WorldWideScience

Sample records for field magnetic resonance

  1. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  3. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  4. NMR magnetic field controller for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, G.; Anacker, M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance controller for magnetic fields, which can also be used for pulsed NMR investigations, is described. A longtime stability of 10 -7 is achieved. The control signal is generated by a modified time sharing circuit with resonance at the first side band of the 2 H signal. An exact calibration of the magnetic field is achieved by the variation of the H 1 - or of the time-sharing frequency. (author)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields

  6. Resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, P.I.; Kholodov, R.I.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in the approximation of weakly excited electron states in a strong external magnetic field is analyzed. The differential probability of this process in the Breit-Wigner form is obtained. The probability of double magnetic bremsstrahlung (second-order process of perturbation theory) is compared with the probability of magnetic bremsstrahlung (first-order process of perturbation theory)

  7. Ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lethimonnier, F.; Vedrine, P.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding human brain function, brain development and brain dysfunction is one of the great challenges of the twenty first century. Biomedical imaging has now run up against a number of technical constraints that are exposing limits to its potential. In order to overcome the current limits to high-field magnetic resonance cerebral imaging (MRI) and unleash its fullest potential, the Cea has built NeuroSpin, an ultra-high-field neuroimaging facility at its Saclay centre (in the Essonne). NeuroSpin already boasts three fully operational MRI systems. The first is a 3-tesla high-field system and the second is a very-high-field 7-tesla system, both of which are dedicated to clinical studies and investigations in humans, while the third is an ultra-high-field 17.65-tesla system designed for studies on small animals. In 2011, NeuroSpin will be commissioning an 11.7-tesla ultra-high-field system of unprecedented power that is designed for research on human subjects. The level of the magnetic field and the scale required will make this joint French-German project to build the magnet a breakthrough in the international arena. (authors)

  8. Nuclear resonance apparatus including means for rotating a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus including magnet apparatus for generating a homogeneous static magnetic field between its magnetic poles, shims of a magnetic substance mounted on the magnetic poles to apply a first gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in a direction orthogonal as to the direction of line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field, gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus for generating a second gradient magnetic field having a gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in superimposition with the static magnetic field and for changing the magnetic field gradient of the first gradient magnetic field, an oscillator for generating an oscillating output having a frequency corresponding to the nuclear magnetic resonance condition of an atomic nucleus to be measured, a coil wound around a body to be examined for applying the output of said oscillator as electromagnetic waves upon the body, a receiver for detecting the nuclear magnetic resonance signals received by the coil, a gradient magnetic field controller making a magnetic field line equivalent to the combined gradient magnetic fields and for rotating the line along the section of the body to be examined by controlling said gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus and devices for recording the nuclear magnetic resonance signals, for reconstructing the concentration distribution of the specific atomic nuclei in the section of the body, and a display unit for depicting the result of reconstruction

  9. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn; Creber, Sarah A.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Johns, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  10. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  11. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  12. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed

  13. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  14. SQUID-detected magnetic resonance imaging in microtesla magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, Robert; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Mueck, Michael; Myers, Whittier; Haken, Bernard ten; Seton, H.C.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Pines, Alex; Clarke, John

    2003-01-01

    We describe studies of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liquid samples at room temperature in microtesla magnetic fields. The nuclear spins are prepolarized in a strong transient field. The magnetic signals generated by the precessing spins, which range in frequency from tens of Hz to several kHz, are detected by a low-transition temperature dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) coupled to an untuned, superconducting flux transformer configured as an axial gradiometer. The combination of prepolarization and frequency-independent detector sensitivity results in a high signal-to-noise ratio and high spectral resolution (∼1 Hz) even in grossly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In the NMR experiments, the high spectral resolution enables us to detect the 10-Hz splitting of the spectrum of protons due to their scalar coupling to a 31P nucleus. Furthermore, the broadband detection scheme combined with a non-resonant field-reversal spin echo allows the simultaneous observation of signals from protons and 31P nuclei, even though their NMR resonance frequencies differ by a factor of 2.5. We extend our methodology to MRI in microtesla fields, where the high spectral resolution translates into high spatial resolution. We demonstrate two-dimensional images of a mineral oil phantom and slices of peppers, with a spatial resolution of about 1 mm. We also image an intact pepper using slice selection, again with 1-mm resolution. In further experiments we demonstrate T1-contrast imaging of a water phantom, some parts of which were doped with a paramagnetic salt to reduce the longitudinal relaxation time T1. Possible applications of this MRI technique include screening for tumors and integration with existing multichannel SQUID systems for brain imaging

  15. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  16. Very low field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herreros, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to perform Magnetic Resonance Imaging at very low field (from 1 mT to 10 mT). A new kind of sensor called 'mixed sensor' has been used to achieve a good detectivity at low frequencies. Combining a superconducting loop and a giant magnetoresistance, those detectors have a competitive equivalent field noise compared to existing devices (Tuned coils, SQUIDs and Atomic Magnetometers). They have been combined with flux transformers to increase the coupling between the sample and the sensor. A complete study has been performed to adapt it to mixed sensors and then maximize the gain. This set has been incorporated in an existing small MRI device to test its robustness in real conditions. In parallel, several MRI sequences (GE, SE, FLASH, EPI,...) have been integrated and adapted to very low field requirements. They have been used to perform in-vivo three dimensional imaging and relaxometry studies on well known products to test their reliability. Finally, a larger setup adapted for full-head imaging has been designed and built to perform images on a larger working volume. (author) [fr

  17. Magnetic field induced incommensurate resonance in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingge; Cheng Li; Guo Huaiming; Feng Shiping

    2009-01-01

    The influence of a uniform external magnetic field on the dynamical spin response of cuprate superconductors in the superconducting state is studied based on the kinetic energy driven superconducting mechanism. It is shown that the magnetic scattering around low and intermediate energies is dramatically changed with a modest external magnetic field. With increasing the external magnetic field, although the incommensurate magnetic scattering from both low and high energies is rather robust, the commensurate magnetic resonance scattering peak is broadened. The part of the spin excitation dispersion seems to be an hourglass-like dispersion, which breaks down at the heavily low energy regime. The theory also predicts that the commensurate resonance scattering at zero external magnetic field is induced into the incommensurate resonance scattering by applying an external magnetic field large enough

  18. Propagation characteristics of resonance cone in a nonuniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, T.; Sanuki, H.

    1984-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of resonance cone field for frequencies below the electron cyclotron frequency are described in a mirror magnetic field on the basis of fluid equation. Theoretical results are compared qualitatively with those of experiment

  19. Magnetic resonance of field-frozen and zero-field-frozen magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, A.R.; Pelegrini, F.; Neto, K. Skeff; Buske, N.; Morais, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study magnetic resonance was used to investigate magnetic fluid samples frozen under zero and non-zero (15 kG) external fields. The magnetite-based sample containing 2x10 17 particle/cm 3 was investigated from 100 to 400 K. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the resonance field revealed bigger magnetic structures in the frozen state than in the liquid phase. Also, differences in the mesoscopic organization in the frozen state may explain the data obtained from samples frozen under zero and non-zero fields

  20. On field line resonances of hydromagnetic Alfven waves in dipole magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liu; Cowley, S.C.

    1989-07-01

    Using the dipole magnetic field model, we have developed the theory of field line resonances of hydromagnetic Alfven waves in general magnetic field geometries. In this model, the Alfven speed thus varies both perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. Specifically, it is found that field line resonances do persist in the dipole model. The corresponding singular solutions near the resonant field lines as well as the natural definition of standing shear Alfven eigenfunctions have also been systematically derived. 11 refs

  1. Pulsed magnetic field generation suited for low-field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunkar, Neelam Prabhu; Selvaraj, Jayaprakash; Theh, Wei-Shen; Weber, Robert; Mina, Mani

    2018-05-01

    Pulsed magnetic fields can be used to provide instantaneous localized magnetic field variations. In presence of static fields, pulsed field variations are often used to apply torques and in-effect to measure behavior of magnetic moments in different states. In this work, the design and experimental performance of a pulsed magnetic field generator suited for low static field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications is presented. One of the challenges of low bias field NMR measurements is low signal to noise ratio due to the comparable nature of the bias field and the pulsed field. Therefore, a circuit is designed to apply pulsed currents through an inductive load, leading to generation of pulsed magnetic fields which can temporarily overpower the effect of the bias field on magnetic moments. The designed circuit will be tuned to operate at the precession frequency of 1H (protons) placed in a bias field produced by permanent magnets. The designed circuit parameters may be tuned to operate under different bias conditions. Therefore, low field NMR measurements can be performed for different bias fields. Circuit simulations were used to determine design parameters, corresponding experimental measurements will be presented in this work.

  2. Resonances of the helium atom in a strong magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Al-Hujaj, Omar-Alexander; Schmelcher, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present an investigation of the resonances of a doubly excited helium atom in a strong magnetic field covering the regime B=0–100  a.u. A full-interaction approach which is based on an anisotropic Gaussian basis set of one-particle functions being nonlinearly optimized for each field strength...

  3. Radiofrequency solutions in clinical high field magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreychenko, A.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) benefit from the sensitivity gain at high field (≥7T). However, high field brings also certain challenges associated with growing frequency and spectral dispersion. Frequency growth results in degraded performance of large volume radiofrequency

  4. Parahydrogen-enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, T.; Ganssle, P.; Kervern, G.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance, conventionally detected in magnetic fields of several tesla, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices, interest in NMR in fields comparable to the Earth's magnetic field and below (down to zero field) has been revived. Despite the use of superconducting quantum interference devices or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared with conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated through parahydrogen-induced polarization, enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H scalar nuclear spin-spin couplings (known as J couplings) in compounds with 13C in natural abundance, without the need for signal averaging. The resulting spectra show distinct features that aid chemical fingerprinting.

  5. Ultrasound versus high field magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the field of musculoskeletal imaging, especially in the application of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both modalities offer significant advantages over the previous...

  6. Resonant Magnetic Field Sensors Based On MEMS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Manjarrez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS technology allows the integration of magnetic field sensors with electronic components, which presents important advantages such as small size, light weight, minimum power consumption, low cost, better sensitivity and high resolution. We present a discussion and review of resonant magnetic field sensors based on MEMS technology. In practice, these sensors exploit the Lorentz force in order to detect external magnetic fields through the displacement of resonant structures, which are measured with optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive sensing techniques. From these, the optical sensing presents immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI and reduces the read-out electronic complexity. Moreover, piezoresistive sensing requires an easy fabrication process as well as a standard packaging. A description of the operation mechanisms, advantages and drawbacks of each sensor is considered. MEMS magnetic field sensors are a potential alternative for numerous applications, including the automotive industry, military, medical, telecommunications, oceanographic, spatial, and environment science. In addition, future markets will need the development of several sensors on a single chip for measuring different parameters such as the magnetic field, pressure, temperature and acceleration.

  7. Resonant Magnetic Field Sensors Based On MEMS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-May, Agustín L.; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A.; García-Ramírez, Pedro J.; Manjarrez, Elías

    2009-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows the integration of magnetic field sensors with electronic components, which presents important advantages such as small size, light weight, minimum power consumption, low cost, better sensitivity and high resolution. We present a discussion and review of resonant magnetic field sensors based on MEMS technology. In practice, these sensors exploit the Lorentz force in order to detect external magnetic fields through the displacement of resonant structures, which are measured with optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive sensing techniques. From these, the optical sensing presents immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and reduces the read-out electronic complexity. Moreover, piezoresistive sensing requires an easy fabrication process as well as a standard packaging. A description of the operation mechanisms, advantages and drawbacks of each sensor is considered. MEMS magnetic field sensors are a potential alternative for numerous applications, including the automotive industry, military, medical, telecommunications, oceanographic, spatial, and environment science. In addition, future markets will need the development of several sensors on a single chip for measuring different parameters such as the magnetic field, pressure, temperature and acceleration. PMID:22408480

  8. Functional magnetic resonance imaging with ultra-high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windischberger, C.; Schoepf, V.; Sladky, R.; Moser, E.; Fischmeister, F.P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the primary method for non-invasive functional localization in the brain. With the emergence of MR systems with field strengths of 4 Tesla and above, neuronal activation may be studied with unprecedented accuracy. In this article we present different approaches to use the improved sensitivity and specificity for expanding current fMRT resolution limits in space and time based on several 7 Tesla studies. In addition to the challenges that arise with ultra-high magnetic fields possible solutions will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Canine Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Adamiak* and M. Jaskólska and A. Pomianowski1

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of presented study was to evaluate selected surface spine coil, and low-field magnetic resonance (MR selected sequences in diagnosing hydrocephalus in dogs. This paper discusses 19 dogs (14 canine patients with hydrocephalus and 5 healthy dogs, of five breeds, subjected to low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of hydrocephalus. Area of the lateral ventricles and brain were examined in dogs with hydrocephalus using low-field MRI (at 0.25 Tesla. The MRI of FSE REL, SE, FLAIR, STIR, 3D HYCE, T3DT1, GE STIR 3D and 3D SHARC sequences with an indication of the most effective sequences are described. Additionally, coils for MR were compared, and models for infusion anesthesia were described. As a result of performed study all estimated sequences were diagnostically useful. However, spinal coil No. 2 (ESAOTE was the most optimal for examining and positioning the cranium.

  10. Least Squares Magnetic-Field Optimization for Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Franck, John; Demas, Vasiliki; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2008-01-01

    Single-sided and mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have the advantages of portability, low cost, and low power consumption compared to conventional high-field NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. We present fast, flexible, and easy-to-implement target field algorithms for mobile NMR and MRI magnet design. The optimization finds a global optimum in a cost function that minimizes the error in the target magnetic field in the sense of least squares. When the technique is tested on a ring array of permanent-magnet elements, the solution matches the classical dipole Halbach solution. For a single-sided handheld NMR sensor, the algorithm yields a 640 G field homogeneous to 16,100 ppm across a 1.9 cc volume located 1.5 cm above the top of the magnets and homogeneous to 32,200 ppm over a 7.6 cc volume. This regime is adequate for MRI applications. We demonstrate that the homogeneous region can be continuously moved away from the sensor by rotating magnet rod elements, opening the way for NMR sensors with adjustable 'sensitive volumes'

  11. Electromagnetically induced transparency resonances inverted in magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D., E-mail: davsark@yahoo.com, E-mail: david@ipr.sci.am [National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, Institute for Physical Research (Armenia); Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Leroy, C. [Université de Bourgogne-Dijon, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS (France); Cartaleva, S. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Electronics (Bulgaria); Wilson-Gordon, A. D. [Bar-Ilan University Ramat Gan, Department of Chemistry (Israel); Auzinsh, M. [University of Latvia, Department of Physics (Latvia)

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is investigated in a Λ-system of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line in an external transverse magnetic field. Two spectroscopic cells having strongly different values of the relaxation rates γ{sub rel} are used: an Rb cell with antirelaxation coating (L ∼ 1 cm) and an Rb nanometric- thin cell (nanocell) with a thickness of the atomic vapor column L = 795 nm. For the EIT in the nanocell, we have the usual EIT resonances characterized by a reduction in the absorption (dark resonance (DR)), whereas for the EIT in the Rb cell with an antirelaxation coating, the resonances demonstrate an increase in the absorption (bright resonances (BR)). We suppose that such an unusual behavior of the EIT resonances (i.e., the reversal of the sign from DR to BR) is caused by the influence of an alignment process. The influence of alignment strongly depends on the configuration of the coupling and probe frequencies as well as on the configuration of the magnetic field.

  12. Development and applications of NMR [nuclear magnetic resonance] in low fields and zero field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielecki, A.

    1987-05-01

    This dissertation is about nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the absence of applied magnetic fields. NMR is usually done in large magnetic fields, often as large as can be practically attained. The motivation for going the opposite way, toward zero field, is that for certain types of materials, particularly powdered or polycrystalline solids, the NMR spectra in zero field are easier to interpret than those obtained in high field. 92 refs., 60 figs., 1 tab

  13. Diamagnetic (cyclotron) resonance in semiconductors using strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosniak, J

    1962-07-01

    Diamagnetic (cyclotron) resonance experiments have been carried out in the semiconductors indium-antimonide (InSb), the indium-arsenide (InAs). Pulsed magnetic fields up to 300,000 gauss and monochromatic infrared radiation of 9 to 13.5 microns wavelength were used to measure the effective mass of the conduction electrons in those materials. The samples were n-type single crystals, with a room temperature electron concentration of 1.9 x 10{sup 16} and 6 x 10{sup 16} per cm{sup 3} in InSb and InAs respectively. Both the InSb and InAs samples showed a strong dependence of the effective mass on the magnetic field. The results show that the conduction bands in those solids are highly non-parabolic. Measurements were also made of the resonance absorption coefficients, which were found to be considerably smaller than the values obtained from simple theory. The effect is explained by assuming that the magnetic field reduces the intrinsic electron density, and that the absorption coefficient depends on the shape of the conduction band. It is postulated as a consequence that the relaxation time of diamagnetic energy levels at high magnetic fields does not differ appreciably from the relaxation time used in the description of conduction processes. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-06-23

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  16. Safety aspects in high-field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlenweg, M.; Trattnig, S.; Schaefers, G.

    2008-01-01

    With more and more 3 Tesla high-field magnetic resonance (MR) scanners entering clinical routine, the safety notion in MR imaging has also reached a new dimension. The first part of this paper deals with the three most important sources of physical interaction (static magnetic field, gradient and HF fields). The paper discusses the differences compared with the traditional clinical 1.5 T standard scanners, the impact on human beings, the interactions with metallic objects and the relevant safety standards. The second part of the paper examines the issue of MR safety as seen in clinical practice and tries to demonstrate optimization potentials. This includes structural optimization in information distribution and hospital organization as well as test standards and labeling guidelines. (orig.) [de

  17. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong; Chen, Youhe

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

  18. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MicroteslaFields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2006-08-14

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a powerful clinical tool for imaging the human body (1). This technique is based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of protons (2, 3) in a static magnetic field B{sub 0}. An applied radiofrequency pulse causes the protons to precess about B{sub 0} at their Larmor frequency {nu}{sub 0} = ({gamma}/2{pi})B{sub 0}, where {gamma} is the gyromagnetic ratio; {gamma}/2{pi} = 42.58 MHz/tesla. The precessing protons generate an oscillating magnetic field and hence a voltage in a nearby coil that is amplified and recorded. The application of three-dimensional magnetic field gradients specifies a unique magnetic field and thus an NMR frequency in each voxel of the subject, so that with appropriate encoding of the signals one can acquire a complete image (4). Most clinical MRI systems involve magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets, and the current trend is to higher magnetic fields than the widely used 1.5-T systems (5). Nonetheless, there is ongoing interest in the development of less expensive imagers operating at lower fields. Commercially available 0.2-T systems based on permanent magnets offer both lower cost and a more open access than their higher-field counterparts, at the expense of signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution. At the still lower field of 0.03 mT maintained by a conventional, room-temperature solenoid, Connolly and co-workers (6, 7) obtain good spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by prepolarizing the protons in a field B{sub p} of 0.3 T. Prepolarization (8) enhances the magnetic moment of an ensemble of protons over that produced by the lower precession field; after the polarizing field is removed, the higher magnetic moment produces a correspondingly larger signal during its precession in B{sub 0}. Using the same method, Stepisnik et al. (9) obtained MR images in the Earth's magnetic field ({approx} 50 {micro}T). Alternatively, one can enhance the signal

  19. Magnetic resonance in medicine occupational exposure to static magnetic field and radiofrequency radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivkovic, D.; Hrnjak, M.; Ivanovic, C.

    1997-01-01

    Medical personnel working with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices could be exposed to static magnetic (M) field, time-varying M fields and radiofrequency (RF) radiation. The aim of work was to investigate the density of magnetic flux of static magnetic field and the power density of RF radiation which appear in the working environment around the 0.5 T MRI unit in one hospital. The density of magnetic flux of static magnetic field was measured with Hall Effect Gauss meter - Magnetech (Great Britain), and the power density of RF radiation was measured with broadband isotropic meter - The Narda Microwave Corp. (USA). The results of measurement show that the density of magnetic flux of static M field on working places are below threshold limit of exposure and the intensities of RF radiation are far below maximum permissible level. (author)

  20. Resonance and Chaotic Trajectories in Magnetic Field Reversed Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.S. Landsman; S.A. Cohen; M. Edelman; G.M. Zaslavsky

    2005-04-13

    The nonlinear dynamics of a single ion in a field-reversed configuration (FRC) were investigated. FRC is a toroidal fusion device which uses a specific type of magnetic field to confine ions. As a result of angular invariance, the full three-dimensional Hamiltonian system can be expressed as two coupled, highly nonlinear oscillators. Due to the high nonlinearity in the equations of motion, the behavior of the system is extremely complex, showing different regimes, depending on the values of the conserved canonical angular momentum and the geometry of the fusion vessel. Perturbation theory and averaging were used to derive the unperturbed Hamiltonian and frequencies of the two degrees of freedom. The derived equations were then used to find resonances and compare to Poincar{copyright} surface-of-section plots. A regime was found where the nonlinear resonances were clearly separated by KAM [Kolmogorov-Arnold-Mosher] curves. The structure of the observed island chains was explained. The condition for the destruction of KAM curves and the onset of strong chaos was derived, using Chirikov island overlap criterion, and shown qualitatively to depend both on the canonical angular momentum and geometry of the device. After a brief discussion of the adiabatic regime the paper goes on to explore the degenerate regime that sets in at higher values of angular momenta. In this regime, the unperturbed Hamiltonian can be approximated as two uncoupled linear oscillators. In this case, the system is near-integrable, except in cases of a universal resonance, which results in large island structures, due to the smallness of nonlinear terms, which bound the resonance. The linear force constants, dominant in this regime, were derived and the geometry for a large one-to-one resonance identified. The above analysis showed good agreement with numerical simulations and was able to explain characteristic features of the dynamics.

  1. Resonance and Chaotic Trajectories in Magnetic Field Reversed Configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsman, A.S.; Cohen, S.A.; Edelman, M.; Zaslavsky, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a single ion in a field-reversed configuration (FRC) were investigated. FRC is a toroidal fusion device which uses a specific type of magnetic field to confine ions. As a result of angular invariance, the full three-dimensional Hamiltonian system can be expressed as two coupled, highly nonlinear oscillators. Due to the high nonlinearity in the equations of motion, the behavior of the system is extremely complex, showing different regimes, depending on the values of the conserved canonical angular momentum and the geometry of the fusion vessel. Perturbation theory and averaging were used to derive the unperturbed Hamiltonian and frequencies of the two degrees of freedom. The derived equations were then used to find resonances and compare to Poincar(copyright) surface-of-section plots. A regime was found where the nonlinear resonances were clearly separated by KAM [Kolmogorov-Arnold-Mosher] curves. The structure of the observed island chains was explained. The condition for the destruction of KAM curves and the onset of strong chaos was derived, using Chirikov island overlap criterion, and shown qualitatively to depend both on the canonical angular momentum and geometry of the device. After a brief discussion of the adiabatic regime the paper goes on to explore the degenerate regime that sets in at higher values of angular momenta. In this regime, the unperturbed Hamiltonian can be approximated as two uncoupled linear oscillators. In this case, the system is near-integrable, except in cases of a universal resonance, which results in large island structures, due to the smallness of nonlinear terms, which bound the resonance. The linear force constants, dominant in this regime, were derived and the geometry for a large one-to-one resonance identified. The above analysis showed good agreement with numerical simulations and was able to explain characteristic features of the dynamics

  2. Slotted cage resonator for high-field magnetic resonance imaging of rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrufo, O; Vasquez, F; Solis, S E; Rodriguez, A O, E-mail: arog@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico)

    2011-04-20

    A variation of the high-frequency cavity resonator coil was experimentally developed according to the theoretical frame proposed by Mansfield in 1990. Circular slots were used instead of cavities to form the coil endplates and it was called the slotted cage resonator coil. The theoretical principles were validated via a coil equivalent circuit and also experimentally with a coil prototype. The radio frequency magnetic field, B1, produced by several coil configurations was numerically simulated using the finite-element approach to investigate their performances. A transceiver coil, 8 cm long and 7.6 cm in diameter, and composed of 4 circular slots with a 15 mm diameter on both endplates, was built to operate at 300 MHz and quadrature driven. Experimental results obtained with the slotted cage resonator coil were presented and showed very good agreement with the theoretical expectations for the resonant frequency as a function of the coil dimensions and slots. A standard birdcage coil was also built for performance comparison purposes. Phantom images were then acquired to compute the signal-to-noise ratio of both coils showing an important improvement of the slotted cage coil over the birdcage coil. The whole-body images of the mouse were also obtained showing high-quality images. Volume resonator coils can be reliably built following the physical principles of the cavity resonator design for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications of rodents.

  3. High field nuclear magnetic resonance application to polysaccharide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincendon, Marc

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to polysaccharide chemistry using time averaging technique and high fields (100 and 250 MHz). The three methyl signals of methyl cellulose and cellulose triacetate are separated, and the C-6 substituent has been identified. Biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose has been performed using deuterium labelled D-glucose and Acetobacter xylinum. Per-acetylated derivative of bacterial cellulose has been studied by NMR; this study permitted us to determine the quantity of deuterium on each position of the anhydro-glucose unit in the polymer. NMR has also been used to see the anomeric end chain of cellulose and amylose derivatives and to show the fixation of bromine and t-butyl group on the free anomeric end chain of cellulose triacetate. (author) [fr

  4. A Method for Eddy Current Field Measurement in Permanent Magnet Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONG Rui

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a widely used medical imaging technique. In MRI system, gradient magnetic fields are used to code spatial information. However, the fast-switching electric currents in the gradients coils used to generate gradient fields also induce vortex electric field, often referred as eddy current, in the surrounding metal conductors. In this paper, a method for eddy current field measurement was proposed. Based on the Faraday law of electromagnetic induction, an eddy current field measuring device was designed. Combining hardware acquisition and software processing, the eddy current field was obtained by subtracting the ideal gradient field from the magnetic field measured experimentally, whose waveform could be displayed in real time. The proposed method was verified by experimental results.

  5. Resonant cell of a double nuclear electron resonance spectrometer for performance in a 120-350 Gs magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, V.I.; Stepanov, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    Spectrometer double-frequency resonance cell construction of a double nuclear electron resonance for operation in 120-350 Gs magnetic fields is described. The cell has been developed from a special decimeter resonator with a concentrated capacitance. The electric and magnetic components of a high frequency field are efficiently divided in the separator. Therefore, the insertion of a measuring coil and a sample in the maximum of the magnetic component of the field does not practically affect the distribution and parameters of the high-frequency field. The double-frequency resonance cell proposed provides for a higher accuracy of measuring amplifications of the nuclear magnetic resonance signals when there is the overhauzer effect for 120-350 Gs magnetic fields

  6. Self-Biased 215MHz Magnetoelectric NEMS Resonator for Ultra-Sensitive DC Magnetic Field Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Hui, Yu; Rinaldi, Matteo; Sun, Nian X.

    2013-06-01

    High sensitivity magnetoelectric sensors with their electromechanical resonance frequencies electromechanical systems (NEMS) resonator with an electromechanical resonance frequency of 215 MHz based on an AlN/(FeGaB/Al2O3) × 10 magnetoelectric heterostructure for detecting DC magnetic fields. This magnetoelectric NEMS resonator showed a high quality factor of 735, and strong magnetoelectric coupling with a large voltage tunable sensitivity. The admittance of the magnetoelectric NEMS resonator was very sensitive to DC magnetic fields at its electromechanical resonance, which led to a new detection mechanism for ultra-sensitive self-biased RF NEMS magnetoelectric sensor with a low limit of detection of DC magnetic fields of ~300 picoTelsa. The magnetic/piezoelectric heterostructure based RF NEMS magnetoelectric sensor is compact, power efficient and readily integrated with CMOS technology, which represents a new class of ultra-sensitive magnetometers for DC and low frequency AC magnetic fields.

  7. Optimum condition for spatial ion cyclotron resonance in a multiple magnetic mirror field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieno, Tetsu; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Sato, Noriyoshi

    1988-01-01

    A Spatial cyclotron resonance of ion beams passing through a multiple magnetic mirror field is investigated experimentally by varying parameters of the multiple mirror field. The optimum resonance condition is realized with a decrease in the cell length of the multiple mirror along the beams to satisfy the local condition of the spatial ion cyclotron resonance. The results show a remarkable increase of nonadiabatic transfer of the beam energy into the transverse direction to the magnetic field. (author)

  8. Communication patterns in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomov, D.; Filipov, F.; Kolev, N.

    1986-01-01

    A scientometric analysis of publications presented in four secondary information sources on the problem of nuclear magnetic resonance in physics, biomedicine and technology was carried out. A dynamic growth of the number of articles in biomedicine over 1982 to 1984 was established. Secondary publications play an important role in scientific communications as revealed by citation analysis. (author)

  9. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  10. Magnetic Field Dependence and Q of the Josephson Plasma Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Finnegan, T. F.; Langenberg, D. N.

    1972-01-01

    of supercurrent density which is not observed in conventional measurements of the field-dependent critical current. The frequency and field dependence of the plasma-resonance linewidth are interpreted as evidence that the previously unobserved quasiparticle-pair-interference tunnel current predicted by Josephson...

  11. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Michael W; Giorni, Andrea; Vegh, Viktor; Pellicer-Guridi, Ruben; Reutens, David C

    2016-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability. The finite element method (COMSOL®) was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field. A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20-50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres. A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably.

  12. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging using an inhomogeneous polarizing field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briguet, A.; Chaillout, J.; Goldman, M.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, it is indicated how to reconstruct nuclear magnetic resonance images acquired in an inhomogeneous static magnetic field without the previous knowledge of its spatial distribution. The method provides also the map of the static magnetic field through the sample volume; furthermore it allows the use of non uniform but spatially controlled encoding gradients [fr

  13. Sensitivity analysis of magnetic field measurements for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Cihan; Scheffler, Klaus; Ehses, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical use of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) still requires significant sensitivity improvements. Here, the measurement of the current-induced magnetic field (DBz,c) is improved using systematic efficiency analyses and optimization of multi-echo spin echo...... (MESE) and steady-state free precession free induction decay (SSFP-FID) sequences. Theory and Methods: Considering T1, T2, and T 2 relaxation in the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the MR magnitude images, the efficiency of MESE and SSFP-FID MREIT experiments, and its dependence on the sequence...

  14. Electromagnetically induced transparency with large delay-bandwidth product induced by magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hai-ming; Liu, Shao-bin, E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Liu, Si-yuan; Zhang, Hai-feng; Bian, Bo-rui; Kong, Xiang-kun [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Shen-yun [Research Center of Applied Electromagnetics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China)

    2015-03-16

    In this paper, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like spectral response with magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance. Six split-ring resonators and a cut wire are chosen as the bright and dark resonator, respectively. An EIT-like transmission peak located between two dips can be observed with incident magnetic field excitation. A large delay bandwidth product (0.39) is obtained, which has potential application in quantum optics and communications. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulated results.

  15. Gravitational Resonance Spectroscopy with an Oscillating Magnetic Field Gradient in the GRANIT Flow through Arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebreyend, D.; Pignol, G.; Baeßler, S.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Protasov, K.; Voronin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational resonance spectroscopy consists in measuring the energy spectrum of bouncing ultracold neutrons above a mirror by inducing resonant transitions between different discrete quantum levels. We discuss how to induce the resonances with a flow through arrangement in the GRANIT spectrometer, excited by an oscillating magnetic field gradient. The spectroscopy could be realized in two distinct modes (so called DC and AC) using the same device to produce the magnetic excitation. We present calculations demonstrating the feasibility of the newly proposed AC mode

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  17. Retrospective assessment of exposure to static magnetic fields during production and development of magnetic resonance imaging systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Suzan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313874050; Christopher, Yvette|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/27590184X; Engels, Hans; Slottje, Pauline|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/299345351; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2014-01-01

    At present, the relationship between chronic exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) and health effects is unclear. We developed a task-based deterministic model for estimating historical electromagnetic field exposure from the static B-field (B0) of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, for a

  18. Wake-Field Wave Resonant Excitation in Magnetized Plasmas by Electromagnetic Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milant'ev, V.P.; Turikov, V.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the space charge wave excitation process at electromagnetic pulse propagation along external magnetic field in vicinity of electron cyclotron resonance. In hydrodynamic approach it is obtained an equation for plasma density under ponderomotive force action. With help of this equation we investigated a wake-field wave amplitude dependence from resonance detuning. The numerical simulation using a PIC method electromagnetic pulse propagation process in the resonant conditions was done

  19. On effect of stability of magnetic resonance position by harmonized field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanchenko, E.A.; Tolstoluzhsky, A.P.

    2006-01-01

    The formalism of density matrix in a two level system is used to study the time-periodic modulation of the magnetic field stabilizating the magnetic resonance position. An exact solution for density matrix at resonance is found. It is shown that the fundamental resonance is stable with respect to consistent variations of longitudinal and transversal magnetic fields. A differential equation for the transition probability is obtained. The dependence of time-averaged spin flip probability on the normalized Larmor frequency was numerically researched in different parameter regimes with account of dissipation and decoherence. It is shown that the position of the main resonance is independent of field deformation and dissipation; only the width of resonance line changes upon field deformation and dissipation. The odd parametric (multi-photon) resonance transitions is studied. Static magnetization induced by time-periodic modulated magnetic field is considered. The results of the investigation may be useful for analysis of interference experiments, improvement of magnetic spectrometers and in the field of quantum computing manipulation of q-bits

  20. Field-angle dependence of magnetic resonance in Pt/NiFe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.Y.; Harii, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2007-01-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance in NiFe/ amorphous Pt bilayer thin films was investigated with changing the external field direction. The spectral width of the ferromagnetic resonance depends critically on the external-magnetic-field direction. We found that the sample dependence of the spectral width is enhanced with deviation of external field direction from the direction along the film plain, implying an important role of spin directions in field-induced spin-decoherence mechanism in Pt

  1. Low field magnetic resonance experiments in superfluid 3He--A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gully, W.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal and transverse nuclear magnetic resonance signals have been made on the A phase of liquid 3 He. They were performed on a sample of 3 He self-cooled by the Pomeranchuk effect to the critical temperature of the superfluid at 2.7 m 0 K. The longitudinal resonance is a magnetic mode of the liquid excited by radio frequency magnetic fields applied in the direction of the static magnetic field. Frequency profiles of this resonance were indirectly obtained by contour techniques from signals recorded by sweeping the temperature. Its frequency is found to be related to the frequency shift of the transverse resonance in agreement with theoretical predictions for the ABM pairing state. Its linewidth also agrees with theoretical predictions based upon dissipative phenomena peculiar to the superfluid phase. An analysis of the linewidth of the longitudinal resonance yields a value for the quasiparticle collision time. Transverse NMR lines were also studied. In low magnetic fields (20 Oersted) these lines were found to become extremely broad. This is shown to be a manifestation of the same collisional processes that broaden the longitudinal resonance lines. Also, the effects of various textures on the resonance lines are discussed, including the results of an attempt to create a single domain of 3 He with crossed electric and magnetic fields

  2. Magnetic neutron scattering resonance of high-¤Tc¤ superconductors in external magnetic fields: An SO(5) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Rønnow, Henrik Moodysson; Bruus, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic resonance at 41 meV observed in neutron scattering studies of YBa2Cu3O7 holds a key position in the understanding of high-T-c, superconductivity. Within the SO(5) model for superconductivity and antiferromagnetism, we have calculated the effect of an applied magnetic field on the neu......The magnetic resonance at 41 meV observed in neutron scattering studies of YBa2Cu3O7 holds a key position in the understanding of high-T-c, superconductivity. Within the SO(5) model for superconductivity and antiferromagnetism, we have calculated the effect of an applied magnetic field...

  3. RF Magnetic Field Uniformity of Rectangular Planar Coils for Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-04

    magnetic, potassium chlorate , nuclear quadrupole resonance, uniform field, coil, surface coil I. INTRODUCTION QR is a magnetic resonance phenomenon...material that will be used is this investigation is potassium chlorate (KCLO3). This paper utilizes the NQR signals detection from KCLO3 to determine the...frequency of potassium chlorate (KCLO3), and matched to a 50 ohm input impedance using L-network circuit of capacitors. Fig.1 shows a diagram of the

  4. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich; Espy, Michelle A.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Kraus, Jr., Robert Henry

    2013-03-05

    Method comprising obtaining an NMR measurement from a sample wherein an ultra-low field NMR system probes the sample and produces the NMR measurement and wherein a sampling temperature, prepolarizing field, and measurement field are known; detecting the NMR measurement by means of inductive coils; analyzing the NMR measurement to obtain at least one measurement feature wherein the measurement feature comprises T1, T2, T1.rho., or the frequency dependence thereof; and, searching for the at least one measurement feature within a database comprising NMR reference data for at least one material to determine if the sample comprises a material of interest.

  5. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  6. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of the Yosida-Kondo resonance for a single magnetic atom adsorbed on a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dino, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki; Rodulfo, Emmanuel Tapas; Nishi, Mayuko

    2006-01-01

    Manifestations of the Kondo effect on an atomic length scale on and around a magnetic atom adsorbed on a nonmagnetic surface differ depending on the spectroscopic mode of operation of the scanning tunneling microscope. Two prominent signatures of the Kondo effect that can be observed at surfaces are the development of a sharp resonance (Yosida-Kondo resonance) at the Fermi level, which broadens with increasing temperature, and the splitting of this sharp resonance upon application of an external magnetic field. Until recently, observing the temperature and magnetic field dependence has been a challenge, because the experimental conditions strongly depend on the system's critical temperature, the so-called Kondo temperature T K . In order to clearly observe the temperature dependence, one needs to choose a system with a large T K . One can thus perform the experiments at temperatures T K . However, because the applied external magnetic field necessary to observe the magnetic field dependence scales with T K , one needs to choose a system with a very small T K . This in turn means that one should perform the experiments at very low temperatures, e.g., in the mK range. Here we discuss the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the Yosida-Kondo resonance for a single magnetic atom on a metal surface, in relation to recent experimental developments

  7. Resonance scattering formalism for the hydrogen lines in the presence of magnetic and electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casini, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We derive a formalism for the computation of resonance-scattering polarization of hydrogen lines in the presence of simultaneous magnetic and electric fields, within a framework of the quantum theory of polarized line formation in the limit of complete frequency redistribution and of collisionless regime. Quantum interferences between fine-structure levels are included in this formalism. In the presence of a magnetic field, these interferences affect, together with the magnetic Hanle effect, the polarization of the atomic levels. In the presence of an electric field, interferences between distinct orbital configurations are also induced, further affecting the polarization of the hydrogen levels. In turn, the electric field is expected to affect the polarization of the atomic levels (electric Hanle effect), in a way analogous to the magnetic Hanle effect. We find that the simultaneous action of electric and magnetic fields give rise to complicated patterns of polarization and depolarization regimes, for varying geometries and field strengths

  8. Influence of external resonant magnetic perturbation field on edge plasma of small tokamak HYBTOK-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Y., E-mail: hayashi-yuki13@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Suzuki, Y.; Ohno, N. [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Okamoto, M. [Ishikawa National College of Technology, Kitachujo, Tsubata-cho, Kahoku-gun, Ishikawa 929-0392 (Japan); Kikuchi, Y. [University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Sakakibara, S.; Watanabe, K.; Takemura, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Radial profile of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field with mode numbers of m = 6 and n = 2 in a small tokamak device HYBTOK-II have been investigated using a magnetic probe array, which is able to measure the radial profile of magnetic field perturbation induced by applying RMP. Results of RMP penetration into the plasma show that the RMP decreased toward the plasma center, while they were amplified around the resonant surface with a safety factor q = 3 due to the formation of magnetic islands. This suggests that RMP fields for controlling edge plasmas may trigger some kind of MHD instabilities. In addition, simulation results, based on a linearized four-field model, which agrees with the experimental ones, indicates that the penetration and amplification process of RMP strongly depend on a Doppler-shifted frequency between the RMP and plasma rotation.

  9. Magnetic-field-controlled negative differential conductance in scanning tunneling spectroscopy of graphene npn junction resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si-Yu; Liu, Haiwen; Qiao, Jia-Bin; Jiang, Hua; He, Lin

    2018-03-01

    Negative differential conductance (NDC), characterized by the decreasing current with increasing voltage, has attracted continuous attention for its various novel applications. The NDC typically exists in a certain range of bias voltages for a selected system and controlling the regions of NDC in curves of current versus voltage (I -V ) is experimentally challenging. Here, we demonstrate a magnetic-field-controlled NDC in scanning tunneling spectroscopy of graphene npn junction resonators. The magnetic field not only can switch on and off the NDC, but also can continuously tune the regions of the NDC in the I -V curves. In the graphene npn junction resonators, magnetic fields generate sharp and pronounced Landau-level peaks with the help of the Klein tunneling of massless Dirac fermions. A tip of scanning tunneling microscope induces a relatively shift of the Landau levels in graphene beneath the tip. Tunneling between the misaligned Landau levels results in the magnetic-field-controlled NDC.

  10. Oval gradient coils for an open magnetic resonance imaging system with a vertical magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Koki; Abe, Mitsushi; Kose, Katsumi; Terada, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Existing open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems use biplanar gradient coils for the spatial encoding of signals. We propose using novel oval gradient coils for an open vertical-field MRI. We designed oval gradients for a 0.3T open MRI system and showed that such a system could outperform a traditional biplanar gradient system while maintaining adequate gradient homogeneity and subject accessibility. Such oval gradient coils would exhibit high efficiency, low inductance and resistance, and high switching capability. Although the designed oval Y and Z coils showed more heat dissipation and less cooling capability than biplanar coils with the same gap, they showed an efficient heat-dissipation path to the surrounding air, which would alleviate the heat problem. The performance of the designed oval-coil system was demonstrated experimentally by imaging a human hand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Plasma transport in stochastic magnetic field caused by vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations at diverted tokamak edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, G.; Chang, C. S.; Joseph, I.; Moyer, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    A kinetic transport simulation for the first 4 ms of the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) application has been performed for the first time in realistic diverted DIII-D tokamak geometry [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], with the self-consistent evaluation of the radial electric field and the plasma rotation. It is found that, due to the kinetic effects, the stochastic parallel thermal transport is significantly reduced when compared to the standard analytic model [A. B. Rechester and M. N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 38 (1978)] and the nonaxisymmetric perpendicular radial particle transport is significantly enhanced from the axisymmetric level. These trends agree with recent experimental result trends [T. E. Evans, R. A. Moyer, K. H. Burrell et al., Nat. Phys. 2, 419 (2006)]. It is also found, as a side product, that an artificial local reduction of the vacuum RMP fields in the vicinity of the magnetic separatrix can bring the kinetic simulation results to a more detailed agreement with experimental plasma profiles.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  13. Investigation of Condensed Media in Weak Fields by the Method of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V. V.; Myazin, N. S.; Dudkin, V. I.; Velichko, E. N.

    2018-05-01

    A compact design of a rapid-response nuclear magnetic spectrometer for investigation of condensed media in weak fields is reported. As a result of investigation of different condensed media, special features of recording a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal in a weak magnetic field from a small volume of the medium under study are established. For the first time the NMR absorption spectra of condensed media in a weak field are collected. Based on the results of experimental studies, the potential of using a compact NMR-spectrometer for condensed media monitoring in a rapid response mode is determined.

  14. Zero-field optical magnetic resonance study of phosphorus donors in 28-silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Kevin J.; Dluhy, Phillip; Huber, Julian; Salvail, Jeff Z.; Saeedi, Kamyar; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolay V.; Becker, Peter; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Simmons, S.; Thewalt, M. L. W.

    2018-03-01

    Donor spins in silicon are some of the most promising qubits for upcoming solid-state quantum technologies. The nuclear spins of phosphorus donors in enriched silicon have among the longest coherence times of any solid-state system as well as simultaneous high fidelity qubit initialization, manipulation, and readout. Here we characterize the phosphorus in silicon system in the regime of "zero" magnetic field, where a singlet-triplet spin clock transition can be accessed, using laser spectroscopy and magnetic resonance methods. We show the system can be optically hyperpolarized and has ˜10 s Hahn echo coherence times, even for applied static magnetic fields below Earth's field.

  15. One phonon resonant Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum wires: Magnetic field effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancourt-Riera, Re., E-mail: rbriera@posgrado.cifus.uson.mx [Instituto Tecnologico de Hermosillo, Avenida Tecnologico S/N, Colonia Sahuaro, C.P. 83170, Hermosillo, Sonor, (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, C.P. 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Betancourt-Riera, Ri. [Instituto Tecnologico de Hermosillo, Avenida Tecnologico S/N, Colonia Sahuaro, C.P. 83170, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Nieto Jalil, J.M. [Tecnologico de Monterrey-Campus Sonora Norte, Bulevar Enrique Mazon Lopez No. 965, C.P. 83000, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Riera, R. [Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, C.P. 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a theory of one phonon resonant Raman scattering in a semiconductor quantum wire of cylindrical geometry in the presence of an external magnetic field distribution, parallel to the cylinder axis. The effect of the magnetic field in the electron and hole states, and in the Raman scattering efficiency, is determinate. We consider the electron-phonon interaction using a Froehlich-type Hamiltonian, deduced for the case of complete confinement phonon modes by Comas and his collaborators. We also assume T=0 K, a single parabolic conduction and valence bands. The spectra are discussed for different magnetic field values and the selection rules for the processes are also studied.

  16. The magnetic field gradients generation for magnetic resonance tomography; Generacja gradientow pola magnetyczbego dla tomografii MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasinski, A.; Skorka, T.; Kwiecinski, S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    To obtain three-dimensional images in the computerized tomography a gradient of magnetic field should be generated. In this paper the analytical as well as computerized calculations of magnetic coils for such purposes are presented. 4 refs, 8 figs.

  17. Searching for resonances in the helicity conversion of neutrinos interacting with rotating magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellandi, Jose; Guzzo, Marcelo M.; Hollanda, Pedro C. de

    1997-01-01

    Assuming that neutrino magnetic moment is not null, we study the evolution of neutrinos submitted to rotating magnetic fields, and the way the evolution can convert 'left' helicity neutrinos (actives) into 'right' neutrinos (sterile). We use the fact that the 'right' neutrinos do not interact with the detectors to obtain information on the neutrino magnetic field magnitude. For solving the neutrino evolution equation, the expansion method was combined with steady phase approximation used for the expansion integrals solution. The possibility of 'left' conversion into 'right' neutrinos has been calculated as function of the evolution matrix parameters (neutrino magnetic moment, electron density of the medium, the magnetic field magnitude and phase, etc). We made an attempt to obtain fitting of the parameter conditions in order to occur resonances in the neutrino transition probability, and therefore to obtain information on the limits for neutrino magnetic moments from the controlled beam helicity

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  19. The mechanism of vortex switching in magnetic nanodots under circular magnetic field. I. The resonance action of the field on the nanodot eigenmodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, A S

    2002-01-01

    The resonance activation of eigenmodes for a finite 2D easy-plane ferromagnet is considered to treat theoretically by the vortex switching in magnetic nanodots due to the action of external circular magnetic field. It is shown analytically that if the anisotropy is weak, i.e. the vortex has a nonzero polarity (total magnization along the z-axis), the process of the field action has a complicated nature. The circular field acts in a resonance way upon azimuthal system eigenmodes, in which magnetization depends on the azimuthal coordinate (as a direct resonance at the eigenfrequencies of these modes). The interaction of the azimuthal and symmetric modes (in which the magnetization does not depend on the azimuthal coordinate) via the applied field gives rise to complex parametric resonance at multifrequencies. The results obtained are compared with the data of previous numerical calculations.

  20. Study of the interplay between magnetic shear and resonances using Hamiltonian models for the magnetic field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firpo, M.-C.; Constantinescu, D.

    2011-03-01

    The issue of magnetic confinement in magnetic fusion devices is addressed within a purely magnetic approach. Using some Hamiltonian models for the magnetic field lines, the dual impact of low magnetic shear is shown in a unified way. Away from resonances, it induces a drastic enhancement of magnetic confinement that favors robust internal transport barriers (ITBs) and stochastic transport reduction. When low shear occurs for values of the winding of the magnetic field lines close to low-order rationals, the amplitude thresholds of the resonant modes that break internal transport barriers by allowing a radial stochastic transport of the magnetic field lines may be quite low. The approach can be applied to assess the robustness versus magnetic perturbations of general (almost) integrable magnetic steady states, including nonaxisymmetric ones such as the important single-helicity steady states. This analysis puts a constraint on the tolerable mode amplitudes compatible with ITBs and may be proposed as a possible explanation of diverse experimental and numerical signatures of their collapses.

  1. Effect of ECRH and resonant magnetic fields on formation of magnetic islands in the T-10 tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakov, E. A.; Savrukhin, P. V.

    2017-10-01

    Experiments in the T-10 tokamak demonstrated possibility of controlling the plasma current during disruption instability using the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and the controlled operation of the ohmic current-holding system. Quasistable plasma discharge with repeating sawtooth oscillations can be restored after energy quench using auxiliary ECRH power when PEC / POH > 2-5. The external magnetic field generation system consisted of eight saddle coils that were arranged symmetrically relative to the equatorial plane of the torus outside of the vacuum vessel of the T-10 tokamak to study the possible resonant magnetic field effects on the rotation frequency of magnetic islands. The saddle coils power supply system is based on four thyristor converters with a total power of 300 kW. The power supply control system is based on Siemens S7 controllers. As shown by preliminary experiments, the interaction efficiency of external magnetic fields with plasma depends on the plasma magnetic configuration. Optimal conditions for slowing the rotation of magnetic islands were determined. Additionally, the direction of the error magnetic field in the T-10 tokamak was determined, and the threshold value of the external magnetic field was determined.

  2. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos, NM; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos, NM; Mosher, John C [Los Alamos, NM; Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos, NM; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.

    2009-08-11

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  4. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  5. Fano coil-type resonances: a plasmonic tool for the magnetic field manipulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaro, Simone; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Toma, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Spintronics and spin-based technology rely on the ultra-fast unbalance of the electronic spin population in quite localized spatial regions. However, as a matter of fact, the low susceptibility of conventional materials at high frequencies strongly limits these phenomena, rendering the efficiency of magnetically active devices insufficient for application purposes. Among the possible strategies which can be envisaged, plasmonics offers a direct approach to increase the effect of local electronic unbalancing processes. By confining and enhancing free radiation in nm-size spatial regions, plasmonic nano-assemblies have demonstrated to support very intense electric and magnetic hot-spots. In particular, very recent studies have proven the fine control of magnetic fields in Fano resonance condition. The near-field-induced out-of-phase oscillation of localized surface plasmons has manifested itself with the arising of magnetic sub-diffractive hot-spots. Here, we show how this effect can be further boosted in the mid-infrared regime via the introduction of higher order plasmonic modes. The investigated system, namely Moon Trimer Resonator (MTR), combines the high efficiency of a strongly coupled nano-assembly in Fano interferential condition with the elevated tunability of the quadrupolar resonance supported by a moon-like geometry. The fine control of the apical gap in this unique nanostructure, characterizes a plasmonic device able to tune its resonance without any consequence on the magnetic hot-spot size, thus enabling an efficient squeezing in the infrared.

  6. Novel 1H low field nuclear magnetic resonance applications for the field of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiesel production has increased dramatically over the last decade, raising the need for new rapid and non-destructive analytical tools and technologies. 1H Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) applications, which offer great potential to the field of biodiesel, have been developed by the Phyto Lipid Biotechnology Lab research team in the last few years. Results Supervised and un-supervised chemometric tools are suggested for screening new alternative biodiesel feedstocks according to oil content and viscosity. The tools allowed assignment into viscosity groups of biodiesel-petrodiesel samples whose viscosity is unknown, and uncovered biodiesel samples that have residues of unreacted acylglycerol and/or methanol, and poorly separated and cleaned glycerol and water. In the case of composite materials, relaxation time distribution, and cross-correlation methods were successfully applied to differentiate components. Continuous distributed methods were also applied to calculate the yield of the transesterification reaction, and thus monitor the progress of the common and in-situ transesterification reactions, offering a tool for optimization of reaction parameters. Conclusions Comprehensive applied tools are detailed for the characterization of new alternative biodiesel resources in their whole conformation, monitoring of the biodiesel transesterification reaction, and quality evaluation of the final product, using a non-invasive and non-destructive technology that is new to the biodiesel research area. A new integrated computational-experimental approach for analysis of 1H LF-NMR relaxometry data is also presented, suggesting improved solution stability and peak resolution. PMID:23590829

  7. Effect of an additional magnetic field on Hanle-type absorption resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Grewal, Raghwinder; Pattabiraman, M

    2014-01-01

    We computationally compare Hanle-type resonances for a F g =1→F e =0 transition of the 87 RbD 2 line for magnetic field scans parallel (longitudinal scan) and perpendicular (transverse scan) to the direction of propagation of the optical field in the presence of an additional transverse magnetic field (TMF). For a linearly polarized light, the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances split at line centre and are identical for both longitudinal and transverse scans. When the probe beam ellipticity is varied, the effect of the TMF is found to be opposite for longitudinal and transverse scans. For a longitudinal scan, the splitting observed in the CPT resonance evolves into an enhanced absorption resonance with an increase in ellipticity. For a transverse scan, the splitting vanishes at higher ellipticities. This can be understood in terms of population redistribution in the ground state sublevels and near-neighbor ground state coherences created by the TMF. We also show that the enhanced absorption signal that splits the CPT resonance strongly depends on transit time, and the CPT resonance strength depends on the excited state dephasing rate. (paper)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  9. The effect of colloidal stabilization upon ferrimagnetic resonance in magnetic fluids in the presence of a polarizing magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Fannin, P C; Socoliuc, V; Istratuca, G M; Giannitsis, A T

    2003-01-01

    The complex magnetic susceptibility of two magnetic fluids, with different degrees of colloidal stabilization, has been measured over the frequency range 100 MHz to 6 GHz. The colloidal stabilization of the magnetic fluids has been investigated using magneto-optical measurements. Based on complex magnetic susceptibility measurements, chi(omega) chi'(omega)-i chi''(omega), the dependence of the maximum absorption frequency at resonance, f sub m sub a sub x , and of line width, DELTA f, on an external magnetic polarizing field, H, over the range 0-1.45 kOe, has been examined for both magnetic fluids. The experimental results have been interpreted in terms of magnetic interparticle interactions and particle agglomeration.

  10. Medical Imaging Field of Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Identification of Specialties within the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if specialty areas are emerging in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profession due to advancements made in the medical sciences, imaging technology, and clinical applications used in MRI that would require new developments in education/training programs and national registry examinations. In this…

  11. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  12. Particle acceleration through the resonance of high magnetic field and high frequency electromagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Liu; He, X.T.; Chen, S.G.; Zhang, W.Y.; He, X.T.; Hong, Liu

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new particle acceleration mechanism. Electrons can be accelerated to relativistic energy within a few electromagnetic wave cycles through the mechanism which is named electromagnetic and magnetic field resonance acceleration (EMRA). We find that the electron acceleration depends not only on the electromagnetic wave intensity, but also on the ratio between electron Larmor frequency and electromagnetic wave frequency. As the ratio approaches to unity, a clear resonance peak is observed, corresponding to the EMRA. Near the resonance regime, the strong magnetic fields still affect the electron acceleration dramatically. We derive an approximate analytical solution of the relativistic electron energy in adiabatic limit, which provides a full understanding of this phenomenon. In typical parameters of pulsar magnetospheres, the mechanism allows particles to increase their energies through the resonance of high magnetic field and high frequency electromagnetic wave in each electromagnetic wave period. The energy spectra of the accelerated particles exhibit the synchrotron radiation behavior. These can help to understand the remaining emission of high energy electron from radio pulsar within supernova remnant. The other potential application of our theory in fast ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion is also discussed. (authors)

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  14. A resonant magnetic field microsensor with high quality factor at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-May, A L; García-Ramírez, P J; Martínez-Castillo, J; Sauceda-Carvajal, A; García-González, L; Aguilera-Cortés, L A; Figueras-Costa, E

    2009-01-01

    A resonant magnetic field microsensor with a high quality factor at atmospheric pressure has been designed, fabricated and tested. This microsensor does not require vacuum packaging to operate efficiently and presents a compact and simple geometrical configuration of silicon. This geometry permits us to decrease the size of the structure and facilities its fabrication and operation. It is constructed of a seesaw plate (400 × 150 × 15 µm 3 ), two torsional beams (60 × 40 × 15 µm 3 ), four flexural beams (130 × 12 × 15 µm 3 ) and a Wheatstone bridge with four p-type piezoresistors. The resonant device exploits the Lorentz force principle and operates at its first resonant frequency (136.52 kHz). A sinusoidal excitation current of 22.0 mA with a frequency of 136.52 kHz and magnetic fields from 1 to 400 G are considered. The mechanical response of the microsensor is modeled with the finite element method (FEM). The structure of the microsensor registered a maximum von Mises stress of 53.8 MPa between the flexural and the torsional beams. Additionally, a maximum deflection (372.5 nm) is obtained at the extreme end of the plate. The proposed microsensor has the maximum magnetic sensitivity of 40.3 µV G −1 (magnetic fields −1/2 , theoretical resolution of 1.43 mG Hz −1/2 and power consumption less than 10.0 mW

  15. Exposure to time varying magnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging reduces fentanyl-induced analgesia in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teskey, G.C.; Prato, F.S.; Ossenkopp, K.P.; Kavaliers, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of exposure to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on analgesia induced by the mu opiate agonist, fentanyl, was examined in mice. During the dark period, adult male mice were exposed for 23.2 min to the time-varying (0.6 T/sec) magnetic field (TVMF) component of the MRI procedure. Following this exposure, the analgesic potency of fentanyl citrate (0.1 mg/kg) was determined at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-injection, using a thermal test stimulus (hot-plate 50 degrees C). Exposure to the magnetic-field gradients attenuated the fentanyl-induced analgesia in a manner comparable to that previously observed with morphine. These results indicate that the time-varying magnetic fields associated with MRI have significant inhibitory effects on the analgesic effects of specific mu-opiate-directed ligands.

  16. Evaluation of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and collagen by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Paula de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2005-01-01

    Blends of natural and synthetic polymers represent a new class of materials with better mechanical properties and biocompatibility than those of the single components. Collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are well known for their important biological properties. The blending of collagen with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) makes it possible to obtain new materials in which strong interactions between the synthetic and biological components occur. Do to the excellent biocompatibility of these polymers, this blend has been much studied intending biomedical applications. And a one technique that can provide important information on molecular mobility, compatibility and even evaluate the interactions that can occur with these polymers is the Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Thus, the purpose of this work is to evaluate collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. From the values of relaxation times obtained, we can conclude that these materials have different interactions, and different mobility domains, confirming the heterogeneity and complexity of these materials. (author)

  17. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Non Q.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  18. The Vlasov equation with strong magnetic field and oscillating electric field as a model for isotop resonant separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Frenod

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the qualitative behavior of solutions to the Vlasov equation with strong external magnetic field and oscillating electric field. This model is relevant to the understanding of isotop resonant separation. We show that the effective equation is a kinetic equation with a memory term. This memory term involves a pseudo-differential operator whose kernel is characterized by an integral equation involving Bessel functions. The kernel is explicitly given in some particular cases.

  19. Analysis of stochastic magnetic fields formed by the application of resonant magnetic perturbations on MAST and comparison with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denner, P.; Liu, Yueqiang; Kirk, A.; Nardon, E.

    2012-01-01

    In MAST experiments with applied resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), clear reduction in line-averaged density has been observed in a wide range of L-mode plasmas when there is an alignment between the perturbation and the equilibrium magnetic field that maximizes the size of the resonant components of the applied magnetic field, as well as in a few H-mode plasmas but with a much stronger sensitivity to this alignment. This density pump-out is the result of increased particle transport, which is thought to be caused by the formation of a stochastic magnetic field in the plasma edge. This paper presents an analysis of the magnetic field structures formed by the application of n = 3 RMPs on MAST, including various parameters characterizing the degree of stochasticity in the plasma edge. Values for these parameters are calculated and compared with the amount of density pump-out observed in MAST experiments. It is found that density pump-out is fairly well correlated with some of the parameters calculated using vacuum modelling, but none of them provides a single threshold value for pump-out that applies to both L- and H-mode plasmas. Plasma response modelling provides a robust criterion for density pump-out that applies both to L- and H-mode plasmas. (paper)

  20. Non-Weyl resonance asymptotics for quantum graphs in a magnetic field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Exner, Pavel; Lipovský, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 375, č. 4 (2011), s. 805-807 ISSN 0375-9601 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06002; GA ČR GAP203/11/0701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Quantum graphs * Magnetic field * Resonances Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.632, year: 2011

  1. Pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance study of transport properties of fluid catalytic cracking catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kortunov, P.; Vasenkov, S.; Kärger, J.; Fé Elía, M.; Perez, M.; Stöcker, M.; Papadopoulos, G. K.; Theodorou, D.; Drescher, B.; McElhiney, G.; Bernauer, B.; Krystl, V.; Kočiřík, Milan; Zikánová, Arlette; Jirglová, Hana; Berger, C.; Gläser, R.; Weitkamp, J.; Hansen, E. W.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2005), s. 233-237 ISSN 0730-725X Grant - others:TROCAT project - European Community(DE) G5RD-CT-2001-00520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : pulsed-field gradient * nuclear magnetic resonance * fluid catalytic cracking catalyst Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.361, year: 2005

  2. Recent Advances of MEMS Resonators for Lorentz Force Based Magnetic Field Sensors: Design, Applications and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Leobardo Herrera-May

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS resonators have allowed the development of magnetic field sensors with potential applications such as biomedicine, automotive industry, navigation systems, space satellites, telecommunications and non-destructive testing. We present a review of recent magnetic field sensors based on MEMS resonators, which operate with Lorentz force. These sensors have a compact structure, wide measurement range, low energy consumption, high sensitivity and suitable performance. The design methodology, simulation tools, damping sources, sensing techniques and future applications of magnetic field sensors are discussed. The design process is fundamental in achieving correct selection of the operation principle, sensing technique, materials, fabrication process and readout systems of the sensors. In addition, the description of the main sensing systems and challenges of the MEMS sensors are discussed. To develop the best devices, researches of their mechanical reliability, vacuum packaging, design optimization and temperature compensation circuits are needed. Future applications will require multifunctional sensors for monitoring several physical parameters (e.g., magnetic field, acceleration, angular ratio, humidity, temperature and gases.

  3. Ultrahigh-Resolution Magnetic Resonance in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields: Two-Dimensional Long-Lived-Coherence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthalapalli, Srinivas; Bornet, Aurélien; Segawa, Takuya F.; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2012-07-01

    A half-century quest for improving resolution in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has enabled the study of molecular structures, biological interactions, and fine details of anatomy. This progress largely relied on the advent of sophisticated superconducting magnets that can provide stable and homogeneous fields with temporal and spatial variations below ΔB0/B0LLC-COSY) opens the way to overcome both inhomogeneous and homogeneous broadening, which arise from local variations in static fields and fluctuating dipole-dipole interactions, respectively. LLC-COSY makes it possible to obtain ultrahigh resolution two-dimensional spectra, with linewidths on the order of Δν=0.1 to 1 Hz, even in very inhomogeneous fields (ΔB0/B0>10ppm or 5000 Hz at 9.7 T), and can improve resolution by a factor up to 9 when the homogeneous linewidths are determined by dipole-dipole interactions. The resulting LLC-COSY spectra display chemical shift differences and scalar couplings in two orthogonal dimensions, like in “J spectroscopy.” LLC-COSY does not require any sophisticated gradient switching or frequency-modulated pulses. Applications to in-cell NMR and to magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of selected volume elements in MRI appear promising, particularly when susceptibility variations tend to preclude high resolution.

  4. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for determining electric field distribution during electroporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranjc, Matej; Miklavcic, Damijan; Bajd, Franci; Serša, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon caused by externally applied electric field to cells that results in an increase of cell membrane permeability to various molecules. Accurate coverage of the tissue with a sufficiently large electric field presents one of the most important conditions for successful membrane permeabilization. Applications based on electroporation would greatly benefit with a method for monitoring the electric field, especially if it could be done in situ. As the membrane electroporation is a consequence of an induced transmembrane potential, which is directly proportional to the local electric field, we have been investigating current density imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography techniques to determine the electric field distribution during electroporation. In this paper, we present comparison of current density and electric field distribution in an agar phantom and in a liver tissue exposed to electroporation pulses. As expected, a region of increased electrical conductivity was observed in the liver tissue exposed to sufficiently high electric field but not in agar phantom.

  5. Impact of rotating resonant magnetic perturbation fields on plasma edge electron density and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoschus, H.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Reiser, D.; Unterberg, B.; Lehnen, M.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Jakubowski, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Rotating resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields impose a characteristic modulation to the edge electron density n e (r, t) and temperature T e (r, t) fields, which depends on the relative rotation f rel between external RMP field and plasma fluid. The n e (r, t) and T e (r, t) fields measured in the edge (r/a = 0.9–1.05) of TEXTOR L-mode plasmas are in close correlation with the local magnetic vacuum topology for low relative rotation f rel = −0.2 kHz. In comparison with the 3D neutral and plasma transport code EMC3-Eirene, this provides substantial experimental evidence that for low relative rotation level and high resonant field amplitudes (normalized radial field strength B r 4/1 /B t =2×10 -3 ), a stochastic edge with a remnant island chain dominated by diffusive transport exists. Radially outside a helical scrape-off layer, the so-called laminar zone embedded into a stochastic domain is found to exist. In contrast for high relative rotation of f rel = 1.8 kHz, the measured modulation of n e is shifted by π/2 toroidally with respect to the modelled vacuum topology. A pronounced flattening in T e (r) and a reduction in n e (r) is measured at the resonant flux surface and represents a clear signature for a magnetic island, which is phase shifted with respect to the vacuum island position. A correlated shift of the laminar zone radially outwards at the very plasma edge is observed suggesting that the actual near-field structure at the perturbation source is determined by the plasma response as well. (paper)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging. Recent studies on biological effects of static magnetic and high-frequency electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pophof, B.; Brix, G.

    2017-01-01

    During the last few years, new studies on biological effects of strong static magnetic fields and on thermal effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were published. Many of these studies have not yet been included in the current safety recommendations. Scientific publications since 2010 on biological effects of static and electromagnetic fields in MRI were researched and evaluated. New studies confirm older publications that have already described effects of static magnetic fields on sensory organs and the central nervous system, accompanied by sensory perceptions. A new result is the direct effect of Lorentz forces on ionic currents in the semicircular canals of the vestibular system. Recent studies of thermal effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields were focused on the development of anatomically realistic body models and a more precise simulation of exposure scenarios. Strong static magnetic fields can cause unpleasant sensations, in particular, vertigo. In addition, they can influence the performance of the medical staff and thus potentially endanger the patient's safety. As a precaution, medical personnel should move slowly within the field gradient. High-frequency electromagnetic fields lead to an increase in the temperature of patients' tissues and organs. This should be considered especially in patients with restricted thermoregulation and in pregnant women and neonates; in these cases exposure should be kept as low as possible. (orig.) [de

  7. Measurements of the longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance in superfluid helium-3 B as a function of magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherrill, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    These are the first measurements of the longitudinal NMR mode in a magnetic field large enough to cause an appreciable distortion of the energy gap. Measurements were made at pressures P = 3, 6, 12, 21, and 33 bar; at fields from 2 to 15 MHz; and over temperatures between 0.18 and 0.40 T/sub c/(P), where T/sub c/(P) is the superfluid transition temperature. Therefore, these experiments are in the collisionless regime in which the longitudinal resonance frequency is small compared to the quasiparticle collision frequency. The gap distortion causes a large shift in the longitudinal frequency. As the magnetic field increases from 2 to 15 MHz, the frequency decreases by about 20 kHz at all pressures. Thus, these experiments are a powerful probe of the field distortion of the energy gap. Pulsed NMR is used and, in addition to the resonance frequency, the amplitude and damping of the induced oscillations were obtained. Results are compared for the longitudinal frequency as a function of field, temperature, and pressure to a recent theory, and estimates of the theoretical parameters involved were obtained. At the lowest temperatures a startling behavior was observed, in which the resonance lineshape broadened with decreasing temperature

  8. Multiple coil pulsed magnetic resonance method for measuring cold SSC dipole magnet field quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.G.; Moore, J.M.; Wong, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    The operating principles and system architecture for a method to measure the magnetic field multipole expansion coefficients are described in the context of the needs of SSC dipole magnets. The operation of an 8-coil prototype system is discussed. Several of the most important technological issues that influence the design are identified and the basis of their resolution is explained. The new features of a 32-coil system presently under construction are described, along with estimates of its requirements for measurement time and data storage capacity

  9. Gradient-induced longitudinal relaxation of hyperpolarized noble gases in the fringe fields of superconducting magnets used for magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wangzhi; Cleveland, Zackary I; Möller, Harald E; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2011-02-01

    When hyperpolarized noble gases are brought into the bore of a superconducting magnet for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or spectroscopy studies, the gases must pass through substantial field gradients, which can cause rapid longitudinal relaxation. In this communication, we present a means of calculating this spatially dependent relaxation rate in the fringe field of typical magnets. We then compare these predictions to experimental measurements of (3)He relaxation at various positions near a medium-bore 2-T small animal MRI system. The calculated and measured relaxation rates on the central axis of the magnet agree well and show a maximum (3)He relaxation rate of 3.83×10(-3) s(-1) (T(1)=4.4 min) at a distance of 47 cm from the magnet isocenter. We also show that if this magnet were self-shielded, its minimum T(1) would drop to 1.2 min. In contrast, a typical self-shielded 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner will induce a minimum on-axis T(1) of 12 min. Additionally, we show that the cylindrically symmetric fields of these magnets enable gradient-induced relaxation to be calculated using only knowledge of the on-axis longitudinal field, which can either be measured directly or calculated from a simple field model. Thus, while most MRI magnets employ complex and proprietary current configurations, we show that their fringe fields and the resulting gradient-induced relaxation are well approximated by simple solenoid models. Finally, our modeling also demonstrates that relaxation rates can increase by nearly an order of magnitude at radial distances equivalent to the solenoid radius. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minaif, Karine; Ajzen, Sergio; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Minami, Cintia Cristina Satie; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Ruano, Jose Maria Cordeiro; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti

    2008-01-01

    Objective: to compare low-field (0.2 T) with high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. Materials and methods: twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. Results: among the 27 patients included in the present study, 18 (66.7%) had some type of lesion suggesting the presence of endometriosis demonstrated at high-field images. In 14 of these patients the diagnosis was correctly established by low-field magnetic resonance imaging. Endometriomas, tubal lesions, and endometriotic foci > 7 mm identified at the high-field images were also identified at low-field images with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Among the nine patients diagnosed with adenomyosis by high-field images, eight were correctly diagnosed by low-field images with 88.9% accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: low-field magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low sensitivity in the detection of small endometriotic foci, high sensitivity in the detection of endometriomas and large endometriotic foci, and high accuracy in the detection of adenomyosis when compared with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  11. Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minaif, Karine; Ajzen, Sergio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: kminaif@uol.com.br; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Minami, Cintia Cristina Satie; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis. Unit of Abdomen; Ruano, Jose Maria Cordeiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology. Sector of Videlaparoscopy; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology

    2008-11-15

    Objective: to compare low-field (0.2 T) with high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. Materials and methods: twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. Results: among the 27 patients included in the present study, 18 (66.7%) had some type of lesion suggesting the presence of endometriosis demonstrated at high-field images. In 14 of these patients the diagnosis was correctly established by low-field magnetic resonance imaging. Endometriomas, tubal lesions, and endometriotic foci > 7 mm identified at the high-field images were also identified at low-field images with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Among the nine patients diagnosed with adenomyosis by high-field images, eight were correctly diagnosed by low-field images with 88.9% accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: low-field magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low sensitivity in the detection of small endometriotic foci, high sensitivity in the detection of endometriomas and large endometriotic foci, and high accuracy in the detection of adenomyosis when compared with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  12. Imaging by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duroure, J.F.; Serpolay, H.; Vallens, D.

    1995-01-01

    Here are described the advanced technology for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: reduction of acquisition times, and rebuilding times, images quality improvement. The tendency is to open the machines at low and middle field, on a market being at 10% of NMR I sales, with economical, scientifical and ergonomic reasons broadly developed by constructors

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  14. Effect of a high-frequency magnetic field on the resonant behavior displayed by a spin-1/2 particle under the influence of a rotating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado-Pascual, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In this paper, we investigate the role of a high-frequency magnetic field in the resonant behavior displayed by a spin-1/2 particle under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. We propose two alternative methods for analyzing the system dynamics, namely, the averaging method and the multiple scale method. - Abstract: In this paper, we investigate the role of a high-frequency magnetic field in the resonant behavior displayed by a spin-1/2 particle under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. We propose two alternative methods for analyzing the system dynamics, namely, the averaging method and the multiple scale method. The analytical results achieved by applying these two methods are compared with those obtained from the numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation. This comparison leads to the conclusion that the multiple scale method provides a better understanding of the system dynamics than the averaging method. In particular, the averaging method predicts the complete destruction of the resonant behavior by an appropriate choice of the parameter values of the high-frequency magnetic field. This conclusion is disproved both by the numerical results, and also by the results obtained from the multiple scale method.

  15. Adjustability of resonance frequency by external magnetic field and bias electric field of sandwich magnetoelectric PZT/NFO/PZT composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ling-Fang; Feng, Xing; Sun, Kang; Liang, Ze-Yu; Xu, Qian; Liang, Jia-Yu; Yang, Chang-Ping [Hubei University, Hubei Key Laboratory of Ferro and Piezoelectric Materials and Devices, Faculty of Physics and Electronic Science, Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Wuhan (China)

    2017-07-15

    Sandwich magnetoelectric composites of PZT/NFO/PZT (PNP) have been prepared by laminating PZT5, NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and PZT5 ceramics in turn with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) paste. A systematic study of structural, magnetic and ferroelectric properties is undertaken. Structural studies carried out by X-ray diffraction indicate formation of cubic perovskite phase of PZT5 ceramic and cubic spinel phase of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramic. As increasing the content of PZT5 phase, ferroelectric loops and magnetic loops of PNP composites showed increasing remnant electric polarizations and decreasing remnant magnetic moments separately. Both external magnetic fields and bias voltages could regulate the basal radial resonance frequency of the composites, which should be originated with the transformation and coupling of the stress between the piezoelectric phase and magnetostrictive phase. Such magnetoelectric composite provides great opportunities for electrostatically tunable devices. (orig.)

  16. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  17. Observation of disruptions in tokamak plasma under the influence of resonant helical magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, M.; Vannucci, A.; Caldas, I.

    1996-01-01

    Disruptive instabilities were investigated in the small tokamak TBR-1 during the application of resonant helical magnetic fields created by external helical windings. Indications were found that the main triggering mechanism of the disruptions was the rapid increase of the m=2/n=1 mode which, apparently after reaching a certain amplitude, interacts with other resistive modes: the internal 1/1 mode in the case of minor disruptions. After the coupling, the growth of the associated islands would create a chaotic field line distribution in the region between the corresponding rational magnetic surfaces which caused the gross particle transport and, finally, destroyed the confinement. In addition, investigations on higher Z eff discharges in which a mixture of helium and hydrogen was used resulted in much more unstable plasmas but apparently did not alter basic characteristics of the disruptions

  18. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems

  19. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuqing; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin, E-mail: linyq@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong, E-mail: linyq@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Lin, Yung-Ya [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  20. Propagation Dynamics Associated with Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Fields in High-Confinement Mode Plasmas inside the KSTAR Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, W W; Evans, T E; Tynan, G R; Yoon, S W; Jeon, Y M; Ko, W H; Nam, Y U; Oh, Y K

    2017-11-17

    The propagation dynamics of resonant magnetic perturbation fields in KSTAR H-mode plasmas with injection of small edge perturbations produced by a supersonic molecular beam injection is reported for the first time. The results show that the perturbation field first excites a plasma response on the q=3 magnetic surface and then propagates inward to the q=2 surface with a radially averaged propagation velocity of resonant magnetic perturbations field equal to 32.5  m/ s. As a result, the perturbation field brakes the toroidal rotation on the q=3 surface first causing a momentum transport perturbation that propagates both inward and outward. A higher density fluctuation level is observed. The propagation velocity of the resonant magnetic perturbations field is larger than the radial propagation velocity of the perturbation in the toroidal rotation.

  1. Frequency and magnetic field mapping of magnetoelastic spin pumping in high overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Polzikova

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first observation of microvolt-scale inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE dc voltage driven by an acoustic spin pumping (ASP in a bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonator formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-YIG(1-GGG-YIG(2-Pt structure. When 2 mW power is applied to an Al-ZnO-Al transducer, the voltage VISHE ∼ 4 μV in the Pt film is observed as a result of resonant ASP from YIG(2 to Pt in the area ∼ 170 μm. The results of frequency and magnetic field mapping of VISHE(f,H together with reflectivity of the resonator show an obvious agreement between the positions of the voltage maxima and BAW resonance frequencies fn(H on the (f, H plane. At the same time a significant asymmetry of the VISHE(fn(H value in reference to the magnetoelastic resonance (MER line fMER(H position is revealed, which is explained by asymmetry of the magnetoelastic waves dispersion law.

  2. Frequency and magnetic field mapping of magnetoelastic spin pumping in high overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzikova, N. I.; Alekseev, S. G.; Pyataikin, I. I.; Luzanov, V. A.; Raevskiy, A. O.; Kotov, V. A.

    2018-05-01

    We report on the first observation of microvolt-scale inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) dc voltage driven by an acoustic spin pumping (ASP) in a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonator formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-YIG(1)-GGG-YIG(2)-Pt structure. When 2 mW power is applied to an Al-ZnO-Al transducer, the voltage VISHE ˜ 4 μV in the Pt film is observed as a result of resonant ASP from YIG(2) to Pt in the area ˜ 170 μm. The results of frequency and magnetic field mapping of VISHE(f,H) together with reflectivity of the resonator show an obvious agreement between the positions of the voltage maxima and BAW resonance frequencies fn(H) on the (f, H) plane. At the same time a significant asymmetry of the VISHE(fn(H)) value in reference to the magnetoelastic resonance (MER) line fMER(H) position is revealed, which is explained by asymmetry of the magnetoelastic waves dispersion law.

  3. Magneto-Plasmonic Janus Vesicles for Magnetic Field-Enhanced Photoacoustic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumors

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Huang, Zhiqi; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Yang; Deng, Lin; Wang, Zhantong; Zhou, Zijian; Liu, Yi; Kalish, Heather; Khachab, Niveen M.; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Nie, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Magneto-plasmonic Janus vesicles (JVs) integrated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and magnetic NPs (MNPs) were prepared asymmetrically in the membrane for in vivo cancer imaging. The hybrid JVs were produced by coassembling a mixture of hydrophobic MNPs, free amphiphilic block copolymers (BCPs), and AuNPs tethered with amphiphilic BCPs. Depending on the size and content of NPs, the JVs acquired spherical or hemispherical shapes. Among them, hemispherical JVs containing 50 nm AuNPs and 15 nm MNPs showed a strong absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) window and enhanced the transverse relaxation (T2) contrast effect, as a result of the ordering and dense packing of AuNPs and MNPs in the membrane. The magneto-plasmonic JVs were used as drug delivery vehicles, from which the release of a payload can be triggered by NIR light and the release rate can be modulated by a magnetic field. Moreover, the JVs were applied as imaging agents for in vivo bimodal photoacoustic (PA) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of tumors by intravenous injection. With an external magnetic field, the accumulation of the JVs in tumors was significantly increased, leading to a signal enhancement of approximately 2–3 times in the PA and MR imaging, compared with control groups without a magnetic field.

  4. Magneto-Plasmonic Janus Vesicles for Magnetic Field-Enhanced Photoacoustic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumors

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yijing

    2016-11-10

    Magneto-plasmonic Janus vesicles (JVs) integrated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and magnetic NPs (MNPs) were prepared asymmetrically in the membrane for in vivo cancer imaging. The hybrid JVs were produced by coassembling a mixture of hydrophobic MNPs, free amphiphilic block copolymers (BCPs), and AuNPs tethered with amphiphilic BCPs. Depending on the size and content of NPs, the JVs acquired spherical or hemispherical shapes. Among them, hemispherical JVs containing 50 nm AuNPs and 15 nm MNPs showed a strong absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) window and enhanced the transverse relaxation (T2) contrast effect, as a result of the ordering and dense packing of AuNPs and MNPs in the membrane. The magneto-plasmonic JVs were used as drug delivery vehicles, from which the release of a payload can be triggered by NIR light and the release rate can be modulated by a magnetic field. Moreover, the JVs were applied as imaging agents for in vivo bimodal photoacoustic (PA) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of tumors by intravenous injection. With an external magnetic field, the accumulation of the JVs in tumors was significantly increased, leading to a signal enhancement of approximately 2–3 times in the PA and MR imaging, compared with control groups without a magnetic field.

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the frontal eye fields during saccadic eye movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Atsushi; Takagi, Mineo; Abe, Haruki; Nakajima, Takashi; Miyauchi, Satoru.

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated activity-induced signal intensity changes in the human cerebral cortex during horizontal saccadic eye movements using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on the blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast method. Compared with central fixation, significant signal increases were observed bilaterally in the middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 8) during saccadic conditions. The location of the activated area was consistent with that of previously reported frontal eye fields (FEF). These results suggest that fMRI has potential merit for the study of cortical control of eye movements in humans. (author)

  6. Experimental differentiation of intraocular masses using ultrahigh-field magnetic resonance imaging--a case series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Falke

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The case reports presented here were compiled to demonstrate the potential for improved diagnosis and monitoring of disease progress of intraocular lesions using ultrahigh-field magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM at 7.1 Tesla. METHODS: High-resolution ex vivo ocular magnetic resonance (MR images were acquired on an ultrahigh-field MR system (7.1 Tesla, ClinScan, Bruker BioScan, Germany using a 2-channel coil with 4 coil elements and T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE sequences of human eyes enucleated because of different intraocular lesions. Imaging parameters were: 40×40 mm field of view, 512×512 matrix, and 700 µm slice thickness. The results were correlated with in vivo ultrasound and histology of the enucleated eyes. RESULTS: Imaging was performed in enucleated eyes with choroidal melanoma, malignant melanoma of iris and ciliary body with scleral perforation, ciliary body melanoma, intraocular metastasis of esophageal cancer, subretinal bleeding in the presence of perforated corneal ulcer, hemorrhagic choroidal detachment, and premature retinopathy with phthisis and ossification of bulbar structures. MR imaging allowed differentiation between solid and cystic tumor components. In case of hemorrhage, fluid-fluid levels were identified. Melanin and calcifications caused significant hypointensity. Microstructural features of eye lesions identified by MRM were confirmed by histology. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the potential of MRM for the visualization and differential diagnosis of intraocular lesions. At present, the narrow bore of the magnet still limits the use of this technology in humans in vivo. Further advances in ultrahigh-field MR imaging will permit visualization of tumor extent and evaluation of nonclassified intraocular structures in the near future.

  7. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jachmann, Rebecca C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  8. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jachmann, Rebecca C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-18

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  9. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  10. Spatial Steering of Cyclotron-Resonance Maser Array Antenna by Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesar, A.; Jerby, E.

    2001-01-01

    The novel concept of radiation lobe generation and steering by cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) array is presented. In this scheme the gain and phase of each CRM-element in the array are tuned by magnetic fields which control the cyclotron synchronism condition and the pitch-ratio of each CRM-element. These operating parameters are controlled by the magnetic fields of the solenoid and the kicker, respectively. A numerical example of a CRM-array operating in a gyro-TWT mode is presented. The radiation pattern of a 10-element CRM phased array (15 kV, 1A each) is calculated. The radiation lobe steering by the magnetic field controls is demonstrated in this analysis. A 40 lobe steering range is shown for the 10-element CRM-array at 7.3 GHz. An experimental device is built in our laboratory to demonstrate the active CRM-array antenna concept. Preliminary experimental results of gain and phase-delay of a single CRM-element, as function of electron-beam parameters are presented. These results are compared to the numerical model

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an encoding

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  13. Differential measurement of the earth's magnetic field by nuclear magnetic resonance; Mesure differentielle du champ magnetique terrestre par resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robach, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 38 - Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    MNR transducers using proton dynamic polarisation allows to convert into a phase measurement any variation of the earth magnetic field. There exist several versions of the instrument corresponding to various models of MNR transducers, which the author analyses in detail, devoting an important place to influence of their alignment with respect to the earth's magnetic field. The sensibility obtained is of one hundredth of a gamma over a bandwidth of (0-0,1 Hz). - This instrument is designed for measuring field gradients in airborne magnetic surveying, for detecting nearly magnetic anomalies, and for distinguishing between nearly and distant magnetic phenomena. (author) [French] L'emploi de capteurs, bases sur la resonance magnetique nucleaire des protons en presence de polarisation dynamique, permet de traduire une difference de champ magnetique terrestre en une mesure de phase. L'appareil existe sous plusieurs versions avec des capteurs de modeles differents dont l'auteur fait une analyse detaillee en accordant une part importante a l'influence de l'orientation des capteurs par rapport au champ magnetique terrestre. La sensibilite est de 1/100 {gamma} pour une bande passante de (0 - 0,1 Hz). Cet appareil s'applique a la mesure du gradient en prospection magnetique aeroportee, a la detection d'anomalies magnetiques proches, a la differentiation d'effets magnetiques proches et lointains. (auteur)

  14. Molecular Dynamics of Water in Wood Studied by Fast Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water plays a very important role in wood and wood products. The molecular motion of water in wood is susceptible to thermal activation. Thermal energy makes water molecules more active and weakens the force between water and wood; therefore, the water molecules dynamic properties are greatly influenced. Molecular dynamics study is important for wood drying; this paper therefore focuses on water molecular dynamics in wood through fast field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry techniques. The results show that the spin-lattice relaxation rate decreases with the Larmor frequency. Nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion profiles at different temperatures could separate the relaxation contribution of water in bigger pores and smaller pores. The T1 distribution from wide to narrow at 10 MHz Larmor frequency reflects the shrinkage of pore size with the higher temperature. The dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate on correlation time for water molecular motion based on BPP (proposed by Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound theory shows that water correlation time increases with higher temperature, and its activation energy, calculated using the Arrhenius transformation equation, is 9.06±0.53 kJ/mol.

  15. Progress and promises of human cardiac magnetic resonance at ultrahigh fields: a physics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Graessl, Andreas; Thalhammer, Christof; Dieringer, Matthias A; Kraus, Oliver; Santoro, Davide; Fuchs, Katharina; Hezel, Fabian; Waiczies, Sonia; Ittermann, Bernd; Winter, Lukas

    2013-04-01

    A growing number of reports eloquently speak about explorations into cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0 T). Realizing the progress, promises and challenges of ultrahigh field (UHF) CMR this perspective outlines current trends in enabling MR technology tailored for cardiac MR in the short wavelength regime. For this purpose many channel radiofrequency (RF) technology concepts are outlined. Basic principles of mapping and shimming of transmission fields including RF power deposition considerations are presented. Explorations motivated by the safe operation of UHF-CMR even in the presence of conductive implants are described together with the physics, numerical simulations and experiments, all of which detailing antenna effects and RF heating induced by intracoronary stents at 7.0 T. Early applications of CMR at 7.0 T and their clinical implications for explorations into cardiovascular diseases are explored including assessment of cardiac function, myocardial tissue characterization, MR angiography of large and small vessels as well as heteronuclear MR of the heart and the skin. A concluding section ventures a glance beyond the horizon and explores future directions. The goal here is not to be comprehensive but to inspire the biomedical and diagnostic imaging communities to throw further weight behind the solution of the many remaining unsolved problems and technical obstacles of UHF-CMR with the goal to transfer MR physics driven methodological advancements into extra clinical value. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Patient exposure to electromagnetic fields in magnetic resonance scanners: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibelalde del Castillo, E

    2013-12-01

    The use of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in the low frequency end of the electromagnetic spectrum and static fields, radiofrequencies (RF), and microwaves is fundamental both in modern communication systems and in diagnostic medical imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proliferation of these applications in recent decades has led to intense activity in developing regulations to guarantee their safety and to the establishment of guidelines and legal recommendations for the public, workers, and patients. In April 2012 it was foreseen that the European Parliament and Council would approve and publish a directive on the minimum health and safety requirements regarding the exposure of workers to the risks arising from electromagnetic fields, which would modify Directive 2004/40/EC. New studies related to the exposure to electromagnetic radiation and its impact on health published in recent years have led to a new postponement, and it is now foreseen that the directive will come into effect in October 2013. One of the most noteworthy aspects of the new version of the directive is the exclusion of the limits of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields in the clinical use of MRI. In exchange for this exception, physicians and experts in protection against non-ionizing radiation are asked to make additional efforts to train workers exposed to non-ionizing radiation and to establish mechanisms to guarantee the correct application of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in patients, along similar lines to the principles of justification and optimization established for ionizing radiation. On the basis of the most recently published studies, this article reviews some safety-related aspects to take into account when examining patients with MRI with high magnetic fields. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Magneto-optical and cyclotron resonance studies of semiconductors and their nanostructures in pulsed high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, N.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: We present a review on the recent advances in physics of magneto-optical spectroscopy in the visible range and of infrared cyclotron resonance in pulsed high magnetic fields, which are produced by electromagnetic flux compression up to 500T, by the single-turn coil technique up to 200T or by conventional non-destructive long pulse magnets up to 50T. We discuss the recent results on the spectroscopy of low dimensional excitons in quantum wells and short period superlattices. In very high fields up to 500T, we observed anomalous field dependence of the exciton absorption lines and the 2D - 3D cross-over effects in GaAs/AlAs quantum wells. In GaP/AlP short period superlattices, it was found that the exciton photoluminescence intensity shows a dramatic decrease and the diamagnetic shift was negative when high magnetic fields were applied parallel to the growth direction. We observed also remarkable effects of uniaxial stress, which are ascribed to the cross-over effect between the two inequivalent valleys at the X points. Cyclotron resonance was measured by using various molecular gas lasers as radiation sources in the range 5 - 119 m . We present the results of cyclotron resonance in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells with tilted magnetic fields from the growth direction. It was found that the resonant field and the peak intensity show many different features depending on the extent of the Landau level-subband coupling and on the relation between the photon energy and the barrier height. A large hysteresis was observed between the rising and the falling sweeps of the magnetic field, when the cyclotron resonance energy became comparable with the subband spacing. In a diluted magnetic semiconductor CdFeS, we observed anomalous temperature dependence of the effective mass, suggestive of the magnetic polaron effect

  18. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Needles and Interactive Sequences for Musculoskeletal Interventions Using an Open High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wonneberger, Uta; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Streitparth, Florian; Walter, Thula; Rump, Jens; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we study in vitro evaluation of needle artefacts and image quality for musculoskeletal laser-interventions in an open high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at 1.0T with vertical field orientation. Five commercially available MRI-compatible puncture needles were assessed based on artefact characteristics in a CuSO4 phantom (0.1%) and in human cadaveric lumbar spines. First, six different interventional sequences were evaluated with varying needle orientation to the main magnetic field B0 (0 o to 90 o ) in a sequence test. Artefact width, needle-tip error, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Second, a gradient-echo sequence used for thermometric monitoring was assessed and in varying echo times, artefact width, tip error, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured. Artefact width and needle-tip error correlated with needle material, instrument orientation to B0, and sequence type. Fast spin-echo sequences produced the smallest needle artefacts for all needles, except for the carbon fibre needle (width o to B0. Overall, the proton density-weighted spin-echo sequences had the best CNR (CNR Muscle/Needle >16.8). Concerning the thermometric gradient echo sequence, artefacts remained <5 mm, and the SNR reached its maximum at an echo time of 15 ms. If needle materials and sequences are accordingly combined, guidance and monitoring of musculoskeletal laser interventions may be feasible in a vertical magnetic field at 1.0T.

  19. Experimental benchmarking of quantum control in zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Min; Wu, Teng; Blanchard, John W; Feng, Guanru; Peng, Xinhua; Budker, Dmitry

    2018-06-01

    Demonstration of coherent control and characterization of the control fidelity is important for the development of quantum architectures such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We introduce an experimental approach to realize universal quantum control, and benchmarking thereof, in zero-field NMR, an analog of conventional high-field NMR that features less-constrained spin dynamics. We design a composite pulse technique for both arbitrary one-spin rotations and a two-spin controlled-not (CNOT) gate in a heteronuclear two-spin system at zero field, which experimentally demonstrates universal quantum control in such a system. Moreover, using quantum information-inspired randomized benchmarking and partial quantum process tomography, we evaluate the quality of the control, achieving single-spin control for 13 C with an average fidelity of 0.9960(2) and two-spin control via a CNOT gate with a fidelity of 0.9877(2). Our method can also be extended to more general multispin heteronuclear systems at zero field. The realization of universal quantum control in zero-field NMR is important for quantum state/coherence preparation, pulse sequence design, and is an essential step toward applications to materials science, chemical analysis, and fundamental physics.

  20. [Application of an Adaptive Inertia Weight Particle Swarm Algorithm in the Magnetic Resonance Bias Field Correction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chang; Qin, Xin; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Wenchao

    2016-06-01

    An adaptive inertia weight particle swarm algorithm is proposed in this study to solve the local optimal problem with the method of traditional particle swarm optimization in the process of estimating magnetic resonance(MR)image bias field.An indicator measuring the degree of premature convergence was designed for the defect of traditional particle swarm optimization algorithm.The inertia weight was adjusted adaptively based on this indicator to ensure particle swarm to be optimized globally and to avoid it from falling into local optimum.The Legendre polynomial was used to fit bias field,the polynomial parameters were optimized globally,and finally the bias field was estimated and corrected.Compared to those with the improved entropy minimum algorithm,the entropy of corrected image was smaller and the estimated bias field was more accurate in this study.Then the corrected image was segmented and the segmentation accuracy obtained in this research was 10% higher than that with improved entropy minimum algorithm.This algorithm can be applied to the correction of MR image bias field.

  1. A high temperature superconductor tape RF receiver coil for a low field magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, M C; Yan, B P; Lee, K H; Ma, Q Y; Yang, E S

    2005-01-01

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) thin films have been applied in making a low loss RF receiver coil for improving magnetic resonance imaging image quality. However, the application of these coils is severely limited by their limited field of view (FOV). Stringent fabrication environment requirements and high cost are further limitations. In this paper, we propose a simpler method for designing and fabricating HTS coils. Using industrial silver alloy sheathed Bi (2-x) Pb x Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 (Bi-2223) HTS tapes, a five-inch single-turn HTS solenoid coil has been developed, and human wrist images have been acquired with this coil. The HTS tape coil has demonstrated an enhanced FOV over a six-inch YBCO thin film surface coil at 77 K with comparable signal-to-noise ratio

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  3. Cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb quantum wells in magnetic fields up to 45 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spirin, K. E., E-mail: spirink@ipmras.ru; Krishtopenko, S. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Sadofyev, Yu. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Drachenko, O. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magn’etiques Intenses (France); Helm, M. [Forschungszentrum Dresden–Rossendorf, Dresden High-Magnetic-Field Laboratory and Institute of Ion-Beam Physics and Materials Research (Germany); Teppe, F.; Knap, W. [GIS-TERALAB Universite Montpellier II, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR CNRS 5221 (L2C) (France); Gavrilenko, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures with quantum wells of various widths in pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T are investigated. Our experimental cyclotron energies are in satisfactory agreement with the results of theoretical calculations performed using the eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The shift of the cyclotron resonance (CR) line, which corresponds to the transition from the lowest Landau level to the low magnetic-field region, is found upon varying the electron concentration due to the negative persistent photoconductivity effect. It is shown that the observed shift of the CR lines is associated with the finite width of the density of states at the Landau levels.

  4. Fourier Transfrom Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at High Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-03-01

    At high magnetic field (9.4 tesla at NHMFL), Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry performance improves dramatically: mass resolving power, axialization efficiency, and scan speed (each proportional to B), maximum ion mass, dynamic range, ion trapping period, kinetic energy, and electron self-cooling rate for sympathetic cooling (each proportional to B^2), and ion coalescence tendency (proportional 1/B^2). These advantages may apply singly (e.g., unit mass resolution for proteins of >100,000 Da), or compound (e.g., 10-fold improvement in S/N ratio for 9.4 T vs. 6 T at the same resolving power). Examples range from direct determination of molecular formulas of diesel fuel components by accurate mass measurement (=B10.1 ppm) to protein structure and dynamics probed by H/D exchange. This work was supported by N.S.F. (CHE-93-22824; CHE-94-13008), N.I.H. (GM-31683), Florida State University, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, FL.

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging with ultra-high fields; Funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie bei ultrahohen Feldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windischberger, C.; Schoepf, V.; Sladky, R.; Moser, E. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-MR, Wien (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Zentrum fuer Medizinische Physik und Biomedizinische Technik, Wien (Austria); Fischmeister, F.P.S. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-MR, Wien (Austria); Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Psychologie, Wien (Austria)

    2010-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the primary method for non-invasive functional localization in the brain. With the emergence of MR systems with field strengths of 4 Tesla and above, neuronal activation may be studied with unprecedented accuracy. In this article we present different approaches to use the improved sensitivity and specificity for expanding current fMRT resolution limits in space and time based on several 7 Tesla studies. In addition to the challenges that arise with ultra-high magnetic fields possible solutions will be discussed. (orig.) [German] Die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) stellt zurzeit die wichtigste Methode zur nichtinvasiven Funktionslokalisation im Gehirn dar. Mit der Verfuegbarkeit von MRT-Geraeten mit Magnetfeldstaerken von 4 Tesla (T) und darueber ergeben sich neue Moeglichkeiten, mittels fMRT die neuronale Aktivitaet in bislang unerreichter Genauigkeit zu untersuchen. In diesem Artikel zeigen wir anhand mehrerer Studien bei 7 T, in wieweit die Zugewinne an Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet verwendet werden koennen, um die bisherigen Grenzen der fMRT-Aufloesung in raeumlicher und zeitlicher Hinsicht auszuweiten. Die neuen Herausforderungen, die mit dem Schritt zu ultrahohen Magnetfeldern einhergehen, werden dabei ebenso diskutiert wie moegliche Ansaetze zu deren Loesung. (orig.)

  6. Mapping the Induction of Magnetic Field Around an Applicator for Dermato Magnetotherapy, using the Magnetic Resonance Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartušek, Karel; Gescheidtová, E.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2005), s. 62-66 ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2065201 Keywords : Nuclear Magnetic Resonance * Gradient Echo * Spin Echo Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  7. Analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging by the combined field integral equation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H [Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, 10/B1D728, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2006-06-21

    We present the combined field integral equation (CFIE) method for analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three-dimensional models of coils and the human body were used to take into account the electromagnetic coupling. In the method of moments formulation, we applied triangular patches and the Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis functions to model arbitrarily shaped geometries. We first examined a rectangular loop coil to verify the CFIE method and also demonstrate its efficiency and accuracy. We then studied several eight-channel receive-only head coil arrays for 7.0 T SENSE functional MRI. Numerical results show that the signal dropout and the average SNR are two major concerns in SENSE coil array design. A good design should be a balance of these two factors.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of standard radiotherapy field borders in patients with uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Geison Moreira; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo; Ribalta, Julisa Chamorro Lascasas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate, by means of magnetic resonance imaging, the standardized field borders in radiotherapy for malignant neoplasm of uterine cervix, and to determine the role of this method in the reduction of possible planning errors related to the conventional technique. Materials and methods: magnetic resonance imaging studies for planning of treatment of 51 patients with uterine cervix cancer were retrospectively analyzed. The parameters assessed were the anterior and posterior field borders on sagittal section. Results: The anterior field border was inappropriate in 20 (39.2%) patients and geographic miss was observed in 37.3% of cases in the posterior border. The inappropriateness of both field borders did not correlate with clinical parameters such as patients' age, tumor staging, histological type and degree. Conclusion: the evaluation of standardized field borders with the use of magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated high indices of inappropriateness of the lateral field borders, as well as the relevant role of magnetic resonance imaging in the radiotherapy planning for patients with uterine cervix cancer with a view to reduce the occurrence of geographic miss of the target volume. (author)

  9. Analytic reconstruction of magnetic resonance imaging signal obtained from a periodic encoding field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, F J; Hrovat, M I; Patz, S

    2000-09-01

    We have proposed a two-dimensional PERiodic-Linear (PERL) magnetic encoding field geometry B(x,y) = g(y)y cos(q(x)x) and a magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence which incorporates two fields to image a two-dimensional spin density: a standard linear gradient in the x dimension, and the PERL field. Because of its periodicity, the PERL field produces a signal where the phase of the two dimensions is functionally different. The x dimension is encoded linearly, but the y dimension appears as the argument of a sinusoidal phase term. Thus, the time-domain signal and image spin density are not related by a two-dimensional Fourier transform. They are related by a one-dimensional Fourier transform in the x dimension and a new Bessel function integral transform (the PERL transform) in the y dimension. The inverse of the PERL transform provides a reconstruction algorithm for the y dimension of the spin density from the signal space. To date, the inverse transform has been computed numerically by a Bessel function expansion over its basis functions. This numerical solution used a finite sum to approximate an infinite summation and thus introduced a truncation error. This work analytically determines the basis functions for the PERL transform and incorporates them into the reconstruction algorithm. The improved algorithm is demonstrated by (1) direct comparison between the numerically and analytically computed basis functions, and (2) reconstruction of a known spin density. The new solution for the basis functions also lends proof of the system function for the PERL transform under specific conditions.

  10. Ion heating at the cyclotron resonance in plasmas magnetically confined in a toroidal octupole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures as high as 600 eV have been produced using rf wave heating at the ion cyclotron resonance frequency in a toroidal octupole magnetic field. Rf is coupled to the plasma with an externally driven ''fifth'' hoop which forms the inductive leg of an oscillator tank circuit. Power levels up to 1 MW at 1 to 3 MHz have been applied for periods up to 2 msec. Plasmas produced either by ECRH or by gun injection are simulated with a computer program in which known particle and energy production and loss mechanisms are used to predict the spatially averaged time behaviour of the plasma in the presence of the applied ion heating. The program can be used to calculate the consequences of the heating model in the presence of many cooling mechanisms which may each have a separate dependence on instantaneous plasma parameters. Experimental quantities compared to computer predictions include density, ion temperature, and loading of the hoop by the plasma, both resistive and reactive, and neutral reflux from the wall by electron and ion impact. Wave penetration to the resonance zone is good up to the highest densities available (6 x 10 12 cm -3 by gun injection) in good agreement with theory. Neutral reflux from the walls and the large charge exchange cooling which results is the dominant loss mechanism at the higher hoop voltages

  11. High-energy localized eigenstates in a Fabry-Perot graphene resonator in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalipaev, V. V.

    2012-06-01

    A semiclassical analysis of the high-energy eigenstates of Dirac fermions inside a graphene monolayer nanoribbon resonator of Fabry-Perot type in a magnetic field with zigzag boundary conditions is discussed. A semiclassical asymptotic method of construction of Maslov spectral series of energy spectrum and eigenfunctions, localized in an asymptotically small neighborhood of a periodic orbit, is developed for the graphene Dirac system. The isolated periodic orbit is confined between two flat boundaries. The analysis involves constructing a localized asymptotic solution to the Dirac system (electron-hole Gaussian beam). Then, the stability of a continuous family of periodic orbits (POs) confined between reflecting boundaries of the resonator is studied. The asymptotics of the eigenfunctions are constructed as a superposition of two Gaussian beams propagating in opposite directions between two reflecting points of the periodic orbit. The asymptotics of the energy spectrum are obtained by means of the generalized Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition only for stable POs. It provides two parts of semiclassical Maslov spectral series with positive and negative energies, for electrons and holes, correspondingly, with two different Hamiltonian dynamics and families of classical trajectories. The presence of electrostatic potential is vital as it makes a family of periodic orbit stable. For one subclass of lens-shaped periodic orbits, for a piecewise linear potential, localized eigenstates were computed numerically by the finite element method using COMSOL, and proved to be in very good agreement with the ones computed semiclassically.

  12. High magnetic field observation of the resonance donor states of S in InSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porowski, S.; Konczewicz, L.; Kowalski, J.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical transport measurements in InSb heavily doped with sulfur (n approximately 5x10 18 cm -3 ) are performed. At T = 4.2 K the Hall coefficient and transverse magnetoresistivity are measured as a function of pressure up to 2100 MPa and magnetic field up to 18 T. At the highest pressure, a decrease of the frequency and a decrease of the damping of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations are observed. These effects are explained as a result of the transfer of electrons from the conduction band to the resonance states of sulfur. At atmospheric pressure these states are 0.55 eV above the bottom of conduction band. In the lower pressure range, the experimental dependence of the effective Dingle temperature T*sub(D) = Tsub(D) + Tsub(i) can be explained by the model in which the scattering by ionized impurities and short-range potentials are taken into account. At the highest pressures a change of inhomogeneity of carrier concentration due to the transfer of electrons to the resonance states has to be considered. (author)

  13. Low field-low cost: Can low-field magnetic resonance systems replace high-field magnetic resonance systems in the diagnostic assessment of multiple sclerosis patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reith, W.; Sartor, K.

    2001-01-01

    As low-field MR imaging is becoming a widely used imaging technique, we aimed at a prospective assessment of differences in imaging quality between low- and high-field MR imaging in multiple sclerosis patients possibly interfering with diagnostic or therapeutic decision making. Twenty patients with clinically proven multiple sclerosis were examined with optimized imaging protocols in a 1.5- and a 0.23-T MR scanner within 48 h. Images were assessed independently by two neuroradiologists. No statistically significant interrater discrepancies were observed. A significantly lower number of white matter lesions could be identified in low-field MR imaging both on T1- and on T2-weighted images (T2: high field 700, low field 481; T1: high field 253, low field 177). A total of 114 enhancing lesions were discerned in the high-field MR imaging as opposed to 45 enhancing lesions in low-field MR imaging. Blood-brain barrier disruption was identified in 11 of 20 patients in the high-field MR imaging, but only in 4 of 20 patients in low-field MR imaging. Since a significantly lower lesion load is identified in low-field MR imaging than in high-field MR imaging, and blood-brain barrier disruption is frequently missed, caution must be exercised in interpreting a normal low-field MR imaging scan in a patient with clinical signs of multiple sclerosis and in interpreting a scan without enhancing lesions in a patient with known multiple sclerosis and clinical signs of exacerbation. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    he Earth has a large and complicated magnetic field, the major part of which is produced by a self-sustaining dynamo operating in the fluid outer core. Magnetic field observations provide one of the few tools for remote sensing the Earth’s deep interior, especially regarding the dynamics...... of the fluid flow at the top of the core. However, what is measured at or near the surface of the Earth is the superposition of the core field and fields caused by magnetized rocks in the Earth’s crust, by electric currents flowing in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and oceans, and by currents induced...... in the Earth by time-varying external fields. These sources have their specific characteristics in terms of spatial and temporal variations, and their proper separation, based on magnetic measurements, is a major challenge. Such a separation is a prerequisite for remote sensing by means of magnetic field...

  15. Resonant shallow donor magnetopolaron effect in a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Kadi.

    1993-11-01

    Resonant shallow donor magnetopolaron effect in a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot in high magnetic fields is investigated by the variational treatment. It is shown that both the cyclotron resonant frequency ω * c+ due to the 1s-p+ hydrogenic transition and the cyclotron resonant frequency ω * c- due to the 1s-p - hydrogenic transition increase with the decrease of the dot size. The cyclotron resonant frequency ω * c+ is always larger than the bulk LO-phonon frequency ω LO , while the cyclotron resonant frequency ω * c- is lower than ω LO for larger quantum dots (l 0 > 2.0.r 0 , r 0 is the polaron radius). The results also show that the Coulomb interaction effect on the resonant frequencies is significant. (author). 26 refs, 3 figs

  16. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  17. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of an open low-field magnetic resonance simulator for radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.H.; Laursen, F.J.; Logager, V.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior to computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy of brain tumours. In this study an open low-field MR-simulator is evaluated in order to eliminate the cost of and time spent on additional CT scanning. Materials and methods: Eleven...

  18. Low field magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: Reliability of qualitative evaluation of disc and muscle parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Joan Solgaard; Kjaer, Per; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the intra- and interobserver reliability in grading disc and muscle parameters using low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIAL AND METHODS: MRI scans of 100 subjects representative of the general population were evaluated blindly by two radiologists. Criteria......: Convincing reliability was found in the evaluation of disc- and muscle-related MRI variables....

  19. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  20. Estimation of transversely isotropic material properties from magnetic resonance elastography using the optimised virtual fields method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Renee; Kolipaka, Arunark; Nash, Martyn P; Young, Alistair A

    2018-03-12

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been used to estimate isotropic myocardial stiffness. However, anisotropic stiffness estimates may give insight into structural changes that occur in the myocardium as a result of pathologies such as diastolic heart failure. The virtual fields method (VFM) has been proposed for estimating material stiffness from image data. This study applied the optimised VFM to identify transversely isotropic material properties from both simulated harmonic displacements in a left ventricular (LV) model with a fibre field measured from histology as well as isotropic phantom MRE data. Two material model formulations were implemented, estimating either 3 or 5 material properties. The 3-parameter formulation writes the transversely isotropic constitutive relation in a way that dissociates the bulk modulus from other parameters. Accurate identification of transversely isotropic material properties in the LV model was shown to be dependent on the loading condition applied, amount of Gaussian noise in the signal, and frequency of excitation. Parameter sensitivity values showed that shear moduli are less sensitive to noise than the other parameters. This preliminary investigation showed the feasibility and limitations of using the VFM to identify transversely isotropic material properties from MRE images of a phantom as well as simulated harmonic displacements in an LV geometry. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  2. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in a low-field intraoperative scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulder, Michael; Azmi, Hooman; Biswal, Bharat

    2003-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used for preoperative planning and intraoperative surgical navigation. However, most experience to date has been with preoperative images acquired on high-field echoplanar MRI units. We explored the feasibility of acquiring fMRI of the motor cortex with a dedicated low-field intraoperative MRI (iMRI). Five healthy volunteers were scanned with the 0.12-tesla PoleStar N-10 iMRI (Odin Medical Technologies, Israel). A finger-tapping motor paradigm was performed with sequential scans, acquired alternately at rest and during activity. In addition, scans were obtained during breath holding alternating with normal breathing. The same paradigms were repeated using a 3-tesla MRI (Siemens Corp., Allandale, N.J., USA). Statistical analysis was performed offline using cross-correlation and cluster techniques. Data were resampled using the 'jackknife' process. The location, number of activated voxels and degrees of statistical significance between the two scanners were compared. With both the 0.12- and 3-tesla imagers, motor cortex activation was seen in all subjects to a significance of p < 0.02 or greater. No clustered pixels were seen outside the sensorimotor cortex. The resampled correlation coefficients were normally distributed, with a mean of 0.56 for both the 0.12- and 3-tesla scanners (standard deviations 0.11 and 0.08, respectively). The breath holding paradigm confirmed that the expected diffuse activation was seen on 0.12- and 3-tesla scans. Accurate fMRI with a low-field iMRI is feasible. Such data could be acquired immediately before or even during surgery. This would increase the utility of iMRI and allow for updated intraoperative functional imaging, free of the limitations of brain shift. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Usefulness of intraoperative ultra low-field magnetic resonance imaging in glioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Christian; Seifert, Volker; Hermann, Elvis; Franz, Kea; Gasser, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of a mobile, intraoperative 0.15-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner in glioma surgery. We analyzed our prospectively collected database of patients with glial tumors who underwent tumor resection with the use of an intraoperative ultra low-field MRI scanner (PoleStar N-20; Odin Medical Technologies, Yokneam, Israel/Medtronic, Louisville, CO). Sixty-three patients with World Health Organization Grade II to IV tumors were included in the study. All patients were subjected to postoperative 1.5-T imaging to confirm the extent of resection. Intraoperative image quality was sufficient for navigation and resection control in both high- and low-grade tumors. Primarily enhancing tumors were best detected on T1-weighted imaging, whereas fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences proved best for nonenhancing tumors. Intraoperative resection control led to further tumor resection in 12 (28.6%) of 42 patients with contrast-enhancing tumors and in 10 (47.6%) of 21 patients with noncontrast-enhancing tumors. In contrast-enhancing tumors, further resection led to an increased rate of complete tumor resection (71.2 versus 52.4%), and the surgical goal of gross total removal or subtotal resection was achieved in all cases (100.0%). In patients with noncontrast-enhancing tumors, the surgical goal was achieved in 19 (90.5%) of 21 cases, as intraoperative MRI findings were inconsistent with postoperative high-field imaging in 2 cases. The use of the PoleStar N-20 intraoperative ultra low-field MRI scanner helps to evaluate the extent of resection in glioma surgery. Further tumor resection after intraoperative scanning leads to an increased rate of complete tumor resection, especially in patients with contrast-enhancing tumors. However, in noncontrast- enhancing tumors, the intraoperative visualization of a complete resection seems less specific, when compared with postoperative 1.5-T MRI.

  4. Characterization of a dielectric phantom for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Qi, E-mail: Qi.Duan@nih.gov; Duyn, Jeff H.; Gudino, Natalia; Zwart, Jacco A. de; Gelderen, Peter van [Advanced MRI Section, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan [The Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: In this work, a generic recipe for an inexpensive and nontoxic phantom was developed within a range of biologically relevant dielectric properties from 150 MHz to 4.5 GHz. Methods: The recipe includes deionized water as the solvent, NaCl to primarily control conductivity, sucrose to primarily control permittivity, agar–agar to gel the solution and reduce heat diffusivity, and benzoic acid to preserve the gel. Two hundred and seventeen samples were prepared to cover the feasible range of NaCl and sucrose concentrations. Their dielectric properties were measured using a commercial dielectric probe and were fitted to a 3D polynomial to generate a recipe describing the properties as a function of NaCl concentration, sucrose concentration, and frequency. Results: Results indicated that the intuitive linear and independent relationships between NaCl and conductivity and between sucrose and permittivity are not valid. A generic polynomial recipe was developed to characterize the complex relationship between the solutes and the resulting dielectric values and has been made publicly available as a web application. In representative mixtures developed to mimic brain and muscle tissue, less than 2% difference was observed between the predicted and measured conductivity and permittivity values. Conclusions: It is expected that the recipe will be useful for generating dielectric phantoms for general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil development at high magnetic field strength, including coil safety evaluation as well as pulse sequence evaluation (including B{sub 1}{sup +} mapping, B{sub 1}{sup +} shimming, and selective excitation pulse design), and other non-MRI applications which require biologically equivalent dielectric properties.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  6. The diagnostic value of magnetic resonance urography using a balanced turbo field echo sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cifci, Egemen; Coban, Goekcen [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konya (Turkey); Cicek, Tufan; Goenuelalan, Umut [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Urology, Konya (Turkey)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of the study was to compare the inter-observer variability and the accuracy of magnetic resonance urography (MRU) using a thin sectional balanced-turbo field echo (B-TFE) sequence for detecting ureteral calculi and to determine the effect of additional factors (size, density and location of the calculus) on the sensitivity and specificity of the MRU. MRU and CT images were evaluated independently by two radiologists according to presence, density and localization of calculi. The degrees of inter-rater agreement for categorical items were evaluated by the Kappa coefficient. According to the 1st and 2nd observers, the sensitivity of MRU was 65.9 %, 71.8 % and the specificity of MRU was 95.9 %, 100 %, respectively. Inter-observer agreement was 84.6 % for stone detection. The larger size had a better effect on detectability (p < 0.05). Also, the higher density had a better impact on detectability (p < 0.05). Our study has shown that B-TFE MRU was useful to detect ureteral calculi. However, B-TFE MRU has low sensitivity and high specificity in comparison with CT images. MRU is a reasonable alternative imaging technique for follow-up periods of selective groups like patients with large urinary stones, children or pregnant patients when ionizing radiation is undesirable. (orig.)

  7. Assessment of Abdominal Fat Using High-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Anthropometric and Biochemical Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Radaideh, Ali; Tayyem, Reema; Al-Fayomi, Kholoud; Nimer, Nisreen; Malkawi, Amer; Al-Zu Bi, Rana; Agraib, Lana; Athamneh, Imad; Hijjawi, Nawal

    2016-12-01

    To measure the abdominal subcutaneous fat (SF) and visceral fat (VF) volumes using high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to investigate their association with selected anthropometric and biochemical parameters among obese and nonobese apparently healthy participants. A cross-sectional study was conducted by recruiting 167 healthy participants. Abdominal scans were acquired at 3T MRI, and the SF and VF were segmented and their volumes were calculated. Selected anthropometric and biochemical measurements were also determined. A significant difference (P abdominal fat volumes, leptin, resistin, adiponectin and waist circumference. Waist circumferences were measured by tape and MRI. Findings revealed that MRI-measured fat volumes were different between males and females and had a significant (P fat volumes were found to correlate moderately with interleukin-6 and weakly with cholesterol, serum triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein. Except for cholesterol, all measured biochemical variables and abdominal fat volumes in the current study were significantly associated with body mass index. All anthropometric and biochemical parameters showed weak-to-strong associations with the MRI-measured fat volumes. Abdominal fat distribution was different between males and females and their correlations with some lipid profiles were found to be sex dependent. These findings revealed that MRI can be used as an alternative tool for obesity assessment. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An intra-neural microstimulation system for ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Paul M; Watkins, Roger H; O'Neill, George C; Ackerley, Rochelle; Sanchez-Panchuelo, Rosa; McGlone, Francis; Brookes, Matthew J; Wessberg, Johan; Francis, Susan T

    2017-10-01

    Intra-neural microstimulation (INMS) is a technique that allows the precise delivery of low-current electrical pulses into human peripheral nerves. Single unit INMS can be used to stimulate individual afferent nerve fibres during microneurography. Combining this with neuroimaging allows the unique monitoring of central nervous system activation in response to unitary, controlled tactile input, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) providing exquisite spatial localisation of brain activity and magnetoencephalography (MEG) high temporal resolution. INMS systems suitable for use within electrophysiology laboratories have been available for many years. We describe an INMS system specifically designed to provide compatibility with both ultra-high field (7T) fMRI and MEG. Numerous technical and safety issues are addressed. The system is fully analogue, allowing for arbitrary frequency and amplitude INMS stimulation. Unitary recordings obtained within both the MRI and MEG screened-room environments are comparable with those obtained in 'clean' electrophysiology recording environments. Single unit INMS (current met. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of organic content in shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Kirkland, Catherine; Vogt, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) relaxometry is a non-invasive technique commonly used to assess hydrogen-bearing fluids in petroleum reservoir rocks. Longitudinal T1 and transverse T2 relaxation time measurements made using LF-NMR on conventional reservoir systems provides information on rock porosity, pore size distributions, and fluid types and saturations in some cases. Recent improvements in LF-SNMR instrument electronics have made it possible to apply these methods to assess highly viscous and even solid organic phases within reservoir rocks. T1 and T2 relaxation responses behave very differently in solids and liquids, therefore the relationship between these two modes of relaxation can be used to differentiate organic phases in rock samples or to characterize extracted organic materials. Using T1-T2 correlation data, organic components present in shales, such as kerogen and bitumen, can be examined in laboratory relaxometry measurements. In addition, implementation of a solid-echo pulse sequence to refocus some types of T2 relaxation during correlation measurements allows for improved resolution of solid phase photons. LF-NMR measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation time correlations were carried out on raw oil shale samples from resources around the world. These shales vary widely in mineralogy, total organic carbon (TOC) content and kerogen type. NMR results were correlcated with Leco TOC and geochemical data obtained from Rock-Eval. There is excellent correlation between NMR data and programmed pyrolysis parameters, particularly TOC and S2, and predictive capability is also good. To better understand the NMR response, the 2D NMR spectra were compared to similar NMR measurements made using high-field (HF) NMR equipment.

  10. Effects of CO2 injection and Kerogen Maturation on Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, M.; Livo, K.

    2017-12-01

    Low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is commonly used in petrophysical analysis of petroleum reservoir rocks. NMR experiments record the relaxation and polarization of in-situ hydrogen protons present in gaseous phases such as free-gas intervals and solution gas fluids, bulk fluid phases such as oil and aquifer intervals, and immovable fractions of kerogen and bitumen. Analysis of NMR relaxation spectra is performed to record how fluid composition, maturity, and viscosity change NMR experimental results. We present T1-T2 maps as thermal maturity of a water-saturated, sub-mature Woodford shale is increased at temperatures from 125 to 400 degrees Celsius. Experiments with applied fluid pressure in paraffinic mineral oil and DI water with varying fluid pH have been performed to mimic reservoir conditions in analysis of the relaxation of bulk fluid phases. We have recorded NMR spectra, T1-T2 maps, and fluid diffusion coefficients using a low-field (2 MHz) MagritekTM NMR. CO2 was injected at a pressure of 900 psi in an in house developed NMR pressure vessel made of torlon plastic. Observable 2D NMR shifts in immature kerogen formations as thermal maturity is increased show generation of lighter oils with increased maturity. CO2 injection leads to a decrease in bulk fluid relaxation time that is attributed to viscosity modification with gas presence. pH variation with increased CO2 presence were shown to not effect NMR spectra. From this, fluid properties have been shown to greatly affect NMR readings and must be taken into account for more accurate NMR reservoir characterization.

  11. Low-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging in the canine brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteve Ratsch, B.

    2000-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 0,23 T) of the canine brain was performed. Each scan plane was compared with corresponding anatomic sections. The best imaging planes to visualize various anatomic structures were determined. Low-field-strength MRI allowed the good definition of all relevant anatomic structures of the brain of 55 dogs with the exception of most cranial nerves. White matter could be best differentiated using proton-weighted images. On T1-weighted images the contrast of white matter was markedly limited in the living dogs in contrast to the examined canine specimens. The relative size of the lateral ventricle was defined as the ratio of the size of the lateral ventricle and the size of the half brain. The relative size of the lateral ventricle of Yorkshire Terrier dogs (5,35 %) was significantly (p 0,05) in the relative size of the lateral ventricles of healthy Yorkshire Terrier dogs (5,35 %) and Yorkshire Terrier dogs with neurological symptoms (7,06 %). Asymmetric lateral ventricles were very common in the examined dogs independently from body size, skull shape and neurological status. Occasionally the septum telencephali was not developed completely. 11 of 12 intracranial neoplasm could be delineated using low-field-strength MRI. Anatomic site, number of intracerebral lesions, limitation, shape and growth pattern, secondary brain lesions and development of peritumoral edema were described for each intracranial neoplasm as well as its signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images and contrast enhancement pattern. MRI did not allow an accurate diagnosis of tumor type, nevertheless skull shape (brachycephalic/dolichocephalic), anatomic site and number of intracerebral lesions facilitated a presumable diagnosis of the tumor type. (author)

  12. Influence of magnetic-field inhomogeneity on nonlinear magneto-optical resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustelny, S.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Rochester, S. M.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Budker, D.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, a sensitivity of the rate of relaxation of ground-state atomic coherences to magnetic-field inhomogeneities is studied. Such coherences give rise to many interesting phenomena in light-atom interactions, and their lifetimes are a limiting factor for achieving better sensitivity, resolution, or contrast in many applications. For atoms contained in a vapor cell, some of the coherence-relaxation mechanisms are related to magnetic-field inhomogeneities. We present a simple model describing relaxation due to such inhomogeneities in a buffer-gas-free antirelaxation-coated cell. A relation is given between relaxation rate and magnetic-field inhomogeneities including the dependence on cell size and atomic species. Experimental results, which confirm predictions of the model, are presented. Different regimes, in which the relaxation rate is equally sensitive to the gradients in any direction and in which it is insensitive to gradients transverse to the bias magnetic field, are predicted and demonstrated experimentally

  13. Cardiovascular fluid dynamics. Methods for flow and pressure field analysis from magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbers, T.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular blood flow is highly complex and incompletely understood. Blood flow patterns are expected to influence the opening and closing of normal and prosthetic heart valves, the efficiency of cardiac filling and ejection, and the resistance to thrombus formation within the heart. Conventional diagnostic techniques are poorly suited to the study of the three-dimensional (3D) blood flow patterns in the heart chambers and large vessels. Noninvasive methods have also been inadequate in studying intracardiac pressure differences, which are the driving force of flow and are critical in the evaluation of many cardiovascular abnormalities. This thesis focuses on the development of non-invasive methods for analysis of 3D cardiovascular blood flow. Simultaneous study of cardiovascular fluid dynamics allowed knowledge exchange across the two disciplines, facilitating the development process and broadening the applicability of the methods. A time-resolved 3D phase-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique was used to acquire the velocity vector field in a 3D volume encompassing the entire heart or a large vessel. Cardiovascular blood flow patterns were visualized by use of particle traces, which revealed, for instance, vortical flow patterns in the left atrium. By applying the Navier-Stokes equation along a user-defined line in the 3D velocity vector field, the relative pressure could be obtained as an excellent supplement to the flow pattern visualization. Using a delineation of the blood pool, the time-varying 3D relative pressure field in the human left ventricle was obtained from the velocity field by use of the pressure Poisson equation. A delineation of the heart muscle, a task that is almost impossible to perform on 3D MRI either automatically or manually, was also achieved by usage of particle traces. This segmentation allows automatic calculation of the 3D relative pressure field, as well as calculation of well-established parameters such as

  14. Cardiovascular fluid dynamics. Methods for flow and pressure field analysis from magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbers, T

    2001-05-01

    Cardiovascular blood flow is highly complex and incompletely understood. Blood flow patterns are expected to influence the opening and closing of normal and prosthetic heart valves, the efficiency of cardiac filling and ejection, and the resistance to thrombus formation within the heart. Conventional diagnostic techniques are poorly suited to the study of the three-dimensional (3D) blood flow patterns in the heart chambers and large vessels. Noninvasive methods have also been inadequate in studying intracardiac pressure differences, which are the driving force of flow and are critical in the evaluation of many cardiovascular abnormalities. This thesis focuses on the development of non-invasive methods for analysis of 3D cardiovascular blood flow. Simultaneous study of cardiovascular fluid dynamics allowed knowledge exchange across the two disciplines, facilitating the development process and broadening the applicability of the methods. A time-resolved 3D phase-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique was used to acquire the velocity vector field in a 3D volume encompassing the entire heart or a large vessel. Cardiovascular blood flow patterns were visualized by use of particle traces, which revealed, for instance, vortical flow patterns in the left atrium. By applying the Navier-Stokes equation along a user-defined line in the 3D velocity vector field, the relative pressure could be obtained as an excellent supplement to the flow pattern visualization. Using a delineation of the blood pool, the time-varying 3D relative pressure field in the human left ventricle was obtained from the velocity field by use of the pressure Poisson equation. A delineation of the heart muscle, a task that is almost impossible to perform on 3D MRI either automatically or manually, was also achieved by usage of particle traces. This segmentation allows automatic calculation of the 3D relative pressure field, as well as calculation of well-established parameters such as

  15. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  16. High magnetic field MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hideaki; Urata, Masami; Satoh, Kozo

    1990-01-01

    A high field superconducting magnet, 4-5 T in central magnetic field, is required for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) on 31 P, essential nuclei for energy metabolism of human body. This paper reviews superconducting magnets for high field MRSI systems. Examples of the cross-sectional image and the spectrum of living animals are shown in the paper. (author)

  17. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a special ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MR defecography helps assess pelvic ...

  18. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  19. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct for disease. It is ... of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  20. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  1. Toroidal modeling of plasma response and resonant magnetic perturbation field penetration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, Y.Q.; Kirk, A.; Sun, Y.; Cahyna, Pavel; Chapman, I.T.; Denner, P.; Fishpool, G.; Garofalo, A.M.; Harrison, J.R.; Nardon, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 12 (2012), s. 124013-124013 ISSN 0741-3335 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * resonant magnetic perturbation * neoclassical toroidal viscosity Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.369, year: 2012 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/54/12/124013/pdf/0741-3335_54_12_124013.pdf

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  5. Principles of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarik, V.; Tkac, I.; Srbecky, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe and explain the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the text is devoted to the phenomenon of magnetic resonance (the interaction of RF magnetic field with the set of magnetic moments in the homogeneous magnetic field) and to relaxation processes. Then, the creation of MR image is described (slice selection, phase and frequency encoding of spatial information). The basic and the most frequently used techniques are explained (spin echo, gradient echo). The way the repetition and echo times influence the image quality and contrast (T1 or T2 weighing) is described. The part with the technical description of the MR equipment is included in the review. The MR imagination examination are compared with X-ray computer tomography technique

  6. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Microbes and microbial activities in the Earth's subsurface play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in environmental applications such as remediation of contaminants in groundwater and oil fields biodegradation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface. It is critical to monitor and determine the fate and transportation of microorganisms in the subsurface during such applications. Recent geophysical studies demonstrate the potential of two innovative techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for monitoring microbial growth and activities in porous media. The SIP measures complex dielectric properties of porous media at low frequencies of exciting electric field, and NMR studies the porous structure of geologic media and characterizes fluids subsurface. In this laboratory study, we examined both SIP and NMR responses from bacterial growth suspension as well as suspension mixed with silica sands. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the SIP and NMR signals in the absence of biofilm formation or biomineralization. We used Zymomonas mobilis and Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1) for SIP and NMR measurements, respectively. The SIP measurements were collected over the frequency range of 0.1 - 1 kHz on Z. mobilis growth suspension and suspension saturated sands at different cell densities. SIP data show two distinct peaks in imaginary conductivity spectra, and both imaginary and real conductivities increased as microbial density increased. NMR data were collected using both CPMG pulse sequence and D-T2 mapping to determine the T2-distribution and diffusion properties on S. oneidensis suspension, pellets (live and dead), and suspension mixed with silica sands. NMR data show a decrease in the T2-distribution in S. oneidensis suspension saturated sands as microbial density increase. A

  7. 3.0-T high-field magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis: preliminary experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morakkabati-Spitz, N.; Gieseke, J.; Kuhl, C.; Lutterbey, G.; Falkenhausen, M. von; Traeber, F.; Zivanovic, O.; Schild, H.H.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if 3.0 T allows for clinically useful pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, i.e. if familiar image quality and tissue contrast can be achieved at 3.0 T as compared with at 1.5 T. Adapting a 1.5-T protocol to the 3.0-T environment is subject to a variety of factors. In order to reduce the number of potential variables, we chose two cornerstones: the 3.0-T sequence should have similar spatial resolution and acquisition time; furthermore, the contrast parameters repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE) were kept identical. Based on this modified 3.0-T T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence (TR/TE 2,705/80 ms; 0.7 x 1.04 x 4 mm measured voxel size; field of view 360 mm; 4.03-min scan time) we performed an intraindividual study on 19 patients with the 1.5-T sequence as the standard of reference. Two radiologists analyzed the examinations in consensus with regard to tissue contrast (visualization of zonal anatomy of the uterus and/or delineation of pathologic findings) rated on a three-point scale (3 is 3.0 T better; 2 is 3.0 T equal; 1 is 3.0 T worse than 1.5 T). In addition, the signal difference between muscle and bone marrow was measured as a marker for tissue contrast. The analysis of the image quality comprised the level of the artifacts (rated on a five-point scale: 1 is no artifacts; 5 is nondiagnostic study), the visual signal-to-noise ratio (rated on a three-point scale) and detail delineation. Only minor artifacts were observed at both 1.5 and 3.0 T; the difference was not statistically significant. The visual signal-to-noise ratio and the delineation of image details were rated equal for 1.5 and 3.0 T. With regard to image contrast, both qualitative analysis as well as quantitative analysis revealed comparable image contrast for the 1.5- and 3.0-T protocols. Pathological findings were seen equally well with both field strengths. Clinically diagnostic pelvic studies of high image quality can be obtained using a 3.0-T scanner

  8. Metamaterial-based transmit and receive system for whole-body magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Tim; Liebig, Thorsten; Mallow, Johannes; Bruns, Christian; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Svedja, Jan Taro; Chen, Zhichao; Rennings, Andreas; Scheich, Henning; Plaumann, Markus; Hauser, Marcus J B; Bernarding, Johannes; Erni, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high fields (UHF), such as 7 T, provides an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and has led to unprecedented high-resolution anatomic images and brain activation maps. Although a variety of radio frequency (RF) coil architectures have been developed for imaging at UHF conditions, they usually are specialized for small volumes of interests (VoI). So far, whole-body coil resonators are not available for commercial UHF human whole-body MRI systems. The goal of the present study was the development and validation of a transmit and receive system for large VoIs that operates at a 7 T human whole-body MRI system. A Metamaterial Ring Antenna System (MRAS) consisting of several ring antennas was developed, since it allows for the imaging of extended VoIs. Furthermore, the MRAS not only requires lower intensities of the irradiated RF energy, but also provides a more confined and focused injection of excitation energy on selected body parts. The MRAS consisted of several antennas with 50 cm inner diameter, 10 cm width and 0.5 cm depth. The position of the rings was freely adjustable. Conformal resonant right-/left-handed metamaterial was used for each ring antenna with two quadrature feeding ports for RF power. The system was successfully implemented and demonstrated with both a silicone oil and a water-NaCl-isopropanol phantom as well as in vivo by acquiring whole-body images of a crab-eating macaque. The potential for future neuroimaging applications was demonstrated by the acquired high-resolution anatomic images of the macaque's head. Phantom and in vivo measurements of crab-eating macaques provided high-resolution images with large VoIs up to 40 cm in xy-direction and 45 cm in z-direction. The results of this work demonstrate the feasibility of the MRAS system for UHF MRI as proof of principle. The MRAS shows a substantial potential for MR imaging of larger volumes at 7 T UHF. This new technique may provide new diagnostic potential

  9. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  11. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  12. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M.

    2012-01-01

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: ► An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. ► Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. ► Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. ► Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  13. Investigation of local fields in different barium ferrite sublattices by means of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utrecht, R.; Hankiewicz, J.

    1995-01-01

    The local fields on 57 Fe nuclei in ferrite (BaFe 12 O 19 ) polycrystals have been investigated by means of spin echo amplitudes measurements at 4.2 and 77 K. The magnetic moment orientation and local field intensity have been determined for five different ferrite sublattices

  14. Characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging with partial flip angle and gradient field echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tatsumi; Uto, Tatsurou; Okafuji, Tatsumasa; Ookusa, Akihiko; Oonishi, Takuya; Mabuchi, Nobuhisa; Fujii, Kouichi; Yoshioka, Hiroyasu; Ishida, Osamu

    1988-01-01

    Characteristics of a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging pulse sequence with short repetition time (Tr), short echo time (Te), partial flip angle and gradient field echo, at 0.5 T, were studied. A series of sagittal images of the cerebrospinal region was obtained with varied Tr, Te and flip angle, signal intensities were measured by means of a region of interest (ROI) function, and optimal parameters to achieve maximum tissue contrast were found. Of the parameters flip angle had the greatest effect on tissue contrast. Flip angles less than 20 or more than 60 degrees were necessary to discriminate between spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid. So called MR myelography was obtained with the flip angle of 15 degrees. Opposed and inphase images were obtained at the Te levels of 21 and 28 ms, respectively. Likewise, a series of transverse images of the abdomen with short Tr, short Te and varied flip angles was obtained in a breath-holding interval, and signal intensities of ROIs were measured. Maximum intensities of the liver, the spleen and perirenal fat were obtained at the flip angles of 40, 30 and 60 degrees, respectively. Although maximum intensity was found at the flip angle of 30 degrees for both of the renal cortex and medulla, the maximum contrast between the two tissues was obtained at the flip angles of 50-60 degrees. The image contrast obtained by these pulse sequences was also theoretically predictable, and so it is thought possible that flip angle, Tr and Te are manipulated to yield a desired contrast. (author)

  15. Modeling of electron cyclotron resonance acceleration in a stationary inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeri D. Dougar-Jabon

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the cyclotron autoresonance acceleration of electrons in a stationary inhomogeneous magnetic field is studied. The trajectory and energy of electrons are found through a numerical solution of the relativistic Newton-Lorentz equation by a finite difference method. The electrons move along a TE_{112} cylinder cavity in a steady-state magnetic field whose axis coincides with the cavity axis. The magnetic field profile is such that it keeps the phase difference between the electric microwave field and the electron velocity vector within the acceleration phase band. The microwaves amplitude of 6  kV/cm is used for numerical calculations. It is shown that an electron with an initial longitudinal energy of 8 keV can be accelerated up to 260 keV by 2.45 GHz microwaves at a distance of 17 cm.

  16. High- and ultrahigh-field magnetic resonance imaging of na?ve, injured and scarred vocal fold mucosae in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kishimoto, Ayami Ohno; Kishimoto, Yo; Young, David L.; Zhang, Jinjin; Rowland, Ian J.; Welham, Nathan V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Subepithelial changes to the vocal fold mucosa, such as fibrosis, are difficult to identify using visual assessment of the tissue surface. Moreover, without suspicion of neoplasm, mucosal biopsy is not a viable clinical option, as it carries its own risk of iatrogenic injury and scar formation. Given these challenges, we assessed the ability of high- (4.7?T) and ultrahigh-field (9.4?T) magnetic resonance imaging to resolve key vocal fold subepithelial tissue structures in the rat, an...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Ewald; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Windischberger, Christian; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  18. New Methods of Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Application to Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    vectorially to the encoding field. This is explicitly corrected for when calculating the encoding matrix. Other external fields and magnet field drift (~-1/ 2G ...simulated reconstruction with the same parameters as Fig. 3c. Fig. 3f and 3g show the experimental and simulated single coil image from the phantom...acquisition times (1), including a mobile MRI system developed for outdoor imaging of small tree branches (2), but these scanners lack a bore size suitable for

  19. Test particle calculations for the Texas experimental tokamak with resonant magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.; McCool, S.C.; Zheng, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a simple test particle model that attempts to describe particle motion in the presence of intrinsic electrostatic fluctuations in a prescribed tokamak magnetic field. In particular, magnetic field configurations that include externally produced magnetic islands and stochastic regions are considered. The resulting test particle transport is compared with the predictions of analytic models and with the experimentally measured electron heat and particle transport on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). Agreement between the test particle results and applicable analytic theories is found. However, there is only partial agreement with the experimental results, and possible reasons for the discrepancies are explored. Good agreement is found between predicted and measured spatially asymmetric particle distributions. The particle collection efficiency of an apertured limiter inside a magnetic island (an intra-island pump limiter) is discussed

  20. Monitoring of organic contaminants in sediments using low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Rupert, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    The effective monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. Recent geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity, complex conductivity, and ground penetrating radar have been successfully applied to characterize organic contaminants in the subsurface and to monitor remediation process both in laboratory and in field. Low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical tool sensitive to the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of hydrogen-bearing fluids in geological materials and shows promise as a novel method for monitoring contaminant remediation. This laboratory research focuses on measurements on synthetic samples to determine the sensitivity of NMR to the presence of organic contaminants and improve understanding of relationships between NMR observables, hydrological properties of the sediments, and amount and state of contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) has been selected as a representative organic contaminant. Three types of porous media (pure silica sands, montmorillonite clay, and various sand-clay mixtures with different sand/clay ratios) were prepared as synthetic sediments. NMR relaxation time (T2) and diffusion-relaxation (D - T2) correlation measurements were performed in each sediment saturated with water and toluene mixed fluid at assorted concentrations (0% toluene and 100% water, 1% toluene and 99% water, 5% toluene and 95% water, 25% toluene and 75% water, and 100% toluene and 0% water) to 1) understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR responses in each fluid mixture, 2) investigate the role of clay content on T2 relaxation of each fluid, 3) quantify the amount hydrocarbons in the presence of water in each sediment, and 4) resolve hydrocarbons from water in D - T2 map. Relationships between the compositions of porous media, hydrocarbon concentration, and hydraulic

  1. Quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility artifacts caused by neurosurgical biomaterials. Comparison of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 tesla magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hideki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Sasaki, Makoto; Konno, Hiromu; Kuzu, Yasutaka; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Ogawa, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an important diagnostic tool for neurosurgical diseases but susceptibility artifacts caused by biomaterial instrumentation frequently causes difficulty in visualizing postoperative changes. The susceptibility artifacts caused by neurosurgical biomaterials were compared quantitatively by 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Tesla MR imaging. MR imaging of uniform size and shape of pieces ceramic (zirconia), pure titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt-based alloy was performed at 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Tesla. A linear region of interest was defined across the center of the biomaterial in the transverse direction, and the susceptibility artifact diameter was calculated. Susceptibility artifacts developed around all biomaterials at all magnetic field strengths. The artifact diameters caused by pure titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt-based alloy increased in the order of 0.5, 1.5, to 3.0 Tesla magnetic fields. The artifact diameter of ceramic was not influenced by magnetic field strength, and was the smallest of all biomaterials at all magnetic field strengths. The artifacts caused by biomaterials except ceramic increase with the magnetic field strength. Ceramic instrumentation will minimize artifacts in all magnetic fields. (author)

  2. Ferromagnetic resonance in a single crystal of iron borate and magnetic field tuning of hybrid oscillations in a composite structure with a dielectric: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, M. A.; Zavislyak, I. V.; Chumak, H. L.; Strugatsky, M. B.; Yagupov, S. V.; Srinivasan, G.

    2015-01-01

    The high-frequency properties of a composite resonator comprised single crystal iron borate (FeBO 3 ), a canted antiferromagnet with a weak ferromagnetic moment, and a polycrystalline dielectric were investigated at 9–10 GHz. Ferromagnetic resonance in this frequency range was observed in FeBO 3 for bias magnetic fields of ∼250 Oe. In the composite resonator, the magnetic mode in iron borate and dielectric mode are found to hybridize strongly. It is shown that the hybrid mode can be tuned with a static magnetic field. Our studies indicate that coupling between the magnetic mode and the dielectric resonance can be altered from maximum hybridization to a minimum by adjusting the position of resonator inside the waveguide. Magnetic field tuning of the resonance frequency by a maximum of 145 MHz and a change in the transmitted microwave power by as much as 16 dB have been observed for a bias field of 250 Oe. A model is discussed for the magnetic field tuning of the composite resonator and theoretical estimates are in reasonable agreement with the data. The composite resonator with a weak ferromagnet and a dielectric is of interest for application in frequency agile devices with electronically tunable electrodynamic characteristics for the mm and sub-mm wave bands

  3. Towards Motion-Insensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Dynamic Field Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads

    motion during scanning and update the MRI scanner in real-time such that the imaging volume follows the head motion (prospective motion correction). In this thesis, prospective motion correction is presented where head motion is determined from signals measured with an electroencephalography (EEG) cap......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is frequently used for both clinical diagnosis and brain research. This is due to the great versatility of the technique and the excellent ability to distinguish different types of soft tissue. The image quality is, however, heavily degraded when...

  4. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  5. A review of the safety implications of magnetic resonance imaging at field strengths of 3 Tesla and above

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crook, Neil; Robinson, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Diagnostic imaging is being driven by technological developments particularly so in the field of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Electromagnetic fields used to produce images are becoming much stronger and switched more rapidly and it is essential that safety advice remains appropriate and current. Using a systematic methodology, this review aims to identify the clinical safety implications in performing MRI at field strengths of 3 Tesla (T) and above and determine whether the current clinical safety guidelines are appropriate. Method: References were sourced from The Cochrane Library, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination Science Direct, PubMed and Google Scholar. Related websites searched included The British Institute of Radiology, Society of Radiographers, Royal College of Radiologists, The Institution of Engineering and Technology, IMRSER (Institute for Magnetic Resonance Safety, Education, and Research), MagNet (NHS PASA). References supplied in retrieved papers were also checked for potential relevance. The use of consistent search terminology and inclusion and exclusion criteria ensured quality and provided rigour to conclusions drawn. Conclusion: According to the literature retrieved, the current body of knowledge has allowed safety guidelines to be established for patient safety and these are both appropriate and valid at field strengths of 3 T.

  6. Magnetic resonance and porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.; Strange, J.

    1998-01-01

    Mention the words magnetic resonance to your medical advisor and he or she will immediately think of a multi-million pound scanner that peers deep into the brain. A chemist, on the other hand, will imagine a machine that costs several hundred thousand pounds and produces high-resolution spectra for chemical analysis. Food technologists will probably think of a bench-top instrument for determining moisture content, while an oil prospector will envisage a device that can be operated several kilometres down an oil well. To a physicist the term is more likely to conjure up a mental picture of nuclear spins precessing in a magnetic field. These examples illustrate the diverse aspects of a phenomenon discovered by physicists over 50 years ago. Electron spin resonance was first discovered by Russian scientists, and nuclear magnetic resonance was discovered in the US shortly afterwards by Ed Purcell at Harvard University and Felix Bloch at Stanford University. Today, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used technique. Modern NMR machines are making it possible to probe microstructure and molecular movement in materials as diverse as polymers, cements, rocks, soil and foods. NMR allows the distribution of different components in a material to be determined with a resolution approaching 1μm, although the signal can be sensitive to even smaller lengthscales. In this article the authors describe how physicists are still developing magnetic resonance to exploit a range of new applications. (UK)

  7. Self-consistent modeling of induced magnetic field in Titan's atmosphere accounting for the generation of Schumann resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béghin, Christian

    2015-02-01

    This model is worked out in the frame of physical mechanisms proposed in previous studies accounting for the generation and the observation of an atypical Schumann Resonance (SR) during the descent of the Huygens Probe in the Titan's atmosphere on 14 January 2005. While Titan is staying inside the subsonic co-rotating magnetosphere of Saturn, a secondary magnetic field carrying an Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) modulation is shown to be generated through ion-acoustic instabilities of the Pedersen current sheets induced at the interface region between the impacting magnetospheric plasma and Titan's ionosphere. The stronger induced magnetic field components are focused within field-aligned arcs-like structures hanging down the current sheets, with minimum amplitude of about 0.3 nT throughout the ramside hemisphere from the ionopause down to the Moon surface, including the icy crust and its interface with a conductive water ocean. The deep penetration of the modulated magnetic field in the atmosphere is thought to be allowed thanks to the force balance between the average temporal variations of thermal and magnetic pressures within the field-aligned arcs. However, there is a first cause of diffusion of the ELF magnetic components, probably due to feeding one, or eventually several SR eigenmodes. A second leakage source is ascribed to a system of eddy-Foucault currents assumed to be induced through the buried water ocean. The amplitude spectrum distribution of the induced ELF magnetic field components inside the SR cavity is found fully consistent with the measurements of the Huygens wave-field strength. Waiting for expected future in-situ exploration of Titan's lower atmosphere and the surface, the Huygens data are the only experimental means available to date for constraining the proposed model.

  8. A novel target-field method for finite-length magnetic resonance shim coils: I. Zonal shims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, Lawrence K.; Crozier, Stuart

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the design of genuinely finite-length shim and gradient coils, intended for use in magnetic resonance imaging equipment. A cylindrical target region is located asymmetrically, at an arbitrary position within a coil of finite length. A desired target field is specified on the surface of that region, and a method is given that enables winding patterns on the surface of the coil to be designed, to produce the desired field at the inner target region. The method uses a minimization technique combined with regularization, to find the current density on the surface of the coil. The method is illustrated for linear, quadratic and cubic magnetic target fields located asymmetrically within a finite-length coil. (author)

  9. Suppression of large edge localized modes with edge resonant magnetic fields in high confinement DIII-D plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.R.; Becoulet, M.; Evans, T.E.; Osborne, T.H.; Groebner, R.J.; Jackson, G.L.; Haye, R.J. La; Schaffer, M.J.; West, W.P.; Moyer, R.A.; Rhodes, T.L.; Rudakov, D.L.; Watkins, J.G.; Boedo, J.A.; Doyle, E.J.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Groth, M.; Lasnier, C.J.; Finken, K.H.; Harris, J.H.; Pretty, D.G.; Masuzaki, S.; Ohyabu, N.; Reimerdes, H.; Wade, M.R.

    2005-01-01

    Large divertor heat pulses due to Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) have been eliminated reproducibly in DIII-D with small dc currents driven in a simple magnetic perturbation coil. The current required to eliminate all but a few isolated Type-I ELMs, during a coil pulse, is less than 0.4% of plasma current. Modelling shows that the perturbation fields resonate with plasma flux surfaces across most of the pedestal region (0.9 ≤ N ≤ 1.0), when q95 = 3.7±0.2 creating small remnant magnetic islands surrounded by weakly stochastic field lines. The stored energy, N , H-mode quality factor and global energy confinement time are unaltered by the magnetic perturbation. At high collisionality (ν* ∼0.5-1), there is no obvious effect of the perturbation on the edge profiles and yet ELMs are suppressed, nearly completely, for up to 9τ E . At low collisionality (ν* <0.1), there is a density pump-out and complete ELM suppression, reminiscent of the DIIID QH- mode. Other differences, specifically in the resonance condition and the magnetic fluctuations, suggest that different mechanisms are at play in the different collisionality regimes. In addition to a description and interpretation of the DIIID data, the application of this method to ELM control on other machines, such as JET and ITER will be discussed. (author)

  10. Beginnings and early history of the International Conferences on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems: development of the basic ideas in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardetzky, Oleg

    2010-09-01

    The early history of the principal meeting in the field of biological NMR spectroscopy, the International Conference on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems (ICMRBS), is presented from the perspective of one of the founders. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system

  12. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  13. Electric field-induced ferromagnetic resonance in a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction under dc bias voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Shun; Gajek, Martin; Worledge, D. C.; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2014-12-01

    We measure homodyne-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) induced by the electric-field effect in a CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with perpendicular magnetic easy axis under dc bias voltages up to 0.1 V. From the bias dependence of the resonant frequency, we find that the first order perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is modulated by the applied electric field, whereas the second order component is virtually independent of the electric field. The lineshapes of the FMR spectra are bias dependent, which are explained by the combination of electric-field effect and reflection of the bias voltage from the MTJ.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging: hazard, risk and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep; Suri, S.; Singh, P.

    2001-01-01

    The hazard and risk associated with magnetic resonance imaging is a matter of concern. In 1982, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA issued guidelines to Hospital's Investigational Review Board (IRBs) in 'Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic Exposure Risks for Trials of Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)'. In 1997, the Berufsgenossenschaft (BG), professional association for precision engineering and electronics of Germany, in their preliminary proposal for safety limits extended their concerns on static magnetic field. Owing to both time varying and static magnetic fields applied in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) this became of immediate concern to user community to assess the potential hazard and risk associated with the NMR system

  15. Enhancement of Ar sup 8 sup + ion beam intensity from RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source by optimizing the magnetic field configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Higurashi, Y; Kidera, M; Kase, M; Yano, Y; Aihara, T

    2003-01-01

    We successfully produced a 1.55 emA Ar sup 8 sup + ion beam using the RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at a microwave power of 700 W. To produce such an intense beam, we optimized the minimum magnetic field of mirror magnetic field and plasma electrode position. (author)

  16. Measuring aortic pulse wave velocity using high-field cardiovascular magnetic resonance: comparison of techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer Jean M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of arterial stiffness is increasingly used for evaluating patients with different cardiovascular diseases as the mechanical properties of major arteries are often altered. Aortic stiffness can be noninvasively estimated by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV. Several methods have been proposed for measuring PWV using velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, including transit-time (TT, flow-area (QA, and cross-correlation (XC methods. However, assessment and comparison of these techniques at high field strength has not yet been performed. In this work, the TT, QA, and XC techniques were clinically tested at 3 Tesla and compared to each other. Methods Fifty cardiovascular patients and six volunteers were scanned to acquire the necessary images. The six volunteer scans were performed twice to test inter-scan reproducibility. Patient images were analyzed using the TT, XC, and QA methods to determine PWV. Two observers analyzed the images to determine inter-observer and intra-observer variabilities. The PWV measurements by the three methods were compared to each other to test inter-method variability. To illustrate the importance of PWV using CMR, the degree of aortic stiffness was assessed using PWV and related to LV dysfunction in five patients with diastolic heart failure patients and five matched volunteers. Results The inter-observer and intra-observer variability results showed no bias between the different techniques. The TT and XC results were more reproducible than the QA; the mean (SD inter-observer/intra-observer PWV differences were -0.12(1.3/-0.04(0.4 for TT, 0.2(1.3/0.09(0.9 for XC, and 0.6(1.6/0.2(1.4 m/s for QA methods, respectively. The correlation coefficients (r for the inter-observer/intra-observer comparisons were 0.94/0.99, 0.88/0.94, and 0.83/0.92 for the TT, XC, and QA methods, respectively. The inter-scan reproducibility results showed low variability between the repeated

  17. Metamaterial Combining Electric- and Magnetic-Dipole-Based Configurations for Unique Dual-Band Signal Enhancement in Ultrahigh-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rita; Webb, Andrew

    2017-10-11

    Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI and MRS) are both widely used techniques in medical diagnostics and research. One of the major thrusts in recent years has been the introduction of ultrahigh-field magnets in order to boost the sensitivity. Several MRI studies have examined further potential improvements in sensitivity using metamaterials, focusing on single frequency applications. However, metamaterials have yet to reach a level that is practical for routine MRI use. In this work, we explore a new metamaterial implementation for MRI, a dual-nuclei resonant structure, which can be used for both proton and heteronuclear magnetic resonance. Our approach combines two configurations, one based on a set of electric dipoles for the low frequency band, and the second based on a set of magnetic dipoles for the high frequency band. We focus on the implementation of a dual-nuclei metamaterial for phosphorus and proton imaging and spectroscopy at an ultrahigh-field strength of 7 T. In vivo scans using this flexible and compact structure show that it locally enhances both the phosphorus and proton transmit and receive sensitivities.

  18. Dynamic ELM and divertor control using resonant toroidal multi-mode magnetic fields in DIII-D and EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youwen

    2017-10-01

    A rotating n = 2 Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP) field combined with a stationary n = 3 RMP field has validated predictions that access to ELM suppression can be improved, while divertor heat and particle flux can also be dynamically controlled in DIII-D. Recent observations in the EAST tokamak indicate that edge magnetic topology changes, due to nonlinear plasma response to magnetic perturbations, play a critical role in accessing ELM suppression. MARS-F code MHD simulations, which include the plasma response to the RMP, indicate the nonlinear transition to ELM suppression is optimized by configuring the RMP coils to drive maximal edge stochasticity. Consequently, mixed toroidal multi-mode RMP fields, which produce more densely packed islands over a range of additional rational surfaces, improve access to ELM suppression, and further spread heat loading on the divertor. Beneficial effects of this multi-harmonic spectrum on ELM suppression have been validated in DIII-D. Here, the threshold current required for ELM suppression with a mixed n spectrum, where part of the n = 3 RMP field is replaced by an n = 2 field, is smaller than the case with pure n = 3 field. An important further benefit of this multi-mode approach is that significant changes of 3D particle flux footprint profiles on the divertor are found in the experiment during the application of a rotating n = 2 RMP field superimposed on a static n = 3 RMP field. This result was predicted by modeling studies of the edge magnetic field structure using the TOP2D code which takes into account plasma response from MARS-F code. These results expand physics understanding and potential effectiveness of the technique for reliably controlling ELMs and divertor power/particle loading distributions in future burning plasma devices such as ITER. Work supported by USDOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and NNSF of China under 11475224.

  19. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole; Liu, Kecheng; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Mark A

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance is an exceptionally powerful and versatile measurement technique. The basic structure of a magnetic resonance experiment has remained largely unchanged for almost 50 years, being mainly restricted to the qualitative probing of only a limited set of the properties that can in principle be accessed by this technique. Here we introduce an approach to data acquisition, post-processing and visualization--which we term 'magnetic resonance fingerprinting' (MRF)--that permits the simultaneous non-invasive quantification of multiple important properties of a material or tissue. MRF thus provides an alternative way to quantitatively detect and analyse complex changes that can represent physical alterations of a substance or early indicators of disease. MRF can also be used to identify the presence of a specific target material or tissue, which will increase the sensitivity, specificity and speed of a magnetic resonance study, and potentially lead to new diagnostic testing methodologies. When paired with an appropriate pattern-recognition algorithm, MRF inherently suppresses measurement errors and can thus improve measurement accuracy.

  20. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  2. Electric field gradient in FeTiO3 by nuclear magnetic resonance and ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházka, V; Stěpánková, H; Chlan, V; Tuček, J; Cuda, J; Kouřil, K; Filip, J; Zbořil, R

    2011-05-25

    Temperature dependence of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of (47)Ti and (49)Ti in polycrystalline ilmenite FeTiO(3) was measured in the range from 5 to 300 K under an external magnetic field of 9.401 T. NMR spectra collected between 300 and 77 K exhibit a resolved quadrupole splitting. The electric field gradient (EFG) tensor was evaluated for Ti nuclei and the ratio of (47)Ti and (49)Ti nuclear quadrupole moments was refined during the fitting procedure. Below 77 K, the fine structure of quadrupole splitting disappears due to the enormous increase of anisotropy. As a counterpart, ab initio calculations were performed using full potential augmented plane waves + local orbitals. The calculated EFG tensors for Ti and Fe were compared to the experimental ones evaluated from NMR and the Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments.

  3. Wave propagation to lower hybrid resonance in a magnetic field with shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Kunizo; Ohasa, Kazumi; Matsuura, Kiyokata

    1977-01-01

    The ray trajectories of electrostatic wave to the lower hybrid (LH) resonance on the meridian plane of torus is significantly modified as compared with that without shear. The ray starting from the vicinity of the plasma surface rotates spirally around the magnetic axis. The ray reaching the layer S=0, where the perpendicular dielectric constant vanishes, is not terminated but reflected along the second characteristic curve towards another point on the layer S=0. After being reflected successively, rays finally converge on the node point of the layer S=0 on the equatorial plane. In the absence of the layer S=0 the rays infinitely reflect between the cutoff layers near the center and surface of plasma and cover all the region between the layers. (auth.)

  4. Dynamical cancellation of pulse-induced transients in a metallic shielded room for ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Dong, Hui; Clarke, John

    2015-01-01

    Pulse-induced transients such as eddy currents can cause problems in measurement techniques where a signal is acquired after an applied preparatory pulse. In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging, performed in magnetic fields typically of the order of 100 μT, the signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced in part by prepolarizing the proton spins with a pulse of much larger magnetic field and in part by detecting the signal with a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). The pulse turn-off, however, can induce large eddy currents in the shielded room, producing an inhomogeneous magnetic-field transient that both seriously distorts the spin dynamics and exceeds the range of the SQUID readout. It is essential to reduce this transient substantially before image acquisition. We introduce dynamical cancellation (DynaCan), a technique in which a precisely designed current waveform is applied to a separate coil during the later part and turn off of the polarizing pulse. This waveform, which bears no resemblance to the polarizing pulse, is designed to drive the eddy currents to zero at the precise moment that the polarizing field becomes zero. We present the theory used to optimize the waveform using a detailed computational model with corrections from measured magnetic-field transients. SQUID-based measurements with DynaCan demonstrate a cancellation of 99%. Dynamical cancellation has the great advantage that, for a given system, the cancellation accuracy can be optimized in software. This technique can be applied to both metal and high-permeability alloy shielded rooms, and even to transients other than eddy currents

  5. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT. Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Min; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Jung-in; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jin Ho; Jeon, Seung Hyuck; Choi, Noorie

    2018-01-01

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm 2 , respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field. (orig.) [de

  6. Formation of a three-dimensional plasma boundary after decay of the plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, O.; Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lasnier, C. L.; Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R. A.; Reimerdes, H.; the DIII-D Team

    2014-01-01

    First time experimental evidence is presented for a direct link between the decay of a n = 3 plasma response and the formation of a three-dimensional (3D) plasma boundary. We inspect a lower single-null L-mode plasma which first reacts at sufficiently high rotation with an ideal resonant screening response to an external toroidal mode number n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbation field. Decay of this response due to reduced bulk plasma rotation changes the plasma state considerably. Signatures such as density pump out and a spin up of the edge rotation—which are usually connected to formation of a stochastic boundary—are detected. Coincident, striation of the divertor single ionized carbon emission and a 3D emission structure in double ionized carbon at the separatrix is seen. The striated C II pattern follows in this stage the perturbed magnetic footprint modelled without a plasma response (vacuum approach). This provides for the first time substantial experimental evidence, that a 3D plasma boundary with direct impact on the divertor particle flux pattern is formed as soon as the internal plasma response decays. The resulting divertor structure follows the vacuum modelled magnetic field topology. However, the inward extension of the perturbed boundary layer can still not directly be determined from these measurements.

  7. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  11. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  12. Field experiment provides ground truth for surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R.; Grunewald, E.; Irons, T.; Dlubac, K.; Song, Y.; Bachman, H.N.; Grau, B.; Walsh, D.; Abraham, J.D.; Cannia, J.

    2012-01-01

    The need for sustainable management of fresh water resources is one of the great challenges of the 21st century. Since most of the planet's liquid fresh water exists as groundwater, it is essential to develop non-invasive geophysical techniques to characterize groundwater aquifers. A field experiment was conducted in the High Plains Aquifer, central United States, to explore the mechanisms governing the non-invasive Surface NMR (SNMR) technology. We acquired both SNMR data and logging NMR data at a field site, along with lithology information from drill cuttings. This allowed us to directly compare the NMR relaxation parameter measured during logging,T2, to the relaxation parameter T2* measured using the SNMR method. The latter can be affected by inhomogeneity in the magnetic field, thus obscuring the link between the NMR relaxation parameter and the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic material. When the logging T2data were transformed to pseudo-T2* data, by accounting for inhomogeneity in the magnetic field and instrument dead time, we found good agreement with T2* obtained from the SNMR measurement. These results, combined with the additional information about lithology at the site, allowed us to delineate the physical mechanisms governing the SNMR measurement. Such understanding is a critical step in developing SNMR as a reliable geophysical method for the assessment of groundwater resources.

  13. Magnetic resonance in zero-field: construction of a spectrometer, evaluation of a method for structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llor, M.

    1987-01-01

    The method known as Nuclear Resonance in the zero-field, applied to the spectral analysis of powders, is discussed. In the method, the anisotropy due to the preferential direction of the magnetic field is suppressed, but a high sensitivity is keeped. For powders spectra, the process allows the obtention resolutions, of dipolar and quadrupolar couplings, in the range of those only obtained on monocrystals under strong fields. By suitable magnetic field oscillations, and by the effect of the high field on the RMN signal, the transient evolutions of the spins are obtained. Concerning the absence of a preferred direction in the zero-field, a powder or the monocrystals show nearly the same behavior. In such conditions, a much more interesting spectra than those from a powder in a strong field, can be obtained. The RMN spectrometer is described. The possibilities, the experimental and theoretical limits of the proposed method, are analyzed. Applications on dipolar (proton and phosphor) and quadrupolar (deuterium) interactions, on hydrated salts and on cyclophasphazenes are carried out [fr

  14. Orthodontic springs and auxiliary appliances: assessment of magnetic field interactions associated with 1.5 T and 3 T magnetic resonance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemper, J.; Priest, A.N.; Adam, G.; Schulze, D.; Kahl-Nieke, B.; Klocke, A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate magnetic field interactions at 1.5 and 3 T for 20 orthodontic devices used for fixed orthodontic therapy. Twenty springs and auxiliary parts made from varying ferromagnetic alloys were tested for magnetic field interactions in the static magnetic field at 1.5 and 3 T. Magnetic translational force F z (in millinewtons) was evaluated by determining the deflection angle β [American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standard test method)]. Magnetic-field-induced rotational force F rot was qualitatively determined using a five-point scale. β was found to be >45 in 13(15) devices at 1.5(3) T and translational force F z exceeded gravitational force F g on the particular object [F z 10.17-261.4 mN (10.72-566.4 mN) at 1.5(3) T]. F z was found to be up to 24.1(47.5)-fold higher than F g at 1.5(3) T. Corresponding to this, F rot on the objects was shown to be high at both field strengths (≥ +3). Three objects (at 1.5 T) and one object (at 3 T) showed deflection angles rot was found to be ≥ +3 at both field strengths. For the remaining objects, β was below 45 and torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. Of 20 objects investigated for magnetic field interactions at 1.5(3) T, 13(15) were unsafe in magnetic resonance (MR), based on the ASTM criteria of F z . The implications of these results for orthodontic patients undergoing MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Orthodontic springs and auxiliary appliances: assessment of magnetic field interactions associated with 1.5 T and 3 T magnetic resonance systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemper, J.; Priest, A.N.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Clinic of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Schulze, D. [University Hospital of Freiburg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Kahl-Nieke, B.; Klocke, A. [University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Orthodontics, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate magnetic field interactions at 1.5 and 3 T for 20 orthodontic devices used for fixed orthodontic therapy. Twenty springs and auxiliary parts made from varying ferromagnetic alloys were tested for magnetic field interactions in the static magnetic field at 1.5 and 3 T. Magnetic translational force F{sub z} (in millinewtons) was evaluated by determining the deflection angle {beta} [American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standard test method)]. Magnetic-field-induced rotational force F{sub rot} was qualitatively determined using a five-point scale. {beta} was found to be >45 in 13(15) devices at 1.5(3) T and translational force F{sub z} exceeded gravitational force F{sub g} on the particular object [F{sub z} 10.17-261.4 mN (10.72-566.4 mN) at 1.5(3) T]. F{sub z} was found to be up to 24.1(47.5)-fold higher than F{sub g} at 1.5(3) T. Corresponding to this, F{sub rot} on the objects was shown to be high at both field strengths ({>=} +3). Three objects (at 1.5 T) and one object (at 3 T) showed deflection angles <45 , but F{sub rot} was found to be {>=} +3 at both field strengths. For the remaining objects, {beta} was below 45 and torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. Of 20 objects investigated for magnetic field interactions at 1.5(3) T, 13(15) were unsafe in magnetic resonance (MR), based on the ASTM criteria of F{sub z}. The implications of these results for orthodontic patients undergoing MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Calculation of the resonance frequency change for a cavity charged by a plasma with or without a static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melin, G.

    1967-03-01

    In the mere case of a cold plasma with or without static magnetic field, are given two methods of calculation of resonance frequency shift and absorption in a cylindrical cavity crossed by a plasma column: 1. A perturbation method, already known and used for electronic density measurements is restated and its application is used for several high frequency cavity modes. 2. An exact method employing Maxwell's equations, which however necessitates a computer, is compared with the first one; it permits a determination of the validity limits of the perturbation method and to draw conclusions, [fr

  17. Quiescent H-mode operation using torque from non-axisymmetric, non-resonant magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K.H.; Garofalo, A.M.; Osborne, T.H.; Snyder, P.B.; Solomon, W.M.; Park, J.-K.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Orlov, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) sustained by magnetic torque from non-axisymmetric magnetic fields is a promising operating mode for future burning plasmas including ITER. Using magnetic torque from n = 3 fields to replace counter-I p torque from neutral beam injection, we have achieved long duration, counter-rotating QH-mode operation with neutral beam injection (NBI) torque ranging continuously from counter-I p up to co-I p values of about 1 N m. This co-I p torque is about 3 times the scaled torque that ITER will have. This range also includes operation at zero net NBI torque, applicable to rf wave heated plasmas. These n = 3 fields have been created using coils either inside or, most recently, outside the toroidal coils. Experiments utilized an ITER-relevant lower single-null plasma shape and were done with ITER-relevant values ν ped * ∼0.08, β T ped ∼ 1%$ and β N = 2. Discharges have confinement quality H 98y2 = 1.3, exceeding the value required for ITER. Initial work with low q 95 = 3.4 QH-mode plasmas transiently reached fusion gain values of G = β N H 89 /q 95 2 =0.4, which is the desired value for ITER; the limits on G have not yet been established. This paper also includes the most recent results on QH-mode plasmas run without n = 3 fields and with co-I p NBI; these shots exhibit co-I p plasma rotation and require NBI torque ⩾2 N m. The QH-mode work to date has made significant contact with theory. The importance of edge rotational shear is consistent with peeling–ballooning mode theory. We have seen qualitative and quantitative agreement with the predicted torque from neoclassical toroidal viscosity. (paper)

  18. Evaluation of the toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Maassberg, Henning [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant magnetic perturbations (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) is an important momentum source affecting the toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. The well-known force-flux relation directly links this torque to the non-ambipolar neoclassical particle fluxes arising due to the violation of the toroidal symmetry of the magnetic field. Here, a quasilinear approach for the numerical computation of these fluxes is described, which reduces the dimension of a standard neoclassical transport problem by one without model simplifications of the linearized drift kinetic equation. The only limiting condition is that the non-axisymmetric perturbation field is small enough such that the effect of the perturbation field on particle motion within the flux surface is negligible. Therefore, in addition to most of the transport regimes described by the banana (bounce averaged) kinetic equation also such regimes as, e.g., ripple-plateau and resonant diffusion regimes are naturally included in this approach. Based on this approach, a quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 [W. Kernbichler et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 3, S1061 (2008).] has been developed and benchmarked against a few analytical and numerical models. Results from NEO-2 stay in good agreement with results from these models in their pertinent range of validity.

  19. Evaluation of the SLAP lesion using a low-field (0.2T) magnetic resonance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Soo; Back, Chang Hee; Lee, Kyung Rae; Shin, Yun Hack

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic capabilities of the low-field (0.2T) magnetic resonance (MR) system in the detection of the superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion. One hundred fifty patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder over a 7-month period. Forty-six patients underwent arthroscopic surgery, and the surgical results were correlated with the findings of the MR imaging. Arthroscopic procedures were performed within a mean of 8 days after MR imaging. MR imaging of the shoulder was conducted as follows: shoulder coil; T1-weighted spin echo, coronal-oblique images; T2-weighted gradient echo, coronal-oblique and axial images; and T2-weighted spin echo, coronal oblique and sagittal-oblique images. Prospectively, one radiologist interpreted the MR images. The results of surgery were as follow: SLAP II in 26 shoulders, SLAP III in 1 shoulder, SLAP IV in 1 shoulder, normal labrum in 6 shoulder. For SLAP lesions with a higher grade than type 2, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the low-field MRI were 85.7%, 55.5%. 75%, 71%, and 74%, respectively. There was relatively good agreement for the comparison of the MR results obtained using a low-field MR system with the surgical findings for identifying SLAP lesions

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  5. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  6. ZERO-FIELD NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE FOR STUDY OF ANTIFERROMAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF FeF3 MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. F. Suwandi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR has been used as a research tool in many fields. In this study, the magnetic properties, especially anti-ferromagnetic properties of FeF3 materials were investigated. Zero-field custom-built NMR method was used to investigate the anti-ferromagnetic properties in the materials. Experiments have been carried out by varying the sample temperatures from 8 K to 220 K. Ordinary spin echo pulse sequence 90⁰RF–τ–180⁰RF were used. Using Fast Fourier Transform, the signals in NMR spectrum were analyzed and the peak showed the resonance frequency. The result showed that resonance frequencies decrease with increasing in temperature. The frequency of the spectrum was around 85.41 MHz in the zero-temperature limit, and this corresponds with Fe hyperfine field at zero-temperature limit was 2.14 T. The temperature dependence of the local magnetization does not fit T2 Bloch’s Law very well. Instead, it fits the exponential form having an energy gap in the dispersion relation of the spin wave. It is obtained from the result that FeF3 is antiferromagnetic materials with energy gap of 11.466 meV and anisotropy energy of 1.045 meV.Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR telah banyak digunakan sebagai “research tool” pada berbagai bidang kajian di fisika. Pada studi ini, akan dilakukan eksperimen untuk menguji sifat magnetik, khususnya antiferromagnetik pada material FeF3. Telah dilakukan eksperimen dengan memvariasikan temperatur pada sampel dari 8 K hingga 220 K. Pulse sequence yang digunakan adalah 90⁰RF–τ–180⁰RF. Dengan memanfaatkan Fast Fourier Transform, sinyal echo ini dapat dianalisis dalam bentuk spektrum NMR dengan puncak spektrum menunjukkan frekuensi resonansinya. Diperoleh bahwa frekuensi resonansi akan menurun seiring dengan kenaikan temperatur. Posisi frekuensi pada temperatur 0 K adalah sebesar 85,41 MHz, hal ini memperlihatkan bahwa medan hyperfine dari Fe sebesar 2,14 T pada temperatur 0 K. Kurva

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance system with continuous flow of polarized water to obtain the traceability to static magnetic fields; Sistema de ressonancia magnetica nuclear com fluxo continuo de agua polarizada para obtencao da rastreabilidade para campos magneticos estaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ramon Valls; Nazarre, Diego Joriro, E-mail: ramon@ipt.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a system to obtain the traceability of field or magnetic induction intensity in the range of 2 μT up to 2 T, even in the presence of magnetic field gradients or noisy environments. The system is based on a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer, built in streaming water. The calibration procedure of a coil for magnetic field generation is described, as well as the results obtained and the estimated uncertainty (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR), while opening new vistas to diagnostic medicine, utilizes equipment that is unfamiliar to most clinicians. Beyond learning to cope with new terms, such as spin-echo, T1, T2, and spin density, health care professionals are faced with the inclusion of magnetic and radiofrequency effects in their facilities produced by a complex array of devices. It is the purpose of this chapter to outline the components of an MR imaging system, to discuss their functions, and to note the variations in equipment commercially available

  9. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmani, Nawaid; Sloboda, Ron; Kamal, Wafa; Ghosh, Sunita; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John; Monajemi, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.

  10. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Hachemian, Nilouparak [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality.

  11. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik; Hachemian, Nilouparak; Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles for the interpretation of MR images are developed. The book is divided into five chapters: introduction, tissue, parameters, acquisition parameters, contribution to diagnosis, and practical management of an MR examination. Eight exercises allow the reader to test the knowledge he has acquired. Signal localization and MR artefacts are reviewed in an appendix

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  15. ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line broadening due to the earth magnetic field, occuring only in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissani, Sarra; Guendouz, Laouès; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As demonstrated before, the application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 10 G) may produce definite effects on the ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. Here, we address more precisely the problem of the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields (the static field and the radio-frequency field of the pure NQR experiment). For a field of 6G, the evolution of the signal intensity, as a function of this relative orientation, is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions. There is in particular an intensity loss by a factor of three when going from the parallel configuration to the perpendicular configuration. By contrast, when dealing with a very weak magnetic field (as the earth field, around 0.5 G), this effect drops to ca. 1.5 in the case Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).This is explained by the fact that the Zeeman shift (due to the very weak magnetic field) becomes comparable to the natural line-width. The latter can therefore be determined by accounting for this competition. Still in the case of HMT, the estimated natural line-width is half the observed line-width. The extra broadening is thus attributed to earth magnetic field. The latter constitutes therefore the main cause of the difference between the natural transverse relaxation time (T₂) and the transverse relaxation time derived from the observed line-width (T₂(⁎)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge.

  17. An investigation of the performance of a coaxial HPGe detector operating in a magnetic resonance imaging field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, L.J., E-mail: ljh@ns.ph.liv.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cole, P.; Cresswell, J.R.; Filmer, F.; Jones, M.; Judson, D.S.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Sampson, J.A.; Scraggs, D.P.; Slee, M.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Bimson, W.E.; Kemp, G.J. [MARIARC, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE (United Kingdom); Groves, J.; Headspith, J.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Cooper, R.J. [Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States)

    2011-05-11

    Nuclear medical imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography are used to probe physiological functions of the body by detecting gamma rays emitted from biologically targeted radiopharmaceuticals. A system which is capable of simultaneous data acquisition for nuclear medical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging is highly sought after by the medical imaging community. Such a device could provide a more complete medical insight into the functions of the body within a well-defined structural context. However, acquiring simultaneous nuclear/MRI sequences are technically challenging due to the conventional photomultiplier tube readout employed by most existing scintillator detector systems. A promising solution is a nuclear imaging device composed of semiconductor detectors that can be operated with a standard MRI scanner. However, the influence of placing a semiconductor detector such as high purity germanium (HPGe) within or close to the bore of an MRI scanner, where high magnetic fields are present, is not well understood. In this paper, the performance of a HPGe detector operating in a high strength static (B{sub S}) MRI field along with fast switching gradient fields and radiofrequency from the MRI system has been assessed. The influence of the B{sub S} field on the energy resolution of the detector has been investigated for various positions and orientations of the detector within the magnetic field. The results have then been interpreted in terms of the influence of the B{sub S} field on the charge collection properties. MRI images have been acquired with the detector situated at the entrance of the MRI bore to investigate the effects of simultaneous data acquisition on detector performance and MRI imaging.

  18. Restricted lithium ion dynamics in PEO-based block copolymer electrolytes measured by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tan Vu; Messinger, Robert J.; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Fayon, Franck; Bouchet, Renaud; Deschamps, Michaël

    2017-10-01

    The intrinsic ionic conductivity of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based block copolymer electrolytes is often assumed to be identical to the conductivity of the PEO homopolymer. Here, we use high-field 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurements to probe lithium ion dynamics over nanosecond and millisecond time scales in PEO and polystyrene (PS)-b-PEO-b-PS electrolytes containing the lithium salt LiTFSI. Variable-temperature longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) 7Li NMR relaxation rates were acquired at three magnetic field strengths and quantitatively analyzed for the first time at such fields, enabling us to distinguish two characteristic time scales that describe fluctuations of the 7Li nuclear electric quadrupolar interaction. Fast lithium motions [up to O (ns)] are essentially identical between the two polymer electrolytes, including sub-nanosecond vibrations and local fluctuations of the coordination polyhedra between lithium and nearby oxygen atoms. However, lithium dynamics over longer time scales [O (10 ns) and greater] are slower in the block copolymer compared to the homopolymer, as manifested experimentally by their different transverse 7Li NMR relaxation rates. Restricted dynamics and altered thermodynamic behavior of PEO chains anchored near PS domains likely explain these results.

  19. Proton and multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the human brain at ultra-high field strength: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Anke

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allows for a non-invasive and non-ionizing determination of in vivo tissue concentrations and metabolic turn-over rates of more than 20 metabolites and compounds in the central nervous system of humans. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview about the advantages, challenges and advances of ultra-high field MRS with regard to methodological development, discoveries and applications from its beginnings around 15 years ago up to the current state. The review is limited to human brain and spinal cord application at field strength of 7T and 9.4T and includes all relevant nuclei ( 1 H, 31 P, 13 C). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Resonant alteration of propagation in guiding structures with complex Robin parameter and its magnetic-field-induced restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olendski, O.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Solutions of the wave equation are analyzed for the confined circular geometry with complex Robin boundary conditions. → Sharp extremum is found in the energy dependence on the imaginary part of the extrapolation length. → Nonzero real part of the Robin length or/and magnetic field wipe out the resonance. - Abstract: Solutions of the scalar Helmholtz wave equation are derived for the analysis of the transport and thermodynamic properties of the two-dimensional disk and three-dimensional infinitely long straight wire in the external uniform longitudinal magnetic field B under the assumption that the Robin boundary condition contains extrapolation length Λ with nonzero imaginary part Λ i . As a result of this complexity, the self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian is lost, its eigenvalues E become complex too and the discrete bound states of the disk characteristic for the real Λ turn into the corresponding quasibound states with their lifetime defined by the eigenenergies imaginary parts E i . Accordingly, the longitudinal flux undergoes an alteration as it flows along the wire with its attenuation/amplification being E i -dependent too. It is shown that, for zero magnetic field, the component E i as a function of the Robin imaginary part exhibits a pronounced sharp extremum with its magnitude being the largest for the zero real part Λ r of the extrapolation length. Increasing magnitude of Λ r quenches the E i - Λ i resonance and at very large Λ r the eigenenergies E approach the asymptotic real values independent of Λ i . The extremum is also wiped out by the magnetic field when, for the large B, the energies tend to the Landau levels. Mathematical and physical interpretations of the obtained results are provided; in particular, it is shown that the finite lifetime of the disk quasibound states stems from the Λ i -induced currents flowing through the sample boundary. Possible experimental tests of the calculated effect are discussed; namely

  1. Dynamic divertor control using resonant mixed toroidal harmonic magnetic fields during ELM suppression in DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, M.; Sun, Y.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Gu, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Abrams, T.; Bykov, I.; Cui, L.; Evans, T.; Garofalo, A.; Guo, W.; Gong, X.; Lasnier, C.; Logan, N. C.; Makowski, M.; Orlov, D.; Wang, H. H.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments using Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs), with a rotating n = 2 toroidal harmonic combined with a stationary n = 3 toroidal harmonic, have validated predictions that divertor heat and particle flux can be dynamically controlled while maintaining Edge Localized Mode (ELM) suppression in the DIII-D tokamak. Here, n is the toroidal mode number. ELM suppression over one full cycle of a rotating n = 2 RMP that was mixed with a static n = 3 RMP field has been achieved. Prominent heat flux splitting on the outer divertor has been observed during ELM suppression by RMPs in low collisionality regime in DIII-D. Strong changes in the three dimensional heat and particle flux footprint in the divertor were observed during the application of the mixed toroidal harmonic magnetic perturbations. These results agree well with modeling of the edge magnetic field structure using the TOP2D code, which takes into account the plasma response from the MARS-F code. These results expand the potential effectiveness of the RMP ELM suppression technique for the simultaneous control of divertor heat and particle load required in ITER.

  2. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on three dimensional equilibria in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munaretto, S., E-mail: smunaretto@wisc.edu; Chapman, B. E.; Nornberg, M. D.; Boguski, J.; DuBois, A. M.; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1150 University Ave, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The orientation of 3D equilibria in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed-field pinch can now be controlled with a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP). Absent the RMP, the orientation of the stationary 3D equilibrium varies from shot to shot in a semi-random manner, making its diagnosis difficult. Produced with a poloidal array of saddle coils at the vertical insulated cut in MST's thick conducting shell, an m = 1 RMP with an amplitude b{sub r}/B ∼ 10% forces the 3D structure into any desired orientation relative to MST's diagnostics. This control has led to improved diagnosis, revealing enhancements in both the central electron temperature and density. With sufficient amplitude, the RMP also inhibits the generation of high-energy (>20 keV) electrons, which otherwise emerge due to a reduction in magnetic stochasticity in the core. Field line tracing reveals that the RMP reintroduces stochasticity to the core. A m = 3 RMP of similar amplitude has little effect on the magnetic topology or the high-energy electrons.

  3. Review on resonance cone fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro.

    1980-02-01

    Resonance cone fields and lower hybrid heating are reviewed in this report. The resonance cone fields were reported by Fisher and Gould, and they proposed the use of the measurement of resonance cones and structure as a diagnostic tool to determine the plasma density and electron temperature in magnetoplasma. After the resonance cone, a wave-like disturbance persists. Ohnuma et al. have measured bending, reflection and ducting of resonance cones in detail. The thermal modes in inhomogeneous magnetoplasma were seen. The reflection of thermal mode near an electron plasma frequency layer and an insulating plate has been observed. The non-linear effects of resonance cones is reported. Monochromatic electron beam produces the noise of broad band whistler mode. Lower hybrid waves have been the subject of propagation from the edge of plasma to the lower hybrid layer. Linear lower hybrid waves were studied. The lower hybrid and ion acoustic waves radiated from a point source were observed. The parametric decay of finite-extent, cold electron plasma waves was studied. The lower hybrid cone radiated from a point source going along magnetic field lines was observed. Several experimental data on the lower hybrid heating in tokamak devices have been reported. The theories on resonance cones and lower hybrid waves are introduced in this report. (Kato, T.)

  4. High Field In Vivo 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Brain by Random Radiofrequency Heteronuclear Decoupling and Data Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ningzhi; Li, Shizhe; Shen, Jun

    2017-06-01

    In vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a unique and effective tool for studying dynamic human brain metabolism and the cycling of neurotransmitters. One of the major technical challenges for in vivo 13C-MRS is the high radio frequency (RF) power necessary for heteronuclear decoupling. In the common practice of in vivo 13C-MRS, alkanyl carbons are detected in the spectra range of 10-65ppm. The amplitude of decoupling pulses has to be significantly greater than the large one-bond 1H-13C scalar coupling (1JCH=125-145 Hz). Two main proton decoupling methods have been developed: broadband stochastic decoupling and coherent composite or adiabatic pulse decoupling (e.g., WALTZ); the latter is widely used because of its efficiency and superb performance under inhomogeneous B1 field. Because the RF power required for proton decoupling increases quadratically with field strength, in vivo 13C-MRS using coherent decoupling is often limited to low magnetic fields (protons via weak long-range 1H-13C scalar couplings, which can be decoupled using low RF power broadband stochastic decoupling. Recently, the carboxylic/amide 13C-MRS technique using low power random RF heteronuclear decoupling was safely applied to human brain studies at 7T. Here, we review the two major decoupling methods and the carboxylic/amide 13C-MRS with low power decoupling strategy. Further decreases in RF power deposition by frequency-domain windowing and time-domain random under-sampling are also discussed. Low RF power decoupling opens the possibility of performing in vivo 13C experiments of human brain at very high magnetic fields (such as 11.7T), where signal-to-noise ratio as well as spatial and temporal spectral resolution are more favorable than lower fields.

  5. Introduction lecture to magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, J.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture deals with all that is common either to electron paramagnetic resonance (E.P.R.) or to nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). It will present, in an as elementary form as possible, the main concepts used in magnetic resonance emphasizing some aspects, specific for interface science. (orig./BHO)

  6. Limits to magnetic resonance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, Paul; Mansfield, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grow from a laboratory demonstration to a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. There is a clinical body scanner in almost every hospital of the developed nations. The field of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), after mostly being abandoned by researchers in the first decade of MRI, has become an established branch of the science. This paper reviews the development of MRM over the last decade with an emphasis on the current state of the art. The fundamental principles of imaging and signal detection are examined to determine the physical principles which limit the available resolution. The limits are discussed with reference to liquid, solid and gas phase microscopy. In each area, the novel approaches employed by researchers to push back the limits of resolution are discussed. Although the limits to resolution are well known, the developments and applications of MRM have not reached their limit. (author)

  7. Landau Quasi-energy Spectrum Destruction for an Electron in Both a Static Magnetic Field and a Resonant Electromagnetic Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoblin, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Free nonrelativistic electrons in both a static magnetic field and an electromagnetic wave are considered. A plane-polarized wave propagates along a magnetic field, its frequency is close to the electron rotation frequency in a magnetic field. Electron spin is taken into account. An electron quasi energy spectrum and steady states (quasi energy states) are constructed. 6 refs

  8. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT : Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Min; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Jung-In; Park, So-Yeon; Jeon, Seung Hyuck; Choi, Noorie; Kim, Jin Ho; Wu, Hong-Gyun

    2018-01-01

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm 2 , respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field.

  9. Use of movable high-field-strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging with awake craniotomies for resection of gliomas: preliminary experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leuthardt, Eric C

    2011-07-01

    Awake craniotomy with electrocortical mapping and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) are established techniques for maximizing tumor resection and preserving function, but there has been little experience combining these methodologies.

  10. Diagnostic apparatus employing nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, K.; Yamada, N.; Yoshitome, E.; Matsuura, H.

    1987-01-01

    An NMR diagnostic apparatus is described comprising means for applying a primary magnetic field to a subject; means for applying RF pulses to the subject to give nuclear magnetic resonance to the nuclei of atoms in the subject; means for applying gradient magnetic fields to project an NMR signal of the nuclei at least in one direction; means for observing the NMR signal projected by the gradient magnetic fields applying means; and arithmetic means for constructing a distribution of information on resonance energy as an image from an output signal from the observing means; wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means comprises means for applying the gradient magnetic fields at a predetermined time and for not applying the gradient magnetic fields at another predetermined time, during the time period of one view; and wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means further comprises means for measuring the NMR signal during the predetermined time when the gradient magnetic fields are applied, and means for measuring the intensity of the primary magnetic field during the other predetermined time when no gradient magnetic fields are applied

  11. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  12. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  14. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  15. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy; Bontemps, P.; Rikken, Geert L J A

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  16. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Magnetic resonance elastometry using a single-sided permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Carl S; Marble, Andrew E; Ono, Yuu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a magnetic resonance method of measuring material elasticity using a single-sided magnet with a permanent static field gradient. This method encodes sample velocity in a reciprocal space using Hahn spin-echoes with variable timing. The experimental results show a strong correlation between magnetic resonance signal attenuation and elasticity when an oscillating force is applied on the sample. This relationship in turn provides us with information about the displacement velocity experienced by the sample, which is inversely proportional to Young's modulus. The proposed method shows promise in offering a portable and cost-effective magnetic resonance elastography system. (paper)

  18. Force detection of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugar, D.; Zueger, O.; Hoen, S.; Yannoni, C.S.; Vieth, H.M.; Kendrick, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Micromechanical sensing of magnetic force was used to detect nuclear magnetic resonance with exceptional sensitivity and spatial resolution. With a 900 angstrom thick silicon nitride cantilever capable of detecting subfemtonewton forces, a single shot sensitivity of 1.6 x 10 13 protons was achieved for an ammonium nitrate sample mounted on the cantilever. A nearby millimeter-size iron particle produced a 600 tesla per meter magnetic field gradient, resulting in a spatial resolution of 2.6 micrometers in one dimension. These results suggest that magnetic force sensing is a viable approach for enhancing the sensitivity and spatial resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging

  19. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  20. Plasma heating in the TM-3 Tokamak at electron-cyclotron resonance with magnetic fields up to 25 ke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikaev, V.V.; Bobrovskii, G.A.; Poznyak, V.I.; Razumova, K.A.; Sannikov, V.V.; Sokolov, Yu.A.; Shmarin, A.A.

    Experiments were conducted in heating plasma at electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) with longitudinal magnetic fields up to 25 ke. It was shown by the aid of laser diagnosis that the temperature of the basic component of the electrons increases in accordance with the classical mechanism of heating at ECR in the process of electron-cyclotron heating (ECH). The distribution of the temperature of electrons with respect to radius was measured. The relationship of energetic lifetime in the Tokamak and electron temperature was obtained and the magnitude of energetic lifetime of accelerated electrons in the function of their energy was estimated. The value β/sub tau/ approximately equal to 2.2 was obtained by the aid of ECH in a regime with small discharge currents

  1. Windows on the Human Body – in Vivo High-Field Magnetic Resonance Research and Applications in Medicine and Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin; Fischmeister, Florian Ph. S.; Grabner, Günther; Bauer, Herbert; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given. PMID:22219684

  2. Composite Match Index with Application of Interior Deformation Field Measurement from Magnetic Resonance Volumetric Images of Human Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penglin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whereas a variety of different feature-point matching approaches have been reported in computer vision, few feature-point matching approaches employed in images from nonrigid, nonuniform human tissues have been reported. The present work is concerned with interior deformation field measurement of complex human tissues from three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR volumetric images. To improve the reliability of matching results, this paper proposes composite match index (CMI as the foundation of multimethod fusion methods to increase the reliability of these various methods. Thereinto, we discuss the definition, components, and weight determination of CMI. To test the validity of the proposed approach, it is applied to actual MR volumetric images obtained from a volunteer’s calf. The main result is consistent with the actual condition.

  3. A study of J-coupling spectroscopy using the Earth's field nuclear magnetic resonance inside a laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu-Hsien; Chen, Ming-Jye; Yang, Hong-Chang; Lee, Shin-Yi; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Shieh-Yueh

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, an instrumentation of the Earth's field nuclear magnetic resonance (EFNMR) inside a laboratory is presented. A lock-in analysis (LIA) technique was proposed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A SNR of 137.8 was achieved in a single measurement for 9 ml tap water, and the LIA technique significantly enhanced the SNR to 188 after a 10-average in a noisy laboratory environment. The proton-phosphorus coupling in trimethyl phosphate ((CH(3)O)(3)PO) with J-coupling J[H,F]=(10.99±0.013) Hz has been demonstrated. The LIA technique improves the SNR, and a 2.6-fold improvement in SNR over that of the frequency-adjusted averaging is achieved. To reduce the noise in EFNMR, it was suggested that the LIA technique and the first order gradient shim be used to achieve a subhertz linewidth.

  4. Characterization of moisture in acetylated and propionylated radiata pine using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LFNMR) relaxometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Greeley; Thybring, Emil Engelund; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht

    2018-01-01

    . A possible explanation is the counteracting effects of decreased hydrophilicity and reduced moisture content (MC) of these water populations at higher levels of acetylation. The evaluation of propionylation on WCW T2 data was complicated by peak splitting in the relaxation spectrum. Constant T2 values......Moisture in radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) earlywood (EW), which was acetylated or propionylated to various degrees, was measured by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LFNMR) relaxometry. Spin-spin relaxation times (T2) were determined for fully saturated samples at 22 and -18°C. T2 values...... for EW lumen water increased with increasing acetylation weight percentage gain (WPG), perhaps caused by the less hydrophilic acetylated wood (AcW) surface. Cell wall water (WCW) and the water in pits and small voids also showed increasing T2 values as a function of WPG but with a weaker tendency...

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  6. Endometrium evaluation with high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging in patients submitted to uterine leiomyoma embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Monica Amadio Piazza [Post-graduation Program in Abdominal Imaging, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nasser, Felipe [Intervention Radiology Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zlotnik, Eduardo; Messina, Marcos de Lorenzo [Gynecology and Obstetrics Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Imaging Department, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the endometrial alterations related to embolization of uterine arteries for the treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis (pelvic pain and/or uterine bleeding) by means of high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance. This is a longitudinal and prospective study that included 94 patients with a clinical and imaging diagnosis of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis, all of them treated by embolization of the uterine arteries. The patients were submitted to evaluations by high-field magnetic resonance of the pelvis before and 6 months after the procedure. Specific evaluations were made of the endometrium on the T2-weighted sequences, and on the T1-weighted sequences before and after the intravenous dynamic infusion of the paramagnetic contrast. In face of these measures, statistical analyses were performed using Student's t test for comparison of the results obtained before and after the procedure. An average increase of 20.9% was noted in the endometrial signal on T2-weighted images obtained after the uterine artery embolization procedure when compared to the pre-procedure evaluation (p=0.0004). In the images obtained with the intravenous infusion of paramagnetic contrast, an average increase of 18.7% was noted in the post-embolization intensity of the endometrial signal, compared to the pre-embolization measure (p<0.035). After embolization of the uterine arteries, there was a significant increase of the endometrial signal on the T2-weighted images and on the post-contrast images, inferring possible edema and increased endometrial flow. Future studies are needed to assess the clinical impact of these findings.

  7. Endometrium evaluation with high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging in patients submitted to uterine leiomyoma embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Monica Amadio Piazza; Nasser, Felipe; Zlotnik, Eduardo; Messina, Marcos de Lorenzo; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the endometrial alterations related to embolization of uterine arteries for the treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis (pelvic pain and/or uterine bleeding) by means of high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance. This is a longitudinal and prospective study that included 94 patients with a clinical and imaging diagnosis of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis, all of them treated by embolization of the uterine arteries. The patients were submitted to evaluations by high-field magnetic resonance of the pelvis before and 6 months after the procedure. Specific evaluations were made of the endometrium on the T2-weighted sequences, and on the T1-weighted sequences before and after the intravenous dynamic infusion of the paramagnetic contrast. In face of these measures, statistical analyses were performed using Student's t test for comparison of the results obtained before and after the procedure. An average increase of 20.9% was noted in the endometrial signal on T2-weighted images obtained after the uterine artery embolization procedure when compared to the pre-procedure evaluation (p=0.0004). In the images obtained with the intravenous infusion of paramagnetic contrast, an average increase of 18.7% was noted in the post-embolization intensity of the endometrial signal, compared to the pre-embolization measure (p<0.035). After embolization of the uterine arteries, there was a significant increase of the endometrial signal on the T2-weighted images and on the post-contrast images, inferring possible edema and increased endometrial flow. Future studies are needed to assess the clinical impact of these findings

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  9. Modeling of divertor particle and heat loads during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields for ELM control in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, O., E-mail: o.schmitz@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Becoulet, M. [CEA/IRFM, Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Cahyna, P. [IPP AS CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Evans, T.E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Feng, Y. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Frerichs, H.; Kirschner, A. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Kukushkin, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Laengner, R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Lunt, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Loarte, A.; Pitts, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Reiser, D.; Reiter, D. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Saibene, G. [Fusion for Energy Joint Undertaking, Barcelona (Spain); Samm, U. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    First results from three-dimensional modeling of the divertor heat and particle flux pattern during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields as ELM control scheme in ITER with the EMC3-Eirene fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code are discussed. The formation of a helical magnetic footprint breaks the toroidal symmetry of the heat and particle fluxes. Expansion of the flux pattern as far as 60 cm away from the unperturbed strike line is seen with vacuum RMP fields, resulting in a preferable heat flux spreading. Inclusion of plasma response reduces the radial extension of the heat and particle fluxes and results in a heat flux peaking closer to the unperturbed level. A strong reduction of the particle confinement is found. 3D flow channels are identified as a consistent reason due to direct parallel outflow from inside of the separatrix. Their radial inward expansion and hence the level of particle pump out is shown to be dependent on the perturbation level.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  13. A four-dimensional motion field atlas of the tongue from tagged and cine magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L.; Stone, Maureen; Wedeen, Van J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Woo, Jonghye

    2017-02-01

    Representation of human tongue motion using three-dimensional vector fields over time can be used to better understand tongue function during speech, swallowing, and other lingual behaviors. To characterize the inter-subject variability of the tongue's shape and motion of a population carrying out one of these functions it is desirable to build a statistical model of the four-dimensional (4D) tongue. In this paper, we propose a method to construct a spatio-temporal atlas of tongue motion using magnetic resonance (MR) images acquired from fourteen healthy human subjects. First, cine MR images revealing the anatomical features of the tongue are used to construct a 4D intensity image atlas. Second, tagged MR images acquired to capture internal motion are used to compute a dense motion field at each time frame using a phase-based motion tracking method. Third, motion fields from each subject are pulled back to the cine atlas space using the deformation fields computed during the cine atlas construction. Finally, a spatio-temporal motion field atlas is created to show a sequence of mean motion fields and their inter-subject variation. The quality of the atlas was evaluated by deforming cine images in the atlas space. Comparison between deformed and original cine images showed high correspondence. The proposed method provides a quantitative representation to observe the commonality and variability of the tongue motion field for the first time, and shows potential in evaluation of common properties such as strains and other tensors based on motion fields.

  14. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate.

  15. Magnetic resonance phenomena in dynamics of relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternov, I.M.; Bordovitsyn, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    A relativistic generalization of Rabi's formula for magnetic resonance is given. On this basis, we consider fast and slow passage through resonance. We define a magnetic resonance exterior field as usual, using unit vectors of a Cartesian coordinate system, a homogeneous magnetic field, and the amplitude of a rotating magnetic field. For the description of spin dynamics we use the Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equation

  16. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  17. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustymowicz, A.; Zajkowska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  18. Cine magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Sechtem, U.P.; Pflugfelder, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance (MR) is a fast MR imaging process with referencing of the imaging data to the electrocardiogram (ECG) so that images corresponding to 21-msec segments of the cardiac cycle are acquired. A series of such images, each corresponding to a 21-msec segment of the cardiac cycle, can be laced together for viewing in the cine format at a framing rate of 20 to 40 frames per second. Since cine angiograms of the heart are usually done at 30 frames per second, this technique achieves a temporal resolution adequate for the evluation of central cardiovascular function. The major application of this technique is to depict central cardiovascular function and blood flow

  19. Suppression of nonlinear frequency-sweeping of resonant interchange modes in a magnetic dipole with applied radio frequency fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslovsky, D.; Levitt, B.; Mauel, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    Interchange instabilities excited by energetic electrons trapped by a magnetic dipole nonlinearly saturate and exhibit complex, coherent spectral characteristics and frequency sweeping [H. P. Warren and M. E. Mauel, Phys. Plasmas 2, 4185 (1995)]. When monochromatic radio frequency (rf) fields are applied in the range of 100-1000 MHz, the saturation behavior of the interchange instability changes dramatically. For applied fields of sufficient intensity and pulse-length, coherent interchange fluctuations are suppressed and frequency sweeping is eliminated. When rf fields are switched off, coherent frequency sweeping reappears. Since low frequency interchange instabilities preserve the electron's first and second adiabatic invariants, these observations can be interpreted as resulting from nonlinear resonant wave-particle interactions described within a particle phase-space, (ψ,φ), comprised of the third adiabatic invariant and the azimuthal angle. Self-consistent numerical simulation is used to study (1) the nonlinear development of the instability, (2) the radial mode structure of the interchange instability, and (3) the suppression of frequency sweeping. When the applied rf heating is modeled as an 'rf collisionality', the simulation reproduces frequency sweeping suppression and suggests an explanation for the observations that is consistent with Berk and co-workers [H. L. Berk et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 3102 (1999)

  20. Intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring-guided surgery for treating supratentorial cavernomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang-Ye; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2016-09-01

    To determine the beneficial effects of intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring-guided surgery for treating supratentorial cavernomas. Twelve patients with 13 supratentorial cavernomas were prospectively enrolled and operated while using a 1.5 T intraoperative MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring. All cavernomas were deeply located in subcortical areas or involved critical areas. Intraoperative high-field MRIs were obtained for the intraoperative "visualization" of surrounding eloquent structures, "brain shift" corrections, and navigational plan updates. All cavernomas were successfully resected with guidance from intraoperative MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring. In 5 cases with supratentorial cavernomas, intraoperative "brain shift" severely deterred locating of the lesions; however, intraoperative MRI facilitated precise locating of these lesions. During long-term (>3 months) follow-up, some or all presenting signs and symptoms improved or resolved in 4 cases, but were unchanged in 7 patients. Intraoperative high-field MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring are helpful in surgeries for the treatment of small deeply seated subcortical cavernomas.

  1. Electron dynamics in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogaret, Alain, E-mail: A.R.Nogaret@bath.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-30

    This review explores the dynamics of two-dimensional electrons in magnetic potentials that vary on scales smaller than the mean free path. The physics of microscopically inhomogeneous magnetic fields relates to important fundamental problems in the fractional quantum Hall effect, superconductivity, spintronics and graphene physics and spins out promising applications which will be described here. After introducing the initial work done on electron localization in random magnetic fields, the experimental methods for fabricating magnetic potentials are presented. Drift-diffusion phenomena are then described, which include commensurability oscillations, magnetic channelling, resistance resonance effects and magnetic dots. We then review quantum phenomena in magnetic potentials including magnetic quantum wires, magnetic minibands in superlattices, rectification by snake states, quantum tunnelling and Klein tunnelling. The third part is devoted to spintronics in inhomogeneous magnetic fields. This covers spin filtering by magnetic field gradients and circular magnetic fields, electrically induced spin resonance, spin resonance fluorescence and coherent spin manipulation. (topical review)

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  5. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R.

    1994-01-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs

  7. Magnetic field screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, P.; Turner, R.; Chapman, B.L.W.; Bowley, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    A screen for a magnetic coil, for producing, for example, a homogeneous, gradient or RF field in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, is described. It is provided by surround the coil with a set of electrical conductors. The currents within the conductors are controlled in such a manner that the field is neutralised in a specific region of space. The current distribution within the conductors is determined by calculating the current within a hypothetical superconductive shield which would have the effect of neutralising the field, the current through the conductors thereby being a substitute for the superconductive shield. The conductors may be evenly spaced and connected in parallel, their resistances being determined by thickness or composition to provide the desired current, or they may carry equal currents but be differently spaced. A further set or sets of controlled conductors outside the first set may ensure that the first set does not upset the field from the NMR coil. The shield may selectively reflect certain fields while transmitting others and may prevent acoustic vibration e.g. when switching gradient fields. An RF coil arrangement may consist of two orthogonal coils, one coil within the other for use as a transmit/receive set or as a double resonance transmitter; a shield between the coils is in series with, and formed from the same winding as, the inner coil. (author)

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  9. Image production by magnetic resonance: transparency via the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, A.

    1984-01-01

    The author gives a general description of the nuclear magnetic resonance technique to study the human body. The use of superconducting magnets to generate the required magnetic field is discussed. (G.T.H.)

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  11. Magnetic islands created by resonant helical windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.S.; Heller, M.V.; Caldas, I.L.

    1986-01-01

    The triggering of disruptive instabilities by resonant helical windings in large aspect-ratio tokamaks is associated to destruction of magnetic surfaces. The Chirikov condition is applied to estimate analytically the helical winding current thresholds for ergodization of the magnetic field lines. (Autor) [pt

  12. Topical questions in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines a number of practical questions concerning magnetic resonance imaging. These include the choice of operating magnetic field strength, the problem of siting and screening, a procedure for securing precise slice selection and the use of paramagnetic contrast agents. (author). 5 refs

  13. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  14. Terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using a high-field pulsed magnet and an asynchronous optical sampling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B. F.; Smith, W. F.; Hibberd, M. T.; Dawson, P.; Graham, D. M.; Beck, M.; Bartels, A.; Guiney, I.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    The effective mass, sheet carrier concentration, and mobility of electrons within a two-dimensional electron gas in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure were determined using a laboratory-based terahertz cyclotron resonance spectrometer. The ability to perform terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy with magnetic fields of up to 31 T was enabled by combining a high-field pulsed magnet with a modified asynchronous optical sampling terahertz detection scheme. This scheme allowed around 100 transmitted terahertz waveforms to be recorded over the 14 ms magnetic field pulse duration. The sheet density and mobility were measured to be 8.0 × 10 12  cm −2 and 9000 cm 2 V −1  s −1 at 77 K. The in-plane electron effective mass at the band edge was determined to be 0.228 ± 0.002m 0 .

  15. Measurements of the ripple effect and geometric distribution of switched gradient fields inside a magnetic resonance scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Henrik; Mild, Kjell Hansson; Wilén, Jonna

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of patient exposure during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures is limited, and the need for such knowledge has been demonstrated in recent in vitro and in vivo studies of the genotoxic effects of MRI. This study focuses on the dB/dt of the switched gradient field (SGF) and its geometric distribution. These values were characterized by measuring the peak dB/dt generated by a programmed gradient current of alternating triangles inside a 1.5T MR scanner. The maximum dB/dt exposure to the gradient field was 6-14 T/s, and this occurred at the edges of the field of view (FOV) 20-25 cm from the isocenter in the longitudinal direction. The dB/dt exposure dropped off to roughly half the maximum (3-7 T/s) at the edge of the bore. It was found that the dB/dt of the SGF was distorted by a 200 kHz ripple arising from the amplifier. The ripple is small in terms of B-field, but the high frequency content contributes to a peak dB/dt up to 18 times larger than that predicted by the slew rate (4 T/s m) and the distance from the isocenter. Measurements on a 3 T MRI scanner, however, revealed a much smaller filtered ripple of 100 kHz in dB/dt. These findings suggest that the gradient current to each coil together with information on the geometrical distribution of the gradient field and ripple effects could be used to assess the SGF exposure within an MRI bore. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance of iron-57 nuclei in local fields in yttrium and iron garnets; Resonance magnetique nucleaire des noyaux du fer 57 dans les champs locaux du grenat d'yttrium et de fer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    We have demonstrated the nuclear resonance of {sup 57}Fe nuclei in the local field of each of the two magnetic sub-lattices of yttrium and iron garnets. The resonance frequencies and the relaxation times have been measured as a function of the temperature. (author) [French] Nous avons mis en evidence la resonance nucleaire des noyaux de {sup 57}Fe dans le champ local de chacun des deux sous-reseaux magnetiques du grenat d'yttrium et de fer. Les frequences de resonances et les temps de relaxation ont ete mesures en fonction de la temperature. (auteur)

  17. Biological responses of human solid tumor cells to X-ray irradiation within a 1.5-Tesla magnetic field generated by a magnetic resonance imaging–linear accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Li; Hoogcarspel, Stan Jelle; Wen, Zhifei; van Vulpen, Marco; Molkentine, David P.; Kok, Jan; Lin, Steven H.; Broekhuizen, Roel; Ang, Kie Kian; Bovenschen, Niels; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Frank, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Devices that combine magnetic resonance imaging with linear accelerators (MRL) represent a novel tool for MR-guided radiotherapy. However, whether magnetic fields (MFs) generated by these devices affect the radiosensitivity of tumors is unknown. We investigated the influence of a 1.5-T MF on cell

  18. Oxidative response of human monocytes and macrophages cultured under low oxygen culture conditions to ion parametric resonance magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    INTRODUCTION One proposed mechanism of action of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on biological systems is the Ion Parametric Resonance (IPR) model, which has been experimentally validated in neuronal PC-12 cells [1, 2]. It proposes that when applied EMFs are tuned to resonate with...

  19. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT. Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Robotics Research Laboratory for Extreme Environments, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan; Wu, Hong-Gyun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-in; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jin Ho [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seung Hyuck [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Noorie [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm{sup 2}, respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field. (orig.) [German] Beim Einsatz eines Magnetresonanztomographie(MRT)-gefuehrten Bestrahlungsgeraets kann durch die Wechselwirkung von Magnetfeld und Strahlenquelle unerwuenscht

  20. Brain-heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catie; Raven, Erika P; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-05-13

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain-heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain-heart interactions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in ophthalmic diagnosis. Results of examinations using a small field-of-view surface coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yuji; Yoshida, Akitoshi; Kanno, Harumi; Ogasawara, Hironobu; Murakami, Noboru; Cheng, Hong-Ming.

    1997-01-01

    We obtained T 1 -and T 2 -weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images in 3 patients with vitreoretinal disorders using a recently developed surface coil that was inductively coupled and had a small field of view. On both T 1 -and T 2 -weighted images, tractional retinal detachment was clearly detected in the first patient, who had proliferative diabetic retinopathy. T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images of the second patient, who had total retinal detachment with proliferative vitreous retinopathy, revealed a funnel-shaped thickened retina. The third patient had postoperative rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with opacity due to postoperative cataract and intravitreous injection of gas; on this patient's MR images we could clearly differentiate the reattached retina, silicone used for scleral buckling, and intravitreous gas, even though these differentiations were not possible with ophthalmoscopy or B-scan ultrasonography. High resolution MR imaging with our technique can be performed in a short time and regardless of the eye's condition. Our findings strongly indicate that MRI with a small field-of-view surface coil is a useful tool for diagnosing various vitreoretinal disorders and observing pathological changes. (author)

  2. Impact of high field (3.0 T) magnetic resonance imaging on diagnosis of osteochondral defects in the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schibany, N.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Marlovits, S.; Mlynarik, V.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Striessnig, G.; Shodjai-Baghini, M.; Heinze, G.; Trattnig, S.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate high field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for imaging of osteochondral defects. Materials and methods: Nine osteochondral defects were simulated in three cadaveric talus specimens using a diamond drill. All specimens were examined on a 1.0 T MR unit and a 3.0 T MR unit. A T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence with a 2 mm slice thickness and a 256 x 256 matrix size was used on both scanners. The visibility of the osteochondral separation and the presence of susceptibility artifacts at the drilling bores were scored on all images. Results: Compared to the 1.0 T MR unit, the protocol on the 3.0 T MR unit allowed a better delineation of the disruption of the articular cartilage and a better demarcation of the subchondral defect. Differences regarding the visualization of the subchondral defect were found to be statistically significant (P 0.05). The average SNR was higher using 3.0 T MRI (SNR = 12), compared to 1.0 T MRI (SNR = 7). Conclusion: High field MRI enables the acquisition of images with sufficient resolution and higher SNR and has therefore the potential to improve the staging of osteochondral defects

  3. Magnetic resonance: safety measures and biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo, I.; Lafuente, J.; Fernandez, C.; Barbero, M.J.; Cascon, E.

    1997-01-01

    The biological effects of electromagnetic fields is currently a subject of great controversy. For this reason, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy are constantly under investigation. The source of the risk in MRI is associated with the three types of electromagnetic radiation to which the patient is exposed: the static magnetic field, variable (gradient) magnetic fields and radiofrequency fields. Each is capable of producing significant biological effects when employed at sufficient intensity. Patients exposed to risk sources are those situated within the lines of force of the magnetic field, ellipsoid lines that are arranged around the magnet, representing the strength of the surrounding field. To date, at the intensity normally utilized in MRI(<2T) and respecting the field limit recommendations established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use of this technique no adverse secondary biological effects have been reported. The known biological effects and other possible secondary effects are reviewed, and the recommended safety measures are discussed. (Author)

  4. Resonant Alfven waves on auroral field lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Y.T.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that resonant Alfven waves on dipole magnetic field geometry and plasma distributions suitable for auroral field lines can be conveniently treated in the theory of Mathieu functions. Resurgent interest in invoking large-scale Alfven waves to structure some elements of auroral electrodynamics calls for interpretation of measured perpendicular electric and magnetic disturbance fields in terms of Alfven waves. The ability to express the resonant eigenmodes in closed form in terms of Mathieu functions allows for convenient tests of the Alfven wave structuring hypothesis. Implications for current vector electric and magnetic disturbance measurements are discussed

  5. Effects of diffusion and surface interactions on the line shape of electron paramagnetic resonances in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaden, M.; Zhao, K. F.; Wu, Z.

    2007-01-01

    In an evanescent wave magnetometer the Zeeman polarization is probed at micrometer to submicrometer distances from the cell surface. The electron paramagnetic resonance lines of an evanescent wave magnetometer in the presence of a magnetic field gradient exhibit edge enhancement seen previously in nuclear magnetic resonance lines. We present a theoretical model that describes quantitatively the shape of the magnetic resonance lines of an evanescent wave magnetometer under a wide range of experimental conditions. It accounts for diffusion broadening in the presence of a magnetic field gradient as well as interactions of spin polarized Rb atoms with the coated Pyrex glass surfaces. Depending on the field gradient, cell thickness, and buffer gas pressure, the resonance line may have the form of a single asymmetric peak or two peaks localized near the front and back surfaces in frequency space. The double-peaked response depends on average characteristics of the surface interactions. Its shape is sensitive to the dwell time, relaxation probability, and average phase shift of adsorbed spin polarized Rb atoms

  6. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: a postmortem study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q; Ducote, Justin L; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-12-01

    Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left-right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson's r, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left-right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left-right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson's r increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction. The investigated CLIC method

  7. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson'sr, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson'sr increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction

  8. Peak divergence in the curve of magnetoelectric coefficient versus dc bias magnetic field at resonance region for bi-layer magnetostrictive/piezoelectric composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Zuo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoelectric (ME coefficient dependence on the bias magnetic field at resonance frequencies for the bi-layered bonded Terfenol-D/Pb(Zr,TiO3 composite was investigated. The resonance frequency decreases first and then increases with the bias magnetic field (HDC, showing a “V” shape in the range of 0 ∼ 5 kOe. Below the resonance frequency, the pattern of ME coefficient dependence on the HDC shows a single peak, but splits into a double-peak pattern when the testing frequency increases into a certain region. With increasing the frequency, a divergent evolution of the HDC patterns was observed. Domain motion and ΔE effect combined with magnetostriction-piezoelectric coupling effect were employed to explain this experimental result.

  9. Effectiveness of low-field magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing brachial plexus tumours in dogs – short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamiak Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI sequences that contribute to a quick and reliable diagnosis of brachial plexus tumours in dogs. The tumours were successfully diagnosed in 6 dogs by the MRI with the use of SE, FSE, STIR, Turbo 3 D, 3D HYCE, and GE sequences and the gadolinium contrast agent

  10. Radio frequency self-resonant coil for contactless AC-conductivity in 100 T class ultra-strong pulse magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, D.; Altarawneh, M. M.; Takeyama, S.

    2018-03-01

    A contactless measurement system of electrical conductivity was developed for application under pulsed high magnetic fields over 100 T by using a self-resonant-type, high-frequency circuit. Electromagnetic fields in the circuit were numerically analysed by the finite element method, to show how the resonant power spectra of the circuit depends on the electrical conductivity of a sample set on the probe-coil. The performance was examined using a high-temperature cuprate superconductor, La2-x Sr x CuO4, in magnetic fields up to 102 T with a high frequency of close to 800 MHz. As a result, the upper critical field could be determined with a good signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of the human temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Colon-Perez

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Fresh ex vivo MR imaging, along with tractography, revealed complex intra-temporal structural variation corresponding to neuronal cell body layers, dendritic fields, and axonal projection systems evident histologically. This is the first study to describe in detail the human temporal lobe structural organization using high-field MR imaging and tractography. By preserving the 3-dimensional structures of the hippocampus and surrounding structures, specific changes in anatomy may inform us about the changes that occur in TLE in relation to the disease process and structural underpinnings in epilepsy-related memory dysfunction.

  12. Domain Engineered Magnetoelectric Thin Films for High Sensitivity Resonant Magnetic Field Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    increas small at low uency shift ur hypothes former: Sin (output), w tion. Materia ansducer. Th e transform voltage gai rmer. Furth ansformer p ded...90 min, r 0 Oe to 300 ith increasin ity (GH-G0/G tic field. Th dels. The d agnetic fiel ion of actua rent materia se with high nce and new r. This

  13. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  14. Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Lymphography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivé, Lionel; Derhy, Sarah; El Mouhadi, Sanaâ; Monnier-Cholley, Laurence; Menu, Yves; Becker, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Different imaging techniques have been used for the investigation of the lymphatic channels and lymph glands. Noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography has significant advantages in comparison with other imaging modalities. Noncontrast MR lymphography uses very heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences which obtain a nearly complete signal loss in tissue background and specific display of lymphatic vessels with a long T2 relaxation time. The raw data can be processed with different algorithms such as maximum intensity projection algorithm to obtain an anatomic representation. Standard T2-weighted MR images easily demonstrate the location of edema. It appears as subcutaneous infiltration of soft tissue with a classical honeycomb pattern. True collection around the muscular area may be demonstrated in case of severe lymphedema. Lymph nodes may be normal in size, number, and signal intensity; in other cases, lymph nodes may be smaller in size or number of lymph nodes may be restricted. MR lymphography allows a classification of lymphedema in aplasia (no collecting vessels demonstrated); hypoplasia (a small number of lymphatic vessels), and numerical hyperplasia or hyperplasia (with an increased number of lymphatic vessels of greater and abnormal diameter). Noncontrast MR lymphography is a unique noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of lymphedema. It can be used for positive diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and specific evaluation of lymphedema severity. It may also be used for follow-up evaluation after treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A.A. de; Doornbos, J.; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Matheijssen, N.A.A.; Laarse, A. van der; Krauss, X.H.; Blokland, J.A.k.; Manger Cats, V.; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiovascular applications of MRI in coronary artery disease have considerably increased in recent years. Although many applications overlap those of other more cost-effective techniques, such as echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, and CT, MRI offers unique features not shared by the conventional techniques. Technical advantages are the excellent spatial resolution, the characterization of myocardial tissue, and the potential for three-dimensional imaging. This allows the accurate assessment of left ventricular mass and volume, the differentiation of infarcted tissue from normal myocardial tissue, and the determination of systolic wall thickening and regional wall motion abnormalities. Also inducible myocardial ischemia using pharmacological stress (dipyramidole or dobutamine) may be assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Future technical developments include real-time imaging and noninvasive visualization of the coronary arteries. These advantages will have a major impact on the application of MRI in coronary artery disease, potentially unsurpassed by other techniques and certainly justifying the expenses. Consequently, the clinical use of MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease largely depends on the progress of technical developments. (author). 134 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  19. Assessing Exposures to Magnetic Resonance Imaging’s Complex Mixture of Magnetic Fields for In Vivo, In Vitro, and Epidemiologic Studies of Health Effects for Staff and Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Frankel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A complex mixture of electromagnetic fields is used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: static, low-frequency, and radio frequency magnetic fields. Commonly, the static magnetic field ranges from one to three Tesla. The low-frequency field can reach several millitesla and with a time derivative of the order of some Tesla per second. The radiofrequency (RF field has a magnitude in the microtesla range giving rise to specific absorption rate values of a few Watts per kilogram. Very little attention has been paid to the case where there is a combined exposure to several different fields at the same time. Some studies have shown genotoxic effects in cells after exposure to an MRI scan while others have not demonstrated any effects. A typical MRI exam includes muliple imaging sequences of varying length and intensity, to produce different types of images. Each sequence is designed with a particular purpose in mind, so one sequence can, for example, be optimized for clearly showing fat water contrast, while another is optimized for high-resolution detail. It is of the utmost importance that future experimental studies give a thorough description of the exposure they are using, and not just a statement such as “An ordinary MRI sequence was used.” Even if the sequence is specified, it can differ substantially between manufacturers on, e.g., RF pulse height, width, and duty cycle. In the latest SCENIHR opinion, it is stated that there is very little information regarding the health effects of occupational exposure to MRI fields, and long-term prospective or retrospective cohort studies on workers are recommended as a high priority. They also state that MRI is increasingly used in pediatric diagnostic imaging, and a cohort study into the effects of MRI exposure on children is recommended as a high priority. For the exposure assessment in epidemiological studies, there is a clear difference between patients and staff and further work is needed on this

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  3. Nondestructive prediction and visualization of plumpness in live Eriocheir sinensis using low-field 1 H magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongcai; Mei, Jun; Chen, Shunsheng; Wu, Xugan

    2018-02-06

    The plumpness of hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in live Chinese mitten crabs (Eriocheir sinensis) depends on the grading scale and its commercial value. In this work, a low-field T 1 -weighted 1 H magnetic resonance imaging (LF- 1 H MRI) technique was developed to nondestructively analyze the plumpness of hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in live E. sinensis. Both male and female E. sinensis were characterized by two-dimensional (2D) LF- 1 H MRI. Moreover, a three-dimensional (3D) LF- 1 H MRI model that quantitatively integrated the total volume of lipid tissues in live E. sinensis was used. The results showed 2D LF- 1 H MRI could accurately discriminate the plumpness of hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in live E. sinensis. The results of the 3D LF- 1 H MRI model displayed that the lipid volume of E. sinensis could be used to quantify lipid accumulation in lipid tissues. LF- 1 H MRI technology was successfully developed to accurately discriminate the development of E. sinensis hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in a nondestructive manner, indicating its application potential in grading commercial live crabs or advising crab farmers on breeding and fattening processes. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Study of the method of water-injected meat identifying based on low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianmei; Lin, Qing; Yang, Fang; Zheng, Zheng; Ai, Zhujun

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study to apply low-field nuclear magnetic resonance technique was to study regular variation of the transverse relaxation spectral parameters of water-injected meat with the proportion of water injection. Based on this, the method of one-way ANOVA and discriminant analysis was used to analyse the differences between these parameters in the capacity of distinguishing water-injected proportion, and established a model for identifying water-injected meat. The results show that, except for T 21b, T 22e and T 23b, the other parameters of the T 2 relaxation spectrum changed regularly with the change of water-injected proportion. The ability of different parameters to distinguish water-injected proportion was different. Based on S, P 22 and T 23m as the prediction variable, the Fisher model and the Bayes model were established by discriminant analysis method, qualitative and quantitative classification of water-injected meat can be realized. The rate of correct discrimination of distinguished validation and cross validation were 88%, the model was stable.

  5. Comparative analysis of full-field digital mammography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of malignant breast tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chuan; Meng Xiaochun; Kong Qingcong; Wang Xiaohong; Zhang Jiansheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively compare the efficacy of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of mammary cancer. Methods: 93 cases suspected mammary lesions both received FFDM and MRI examinations. Compared with pathology, we analyzed the imaging features of mammary cancer in these two methods and investigated the capability of these two methods in mammary cancer diagnosis. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value of positive cases, predictive value of negative cases and accuracy of FFDM in mammary cancer were 84.48%, 80.00%, 87.50%, 75.68% and 82.80% respectively; the detection rate for multi-focus was 55.56%. And the detection rate for microcalcifications in FFDM examination (29/69) was much higher than in MR/(7/69). The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value of positive cases, predictive value of negative cases and accuracy of MR/in mammary cancer diagnosis were 94.82%, 97.14%, 98.21%, 91.89% and 95.69%, respectively; the detection rate for multi-focus was 83.33%. The spiculate margin, ringed enhancement of the peripheral part of tumor and the fast-in-and-fast-out type of the time-signal intensity curve were the diagnostic signs of breast cancer. Conclusion: FFDM was sensitive for breast microcalcifications and could be feasible for breast cancer screening. MR/had a high sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis, which could be effective for pre-operation estimation. (authors)

  6. Comparison between high-field magnetic resonance imaging of the liver and computed tomography. A preliminary study on 39 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, P.; Marchal, G.; Aerts, P.; Van Fraeyenhoven, L.; Baert, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty nine patients with one or more focal hepatic lesions were examined by contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A variety of pulse sequences - spin echo (SE), gradient echo (GE) and inversion recovery (IR) - have been reported in the literature on MRI concerning the detection and characterization of liver tumors. Multiple studies have compared MRI at different field strenghts to CT. As controversy still exists concerning the optimal pulse sequence on MRI, CE-CT has been compared to T2 weighted SE sequence in this study. CT, as well as MRI, identified abnormalities in liver parenchyma in all patients. As far as detection of hepatic lesions is concerned, MRI and CE-CT were equal in 35 cases and MRI was superior in the other four cases. However, CT remains the examination of choice for detection of focal lesions, due to the short examination time, the low cost and the superiority in detection of extrahepatic pathology [fr

  7. Thermal magnetic resonance: physics considerations and electromagnetic field simulations up to 23.5 Tesla (1GHz)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Lukas; Oezerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Lindt, Tessa van de; Periquito, Joao; Ji, Yiyi; Ghadjar, Pirus; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and most aggressive malign brain tumor. The 5-year survival rate after tumor resection and adjuvant chemoradiation is only 10 %, with almost all recurrences occurring in the initially treated site. Attempts to improve local control using a higher radiation dose were not successful so that alternative additive treatments are urgently needed. Given the strong rationale for hyperthermia as part of a multimodal treatment for patients with glioblastoma, non-invasive radio frequency (RF) hyperthermia might significantly improve treatment results. A non-invasive applicator was constructed utilizing the magnetic resonance (MR) spin excitation frequency for controlled RF hyperthermia and MR imaging in an integrated system, which we refer to as thermal MR. Applicator designs at RF frequencies 300 MHz, 500 MHz and 1GHz were investigated and examined for absolute applicable thermal dose and temperature hotspot size. Electromagnetic field (EMF) and temperature simulations were performed in human voxel models. RF heating experiments were conducted at 300 MHz and 500 MHz to characterize the applicator performance and validate the simulations. The feasibility of thermal MR was demonstrated at 7.0 T. The temperature could be increased by ~11 °C in 3 min in the center of a head sized phantom. Modification of the RF phases allowed steering of a temperature hotspot to a deliberately selected location. RF heating was monitored using the integrated system for MR thermometry and high spatial resolution MRI. EMF and thermal simulations demonstrated that local RF hyperthermia using the integrated system is feasible to reach a maximum temperature in the center of the human brain of 46.8 °C after 3 min of RF heating while surface temperatures stayed below 41 °C. Using higher RF frequencies reduces the size of the temperature hotspot significantly. The opportunities and capabilities of thermal magnetic resonance for RF hyperthermia interventions

  8. Thermal magnetic resonance: physics considerations and electromagnetic field simulations up to 23.5 Tesla (1GHz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Lukas; Oezerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; van de Lindt, Tessa; Periquito, Joao; Ji, Yiyi; Ghadjar, Pirus; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2015-09-22

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and most aggressive malign brain tumor. The 5-year survival rate after tumor resection and adjuvant chemoradiation is only 10 %, with almost all recurrences occurring in the initially treated site. Attempts to improve local control using a higher radiation dose were not successful so that alternative additive treatments are urgently needed. Given the strong rationale for hyperthermia as part of a multimodal treatment for patients with glioblastoma, non-invasive radio frequency (RF) hyperthermia might significantly improve treatment results. A non-invasive applicator was constructed utilizing the magnetic resonance (MR) spin excitation frequency for controlled RF hyperthermia and MR imaging in an integrated system, which we refer to as thermal MR. Applicator designs at RF frequencies 300 MHz, 500 MHz and 1GHz were investigated and examined for absolute applicable thermal dose and temperature hotspot size. Electromagnetic field (EMF) and temperature simulations were performed in human voxel models. RF heating experiments were conducted at 300 MHz and 500 MHz to characterize the applicator performance and validate the simulations. The feasibility of thermal MR was demonstrated at 7.0 T. The temperature could be increased by ~11 °C in 3 min in the center of a head sized phantom. Modification of the RF phases allowed steering of a temperature hotspot to a deliberately selected location. RF heating was monitored using the integrated system for MR thermometry and high spatial resolution MRI. EMF and thermal simulations demonstrated that local RF hyperthermia using the integrated system is feasible to reach a maximum temperature in the center of the human brain of 46.8 °C after 3 min of RF heating while surface temperatures stayed below 41 °C. Using higher RF frequencies reduces the size of the temperature hotspot significantly. The opportunities and capabilities of thermal magnetic resonance for RF hyperthermia

  9. Assessing the wettability of unconsolidated porous media using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manalo, Florence Pabalan

    2002-01-01

    Methods such as the molarity of ethanol droplet (MED) test and water drop penetration test (WDPT) are commonly used to measure soil wettability because these tests are quick and easy to perform. However, they are not without limitations. This thesis proposes using a low-field NMR relaxometer as an alternative method of assessing soil wettability. This instrument is able to discriminate surface bound fluid from bulk fluid Fluid bound to the surface relaxes quickly and produces signal amplitude peaks at low transverse relaxation time (T 2 ) values. Bulk fluid , on the other hand, relaxes much more slowly and signal amplitude peaks consequently appear at higher T 2 values. An extensive experimental program was designed to test the above hypothesis. Hundreds of NMR measurements were performed on clays, humic acids, fulvic acids, clean sands, sands coated with organic matter, wettable soils and water-repellent soils exposed to distilled water and kerosene. The results confirm the hypothesis and show clearly that NMR does detect preferentially water-wet and water-repellent samples. The differences in the solid-fluid interactions between water and unconsolidated porous media with varying wetting preferences also allow for the use of low-field NMR to detect wettability alteration and to monitor fluid uptake in unconsolidated porous media. The advantages of using this tool include obtaining reproducible results quickly, using only small amounts of sample for analysis, and calculating the mass of water without performing a mass balance calculation. (author)

  10. The intra-observer reproducibility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking strain assessment is independent of field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, Andreas; Morton, Geraint; Hussain, Shazia T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT) is a promising novel method for quantification of myocardial wall mechanics from standard steady-state free precession (SSFP) images. We sought to determine whether magnetic field strength affects the intra-observer reproducibility of CMR-FT strain analysis. Methods: We studied 2 groups, each consisting of 10 healthy subjects, at 1.5 T or 3 T Analysis was performed at baseline and after 4 weeks using dedicated CMR-FT prototype software (Tomtec, Germany) to analyze standard SSFP cine images. Right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) longitudinal strain (Ell RV and Ell LV ) and LV long-axis radial strain (Err LAX ) were derived from the 4-chamber cine, and LV short-axis circumferential and radial strains (Ecc SAX , Err SAX ) from the short-axis orientation. Strain parameters were assessed together with LV ejection fraction (EF) and volumes. Intra-observer reproducibility was determined by comparing the first and the second analysis in both groups. Results: In all volunteers resting strain parameters were successfully derived from the SSFP images. There was no difference in strain parameters, volumes and EF between field strengths (p > 0.05). In general Ecc SAX was the most reproducible strain parameter as determined by the coefficient of variation (CV) at 1.5 T (CV 13.3% and 46% global and segmental respectively) and 3 T (CV 17.2% and 31.1% global and segmental respectively). The least reproducible parameter was Ell RV (CV 1.5 T 28.7% and 53.2%; 3 T 43.5% and 63.3% global and segmental respectively). Conclusions: CMR-FT results are similar with reasonable intra-observer reproducibility in different groups of volunteers at 1.5 T and 3 T. CMR-FT is a promising novel technique and our data indicate that results might be transferable between field strengths. However there is a considerable amount of segmental variability indicating that further refinements are needed before CMR

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  2. Monitoring of pistachio (Pistacia Vera) ripening by high field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciubba, Fabio; Avanzato, Damiano; Vaccaro, Angela; Capuani, Giorgio; Spagnoli, Mariangela; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Tzareva, Irina Nikolova; Delfini, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    The metabolic profiling of pistachio (Pistacia vera) aqueous extracts from two different cultivars, namely 'Bianca' and 'Gloria', was monitored over the months from May to September employing high field NMR spectroscopy. A large number of water-soluble metabolites were assigned by means of 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The change in the metabolic profiles monitored over time allowed the pistachio development to be investigated. Specific temporal trends of amino acids, sugars, organic acids and other metabolites were observed and analysed by multivariate Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis. Statistical analysis showed that while in the period from May to September there were few differences between the two cultivars, the ripening rate was different.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M. O. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    In Chapter 14, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance were presented, along with an introduction to image forming processes. In this chapter, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed, beginning with the hardware needed and its impact on image quality. The acquisition processes and image reconstruction will be discussed, as well as the artefacts that are possible, with discussion of the important area of safety and bioeffects completing the chapter.

  4. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  5. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  6. Structure of magnetic field in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.V.A.P.; Caldas, I.L.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic surfaces, necessary to plasma confinement, can be extinguished by resonant helical perturbations with small intensities due to plasma oscillations or external helical currents. The mapping of magnetic field is obtained intergrating numerically the differential equation of its lines. Criteria which evaluate the chaotic distribution of lines between resonant magnetic islands are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  7. Magnetic field line Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1985-02-01

    The basic properties of the Hamiltonian representation of magnetic fields in canonical form are reviewed. The theory of canonical magnetic perturbation theory is then developed and applied to the time evolution of a magnetic field embedded in a toroidal plasma. Finally, the extension of the energy principle to tearing modes, utilizing the magnetic field line Hamiltonian, is outlined

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yusaku; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Akaneya, Yukio; Mitui, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    We studied eighteen patients affected by Parkinsonism with symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, or rigidity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients ranged in age from 34 to 80 years (mean 62.8±11.6 years), and the duration of their disease had been 3.8±3.2 years. MRI examinations were performed with Shimazu and Siemens superconducting magnets, operating at 0.5 and 1.5 T magnetic fields, respectively. Both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used. In eight patients (44.4%), MRI demonstrated bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia. The most common abnormality identified was multiple, bilateral lacunar infarcts in the lateral portion of the putamen. The average size of the lacunar infarction of the putamen was less than half that of the entire putamen. Patients with multiple lacunar infarction were significantly older than the other patients and had lower Yahr's scores. The clinical symptoms of patients with bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia were compatible with the diagnosis of arteriosclerotic Parkinsonism of akinetic rigid type. It has been suggested that multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia may have led to Parkinsonism in these patients. (author)

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Permanent cosmetics or tattoos Dentures/teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i. ... or longer. You’ll be told ahead of time just how long your scan is expected to ...

  10. Investigation of Resonance Effect Caused by Local Exposure of Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field on Brain Signals: A Randomize Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasul Zadeh Tabataba’ei K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Some studies have investigated the effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs on brain signals, but only few of them have reported that humans exposed to magnetic fields exhibit changes in brain signals at the frequency of stimulation, i.e. resonance effect. In most investigations, researchers usually take advantage of a uniform field which encompasses the head. The aim of present study was to expose different parts of the brain to ELF-MFs locally and to investigate variation of brain signal and resonance effect.Methods: The subjects consisting of 19 male-students with the mean age of 25.6±1.6 years participated in this study. Local ELF-MFs with 3, 5, 10, 17 and 45Hz frequencies and 240 μT intensity was applied on five points (T3, T4, Cz, F3 and F4 of participants scalp Separately in 10-20 system. In the end, relative power over this points in common frequency bands and at the frequency of magnetic fields was evaluated by paired t-test.Results: Exposure of Central area by local magnetic field caused significant change (p<0.05 in the forehead alpha band. Reduction in the alpha band over central area was observed when temporal area was exposed to ELF MF.Conclusion: The results showed that resonance effect in the brain signals caused by local magnetic field exposure was not observed and change in every part of the relative power spectrum might occur. The changes in the EEG bands were not limited necessarily to the exposure point.

  11. Transition metal nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregosin, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Transition metal NMR spectroscopy has progressed enormously in recent years. New methods, and specifically solid-state methods and new pulse sequences, have allowed access to data from nuclei with relatively low receptivities with the result that chemists have begun to consider old and new problems, previously unapproachable. Moreover, theory, computational science in particular, now permits the calculation of not just 13 C, 15 N and other light nuclei chemical shifts, but heavy main-group element and transition metals as well. These two points, combined with increasing access to high field pulsed spectrometer has produced a wealth of new data on the NMR transition metals. A new series of articles concerned with measuring, understanding and using the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the metals of Group 3-12 is presented. (author)

  12. Cyclotron resonance study of the two-dimensional electron layers and double layers in tilted magnetic fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goncharuk, Natalya; Smrčka, Ludvík; Kučera, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2004), s. 590-593 ISSN 1386-9477. [International Conference on Electronic Properties of Two-Dimensional Systems /15./. Nara, 14.07.2003-18.07.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0754 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : single layer * double layer * two-dimensional electron system * cyclotron resonance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.898, year: 2004

  13. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...

  14. The Galactic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jinlin

    2006-01-01

    A good progress has been made on studies of Galactic magnetic fields in last 10 years. I describe what we want to know about the Galactic magnetic fields, and then review we current knowledge about magnetic fields in the Galactic disk, the Galactic halo and the field strengths. I also listed many unsolved problems on this area

  15. Magnetic resonance study of maghemite-based magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, L.C.; Lacava, B.M.; Skeff Neto, K.; Pelegrini, F.; Morais, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the magnetic resonance (MR) data (X-band experiment) of 10.2 nm average diameter maghemite nanoparticle in the temperature range of 100-230 K. Maghemite nanoparticles were suspended as low-pH ionic magnetic fluid containing 2.3x10 17 particles/cm 3 . The temperature dependence of both resonance linewidth and resonance field of the zero-field-cooled sample as well as the resonance field of the field-cooled sample (angular variation experiment) was analyzed using well-established methodology. Information regarding particle size, particle clusterization and surface magnetic anisotropy were obtained from the analysis of the MR data. The number of magnetic sites per particle from the MR data is in excellent agreement with the number provided by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data. The demagnetizing field value obtained from the MR data indicates cluster of particles containing on average 1.42 particles. The MR angular variation data suggest that magnetoelastic effect accounts for the non-linearity observed for the surface component of the magnetic anisotropy

  16. Evaluation of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and collagen by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; Avaliacao da polivinilpirrolidona e do colageno por ressonancia magnetica nuclear de baixo campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paula de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano]. E-mail: pmcosta@ima.ufrj.br

    2005-07-01

    Blends of natural and synthetic polymers represent a new class of materials with better mechanical properties and biocompatibility than those of the single components. Collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are well known for their important biological properties. The blending of collagen with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) makes it possible to obtain new materials in which strong interactions between the synthetic and biological components occur. Do to the excellent biocompatibility of these polymers, this blend has been much studied intending biomedical applications. And a one technique that can provide important information on molecular mobility, compatibility and even evaluate the interactions that can occur with these polymers is the Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Thus, the purpose of this work is to evaluate collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. From the values of relaxation times obtained, we can conclude that these materials have different interactions, and different mobility domains, confirming the heterogeneity and complexity of these materials. (author)

  17. Comparison of onboard low-field magnetic resonance imaging versus onboard computed tomography for anatomy visualization in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Camille E; Parikh, Parag J; Spencer, Christopher R; Green, Olga L; Hu, Yanle; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Onboard magnetic resonance imaging (OB-MRI) for daily localization and adaptive radiotherapy has been under development by several groups. However, no clinical studies have evaluated whether OB-MRI improves visualization of the target and organs at risk (OARs) compared to standard onboard computed tomography (OB-CT). This study compared visualization of patient anatomy on images acquired on the MRI-(60)Co ViewRay system to those acquired with OB-CT. Fourteen patients enrolled on a protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and undergoing image-guided radiotherapy for cancer in the thorax (n = 2), pelvis (n = 6), abdomen (n = 3) or head and neck (n = 3) were imaged with OB-MRI and OB-CT. For each of the 14 patients, the OB-MRI and OB-CT datasets were displayed side-by-side and independently reviewed by three radiation oncologists. Each physician was asked to evaluate which dataset offered better visualization of the target and OARs. A quantitative contouring study was performed on two abdominal patients to assess if OB-MRI could offer improved inter-observer segmentation agreement for adaptive planning. In total 221 OARs and 10 targets were compared for visualization on OB-MRI and OB-CT by each of the three physicians. The majority of physicians (two or more) evaluated visualization on MRI as better for 71% of structures, worse for 10% of structures, and equivalent for 14% of structures. 5% of structures were not visible on either. Physicians agreed unanimously for 74% and in majority for > 99% of structures. Targets were better visualized on MRI in 4/10 cases, and never on OB-CT. Low-field MR provides better anatomic visualization of many radiotherapy targets and most OARs as compared to OB-CT. Further studies with OB-MRI should be pursued.

  18. Assessment of female ballet dancers' ankles in the en pointe position using high field strength magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The en pointe position of the ankle in ballet is extreme. Previously, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of ballet dancers' ankles en pointe was confined to a low field, open MR device. To develop a reproducible ankle MRI protocol for ballet dancers en pointe and to assess the positions of the key structures in the dancers ankles. Six female ballet dancers participated; each was randomly assigned to stand en pointe while one of her feet and ankles was splinted with wooden rods affixed with straps or to begin with the ankle in neutral position. She lay in an MR scanner with the ankle inside a knee coil for en pointe imaging and inside an ankle/foot coil for neutral position imaging. Proton density weighted images with and without fat suppression and 3D water excitation gradient recalled echo images were obtained en pointe and in neutral position in sagittal, axial, and coronal planes. We compared the bones, cartilage, and soft tissues within and between positions. No difficulties using the protocol were encountered. En pointe the posterior articular surface of the tibial plafond was incongruent with the talar dome and rested on the posterior talus. The posterior edge of the plafond impinged Kager's fat pad. All participants exhibited one or more small ganglion cysts about the ankle and proximal foot, as well as fluid accumulation in the flexor and fibularis tendon sheaths. Our MRI protocol allows assessment of female ballet dancers' ankles in the extreme plantar flexion position in which the dancers perform. We consistently noted incongruence of the talocrural joint and convergence of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus posteriorly. This protocol may be useful for clinicians who evaluate dancers. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  19. Magnetically coupled Fano resonance of dielectric pentamer oligomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fuli; Li, Chang; He, Xuan; Chen, Lei; Fan, Yuancheng; Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Weihong; Zhou, Ji

    2017-01-01

    We present magnetically induced Fano resonance inside a dielectric metamaterial pentamer composed of ceramic bricks. Unlike previous reports where different sizes of dielectric resonators were essential to produce Fano resonance, under external magnetic field excitation, central and outer dielectric bricks with identical sizes exhibit in-phase and out-of-phase magnetic Mie oscillations. An asymmetric line shape of Fano resonance along with enhanced group delay is observed due to the interference between the magnetic resonance of the central brick and the symmetric magnetic resonance of outer bricks. Besides, Fano resonance blueshifts with the increasing resonance of the smaller central brick. The thermal-dependent permittivity of ceramics allows Fano resonance to be reversibly tuned by 300 MHz when temperature varies by 60 °C. (paper)

  20. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  1. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Field Grid Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Properties Calculator will computes the estimated values of Earth's magnetic field(declination, inclination, vertical component, northerly...

  3. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  5. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Auricular Percutaneous Electrical Neural Field Stimulation for Fibromyalgia: Protocol for a Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebre, Melat; Woodbury, Anna; Napadow, Vitaly; Krishnamurthy, Venkatagiri; Krishnamurthy, Lisa C; Sniecinski, Roman; Crosson, Bruce

    2018-02-06

    patient comorbidities and preferences, prescribed by a pain management practitioner. The PENFS group will include the above therapies in addition to the PENFS treatments. The PENFS subject group will have the Neuro-Stim System placed on the ear for 5 days then removed and replaced once per week for 4 weeks. The primary outcome will be resting functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity between DMN and insula, which will also be correlated with pain relief and functional improvements. This connectivity will be analyzed utilizing functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and will be compared with patient-reported analgesic improvements as indicated by the DVPRS and patient-reported analgesic medication consumption. Pain and function will be further evaluated using Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System measures and measures describing a person's functional status from Activity and Participation section of the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health. This trial has been funded by the Veterans Health Administration Program Office. This study attained approval by the Emory University/Veterans Affairs (VA) institutional review board and VA Research & Development committee. Institutional review board expedited approval was granted on 2/7/17 (IRB00092224). The study start date is 6/1/17 and estimated completion date is 5/31/20. The recruitment started in June 2017. This is a feasibility study that is meant to demonstrate the practicality of using fcMRI to study the neural correlates of PENFS outcomes and provide information regarding power calculations in order to design and execute a larger randomized controlled clinical trial to determine the efficacy of PENFS for improving pain and function. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03008837; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03008837 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6wrY3NmaQ). ©Melat Gebre, Anna Woodbury, Vitaly Napadow, Venkatagiri Krishnamurthy, Lisa C

  6. Neurobehavioral effects among subjects exposed to high static and gradient magnetic fields from a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system--a case-crossover pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vocht, Frank; van-Wendel-de-Joode, Berna; Engels, Hans; Kromhout, Hans

    2003-10-01

    The interactive use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques is increasing in operating theaters. A study was performed on 17 male company volunteers to assess the neurobehavioral effects of exposure to magnetic fields from a 1.5 Tesla MRI system. The subjects' neurobehavioral performances on a neurobehavioral test battery were compared in four 1-hr sessions with and without exposure to magnetic fields, and with and without additional movements. Adverse effects were found for hand coordination (-4%, P Tesla MRI system may lead to neurobehavioral effects. Further research is recommended, especially in members of operating teams using interactive MRI systems. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Large field-of-view transmission line resonator for high field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johannesson, Kristjan Sundgaard; Boer, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line resonators is often a preferable choice for coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because they provide a number of advantages over traditional loop coils. The size of such resonators, however, is limited to shorter than half a wavelength due to high standing wave....... Achieved magnetic field distribution is compared to the conventional transmission line resonator. Imaging experiments are performed using 7 Tesla MRI system. The developed resonator is useful for building coils with large field-of-view....

  8. Omnigenous magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupakov, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    In omnigenous magnetic fields particles' drift surfaces coincide with plasma magnetic surfaces. In this paper we formulate equations of omnigenous magnetic fields in natural curvilinear coordinates. An analysis of fields which are omnigenous only in the paraxial approximation is presented. (author)

  9. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy Morais, J.P.M.; Azevedo, R.B.; Silva, L.P.; Lacava, Z.G.M.; Bao, S.N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malla Huesh, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    nuclei and sulci. FLAIR - sequences with its advantage in suppressing the signal from the cerebrospinal fluid is useful in case of meningeal involvement in hypophysitis. DWI is essential in case of ischemia, apoplexy and associated necrotic changes. Contrast medium application is not compulsory, but it increases the sensitivity of the method, especially in young patients. The contrast used is Gadolinium, applied according to the body weight. After contrast application the gland enhances homogeneously. MR-methods made are responsible for throwing light upon the normal images of the pituitary gland from the neonatal patients to adults, explaining the malformative and rare conditions, leading to disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The most common reason for pathologic conditions in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis remain the adenomas. MR-imaging is the method of choice to rule out a suspected formation in the sellar area. Small adenomas with size around 3mm are now detectable with the use of equipment with high strength of magnetic field. Authors agree on the fact the secreting and nonsecreting adenomas need a thorough MR-follow up in time, especially the nonsecreting ones that are usually detected accidentally. In the era before the multislice diagnostic imaging the pathologies in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis were difficult to assess. The introduction of the new methods of investigation made the diagnosis of such conditions achievable. Magnetic resonance imaging is convenient, informative and clinically applicable for detecting hypothalamic-pituitary axis. However there is no agreement how the MR-protocol should be carried out. MR with high magnetic field is an essential tool in obtaining images with better quality, higher diagnostic value and the opportunity for performing sequences in thin slices and reconstructions in different planes. Key words: Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Hypophysis. 3TESLA

  11. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Magnetic Field Measurements in Beam Guiding Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Henrichsen, K N

    1998-01-01

    Electromagnets used as beam guiding elements in particle accelerators and colliders require very tight tole-rances on their magnetic fields and on their alignment along the particle path. This article describes the methods and equipment used for magnetic measurements in beam transport magnets. Descriptions are given of magnetic resonance techniques, various induction coil methods, Hall generator measurements, the fluxgate magnetometer as well as the recently developed method of beam based alignment. References of historical nature as well as citations of recent work are given. The present commercial availability of the different sensors and asso-ciated equipment is indicated. Finally we shall try to analyze possible future needs for developments in those fields.

  13. Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Martínez González, M. J.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in many astrophysical processes. They are difficult to detect and characterize since often their properties have to be inferred through interpreting the polarization of the light. Magnetic fields are also challenging to model and understand. Magnetized plasmas behave following highly non-linear differential equations having no general solution, so that every astrophysical problem represents a special case to be studied independently. Hence, magnetic fields are often an inconvenient subject which is overlooked or simply neglected (the elephant in the room, as they are dubbed in poster of the school). Such difficulty burdens the research on magnetic fields, which has evolved to become a very technical subject, with many small disconnected communities studying specific aspects and details. The school tried to amend the situation by providing a unifying view of the subject. The students had a chance to understand the behavior of magnetic fields in all astrophysical contexts, from cosmology to the Sun, and from starbursts to AGNs. The school was planed to present a balanced yet complete review of our knowledge, with excursions into the unknown to point out present and future lines of research. The subject of Cosmic Magnetic Fields was split into seven different topics: cosmic magnetic field essentials, solar magnetic fields, stellar magnetic fields, the role of magnetic fields on AGN feedback, magnetic fields in galaxies, magnetic fields in galaxy clusters and at larger scales, and primordial magnetic fields and magnetic fields in the early Universe. The corresponding lectures were delivered by seven well known and experienced scientists that have played key roles in the major advances of the field during the last years: F. Cattaneo, P. Judge, O. Kochukhov, R. Keppens, R. Beck, K. Dolag, and F. Finelli. Their lectures were recorded and are freely available at the IAC website: http://iactalks.iac.es/talks/serie/19.

  14. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31 P, 13 C, 1 H (and possibly 19 F and 23 Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  15. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  16. Magnetic elliptical polarization of Schumann resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentman, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of orthogonal, horizontal components of the magnetic field in the ELF range obtained during September 1985 show that the Schumann resonance eigenfrequencies determined separately for the north-south and east-west magnetic components differ by as much as 0.5 Hz, suggesting that the underlying magnetic signal is not linearly polarized at such times. The high degree of magnetic ellipticity found suggests that the side multiplets of the Schumann resonances corresponding to azimuthally inhomogeneous normal modes are strongly excited in the highly asymmetric earth-ionosphere cavity. The dominant sense of polarization over the measurement passband is found to be right-handed during local daylight hours, and to be left-handed during local nighttime hours. 16 references

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quibilan, E.I.

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  18. Contributed Review: Camera-limits for wide-field magnetic resonance imaging with a nitrogen-vacancy spin sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Adam M.; Karadas, Mürsel; Huck, Alexander; Osterkamp, Christian; Jankuhn, Steffen; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2018-03-01

    Sensitive, real-time optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond relies on accurate imaging of small (≪10-2), fractional fluorescence changes across the diamond sample. We discuss the limitations on magnetic field sensitivity resulting from the limited number of photoelectrons that a camera can record in a given time. Several types of camera sensors are analyzed, and the smallest measurable magnetic field change is estimated for each type. We show that most common sensors are of a limited use in such applications, while certain highly specific cameras allow achieving nanotesla-level sensitivity in 1 s of a combined exposure. Finally, we demonstrate the results obtained with a lock-in camera that paves the way for real-time, wide-field magnetometry at the nanotesla level and with a micrometer resolution.

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  6. Terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using a high-field pulsed magnet and an asynchronous optical sampling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B. F., E-mail: Ben.Spencer@manchester.ac.uk; Smith, W. F.; Hibberd, M. T.; Dawson, P.; Graham, D. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy and the Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Beck, M.; Bartels, A. [Laser Quantum GmbH, Max-Stromeyer-Str. 116, 78467 Konstanz (Germany); Guiney, I.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-23

    The effective mass, sheet carrier concentration, and mobility of electrons within a two-dimensional electron gas in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure were determined using a laboratory-based terahertz cyclotron resonance spectrometer. The ability to perform terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy with magnetic fields of up to 31 T was enabled by combining a high-field pulsed magnet with a modified asynchronous optical sampling terahertz detection scheme. This scheme allowed around 100 transmitted terahertz waveforms to be recorded over the 14 ms magnetic field pulse duration. The sheet density and mobility were measured to be 8.0 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} and 9000 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} at 77 K. The in-plane electron effective mass at the band edge was determined to be 0.228 ± 0.002m{sub 0}.

  7. Resonant helical fields in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, V.

    1990-01-01

    Poincare maps of magnetic field lines of a toroidal helical system were made. The magnetic field is a linear superposition of the magnetic fields produced by a toroidal plasma in equilibrium and by external helical currents. Analytical expression for the Poincare maps was no obtained since the magnetic field do not have symmetry. In order to obtain the maps, the equation minus derivative of l vector times B vector = 0 was numerically integrated. In the Poincare maps, the principal and the secondary magnetic island were observed. (author)

  8. Strong Magnetic Field Characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    an advertised surface field of approximately 0.5 T were used to supply the static magnetic field source. The disc magnet had a diameter of 50 mm and... colour bar indicates the magnetic field strength set to an arbitrary 0.25 T. The white area has a field >0.25 T. The size of the arrow is proportional...9 shows the magnetic field strength along a slice in the XZ plane. The colours represent the total UNCLASSIFIED 10 UNCLASSIFIED DSTO-TR-2699

  9. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, Mathias; Bjarnø, Jonas Bækby

    2017-01-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter’s planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor ...

  10. Resonant diffuse X-ray scattering from magnetic multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezzani, Carlo; Torelli, Piero; Delaunay, Renaud; Hague, C.F.; Petroff, Frederic; Scholl, Andreas; Gullikson, E.M.; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2004-01-01

    We have measured field-dependent resonant diffuse scattering from a magnetoresistive Co/Cu multilayer. We have observed that the magnetic domain size in zero field depends on the magnetic history of the sample. The results of the X-ray scattering analysis have been compared to PEEM images of the magnetic domains

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What ...

  12. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  13. Physics of Magnetic Resonance. Chapter 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hee Kwon [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), a property of nuclei in a magnetic field where they are able to absorb applied radiofrequency (RF) energy and subsequently release it at a specific frequency, goes back many decades to the early 1900s. Physicist Isidor I. Rabi, fascinated by the work of Otto Stern and Walther Gerlach which demonstrated that particles have intrinsic quantum properties, delved into the magnetic properties of nuclei, and in 1938 Rabi discovered the phenomenon of NMR. Several years later, in 1946, Felix Bloch and Edward Purcell refined the methods and successfully measured the NMR signal from liquids and solids. For their discoveries, Rabi received the Nobel Prize for physics in 1944 and Bloch and Purcell in 1952. While Rabi, Bloch, Purcell and other physicists working in this field had laid the foundations, a major discovery that transformed the NMR phenomenon for imaging was not made until 1973, when Paul Lauterbur developed a method for spatially encoding the NMR signal by utilizing linear magnetic field gradients. About the same time, Peter Mansfield had also discovered a means of determining the spatial structure of solids by introducing a linear gradient across the object. The idea of applying magnetic field gradients to induce spatially varying resonance frequencies to resolve the spatial distribution of magnetization was a major milestone and the beginning of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For their work, Lauterbur and Mansfield were awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine in 2003. Since its discovery, MRI has quickly become one of the most important medical imaging devices available to physicians today. Unlike other imaging modalities, such as X ray and computed tomography, MRI does not involve ionizing radiation. MRI also offers superior soft tissue contrast that is not possible with other imaging modalities. Furthermore, in MRI, the desired level of image contrast among different tissues can often be precisely controlled

  14. Cosmological magnetic fields - V

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic fields seem to be everywhere that we can look in the universe, from our own ... The field tensor is observer-independent, while the electric and magnetic .... based on string theory [11], in which vacuum fluctuations of the field are ...

  15. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  16. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.) [de

  17. Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, L W; Bakker, C J G

    2003-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed. (topical review)

  18. Magnetic resonance for wireless power transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, SYR

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance has been a cornerstone of nonradiative wireless power transfer (WPT) since the late 19th century. However, some researchers have the misconception that magnetic resonance for WPT was developed recently. This article traces some early work of Tesla and other researchers related to the use of magnetic resonance in WPT. Included are some examples of magnetic resonance-based WPT projects conducted by researchers in the biomedical and power electronics communities over the last ...

  19. Contributed review: camera-limits for wide-field magnetic resonance imaging with a nitrogen-vacancy spin sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojciechowski, Adam M.; Karadas, Mürsel; Huck, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Sensitive, real-time optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond relies on accurate imaging of small (≪10−2), fractional fluorescence changes across the diamond sample. We discuss the limitations on magnetic field sensitivity resulting from the limited number of photoelectrons t......-level sensitivity in 1 s of a combined exposure. Finally, we demonstrate the results obtained with a lock-in camera that paves the way for real-time, wide-field magnetometry at the nanotesla level and with a micrometer resolution....

  20. Organic magnetic field sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCamey, Dane; Boehme, Christoph

    2017-01-24

    An organic, spin-dependent magnetic field sensor (10) includes an active stack (12) having an organic material with a spin-dependence. The sensor (10) also includes a back electrical contact (14) electrically coupled to a back of the active stack (12) and a front electrical contact (16) electrically coupled to a front of the active stack (12). A magnetic field generator (18) is oriented so as to provide an oscillating magnetic field which penetrates the active stack (12).

  1. Comparative magnetic resonance imaging of renal space-occupying lesions with a high and a low field MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehl, H.B.; Lorch, H.; Amblank, O.B.M.; Engerhoff, B.; Weiss, H.D.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective study of the diagnostic accuracy and image quality of two MRI systems in the detection of renal tumors was investigated. Materials and Methods: 34 patients with the clinical suspicion of a space-occupying renal lesion were examined by MRI with a low field (0.2 Tesla magnet) and a high field (1.5 Tesla magnet) for comparison. An 'informed' and a 'blind' observer evaluated all of the MR images. In addition, the signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios were evaluated as second quality parameters. Results: In 29 cases the results could be compared with a confirmed release diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy was comparable with both systems (Sensitivity for both observer on LF apparatus: 83%, HF apparatus: 81%) although the signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly poorer at low field. Conclusions: The low field system in comparable to the high field MRI for detection and differentiation of renal space-occupying lesions. (orig.) [de

  2. Specific proof of various stages of Osler's disease of the brain via high field magnetic resonance tomography (1. 5 Tesla)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billet, F; Bluemm, R G; Beyer, H K

    1988-08-01

    MR is a sensitive noninvasive examination method for diagnosing parenchymatous cryptic arteriovenous malformations and sequels of cerebral haemorrhage. In a patient with recurring nosebleed and brain stem syndrome eleven so-called cryptic arteriovenous malformations or their haemorrhage sequels were diagnosed via magnetic resonance tomography. Basing on these specific findings, nosebleeding, and a positive family anamnesis, the findings could be classified as belonging to manifestations of Osler's disease (hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia). This rare disease is characterised by a triad of signs: telangiectasias, recurring bleeding, and heredity. In this article the specific MR image is compared with the CT pattern and the results are discussed against the background of literature on Osler's disease which is also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasson, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The review covers published literature from July 1979 to July 1981, although a few references to other work are also included. This list of references should serve as a useful guide to the applications and to the literature available in this field. 367 references

  4. Isotope separation by magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    One of the isotopes of an element having several isotopes can be separated from the others in a dense, neutral plasma. Thus initially a neutral plasma is prepared including the element in question. This may consist of positive ions and negative electrons or alternatively of positive and negative ions, or else of a mixture of positive ions, negative ions and electrons. The plasma may then be injected into a magnetic field or may be generated in the field where more energy is imparted to a selected isotope than to the others. Finally, the isotopes are separated from each other on the basis of their differential energies. For example, the selected isotope may be given more energy than the others by stimulating it within the plasma at its resonant frequency which may be close to the cyclotron frequency, either by an electric field or by a magnetic field. In order to excite the other isotope, a different resonant frequency is required which depends on the plasma density, the relative concentration of electrons if the plasma contains electrons, the strength of the magnetic field, the ratio of charge to mass of the isotope, and possibly on the physical parameters of the plasma apparatus itself, such as the ratio of the length of the plasma column to its radius. The more energetic isotope may be separated by energy dependent chemical reactions, it may be collected by a positively biased probe or else the isotopes may be separated from each other by magnetic fields or in various other ways

  5. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Highton, Louise A R; Kenny, Stephen M; Green, Gary G R; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all ¹H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10⁻³ Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  6. Analysis and reduction of thermal magnetic noise in liquid-He dewar for sensitive low-field nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S. M.; Yu, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Kang, C. S.; Kim, K.; Lee, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    For sensitive measurements of micro-Tesla nuclear magnetic resonance (μT-NMR) signal, a low-noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) system is needed. We have fabricated a liquid He dewar for an SQUID having a large diameter for the pickup coil. The initial test of the SQUID system showed much higher low-frequency magnetic noise caused by the thermal magnetic noise of the aluminum plates used for the vapor-cooled thermal shield material. The frequency dependence of the noise spectrum showed that the noise increases with the decrease of frequency. This behavior could be explained from a two-layer model; one generating the thermal noise and the other one shielding the thermal noise by eddy-current shielding. And the eddy-current shielding effect is strongly dependent on the frequency through the skin-depth. To minimize the loop size for the fluctuating thermal noise current, we changed the thermal shield material into insulated thin Cu mesh. The magnetic noise of the SQUID system became flat down to 0.1 Hz with a white noise of 0.3 fT√ Hz, including the other noise contributions such as SQUID electronics and magnetically shielded room, etc, which is acceptable for low-noise μT-NMR experiments.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, ... to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI is ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... material called gadolinium, which is less likely to cause an allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... the MRI equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MRI scan, but this is rare. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lodged in the eyes are particularly important. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... regular daily routine and have him/her take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... the exam if your child has a known allergy to contrast material. Your child should wear loose, ...

  5. Interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debatin, J.F.; Adam, G.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of open configuration MR imaging systems, the vision of MRI-based guidance, control, and monitoring of minimally invasive interventions has evolved from a hypothetical concept to a practical possibility. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the very exciting emerging field of interventional MRI. The international authorship provides firsthand experience of all relevant topics. This book will familiarize the reader with the basic principles underlying currently available hardware and software configurations. In addition, technical aspects of thermosensitive imaging, techniques for instrument visualization, and safety aspects are covered. Finally, the book emphasizes both existing and future clinical applications. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of tablet dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nott, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for measuring hydration, and its effects, during dissolution of tablets since it non-invasively maps (1)H nuclei associated with 'mobile' water. Although most studies have used MRI systems with high-field superconducting magnets, low-field laboratory-based instruments based on permanent magnet technology are being developed that provide key data for the formulation scientist. Incorporation of dissolution hardware, in particular the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus 4 flow-through cell, allows measurements under controlled conditions for comparison against other dissolution methods. Furthermore, simultaneous image acquisition and measurement of drug concentration allow direct comparison of the drug release throughout the hydration process. The combination of low-field MRI with USP-4 apparatus provides another tool to aid tablet formulation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.; Staedtisches Rudolf-Virchow Krankenhaus, Berlin

    1985-01-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness. (orig.) [de

  8. Detection of undistorted continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra with non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) of the magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Hyde, James S.

    2011-01-01

    A continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum is typically displayed as the first harmonic response to the application of 100 kHz magnetic field modulation, which is used to enhance sensitivity by reducing the level of 1/f noise. However, magnetic field modulation of any amplitude causes spectral broadening and sacrifices EPR spectral intensity by at least a factor of two. In the work presented here, a CW rapid-scan spectroscopic technique that avoids these compromises and also provides a means of avoiding 1/f noise is developed. This technique, termed non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR, consists of repetitively sweeping the polarizing magnetic field in a linear manner over a spectral fragment with a small coil at a repetition rate that is sufficiently high that receiver noise, microwave phase noise, and environmental microphonics, each of which has 1/f characteristics, are overcome. Nevertheless, the rate of sweep is sufficiently slow that adiabatic responses are avoided and the spin system is always close to thermal equilibrium. The repetitively acquired spectra from the spectral fragment are averaged. Under these conditions, undistorted pure absorption spectra are obtained without broadening or loss of signal intensity. A digital filter such as a moving average is applied to remove high frequency noise, which is approximately equivalent in bandwidth to use of an integrating time constant in conventional field modulation with lock-in detection. Nitroxide spectra at L- and X-band are presented. PMID:21741868

  9. [Comparative assessment of MR-semiotics of acutest intracerebral hematomas in low- and extra high-field frequency magnetic resonance tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsova, V I; Burenchev, D V; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Prokhorov, A V; Smirnov, A M; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    An objective of the study was to compare sensitivity of low- and extra high-field frequency magnetic resonance (MR) tomography of acutest intracerebral hematomas (ICH) and to assess differences between symptoms in obtained images. A study was conducted using experimental ICH in rats (n=6). Hematomas were formed by two injections of autologic blood into the brain. MR-devices "Bio Spec 70/30" with magnetic field strength of 7 T and "Ellipse-150" with magnetic field strength of 0,15 T were used in the study. MR-tomography was carried out 3-5 h after the injections. Both MR-devices revealed the presence of pathological lesion in all animals. Extra highfield frequency MR-tomography showed the specific signs of ICH caused by the paramagnetic effect of deoxyhemoglobin in T2 and T2*-weighted images (WI) and low frequency MR-tomography - in T2*-WI only. The comparable sensitivity of low- and extra high-field frequency MR-devices in acutest ICH was established.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnetic terbium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, C.L.T.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic properties of terbium were studied by the method of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance at 1.5 to 4 and 85 to 160 0 K. Two unconventional experimental techniques have been employed: the swept frequency and the swept temperature technique. Near 4 0 K, triplet resonance line structures were found and interpreted in terms of the magnetic domain and wall structures of ferromagnetic terbium. In the higher temperature range, temperature dependence of the resonance frequency and the quadrupole splitting were measured. The former provides a measurement of the temperature dependence of the magnetization M, and it agrees with bulk M measurements as well as the latest spin wave theory of M(T) (Brooks 1968). The latter agrees well with a calculation using a very general single ion density matrix for collective excitations (Callen and Shtrikman 1965). In addition, the small temperature-independent contribution to the electric field gradient at the nucleus due to the lattice and conduction electrons was untangled from the P(T) data. Also an anomalous and unexplained relaxation phenomenon was also observed

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  12. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  13. Magnetic field on board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez Radio, H.; Fernandez Arenal, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Here, the calculation of the magnetic field on board ships is performed, using matrix calculus, in a similar way as when the magnetic field in matter is studied. Thus the final formulas are written in a more compact form and they are obtained through a simpler way, more suitable for the university education. (Author)

  14. Magnetic field line Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-01

    The magnetic field line Hamiltonian and the associated canonical form for the magnetic field are important concepts both for understanding toroidal plasma physics and for practical calculations. A number of important properties of the canonical or Hamiltonian representation are derived and their importance is explained

  15. MAGNETIC FIELDS OF STARS

    OpenAIRE

    Bychkov, V. D.; Bychkova, L. V.; Madej, J.

    2008-01-01

    Now it is known about 1212 stars of the main sequence and giants (from them 610 stars - it is chemically peculiarity (CP) stars) for which direct measurements of magnetic fields were spent (Bychkov et al.,2008). Let's consider, what representations were generated about magnetic fields (MT) of stars on the basis of available observations data.

  16. Controlling magnetic field profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.R.

    1979-04-01

    A method for designing solenoid magnets with controlled field profiles is discussed. The method, originated by D.B. Montgomery, minimizes both the field errors and the power consumption. An NOS time-sharing computer program for the CDC-6600, entitled MAGCOR, was constructed to provide an interactive magnet design capability. Results obtained during the design of magnets for a radial line electron accelerator are presented. 9 figures

  17. Reactor-relevant quiescent H-mode operation using torque from non-axisymmetric, non-resonant magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M; Osborne, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Park, J.-K.; Fenstermacher, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Results from recent experiments demonstrate that quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) sustained by magnetic torque from non-axisymmetric magnetic fields is a promising operating mode for future burning plasmas. Using magnetic torque from n=3 fields to replace counter-I p torque from neutral beam injection (NBI), we have achieved long duration, counter-rotating QH-mode operation with NBI torque ranging from counter-I p to up to co-I p values of 1-1.3 Nm. This co-I p torque is 3 to 4 times the scaled torque that ITER will have. These experiments utilized an ITER-relevant lower single-null plasma shape and were done with ITER-relevant values of ν ped * and β N ped . These discharges exhibited confinement quality H 98y2 =1.3, in the range required for ITER. In preliminary experiments using n=3 fields only from a coil outside the toroidal coil, QH-mode plasmas with low q 95 =3.4 have reached fusion gain values of G=β N H 89 /q 95 2 =0.4, which is the desired value for ITER. Shots with the same coil configuration also operated with net zero NBI torque. The limits on G and co-I p torque have not yet been established for this coil configuration. QH-mode work to has made significant contact with theory. The importance of edge rotational shear is consistent with peeling-ballooning mode theory. Qualitative and quantitative agreements with the predicted neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque is seen.

  18. Ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging; L'imagerie par resonance magnetique a ultra-haut champ. L'aimant, piece maitresse de l'imageur. Memo C: les principales techniques d'imagerie medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lethimonnier, F. [CEA Saclay, Institut d' Imagerie Biomedicale - NeuroSpin, Dir. des Sciences du Vivant, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vedrine, P. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Understanding human brain function, brain development and brain dysfunction is one of the great challenges of the twenty first century. Biomedical imaging has now run up against a number of technical constraints that are exposing limits to its potential. In order to overcome the current limits to high-field magnetic resonance cerebral imaging (MRI) and unleash its fullest potential, the Cea has built NeuroSpin, an ultra-high-field neuroimaging facility at its Saclay centre (in the Essonne). NeuroSpin already boasts three fully operational MRI systems. The first is a 3-tesla high-field system and the second is a very-high-field 7-tesla system, both of which are dedicated to clinical studies and investigations in humans, while the third is an ultra-high-field 17.65-tesla system designed for studies on small animals. In 2011, NeuroSpin will be commissioning an 11.7-tesla ultra-high-field system of unprecedented power that is designed for research on human subjects. The level of the magnetic field and the scale required will make this joint French-German project to build the magnet a breakthrough in the international arena. (authors)

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in pharmaceutical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has important applications in pharmaceutical research since it allows specific tissue and disease characterization in animal models noninvasively with excellent anatomical resolution and therefore provides improved ability to monitor the efficacy of novel drugs. The utility of NMR imaging in renal studies to monitor the mechanism of drug action and renal function in rats is described. The extension of the resolution of an NMR image to microscopic domain at higher magnetic field strengths and the utility of NMR microimaging in cerebrovascular and tumour metastasis studies in mice are discussed. (author). 40 refs., 14 figs

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1983-01-01

    In a method of investigating the distribution of a quantity in a chosen region of a body (E) by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques movement of the body during the investigation is monitored by probes (A, B C) (C extends orthogonally to A and B) attached to the body and responsive to magnetic fields applied to the body during the investigation. An apparatus for carrying out the method is also described. If movement is detected, due compensation may be made during processing of the collected data, or the latter may be re-ascertained after appropriate adjustment e.g. a change in the RF excitation frequency. (author)

  1. High-resolution small field-of-view magnetic resonance image acquisition system using a small planar coil and a pneumatic manipulator in an open MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kohei; Masamune, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Low-field open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for performing image-guided neurosurgical procedures. Intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images are useful for tracking brain shifts and verifying residual tumors. However, it is difficult to precisely determine the boundary of the brain tumors and normal brain tissues because the MR image resolution is low, especially when using a low-field open MRI scanner. To overcome this problem, a high-resolution MR image acquisition system was developed and tested. An MR-compatible manipulator with pneumatic actuators containing an MR signal receiver with a small radiofrequency (RF) coil was developed. The manipulator had five degrees of freedom for position and orientation control of the RF coil. An 8-mm planar RF coil with resistance and inductance of 2.04 [Formula: see text] and 1.00 [Formula: see text] was attached to the MR signal receiver at the distal end of the probe. MR images of phantom test devices were acquired using the MR signal receiver and normal head coil for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) testing. The SNR of MR images acquired using the MR signal receiver was 8.0 times greater than that of MR images acquired using the normal head coil. The RF coil was moved by the manipulator, and local MR images of a phantom with a 2-mm grid were acquired using the MR signal receiver. A wide field-of-view MR image was generated from a montage of local MR images. A small field-of-view RF system with a pneumatic manipulator was integrated in a low-field MRI scanner to allow acquisition of both wide field-of-view and high-resolution MR images. This system is promising for image-guided neurosurgery as it may allow brain tumors to be observed more clearly and removed precisely.

  2. Green’s function theory of ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic superlattices with damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, R.K.; Guo, F.F.; Zhang, Z.D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore a quantum Green’s-function method to study the resonance absorption of magnetic materials. The relationship between the resonance magnon (spin wave) density and the resonance frequency of a superlattice consisting of two magnetic layers with damping and antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling is studied. The effects of temperature, interlayer coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and damping on the the resonance frequency and resonance magnon density are investigated. The resonance excitation probability for a magnon is proportional to the resonance magnon density. In the classic methods, the imaginary part of magnetic permeability represents the resonance absorption in magnetic materials. In the quantum approach, the resonance magnon density can be used to estimate the strength of the resonance absorption. In the present work, a quantum approach is developed to study resonance absorption of magnetic materials and the results show the method to obtain a magnetic multilayered materials with both high resonance frequency and high resonance absorption.

  3. Green’s function theory of ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic superlattices with damping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, R.K., E-mail: rkqiu@163.com [Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Guo, F.F. [Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Zhang, Z.D. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2016-02-01

    We explore a quantum Green’s-function method to study the resonance absorption of magnetic materials. The relationship between the resonance magnon (spin wave) density and the resonance frequency of a superlattice consisting of two magnetic layers with damping and antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling is studied. The effects of temperature, interlayer coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and damping on the the resonance frequency and resonance magnon density are investigated. The resonance excitation probability for a magnon is proportional to the resonance magnon density. In the classic methods, the imaginary part of magnetic permeability represents the resonance absorption in magnetic materials. In the quantum approach, the resonance magnon density can be used to estimate the strength of the resonance absorption. In the present work, a quantum approach is developed to study resonance absorption of magnetic materials and the results show the method to obtain a magnetic multilayered materials with both high resonance frequency and high resonance absorption.

  4. An ultra­high field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy study of post exercise brain lactate, glutamate and glutamine change in the human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eDennis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During strenuous exercise there is a progressive increase in lactate uptake and metabolism into the brain as workload and plasma lactate levels increase. Although it is now widely accepted that the brain can metabolise lactate, few studies have directly measured brain lactate following vigorous exercise. Here, we used ultra-high field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the brain to obtain static measures of brain lactate, as well as brain glutamate and glutamine after vigorous exercise. The aims of our experiment were to (a track the changes in brain lactate following recovery from exercise and, (b to simultaneously measure the signals from brain glutamate and glutamine. The results of our experiment showed that vigorous exercise resulted in a significant increase in brain lactate. Furthermore, both glutamate and glutamine were successfully resolved, and as expected, although contrary to some previous reports, we did not observe any significant change in either amino acid after exercise. We did however observe a negative correlation between glutamate and a measure of fitness. These results support the hypothesis that peripherally-derived lactate is taken up by the brain when available. Our data additionally highlight the potential of ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a non-invasive way of measuring multiple brain metabolite changes with exercise.

  5. Magnetic fields at Neptune

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ness, N.F.; Acuna, M.H.; Burlaga, L.F.; Connerney, J.E.P.; Lepping, R.P.; Neubauer, F.M.

    1989-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10 -5 gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a distance of 1.18 R N . The planetary magnetic field between 4 and 15 R N can be well represented by an offset tilted magnetic dipole (OTD), displaced from the center of Neptune by the surprisingly large amount of 0.55 R N and inclined by 47 degrees with respect to the rotation axis. Within 4 R N , the magnetic field representation must include localized sources or higher order magnetic multipoles, or both, which are not yet well determined. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar, and no crossings of an imbedded magnetic field reversal or plasma neutral sheet were observed. The auroral zones are most likely located far from the rotation poles and may have a complicated geometry. The rings and all the known moons of Neptune are imbedded deep inside the magnetosphere, except for Nereid, which is outside when sunward of the planet. The radiation belts will have a complex structure owing to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune and losses associated with the significant changes in the diurnally varying magnetosphere configuration. In an astrophysical context, the magnetic field of Neptune, like that of Uranus, may be described as that of an oblique rotator

  6. Effects of Liver Fibrosis Progression on Tissue Relaxation Times in Different Mouse Models Assessed by Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Müller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, clinical studies demonstrated that magnetic resonance relaxometry with determination of relaxation times T1 and T2⁎ may aid in staging and management of liver fibrosis in patients suffering from viral hepatitis and steatohepatitis. In the present study we investigated T1 and T2⁎ in different models of liver fibrosis to compare alternate pathophysiologies in their effects on relaxation times and to further develop noninvasive quantification methods of liver fibrosis. MRI was performed with a fast spin echo sequence for measurement of T1 and a multigradient echo sequence for determination of T2⁎. Toxic liver fibrosis was induced by injections of carbon tetrachloride (1.4 mL CCl4 per kg bodyweight and week, for 3 or 6 weeks in BALB/cJ mice. Chronic sclerosing cholangitis was mimicked using the ATP-binding cassette transporter B4 knockout (Abcb4 -/- mouse model. Untreated BALB/cJ mice served as controls. To assess hepatic fibrosis, we ascertained collagen contents and fibrosis scores after Sirius red staining. T1 and T2⁎ correlate differently to disease severity and etiology of liver fibrosis. T2⁎ shows significant decrease correlating with fibrosis in CCl4 treated animals, while demonstrating significant increase with disease severity in Abcb4 -/- mice. Measurements of T1 and T2⁎ may therefore facilitate discrimination between different stages and causes of liver fibrosis.

  7. Quantum dynamics of crystals of molecular magnets inside microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amigo, R.; Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E.M.; Hernandez, J.M.; Garcia-Santiago, A. E-mail: antonio@ubxlab.comtoni@ubxlab.com

    2004-05-01

    It is shown that crystals of molecular nanomagnets exhibit enhanced magnetic relaxation when placed inside a resonant cavity. Strong dependence of the magnetization curve on the geometry of the cavity has been observed, providing evidence of the coherent microwave radiation by the crystals. These observations open the possibility of building a nanomagnetic microwave laser pumped by the magnetic field.

  8. Quantum dynamics of crystals of molecular magnets inside microwave resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, R.; Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E.M.; Hernandez, J.M.; Garcia-Santiago, A.

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that crystals of molecular nanomagnets exhibit enhanced magnetic relaxation when placed inside a resonant cavity. Strong dependence of the magnetization curve on the geometry of the cavity has been observed, providing evidence of the coherent microwave radiation by the crystals. These observations open the possibility of building a nanomagnetic microwave laser pumped by the magnetic field

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in the treatment planning of radiation therapy in carcinoma of the cervix treated with the four-field pelvic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Laurence; Chacon, Bosco; Kind, Michele; Lasbareilles, Olivier; Muyldermans, Piet; Chemin, Antony; Le Treut, Alain; Pigneux, Jaques; Kantor, Guy

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the planning of radiation therapy for patients with carcinoma of the cervix treated with a four-field technique. Methods and Materials: Between May 1994 and February 1995, 18 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were entered in the study (1 T1 N-; 2 T2a N-; 1 T2b NO; 10 T2b N-; 2 T2b N+; 2 T3b N+). Node status was assessed by a laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy. During the first step, all the patients were simulated with an isocentric four-field pelvic technique. In one group (11 patients) simulation was done based on clinical examination, computed tomography (CT), and standard guidelines. In the second group (seven patients) simulation was based on clinical examination, CT, and with the help of diagnostic MRI, which was available at that time. During the second step, MRI in treatment position with skin markings of the isocenter of the radiation fields was then performed in every patient. During the third step, in each patient, the simulated radiation fields were correlated with the MRI defined target volume by superimposing them on midsagittal and midcoronal MR images. The adequacy of the margins was arbitrarly defined as 1 cm around the MRI defined target volume (tumor of the cervix and its extension, and uterus). Results: In the first group (11 patients), MRI in treatment position led to a change in 7 patients: six inadequate margins in the lateral fields and one in the anterior and lateral field. In almost all the cases, the adjustments were of an increase of 10 mm, equally matched between the anterior and posterior borders of the lateral fields. In the second group (seven patients), MRI in treatment position has led to a change in lateral fields in five patients. The mean adjustment was 10 mm: four increases (two anterior border, one posterior border, one anterior and posterior border), and one decrease of the posterior border. In the two groups, modifications of the anterior border of the lateral

  10. Magnetic fields in cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The possible role of a large-scale relic magnetic field in the history of the Universe is considered. The perturbation of the cosmic microwave back-ground radiation on large angular scales due to a homogeneous magnetic field is estimated in a simple relativistic model. This allows corresponding limits to be placed on the magnitude of any such large-scale relic magnetic field at the present time. These limits are essentially the strongest which can be set on the largest scales. A corresponding bound is obtained by use of the requirement that the field should not spoil the predictions of primordial nucleosynthesis. It is noted that the existence of large-scale cosmic magnetic fields would circumvent the limits previously set - also on the basis of nucleosynthesis considerations - on the large-scale anisotropy now present in the Universe. (author)

  11. Role of chelates in magnetic resonance imaging studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Laxmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging studies are tests performed with a variety of techniques that produce pictures of the inside of a patient′s body. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an imaging technique based on the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone, and virtually all other internal body structures. Chelates have a wide application in such imaging techniques. Chelates in imaging studies are used alone as radioactive agents or conjugated to monoclonal antibodies or to DNA as radioactive agents. Technetium chelates and gadolinium chelates are being widely used as magnetic resonance contrast media.

  12. Monitoring of aquifer pump tests with Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herckenrath, Daan; Auken, Esben; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) can provide valuable data to constrain and calibrate groundwater flow and transport models. With this non-invasive geophysical technique, field measurements of water content and hydraulic conductivities can be obtained. We developed a hydrogeophyiscal forward...

  13. Shape resonances in molecular fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A shape resonance is a quasibound state in which a particle is temporarily trapped by a potential barrier (i.e., the shape of the potential), through which it may eventually tunnel and escape. This simple mechanism plays a prominent role in a variety of excitation processes in molecules, ranging from vibrational excitation by slow electrons to ionization of deep core levels by x-rays. Moreover, their localized nature makes shape resonances a unifying link between otherwise dissimilar circumstances. One example is the close connection between shape resonances in electron-molecule scattering and in molecular photoionization. Another is the frequent persistence of free-molecule shape resonant behavior upon adsorption on a surface or condensation into a molecular solid. The main focus of this article is a discussion of the basic properties of shape resonances in molecular fields, illustrated by the more transparent examples studied over the last ten years. Other aspects to be discussed are vibrational effects of shape resonances, connections between shape resonances in different physical settings, and examples of shape resonant behavior in more complex cases, which form current challenges in this field

  14. 'Blocking' effects in magnetic resonance? The ferromagnetic nanowires case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, C.A.; De Biasi, E.; Zysler, R.D.; Vassallo Brigneti, E.; Vazquez, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present magnetic resonance results obtained at L, X, and Q bands (1.2, 9.4 and 34GHz, respectively) on ferromagnetic nanowires with a hysteresis cycle characterized by a remanent magnetization M r /M s ∼0.92 and a coercive field H c =1.0kOe. The hysteretic response of the ferromagnetic resonance spectra is discussed in terms of independent contributions of the nanowires aligned along and opposite to the applied field. We will discuss the implications of this study on the magnetic resonance in nanoparticles and other systems with large anisotropy

  15. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  16. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  17. The effect of divalent ions on the elasticity and pore collapse of chalk evaluated from compressional wave velocity and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Addassi, Mouadh; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    2015-01-01

    The effects of divalent ions on the elasticity and the pore collapse of chalk were studied through rock-mechanical testing and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. Chalk samples saturated with deionized water and brines containing sodium, magnesium, calcium and sulfate ions were...... subjected to petrophysical experiments, rock mechanical testing and low-field NMR spectroscopy. Petrophysical characterization involving ultrasonic elastic wave velocities in unconfined conditions, porosity and permeability measurements, specific surface and carbonate content determination and backscatter...... electron microscopy of the materials were conducted prior to the experiments. The iso-frame model was used to predict the bulk moduli in dry and saturated conditions from the compressional modulus of water-saturated rocks. The effective stress coefficient, as introduced by Biot, was also determined from...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Surgical Implants Made from Weak Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogola, D.; Krafčík, A.; Štrbák, O.; Frollo, I.

    2013-08-01

    Materials with high magnetic susceptibility cause local inhomogeneities in the main field of the magnetic resonance (MR) tomograph. These inhomogeneities lead to loss of phase coherence, and thus to a rapid loss of signal in the image. In our research we investigated inhomogeneous field of magnetic implants such as magnetic fibers, designed for inner suture during surgery. The magnetic field inhomogeneities were studied at low magnetic planar phantom, which was made from four thin strips of magnetic tape, arranged grid-wise. We optimized the properties of imaging sequences with the aim to find the best setup for magnetic fiber visualization. These fibers can be potentially exploited in surgery for internal stitches. Stitches can be visualized by the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method after surgery. This study shows that the imaging of magnetic implants is possible by using the low field MRI systems, without the use of complicated post processing techniques (e.g., IDEAL).

  19. The nuclear magnetic resonance well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yumin; Shen Huitang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristic of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging is described at first. Then its development and its principle is presented. Compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, the magnet techniques is the first question that we must solve in the manufacture of the NMR well logging

  20. Evaluation of low back pain with low field open magnetic resonance imaging scanner in rural hospital of Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhanandham Shrinuvasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain (LBP is the most common symptom which is associated with limitation of normal activities and work-related disability. Imaging techniques are often essential in making the correct diagnosis for prompt management. Plain Radiography though remain a first imaging modality, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI due to its inherent softtissue contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation remains invaluable modality in the evaluation of LBP. Aim: To find the common causes of LBP in different age groups and the role of MRI in detecting the spectrum of various pathological findings. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study done in the Department of Radiodiagnosis during a period of 2 years from July 2013 to July 2015. The study population includes all the cases referred to our department with complaints of LBP. Patients with ferromagnetic metallic implants and uncooperative cases were excluded. HITACHI 0.4 Tesla open MRI machine was used for imaging. Results and Conclusion: This study involved a total of 235 cases. There were 121 males and 114 females. The age of the patient ranged from 21 to 68 years with an average of 41.3 years. Back pain was commonly observed in the third to fifth decade. The common causes for back pain are disc herniations (disc bulge - 35.3%, disc protrusion - 39.6%, disc extrusion - 7.2% accounting to 82.1%, followed by normal study (10.2%, vertebral collapse (traumatic - 2.1%, osteoporotic - 1.7%, infections (2.1%, and neoplasm (1.7%. MRI provides valuable information regarding the underlying causes of LBP, especially in disc and marrow pathology.

  1. Randomized trial for superiority of high field strength intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging guided resection in pituitary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Vivek; Raheja, Amol; Suri, Ashish; Chandra, P Sarat; Kale, Shashank S; Kumar, Rajinder; Garg, Ajay; Kalaivani, Mani; Pandey, Ravindra M; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2017-03-01

    Till date there are no randomized trials to suggest the superiority of intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (IOMRI) guided trans-sphenoidal pituitary resection over two dimensional fluoroscopic (2D-F) guided resections. We conducted this trial to establish the superiority of IOMRI in pituitary surgery. Primary objective was to compare extent of tumor resection between the two study arms. It was a prospective, randomized, outcome assessor and statistician blinded, two arm (A: IOMRI, n=25 and B: 2D-F, n=25), parallel group clinical trial. 4 patients from IOMRI group cross-over to 2D-F group and were consequently analyzed in latter group, based on modified intent to treat method. A total of 50 patients were enrolled till completion of trial (n=25 in each study arm). Demographic profile and baseline parameters were comparable among the two arms (p>0.05) except for higher number of endoscopic procedures and experienced neurosurgeons (>10years) in arm B (p=0.02, 0.002 respectively). Extent of resection was similar in both study arms (A, 94.9% vs B, 93.6%; p=0.78), despite adjusting for experience of operating surgeon and use of microscope/endoscope for surgical resection. We observed that use of IOMRI helped optimize the extent of resection in 5/20 patients (25%) for pituitary tumor resection in-group A. Present study failed to observe superiorty of IOMRI over conventional 2D-F guided resection in pituitary macroadenoma surgery. By use of this technology, younger surgeons could validate their results intra-operatively and hence could increase EOR without causing any increase in complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging at Rikshospitalet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the first 18 months of operations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) unit at Rikshospitalet, 1453 NMR examinations have been performed on 1431 patients. 64% of the time has been devoted to examinations of the central nervous system and spine in children and adults, 9% of the time has been used on non-neuroradiology pediatric patients, while the rest of the time has been spent equally on ear, nose and throat, thoracic (including cardiac) and abdominal examinations in adult patients. The indications for doing NMR at Rikshospitalet are listed and discussed, and it is concluded that NMR has proved to be useful at several conditions in most organ systems. 15 refs

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  5. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation

  6. Resonant and nonresonant magnetic scattering (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1992-01-01

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open up new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and they fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin-polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation

  7. Irreversible magnetic-field dependence of ferromagnetic resonance and inverse spin Hall effect voltage in CoFeB/Pt bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Il [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Spin Engineering Physics Team, Division of Scientific Instrumentation, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon, 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Min-Su [Spin Engineering Physics Team, Division of Scientific Instrumentation, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon, 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yeon Suk, E-mail: ychoi@kbsi.re.kr [Spin Engineering Physics Team, Division of Scientific Instrumentation, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon, 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seung-Young, E-mail: parksy@kbsi.re.kr [Spin Engineering Physics Team, Division of Scientific Instrumentation, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon, 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic field (H) sweeping direction dependences of the mixed voltage V{sub mix} induced by the inverse-spin Hall effect(ISHE) and spin-rectified effect (SRE) in a CoFeB (5 nm)/Pt (10 nm) bilayer structure are investigated using the ferromagnetic resonance in the TE mode cavities and coplanar waveguide methods. Conventionally, the magnitude of ISHE voltage V{sub ISH} (symmetric) excluding the SRE (antisymmetric component) was unavoidably separated from the fitting curve of V{sub mix} (a sum of a symmetric and an antisymmetric part) for one direction of H-source. By studying the ratio of the two voltage parts with the bi-directional H sweeping, the optimized V{sub ISH} (no SRE condition) value which also include a well-defined spin Hall angle can be obtained via the linear response relation of ISHE and SRE components. - Highlights: • Hysteretic behavior of ferromagnetic resonance spectra in the CoFeB/Pt sample. • Hysteretic behavior of inverse-spin Hall effect voltage in the CoFeB/Pt sample. • Proportion of inverse spin-Hall effect voltage can be determined by the cavity mode. • The hysteretic behavior arise from the unsaturated magnetization limit. • The well-defined spin Hall angle which consider a hysteresis can be obtained.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.A.; Morrisett, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Several nuclei in lipoproteins are magnetically active and are thus potential NMR probes of lipoprotein structure. Table I lists the magnetic isotopes preset in the covalent structures of the molecular constituents of lipoproteins: lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Every type of nucleus that is part of the endogenous structure of these molecules has at least one magnetic isotope. Each magnetic nucleus represents an intrinsic and completely nonperturbing probe (when at the natural abundance level) of local molecular motion and magnetic environment. The NMR experiment itself is also nonperturbing and nondestructive. Table I also lists for each nucleus its nuclear spin, its natural isotopic abundance, its sensitivity, and its resonance frequency at two commonly employed magnetic in the low field range (21.14 kG or 2.11 Tesla) and the other in the high field range (47.0 kG or 4.70 Tesla). Of the nuclei listed in Table I, /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 31/P have been the primary ones studied in lipoproteins. The general advantages and disadvantages afforded by these and other nuclei as probes of lipoprotein structure are discussed. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy, the method which has had the most extensive application (and probably has the greatest future potential) to lipoproteins, is treated in greatest detail, but many of the principles described apply to other nuclei as well

  9. Resonant helical fields in the TBR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, O.W.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of external resonant helical fields (RHF) in the tokamak TBR plasma discharges was investigated. These fields were created by helical windings wounded on the TBR vessel with the same helicity of rational magnetic surfaces, producing resonant efects on these surfaces. The characteristics of the MHZ activity (amplitude, frequency and poloidal and toroidal wave numbers, m=2,3,4 and n=1, respectively) during the plasma discharges were modified by eletrical winding currents of the order of 2% of the plasma current. These characterisitics were measured for diferent discharges safety factors at the limiter (q) between 3 and 4, with and without the RHF, with the atenuation of the oscillation amplitudes and the increasing of their frequencies. The existente of expontaneous and induced magnetic islands were investigated. The data were compared with results obtained in other tokamaks. (author) [pt

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ill effects on pregnant women or their unborn babies. However, because the unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant ... intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 hours after contrast medium is ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ...

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalpe, I.O.

    1984-01-01

    A brief survey of the working principle of the NMR technique in diagnostical medicine is given. Its clinical usefulness for locating tumors, diagnosing various other diseases, such as some mental illnesses and multiple sclerosis, and its possibilities for studying biochemical processes in vivo are mentioned. The price of NMR image scanners and the problems of the strong magnetic field around the machines are mentioned

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... MRI equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the ... use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the ... use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a ...

  17. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  18. Transient anisotropic magnetic field calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesenik, Marko; Gorican, Viktor; Trlep, Mladen; Hamler, Anton; Stumberger, Bojan

    2006-01-01

    For anisotropic magnetic material, nonlinear magnetic characteristics of the material are described with magnetization curves for different magnetization directions. The paper presents transient finite element calculation of the magnetic field in the anisotropic magnetic material based on the measured magnetization curves for different magnetization directions. For the verification of the calculation method some results of the calculation are compared with the measurement

  19. Magnetic Fields Versus Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-04-01

    Deep within giant molecular clouds, hidden by dense gas and dust, stars form. Unprecedented data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveal the intricate magnetic structureswoven throughout one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Milky Way.How Stars Are BornThe Horsehead Nebulasdense column of gas and dust is opaque to visible light, but this infrared image reveals the young stars hidden in the dust. [NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team]Simple theory dictates that when a dense clump of molecular gas becomes massive enough that its self-gravity overwhelms the thermal pressure of the cloud, the gas collapses and forms a star. In reality, however, star formation is more complicated than a simple give and take between gravity and pressure. Thedusty molecular gas in stellar nurseries is permeated with magnetic fields, which are thought to impede the inward pull of gravity and slow the rate of star formation.How can we learn about the magnetic fields of distant objects? One way is by measuring dust polarization. An elongated dust grain will tend to align itself with its short axis parallel to the direction of the magnetic field. This systematic alignment of the dust grains along the magnetic field lines polarizes the dust grains emission perpendicular to the local magnetic field. This allows us to infer the direction of the magnetic field from the direction of polarization.Magnetic field orientations for protostars e2 and e8 derived from Submillimeter Array observations (panels a through c) and ALMA observations (panels d and e). Click to enlarge. [Adapted from Koch et al. 2018]Tracing Magnetic FieldsPatrick Koch (Academia Sinica, Taiwan) and collaborators used high-sensitivity ALMA observations of dust polarization to learn more about the magnetic field morphology of Milky Way star-forming region W51. W51 is one of the largest star-forming regions in our galaxy, home to high-mass protostars e2, e8, and North.The ALMA observations reveal

  20. A superconducting magnet for whole-body magnetic-resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Hisao; Watanabe, Tsugio; Takechi, Moriaki; Ogino, Osamu; Yamada, Tadatoshi

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic-resonance imaging is a promising new clinical diagnosis system that employs magnetic resonance to generate cross-sectional images of the object under examination. A large magnet plays a critical role in this system-it must supply a high-strength magnetic field that meets rigid standards of space and time uniformity. Mitsubishi Electric has developed a superconducting magnet that not only offers excellent magnetic characteristics but also features reduced helium consumption and a horizontal service port, and permits direct mounting of a magnetic shield. (author)