at said selected wavenumbers indicates a tissue inside the blood vessel containing a physiological marker for atherosclerosis.

  6. X-ray absorption spectra and emission spectra of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yonglun; Yang Li; Wang Minsheng; Li Jiaming

    2002-01-01

    The author reports a theoretical method to calculate the resolved absorption spectra and emission spectra (optically thin) of hot dense plasmas. Due to its fully relativistic treatment incorporated with the quantum defect theory, it calculates the absorption spectra and emission spectra for single element or multi-element plasmas with little computational efforts. The calculated absorption spectra of LTE gold plasmas agree well with the experimental ones. It also calculates the optical thin emission spectra of LTE gold plasmas, which is helpful to diagnose the plasmas of relevant ICF plasmas. It can also provide the relevant parameters such as population density of various ionic stages, precise radiative properties for ICF studies

  7. Generation of synthetic gamma spectra with MATLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmerio, Julian J.; Coppo, Anibal D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this work is the simulation of gamma spectra using the MATLAB program to generate the calibration curves in efficiency, which will be used to measure radioactive waste in drums. They are necessary for the proper characterization of these drums. A Monte Carlo simulation was basically developed with the random number generator Mersenne Twister and nuclear data obtained from NIST. This paper shows the results obtained and difficulties encountered until today. The physical correction of the simulated spectra has been the only aspect we have been working, up to this moment. Procedures: A simplified representation of the 'Laboratorio de Verificacion y Control de la Calidad' was chosen. Drums with cemented liquid waste are routinely measured in this laboratory. The commercial program MCNP was also used to get a valid reference in the field of simulation of spectra. We analyzed the spectra obtained by MATLAB in the light of classical literature photon detection and the spectrum obtained by MCNP. Conclusions: Currently the program developed seems adequate to simulate a measurement in the 'Laboratorio de Verificacion y Control de la Calidad'. The spectra obtained by MATLAB seem to physically represent what is observed in real spectra. However, it is a slow program. The current development efforts are directed to improve the speed of simulation. An alternative is to use the CUDA language for NVIDIA video cards to parallelized the simulation. An adequate simulation of the electronic measuring chain is also needed to obtain better representations of the shapes of the peaks. (author)

  8. Reflection ciphers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boura, Christina; Canteaut, Anne; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde

    2017-01-01

    study the necessary properties for this coupling permutation. Special care has to be taken of some related-key distinguishers since, in the context of reflection ciphers, they may provide attacks in the single-key setting.We then derive some criteria for constructing secure reflection ciphers...... and analyze the security properties of different families of coupling permutations. Finally, we concentrate on the case of reflection block ciphers and, as an illustration, we provide concrete examples of key schedules corresponding to several coupling permutations, which lead to new variants of the block...

  9. Thermoluminescence spectra of amethyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q. [Suzhou Railway Teachers College (China). Dept. of Physics; Yang, B. [Beijing Normal University (China). Dept. of Physics; Wood, R.A.; White, D.R.R.; Townsend, P.D.; Luff, B.J. [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

    1994-04-01

    Thermoluminescence and cathodoluminescence data from natural and synthetic amethyst and synthetic quartz samples are compared. The spectra include features from the quartz host lattice and from impurity-generated recombination sites. Emission features exist throughout the wavelength range studied, 250-800 nm. The near infrared emission at 740-750 nm appears to be characteristic of the amethyst and is proposed to be due to Fe ion impurity. (Author).

  10. Pattern recognition in spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebran, M.; Paletou, F.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H], and equatorial projected rotational velocity ve sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones.

  11. Estimating Spectra from Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, J. Bryce; Connolly, Andrew J.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring the physical properties of galaxies such as redshift frequently requires the use of spectral energy distributions (SEDs). SED template sets are, however, often small in number and cover limited portions of photometric color space. Here we present a new method to estimate SEDs as a function of color from a small training set of template SEDs. We first cover the mathematical background behind the technique before demonstrating our ability to reconstruct spectra based upon colors and then compare our results to other common interpolation and extrapolation methods. When the photometric filters and spectra overlap, we show that the error in the estimated spectra is reduced by more than 65% compared to the more commonly used techniques. We also show an expansion of the method to wavelengths beyond the range of the photometric filters. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our technique by generating 50 additional SED templates from an original set of 10 and by applying the new set to photometric redshift estimation. We are able to reduce the photometric redshifts standard deviation by at least 22.0% and the outlier rejected bias by over 86.2% compared to original set for z ≤ 3.

  12. Pattern recognition in spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebran, M; Paletou, F

    2017-01-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature T eff , surface gravity log g , metallicity [ Fe/H ], and equatorial projected rotational velocity v e sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones. (paper)

  13. Estimating soil zinc concentrations using reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weichao; Zhang, Xia

    2017-06-01

    Soil contamination by heavy metals has been an increasingly severe threat to nature environment and human health. Efficiently investigation of contamination status is essential to soil protection and remediation. Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (VNIRS) has been regarded as an alternative for monitoring soil contamination by heavy metals. Generally, the entire VNIR spectral bands are employed to estimate heavy metal concentration, which lacks interpretability and requires much calculation. In this study, 74 soil samples were collected from Hunan Province, China and their reflectance spectra were used to estimate zinc (Zn) concentration in soil. Organic matter and clay minerals have strong adsorption for Zn in soil. Spectral bands associated with organic matter and clay minerals were used for estimation with genetic algorithm based partial least square regression (GA-PLSR). The entire VNIR spectral bands, the bands associated with organic matter and the bands associated with clay minerals were incorporated as comparisons. Root mean square error of prediction, residual prediction deviation, and coefficient of determination (R2) for the model developed using combined bands of organic matter and clay minerals were 329.65 mg kg-1, 1.96 and 0.73, which is better than 341.88 mg kg-1, 1.89 and 0.71 for the entire VNIR spectral bands, 492.65 mg kg-1, 1.31 and 0.40 for the organic matter, and 430.26 mg kg-1, 1.50 and 0.54 for the clay minerals. Additionally, in consideration of atmospheric water vapor absorption in field spectra measurement, combined bands of organic matter and absorption around 2200 nm were used for estimation and achieved high prediction accuracy with R2 reached 0.640. The results indicate huge potential of soil reflectance spectroscopy in estimating Zn concentrations in soil.

  14. Nonlinear FMR spectra in yttrium iron garnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Bunkov, P.M. Vetoshko, I.G. Motygullin, T.R. Safin, M.S. Tagirov, N.A. Tukmakova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of demagnetizing effect studies in yttrium iron garnet Y3Fe5O12 thin films are reported. Experiments were performed on X-Band of electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer at room temperature. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR spectra were obtained for one-layer single crystal YIG films for different values of the applied microwave power. Nonlinear FMR spectra transformation by the microwave power increasing in various directions of magnetic field sweep was observed. It is explained by the influence of the demagnetization action of nonequilibrium magnons.

  15. An Approximate Treatment of Reflection Coefficient in the Phased Beam Tracing Method for the Simulation of Enclosed Sound Fields at Medium Frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2008-01-01

    The phased beam tracing method (PBTM) was suggested as a medium-frequency simulation technique for the calculation of impulse response, although main assumptions of geometric acoustics still hold. The phased method needs the reflection coefficient for characterizing the acoustic property of a sur......The phased beam tracing method (PBTM) was suggested as a medium-frequency simulation technique for the calculation of impulse response, although main assumptions of geometric acoustics still hold. The phased method needs the reflection coefficient for characterizing the acoustic property...... of a surface and the complex wave number for describing the propagation characteristics. In this study, two types of approximate real reflection coefficients derived from the measured absorption coefficient were tested for a practical applicability. As a test example, pressure impulse responses and energy...

  16. Deconvolution of Positrons' Lifetime spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderin Hidalgo, L.; Ortega Villafuerte, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we explain the iterative method previously develop for the deconvolution of Doppler broadening spectra using the mathematical optimization theory. Also, we start the adaptation and application of this method to the deconvolution of positrons' lifetime annihilation spectra

  17. Reflectance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Cooper, K.; Randolph, M.

    1984-01-01

    A classical description of the one dimensional radiative transfer treatment of vegetation canopies was completed and the results were tested against measured prairie (blue grama) and agricultural canopies (soybean). Phase functions are calculated in terms of directly measurable biophysical characteristics of the canopy medium. While the phase functions tend to exhibit backscattering anisotropy, their exact behavior is somewhat more complex and wavelength dependent. A Monte Carlo model was developed that treats soil surfaces with large periodic variations in three dimensions. A photon-ray tracing technology is used. Currently, the rough soil surface is described by analytic functions and appropriate geometric calculations performed. A bidirectional reflectance distribution function is calculated and, hence, available for other atmospheric or canopy reflectance models as a lower boundary condition. This technique is used together with an adding model to calculate several cases where Lambertian leaves possessing anisotropic leaf angle distributions yield non-Lambertian reflectance; similar behavior is exhibited for simulated soil surfaces.

  18. CALCULATION OF CU 2P RESONANT PHOTOEMISSION SPECTRA IN CUO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SEINO, Y; OGASAWARA, H; KOTANI, A; THOLE, BT; VANDERLAAN, G

    We investigated theoretically the Cu 2p resonance of 3d, 3p and 3s X-ray photoemission spectra (XPS) in CuO using a cluster model including multiplet coupling, crystal field and anisotropic hybridization. The spectra were calculated by taking into account the radiative transitions up to the first

  19. Reflective optics

    CERN Document Server

    Korsch, Dietrich

    1991-01-01

    This is the first book dedicated exclusively to all-reflective imaging systems. It is a teaching tool as well as a practical design tool for anyone who specializes in optics, particularly for those interested in telescopes, infrared, and grazing-incidence systems. The first part of the book describes a unified geometric optical theory of all-reflective imaging systems (from near-normal to grazing incidence) developed from basic principles. The second part discusses correction methods and a multitude of closed-form solutions of well-corrected systems, supplemented with many conventional and unc

  20. Autonomous Acqisition of Science Grade Spectra From UAS's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, D.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Sohlberg, R. A.; Ong, L.; Cappelaere, P. G.

    2017-12-01

    We assembled a payload box which contains a QE Pro and a Flame hyperspectral instruments. The payload was mounted on a DJI Matrice 600 drone. The total weight of the drone and the payload was 38 lbs. It was flown over a United States Department of Agricultural (USDA) research field where corn and soybeans were grown. The fields were subdivided into areas that had a variety of treatments such as low nitrogen and high nitrogen. The research is centered on correlating the treatments with the year-end crop yields. Our effort was to monitor spectral data to recognize photosynthetic activity via proxies such as solar induced fluorescence (SIF). To detect SIF requires optimized spectra which is normalized into reflectance. We perform the optimization routine onboard. The intent is to demonstrate a viable measurement campaign that would enable a researcher to measure the fields diurnally over a growing season. What we found out is that there was more complexity to trying to make this happen then we originally thought. For one thing, we had limited battery life, limited payload capacity and sometimes the cloud cover did not cooperate. So the question was how to intelligently apply the resources using some onboard processing and software. Our long term vision is to have multiple drones act as an intelligent cluster and self-manage their own deployment at multiple locations and multiple altitudes, auto-adjustments and intelligent management of errors. This presentation will go over lessons learned, achievements and future directions.

  1. Seizmic response spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Leššo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A computation of 1D and 3D seismic motion parameters was made and the influence of input parameters on these parameters were analysed. A modelling was realised on the examples of sedimentary structures geotechnical models. This comparison provides different spectral and frequencial values and spectral accelerations. The differences in seismic response spectra are influenced not only by properties of geological structures but also by the methodics of the soil structure interaction modeling and input time history spectral composition. However, the influence of geotechnical properties of geological structures on the output results are apparent. The modelling results of different input time history spectral composition, the Ricker impuls and the Gabor function were compared. In the area of cement factory in Rohožník, the new rotary kiln furnance is planned to be build. In the sense of STN 73 0036 the expert seismic judgment has been claimed. The standard and local seismic response spectra is computed for the place where the rotary kiln will be situated. The application of the local spectral acceleration in seismic load computations enables to save costs in comparing with the standard acceleration.

  2. Seasonal soybean crop reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaster, E. W. (Principal Investigator); Chance, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented from field measurements of 1980 including 5 acquisitions of handheld radiometer reflectance measurements, 7 complete sets of parameters for implementing the Suits mode, and other biophysical parameters to characterize the soybean canopy. LANDSAT calculations on the simulated Brazilian soybean reflectance are included along with data collected during the summer and fall on 1981 on soybean single leaf optical parameters for three irrigation treatments. Tests of the Suits vegetative canopy reflectance model for the full hemisphere of observer directions as well as the nadir direction show moderate agreement for the visible channels of the MSS and poor agreement in the near infrared channel. Temporal changes in the spectral characteristics of the single leaves were seen to occur as a function of maturity which demonstrates that the absorptance of a soybean single leaf is more a function of thetransmittancee characteristics than the seasonally consistent single leaf reflectance.

  3. Personal Reflections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Jochen and Werner Heisenberg. Personal Reflections Volume 10 Issue 1 January 2005 pp 93-96. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/01/0093-0096. Resonance – Journal of ...

  4. PERSONAL REFLECTIONS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Resonance journal of science education. April 2015 Volume 20 Number 4. GENERALARTICLES ... Development of. Probability Theory. K B Athreya. Classroom. Tutorial on Phyloge- netic Inference –1. Felix Bast. 360. 346. 286. PERSONAL REFLECTIONS. 368 The Road to IISc. M L Munjal (Transcribed by Maneesh Kunte).

  5. Mapping SOC in a river catchment by integrating laboratory spectra wavelength with remote sensing spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Yi; Xiong, Xiong; Knadel, Maria

    soil spectral features indicative of SOC from laboratory visible near-infrared reflectance (vis-NlR) spectra and incorporate them with remote sensing (RS) images to improve predictions of top SOC in the Skjem river catchment, Denmark. The secondary objective was to improve prediction results......There is potential to use soil ·-proximal and remote sensing derived spectra concomitantly to develop soil organic carbon (SOC) models. Yet mixing spectral data from different sources and technologies to improve soil models is still in its infancy. The objective of this study was to incorporate...... by separately calibrating samples from upland and wetland. We hypbthesize that final prediction accuracy is significantly improved by incorporatin1 laboratory vis-NlR images upscaled from point-based spectra to catchment scale and RS data for topsoil SOC spatial modeling....

  6. Infrared spectra of lunar soils. [using a Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, J. R.; Emslie, A. G.; Smith, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    Measured data obtained by Michelson interferometer spectrometer were stored in a computer file and smoothed by being passed forward and backward through a digital four-pole low pass filter. Infrared spectra of the 10 lunar samples are presented in the format of brightness temperature versus frequency. The mol % of feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, ilmenite and ferromagnetic silicate in each sample is presented in tables. The reflectance spectra of ilmenite and enstatite are shown in graphs.

  7. Infrared measurements of pristine and disturbed soils 1. Spectral contrast differences between field and laboratory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Lucey, P.G.; Horton, K.A.; Winter, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of emissivity spectra (8-13 ??m) of pristine soils in the field with laboratory reflectance spectra of the same soils showed that laboratory spectra tend to have less spectral contrast than field spectra (see following article). We investigated this the phenomenon by measuring emission spectra of both undisturbed (in situ) and disturbed soils (prepared as if for transport to the laboratory). The disturbed soils had much less spectral contrast than the undisturbed soils in the reststrahlen region near 9 ??m. While the increased porosity of a disturbed soil can decrease spectral contrast due to multiple scattering, we hypothesize that the effect is dominantly the result of a difference in grain-size distribution of the optically active layer (i.e., fine particle coatings). This concept was proposed by Salisbury et al. (1994) to explain their observations that soils washed free of small particles adhering the larger grains exhibited greater spectral contrast than unwashed soils. Our laboratory reflectance spectra of wet- and dry-sieved soils returned from field sites also show greater spectral contrast for wet-sieved (washed) soils. We therefore propose that undisturbed soils in the field can be characterized as 'clean' soils (washed free of fine particles at the surface due to rain and wind action) and that disturbed soils represent 'dirty' soils (contaminated with fine particle coatings). The effect of packing soils in the field and laboratory also increases spectral contrast but not to the magnitude of that observed for undisturbed and wet-sieved soils. Since it is a common practice to use laboratory spectra of field samples to interpret spectra obtained remotely, we suggest that the influence of fine particle coatings on disturbed soils, if unrecognized, could influence interpretations of remote sensing data.Comparison of emissivity spectra (8-13 ??m) of pristine soils in the field with laboratory reflectance spectra of the same soils showed that

  8. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  9. Implications of seismic reflection and potential field geophysical data on the structural framework of the Yucca Mountain--Crater Flat region, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocher, T.M.; Langenheim, V.E.; Hunter, W.C.

    1998-01-01

    Seismic reflection and gravity profiles collected across Yucca Mountain, Nevada, together with geologic data, provide evidence against proposed active detachment faults at shallow depth along the pre-Tertiary-Tertiary contact beneath this potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. The new geophysical data show that the inferred pre-Tertiary-Tertiary contact is offset by moderate-to-high-angle faults beneath Crater Flat and Yucca Mountain, and thus this shallow surface cannot represent an active detachment surface. The reflection lines reveal that the Amargosa Desert rift zone is an asymmetric half-graben having a maximum depth of about 4 km and a width of about 25 km. The east-dipping Bare Mountain fault that bounds this graben to the west can be traced by seismic reflection data to a depth of at least 3.5 km and possibly as deep as 6 km, with a constant dip of 64 degree ± 5 degree. Along the profile the transition from east- to west-dipping faults occurs at or just west of the Solitario Canyon fault, which bounds the western side of Yucca Mountain. The interaction at depth of these east- and west-dipping faults, having up to hundreds of meters offset, is not imaged by the seismic reflection profile. Understanding potential seismic hazards at Yucca Mountain requires knowledge of the subsurface geometry of the faults near Yucca Mountain, since earthquakes generally nucleate and release the greatest amount of their seismic energy at depth. The geophysical data indicate that many fault planes near the potential nuclear waste facility dip toward Yucca Mountain, including the Bare Mountain range-front fault and several west-dipping faults east of Yucca Mountain. Thus, earthquake ruptures along these faults would lie closer to Yucca Mountain than is often estimated from their surface locations and could therefore be more damaging

  10. Absorption spectra of AA-stacked graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C W; Lee, S H; Chen, S C; Lin, M F; Shyu, F L

    2010-01-01

    AA-stacked graphite shows strong anisotropy in geometric structures and velocity matrix elements. However, the absorption spectra are isotropic for the polarization vector on the graphene plane. The spectra exhibit one prominent plateau at middle energy and one shoulder structure at lower energy. These structures directly reflect the unique geometric and band structures and provide sufficient information for experimental fitting of the intralayer and interlayer atomic interactions. On the other hand, monolayer graphene shows a sharp absorption peak but no shoulder structure; AA-stacked bilayer graphene has two absorption peaks at middle energy and abruptly vanishes at lower energy. Furthermore, the isotropic features are expected to exist in other graphene-related systems. The calculated results and the predicted atomic interactions could be verified by optical measurements.

  11. Pulsed zero field NMR of solids and liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, A.M.

    1987-02-01

    This work describes the development and applications to solids and liquid crystals of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with pulsed dc magnetic fields. Zero field NMR experiments are one approach for obtaining high resolution spectra of amorphous and polycrystalline materials which normally (in high field) display broad featureless spectra. The behavior of the spin system can be coherently manipulated and probed in zero field with dc magnetic field pulses which are employed in a similar manner to radiofrequency pulses in high field NMR experiments. Nematic phases of liquid crystalline systems are studied in order to observe the effects of the removal of an applied magnetic field on sample alignment and molecular order parameters. In nematic phases with positive and negative magnetic susceptibility anisotropies, a comparison between the forms of the spin interactions in high and low fields is made. High resolution zero field NMR spectra of unaligned smectic samples are also obtained and reflect the symmetry of the liquid crystalline environment. These experiments are a sensitive measure of the motionally induced asymmetry in biaxial phases. Homonuclear and heteronuclear solute spin systems are compared in the nematic and smectic phases. Nonaxially symmetric dipolar couplings are reported for several systems. The effects of residual fields in the presence of a non-zero asymmetry parameter are discussed theoretically and presented experimentally. Computer programs for simulations of these and other experimental results are also reported. 179 refs., 75 figs

  12. Comparison of Measurements and FluorMOD Simulations for Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Reflectance of a Corn Crop under Nitrogen Treatments [SIF and Reflectance for Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Campbell, Petya K. E.

    2007-01-01

    The FLuorescence Explorer (FLEX) satellite concept is one of six semifinalist mission proposals selected in 2006 for pre-Phase studies by the European Space Agency (ESA). The FLEX concept proposes to measure passive solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) of terrestrial ecosystems. A new spectral vegetation Fluorescence Model (FluorMOD) was developed to include the effects of steady state SIF on canopy reflectance. We used our laboratory and field measurements previously acquired from foliage and canopies of corn (Zea mays L.) under controlled nitrogen (N) fertilization to parameterize and evaluate FluorMOD. Our data included biophysical properties, fluorescence (F) and reflectance spectra for leaves; reflectance spectra of canopies and soil; solar irradiance; plot-level leaf area index; and canopy SIF emissions determined using the Fraunhofer Line Depth principal for the atmospheric telluric oxygen absorption features at 688 nm (O2-beta) and 760 nm (O2-alpha). FluorMOD simulations implemented in the default "look-up-table" mode did not reproduce the observed magnitudes of leaf F, canopy SIF, or canopy reflectance. However, simulations for all of these parameters agreed with observations when the default FluorMOD information was replaced with measurements, although N treatment responses were underestimated. Recommendations were provided to enhance FluorMOD's potential utility in support of SIF field experiments and studies of agriculture and ecosystems.

  13. Fourier evaluation of broad Moessbauer spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincze, I.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown by the Fourier analysis of broad Moessbauer spectra that the even part of the distribution of the dominant hyperfine interaction (hyperfine field or quadrupole splitting) can be obtained directly without using least-square fitting procedures. Also the odd part of this distribution correlated with other hyperfine parameters (e.g. isomer shift) can be directly determined. Examples for amorphous magnetic and paramagnetic iron-based alloys are presented. (author)

  14. Spectroscopic identification of individual fluorophores using photoluminescence excitation spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerski, J; Colomb, W; Cannataro, F; Sarkar, S K

    2018-01-25

    The identity of a fluorophore can be ambiguous if other fluorophores or nonspecific fluorescent impurities have overlapping emission spectra. The presence of overlapping spectra makes it difficult to differentiate fluorescent species using discrete detection channels and unmixing of spectra. The unique absorption and emission signatures of fluorophores provide an opportunity for spectroscopic identification. However, absorption spectroscopy may be affected by scattering, whereas fluorescence emission spectroscopy suffers from signal loss by gratings or other dispersive optics. Photoluminescence excitation spectra, where excitation is varied and emission is detected at a fixed wavelength, allows hyperspectral imaging with a single emission filter for high signal-to-background ratio without any moving optics on the emission side. We report a high throughput method for measuring the photoluminescence excitation spectra of individual fluorophores using a tunable supercontinuum laser and prism-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. We used the system to measure and sort the photoluminescence excitation spectra of individual Alexa dyes, fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs), and fluorescent polystyrene beads. We used a Gaussian mixture model with maximum likelihood estimation to objectively separate the spectra. Finally, we spectroscopically identified different species of fluorescent nanodiamonds with overlapping spectra and characterized the heterogeneity of fluorescent nanodiamonds of varying size. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Theoretical Perspectives on Critical Thinking Teaching: Reflections from Field Experiences from a Norwegian Lower Secondary School in Comparison to Tanzanian Secondary School Teaching Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leatitia Gabriel Mashaza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the theoretical perspectives relevant to critical thinking as my topic of research during my teaching practice period which was conducted from 12th -28th October 2015 at Eidsvag secondary school in Bergen, Norway. As a requirement for Masters’ degree in social science education, all master students were required to engage in teaching practice in different Norwegian primary and secondary schools. Importantly, every student teacher was given a topic of concentration as a mini-research for the whole teaching practice period. My topic of research focused at exploring and gaining the theoretical and practical perspectives on critical thinking teaching by drawing some experiences from a Norwegian lower secondary school (Eidsvag skole in reflection to secondary school teaching practice experiences in Tanzania. Therefore, in this paper, my reflections with regard to the conditions favoring the possibility for critical thinking teaching and how it was enhanced by teachers at my practice school will be discussed. Further to that, I will also present the observed challenges of which, in my view, in way or another intervened the possibility for effective critical thinking teaching to take place.

  16. Reflective Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel Jørgensen, Andriette

    2016-01-01

    In Breve fra min Have (Letters from my Garden), the Swedish landscape architect, Sven-Ingvar Andersson, produces dialogues about his garden to a wide circle of friends, colleagues, deceased and still living acquaintances such as Karen Blixen, Gertrude Stein, C. Th. Sørensen, Albrecht Dürer, Peter...... Høeg etetera. The dialogues work as a tool of reflection in terms of providing opportunity to examine his own beliefs, to explore the possible reasons for engaging in a particular activity. On the basis of Sven-Ingvar Andersson’s book a teaching program at the Aarhus School of Architecture provides...

  17. Inspiring Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchie, Mammo

    2011-01-01

    A numberof Chris Freeman's colleagues were asked to reflect on what they thought describes his life and work in a few words. Some of the colleagues replied including former SPRU students that were taught or supervised by Chris Freeman. Their views on what they thought were Chris Freeman's defining...... life is not free from fluctuations, cycles, disruptions, crises and destructions both human and ecological. Innovation research ought to position itself to address environmental, financial and economic crises. The third is innovation research for development by addressing not only poverty erdaication...

  18. Design energy spectra for Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    López Almansa, Francisco; Yazgan, Ahmet Utku; Benavent Climent, Amadeo

    2012-01-01

    This work proposes design energy spectra in terms of velocity, derived through linear dynamic analyses on Turkish registers and intended for regions with design peak acceleration 0.3 g or higher. In the long and mid period ranges the analyses are linear, taking profit of the rather insensitivity of the spectra to the structural parameters other than the fundamental period; in the short period range, the spectra are more sensitive to the structural parameters and nonlinear analyses would be re...

  19. Sequencing BPS spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gukov, Sergei [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik,Vivatsgasse 7, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Nawata, Satoshi [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Centre for Quantum Geometry of Moduli Spaces, University of Aarhus,Nordre Ringgade 1, DK-8000 (Denmark); Saberi, Ingmar [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stošić, Marko [CAMGSD, Departamento de Matemática, Instituto Superior Técnico,Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Mathematical Institute SANU,Knez Mihajlova 36, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sułkowski, Piotr [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-03-02

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel “sliding” property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  20. Modeling soil moisture-reflectance

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Etienne; Decamps, Henri

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Spectral information on soil is not easily available as vegetation and farm works prevent direct observation of soil responses. However, there is an increasing need to include soil reflectance values in spectral unmixing algorithms or in classification approaches. In most cases, the impact of soil moisture on the reflectance is unknown and therefore ignored. The objective of this study was to model reflectance changes due to soil moisture in a real field situation usin...

  1. Surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith

    1988-01-01

    The controversies surrounding the existing spectra of Mercury are discussed together with the various implications for interpretations of Mercury's surface composition. Special attention is given to the basic procedure used for reducing reflectance spectrophotometry data, the factors that must be accounted for in the reduction of these data, and the methodology for defining the portion of the surface contributing the greatest amount of light to an individual spectrum. The application of these methodologies to Mercury's spectra is presented.

  2. Active optics and the axisymmetric case: MINITRUST wide-field three-reflection telescopes with mirrors aspherized from tulip and vase forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulie, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2004-09-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires larger size telescopes. Compared to the catadioptric Schmidt, the optical properties of a three mirror telescope provides significant advantages. (1) The flat field design is anastigmatic at any wavelength, (2) the system is extremely compact -- four times shorter than a Schmidt -- and, (3) compared to a Schmidt with refractive corrector -- requiring the polishing of three optical surfaces --, the presently proposed Modified-Rumsey design uses all of eight available free parameters of a flat fielded anastigmatic three mirror telescope for mirrors generated by active optics methods. Compared to a Rumsey design, these parameters include the additional slope continuity condition at the primary-tertiary link for in-situ stressing and aspherization from a common sphere. Then, active optics allows the polishing of only two spherical surfaces: the combined primary-tertiary mirror and the secondary mirror. All mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. This compact system is of interest for space and ground-based astronomy and allows to built larger wide-field telescopes such as demonstrated by the design and construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° FOV, consisting of an in-situ stressed double vase form primary-tertiary and of a stress polished tulip form secondary. Optical tests of these telescopes, showing diffraction limited images, are presented.

  3. Compendium on neutron spectra in criticality accident dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ing, H.

    1978-01-01

    Graphical and tabulated neutron spectra are presented: from selected critical assemblies; from critical solutions; of fission neutrons through shielding; of H 2 O-moderated fission neutrons through shielding; of D 2 O-moderated fission neutrons through shielding; of fission neutrons reflected from various materials; from the D(T, 4 He)n reaction (''14 MeV'' neutrons) through shielding and of ''14 MeV'' neutrons reflected from various materials

  4. Flexible Bistable Cholesteric Reflective Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Ke

    2006-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) exhibit two stable states at zero field condition-the reflecting planar state and the nonreflecting focal conic state. ChLCs are an excellent candidate for inexpensive and rugged electronic books and papers. This paper will review the display cell structure,materials and drive schemes for flexible bistable cholesteric (Ch) reflective displays.

  5. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 08LCA04 in Lakes Cherry, Helen, Hiawassee, Louisa, and Prevatt, Central Florida, September 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2009-01-01

    From September 2 through 4, 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) conducted geophysical surveys in Lakes Cherry, Helen, Hiawassee, Louisa, and Prevatt, central Florida. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, FACS logs, and formal FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  6. Determining CDOM Absorption Spectra in Diverse Coastal Environments Using a Multiple Pathlength, Liquid Core Waveguide System. Measuring the Absorption of CDOM in the Field Using a Multiple Pathlength Liquid Waveguide System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard L.; Belz, Mathias; DelCastillo, Carlos; Trzaska, Rick

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy, sensitivity and precision of a multiple pathlength, liquid core waveguide (MPLCW) system for measuring colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption in the UV-visible spectral range (370-700 nm). The MPLCW has four optical paths (2.0, 9.8, 49.3, and 204 cm) coupled to a single Teflon AF sample cell. Water samples were obtained from inland, coastal and ocean waters ranging in salinity from 0 to 36 PSU. Reference solutions for the MPLCW were made having a refractive index of the sample. CDOM absorption coefficients, a(sub CDOM), and the slope of the log-linearized absorption spectra, S, were compared with values obtained using a dual-beam spectrophotometer. Absorption of phenol red secondary standards measured by the MPLCW at 558 nm were highly correlated with spectrophotometer values (r > 0.99) and showed a linear response across all four pathlengths. Values of a(sub CDOM) measured using the MPLCW were virtually identical to spectrophotometer values over a wide range of concentrations. The dynamic range of a(sub CDOM) for MPLCW measurements was 0.002 - 231.5/m. At low CDOM concentrations (a(sub 370) < 0.1/m) spectrophotometric a(sub CDOM) were slightly greater than MPLCW values and showed larger fluctuations at longer wavelengths due to limitations in instrument precision. In contrast, MPLCW spectra followed an exponential to 600 nm for all samples. The maximum deviation in replicate MPLCW spectra was less than 0.001 absorbance units. The portability, sampling, and optical characteristics of a MPLCW system provide significant enhancements for routine CDOM absorption measurements in a broad range of natural waters.

  7. Many-body effects on the x-ray spectra of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpathy, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of band structure, of a solid surface, of temperature, and of disorder on the many-electron x-ray spectra of metals are evaluated in a change-of-mean-field approximation using a one-dimensional nearest-neighbor tight-binding model of a metal. The x-ray spectral shapes are determined by both the band structure and the final-state interactions. The effect of the band being non-free-electron-like is not felt at the x-ray threshold, but away from it such effects are noticeable. When the core hole is created at the surface, the spectra at the edge exhibit a Nozieres-de Dominicis-type singularity with the appropriate surface phase-shifts. At energies away from the edge, the one-particle effects are prominent with the x-ray emission and absorption spectra closely reflecting the local one-electron density of states. The recoil spectrum of a Fermi sea at a non-zero temperature has less asymmetry than the zero-temperature case. It was found that at ordinary temperatures the reduction of the asymmetry due to the thermal distribution of one-electron states is not very significant. Finally, using a one-dimensional Anderson model, the effect of lattice disorder on the x-ray absorption spectra is studied for the first time. There are two effects: (1) the strong infrared divergence peak is gradually quenched as disorder is increased, and (2) the threshold is broadened because the threshold energies for absorption at different sites in the crystal depend on the varying local lattice environment. It is proposed that the x-ray spectra may be useful as a tool for studying the degree of electron localization in disordered many-electron systems

  8. Portable instrument that integrates irradiation with fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopies during clinical photodynamic therapy of cutaneous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, W. J.; Oseroff, A. R.; Foster, T. H.

    2006-06-01

    We report a portable clinical instrument for delivering photodynamic therapy (PDT) while performing noninvasive spectroscopic monitoring in vivo. Using an off-surface probe, the instrument delivers the treatment beam to a user-defined field on the skin and performs reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies at two regions within this field. The instrument is being used to monitor photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching, fluorescent photoproduct kinetics, blood volume, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation during a pilot clinical trial of 5-aminolevulinic acid-PDT treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Protoporphyrin IX and photoproduct fluorescence excited by the 633nm PDT treatment laser is collected between 655 and 800nm. During a series of brief treatment interruptions at programable time points, white light reflectance spectra between 475 and 800nm are acquired. Fluorescence spectra are corrected for the effects of absorption and scattering, informed by the reflectance measurements, and then decomposed into known fluorophore contributions in real time using a robust singular value decomposition fitting routine. Reflectance spectra additionally provide information on blood volume and hemoglobin oxygen saturation. Monitoring blood oxygenation and implicit dose metrics such as photosensitizer photobleaching during PDT allows the improved interpretation of clinical results and is helping to guide the treatment protocol for an anticipated low-irradiance PDT clinical trial of BCC.

  9. Fluorescence Spectra of Blowfly Metaxanthopsins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruizinga, B.; Stavenga, D.G.

    The main visual pigment of blowflies (xanthopsin) photoconverts into two thermostable metaxanthopsin states M and M’. The fluorescence spectra of the two photoproducts were studied by microspectrofluorometry in vivo. The emission spectra of M and M’ are very similar and peak at 660 nm. The

  10. Sample cell for studying liquid interfaces with an in situ electric field using X-ray reflectivity and application to clay particles at oil-oil interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Simon R; Hansteen, Marie; Pacakova, Barbara; Theodor, Keld; Arnold, Thomas; Rennie, Adrian R; Helgesen, Geir; Knudsen, Kenneth D; Bordallo, Heloisa N; Fossum, Jon Otto; Cavalcanti, Leide P

    2018-05-01

    Commissioning results of a liquid sample cell for X-ray reflectivity studies with an in situ applied electrical field are presented. The cell consists of a Plexiglas container with lateral Kapton windows for air-liquid and liquid-liquid interface studies, and was constructed with grooves to accept plate electrodes on the walls parallel to the direction of the beam. Both copper and ITO plate electrodes have been used, the latter being useful for simultaneous optical studies. Commissioning tests were made at the I07 beamline of the Diamond Light Source. open access.

  11. Superradiance or total reflection?

    CERN Document Server

    László, András

    2014-01-01

    Numerical evolution of massless scalar fields on Kerr background is studied. The initial data specifications are chosen to have compact support separated from the ergoregion and to yield nearly monochromatic incident wave packets. The initial data is also tuned to maximize the effect of superradiance. Evidences are shown indicating that instead of the anticipated energy extraction from black hole the incident radiation fail to reach the ergoregion rather it suffers a nearly perfect reflection.

  12. Teachers’ way of reflecting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Lea

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to insights on teachers’ thinking and practice by building partly on the large amount of prior research in the field of continuing professional development (in line with ISATT), and partly on examples from an empirical small-scale study executed in Denmark. The purpose......-ers’ reflections on practice. Based on this model, the paper provides a proposal regarding how to work with teachers’ professional development and learning processes. Educational implications and future research directions are discussed....

  13. On the tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a slab under frustrated total reflection condition

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    Tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a dielectric slab under frustrated total reflection condition is investigated. Full-vector X-Waves are obtained by superimposing transverse electric and magnetic polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of reflection and transmission at the dielectric interfaces is carried out analytically in a straightforward fashion using vector Bessel beam expansion. Investigation of the fields propagating away from the farther end of the slab (transmitted fields) shows an advanced (superluminal) transmission of the X-Wave peak. Additionally, a similar advanced reflection is also observed. The apparent tunneling of the peak is shown to be due to the phase shift in the fields\\' spectra and not to be causally related to the incident peak. © 2012 IEEE.

  14. More terminological clarity in the interprofessional field – a call for reflection on the use of terminologies, in both practice and research, on a national and international level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitzkat, Anika

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The terminology which has been used up until now within interprofessional healthcare has been characterised by a certain definitional weakness, which, among other factors, has been caused by an uncritical adoption of language conventions and a lack of theoretical reflection. However, as terminological clarity plays a significant role in the development and profiling of a discipline, the clarification and definition of commonly-used terminology has manifested itself as a considerable objective for the interprofessional research community. One of the most important journals for research in the area of interprofessional education and care, the Journal of Interprofessional Care, has expanded its author guidelines relating to terminology, modeled after the conceptual considerations of the research group around Barr et. al and Reeves et al. A German translation of the suggested terms therein has been presented in this contribution, and discussed in light of the challenges to a possible adaptation for the German-speaking world. The objective is to assist communication in practice and research in becoming clearer, while promoting an increasing awareness to and the transparency of determined definitions and terminologies.

  15. Site-specific responses to short-term environmental variation are reflected in leaf and phloem-sap carbon isotopic abundance of field grown Eucalyptus globulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas N; Pfautsch, Sebastian; Turnbull, Tarryn L; Samsa, Glen A; Adams, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ(13) C) of plant material has been used extensively as an indirect measure of carbon fixation per volume of water used. More recently, the δ(13) C of phloem sap (δ(13) C(phl) ) has been used as a surrogate measure of short-term, canopy scale δ(13) C. Using a combination of δ(13) C physiological, structural and chemical indices from leaves and phloem sap of Eucalyptus globulus at sites of contrasting water availability, we sought to identify short-term, canopy scale resource limitations. Results illustrate that δ(13) C(phl) offers valid reflections of short-term, canopy scale values of leaf δ(13) C and tree water status. Under conditions limited by water, leaf and phloem sap photoassimilates differ in (13) C abundance of a magnitude large enough to significantly influence predictions of water use efficiency. This pattern was not detected among trees with adequate water supply indicating fractionation into heterotrophic tissues that may be sensitive to plant water status. Trees employed a range of physiological, biochemical and structural adaptations to acclimate to resource limitation that differed among sites providing a useful context upon which to interpret patterns in δ(13) C. Our results highlight that such easily characterized properties are ideal for use as minimally invasive tools to monitor growth and resilience of plants to variations in resource availability. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  16. More terminological clarity in the interprofessional field - a call for reflection on the use of terminologies, in both practice and research, on a national and international level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzkat, Anika; Berger, Sarah; Reeves, Scott; Mahler, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    The terminology which has been used up until now within interprofessional healthcare has been characterised by a certain definitional weakness, which, among other factors, has been caused by an uncritical adoption of language conventions and a lack of theoretical reflection. However, as terminological clarity plays a significant role in the development and profiling of a discipline, the clarification and definition of commonly-used terminology has manifested itself as a considerable objective for the interprofessional research community. One of the most important journals for research in the area of interprofessional education and care, the Journal of Interprofessional Care, has expanded its author guidelines relating to terminology, modeled after the conceptual considerations of the research group around Barr et. al and Reeves et al. A German translation of the suggested terms therein has been presented in this contribution, and discussed in light of the challenges to a possible adaptation for the German-speaking world. The objective is to assist communication in practice and research in becoming clearer, while promoting an increasing awareness to and the transparency of determined definitions and terminologies.

  17. Far-infrared spectra of lateral quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, M.; Harju, A.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2006-02-01

    We study effects of electron electron interactions and confinement potential on the magneto-optical absorption spectrum in the far-infrared (FIR) range of lateral quantum dot molecules (QDMs). We calculate FIR spectra for three different QDM confinement potentials. We use an accurate exact diagonalization technique for two interacting electrons and calculate dipole transitions between two-body levels with perturbation theory. We conclude that the two-electron FIR spectra directly reflect the symmetry of the confinement potential and interactions cause only small shifts in the spectra. These predictions could be tested in experiments with non-parabolic quantum dots (QDs) by changing the number of confined electrons. We also calculate FIR spectra for up to six non-interacting electrons and observe some additional features in the spectrum.

  18. About the contrast of δ' precipitates in bulk Al-Cu-Li alloys in reflection mode with a field-emission scanning electron microscope at low accelerating voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Voisard, Frédéric; Gauvin, Raynald

    2017-11-01

    Characterising the impact of lithium additions in the precipitation sequence in Al-Li-Cu alloys is important to control the strengthening of the final material. Since now, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at high beam voltage has been the technique of choice to monitor the size and spatial distribution of δ' precipitates (Al 3 Li). Here we report on the imaging of the δ' phase in such alloys using backscattered electrons (BSE) and low accelerating voltage in a high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscope. By applying low-energy Ar + ion milling to the surface after mechanical polishing (MP), the MP-induced corroded layers were efficiently removed and permitted the δ's to be visible with a limited impact on the observed microstructure. The resulting BSE contrast between the δ's and the Al matrix was compared with that obtained using Monte Carlo modelling. The artefacts possibly resulting from the sample preparation procedure were reviewed and discussed and permitted to confirm that these precipitates were effectively the metastable δ's. The method described in this report necessitates less intensive sample preparation than that required for TEM and provides a much larger field of view and an easily interpretable contrast compared to the transmission techniques. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Thoughts on Reflection (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-06-01

    research evidence.Perhaps EBLIP proponents need to start thinking about the best ways to be reflective practitioners. Could we start a new type of “journal club” where practitioners keep journals as reflective tools, and meet regularly to work through problems and give one another feedback? Or pair up with a reflective partner to have discussions on critical incidents that occurred within our practice? I am sure some people are already doing this, or are finding other mediums such as blogs, wikis, and mailing lists to reflect on elements of practice and engage others who are interested in the topic. However, coming up with concrete strategies for developing reflection within our profession needs to be more widely discussed and articulated. Our professional bodies would be a good starting place, and via these bodies developing skills through continuing professional development. We can learn a lot from other fields such as Education and Nursing, which have more fully incorporated elements of reflection into their practice. We also need to consider the best way to integrate our reflection with available research. I’m sure there are many ideas just waiting to be put into action, or already happening (in which case we would love to hear about them. As with anything worthwhile, there is no simple formula for success, but there is a valuable goal; in this case, improving our practice for the benefit of our patrons and a better understanding of how and why we do what we do as librarians and information professionals.

  20. Broken Reflection Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugari, Steven Louis

    1992-01-01

    We have carried out a search for broken reflection symmetry in the exotic nucleus ^{114 }Xe. Evidence for broken reflection symmetry has been previously observed in the actinide region, most notably Ra-Th nuclei, and more recently in the neutron rich nuclei ^{144}Ba, ^{146}Ce, and ^{146,148}Nd. This evidence has been discussed in terms of two conceptually different theoretical frameworks, namely alpha clustering and octupole deformation. The alpha clustering model makes global predictions of the relative strengths of enhanced electric dipole (E1) transitions characteristic of broken reflection symmetry, and predicts a dependence on isospin divided by nuclear mass (N-Z) ^2/A^2 of the reduced transition probability, B(E1), where A is the nuclear mass number and N and Z are, respectively, the neutron and proton number. The nuclei studied previously have approximately the same value of (N-Z)^2/A ^2 between 0.033 and 0.05. In ^ {114}Xe this parameter is much different, (N-Z)^2/A^2 =.0028, allowing for a test of the prediction. On the other hand, the octupole model description is less straightforward. Two terms contributing to the calculation of reduced transition strengths are based on the collective liquid drop model of nuclei and have a global dependence on A^2 Z^2. A third term, however, depends explicitly on the shell model description of the valence nucleons and can be large enough to remove this global dependence. The nucleus ^{114}Xe was produced in the heavy ion fusion evaporation reaction ^{60}Ni(^ {58}Ni,2p2n)^{114 }Xe in two separate measurements at Daresbury Laboratory and at Yale University. The nucleus was identified by means of a recoil mass spectrometer in the first reaction and by detection of evaporated neutrons in the second. Gamma ray spectra were collected in coincidence with these triggers using similar gamma detector setups. Information on the angular distributions of the gamma rays was collected for at least three separate angles in each

  1. Raman spectra of lithium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Bi, Dongxue; Voinov, Y. P.; Vodchits, A. I.; Gorshunov, B. P.; Yurasov, N. I.; Yurasova, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the results of investigating the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra in the lithium compounds crystals in a wide spectral range by the fibre-optic spectroscopy method. We also present the stimulated Raman scattering spectra in the lithium hydroxide and lithium deuteride crystals obtained with the use of powerful laser source. The symmetry properties of the lithium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide monohydrate and lithium deuteride crystals optical modes were analyzed by means of the irreducible representations of the point symmetry groups. We have established the selection rules in the Raman and infrared absorption spectra of LiOH, LiOH·H2O and LiD crystals.

  2. Decoding Pure Rotational Molecular Spectra for Asymmetric Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Cooke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotational spectroscopy can provide insights of unparalleled precision with respect to the wavefunctions of molecular systems that have relevance in fields as diverse as astronomy and biology. In this paper, we demonstrate how asymmetric molecular pure rotational spectra may be analyzed “pictorially” and with simple formulae. It is shown that the interpretation of such spectra relies heavily upon pattern recognition. The presentation of some common spectral line positions in near-prolate asymmetric rotational spectra provides a means by which spectral assignment, and approximate rotational constant determination, may be usefully explored. To aid in this endeavor we have created a supporting, free, web page and mobile web page.

  3. Fully reflective photon sieve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenbo; Hu, Yongxiang; MacDonnell, David G.; Kim, Hyun Jung; Weimer, Carl; Baize, Rosemary R.

    2018-02-01

    Photon sieves (PS) have many applications and various designs in focusing light. However, a traditional PS only has a light transmissivity up to ∼25% and a focusing efficiency up to ∼7%, which hinder the application of them in many fields, especially for satellite remote sensing. To overcome these inherent drawbacks of traditional PSs, a concept of reflective photon sieve is developed in this work. This reflective photon sieve is based on a transparent membrane backed by a mirror. The transparent membrane is optimally a fully transparent material sheet with given refractive index and designed geometric thickness which has an optical thickness of a quarter incident wavelength (i.e. an anti-reflective coating). The PS-patterned pinholes are made on the transparent membrane. The design makes the light reflected from pinholes and that from zones of membrane material have 180° phase difference. Thus, light incident on this optical device is reflected and focused on its focal point. This device can have a reflectivity of ∼100% and a focusing efficiency of ∼50% based on numerical simulation. This device functions similar to a concave focusing mirror but can preserve the phase feature of light (such as that for the light with orbital angular momentum). It also has excellent wavelength-dependent property, which can exclude most of the undesired light from the focal point. A thin sheet of this component can perform the joint function of lenses and gratings/etalons in the optical path of a remote sensing system, thus is suitable for controling/filtering light in compact instruments such as satellite sensors. This concept is validated by the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) modeling and a lab prototype in this study.

  4. Scientific information repository assisting reflectance spectrometry in legal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenki, Liudmila; Sterzik, Vera; Bohnert, Michael; Zimmermann, Klaus; Liehr, Andreas W

    2012-06-01

    Reflectance spectrometry is a fast and reliable method for the characterization of human skin if the spectra are analyzed with respect to a physical model describing the optical properties of human skin. For a field study performed at the Institute of Legal Medicine and the Freiburg Materials Research Center of the University of Freiburg, a scientific information repository has been developed, which is a variant of an electronic laboratory notebook and assists in the acquisition, management, and high-throughput analysis of reflectance spectra in heterogeneous research environments. At the core of the repository is a database management system hosting the master data. It is filled with primary data via a graphical user interface (GUI) programmed in Java, which also enables the user to browse the database and access the results of data analysis. The latter is carried out via Matlab, Python, and C programs, which retrieve the primary data from the scientific information repository, perform the analysis, and store the results in the database for further usage.

  5. Infrared spectra of mineral species

    CERN Document Server

    Chukanov, Nikita V

    2014-01-01

    This book details more than 3,000 IR spectra of more than 2,000 mineral species collected during last 30 years. It features full descriptions and analytical data of each sample for which IR spectrum was obtained.

  6. Techniques for Handling and Removal of Spectral Channels in Fourier Transform Synchrotron-Based Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Amr; Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Teillet, Philippe M.

    2010-01-01

    Channel spectra are a big problem for those attempting to use synchrotron-based Fourier transform spectra for spectral lineshape studies. Due to the layout of the optical system at the CLS far-infrared beamline, the synchrotron beam undergoes unavoidable multiple reflections on the steering mirrors, beam splitter, several sets of windows, and filters. We present a method for eliminating channel spectra and compare the results of our technique with other methods available in the literature.

  7. Sequential Analysis of Gamma Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayez-Hassan, M.; Hella, Kh.M.

    2009-01-01

    This work shows how easy one can deal with a huge number of gamma spectra. The method can be used for radiation monitoring. It is based on the macro feature of the windows XP connected to QBASIC software. The routine was used usefully in generating accurate results free from human errors. One hundred measured gamma spectra were fully analyzed in 10 minutes using our fast and automated method controlling the Genie 2000 gamma acquisition analysis software.

  8. Correlating features in the primordial spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Achúcarro, Ana; Palma, Gonzalo A; Patil, Subodh P

    2013-01-01

    Heavy fields coupled to the inflaton reduce the speed of sound in the effective theory of the adiabatic mode each time the background inflationary trajectory deviates from a geodesic. This can result in features in the primordial spectra. We compute the corresponding bispectrum and show that if a varying speed of sound induces features in the power spectrum, the change in the bispectrum is given by a simple formula involving the change in the power spectrum and its derivatives. In this manner, we provide a uniquely discriminable signature of a varying sound speed for the adiabatic mode during inflation that indicates the influence of heavy fields. We find that features in the bispectrum peak in the equilateral limit and, in particular, in the squeezed limit we find considerable enhancement entirely consistent with the single field consistency relation. From the perspective of the underlying effective theory, our results generalize to a wide variety of inflationary models where features are sourced by the time...

  9. Reinterpretation of adcoh and cocorp seismic reflection data with constraints from detailed forward modeling of potential field data - Implications for Laurentia-Peri-Gondwana suture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Patrick D.; Kellogg, James N.

    2017-08-01

    To better constrain the structure of the Laurentian - Peri-Gondwana suture zone, maps and a 2-dimensional regional cross-section model constrained by seismic data and surface geology have been developed by forward and inverse modeling the aeromagnetic and gravity fields. The Central Piedmont Suture (CPS), the boundary between the Laurentian Inner Piedmont and the Peri-Gondwanan Carolina terrane is a low-angle thrust fault ( 30°) ramping up from an Alleghanian mid-crustal detachment at depths of about 12 km. ADCOH and COCORP seismic data image anticlinal structures in the footwalls of the Hayesville thrust and the CPS, above the Alleghanian decollement. The footwall rocks have previously been interpreted as Paleozoic shelf strata on the basis of sub-horizontal seismic reflectors; however, the high densities required to fit the observed gravity anomaly suggest that the folded footwall reflectors may need to be reinterpreted as horse blocks or duplex structures of Grenvillian basement. The Appalachian paired gravity anomaly can be explained by an increase in crustal thickness and a decrease in upper crustal density moving northwestward from the Carolina Terrane toward the Appalachian core. A change in lower crustal density is not required, so that Grenville basement rocks may extend farther to the southeast than previously thought. The 5 to 10 km of Alleghanian uplift and exhumation predicted by P-T crystallization data compiled in this paper can be easily accommodated by thrusting on four major low-angle thrust systems: Great Smoky Mountain Thrust (GSMT), Hayesville, Brevard, and CPS. Unroofing of metamorphic core complexes by normal faulting may therefore not be required to explain the observed exhumation. Alleghanian collision along the southeastern Appalachian margin was predominately orthogonal to strike consistent with the previous reconstructions that call for the counter-clockwise rotation of Gondwanan West Africa, creating head-on collision in the southern

  10. Does Subjective Rating Reflect Behavioural Coding? Personality in 2 Month-Old Dog Puppies: An Open-Field Test and Adjective-Based Questionnaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanis Barnard

    Full Text Available A number of studies have recently investigated personality traits in non-human species, with the dog gaining popularity as a subject species for research in this area. Recent research has shown the consistency of personality traits across both context and time for adult dogs, both when using questionnaire based methods of investigation and behavioural analyses of the dogs' behaviour. However, only a few studies have assessed the correspondence between these two methods, with results varying considerably across studies. Furthermore, most studies have focused on adult dogs, despite the fact that an understanding of personality traits in young puppies may be important for research focusing on the genetic basis of personality traits. In the current study, we sought to evaluate the correspondence between a questionnaire based method and the in depth analyses of the behaviour of 2-month old puppies in an open-field test in which a number of both social and non-social stimuli were presented to the subjects. We further evaluated consistency of traits over time by re-testing a subset of puppies. The correspondence between methods was high and test- retest consistency (for the main trait was also good using both evaluation methods. Results showed clear factors referring to the two main personality traits 'extroversion,' (i.e. the enthusiastic, exuberant approach to the stimuli and 'neuroticism,' (i.e. the more cautious and fearful approach to the stimuli, potentially similar to the shyness-boldness dimension found in previous studies. Furthermore, both methods identified an 'amicability' dimension, expressing the positive interactions the pups directed at the humans stranger, and a 'reservedness' dimension which identified pups who largely chose not to interact with the stimuli, and were defined as quiet and not nosey in the questionnaire.

  11. Investigation of structural characteristics of coals. Two parameters of the electron absorption of coals and their connection with reflectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, V.K.; Rys' yanova, N.D.; Plastun, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    A method was developed for obtaining reflectance spectra of coals in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared regions utilising diffuse scattering of light. This enabled the determination of electron spectra to be considerably simplified. The method was used to evaluate changes in electron spectra of vitrinites with rank, using reflectance measurement as the determinant.

  12. Challenges in planning and performing the retrieval of the prototype repository at Aespoe HRL- Project management's reflections and practical experiences from field work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahm, Paer; Hagman, Patrik; Johannesson, Lars-Erik

    2012-01-01

    the outer plug could start in November 2010 and the field-work was fully completed according to schedule at the end of 2011. The field work included breaching of the outer plug and removal and sampling of the buffer and backfill. The removal of the plug was mainly made by external entrepreneurs and the technique used was to core drill trough the entire reinforced concrete dome to make it easier to mechanically tear the plug down. About 200 tons of concrete was removed and the work took about 12 weeks. The removal of the backfill material in the tunnel was made in two stages in order to minimise the upward swelling of the buffer in the deposition holes. The first stage included removal and sampling of the backfill to a sample-section in between the deposition holes. The remaining backfill was removed after the bentonite in the first deposition hole had been removed and the first canister had been retrieved. The backfill was excavated with a back-hoe loader in layers of two metres. Furthermore, samples were taken for determining the water content and density of the backfill. This work was made by a staff of 3 persons. The samples were wrapped in foil, to avoid them from drying, and transported to a local lab where the determination of the water content and density were performed. About 1100 samples were taken and about 900 tons of backfill material was removed. The total time for removing the backfill was about 10 weeks. No actual problems with the excavation method were observed. The main problem with this part of the work was to get representative samples due to the heterogeneity of the backfill material. The removal of the buffer was made by core drilling into the bentonite blocks from tunnel floor level. Double drilling machines were used and the sample-cores were placed in 8 directions to a depth of about 500 mm. The cores were used for determining the water content and the density of the buffer. The bentonite in between the cores was then mechanically removed

  13. Response spectra in alluvial soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekharan, A.R.; Paul, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    For aseismic design of structures, the ground motion data is assumed either in the form of ground acceleration as a function of time or indirectly in the form of response spectra. Though the response spectra approach has limitations like not being applicable for nonlinear problems, it is usually used for structures like nuclear power plants. Fifty accelerograms recorded at alluvial sites have been processed. Since different empirical formulas relating acceleration with magnitude and distance give a wide scatter of values, peak ground acceleration alone cannot be the parameter as is assumed by a number of authors. The spectra corresponding to 5% damping have been normalised with respect to three parameters, namely, peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity and a nondimensional quantity ad/v 2 . Envelopee of maxima and minima as well as average response spectra has been obtained. A comparison with the USAEC spectra has been made. A relation between ground acceleration, ground velocity and ad/v 2 has been obtained which would nearly give the same magnification of the response. A design response spectra for alluvial soils has been recommended. (author)

  14. Are Gaussian spectra a viable perceptual assumption in color appearance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizokami, Yoko; Webster, Michael A

    2012-02-01

    Natural illuminant and reflectance spectra can be roughly approximated by a linear model with as few as three basis functions, and this has suggested that the visual system might construct a linear representation of the spectra by estimating the weights of these functions. However, such models do not accommodate nonlinearities in color appearance, such as the Abney effect. Previously, we found that these nonlinearities are qualitatively consistent with a perceptual inference that stimulus spectra are instead roughly Gaussian, with the hue tied to the inferred centroid of the spectrum [J. Vision 6(9), 12 (2006)]. Here, we examined to what extent a Gaussian inference provides a sufficient approximation of natural color signals. Reflectance and illuminant spectra from a wide set of databases were analyzed to test how well the curves could be fit by either a simple Gaussian with three parameters (amplitude, peak wavelength, and standard deviation) versus the first three principal component analysis components of standard linear models. The resulting Gaussian fits were comparable to linear models with the same degrees of freedom, suggesting that the Gaussian model could provide a plausible perceptual assumption about stimulus spectra for a trichromatic visual system. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  15. Investigation of Effect of KBr Matrix on Drift Infrared Spectra of Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2014-09-28

    Sep 28, 2014 ... ABSTRACT. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy was used in this work to investigate the effect of KBr on infrared spectra of calcite and illite/smectite. 30 mg of each of these minerals were dispersed in. 270 mg of KBr and their drifts spectra were obtained and analysed using ...

  16. Effect of Temperature on Jet Velocity Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical jet noise prediction codes that accurately predict spectral directivity for both cold and hot jets are highly sought both in industry and academia. Their formulation, whether based upon manipulations of the Navier-Stokes equations or upon heuristic arguments, require substantial experimental observation of jet turbulence statistics. Unfortunately, the statistics of most interest involve the space-time correlation of flow quantities, especially velocity. Until the last 10 years, all turbulence statistics were made with single-point probes, such as hotwires or laser Doppler anemometry. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) brought many new insights with its ability to measure velocity fields over large regions of jets simultaneously; however, it could not measure velocity at rates higher than a few fields per second, making it unsuitable for obtaining temporal spectra and correlations. The development of time-resolved PIV, herein called TR-PIV, has removed this limitation, enabling measurement of velocity fields at high resolution in both space and time. In this paper, ground-breaking results from the application of TR-PIV to single-flow hot jets are used to explore the impact of heat on turbulent statistics of interest to jet noise models. First, a brief summary of validation studies is reported, undertaken to show that the new technique produces the same trusted results as hotwire at cold, low-speed jets. Second, velocity spectra from cold and hot jets are compared to see the effect of heat on the spectra. It is seen that heated jets possess 10 percent more turbulence intensity compared to the unheated jets with the same velocity. The spectral shapes, when normalized using Strouhal scaling, are insensitive to temperature if the stream-wise location is normalized relative to the potential core length. Similarly, second order velocity correlations, of interest in modeling of jet noise sources, are also insensitive to temperature as well.

  17. Lightning spectra at 100,000 fps

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHarg, M. G.; Harley, J.; Haaland, R. K.; Edens, H. E.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.

    2016-12-01

    A fundamental understanding of lightning can be inferred from the spectral emissions resulting from the leader and return stroke channel. We examine an event recorded at 00:58:07 on 19 July 2015 at Langmuir Laboratory. We recorded lightning spectra using a 100 line per mm grating in front of a Phantom V2010 camera with an 85mm Nikon lens recording at 100,000 frames per second. Coarse resolution spectra (approximately 5nm resolution) are produced from approximately 400 nm to 800 nm for each frame. Electric field data from the Langmuir Electric Field Array for the 03:19:19 event show 10 V/m changes in the electric field associated with multiple return strokes visible in the spectral data. We used the spectral data to compare temperatures at the top, middle and bottom of the lightning channel. Lightning Mapping Array data at Langmuir for the 00:58:07 event show a complex flash extending 10 km in the East-West plane and 6 km in the North-South plane. The imagery data imply that this is a bolt-from-the-blue event.

  18. Infrared and Raman scattering spectra of layered structured Ga3InSe4 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, M.; Gasanly, N. M.; Korkmaz, F.

    2013-03-01

    The infrared reflectivity and transmittance and Raman scattering in Ga3InSe4 layered crystals were investigated in the frequency ranges of 100-400, 400-4000 and 25-500 cm-1. The refractive and absorption indices, the frequencies of transverse and longitudinal optical modes, high- and low-frequency dielectric constants were obtained from the analysis of the IR reflectivity spectra. The bands observed in IR transmittance spectra were interpreted in terms of two-phonon absorption processes.

  19. General and efficient method for calculating modulation ressponses and noise spectra of active semiconductor waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaaberg, Søren; Öhman, Filip; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical method for obtaining small-signal responses in a spatially resolved active semiconductor waveguide including finite end-facet reflectivities and amplified spontaneous emission. RF-modulation responses and output noise spectra of an SOA are shown.......We present a theoretical method for obtaining small-signal responses in a spatially resolved active semiconductor waveguide including finite end-facet reflectivities and amplified spontaneous emission. RF-modulation responses and output noise spectra of an SOA are shown....

  20. Symmetry in bonding and spectra an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Bodie E

    1985-01-01

    Many courses dealing with the material in this text are called ""Applications of Group Theory."" Emphasizing the central role and primary importance of symmetry in the applications, Symmetry in Bonding and Spectra enables students to handle applications, particularly applications to chemical bonding and spectroscopy. It contains the essential background in vectors and matrices for the applications, along with concise reviews of simple molecular orbital theory, ligand field theory, and treatments of molecular shapes, as well as some quantum mechanics. Solved examples in the text illustra

  1. A Reflective Look at Reflecting Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, Rebecca L.; Stinchfield, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This article reviewed existing literature and research on the reflecting team process. There is a dearth of empirical research that explores the reflecting team process and the outcome of counseling that uses reflecting teams. Implications of using reflecting teams for counselors, counselor educators, and clients will be discussed. A call for…

  2. Interaction of phonons with intraband electronic excitations and crystal field transitions in Raman spectra of (Nd,Eu,Gd)Ba.sub.2./sub.Cu.sub.3./sub.O.sub.y./sub. crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rameš, Michal; Železný, Vladimír; Gregora, Ivan; Wolf, T.; Jirsa, Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 197, Jul (2015), 10-17 ISSN 0921-5107 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10069 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cuprate superconductors * phonons * crystal field * vortex pinning Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.331, year: 2015

  3. Conductance spectra of asymmetric ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasanai, K., E-mail: krisakronmsu@gmail.com

    2017-01-15

    A theory of tunneling spectroscopy of ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions was studied. We applied a delta-functional approximation for the interface scattering properties under a one-dimensional system of a free electron approach. The reflection and transmission probabilities were calculated in the ballistic regime, and the conductance spectra were then calculated using the Landauer formulation. The magnetization directions were set to be either parallel (P) or anti-parallel (AP) alignments, for comparison. We found that the conductance spectra was suppressed when increasing the interfacial scattering at the interfaces. Moreover, the electron could exhibit direct transmission when the thickness was rather thin. Thus, there was no oscillation in this case. However, in the case of a thick layer the conductance spectra oscillated, and this oscillation was most prominent when the middle layer thickness increased. In the case of direct transmission, the conductance spectra of P and AP systems were definitely suppressed with increased exchange energy of the middle ferromagnet. This also refers to an increase in the magnetoresistance of the junction. In the case of oscillatory behavior, the positions of the resonance peaks were changed as the exchange energy was changed. - Highlights: • The conductance spectra of a FM/FM/FM junction were calculated. • The conductance spectra were suppressed by the exchange energy. • The exchange energy and the potential strength play similar roles in the junctions.

  4. Reflections on the process of implementing a social program in the field of physical activity in vulnerable populations: Contributions to the Teacher Education in Physical Education and to the improvement of public policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Campomar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe and analyze the process of implementing a social program of intervention in vulnerable populations through sport, physical activity and recreational games, which has been developed since 2011 in three slums (‘villas’ in La Matanza. The social program is analyzed in various key aspects of the implementation process. These issues were addressed through qualitative research with broad objectives and a comprehensive approach. We reflect on a research breakthrough that privileges the perceptions and representations of technical teachers who worked in this Program. Also, we make some contributions to improve future actions and teacher training. Six focus groups were formed and it is estimated that the input generated will be useful for planning better teaching practices and specific training of future teachers. It also hopes to provide elements of analysis and judgment for the management of public policies in the field of sport and physical activity as a strategy for social integration

  5. The Role of Professional Journals and Societies in the Future of a Field: A Reflection on the Partnership Between the American Journal of Epidemiology and the Society for Epidemiologic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Kristen A; Galea, Sandro

    2016-03-01

    On this, the 100th anniversary of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, we take the opportunity to reflect on the ties between the School, the American Journal of Epidemiology, and the Society for Epidemiologic Research. We discuss briefly the intersection of the School, the Journal, and the Society throughout their histories, with the aim of providing some insight into how the Journal and the Society have contributed to the evolution of the field. In so doing, we articulate the challenges that the Journal and the Society jointly face today, with an eye to finding opportunities in these challenges that can be helpful in coming decades. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. THEORETICAL SPECTRA OF TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANET SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Renyu; Seager, Sara [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ehlmann, Bethany L., E-mail: hury@mit.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-06-10

    We investigate spectra of airless rocky exoplanets with a theoretical framework that self-consistently treats reflection and thermal emission. We find that a silicate surface on an exoplanet is spectroscopically detectable via prominent Si-O features in the thermal emission bands of 7-13 {mu}m and 15-25 {mu}m. The variation of brightness temperature due to the silicate features can be up to 20 K for an airless Earth analog, and the silicate features are wide enough to be distinguished from atmospheric features with relatively high resolution spectra. The surface characterization thus provides a method to unambiguously identify a rocky exoplanet. Furthermore, identification of specific rocky surface types is possible with the planet's reflectance spectrum in near-infrared broad bands. A key parameter to observe is the difference between K-band and J-band geometric albedos (A{sub g}(K) - A{sub g}(J)): A{sub g}(K) - A{sub g}(J) > 0.2 indicates that more than half of the planet's surface has abundant mafic minerals, such as olivine and pyroxene, in other words primary crust from a magma ocean or high-temperature lavas; A{sub g}(K) - A{sub g}(J) < -0.09 indicates that more than half of the planet's surface is covered or partially covered by water ice or hydrated silicates, implying extant or past water on its surface. Also, surface water ice can be specifically distinguished by an H-band geometric albedo lower than the J-band geometric albedo. The surface features can be distinguished from possible atmospheric features with molecule identification of atmospheric species by transmission spectroscopy. We therefore propose that mid-infrared spectroscopy of exoplanets may detect rocky surfaces, and near-infrared spectrophotometry may identify ultramafic surfaces, hydrated surfaces, and water ice.

  7. Crystal field and microwave absorption spectra in tetragonal HoBa.sub.2./sub.Cu.sub.3./sub.O.sub.x./sub.(x = 6.0, 6.3)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kazei, Z.A.; Snegirev, V. V.; Danilova, N.P.; Goiran, M.; Nekvasil, Vladimír; Kozeeva, L. P.; Kameneva, M.Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 13 (2010), 134444/1-134444/10 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100803 Grant - others:EuroMagtNet II(XE) 228043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : level splitting * crystal field * microwave * layered perovskites Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.772, year: 2010

  8. Model of a black hole gas submitted to background gravitational field for active galaxy nuclei with application to calculating the continuous emission spectra of massless particles (Photons: neutrinos and gravitons)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Neto, A.

    1987-01-01

    A new theoretical model for active galaxy nuclei which describes the continuous spectrum of rest massless particles (photons, neutrinos and gravitons) in the frequency range from radiofrequency to gamma ray frequency, is presented. The model consists in a black hole gas interacting with a background gravitacional field. The previously models proposed for active galaxy nuclei are exposured. Whole theoretical fundaments based on Einstein general relativity theory for defining and studying singularity properties (black holes) are also presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  9. Dependence of optical properties of monoclinic MnWO{sub 4} on the electric field of incident light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Lugang [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Measurement-Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu Famin, E-mail: fmliu@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Measurement-Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang Dian; Zhong Wenwu [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Measurement-Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Considering the electric field of incident light along four particular directions [100], [110], [011], and [010], the optical properties of monoclinic MnWO{sub 4} were investigated by the first-principle methods. The calculated electronic structures show that the O 2p states and Mn 3d states dominate the top of the valence bands, while the W 5d and Mn 3d states play a key role in the bottom of the conduction bands. The dielectric function and other optical properties, including absorption coefficient, reflectivity spectra, and energy-loss spectra, were calculated and analyzed. The results predicted the maximum static dielectric function when the electric field of incident light was along the [100] direction; meanwhile the absorption edge was calculated to be consistent with the energy band gap and the values and positions of peaks in absorption coefficient are related with the electric field of light. Otherwise, it is found that the appearance of peaks in the energy-loss spectra is also dependent on the electric field and simultaneously corresponds to the edge of absorption spectra and the peaks' position of reflectivity spectra.

  10. Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic spectra and their interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgemore-Schulthess, K.J.F.; St. Maurice, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    acceleration, wave-particle and wave-wave interactions in the ionosphere, and their association with magnetospheric processes. There is now a substantial body of literature documenting observations of enhanced ion-acoustic spectra, but there remains controversy over generation mechanisms. We present a review...... years there has been much interest in naturally occurring (as opposed to artificially stimulated) enhanced ion-acoustic spectra seen in the auroral zone and cusp/cleft region. A study of the plasma instability processes that lead to such spectra will help us to better understand auroral particle...... of literature documenting observations of naturally enhanced ion-acoustic spectra, observed mainly along the geomagnetic field direction, along with a discussion of the theories put forward to explain such phenomena....

  11. Absolute technique for measuring internal electric fields in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes by electroreflectance applicable to all crystal orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Tomoyuki; Shojiki, Kanako; Katayama, Ryuji; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Matsuoka, Takashi; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    The internal electric fields in III-polar (0001), N-polar (000\\bar{1}), and semipolar (10\\bar{1}1) InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes were investigated by electroreflectance (ER) spectroscopy. The ER spectra reflected the difference in the direction and strength of internal electric fields. Phase analyses of the ER signal revealed that only III-polar InGaN wells have the opposite direction of the internal electric field at zero bias voltage; this finding is in good agreement with the results of numerical analyses. Quantitative analyses of internal electric fields were conducted by the linewidth analyses of ER spectra. Our experimental results indicate that the absolute value of internal electric fields can be measured from ER spectra.

  12. Transmission versus reflectance spectroscopy for quantitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Craig M.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this work was to compare the accuracy of analyte concentration estimation when using transmission versus diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of a scattering medium. Monte Carlo ray tracing of light through the medium was used in conjunction with pure component absorption spectra and Beer-Lambert absorption along each ray's pathlength to generate matched sets of pseudoabsorbance spectra, containing water and six analytes present in skin. PLS regression models revealed an improvement in accuracy when using transmission compared to reflectance for a range of medium thicknesses and instrument noise levels. An analytical expression revealed the source of the accuracy degradation with reflectance was due both to the reduced collection efficiency for a fixed instrument etendue and to the broad pathlength distribution that detected light travels in the medium before exiting from the incident side.

  13. Automatic identification of mass spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabloes, F.

    1992-01-01

    Several approaches to preprocessing and comparison of low resolution mass spectra have been evaluated by various test methods related to library search. It is shown that there is a clear correlation between the nature of any contamination of a spectrum, the basic principle of the transformation or distance measure, and the performance of the identification system. The identification of functionality from low resolution spectra has also been evaluated using several classification methods. It is shown that there is an upper limit to the success of this approach, but also that this can be improved significantly by using a very limited amount of additional information. 10 refs

  14. Correlation Functions and Power Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The present lecture note is a supplement to the textbook Digital Signal Processing by J. Proakis and D.G. Manolakis used in the IMM/DTU course 02451 Digital Signal Processing and provides an extended discussion of correlation functions and power spectra. The definitions of correlation functions....... It is possible to define correlation functions and associated spectra for aperiodic, periodic and random signals although the interpretation is different. Moreover, we will discuss correlation functions when mixing these basic signal types. In addition, the note include several examples for the purpose...

  15. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Corn and Soybean Plants Under Nitrogen Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    We are investigating the use of spectral indices derived from actively induced fluorescence spectra and passive optical spectra. We examined the influence of photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content on the spectral fluorescence and passive optical property characteristics of mature, upper leaves from plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of recommended N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight. Steady state laser-induced fluorescence emission spectra (5 nm resolution) were obtained from adaxial and abaxial surfaces resulting from excitation at single wavelengths (280, 380 or 360, and 532 nm). For emission spectra produced by each of these excitation wavelengths, ratios of emission peaks were calculated, including the red far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) ratio (F685/F740) and the far-red/green (F740/F525) ratio. High resolution (< 3 nm) optical spectra (350-2500 nm) of reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance were also acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces. Species differences were demonstrated for several optical parameters. A 'red edge' derivative ratio determined from transmittance spectra [as the maximum first deivative, between 650-750 nm, normalized to the value at 744 nm, or Dmax/D744], was strongly associated with the C/N ratio (r(exp 2) = 0.90, P +/- 0.001). This ratio, calculated from reflectance spectra, was inversely related to chlorophyll b content (r(exp 2) = 0.91, P +/- 0.001) as was the ChlF (F685/F740) ratio obtained with 532 nm excitation (r(exp 2) = 0.76, P +/- 0.01). Discrimination of N treatment groups was possible with specific fluorescence band ratios (e.g., F740/F525 obtained with 380 nm excitation). Higher ChlF and blue-green emissions were measured from the abaxial leaf surfaces

  16. The Electric Field Standing Wave Effect in Infrared Transmission Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G; Mutschke, Harald; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-10-19

    When band ratios in infrared absorbance spectra of films are compared (which had been converted from transmittance spectra), it can be noted that even after background correction and removal of interference fringes these band ratios change with the thickness of the films. The main goal of this work is to show that this effect is a consequence of an electric field standing wave based on the coherent superposition of light waves in the film. We further investigate how transmittance and reflectance, as well as absorbance and the (from absorbance) regained index of absorption, depend on the thickness of the film and how these parameters influence the positions of bands. We compare the results with those for the incoherent case and the case where a single pass of light through the film without reflection loss is assumed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Critical reflections from men in the field

    OpenAIRE

    McKearney, A

    2014-01-01

    This editorial provides the background to and explains the rationale for a special issue on Men doing (in)equalities research in the journal, Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, Volume 33, Number 5, 2014. The editorial introduces the papers and offers a brief commentary as to the key focus and contribution of each paper.

  18. Intercomparison of Approaches to the Empirical Line Method for Vicarious Hyperspectral Reflectance Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Ortiz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of visible remote sensing data research requires removing atmospheric effects by conversion from radiance to at-surface reflectance. This conversion can be achieved through theoretical radiative transfer models, which yield good results when well-constrained by field observations, although these measurements are often lacking. Additionally, radiative transfer models often perform poorly in marine or lacustrine settings or when complex air masses with variable aerosols are present. The empirical line method (ELM measures reference targets of known reflectance in the scene. ELM methods require minimal environmental observations and are conceptually simple. However, calibration coefficients are unique to the image containing the reflectance reference. Here we compare the conversion of hyperspectral radiance observations obtained with the NASA Glenn Research Center Hyperspectral Imager to at-surface reflectance factor using two reflectance reference targets. The first target employs spherical convex mirrors, deployed on the water surface to reflect ambient direct solar and hemispherical sky irradiance to the sensor. We calculate the mirror gain using near concurrent at-sensor reflectance, integrated mirror radiance, and in situ water reflectance. The second target is the Lambertian-like blacktop surface at Maumee Bay State Park, Oregon, OH, where reflectance was measured concurrently by a downward looking, spectroradiometer on the ground, the aerial hyperspectral imager and an upward looking spectroradiometer on the aircraft. These methods allows us to produce an independently calibrated at-surface water reflectance spectrum, when atmospheric conditions are consistent. We compare the mirror and blacktop-corrected spectra to the in situ water reflectance, and find good agreement between methods. The blacktop method can be applied to all scenes, while the mirror calibration method, based on direct observation of the light illuminating the

  19. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  20. Explanation of earthquake response spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, John

    2017-01-01

    This is a set of five slides explaining how earthquake response spectra are derived from strong-motion records and simple models of structures and their purpose within seismic design and assessment. It dates from about 2002 and I have used it in various introductory lectures on engineering seismology.

  1. Far-infrared spectra of mesoporous ZnS nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajić, J.; Romčević, M.; Romčević, N.; Babić, B.; Matović, B.; Baláž, P.

    2016-07-01

    ZnS nanoparticles were synthesized mechanochemically by high-energy milling, with three different milling times (5 min, 10 min and 20 min). Nitrogen adsorption method was used for examining specific surface area and texture of obtained powders. It was found that all samples are completely mesoporous. The optical properties were studied by far-infrared spectroscopy at room temperature in spectral region of 50-600 cm-1. The analysis of the far-infrared reflectivity spectra was made by the fitting procedure. The dielectric function of ZnS nanoparticles is modeled as a mixture of homogenous spherical inclusions in air by the Maxwell-Garnet formula. In the analysis of the far-infrared reflection spectra, appearance of combined plasmon-LO phonon modes (CPPMs) with high phonon damping are observed, which causes decrease of coupled plasmon-phonon frequencies.

  2. On the origin of cyclotron lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtukov A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclotron resonance scattering features are observed in the spectra of some X-ray pulsars and show significant changes in the line energy with the pulsar luminosity. In a case of bright sources, the line centroid energy is anti-correlated with the luminosity. Such a behaviour is often associated with the onset and growth of the accretion column, which is believed to be the origin of the observed emission and the cyclotron lines. However, this scenario inevitably implies large gradient of the magnetic field strength within the line-forming region, and it makes the formation of the observed line-like features problematic. Moreover, the observed variation of the cyclotron line energy is much smaller than could be anticipated for the corresponding luminosity changes. We argue that a more physically realistic situation is that the cyclotron line forms when the radiation emitted by the accretion column is reflected from the neutron star surface. The idea is based on the facts that a substantial part of column luminosity is intercepted by the neutron star surface and the reflected radiation should contain absorption features. The reflection model is developed and applied to explain the observed variations of the cyclotron line energy in a bright X-ray pulsar V 0332+53 over a wide range of luminosities.

  3. Ionization spectra of highly Stark-shifted rubidium Rydberg states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmel, Jens; Stecker, Markus; Kaiser, Manuel; Karlewski, Florian; Torralbo-Campo, Lara; Günther, Andreas; Fortágh, József

    2017-07-01

    We report on the observation and numerical calculation of ionization spectra of highly Stark-shifted Rydberg states of rubidium beyond the classical ionization threshold. In the numerical calculations, a complex absorbing potential (CAP) allows us to predict the energy levels and ionization rates of Rydberg states in this regime. Our approach of adjusting the CAP to the external electric field reduces the number of free parameters from one per resonance to a single one. Furthermore, we have measured the ionization spectra of magneto-optically trapped rubidium atoms which are excited to principal quantum numbers of 43 and 70 at various electric fields. The emerging ions are detected using an ion optics. We find good agreement between the numerically and experimentally obtained spectra.

  4. Simple emergent power spectra from complex inflationary physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Mafalda; Frazer, Jonathan; Marsh, M.C. David

    2016-04-01

    We construct ensembles of random scalar potentials for N f interacting scalar fields using non-equilibrium random matrix theory, and use these to study the generation of observables during small-field inflation. For N f =O(few), these heavily featured scalar potentials give rise to power spectra that are highly non-linear, at odds with observations. For N f >>1, the superhorizon evolution of the perturbations is generically substantial, yet the power spectra simplify considerably and become more predictive, with most realisations being well approximated by a linear power spectrum. This provides proof of principle that complex inflationary physics can give rise to simple emergent power spectra. We explain how these results can be understood in terms of large N f universality of random matrix theory.

  5. Forensic applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tungol, Mary W.; Bartick, Edward G.; Reffner, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy in forensic science are discussed. Internal reflection spectra of single fibers, hairs, paint chips, vehicle rubber bumpers, photocopy toners, carbon copies, writing ink on paper, lipstick on tissue, black electrical tape, and other types of forensic evidence have been obtained. The technique is convenient, non-destructive, and may permit smeared materials to be analyzed in situ.

  6. Seasonal Variations of Stratospheric Age Spectra in GEOSCCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Waugh, D. W.; Douglass, A. R.; Pawson, S.; Newman, P. A.; Stolarski, R. S.; Strahan, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    The stratospheric age spectrum is the probability distribution function of the transit times since a stratospheric air parcel had last contact with a tropospheric boundary region. The age spectrum provides valuable information on stratospheric transport timescales such as the mean age, modal age, spectral width, and stratospheric decay rate. However, knowledge of the age spectrum's seasonal variability is very limited. In this study, we investigate the seasonal variations of stratospheric age spectra using the pulse tracer method in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). The differences between the age spectrum and the Boundary Impulse Response (BIR), which is the direct product of the pulse tracer method, are clarified. We introduce a simplified method to reconstruct seasonally varying age spectra from seasonally varying BIRs. Age spectra in the GEOSCCM have significant seasonal variations throughout the stratosphere. The largest seasonal changes occur in the lowermost and lower stratosphere and the subtropical overworld. Up to 40% differences between the individual month and annually averaged mean age are commonly found in these regions. The modal ages and spectral shapes demonstrate even bigger changes in the polar stratosphere. The seasonal variations of the age spectra reflect the seasonal evolution and relative importance of the slow Brewer-Dobson circulation and the fast isentropic mixing. The seasonal and interannual variations of the BIRs are also investigated. Our results clearly show that computing an ensemble of seasonally dependent BIRs is necessary in order to capture the seasonal and annual mean properties of the stratospheric age spectra.

  7. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Corn and Soybean Plants Under Nitrogen Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    We are investigating the use of spectral indices derived from actively induced fluorescence spectra and passive optical spectra. We examined the influence of photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content on the spectral fluorescence and passive optical property characteristics of mature, upper leaves from plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of recommended N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight. Steady state laser-induced fluorescence emission spectra (5 nm resolution) were obtained from adaxial and abaxial surfaces resulting from excitation at single wavelengths (280, 380 or 360, and 532 nm). For emission spectra produced by each of these excitation wavelengths, ratios of emission peaks were calculated, including the red far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) ratio (F685/F740) and the far-red/green (F740/F525) ratio. High resolution (treatment groups was possible with specific fluorescence band ratios (e.g., F740/F525 obtained with 380 nm excitation). Higher ChlF and blue-green emissions were measured from the abaxial leaf surfaces. Abaxial surfaces also produced higher reflectances, in general, in the 400-800 nm spectrum.

  8. Magnetic measurements, Raman and infrared spectra of metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    70

    Magnetic measurements, Raman and infrared spectra of metal- ligand complex derived from CoCl2·6H2Oand ... molecule derived transition metal (TM) ion based complexes have opened a wide research field in the interface of physics and ..... will give the proper value of the magnetic moment. The present value suggests.

  9. Energy spectra and optical transitions in germanene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Thakshila M.; Apalkov, Vadym

    2016-04-01

    The band gap of buckled graphene-like materials, such as silicene and germanene, depends on external perpendicular electric field. Then a specially design profile of electric field can produce trapping potential for electrons. We study theoretically the energy spectrum and optical transitions for such designed quantum dots (QDs) in graphene-like materials. The energy spectra depend on the size of the QD and applied electric field in the region of the QD. The number of the states in the QD increases with increasing the size of the dot and the energies of the states have almost linear dependence on the applied electric field with the slope which increases with increasing the dot size. The optical properties of the QDs are characterized by two types of absorption spectra: interband (optical transitions between the states of the valence and conduction bands) and intraband (transitions between the states of conduction/valence band). The interband absorption spectra have triple-peak structure with peak separation around 10 meV, while intraband absorption spectra, which depend on the number of electrons in the dot, have double-peak structure.

  10. Energy corrections and persistent perturbation effects in continuous spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, Léon van

    1955-01-01

    The quantum-mechanical perturbation theory of continuous energy spectra is investigated for a special class of perturbations possessing some of the formal properties of the familiar interaction energies of field theory. These formal properties entail the inapplicability of the familiar perturbation

  11. Temperature and field dependent Mossbauer studies of the metallic inclusions in synthetic MDAS diamond grits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bharuth-Ram, K.; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Mørup, Steen

    2001-01-01

    at temperatures of 300 K and 80 K, in zero field and in an external field of 0.60 T, on the metallic inclusions in these grits. The Mossbauer spectra of the inclusions are rather complex, reflecting the contributions of several different magnetic phases. Our results show that the temperature variation......Mossbauer spectroscopy of the metallic inclusions in diamond grits produced in high-temperature high-pressure synthesis have revealed varying but interesting results. The MDAS(1) grits synthesized with Fe/Ni solvent-catalysts show Mossbauer spectra that vary with grit size, with the ferromagnetic...... of the Mossbauer spectra is not due to superparamagnetic relaxation of ferromagnetic inclusions but rather to magnetic ordering temperatures of the order of room temperature. Based on the spectral lineshapes and elemental analyses, we suggest the inclusions in the 63-75 mum grits contain iron mainly in Fe...

  12. Continuity of Reflectance Data between Landsat-7 ETM+ and Landsat-8 OLI, for Both Top-of-Atmosphere and Surface Reflectance: A Study in the Australian Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Flood

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The new Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI is intended to be broadly compatible with the previous Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+. The spectral response of the OLI is slightly different to the ETM+, and so there may be slight differences in the reflectance measurements. Since the differences are a function not just of spectral responses, but also of the target pixels, there is a need to assess these differences in practice, using imagery from the area of interest. This paper presents a large scale study of the differences between ETM+ and OLI in the Australian landscape. The analysis is carried out in terms of both top-of-atmosphere and surface reflectance, and also in terms of biophysical parameters modelled from those respective reflectance spectra. The results show small differences between the sensors, which can be magnified by modelling to a biophysical parameter. It is also shown that a part of this difference appears to be systematic, and can be reliably removed by regression equations to predict ETM+ reflectance from OLI reflectance, before applying biophysical models. This is important when models have been fitted to historical field data coincident with ETM+ imagery. However, there will remain a small per-pixel difference which could be an unwanted source of variability.

  13. Rejoinder to TESE Reflection Pieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Fred

    1996-01-01

    Reflects on the differing viewpoints in previous articles addressing the preparation of special education teachers. Discusses the need for the special education field to continue to use effective instructional strategies and share them with general education change agents to better the lives of all children. (CR)

  14. Time-dependent density functional theory/discrete reaction field spectra of open shell systems: The visual spectrum of [FeIII(PyPepS)2]- in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijnen, Piet Th; Greene, Shannon N; Richards, Nigel G J

    2007-07-28

    We report the calculated visible spectrum of [FeIII(PyPepS)2]- in aqueous solution. From all-classical molecular dynamics simulations on the solute and 200 water molecules with a polarizable force field, 25 solute/solvent configurations were chosen at random from a 50 ps production run and subjected the systems to calculations using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) for the solute, combined with a solvation model in which the water molecules carry charges and polarizabilities. In each calculation the first 60 excited states were collected in order to span the experimental spectrum. Since the solute has a doublet ground state several excitations to states are of type "three electrons in three orbitals," each of which gives rise to a manifold of a quartet and two doublet states which cannot properly be represented by single Slater determinants. We applied a tentative scheme to analyze this type of spin contamination in terms of Delta and Delta transitions between the same orbital pairs. Assuming the associated states as pure single determinants obtained from restricted calculations, we construct conformation state functions (CFSs), i.e., eigenfunctions of the Hamiltonian Sz and S2, for the two doublets and the quartet for each Delta,Delta pair, the necessary parameters coming from regular and spin-flip calculations. It appears that the lower final states remain where they were originally calculated, while the higher states move up by some tenths of an eV. In this case filtering out these higher states gives a spectrum that compares very well with experiment, but nevertheless we suggest investigating a possible (re)formulation of TD-DFT in terms of CFSs rather than determinants.

  15. Reconstruction of neutron spectra through neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Manzanares A, E.

    2003-01-01

    A neural network has been used to reconstruct the neutron spectra starting from the counting rates of the detectors of the Bonner sphere spectrophotometric system. A group of 56 neutron spectra was selected to calculate the counting rates that would produce in a Bonner sphere system, with these data and the spectra it was trained the neural network. To prove the performance of the net, 12 spectra were used, 6 were taken of the group used for the training, 3 were obtained of mathematical functions and those other 3 correspond to real spectra. When comparing the original spectra of those reconstructed by the net we find that our net has a poor performance when reconstructing monoenergetic spectra, this attributes it to those characteristic of the spectra used for the training of the neural network, however for the other groups of spectra the results of the net are appropriate with the prospective ones. (Author)

  16. Hyperspectral reflectance of leaves and flowers of an outbreak species discriminates season and successional stage of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sabrina; Schlerf, Martin; van der Putten, Wim H.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2013-10-01

    Spectral reflectance can be used to assess large-scale performances of plants in the field based on plant nutrient balance as well as composition of defence compounds. However, plant chemical composition is known to vary with season - due to its phenology - and it may even depend on the succession stage of its habitat. Here we investigate (i) how spectral reflectance could be used to discriminate successional and phenological stages of Jacobaea vulgaris in both leaf and flower organs and (ii) if chemical content estimation by reflectance is flower or leaf dependent. We used J. vulgaris, which is a natural outbreak plant species on abandoned arable fields in north-western Europe and studied this species in a chronosequence representing successional development during time since abandonment. The chemical content and reflectance between 400 and 2500 nm wavelengths of flowers and leaves were measured throughout the season in fields of different successional ages. The data were analyzed with multivariate statistics for temporal discrimination and estimation of chemical contents in both leaf and flower organs. Two main effects were revealed by spectral reflectance measurements: (i) both flower and leaf spectra show successional and seasonal changes, but the pattern is complex and organ specific (ii) flower head pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which are involved in plant defence against herbivores, can be detected through hyperspectral reflectance.We conclude that spectral reflectance of both leaves and flowers can provide information on plant performance during season and successional stages. As a result, remote sensing studies of plant performance in complex field situations will benefit from considering hyperspectral reflectance of different plant organs. This approach may enable more detailed studies on the link between spectral information and plant defence dynamics both aboveground and belowground.

  17. Inclusive spectra in hard processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, A.V.; Petrov, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the unified mechanism of hadronization in hard processes results in universality of inclusive spectra of soft hadrons. Inclusive spectrum of hadrons in energy share in deep-inelastic lepton-hadron scattering is calculated. The spectrum obtained is calculated with analogous distribution in e + e - annihilation. It is noted that inclusive spectrum of soft hadrons in hard processes is described by a universal function

  18. ACCELERATED FITTING OF STELLAR SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-01-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15–30 labels simultaneously.

  19. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Plants Under Nitrogen Stress Determined with Active and Passive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; Chappelle, E. W.

    2003-01-01

    Vegetation productivity is driven by nitrogen (N) availability in soils. Both excessive and low soil N induce physiological changes in plant foliage. In 2001, we examined the use of spectral fluorescence and reflectance measurements to discriminate among plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of optimal N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight daily). Three types of steady state laser-induced fluorescence measurements were made on adaxial and abaxial surfaces: 1) fluorescence images in four 10 nm bands (blue, green, red, far-red) resulting from broad irradiance excitation; 2) emission spectra (5 nm resolution) produced by excitation at single wavelengths (280,380 or 360, and 532 nm); and 3) excitation spectra (2 nm resolution), with emission wavelengths fixed at wavelengths centered on selected solar Fraunhofer lines (532,607,677 and 745 nm). Two complementary sets of high resolution (less than 2 nm) optical spectra were acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces: 1) optical properties (350-2500 nm) for reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance; and 2) reflectance spectra (500-1000 nm) acquired with and without a short pass filter at 665 nm to determine the fluorescence contribution to apparent reflectance in the 650-750 spectrum, especially at the 685 and 740 nm chlorophyll fluorescence (ChIF) peaks. The strongest relationships between foliar chemistry and optical properties were demonstrated for C/N content and two optical parameters associated with the red edge inflection point. Select optical properties and ChIF parameters were highly correlated for both species. A significant contribution of ChIF to apparent reflectance was observed, averaging 10-25% at 685 nm and 2 - 6% at 740 nm over all N treatments. Discrimination of N treatment

  20. Damping modification factors for acceleration response spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available DMF (Damping modification factors are used to modify elastic response spectral values corresponding to damping ratio 5% to other damping levels. The influence of seismological parameters (magnitude, epicentral distances and site conditions on DMF for acceleration spectra was analysed. The results show that for a given period as the magnitude or distance increase, the effect of damping on the seismic response will also increase, which indicates the response reduction from the structural damping will become more efficient. In the near-field of small earthquakes, the influence of site conditions on DMF is obvious, but it does not show a consistent rule. Furthermore, the DMF corresponding to different site conditions gradually close to unity with increasing magnitude and distance. The influence of the above mentioned parameters is related to the relative attenuation of the frequency components of the ground motion. The attenuation index alone is sufficient to take into account the influence. Based on these features, this paper proposes a formula of DMF for acceleration response spectra.