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Sample records for field ionization mass

  1. Low-Pressure, Field-Ionizing Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank; Smith, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A small mass spectrometer utilizing a miniature field ionization source is now undergoing development. It is designed for use in a variety of applications in which there are requirements for a lightweight, low-power-consumption instrument that can analyze the masses of a wide variety of molecules and ions. The device can operate without need for a high-vacuum, carrier-gas feed radioactive ionizing source, or thermal ionizer. This mass spectrometer can operate either in the natural vacuum of outer space or on Earth at any ambient pressure below 50 torr (below about 6.7 kPa) - a partial vacuum that can easily be reached by use of a small sampling pump. This mass spectrometer also has a large dynamic range - from singly charged small gas ions to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments larger than 104 atomic mass units - with sensitivity adequate for detecting some molecules and ions at relative abundances of less than one part per billion. This instrument (see figure) includes a field ionizer integrated with a rotating-field mass spectrometer (RFMS). The field ionizer effects ionization of a type characterized as "soft" in the art because it does not fragment molecules or initiate avalanche arcing. What makes the "soft" ionization mode possible is that the distance between the ionizing electrodes is less than mean free path for ions at the maximum anticipated operating pressure, so that the ionizer always operates on the non-breakdown side of the applicable Paschen curve (a standard plot of breakdown potential on the ordinate and pressure electrode separation on the abscissa). The field ionizer in this instrument is fabricated by micromachining a submicron-thick membrane out of an electrically nonconductive substrate, coating the membrane on both sides to form electrodes, then micromachining small holes through the electrodes and membrane. Because of the submicron electrode separation, even a potential of only 1 V applied between the electrodes gives rise to an electric

  2. High-resolution field desorption/ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass analysis of nonpolar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Tanner M; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Qian, Kuangnan; Quinn, John P; Marshall, Alan G

    2003-05-01

    We report the first field desorption ionization broadband high-resolution (m/Deltam(50%) approximately 65 000) mass spectra. We have interfaced a field ionization/field desorption source to a home-built 9.4-T FT-ICR mass spectrometer. The instrumental configuration employs convenient sample introduction (in-source liquid injection) and external ion accumulation. We demonstrate the utility of this configuration by generating high-resolution positive-ion mass spectra of C(60) and a midboiling crude oil distillate. The latter contains species not accessible by common soft-ionization methods, for example, low-voltage electron ionization, electrospray ionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization. The present work demonstrates significant advantages of FI/FD FT-ICR MS for analysis of nonpolar molecules in complex mixtures.

  3. GoAmazon 2014/15 Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) deployment to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, was motivated by two main scientific objectives of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 field campaign. 1) Study the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions by determining important molecular species in ambient nanoparticles. To address this, TDCIMS data will be combined with coincident measurements such as gas-phase sulfuric acid to determine the contribution of sulfuric acid condensation to nucleation and growth. We can then compare that result to TDCIMS-derived nanoparticle composition to determine the fraction of growth that can be attributed to the uptake of organic compounds. The molecular composition of sampled particles will also be used to attribute specific chemical species and mechanisms to growth, such as the condensation of low-volatility species or the oligomerization of α-dicarbonyl compounds. 2) Determine the source of new ambient nanoparticles in the Amazon. The hypothesis prior to measurements was that potassium salts formed from the evaporation of primary particles emitted by fungal spores can provide a unique and important pathway for new particle production in the Amazon basin. To explore this hypothesis, the TDCIMS recorded the mass spectra of sampled ambient particles using a protonated water cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Laboratory tests performed using potassium salts show that the TDCIMS can detect potassium with high sensitivity with this technique.

  4. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Electron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radauscher, Erich J.; Keil, Adam D.; Wells, Mitch; Amsden, Jason J.; Piascik, Jeffrey R.; Parker, Charles B.; Stoner, Brian R.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2015-11-01

    A novel chemical ionization (CI) source has been developed based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron source. The CNT-based electron source was evaluated and compared with a standard filament thermionic electron source in a commercial explosives trace detection desktop mass spectrometer. This work demonstrates the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. Both positive and negative modes were investigated. Spectra were collected for a standard mass spectrometer calibration compound, perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA), as well as trace explosives including trinitrotoluene (TNT), Research Department explosive (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The electrical characteristics, lifetime at operating pressure, and power requirements of the CNT-based electron source are reported. The CNT field emission electron sources demonstrated an average lifetime of 320 h when operated in constant emission mode under elevated CI pressures. The ability of the CNT field emission source to cycle on and off can provide enhanced lifetime and reduced power consumption without sacrificing performance and detection capabilities.

  5. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet lamp based magnetic field enhanced photoelectron ionization and single photon ionization source for online time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghao; Hua, Lei; Hou, Keyong; Cui, Huapeng; Chen, Wendong; Chen, Ping; Wang, Weiguo; Li, Jinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2011-12-01

    A magnetic field enhanced photoelectron ionization (MEPEI) source combined with single photon ionization (SPI) was developed for an orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer (oaTOFMS). A commercial radio frequency (rf) powered vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp was used as SPI light source, and the photoelectrons generated by photoelectric effect were accelerated to induce electron ionization (EI). The MEPEI was obtained by applying a magnetic field of about 800 G with a permanent annular magnet. Compared to a nonmagnetic field photoelectron ionization source, the signal intensities for SO(2), SF(6), O(2), and N(2) in MEPEI were improved more than 2 orders with the photoelectron energy around 20 eV, while most of the characteristics of soft ionization still remained. Simulation with SIMION showed that the sensitivity enhancement in MEPEI was ascribed to the increase of the electron moving path and the improvement of the electrons transmission. The limits of detection for SO(2) and benzene were 750 and 80 ppbv within a detection time of 4 s, respectively. The advantages of the source, including broad range of ionizable compounds, reduced fragments, and good sensitivity with low energy MEPEI, were demonstrated by monitoring pyrolysis products of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and the intermediate products in discharging of the SF(6) gas inpurity.

  7. A field-deployable, chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Bertram

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a new chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-TOFMS that measures atmospheric trace gases in real time with high sensitivity. We apply the technique to the measurement of formic acid via negative-ion proton transfer, using acetate as the reagent ion. A novel high pressure interface, incorporating two RF-only quadrupoles is used to efficiently focus ions through four stages of differential pumping before analysis with a compact TOFMS. The high ion-duty cycle (>20 % of the TOFMS combined with the efficient production and transmission of ions in the high pressure interface results in a highly sensitive (>300 ions s−1 pptv−1 formic acid instrument capable of measuring and saving complete mass spectra at rates faster than 10 Hz. We demonstrate the efficient transfer and detection of both bare ions and ion-molecule clusters, and characterize the instrument during field measurements aboard the R/V Atlantis as part of the CalNex campaign during the spring of 2010. The in-field short-term precision is better than 5 % at 1 pptv (pL/L, for 1-s averages. The detection limit (3 σ, 1-s averages of the current version of the CI-TOFMS, as applied to the in situ detection of formic acid, is limited by the magnitude and variability in the background determination and was determined to be 4 pptv. Application of the CI-TOFMS to the detection of other inorganic and organic acids, as well as the use of different reagent ion molecules (e.g. I, CF3O, CO3 is promising, as we have demonstrated efficient transmission and detection of both bare ions and their associated ion-molecule clusters.

  8. Connecting the dots: a correlation between ionizing radiation and cloud mass-loss rate traced by optical integral field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, A. F.; Gritschneder, M.; Dale, J. E.; Ginsburg, A.; Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Preibisch, T.; Ramsay, S.; Reiter, M.; Testi, L.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of feedback from O- and B-type stars with data from the integral field spectrograph Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) mounted on the Very Large Telescope of pillar-like structures in the Carina Nebular Complex, one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Galaxy. For the observed pillars, we compute gas electron densities and temperatures maps, produce integrated line and velocity maps of the ionized gas, study the ionization fronts at the pillar tips, analyse the properties of the single regions, and detect two ionized jets originating from two distinct pillar tips. For each pillar tip, we determine the incident ionizing photon flux Q0, pil originating from the nearby massive O- and B-type stars and compute the mass-loss rate dot{M} of the pillar tips due to photoevaporation caused by the incident ionizing radiation. We combine the results of the Carina data set with archival MUSE data of a pillar in NGC 3603 and with previously published MUSE data of the Pillars of Creation in M16, and with a total of 10 analysed pillars, find tight correlations between the ionizing photon flux and the electron density, the electron density and the distance from the ionizing sources, and the ionizing photon flux and the mass-loss rate. The combined MUSE data sets of pillars in regions with different physical conditions and stellar content therefore yield an empirical quantification of the feedback effects of ionizing radiation. In agreement with models, we find that dot{M}∝ Q_0,pil^{1/2}.

  9. Time resolved studies of interfacial reactions of ozone with pulmonary phospholipid surfactants using field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hugh I; Kim, Hyungjun; Shin, Young Shik; Beegle, Luther W; Goddard, William A; Heath, James R; Kanik, Isik; Beauchamp, J L

    2010-07-29

    Field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS) comprises a soft ionization method to sample ions from the surface of microliter droplets. A pulsed electric field stretches neutral droplets until they develop dual Taylor cones, emitting streams of positively and negatively charged submicrometer droplets in opposite directions, with the desired polarity being directed into a mass spectrometer for analysis. This methodology is employed to study the heterogeneous ozonolysis of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) at the air-liquid interface in negative ion mode using FIDI mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrate unique characteristics of the heterogeneous reactions at the air-liquid interface. We observe the hydroxyhydroperoxide and the secondary ozonide as major products of POPG ozonolysis in the FIDI-MS spectra. These products are metastable and difficult to observe in the bulk phase, using standard electrospray ionization (ESI) for mass spectrometric analysis. We also present studies of the heterogeneous ozonolysis of a mixture of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids at the air-liquid interface. A mixture of the saturated phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and unsaturated POPG is investigated in negative ion mode using FIDI-MS while a mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) surfactant is studied in positive ion mode. In both cases FIDI-MS shows the saturated and unsaturated pulmonary surfactants form a mixed interfacial layer. Only the unsaturated phospholipid reacts with ozone, forming products that are more hydrophilic than the saturated phospholipid. With extensive ozonolysis only the saturated phospholipid remains at the droplet surface. Combining these experimental observations with the results of computational analysis provides an improved understanding of the interfacial structure and chemistry of a surfactant layer system when

  10. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation:. Characterization of coal liquids by field ionization mass spectrometry and iodotrimethylsilane derivatization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, R.; McMillen, D.F. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Brandes, S.D. [Consolidation Coal Co., Library, PA (United States). Research and Development Dept.

    1992-01-01

    SRI International evaluated two analytical methods for application to coal liquefaction. These included field ionization mass spectrometry and a technique employing iodotrimethylsilane for the derivatization of oxygen bound to alkyl carbon (alkyl ethers). The full report authored by the SRI researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by Consol into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract. (VC)

  11. Studying interfacial reactions of cholesterol sulfate in an unsaturated phosphatidylglycerol layer with ozone using field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae Yoon; Choi, Sun Mi; Rhee, Young Min; Beauchamp, J L; Kim, Hugh I

    2012-01-01

    Field-induced droplet ionization (FIDI) is a recently developed ionization technique that can transfer ions from the surface of microliter droplets to the gas phase intact. The air-liquid interfacial reactions of cholesterol sulfate (CholSO(4)) in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) surfactant layer with ozone (O(3)) are investigated using field-induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS). Time-resolved studies of interfacial ozonolysis of CholSO(4) reveal that water plays an important role in forming oxygenated products. An epoxide derivative is observed as a major product of CholSO(4) oxidation in the FIDI-MS spectrum after exposure of the droplet to O(3) for 5 s. The abundance of the epoxide product then decreases with continued O(3) exposure as the finite number of water molecules at the air-liquid interface becomes exhausted. Competitive oxidation of CholSO(4) and POPG is observed when they are present together in a lipid surfactant layer at the air-liquid interface. Competitive reactions of CholSO(4) and POPG with O(3) suggest that CholSO(4) is present with POPG as a well-mixed interfacial layer. Compared with CholSO(4) and POPG alone, the overall ozonolysis rates of both CholSO(4) and POPG are reduced in a mixed layer, suggesting the double bonds of both molecules are shielded by additional hydrocarbons from one another. Molecular dynamics simulations of a monolayer comprising POPG and CholSO(4) correlate well with experimental observations and provide a detailed picture of the interactions between CholSO(4), lipids, and water molecules in the interfacial region.

  12. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-30

    mass spectrometer. Also discussed were Corporation, St. Louis , Mo. unique analytical applications of several negative ion chemical Synthesis of the...were purchsed from obtained at a probe temperature of 180-200 °C and displays Sigma Chemical Co.. St. Louis , Mo. Arginine hydrochloride (4) a M4...13) Rosenstock. H, M.: Drax . K.: Stener. B. W: Hernon J. T. J. Phys. Chem, Ref. Data 1977, 6, Supl. 1. 774-783,167 occur in the ratio of 10/ 1

  13. Laserspray and Matrix-Assisted Ionization Inlet Coupled to High-Field FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Peptide and Protein Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyadong, Leonard; Inutan, Ellen D.; Wang, Xu; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Trimpin, Sarah; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-03-01

    We present the first coupling of laser spray ionization inlet (LSII) and matrix assisted ionization inlet (MAII) to high-field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) for generation of electrospray-like ions to take advantage of increased sensitivity, mass range, and mass resolving power afforded by multiple charging. We apply the technique to top-down protein analysis and characterization of metalloproteins. We also present a novel method for generation of multiply-charged copper-peptide complexes with varying degrees of copper adduction by LSII. We show an application of the generated copper-peptide complexes for protein charge state and molecular weight determination, particularly useful for an instrument such as a linear ion trap mass analyzer. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry: A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Cheng, Sy-Chi; Cho, Yi-Tzu [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Shiea, Jentaie, E-mail: jetea@fac.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {yields} Ambient ionization technique allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. {yields} We sort ambient ionization techniques into three main analytical strategies, direct ionization, direct desorption/ionization, and two-step ionization. {yields} The underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques are described and compared. - Abstract: Ambient ionization is a set of mass spectrometric ionization techniques performed under ambient conditions that allows the direct analysis of sample surfaces with little or no sample pretreatment. Using combinations of different types of sample introduction systems and ionization methods, several novel techniques have been developed over the last few years with many applications (e.g., food safety screening; detection of pharmaceuticals and drug abuse; monitoring of environmental pollutants; detection of explosives for antiterrorism and forensics; characterization of biological compounds for proteomics and metabolomics; molecular imaging analysis; and monitoring chemical and biochemical reactions). Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization are the two main ionization principles most commonly used in ambient ionization mass spectrometry. This tutorial paper provides a review of the publications related to ambient ionization techniques. We describe and compare the underlying principles of operation, ionization processes, detecting mass ranges, sensitivity, and representative applications of these techniques.

  15. Analysis of chirality by femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, Philipp; Urbasch, Gunter; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2012-09-01

    Recent progress in the field of chirality analysis employing laser ionization mass spectrometry is reviewed. Emphasis is given to femtosecond (fs) laser ionization work from the author's group. We begin by reviewing fundamental aspects of determining circular dichroism (CD) in fs-laser ionization mass spectrometry (fs-LIMS) discussing an example from the literature (resonant fs-LIMS of 3-methylcyclopentanone). Second, we present new data indicating CD in non-resonant fs-LIMS of propylene oxide.

  16. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry for determining the location of in-source collision-induced dissociation in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yuan-Qing; Jemal, Mohammed

    2009-09-15

    The understanding and control of the in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) of analytes is important for the accurate LC-MS/MS quantitation of drugs and metabolites in biological samples. Accordingly, it was of interest to us to establish whether such in-source CID takes place after and/or before the orifice of an electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometer. A high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) system that is physically located between the sprayer and the orifice of a mass spectrometer can serve as an ion filter to control ions entering the orifice of the mass spectrometer. In such a configuration, FAIMS could conceivably be used to determine if the in-source CID of an analyte occurs after and/or before the mass spectrometer orifice. We demonstrated this capability of FAIMS using ifetroban acylglucuronide metabolite as a model compound. Under the conditions used, the results showed that the in-source CID conversion of the acylglucuronide metabolite to its parent drug ifetroban occurred almost entirely after the orifice of the mass spectrometer, with the conversion upstream of the orifice accounting for only 5.6% of the conversion. Under the circumstance, the term "post-orifice CID" rather than "in-source CID" may be more appropriate in describing such a dissociation occurring in the front end of a mass spectrometer.

  17. Field Measurements Of Ammonia Fluxes Above A Douglas-fir Forest In Speuld, Holland Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillen, M. R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Flynn, M. J.; Percival, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is an important component of the atmospheric nitrogenous species on regional scales and is a major contributor to the nitrogen budget across the UK and Western Europe. It represents the major atmospheric alkaline gas and in its interaction with acidic gases such as nitric acid, leads to the formation of particulate matter (e.g., Asman, 1998). As sulphur emissions decline across Western Europe, regions of excess ammonia are becoming more widespread and ammonium nitrate aerosol is becoming a significant component of atmospheric nitrogen . NH3 is efficiently lost to the semi-natural vegetation, typical of many natural ecosystems prevalent in Western Europe. Deposition of atmospheric NH3 to ecosystems can lead to deleterious effects such as eutrophication and acidification of soils, contributing to forest decline and a decrease in biological diversity (e.g., Fangmeier et al., 1994). Ammonia measurements were performed using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) utilizing the protonated acetone dimer as the precursor ion. NH3 flux measurements were evaluated using the eddy covariance technique at a height of 46m above ground at Speuld forest. The Speuld fieldsite is a mature plantation of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), located in the centre of the Netherlands (52°13'N, 5 ° 39'E). Data was collected over a two week period (June 25th - July 8th 2009), and fluxes will be determined using the eddy covariance technique. To the authors’ knowledge, these measurements represent the only NH3 flux measurements using CIMS, indeed few studies exist that directly determine fluxes using the this technique. Eddy covariance flux measurements are the most direct way to estimate NH3 removal near the surface. Preliminary data will be presented and compared with the GRadient Ammonia High Accuracy Monitor (GRAHAM) method. References: Asman, W. A. H., Sutton, M. A., and Schjorring, J. K.: Ammonia: emission, atmospheric transport and deposition, New Phytol., 139

  18. Acanthocephalan fish parasites (Rhadinorhynchidae Lühe, 1912) as potential biomarkers: Molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinertz, S.; Eckhardt, K.-U.; Theisen, S.; Palm, H. W.; Leinweber, P.

    2016-07-01

    The present study represents the first molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry applied on fish parasites. A total of 71 fishes from Balinese fish markets, 36 Auxis rochei (Risso, 1810) and 35 A. thazard (Lacepède, 1800), were studied for their acanthocephalan parasites. This is the first record of Rhadinorhynchus zhukovi in Balinese waters, Indonesia, and we describe for the first time A. rochei and A. thazard as R. zhukovi hosts. Using this method, small scale variations within the chemical compounds of acanthocephalans could be detected. Using this methodology it will be possible to generate additional, pollutant specific information from aquatic habitats in future with the potential of a new bioindicator application for parasite/host origin and/or environmental pollution.

  19. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1991-03-29

    A mass spectrometer is described having a low weight and low power requirement, for use in space. It can be used to analyze the ionized particles in the region of the spacecraft on which it is mounted. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically sysmetric linear electric field.

  20. Direct coupling of thin-layer chromatography-bioautography with electrostatic field induced spray ionization-mass spectrometry for separation and identification of lipase inhibitors in lotus leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Shi, Jiyao; Tang, Jihe; Cheng, Zhihong; Lu, Xiaohui; Kong, Yao; Wu, Tao

    2017-05-15

    In situ profiling compounds in complex matrices is important technology to develop in analytic chemistry. The aim of this study is to develop a direct coupling method of thin layer chromatography (TLC) to mass spectrometry (MS) via electrostatic field induced spray ionization (EFISI). We proposed a surface treatment method of normal-phase thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates with dimethyl silicone oil coating which successfully allowed TLC to couple to MS via EFISI. Different parameters affecting the ionization efficiency were investigated and optimized, including silicone oil concentrations, air-drying times, applied voltages, and TLC plate types. This optimized TLC-EFISI-MS method was successfully applied to examine lipase inhibitory components present in lotus leaves. Six active alkaloids including three aporphines and three benzylisoquinolines were profiled with their MS(n) (n = 4) data, or with a comparison with reference substances. This is the first report on the coupling EFISI-MS to TLC or TLC bioautography for in situ identification of active natural products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of water-soluble heavy crude oil organic-acids, bases, and neutrals by electrospray ionization and field desorption ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Lateefah A; Kim, Sunghwan; Klein, Geoffrey C; Smith, Donald F; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2007-04-15

    We identify water-soluble (23 degrees C) crude oil NSO nonvolatile acidic, basic, and neutral crude oil hydrocarbons by negative-ion ESI and continuous flow FD FT-ICR MS at an average mass resolving power, m/deltam50% = 550,000. Of the 7000+ singly charged acidic species identified in South American crude oil, surprisingly, many are water-soluble, and much more so in pure water than in seawater. The truncated m/z distributions for water-soluble components exhibit preferential molecular weight, size, and heteroatom class influences on hydrocarbon solubility. Acidic water-soluble heteroatomic classes detected at >1% relative abundance include O, O2, O3, O4, OS, O2S, O3S, O4S, NO2, NO3, and NO4. Parent oil class abundance does not directly relate to abundance in the water-soluble fraction. Acidic oxygen-containing classes are most prevalent in the water-solubles, whereas acidic nitrogen-containing species are least soluble. In contrast to acidic nitrogen-containing heteroatomic classes, basic nitrogen classes are water-soluble. Water-soluble heteroatomic basic classes detected at >1% relative abundance include N, NO, NO2, NS, NS2, NOS, NO2S, N2, N2O, N2O2, OS, O2S, and O2S2.

  2. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15: Hydroxyl Radical (OH) Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Saewung [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The University of California, Irvine, science team (Dr. Saewung Kim, Dr. Roger Seco, Dr. Alex Guenther, and Dr. Jim Smith) deployed a chemical ionization mass spectrometer system for hydroxyl radical (OH) and sulfuric acid quantifications. As part of the GoAmazon 2014/15 field campaign. Hydroxyl radical determines tropospheric oxidation capacity and had been expected to be very low in the pristine rain forest region such as the Brazilian Amazon because of the presence of significant levels of highly reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds and very low levels of NO, which is an OH recycling agent. However, several recent in situ OH observations provided by a laser-induced fluorescence system reported unaccountably high OH concentrations. To address this discrepancy, a series of laboratory and theoretical studies has postulated chemical reaction mechanisms of isoprene that may regenerate OH in photo-oxidation processes. Along with these efforts, potential artifacts on the laser induced fluorescence system from isoprene and its oxidation products also have been explored. Therefore, the first chemical ionization mass spectrometer observations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, are expected to provide a critical experimental constraint to address uncertainty in constraining oxidation capacity over pristine rain forest environments. In addition, we deployed a National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer to characterize atmospheric volatile organic compound levels, especially isoprene and its oxidation products, which are critical input parameters for box modeling to simulate OH with different isoprene photo-oxidation schemes. As there has been no report on noticeable new particle formation events, our first in situ sulfuric acid observations in the Amazon rain forest were expected to constrain the

  3. Multiple ionization in strong fields

    OpenAIRE

    Rudenko, A; Moshammer, R; Schröter, C; Zrost, K.; Feuerstein, B.; de Jesus, V.; Ullrich, J.

    2005-01-01

    Single and multiple ionization of rare gas atoms by 25 and 7 fs intense laser pulses has been studied using a "Reaction Microscope”. For single ionization of He, Ne and Ar in the tunnelling regime, surprising and distinct patterns have been observed in high-resolution low-energy electron spectra. Mechanisms of double and multiple ionization were elucidated and partly identified via recoil-ion momentum distributions and correlated electron spectra. For Ne the highly correlated “instantaneous” ...

  4. Modeling of Plutonium Ionization Probabilities for Use in Nuclear Forensic Analysis by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    material and chemical composition within the sample. This data can then be included in analysis by law enforcement and intelligence agencies to...PLUTONIUM IONIZATION PROBABILITIES FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FORENSIC ANALYSIS BY RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY by Steven F. Hutchinson...IONIZATION PROBABILITIES FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FORENSIC ANALYSIS BY RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Steven F

  5. A field-deployable, chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer: application to the measurement of gas-phase organic and inorganic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Bertram

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a new field-deployable chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-TOFMS for the direct measurement of trace gases in the atmosphere. We apply the technique to the measurement of gas-phase inorganic and organic acids via negative-ion proton transfer, using acetate as the reagent ion. A novel high pressure interface, incorporating two RF-only quadrupoles is used to efficiently focus ions through four stages of differential pumping before analysis with a compact TOFMS. The high ion-duty cycle (>20% of the TOFMS, coupled to efficient production and transmission of ions in the high pressure interface results in a highly sensitive (>300 ions s−1 pptv−1 instrument capable of the fast measurement of atmospheric gases at trace levels. We demonstrate the efficient transfer and detection of both bare ions and ion-molecule clusters, and characterize the instrument during field measurements aboard the R/V Atlantis as part of the CalNex campaign during the spring of 2010. The in-field short-term precision is better than 5% at 1 pptv (pL/L, for 1-second averages. The detection limit (3σ, 1-second averages of the current version of the CI-TOFMS, as applied to the in situ detection of gas-phase acids, is limited by the magnitude and variability in the background determination and was determined to be 4 pptv.

  6. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectra of Dipeptide Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO, Zaigang; ZENG, Chengchu; YANG, Daoshan; HUANG, Yali; WANG, Fang; DU, Hongguang; HU, Liming

    2009-01-01

    Based on the structure of the HIV integrase core domain, dipeptide derivatives, as a type of HIV integrase in- hibitor, were synthesized, and their fragmentation pathways were investigated by electrospray ionization mass spec- trometry (ESI-MSN) in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). In order to better understand the fragmentation pathways, the MS2 and MS3 spectra of the title compound were obtained. The main fragmentation pathways occur by the cleavage of the C-CO bonds between N-(benzothiazol-2-yl)aminocarbonyl and methylene, NH-CO bonds between the NH groups and carbonyl groups. Electrospray ionization was proven to be a good method for the structural characterization and identification of this kind of compound.

  7. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Ernst, W.E. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Holst, B. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: bodil@cantab.net

    2008-05-15

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  8. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L.; Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M.; Ernst, W. E.; Holst, B.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  9. Substrate-Enhanced Micro Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerodyne Research, Inc. and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst will collaborate to develop laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric analysis of...

  10. Strong-field-ionization suppression by light-field control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räsänen, Esa; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    In recent attempts to control strong-field phenomena such as molecular dissociation, undesired ionization sometimes seriously limited the outcome. In this work we examine the capability of quantum optimal control theory to suppress the ionization by rational pulse shaping. Using a simple model sy......, for the enhancement of the high-order-harmonic generation, although further developments in optimal control theory to find proper target functionals are required.......In recent attempts to control strong-field phenomena such as molecular dissociation, undesired ionization sometimes seriously limited the outcome. In this work we examine the capability of quantum optimal control theory to suppress the ionization by rational pulse shaping. Using a simple model...

  11. Atmospheric measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and SO2 using chemical ionization mass spectrometry during the MINATROC field campaign 2000 on Monte Cimone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hanke

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The EU-project MINATROC (MINeral dust And TROpospheric Chemistry aims at enabling an estimation of the influence of mineral dust, a major, but to date largely ignored component of tropospheric aerosol, on tropospheric oxidant cycles. Within the scope of this project continuous atmospheric measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and SO2 were conducted in June and July 2000 at the CNR WMO station, situated on Monte Cimone (MTC (44°11' N --10°42' E, 2165 m asl, Italy. African air transporting dust is occasionally advected over the Mediterranean Sea to the site, thus mineral aerosol emitted from Africa will encounter polluted air masses and provide ideal conditions to study their interactions. HNO3 and SO2 were measured with an improved CIMS (chemical ionization mass spectrometry system for ground-based measurements that was developed and built at MPI-K Heidelberg. Since HNO3  is a very sticky compound special care was paid for the air-sampling and background-measurement system. Complete data sets could be obtained before, during and after major dust intrusions. For the first time these measurements might provide a strong observational indication of efficient uptake of gas-phase HNO3 by atmospheric mineral-dust aerosol particles.

  12. Strong-field-ionization suppression by light-field control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räsänen, Esa; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    In recent attempts to control strong-field phenomena such as molecular dissociation, undesired ionization sometimes seriously limited the outcome. In this work we examine the capability of quantum optimal control theory to suppress the ionization by rational pulse shaping. Using a simple model......, for the enhancement of the high-order-harmonic generation, although further developments in optimal control theory to find proper target functionals are required....

  13. Electron Ionization Mass Spectrum of Tellurium Hexafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Richard A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Peterson, James M.; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2015-05-18

    The first electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5+, TeF4+ TeF3+, TeF2+, TeF1+, and Te+, Te2+. A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the even fluoride bearing ions: TeF1+ < TeF3+ < TeF5+, and a decreasing abundance was observed for the even fragment series: Te(0)+ > TeF2+ > TeF4+ > TeF6+, with the molecular ion TeF6+ not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6+.

  14. Electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Richard A; McNamara, Bruce K; Barinaga, Charles J; Peterson, James M; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M; Ballou, Nathan E

    2015-05-18

    The electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported for the first time. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5(+), TeF4(+) TeF3(+), TeF2(+), TeF1(+), and Te(+), Te2(+). A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the odd fluoride bearing ions, TeF1(+) TeF2(+) > TeF4(+) > TeF6(+), with the molecular ion TeF6(+) not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species, and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6(+).

  15. Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: powerful analytical tools in recombinant protein chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Svensson, B; Roepstorff, P

    1996-01-01

    Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy is presen......Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy...

  16. FIELD IONIZATION OF MOLECULES IN AN INTENSE LASER FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴成印; 龚旗煌

    2001-01-01

    In order to predict the field ionization probabilities, the accurate ab initio electrostatic potential of molecules has to be calculated. However, the calculation of the full ab initio electrostatic potential of molecules is complicated,even impossible for some larger molecules with low symmetry. Here, we present a semi-empirical model to treat the field ionization of molecules in an intense laser field. In this model, a modified Coulomb potential is used to take the place of the complicated ab initio electrostatic potential of molecules. The analytic equations of the Keldysh adiabatic parameter using the Coulomb potential and the modified Coulomb potential have first been given. Using our semiempirical model, we have calculated the field ionization probabilities and the Keldysh adiabatic parameters of O2,N2, SO2, C2H4, CH3CN and C6H6 in an intense laser field. The results agree excellently with the calculations using the ab initio electrostatic potential of molecules. As the modified parameter for the Coulomb potential can be found from experimental measurements, the field ionization mechanism of molecules can be immediately predicted with our semi-empirical model.

  17. Linear electric field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2008-06-10

    A linear electric field ion mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating a linear electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the linear electric field. A source of pulsed ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the linear electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between ionization of atoms or molecules and arrival of an ion out of the ionized atoms or molecules at a predetermined position.

  18. Mass spectrometry of solid samples in open air using combined laser ionization and ambient metastable ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X. N.; Xie, Z. Q.; Gao, Y.; Hu, W.; Guo, L. B.; Jiang, L.; Lu, Y. F.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of solid samples in open air was carried out using combined laser ionization and metastable ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-MI-TOFMS) in ambient environment for qualitative and semiquantitative (relative analyte information, not absolute information) analysis. Ambient metastable ionization using a direct analysis in realtime (DART) ion source was combined with laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-TOFMS) to study the effects of combining metastable and laser ionization. A series of metallic samples from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST 494, 495, 498, 499, and 500) and a pure carbon target were characterized using LI-TOFMS in open air. LI-MI-TOFMS was found to be superior to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Laser pulse energies between 10 and 200 mJ at the second harmonic (532 nm) of an Nd:YAG laser were applied in the experiment to obtain a high degree of ionization in plasmas. Higher laser pulse energy improves signal intensities of trace elements (such as Fe, Cr, Mn, Ni, Ca, Al, and Ag). Data were analyzed by numerically calculating relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) and limit of detections (LODs) from mass spectrometry (MS) and LIBS spectra. Different parameters, such as boiling point, ionization potential, RSC, LOD, and atomic weight, were shown to analyze the ionization and MS detection processes in open air.

  19. Photoelectron emission as an alternative electron impact ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Gerardo; Zhu, Liang; Schmitz, Thomas A; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-09-01

    Electron impact ionization has several known advantages; however, heated filament electron sources have pressure limitations and their power consumption can be significant for certain applications, such as in field-portable instruments. Herein, we evaluate a VUV krypton lamp as an alternative source for ionization inside the ion trap of a mass spectrometer. The observed fragmentation patterns are more characteristic of electron impact ionization than photoionization. In addition, mass spectra of analytes with ionization potentials higher than the lamp's photon energy (10.6 eV) can be easily obtained. A photoelectron impact ionization mechanism is suggested by the observed data allowed by the work function of the ion trap electrodes (4.5 eV), which is well within the lamp's photon energy. In this case, the photoelectrons emitted at the surface of the ion trap end-cap electrode are accelerated by the applied rf field to the ring electrode. This allows the photoelectrons to gain sufficient energy to ionize compounds with high ionization potentials to yield mass spectra characteristic of electron impact. In this manner, electron impact ionization can be used in ion trap mass spectrometers at low powers and without the limitations imposed by elevated pressures on heated filaments.

  20. Fundamentals of Biomolecule Analysis by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinecke, Andrea; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique that allows transfer of fragile biomolecules directly from solution into the gas phase. An instrumental analysis laboratory experiment is designed that would introduce the students to the ESI technique, major parameters of the ion trap mass spectrometers and some caveats in…

  1. Matrix assisted ionization in vacuum, a sensitive and widely applicable ionization method for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D

    2013-05-01

    An astonishingly simple new method to produce gas-phase ions of small molecules as well as proteins from the solid state under cold vacuum conditions is described. This matrix assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) mass spectrometry (MS) method produces multiply charged ions similar to those that typify electrospray ionization (ESI) and uses sample preparation methods that are nearly identical to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Unlike these established methods, MAIV does not require a laser or voltage for ionization, and unlike the recently introduced matrix assisted ionization inlet method, does not require added heat. MAIV-MS requires only introduction of a crystalline mixture of the analyte incorporated with a suitable small molecule matrix compound such as 3-nitrobenzonitrile directly to the vacuum of the mass spectrometer. Vacuum intermediate pressure MALDI sources and modified ESI sources successfully produce ions for analysis by MS with this method. As in ESI-MS, ion formation is continuous and, without a laser, little chemical background is observed. MAIV, operating from a surface offers the possibility of significantly improved sensitivity relative to atmospheric pressure ionization because ions are produced in the vacuum region of the mass spectrometer eliminating losses associated with ion transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum. Mechanistic aspects and potential applications for this new ionization method are discussed.

  2. ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE-IONIZATION MASS-SPECTROMETRY .1. INSTRUMENTATION AND IONIZATION TECHNIQUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, AP

    1994-01-01

    Mass spectrometer ion sources are normally located inside a high-vacuum envelope. Such low-pressure ion sources can make use of a range of different ionization methods and are in routine use in analytical mass spectrometers. An ion source operating at atmospheric pressure is better suited, and may b

  3. Ambient aerodynamic ionization source for remote analyte sampling and mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R Brent; Sampson, Jason S; Hawkridge, Adam M; Muddiman, David C

    2008-07-01

    The use of aerodynamic devices in ambient ionization source development has become increasingly prevalent in the field of mass spectrometry. In this study, an air ejector has been constructed from inexpensive, commercially available components to incorporate an electrospray ionization emitter within the exhaust jet of the device. This novel aerodynamic device, herein termed remote analyte sampling, transport, and ionization relay (RASTIR) was used to remotely sample neutral species in the ambient and entrain them into an electrospray plume where they were subsequently ionized and detected using a linear ion trap Fourier transform mass spectrometer. Two sets of experiments were performed in the ambient environment to demonstrate the device's utility. The first involved the remote (approximately 1 ft) vacuum collection of pure sample particulates (i.e., dry powder) from a glass slide, entrainment and ionization at the ESI emitter, and mass spectrometric detection. The second experiment involved the capture (vacuum collection) of matrix-assisted laser desorbed proteins followed by entrainment in the ESI emitter plume, multiple charging, and mass spectrometric detection. This approach is in principle a RASTIR-assisted matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization source (Sampson, J. S.; Hawkridge, A. M.; Muddiman, D. C. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 2006, 17, 1712-1716; Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2007, 21, 1150-1154.). A detailed description of the device construction, operational parameters, and preliminary small molecule and protein data are presented.

  4. Direct and Convenient Mass Spectrometry Sampling with Ambient Flame Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Pan; Wang, Hao-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Ting; Wu, Meng-Xi; Qi, Wan-Shu; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Yin-Long

    2015-11-01

    Recent innovations in ambient ionization technology for the direct analysis of various samples in their native environment facilitate the development and applications of mass spectrometry in natural science. Presented here is a novel, convenient and flame-based ambient ionization method for mass spectrometric analysis of organic compounds, termed as the ambient flame ionization (AFI) ion source. The key features of AFI ion source were no requirement of (high) voltages, laser beams and spray gases, but just using small size of n-butane flame (height approximately 1 cm, about 500 oC) to accomplish the rapid desorption and ionization for direct analysis of gaseous-, liquid- and solid-phase organic compounds, as well as real-world samples. This method has high sensitivity with a limit of detection of 1 picogram for propyphenazone, which allows consuming trace amount of samples. Compared to previous ionization methods, this ion source device is extremely simple, maintain-free, low-cost, user-friendly so that even an ordinary lighter (with n-butane as fuel) can achieve efficient ionization. A new orientation to mass spectrometry ion source exploitation might emerge from such a convenient, easy and inexpensive AFI ion source.

  5. A mechanism for ionization of nonvolatile compounds in mass spectrometry: considerations from MALDI and inlet ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Wang, Beixi; Inutan, Ellen D; Li, Jing; Lietz, Christopher B; Harron, Andrew; Pagnotti, Vincent S; Sardelis, Diana; McEwen, Charles N

    2012-10-01

    Mechanistic arguments relative to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) address observations that predominately singly charged ions are detected. However, recently a matrix assisted laser ablation method, laserspray ionization (LSI), was introduced that can use the same sample preparation and laser as MALDI, but produce highly charged ions from proteins. In MALDI, ions are generated from neutral molecules by the photon energy provided to a matrix, while in LSI ions are produced inside a heated inlet tube linking atmospheric pressure and the first vacuum region of the mass spectrometer. Some LSI matrices also produce highly charged ions with MALDI ion sources operated at intermediate pressure or high vacuum. The operational similarity of LSI to MALDI, and the large difference in charge states observed by these methods, provides information of fundamental importance to proposed ionization mechanisms for LSI and MALDI. Here, we present data suggesting that the prompt and delayed ionization reported for vacuum MALDI are both fast processes relative to producing highly charged ions by LSI. The energy supplied to produce these charged clusters/droplets as well as their size and time available for desolvation are determining factors in the charge states of the ions observed. Further, charged droplets/clusters may be a common link for ionization of nonvolatile compounds by a variety of MS ionization methods, including MALDI and LSI.

  6. Note: Discharging fused silica test masses with ionized nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, D.; Funk, Q.; Amen, T.

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a technique for discharging fused silica test masses in a gravitational-wave interferometer with nitrogen ionized by an electron beam. The electrons are produced from a heated filament by thermionic emission in a low-pressure region to avoid contamination and burnout. Some electrons then pass through a small aperture and ionize nitrogen in a higher-pressure region, and this ionized gas is pumped across the test mass surface, neutralizing both polarities of charge. The discharge rate varies exponentially with charge density and filament current, quadratically with filament potential, and has an optimal working pressure of ˜8 mT. Adapting the technique to larger test mass chambers is also discussed.

  7. Analytical Properties of Solid-substrate Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Conventional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) uses a capillary for sample loading and ionization. Along with the development of ambient ionization techniques, ESI-MS using noncapillary emitters has attracted more interest in recent years. Following our recent report on ESI-MS using wooden tips ( Anal. Chem. 83, 8201-8207 (2011)), the technique was further investigated and extended in this study. Our results revealed that the wooden tips could serve as a chromatographic column for separation of sample components. Sequential and exhaustive ionization was observed for proteins and salts on wooden tips with salts ionized sooner and proteins later. Nonconductive materials that contain microchannels/pores could be used as tips for ESI-MS analysis with sample solutions loaded to the sharp-ends only, since rapid diffusion of sample solutions by capillary action would enable the tips to become conductive. Tips of inert materials such as bamboo, fabrics, and sponge could be used for sample loading and ionization, while samples such as tissue, mushroom, and bone could form tips to induce ionization for direct analysis with application of a high voltage. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  9. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds.

  10. Biogenic aldehyde determination by reactive paper spray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Soumabha; Hendricks, P.I. [Aston Labs, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Reynolds, J.C. [Centre for Analytical Science, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Cooks, R.G., E-mail: cooks@purdue.edu [Aston Labs, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • In-situ derivatization and simultaneous ionization used to detect aldehydes. • Biogenic aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes reacted with 4-aminophenol. • Derivatized products yield structurally characteristic fragment ions. • This measurement demonstrated using a miniaturized portable mass spectrometer. - Abstract: Ionization of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes is improved by performing simultaneous chemical derivatization using 4-aminophenol to produce charged iminium ions during paper spray ionization. Accelerated reactions occur in the microdroplets generated during the paper spray ionization event for the tested aldehydes (formaldehyde, n-pentanaldehyde, n-nonanaldehyde, n-decanaldehyde, n-dodecanaldehyde, benzaldehyde, m-anisaldehyde, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of the iminium ions using collision-induced dissociation demonstrated that straight chain aldehydes give a characteristic fragment at m/z 122 (shown to correspond to protonated 4-(methyleneamino)phenol), while the aromatic aldehyde iminium ions fragment to give a characteristic product ion at m/z 120. These features allow straightforward identification of linear and aromatic aldehydes. Quantitative analysis of n-nonaldehyde using a benchtop mass spectrometer demonstrated a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude from 2.5 ng to 5 μg of aldehyde loaded on the filter paper emitter. The limit of detection was determined to be 2.2 ng for this aldehyde. The method had a precision of 22%, relative standard deviation. The experiment was also implemented using a portable ion trap mass spectrometer.

  11. Molecular Characterization of S- and N-containing Organic Constituents in Ambient Aerosols by negative ion mode High-Resolution Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Rachel E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Surratt, Jason D.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-11-27

    Samples of ambient aerosols from the 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field study were analyzed using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (nano-DESI/MS). Four samples per day were collected in Bakersfield, CA on June 20-24 with a collection time of 6 hours per sample. Four characteristic groups of organic constituents were identified in the samples: compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen only (CHO), sulfur- (CHOS), nitrogen-(CHON), and both nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organics (CHONS). Within the groups, organonitrates, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates were assigned based on accurate mass measurements and elemental ratio comparisons. Changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol samples were observed throughout the day. The number of observed CHO compounds increased in the afternoon samples, suggesting regional photochemical processing as a source. The average number of CHOS compounds had the smallest changes throughout the day, consistent with a more broadly distributed source. Both of the nitrogen-containing groups (CHON and CHONS) had greater numbers of compounds in the night and morning samples, indicating that nitrate radical chemistry was likely a source for those compounds. Most of the compounds were found in submicron particles. The size distribution of CHON compounds was bimodal. We conclude that the majority of the compounds observed were secondary in nature with both biogenic and anthropogenic sources.

  12. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Highly Reactive Glycosyl Halides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajos Kovács

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Highly reactive glycosyl chlorides and bromides have been analysed by a routine mass spectrometric method using electrospray ionization and lithium salt adduct-forming agents in anhydrous acetonitrile solution, providing salient lithiated molecular ions [M+Li]+, [2M+Li]+ etc. The role of other adduct-forming salts has also been evaluated. The lithium salt method is useful for accurate mass determination of these highly sensitive compounds.

  13. Measurement of boron isotopes by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The isobaric interference for boron isotopic measurement by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (NTIMS) has been studied. The result shows that the CNO- is not only from the organic material, but also from nitrate in loading reagent in NTIMS. Monitoring the mass 43 ion intensity and 43/42 ratio of blank are also necessary for the boron isotopic measurement by NTIMS, other than is only boron content.

  14. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  15. Intracellular protein mass spectroscopy using mid-infrared laser ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awazu, K.; Suzuki, S.

    2007-07-01

    Large-scale analysis of proteins, which can be regarded as functional biomolecule, assumes an important role in the life science. A MALDI using an ultraviolet laser (UV-MALDI) is one of ionization methods without fragmentation and has achieved conformation analysis of proteins. Recently, protein analysis has shifted from conformation analysis to functional and direct one that reserves posttranslational modifications such as the sugar chain addition and phosphorylation. We have proposed a MALDI using a mid-infrared tunable laser (IR-MALDI) as a new ionization method. IR-MALDI is promising because most biomolecules have a specific absorption in mid-infrared range, and IR-MALDI is expected to offer; (1) use of various matrices, (2) use of biomolecules such as water and lipid as the matrix, and (3) super-soft ionization. First, we evaluated the wavelength dependence of ionization of different matrices using a difference frequency generation (DFG) laser, which can tune the wavelength within a range from 5.5 to 10.0 μm. As results, ionization was specifically occurred at 5.8 μm which the C=O vibration stretching bond in matrix material and mass spectrum was observed. Next, protein mass spectrum was observed in the culture cells, MIN6, which secrete insulin, without the conventional cell-preparation processes. We demonstrate that the IR-MALDI has an advantage over the conventional method (UV-MALDI) in direct analysis of intracellular proteins.

  16. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the analysis of chemical food contaminants in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Hooijerink, H.; Zomer, P.; Mol, J.G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction, desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) has been mainly applied in pharmaceutical and forensic analysis. We expect that DESI will find its way in many different fields, including food analysis. In this review, we summarize DESI developments aimed at

  17. Dehydrodimerization of pterostilbene during electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen

    2013-04-30

    RATIONALE Pterostilbene is a member of the hydroxystilbene family of compounds commonly found in plants such as blueberry and grapes. During the analysis of this compound by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), an ion was observed that corresponds to the dehydrodimer of pterostilbene in mass-to-charge ratio. Since such unexpected dimerization may lead to decreased monomer signal during quantitative analysis, it was of interest to identify the origin and structure of the observed pterostilbene dimer and examine the experimental conditions that influence its formation. METHODS Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) were used to examine the origin of the dimerization products. The structure of the formed pterostilbene dimer was examined by performing MSn analysis on the dimer ion. Effects of solvent composition, analyte concentration, radical scavenger, and other experimental conditions on the dimerization were also studied. RESULTS LC/MS and NMR analyses clearly showed that the starting solution did not contain the pterostilbene dimer. Solvent type and radical scavenger concentration were found to have pronounced effects on the dimer formation. Particularly, presence of acetonitrile or ammonium acetate had favorable effects on the extent of dimerization during ESI-MS analysis whereas hydroquinone and butylated hydroquinone had negative effects. Dimer formation decreased at high flow rates and when fused-silica capillary was used as the spray needle. CONCLUSIONS The data indicate that this dimerization occurs as a result of solution-phase electrochemical reactions taking place during the electrospray process. A possible structure for this dimer was proposed based on the MSn analysis and was similar to that of the enzymatically derived pterostilbene dehydrodimer already reported in the literature. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  18. Determination of the first ionization potential of actinides by resonance ionization mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, S. [Institut fuer Kernchemie Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Albus, F. [Institu fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Dibenberger, R.; Erdmann, N.; Funk, H. [Institut fuer Kernchemiess Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Hasse, H. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Herrmann, G. [Institut fuer Kernchemiess Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Huber, G.; Kluge, H.; Nunnemann, M.; Passler, G. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Rao, P.M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Bombay (India); Riegel, J.; Trautmann, N. [Institut fuer Kernchemie Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Urban, F. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    1995-04-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) is used for the precise determination of the first ionization potential of transuranium elements. The first ionization potentials (IP) of americium and curium have been measured for the first time to IP{sub {ital Am}}=5.9738(2) and IP{sub {ital Cm}}=5.9913(8) eV, respectively, using only 10{sup 12} atoms of {sup 243}Am and {sup 248}Cm. The same technique was applied to thorium, neptunium, and plutonium yielding IP{sub T{sub H}}=6.3067(2), IP{sub N{sub P}}=6.2655(2), and IP{sub {ital Pu}}=6.0257(8) eV. The good agreement of our results with the literature data proves the precision of the method which was additionally confirmed by the analysis of Rydberg seris of americium measured by RIMS. {copyright}American Institute of Physics 1995

  19. Laser-Induced Ionization Efficiency Enhancement On A Filament For Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegfried, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-14

    The evaluation of trace Uranium and Plutonium isotope ratios for nanogram to femtogram material quantities is a vital tool for nuclear counter-proliferation and safeguard activities. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) is generally accepted as the state of the art technology for highly accurate and ultra-trace measurements of these actinide ratios. However, the very low TIMS ionization yield (typically less than 1%) leaves much room for improvement. Enhanced ionization of Nd and Sm from a TIMS filament was demonstrated using wavelength resonance with a nanosecond (pulse width) laser operating at 10 Hz when light was directed toward the filament.1 For this study, femtosecond and picosecond laser capabilities were to be employed to study the dissociation and ionization mechanisms of actinides/lanthanides and measure the enhanced ionization of the metal of interest. Since the underlying chemistry of the actinide/lanthanide carbides produced and dissociated on a TIMS filament is not well understood, the experimental parameters affecting the photodissociation and photoionization with one and two laser beams were to be investigated.

  20. Mass-Analyzed Threshold Ionization of LaO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lu; Zhang, Changhua; Krasnokutski, Sergiy; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2010-06-01

    Lanthanum oxide, LaO2, is produced in a pulsed laser-vaporization metal-cluster source and studied by mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy. From the MATI spectrum, the adiabatic ionization energy of LaO2 is determined to be 40134 (5) Cm-1 or 4.976 (6) eV, and La+-O stretching and O-La+-O bending frequencies are measured as 656 and 120 Cm-1. The measured ionization energy is about 3.0 eV lower than the value predicted by recent high-level ab initio calculations. In this talk, we will discuss the discrepancy between the experiment and theory and the electronic transition observed in our experiment. T. K. Todorova, I. Infante, L. Gagliardi, and J. M. Dyke, J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 7825 (2008).

  1. Development of a Portable Single Photon Ionization-Photoelectron Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A vacuum ultraviolet lamp based single photon ionization- (SPI- photoelectron ionization (PEI portable reflecting time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS was designed for online monitoring gas samples. It has a dual mode ionization source: SPI for analyte with ionization energy (IE below 10.6 eV and PEI for IE higher than 10.6 eV. Two kinds of sampling inlets, a capillary inlet and a membrane inlet, are utilized for high concentration and trace volatile organic compounds, respectively. A mass resolution of 1100 at m/z 64 has been obtained with a total size of 40 × 31 × 29 cm, the weight is 27 kg, and the power consumption is only 70 W. A mixture of benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX, SO2, and discharging products of SF6 were used to test its performance, and the result showed that the limit of quantitation for BTX is as low as 5 ppbv (S/N = 10 : 1 with linear dynamic ranges greater than four orders of magnitude. The portable TOFMS was also evaluated by analyzing volatile organic compounds from wine and decomposition products of SF6 inside of a gas-insulated switchgear.

  2. Oxidative Ionization Under Certain Negative-Ion Mass Spectrometric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Isra; Pavlov, Julius; Errabelli, Ramu; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2017-02-01

    1,4-Hydroquinone and several other phenolic compounds generate (M - 2) -• radical-anions, rather than deprotonated molecules, under certain negative-ion mass spectrometric conditions. In fact, spectra generated under helium-plasma ionization (HePI) conditions from 1,4-hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone (by electron capture) were practically indistinguishable. Because this process involves a net loss of H• and H+, it can be termed oxidative ionization. The superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•), known to be present in many atmospheric-pressure plasma ion sources operated in the negative mode, plays a critical role in the oxidative ionization process. The presence of a small peak at m/z 142 in the spectrum of 1,4-hydroquinone, but not in that of 1,4-benzoquinone, indicated that the initial step in the oxidative ionization process is the formation of an O2 -• adduct. On the other hand, under bona fide electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions, 1,4-hydroquinone generates predominantly an (M - 1) - ion. It is known that at sufficiently high capillary voltages, corona discharges begin to occur even in an ESI source. At lower ESI capillary voltages, deprotonation predominates; as the capillary voltage is raised, the abundance of O2 -• present in the plasma increases, and the source in turn increasingly behaves as a composite ESI/APCI source. While maintaining post-ionization ion activation to a minimum (to prevent fragmentation), and monitoring the relative intensities of the m/z 109 (due to deprotonation) and 108 (oxidative ionization) peaks recorded from 1,4-hydroquinone, a semiquantitative estimation of the APCI contribution to the overall ion-generation process can be obtained.

  3. Intense laser induced field ionization of C2H2, C2H4,and C2H6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Lirong; JI Na; XONG Yijia; TANG Xiaoping; KONG Fan'ao

    2003-01-01

    Using HOMO Field Ionization Model, the tunneling probabilities and the theoretical threshold intensities of the field ionizations of acetylene, ethylene, and ethane in intense laser field are calculated. C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 were irradiated by 800 nm, 100 fs laser pulses with the intensity range of 1013-1014 W/cm2. A TOF-mass spectrometer was coupled to the laser system and used to experimentally investigate the field ionization of these molecules. The experimental ionization threshold intensities are obtained. The calculating results of the three molecules agree well with the experimental results, indicating that HOMO Field Ionization Model is valid for the ionization of polyatomic molecules in intense laser field.

  4. Electrospray ionizer for mass spectrometry of aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Siqin; Hogan, Chris; Li, Lin; Liu, Benjamin Y. H.; Naqwi, Amir; Romay, Francisco

    2017-09-19

    A device and method are disclosed to apply ESI-based mass spectroscopy to submicrometer and nanometer scale aerosol particles. Unipolar ionization is utilized to charge the particles in order to collect them electrostatically on the tip of a tungsten rod. Subsequently, the species composing the collected particles are dissolved by making a liquid flow over the tungsten rod. This liquid with dissolved aerosol contents is formed into highly charged droplets, which release unfragmented ions for mass spectroscopy, such as time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The device is configured to operate in a switching mode, wherein aerosol deposition occurs while solvent delivery is turned off and vice versa.

  5. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques.

  6. Metabolomic profiling of prostate cancer by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging using Matrix Coating Assisted by an Electric Field (MCAEF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Han, Jun; Hardie, Darryl B; Yang, Juncong; Pan, Jingxi; Borchers, Christoph H

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we combined the use of two MALDI matrices (quercetin and 9-aminoacridine), a recently developed new matrix coating technique - matrix coating assisted by an electric field (MCAEF), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization - Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICRMS) to detect and image endogenous compounds in the cancerous and non-cancerous regions of three human prostate cancer (stage II) tissue specimens. After three rounds of imaging data acquisitions (i.e., quercetin for positive and negative ion detection and 9-aminoacridine for negative ion detection), and metabolite identification, a total of 1091 metabolites including 1032 lipids and 59 other metabolites were routinely detected and successfully localized. Of these compounds, 250 and 217 were only detected in either the cancerous or the non-cancerous regions respectively, although we cannot rule out the presence of these metabolites at concentrations below the detection limit. In addition, 152 of the other 624 metabolites showed differential distributions (pPeter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lightning electromagnetic field generated by grounding electrode considering soil ionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Rong; HE Jinliang; ZHANG Bo; GAO Yanqing

    2006-01-01

    A circuit model with lumped time-variable parameter is proposed to calculate the transient characteristic of grounding electrode under lightning current, which takes into consideration the dynamic and nonlinear effect of soil ionization around the grounding electrode. The ionization phenomena in the soil are simulated by means of time-variable parameters under appropriate conditions. The generated electromagnetic field in the air is analyzed by using electrical dipole theory and image theory when the lightning current flows into the grounding electrode. The influence of soil ionization on the electromagnetic field is investigated.

  8. Ionization Study of Isomeric Molecules in Strong-field Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigo, Stefan; Le, Anh-Thu; Timilsina, Pratap; Trallero-Herrero, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Through the use of the technique of time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, we obtain strong-field ionization yields for randomly oriented 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2-DCE) (C2H2Cl2) and 2-butene (C4H8). We are interested in studying the effect of conformal structure in strong-field ionization and, in particular, the role of molecular polarity. That is, we can perform strong-field ionization studies in polar vs non-polar molecules that have the same chemical composition. We report our findings through the ionization yields and the ratio (trans/cis) of each stereoisomer pair as a function of intensity. PMID:28186110

  9. Nonsequential double ionization with mid-infrared laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Bin; Wang, Xu; Yu, Ben-Hai; Tang, Qing-Bin; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-11-01

    Using a full-dimensional Monte Carlo classical ensemble method, we present a theoretical study of atomic nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) with mid-infrared laser fields, and compare with results from near-infrared laser fields. Unlike single-electron strong-field processes, double ionization shows complex and unexpected interplays between the returning electron and its parent ion core. As a result of these interplays, NSDI for mid-IR fields is dominated by second-returning electron trajectories, instead of first-returning trajectories for near-IR fields. Some complex NSDI channels commonly happen with near-IR fields, such as the recollision-excitation-with-subsequent-ionization (RESI) channel, are virtually shut down by mid-IR fields. Besides, the final energies of the two electrons can be extremely unequal, leading to novel e-e momentum correlation spectra that can be measured experimentally.

  10. Enhanced Avalanche Ionization by RF Fields Creating an Ultracold Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M. P.; Gallagher, T. F.; Laburthe Tolra, B.; Pillet, P.

    2001-05-01

    Ultracold plasmas have been shown to evolve from initially frozen Rydberg gases held in magneto-optical traps.(M.P. Robinson, B. Laburthe Tolra, Michael W. Noel, T.F. Gallagher, and P. Pillet, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85), 4466 (2000) We report the enhancement of the avalanche ionization process by application of radiofrequency fields. An initial slow ionization rate is observed in the Rydberg sample due to black body ionization and ionizing collisions with hot Rydberg atoms. This produces an overall posititve space charge of cold ions as the hot electrons leave the sample. Once a threshold density of positive charges is built up, the hot electrons become trapped to the sample, leading to avalance ionization due to electron-Rydberg collisions. The mechanism of the ionization remains unclear. However, the application of radiofrequency fields, in the 1 V/cm, 100 MHz range, dramatically enhances the rate of avalanche ionization without changing the threshold density at which it occurs. Apparently, the limiting parameter is the rate of collisional ionization of Rydberg atoms by electrons.

  11. [Real-time analysis of polyvinyl chloride thermal decomposition/combustion products with single photon ionization/photoelectron ionization online mass spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Dong; Hou, Ke-Yong; Chen, Ping; Li, Fang-Long; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Cui, Hua-Peng; Hua, Lei; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Hai-Yang

    2013-01-01

    With the features of a broad range of ionizable compounds, reduced fragments and simple mass spectrum, a homemade magnetic field enhanced photoelectron ionization (MEPEI) source combined with single photon ionization (SPI) for time-of-flight mass spectrometer was built and applied to analyze thermal decomposition/combustion products of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The combined ion source can be switched very fast between SPI mode and SPI-MEPEI mode for detecting different targeted compounds, and only adjusting the voltage of the electrode in the ionization region to trigger the switch. Among the PVC thermal decomposition/combustion products, HCl and CO2, which ionization energies (12.74 eV, 13.77 eV respectively) were higher than the energy of photon (10.60 eV), were ionized by MEPEI, while alkenes, dichloroethylene, benzene and its homologs, monochlorobenzene, styrene, indane, naphthalene and its homologs were ionized by SPI and MEPEI simultaneously. Spectra of interested products as a function of temperatures indicated that products are formed via two main mechanisms: (1) dechlorination and intramolecular cyclization can lead to the formation of HCl, benzene and naphthalene at 250-370 degrees C; (2) intermolecular crosslinking leads to the formation of alkyl aromatics such as toluene and xylene/ethylbenzene at 380-510 degrees C. The experimental results show that the combined ion source of SPI/ SPI-MEPEI for TOF-MS has broad application prospects in the online analysis field.

  12. Magnetic field amplification by collisionless shocks in partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study shock structures of collisionless shocks in partially ionized plasmas by means of two-dimensional hybrid simulations, where the shock is a perpendicular shock with shock velocity Vsh ~ 40 Va ~ 1333 km/s and the upstream ionization fraction is 0.5. We find that large density fluctuations and large magnetic fields fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the velocity distribution of downstream hydrogen atoms has three components. Observed shock structures suggest that diffusive shock acceleration can operate at perpendicular shocks propagating into partially ionized plasmas in real three-dimensional systems.

  13. Characterization of a Continuous Wave Laser for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy Analysis in Nuclear Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    OF A CONTINUOUS WAVE LASER FOR RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS IN NUCLEAR FORENSICS by Sunny G. Lau June 2015 Thesis...IONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS IN NUCLEAR FORENSICS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Sunny G. Lau 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...200 words) The application of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) to nuclear forensics involves the use of lasers to selectively ionize

  14. [Development of a membrane inlet-single photon ionization/chemical ionization-mass spectrometer for online analysis of VOCs in water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Wu, Qing-Hao; Hou, Ke-Yong; Cui, Hua-Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Hai-Yang

    2011-12-01

    A home-made membrane inlet- single photon ionization/chemical ionization- time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been described. A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp with photon energy of 10.6 eV was used as the light source for single photon ionization (SPI). Chemical ionization (CI) was achieved through ion-molecule reactions with O2- reactant ions generated by photoelectron ionization. The two ionization modes could be rapidly switched by adjusting electric field in the ionization region within 2 s. Membrane inlet system used for rapid enrichment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water was constructed by using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane with a thickness of 50 microm. A purge gas was added to accelerate desorption of analytes from the membrane surface. The purge gas could also help to prevent the pump oil back-streaming into the ionization region from the analyzer chamber and improve the signal to noise ratio (S/N). Achieved detection limits were 2 microg x L(-1) for methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in SPI mode and 1 microg x L(-1) for chloroform in SPI-CI mode within 10 s analysis time, respectively. The instrument has been successfully applied to the rapid analysis of MTBE in simulated underground water nearby petrol station and VOCs in disinfected drinking water. The results indicate that the instrument has a great application prospect for online analysis of VOCs in water.

  15. Laboratory and Field Characterizations of a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) Collector Module for a Chemical Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (CI-TOFMS) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J. B.; Vogel, A.; Massoli, P.; Lambe, A. T.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Kroll, J. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) collector module is an add-on for Chemical Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (CI-TOFMS) instruments. The FIGAERO enables simultaneous real-time chemical analysis of trace gases and particles in ambient air. The collector module described here is modelled after the University of Washington (UW) design of Lopez-Hilfikeret al., 2014. The collector module mounts directly to the front of the CI-TOFMS ion molecule reactor, replacing the standard gas phase inlet. Automated operation follows a two-step sequence alternating between gas and particle sampling. Gas and particle flows are sampled through separate inlet lines. Software provides automated control of the ARI FIGAERO and determines which inlet line is sampled into ion molecule reaction region. While in the gas phase measuring position particles are separately collected on a filter. After sufficient particle collection, heated clean nitrogen is passed over the filter to desorb the particles on the filter. The thermally desorbed material is then measured with the CI-TOFMS. Though conceptually similar, the ARI FIGAERO is mechanically different enough from the UW design that it requires its own performance assessment. Presented here is the characterization of the ARI FIGAERO collector module. The FIGAERO performance is assessed by using laboratory, chamber, and field data collected using iodide as the reagent ion to examine detection sensitivity, quantification limits, and time response. Lopez-Hilfiker et al., "A novel method for online analysis of gas and particle composition: description and evaluation of a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO)", Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 983-1001 (2014)

  16. Microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Marttila, Seppo J; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2004-11-15

    A novel microchip heated nebulizer for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Anisotropic wet etching is used to fabricate the flow channels, inlet, and nozzle on a silicon wafer. An integrated heater of aluminum is sputtered on a glass wafer. The two wafers are jointed by anodic bonding, creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI source with a sample channel in the middle and gas channels symmetrically on both sides. The ionization is initiated with an external corona-discharge needle positioned 2 mm in front of the microchip heated nebulizer. The microchip APCI source provides flow rates down to 50 nL/min, stable long-term analysis with chip lifetime of weeks, good quantitative repeatability (RSD 0.995) with linear dynamic rage of at least 4 orders of magnitude, and cost-efficient manufacturing. The limit of detection (LOD) for acridine measured with microchip APCI at flow rate of 6.2 muL/min was 5 nM, corresponding to a mass flow of 0.52 fmol/s. The LOD with commercial macro-APCI at a flow rate of 1 mL/min for acridine was the same, 5 nM, corresponding to a significantly worse mass flow sensitivity (83 fmol/s) than measured with microchip APCI. The advantages of microchip APCI makes it a very attractive new microfluidic detector.

  17. Selective enhancement of resonant multiphoton ionization with strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Min; Luo, Siqiang; Zhou, Yueming; Zhang, Qingbin; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution photoelectron momentum distributions of Xe atom ionized by 800-nm linearly polarized laser fields have been traced at intensities from 1.1*1013 W/cm2 to 3.5*1013 W/cm2 using velocity-map imaging techniques. At certain laser intensities, the momentum spectrum exhibits a distinct double-ring structure for low-order above-threshold ionization, which appears to be absent at lower or higher laser intensities. By investigating intensity-resolved photoelectron energy spectrum, we find that this double-ring structure originates from resonant multiphoton ionization involving multiple Rydberg states of atoms. Varying the laser intensity, we can selectively enhance multiphoton excitation of atomic Rydberg populations. The photoelectron angular distributions of multiphoton resonance are also investigated for the low-order above threshold ionization.

  18. Monitoring of wine aging process by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland Sawaya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of wine samples by direct insertion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, without pre-treatment or chromatographic separation, in a process denominated fingerprinting, has been applied to several samples of wine produced with grapes of the Pinot noir, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon varieties from the state o Rio Grande do Sul, in Brazil. The ESI-MS fingerprints of the samples detected changes which occurred during the aging process in the three grape varieties. Principal Component Analysis (PCA of the negative ion mode fingerprints was used to group the samples, pinpoint the main changes in their composition, and indicate marker ions for each group of samples.

  19. Identification of Fatty Acids, Phospholipids, and Their Oxidation Products Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Christopher W.; Mang, Stephen A.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) have found increasing application in the analysis of biological samples. Using these techniques to solve problems in analytical chemistry should be an essential component of the training of undergraduate chemists. We…

  20. Identification of Fatty Acids, Phospholipids, and Their Oxidation Products Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Christopher W.; Mang, Stephen A.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) have found increasing application in the analysis of biological samples. Using these techniques to solve problems in analytical chemistry should be an essential component of the training of undergraduate chemists. We…

  1. Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

    2008-06-19

    During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

  2. Flame Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Coupled with Negative Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Ion Molecule Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Bhat, Suhail Muzaffar; Shiea, Jentaie

    2017-07-01

    Flame atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) combined with negative electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was developed to detect the ion/molecule reactions (IMRs) products between nitric acid (HNO3) and negatively charged amino acid, angiotensin I (AI) and angiotensin II (AII), and insulin ions. Nitrate and HNO3-nitrate ions were detected in the oxyacetylene flame, suggesting that a large quantity of nitric acid (HNO3) was produced in the flame. The HNO3 and negatively charged analyte ions produced by a negative ESI source were delivered into each arm of a Y-shaped stainless steel tube where they merged and reacted. The products were subsequently characterized with an ion trap mass analyzer attached to the exit of the Y-tube. HNO3 showed the strongest affinity to histidine and formed (Mhistidine-H+HNO3)- complex ions, whereas some amino acids did not react with HNO3 at all. Reactions between HNO3 and histidine residues in AI and AII resulted in the formation of dominant [MAI-H+(HNO3)]- and [MAII-H+(HNO3)]- ions. Results from analyses of AAs and insulin indicated that HNO3 could not only react with basic amino acid residues, but also with disulfide bonds to form [M-3H+(HNO3)n]3- complex ions. This approach is useful for obtaining information about the number of basic amino acid residues and disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins.

  3. Switched ferroelectric plasma ionizer (SwiFerr) for ambient mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidholdt, Evan L; Beauchamp, J L

    2011-01-01

    We present the implementation of a switched ferroelectric plasma ionizer (SwiFerr) for ambient analysis of trace substances by mass spectrometry. The device utilizes the ferroelectric properties of barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) to take advantage of the high electric field resulting from polarization switching in the material. The source comprises a [001]-oriented barium titanate crystal (5 × 5 × 1 mm) with a metallic rear electrode and a metallic grid front electrode. When a high voltage AC waveform is applied to the rear electrode to switch polarization, the resulting electric field on the face of the crystal promotes electron emission and results in plasma formation between the crystal face and the grounded grid at ambient pressure. Interaction with this plasma and the resulting reagent ions effects ionization of trace neutrals. The source requires less than 1 W of power to operate under most circumstances, ionizes molecules with acidic and basic functional groups easily, and has proven quite versatile for ambient analysis of both vapor phase and aspirated powdered solid samples. Ionization of vapor phase samples of the organics triethylamine, tripropylamine, tributylamine, and pyridine results in observation of the singly protonated species in the positive ion mass spectrum with sensitivity extending into the high ppb range. With acetic acid, deprotonated clusters dominate the negative ion mass spectrum. Aerodynamic sampling of powdered samples is used to record mass spectra of the pharmaceuticals loperamide and ibuprofen. Chemical signatures, including protonated loperamide and deprotonated ibuprofen, are observed for each drug. The robust, low power source lends itself easily to miniaturization and incorporation in field-portable devices used for the rapid detection and characterization of trace substances and hazardous materials in a range of different environments.

  4. Secondary ionization mass spectrometry analysis in petrochronology: Chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of petrochronology is to extract information about the rates and conditions at which rocks and magmas are transported through the Earth’s crust. Garnering this information from the rock record greatly benefits from integrating textural and compositional data with radiometric dating of accessory minerals. Length scales of crystal growth and diffusive transport in accessory minerals under realistic geologic conditions are typically in the range of 1–10’s of μm, and in some cases even substantially smaller, with zircon having among the lowest diffusion coefficients at a given temperature (e.g., Cherniak and Watson 2003). Intrinsic to the compartmentalization of geochemical and geochronologic information from intra-crystal domains is the requirement to determine accessory mineral compositions using techniques that sample at commensurate spatial scales so as to not convolute the geologic signals that are recorded within crystals, as may be the case with single grain or large grain fragment analysis by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS; e.g., Schaltegger and Davies 2017, this volume; Schoene and Baxter 2017, this volume). Small crystals can also be difficult to extract by mineral separation techniques traditionally used in geochronology, which also lead to a loss of petrographic context. Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry, that is SIMS performed with an ion microprobe, is an analytical technique ideally suited to meet the high spatial resolution analysis requirements that are critical for petrochronology (Table 1).

  5. Constraining Anthropogenic and Biogenic Emissions Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kathleen M.

    Numerous gas-phase anthropogenic and biogenic compounds are emitted into the atmosphere. These gases undergo oxidation to form other gas-phase species and particulate matter. Whether directly or indirectly, primary pollutants, secondary gas-phase products, and particulate matter all pose health and environmental risks. In this work, ambient measurements conducted using chemical ionization mass spectrometry are used as a tool for investigating regional air quality. Ambient measurements of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) were conducted in Mexico City. A method of inferring the rate of ozone production, PO3, is developed based on observations of HO2NO 2, NO, and NO2. Comparison of this observationally based PO3 to a highly constrained photochemical box model indicates that regulations aimed at reducing ozone levels in Mexico City by reducing NOx concentrations may be effective at higher NO x levels than predicted using accepted photochemistry. Measurements of SO2 and particulate sulfate were conducted over the Los Angeles basin in 2008 and are compared to measurements made in 2002. A large decrease in SO2 concentration and a change in spatial distribution are observed. Nevertheless, only a modest reduction in sulfate concentration is observed at ground sites within the basin. Possible explanations for these trends are investigated. Two techniques, single and triple quadrupole chemical ionization mass spectrometry, were used to quantify ambient concentrations of biogenic oxidation products, hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde. The use of these techniques demonstrates the advantage of triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for separation of mass analogues, provided the collision-induced daughter ions are sufficiently distinct. Enhancement ratios of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde in Californian biomass burning plumes are presented as are concentrations of these compounds at a rural ground site downwind of Sacramento.

  6. Semiclassical two-step model for strong-field ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Shvetsov-Shilovski, N I; Madsen, L B; Räsänen, E; Lemell, C; Burgdörfer, J; Arbó, D G; Tőkési, K

    2016-01-01

    We present a semiclassical two-step model for strong-field ionization that accounts for path interferences of tunnel-ionized electrons in the ionic potential beyond perturbation theory. Within the framework of a classical trajectory Monte-Carlo representation of the phase-space dynamics, the model employs the semiclassical approximation to the phase of the full quantum propagator in the exit channel. By comparison with the exact numerical solution of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation for strong-field ionization of hydrogen, we show that for suitable choices of the momentum distribution after the first tunneling step, the model yields good quantitative agreement with the full quantum simulation. The two-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions, the energy spectra, and the angular distributions are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding quantum results. Specifically, the model quantitatively reproduces the fan-like interference patterns in the low-energy part of the two-dimensional...

  7. Adiabaticity and diabaticity in strong-field ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin

    2013-01-01

    If the photon energy is much less than the electron binding energy, ionization of an atom by a strong optical field is often described in terms of electron tunneling through the potential barrier resulting from the superposition of the atomic potential and the potential associated with the instantaneous electric component of the optical field. In the strict tunneling regime, the electron response to the optical field is said to be adiabatic, and nonadiabatic effects are assumed to be negligible. Here, we investigate to what degree this terminology is consistent with a language based on the so-called adiabatic representation. This representation is commonly used in various fields of physics. For electronically bound states, the adiabatic representation yields discrete potential energy curves that are connected by nonadiabatic transitions. When applying the adiabatic representation to optical strong-field ionization, a conceptual challenge is that the eigenstates of the instantaneous Hamiltonian form a continuu...

  8. Electrostatic fields in an ionization chamber electret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, B. G.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    1983-09-01

    The theory of linear systems is used to derive the potential and electric field in distance space in a cylindrical polarization/depolarization electret chamber. General solutions for the near, intermediate, and far regions are given and their domains of convergence discussed. On the axis of the chamber the solutions for the electret surface are equal to those obtained from Gauss's and Kirchoff's laws, and at large distances from the surface to those obtained from the introduction of a dipole layer model.

  9. Quantification of static magnetic field effects on radiotherapy ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, J.; O’Grady, F.; Young, R.; Duane, S.; Budgell, G. J.

    2017-03-01

    Integrated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and radiotherapy (RT) delivery machines are currently being developed, with some already in clinical use. It is anticipated that the strong magnetic field used in some MR-RT designs will have a significant impact on routine measurements of dose in the MR-linac performed using ionization chambers, which provide traceability back to a primary standard definition of dose. In particular, the presence of small air gaps around ionization chambers may introduce unacceptably high uncertainty into these measurements. In this study, we investigate and quantify the variation attributable to air gaps for several routinely-used cylindrical ionization chambers in a magnetic field, as well as the effect of the magnetic field alone on the response of the chambers. The measurements were performed in a Co-60 beam, while the ionization chambers were positioned in custom-made Perspex phantoms between the poles of an electromagnet, which was capable of generating magnetic fields of up to 2 T field strength, although measurements were focused around 1.5 T. When an asymmetric air gap was rotated at cardinal angles around the ionization chambers investigated here, variation of up to 8.5  ±  0.2 percentage points (PTW 31006 chamber) was observed in an applied magnetic field of 1.5 T. The minimum peak-to-peak variation was 1.1  ±  0.1% (Exradin A1SL). When the same experiment was performed with a well-defined air gap of known position using the PTW 30013 chamber, a variation of 3.8  ±  0.2% was observed. When water was added to the phantom cavity to eliminate all air gaps, the variation for the PTW 30013 was reduced to 0.2  ±  0.01%.

  10. Cold-spray ionization mass spectrometry: applications in structural coordination chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry (MS) is generally used for the characterization of labile supramolecules in which non-covalent bonding interactions are predominant. However, molecular ions are not detected in many cases because of their instability, and even if such ions are detected, thermal decomposition generates fragment ions that also appear in the mass spectrum. Cold-spray ionization (CSI) is designed for the MS detection of labile organic species. It is used to analyze the structures of biomolecular complexes and labile organic species in solution. The method, a variant of ESI-MS, operates at low temperature, allowing simple and precise characterization of labile non-covalent complexes that are difficult or impossible to observe by conventional MS techniques. The CSI method is particularly suitable for elucidating the structures of labile organometallic compounds in solution as it offers a means to investigate the dynamic behavior of unstable molecules and/or labile clusters in solution. Various labile organic compounds are analyzed by using the CSI method in the field of organic chemistry. CSI-MS is also used to investigate the behavior of aggregated steroid compounds, namely, bisguanidinobenzene-benzoic acid complexes, in solution. This method is a powerful tool for analyzing the equilibria of multiply linked self-assembling catenanes in solution. Its application to unstable and complex supramolecules will be shown. We have developed an effective ionization method that uses metal-complex-based ionization probes containing 2,6-bis(oxazolinyl) pyridine (pybox) ligands. Using this method, we were able to detect multiply charged ions of target molecules. This method was proven to effectively ionize large complex molecules, including biomolecules and various supramolecules, as well as carbon clusters, such as fullerenes. Moreover, isotope-labeled pybox-La complexes were used to clearly detect isotopic labeling shifts. Their applications to

  11. Ionization energies of beryllium in strong magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANXiao-xu; ZHANGYue-xia

    2004-01-01

    We have develop an effective frozen core approximation to calculate energy levels and ionization enegies of the beryllium atom in magnetic field strengths up to 2.35 × 105T. Systematic improvement over the Hartree-Fock results for the beryllium low-lying states has been accomplished.

  12. Ionization energies of beryllium in strong magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Xiao-xu; ZHANG Yue-xia

    2004-01-01

    We have develop an effective frozen core approximation to calculate energy levels and ionization enegies of the beryllium atom in magnetic field strengths up to 2.35×105T. Systematic improvement over the Hartree-Fock results for the beryllium low-lying states has been accomplished.

  13. Ambient Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanosecond Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Paul; Levis, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Recent investigations of ambient laser-based transfer of molecules into the gas phase for subsequent mass spectral analysis have undergone a renaissance resulting from the separation of vaporization and ionization events. Here, we seek to provide a snapshot of recent femtosecond (fs) duration laser vaporization and nanosecond (ns) duration laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments. The former employs pulse durations of proteins, and even preserve the condensed phase of folded or unfolded protein structures according to the mass spectral charge state distribution, as demonstrated for cytochrome c and lysozyme. Because of the ability to vaporize and ionize multiple components from complex mixtures for subsequent analysis, near perfect classification of explosive formulations, plant tissue phenotypes, and even the identity of the manufacturer of smokeless powders can be determined by multivariate statistics. We also review the more mature field of nanosecond laser desorption for ambient mass spectrometry, covering the wide range of systems analyzed, the need for resonant absorption, and the spatial imaging of complex systems like tissue samples.

  14. Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of atoms and molecules using VUV synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostko, Oleg; Kim, Sang Kyu; Leone, Stephen R; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-31

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) has been performed for Ar, N(2), O(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, C(2)H(2), and C(6)H(6). MATI allows for a better determination of ionization energies compared to those derived from photoionization efficiency curves traditionally used in synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. The separation of the long-lived Rydberg state from the directly formed prompt ion, essential for a meaningful MATI spectrum, has been accomplished by employing an arrangement of ion optics coupled to unique electric field pulsing schemes. For Ar, a number of resolved bands below the ionization energy are observed, and these are ascribed to high-n,l Rydberg states prepared in the MATI scheme. The first vibrational state resolved MATI spectra of N(2) and O(2) are reported, and spectral characteristics are discussed in comparison with previously reported threshold photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Although MATI performed with synchrotron radiation is intrinsically less sensitive compared to laser-based sources, this work demonstrates that MATI spectroscopy performed with widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation is a complementary technique for studying the ionization spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules.

  15. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2016-06-01

    Ion source pressure plays a significant role in the process of ionization and the subsequent ion transmission inside a mass spectrometer. Pressurizing the ion source to a gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a relatively new approach that aims to further improve the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization sources. For example, under a super-atmospheric pressure environment, a stable electrospray can be sustained for liquid with high surface tension such as pure water, because of the suppression of electric discharge. Even for nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI), which is known to work with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity can also be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source is pressurized. A brief review on the development of super-atmospheric pressure ion sources, including high-pressure electrospray, field desorption and superheated ESI, and the strategies to interface these ion sources to a mass spectrometer will be given. Using a recent ESI prototype with an operating temperature at 220 °C under 27 atm, we also demonstrate that it is possible to achieve an online Asp-specific protein digestion analysis in which the whole processes of digestion, ionization and MS acquisition could be completed on the order of a few seconds. This method is fast, and the reaction can even be monitored on a near-real-time basis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Super-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Rahman, Md Matiur; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-03-01

    Super-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry was performed using a commercial mass spectrometer by pressurizing the ion source with compressed air up to 7 atm. Similar to typical APCI source, reactant ions in the experiment were generated with corona discharge using a needle electrode. Although a higher needle potential was necessary to initiate the corona discharge, discharge current and detected ion signal were stable at all tested pressures. A Roots booster pump with variable pumping speed was installed between the evacuation port of the mass spectrometer and the original rough pumps to maintain a same pressure in the first pumping stage of the mass spectrometer regardless of ion source pressure. Measurement of gaseous methamphetamine and research department explosive showed an increase in ion intensity with the ion source pressure until an optimum pressure at around 4-5 atm. Beyond 5 atm, the ion intensity decreased with further increase of pressure, likely due to greater ion losses inside the ion transport capillary. For benzene, it was found that besides molecular ion and protonated species, ion due to [M + 2H](+) which was not so common in APCI, was also observed with high ion abundance under super-atmospheric pressure condition.

  17. Molecular Strong Field Ionization viewed with Photoelectron Velocity Map Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Peter

    In this thesis, work is presented on molecular strong-field ionization, during which an electron is removed from polyatomic molecules in the presence of strong laser fields. This is a process which is the basis of a number of experimental techniques to uncover electronic dynamics in atoms and molecules on the femtosecond and attosecond timescale. 'Strong' refers to an electric field strength which leads to a response from the system which can not be modeled perturbatively. These fields can be easily produced in the focus of femtosecond laser radiation, as is done in this work. With the use of velocity map imaging of the photoelectron in coincidence with the fragment ion, multiple ionization--dissociation pathways can be distinguished. It is shown that as opposed to early attempts to model the process, multiple low-lying states are populated in the ion, and also the signatures of multielectron dynamics are revealed. By changing the laser pulse duration from 30 fs to below 10 fs, control is demonstrated over which quantum states of the ion are populated. It is also shown that for pulses shorter than 10 fs (which is a timescale below the shortest vibrational period in molecules), ionization pathways that involve motion of the nuclei are almost completely shut off. Finally, the origin of electrons with step model is proposed for creating the electrons: the first step is population transfer to high-lying excited states of the neutral molecule by the laser field; the second step is ionization. Different ionization mechanisms are examined and their viability is checked against available data.

  18. Ionizing gas breakdown waves in strong electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingbeil, R.; Tidman, D. A.; Fernsler, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A previous analysis by Albright and Tidman (1972) of the structure of an ionizing potential wave driven through a dense gas by a strong electric field is extended to include atomic structure details of the background atoms and radiative effects, especially, photoionization. It is found that photoionization plays an important role in avalanche propagation. Velocities, electron densities, and temperatures are presented as a function of electric field for both negative and positive breakdown waves in nitrogen.

  19. Laser fields in dynamically ionized plasma structures for coherent acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of the CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) laser technology, a new scheme for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures has been proposed. By using our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code equipped with ionisation module, we simulate the laser fields dynamics in the periodic structures of different materials. We study how the dynamic ionization influences the field structure.

  20. Multiphoton ionization and stabilization of helium in superintense xuv fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sørngård, S A; Nepstad, R; Førre, M

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization of helium is investigated in the superintense field regime, with particular emphasis on the role of the electron-electron interaction in the ionization and stabilization dynamics. To accomplish this, we solve ab initio the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation with the full electron-electron interaction included. By comparing the ionization yields obtained from the full calculations with corresponding results of an independent-electron model, we come to the somewhat counterintuitive conclusion that the single-particle picture breaks down at superstrong field strengths. We explain this finding from the perspective of the so-called Kramers-Henneberger frame, the reference frame of a free (classical) electron moving in the field. The breakdown is tied to the fact that shake-up and shake-off processes cannot be properly accounted for in commonly used independent-electron models. In addition, we see evidence of a change from the multiphoton to the shake-off ionization regime in the energy di...

  1. Field Ionization detection of supersonic helium atom beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, R. B.

    2003-10-01

    Field ionization detectors (FID) may offer near-unity detection efficiency and nanoscale spatial resolution. To date, FID detection of molecular beams has been limited to effusive beams of broad Maxwellian velocity distributions. We report FID measurements on monoenergetic helium beams, including intensity measurements and time-of-flight measurements. The FID tips were carefully prepared and characterized in a field ionization microscope prior to use. With the supersonic helium beam we find a much smaller effective detection area ( 50 sq. nm) than was reported in the effusive helium beam experiments ( 200,000 sq. nm). This suggests that the FID ionization yield depends strongly on energy loss by the impinging atom during its initial collision with the FID surface: Our thermal energy, monoenergetic helium beam atoms likely lose little or no energy upon scattering from the clean tungsten FID surface, allowing the scattered atoms to escape the FID polarization field and therby reducing the ionization yield. To improve signal levels, inelastic scattering might be enhanced by use of lower beam velocities (present in the tails of a Maxwellian) or by adsorbing an overlayer on the FID tip (present at cryogenic tip temperatures). These factors likely explain the higher detection yields measured in the effusive beam experiments.

  2. Orientation-dependent ionization yields from strong-field ionization of fixed-in-space linear and asymmetric top molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Jonas L; Nielsen, Jens H; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Dimitrovski, Darko; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    The yield of strong-field ionization, by a linearly polarized probe pulse, is studied experimentally and theoretically, as a function of the relative orientation between the laser field and the molecule. Experimentally, carbonyl sulfide, benzonitrile and naphthalene molecules are aligned in one or three dimensions before being singly ionized by a 30 fs laser pulse centered at 800 nm. Theoretically, we address the behaviour of these three molecules. We consider the degree of alignment and orientation and model the angular dependence of the total ionization yield by molecular tunneling theory accounting for the Stark shift of the energy level of the ionizing orbital. For naphthalene and benzonitrile the orientational dependence of the ionization yield agrees well with the calculated results, in particular the observation that ionization is maximized when the probe laser is polarized along the most polarizable axis. For OCS the observation of maximum ionization yield when the probe is perpendicular to the intern...

  3. Resonances in low frequency ionization by periodic electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dando, P.A.; Richards, D. (Open Univ., Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Mathematics Faculty)

    1993-09-28

    The behaviour of a one-dimensional system perturbed by a low frequency, periodic electric field is examined in the limit as the field frequency, [Omega], tends to zero, that is the static field limit. In particular we obtain estimates of the widths of each member of the infinite set of resonances between any finite value of [Omega] and 0. In order to obtain this estimate we derive a new analytic approximation of the two-state equations of motion. Our analysis shows why recent experiments on the ionization of excited hydrogen atoms by low frequency fields failed to observe any resonances. (author).

  4. Comparative mass spectrometric analyses of Photofrin oligomers by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, M M; Tabei, K; Tsao, R; Pastel, M J; Pandey, R K; Berkenkamp, S; Hillenkamp, F; de Vries, M S

    1999-06-01

    Photofrin (porfimer sodium) is a porphyrin derivative used in the treatment of a variety of cancers by photodynamic therapy. This oligomer complex and a variety of porphyrin monomers, dimers and trimers were analyzed with five different mass spectral ionization techniques: fast atom bombardment, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, electrospray ionization, and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization. All five approaches resulted in very similar oligomer distributions with an average oligomer length of 2.7 +/- 0.1 porphyrin units. In addition to the Photofrin analysis, this study provides a side-by-side comparison of the spectra for the five different mass spectrometric techniques.

  5. Intraoperative tissue identification using rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Júlia; Sasi-Szabó, László; Kinross, James; Lewis, Matthew R; Muirhead, Laura J; Veselkov, Kirill; Mirnezami, Reza; Dezső, Balázs; Damjanovich, László; Darzi, Ara; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Takáts, Zoltán

    2013-07-17

    Rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometry (REIMS) is an emerging technique that allows near-real-time characterization of human tissue in vivo by analysis of the aerosol ("smoke") released during electrosurgical dissection. The coupling of REIMS technology with electrosurgery for tissue diagnostics is known as the intelligent knife (iKnife). This study aimed to validate the technique by applying it to the analysis of fresh human tissue samples ex vivo and to demonstrate the translation to real-time use in vivo in a surgical environment. A variety of tissue samples from 302 patients were analyzed in the laboratory, resulting in 1624 cancerous and 1309 noncancerous database entries. The technology was then transferred to the operating theater, where the device was coupled to existing electrosurgical equipment to collect data during a total of 81 resections. Mass spectrometric data were analyzed using multivariate statistical methods, including principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and a spectral identification algorithm using a similar approach was implemented. The REIMS approach differentiated accurately between distinct histological and histopathological tissue types, with malignant tissues yielding chemical characteristics specific to their histopathological subtypes. Tissue identification via intraoperative REIMS matched the postoperative histological diagnosis in 100% (all 81) of the cases studied. The mass spectra reflected lipidomic profiles that varied between distinct histological tumor types and also between primary and metastatic tumors. Thus, in addition to real-time diagnostic information, the spectra provided additional information on divergent tumor biochemistry that may have mechanistic importance in cancer.

  6. Double-electron ionization driven by inhomogeneous fields

    CERN Document Server

    Chacón, A; Cucchietti, F; Suárez, N; Pérez-Hernández, J A; Ciappina, M F; Landsman, A S; Lewenstein, M

    2016-01-01

    Electron-electron correlation effects play an instrumental role in our understanding of sequential (SDI) and non-sequential double ionization (NSDI) mechanisms. Here, we present a theoretical study of NSDI driven by plasmonic-enhanced spatial inhomogeneous fields. By numerically solving the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation for a linear reduced model of He and a double-electron time-evolution probability analysis, we provide evidence for the enhancement effects in NSDI showing that the double ionization yield at lower laser peak intensities is increased due to the inhomogeneity of the laser field. Furthermore, our quantum mechanical model, as well as classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, show that inhomogeneous fields are a useful tool for splitting the binary and recoil processes in the rescattering scenario.

  7. Generalized eikonal approximation for strong-field ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Vélez, F Cajiao; Kamiński, J Z

    2015-01-01

    We develop the eikonal perturbation theory to describe the strong-field ionization by finite laser pulses. This approach in the first order with respect to the binding potential (the so-called generalized eikonal approximation) avoids a singularity at the potential center. Thus, in contrast to the ordinary eikonal approximation, it allows to treat rescattering phenomena in terms of quantum trajectories. We demonstrate how the first Born approximation and its domain of validity follow from eikonal perturbation theory. Using this approach, we study the coherent diffraction patterns in photoelectron energy spectra and their modifications induced by the interaction of photoelectrons with the atomic potential. Along with these first results, we discuss the prospects of using the generalized eikonal approximation to study strong-field ionization from multi-centered atomic systems and to study other strong-field phenomena.

  8. New Types of Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle (Contractor) and MDS Sciex (Participant) and ESA, Inc. (Participant) is to research, develop and apply new types of ionization sources and sampling/inlet systems for analytical mass spectrometry making use of the Participants state-of-the-art atmospheric sampling mass spectrometry electrochemical cell technology instrumentation and ancillary equipment. The two overriding goals of this research project are: to understand the relationship among the various instrumental components and operational parameters of the various ion sources and inlet systems under study, the chemical nature of the gases, solvents, and analytes in use, and the nature and abundances of the ions ultimately observed in the mass spectrometer; and to develop new and better analytical and fundamental applications of these ion sources and inlet systems or alternative sources and inlets coupled with mass spectrometry on the basis of the fundamental understanding obtained in Goal 1. The end results of this work are expected to be: (1) an expanded utility for the ion sources and inlet systems under study (such as the analysis of new types of analytes) and the control or alteration of the ionic species observed in the gas-phase; (2) enhanced instrument performance as judged by operational figures-of-merit such as dynamic range, detection limits, susceptibility to matrix signal suppression and sensitivity; and (3) novel applications (such as surface sampling with electrospray) in both applied and fundamental studies. The research projects outlined herein build upon work initiated under the previous CRADA between the Contractor and MDS Sciex on ion sources and inlet systems for mass spectrometry. Specific ion source and inlet systems for exploration of the fundamental properties and practical implementation of these principles are given.

  9. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L C; Ninomiya, S; Hiraoka, K

    2016-06-01

    Pressure is a key parameter for an ionization source. In this Special Feature article, Lee Chuin Chen and colleagues review super-atmospheric pressure ionization MS with electrospray, corona-discharge-based chemical ionization, and field desorption. They routinely run their mass spectrometer with ion source pressures ranging from several to several tens of atmospheres. A number of strategies have been used to preserve the high vacuum of the instrument while working with a high-pressure (HP) ion source. A recent prototype uses a booster pump with variable pumping speed added to the first pumping stage of the mass spectrometer to regulate a constant vacuum pressure. Further, a new HP-ESI source allowing rapid (a few seconds) online protein digestion MS is also reported. Dr. Lee Chuin Chen is Associate Professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Yamanashi (Yamanashi, Japan). His main research interest is the development of novel mass spectrometric methods for in-situ medical diagnosis.

  10. The Metagalactic Ionizing Field in the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Bland-Hawthorn, J

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the sources which are likely to dominate the ionizing field throughout the Local Group. In terms of the limiting flux to produce detectable H-alpha emission (4-10 x 10**3 phot/cm**2/s), the four dominant galaxies (M31, Galaxy, M33, LMC) have spheres of influence which occupy a small fraction (<10%) of the Local Volume. There are at least two possible sources of ionization whose influence could be far more pervasive: (i) a cosmic background of ionizing photons; (ii) a pervasive warm plasma throughout the Local Group. The COBE FIRAS sky temperature measurements permit a wide variety of plasmas with detectable ionizing fields. It has been suggested (Blitz et al. 1996; Spergel et al. 1996; Sembach et al. 1995, 1998) that a substantial fraction of high velocity clouds are external to the Galaxy but within the Local Group. Deep H-alpha detections are the crucial test of these claims and, indeed, provide a test bed for the putative Local Group corona.

  11. Effects of magnetic fields on the cosmic-ray ionization of molecular cloud cores

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Low-energy cosmic rays are the dominant source of ionization for molecular cloud cores. The ionization fraction, in turn, controls the coupling of the magnetic field to the gas and hence the dynamical evolution of the cores. The purpose of this work is to compute the attenuation of the cosmic-ray flux rate in a cloud core taking into account magnetic focusing, magnetic mirroring, and all relevant energy loss processes. We adopt a standard cloud model characterized by a mass-to-flux ratio supercritical by a factor of about 2 to describe the density and magnetic field distribution of a low-mass starless core, and we follow the propagation of cosmic rays through the core along flux tubes enclosing different amount of mass. We then extend our analysis to cores with different mass-to-flux ratios. We find that mirroring always dominates over focusing, implying a reduction of the cosmic-ray ionization rate by a factor of about 2-3 over most of a solar-mass core with respect to the value in the intercloud medium outs...

  12. Characterization of a CT ionization chamber for radiation field mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana P., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neves, Lucio P., E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vivolo, Vitor, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Xavier, Marcos, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: hjkhoury@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN), Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    A pencil-type ionization chamber, developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), was characterized with the objective to verify the possibility of its application in radiation field mapping procedures. The characterization tests were evaluated, and the results were satisfactory. The results obtained for the X radiation field mapping with the homemade chamber were compared with those of a PTW Farmer-type chamber (TN 30011-1). The maximum difference observed in this comparison was only 1.25%, showing good agreement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new ionization chamber was made and tested for radiation field mapping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ionization chamber was made using only accessible low cost materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The operational tests were made and the results were within the recommended limits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The field map was compared with a commercial chamber presenting a 1.25% difference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our chamber presents potential for assurance reliability in calibration procedures.

  13. Detection, identification, and occurrence of thiotetronic acids in drinking water from underground sources by electrospray ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyczko, Jadwiga; Beach, Daniel; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2015-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that electrospray ionization (ESI) with differential ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS) and "soft" mass spectrometry (MS) provide unique analytical capabilities that led to the discovery of sulfur-containing polar congeners of thiotetronic acid (TA) in drinking water from underground sources in Canada and the United States. Polar TAs accumulate in underground aquifers and appear to be the most abundant class of organic compounds in bottled water but cannot be detected by conventional mass spectrometry methods. We show that normally stable TAs are converted into very reactive ions in ESI which have to be analyzed using special conditions in ESI-FAIMS-MS to avoid extensive dissociation and ion/molecule reactions. De novo identification of 10 TAs was accomplished by the comparative tandem mass spectrometry analysis of authentic TA derivatives from groundwater samples and synthetic TA analogues prepared for this study. We present highlights of gas phase ion chemistry of polar TAs to explain their unique properties and reactivity. TA derivatives were originally isolated from soil bacteria and are of interest in the pharmaceutical industry due to their potent activity against a broad spectrum of pathogenic bacteria and negligible toxicity to mammals. We suspect that TAs are natural disinfection agents protecting groundwater from bacterial contamination, but these compound undergo modifications or decompose during an ozonation water treatment.

  14. The contribution of the delayed ionization in strong-field nonsequential double ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yinbo; Zhou, Yueming, E-mail: zhouymhust@hust.edu.cn; Li, Yang; Li, Min; Lan, Pengfei [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lu, Peixiang, E-mail: lupeixiang@hust.edu.cn [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Laboratory of Optical Information Technology, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China)

    2016-01-14

    With the classical ensemble model, we have investigated the pulse-duration dependence of nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) over a wide range of laser intensity. The correlated electron momentum distributions are distinctly different for the few-cycle and multiple cycle pulses, which agree well with the previous experiments. Based on this agreement, we analyzed the underlying process for the pulse-duration dependence of the electron correlation by tracing the classical trajectories. Counterintuitively, our analysis shows that the recollision-induced excited states of NSDI could resist ionization in the strong laser field for a time much longer than one optical cycle even at very high intensities. For the multiple-cycle pulses, NSDI events with such a long time delay have significant contribution to the total NSDI yields, which is responsible for the pulse-duration dependence of the observed correlated patterns in the electron momentum distributions.

  15. Electrostatic-spray ionization mass spectrometry sniffing for perfume fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobolkina, Elena; Qiao, Liang; Xu, Guobin; Girault, Hubert H

    2013-11-15

    The perfume market is growing significantly, and it is easy to find imitative fragrances of probably all types of perfume. Such imitative fragrances are usually of lower quality than the authentic ones, creating a possible threat for perfume companies. Therefore, it is important to develop efficient chemical analysis techniques to screen rapidly perfume samples. Electrostatic-spray ionization (ESTASI) was used to analyze directly samples sprayed or deposited on different types of paper. A linear ion trap mass spectrometer was used to detect the ions produced by ESTASI with a modified extended transfer capillary for 'sniffing' ions from the paper. Several commercial perfumes and a model perfume were analyzed by ESTASI-sniffing. The results obtained by paper ESTASI-MS of commercial fragrances were compared with those obtained from ESI-MS. In addition, a commercial fragrance was first nebulized on the hand and then soaked up by blotting paper, which was afterwards placed on an insulating plate for ESTASI-MS analysis. Analysis of peptides and proteins was also performed to show that the paper ESTASI-MS could be used for samples with very different molecular masses. Paper ESTASI-MS yields a rapid fingerprinting characterization of perfume fragrances, avoiding time-consuming sample-preparation steps, and thereby performing a rapid screening in a few seconds. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Molecular ionization of cyclohexanone in femtosecond laser fields: An application of ADK theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Q.; Mineo, H.; Wu, D.; Jin, M. X.; Chin, C. H.; Teranishi, Y.; Chao, S. D.; Ding, D.; Lin, S. H.

    2009-08-01

    The mechanisms of ionization and dissociation of cyclohexanone (C6H10O) in a 90 fs, 788 nm linearly polarized laser field ranging from 1013 to 1014 W/cm2 by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) have been investigated. The ion yields as a function of laser intensity have been measured experimentally. By comparison with the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) theory based on a hydrogen-like model, the ionization mechanism of cyclohexanone in this intense femtosecond laser field has been understood. Considering the importance of molecular nuclear motions, we propose that the Franck-Condon (F-C) factor can provide the excess vibrational energy in the molecular ion. This energy is required for the decomposition of the molecular ion which finally results in the observed mass spectrum.

  17. Extended virtual detector theory for strong-field atomic ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Tian, Justin; Eberly, J H

    2013-06-14

    For time-dependent strong-field atomic ionization a new theoretical approach is described that combines the numerical time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) and the numerical time-dependent Newtonian equation (TDNE). This approach keeps both the accuracy of quantum calculations and the speed of classical calculations. It does not use approximate tunneling formulas. It is applied to a recent experimental result, and we show its successful comparison to extensive TDSE calculations made under exactly the same conditions.

  18. Advantages of Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization in Gas Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Pyrethroid Insecticides as a Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portolés, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Hernández, F.

    2012-01-01

    Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been extensively applied for determination of volatile, nonpolar, compounds in many applied fields like food safety, environment, or toxicology. The wide majority of methods reported use electron ionization (EI), which may result in extensi

  19. Unitarity and Complex Mass Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollini, C. G.; Oxman, L. E.

    We consider a field obeying a simple higher order equation with a real mass and two complex conjugate mass parameters. The evaluation of vacuum expectation values leads to the propagators, which are (resp.) a Feynman causal function and two complex conjugate Wheeler-Green functions (half retarded plus half advanced). By means of the computation of convolutions, we are able to show that the total self-energy has an absorptive part which is only due to the real mass. In this way it is shown that this diagram is compatible with unitarity and the elimination of free complex-mass asymptotic states from the set of external legs of the S-matrix. It is also shown that the complex masses act as regulators of ultraviolet divergences.

  20. Characterization of a CT ionization chamber for radiation field mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Ana P; Neves, Lucio P; Vivolo, Vitor; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A pencil-type ionization chamber, developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN), was characterized with the objective to verify the possibility of its application in radiation field mapping procedures. The characterization tests were evaluated, and the results were satisfactory. The results obtained for the X radiation field mapping with the homemade chamber were compared with those of a PTW Farmer-type chamber (TN 30011-1). The maximum difference observed in this comparison was only 1.25%, showing good agreement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Breakdown of the Dipole Approximation in Strong-Field Ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, A; Mayer, B W; Phillips, C R; Gallmann, L; Keller, U

    2014-01-01

    We report the breakdown of the electric dipole approximation in the long-wavelength limit in strong-field ionization with linearly polarized few-cycle mid-infrared laser pulses at intensities on the order of 10$^{13}$ W/cm$^2$. Photoelectron momentum distributions were recorded by velocity map imaging and projected onto the beam propagation axis. We observe an increasing shift of the peak of this projection opposite to the beam propagation direction with increasing laser intensities. From a comparison with semi-classical simulations, we identify the combined action of the magnetic field of the laser pulse and the Coulomb potential as origin of our observations.

  2. Strong field ionization and gauge dependence of nonlocal potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Rensink, T C

    2016-01-01

    Nonlocal potential models have been used in place of the Coulomb potential in the Schrodinger equation as an efficient means of exploring high field laser-atom interaction in previous works. Al- though these models have found use in modeling phenomena including photo-ionization and ejected electron momentum spectra, they are known to break electromagnetic gauge invariance. This paper examines if there is a preferred gauge for the linear field response and photoionization characteristics of nonlocal atomic binding potentials in the length and velocity gauges. It is found that the length gauge is preferable for a wide range of parameters.

  3. Strong-Field Ionization of Laser Cooled Li Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sachin; Romans, Kevin; Fischer, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Recently, our understanding of few-body effects has been substantially boosted by the development of intense femto- and attosecond laser sources. Observing the momenta of the fragments of atoms and molecules ionized in these strong fields provided new and before inconceivable insights in molecular and electronic dynamics. Here, we report on a new experiment, where the target atoms (6 Li) are laser cooled and trapped using a magneto optical trap (MOT). Momentum vectors of the target fragments will be measured using a reaction microscope (ReMi). The exclusivity of this setup is a combination of MOT and ReMi, thus dubbed as MOTReMi. Here, the advantages over standard COLTRIMS systems are multifold: Firstly, an unprecedented recoil ion momentum resolution can be achieved, as the target can be prepared at significantly lower temperatures. Second, the atoms can be optically prepared in the ground or in polarized excited states. In a first experimental campaign, studies on single ionization of laser excited and polarized Lithium atoms will be performed with circularly polarized light. This experiment can provide insight into the helicity-dependence of the ionization dynamics as the differences among co- and counter rotating electron and laser field, if any, can be investigated.

  4. Semiclassical two-step model for strong-field ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov-Shilovski, N. I.; Lein, M.; Madsen, L. B.; Räsänen, E.; Lemell, C.; Burgdörfer, J.; Arbó, D. G.; Tőkési, K.

    2016-07-01

    We present a semiclassical two-step model for strong-field ionization that accounts for path interferences of tunnel-ionized electrons in the ionic potential beyond perturbation theory. Within the framework of a classical trajectory Monte Carlo representation of the phase-space dynamics, the model employs the semiclassical approximation to the phase of the full quantum propagator in the exit channel. By comparison with the exact numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for strong-field ionization of hydrogen, we show that for suitable choices of the momentum distribution after the first tunneling step, the model yields good quantitative agreement with the full quantum simulation. The two-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions, the energy spectra, and the angular distributions are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding quantum results. Specifically, the model quantitatively reproduces the fanlike interference patterns in the low-energy part of the two-dimensional momentum distributions, as well as the modulations in the photoelectron angular distributions.

  5. Emergence of a higher energy structure in strong field ionization with inhomogeneous electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ortmann, L; Ciappina, M F; Chacón, A; Zeraouli, G; Kling, M F; Roso, L; Lewenstein, M; Landsman, A S

    2016-01-01

    Studies of strong field ionization have historically relied on the strong field approximation, which neglects all spatial dependence in the forces experienced by the electron after ionization. More recently, the small spatial inhomogeneity introduced by the long-range Coulomb potential has been linked to a number of important features in the photoelectron spectrum, such as Coulomb asymmetry, Coulomb focusing, and the low energy structure (LES). Here, we demonstrate by combined quantum and classical simulations that a small time-varying spatial dependence in the laser electric field creates a prominent higher energy peak at energies above the "classical cut-off" for direct electrons. This higher energy structure (HES) originates from direct electrons ionized near the peak of a single half-cycle of the laser pulse. The HES is separated from all other ionization events (providing sub-cycle resolution) and is highly sensitive to the carrier envelope phase (CEP). The large accumulation of electrons with tuneable e...

  6. Can strong-field ionization prepare attosecond dynamics?

    CERN Document Server

    Pabst, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Strong-field ionization (SFI) has been shown to prepare wave packets with few-femtosecond periods. Here, we explore whether this technique can be extended to the attosecond time scale. We introduce an intuitive model for predicting the bandwidth of ionic states that can be coherently prepared by SFI. This bandwidth is given by the Fourier-transformed sub-cycle SFI rate and decreases considerably with increasing central wavelength of the ionizing pulse. Many-body calculations based on time-dependent configuration-interaction singles (TDCIS) quantitatively support this result and reveal an additional decrease of the bandwidth as a consequence of channel interactions and non-adiabatic dynamics. Our results further predict that multi-cycle femtosecond pulses can coherently prepare attosecond wave packets with higher selectivity and versatility compared to single-cycle pulses.

  7. Application of nanodiamonds in human body fluid analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianglei Kong

    2008-01-01

    Direct mass spectrometric analysis of complex biological samples is very important and challenging. In this paper, nanodiamonds have been successfully used in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis of human serum and urine. As a practical tool and platform, it can be widely used in the field of humoral proteomics, and it plays a very promising role in clinical diagnosis, including identification of novel disease-associated biomarkers.

  8. Quantum control via a genetic algorithm of the field ionization pathway of a Rydberg electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoric, Vincent C.; Kang, Xinyue; Liu, Zhimin Cheryl; Rowley, Zoe A.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2017-08-01

    Quantum control of the pathway along which a Rydberg electron field ionizes is experimentally and computationally demonstrated. Selective field ionization is typically done with a slowly rising electric field pulse. The (1/n*)4 scaling of the classical ionization threshold leads to a rough mapping between arrival time of the electron signal and principal quantum number of the Rydberg electron. This is complicated by the many avoided level crossings that the electron must traverse on the way to ionization, which in general leads to broadening of the time-resolved field ionization signal. In order to control the ionization pathway, thus directing the signal to the desired arrival time, a perturbing electric field produced by an arbitrary wave-form generator is added to a slowly rising electric field. A genetic algorithm evolves the perturbing field in an effort to achieve the target time-resolved field ionization signal.

  9. High field – low energy muon ionization cooling channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Kamal Sayed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Muon beams are generated with large transverse and longitudinal emittances. In order to achieve the low emittances required by a muon collider, within the short lifetime of the muons, ionization cooling is required. Cooling schemes have been developed to reduce the muon beam 6D emittances to ≈300  μm-rad in transverse and ≈1–1.5  mm in longitudinal dimensions. The transverse emittance has to be further reduced to ≈50–25  μm-rad with an upper limit on the longitudinal emittance of ≈76  mm in order to meet the high-energy muon collider luminosity requirements. Earlier studies of the transverse cooling of low energy muon beams in high field magnets showed a promising performance, but did not include transverse or longitudinal matching between the stages. In this study we present the first complete design of the high field-low energy ionization cooling channel with transverse and longitudinal matching. The channel design was based on strong focusing solenoids with fields of 25–30 T and low momentum muon beam starting at 135  MeV/c and gradually decreasing. The cooling channel design presented here is the first to reach ≈50 micron scale emittance beam. We present the channel’s optimized design parameters including the focusing solenoid fields, absorber parameters and the transverse and longitudinal matching.

  10. A Combined Desorption Ionization by Charge Exchange (DICE) and Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Source for Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S.; Miller, Scott A.; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H]+ or [M + metal]+ ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies.

  11. Revisiting the tunnelling site of electrons in strong field enhanced ionization of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Cheng; Zhou, Yueming; Zhang, Qingbin; Liu, Kunlong; Lu, Peixiang

    2014-01-01

    We investigated electron emissions in strong field enhanced ionization of asymmetric diatomic molecules by quantum calculations. It is demonstrated that the widely-used intuitive physical pic- ture, i.e., electron wave packet direct ionization from the up-field site (DIU), is incomplete. Besides DIU, we find another two new ionization channels, the field-induced excitation with subsequent ionization from the down-field site (ESID), and the up-field site (ESIU). The contributions from these channels depend on the molecular asymmetry and internuclear distance. Our work provides a more comprehensive physical picture for the long-standing issue about enhanced ionization of diatomic molecules.

  12. Tunneling site of electrons in strong-field-enhanced ionization of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Lan, Pengfei; Zhou, Yueming; Zhang, Qingbin; Liu, Kunlong; Lu, Peixiang

    2014-10-01

    We investigated electron emissions in strong-field-enhanced ionization of asymmetric diatomic molecules by quantum calculations. It is demonstrated that the widely used intuitive physical picture, i.e., electron wave-packet direct ionization from the up-field site (DIU), is incomplete. Besides DIU, we find another two ionization channels: the field-induced excitation with subsequent ionization from the down-field site and that from the up-field site. The contributions from these channels depend on the molecular asymmetry and internuclear distance. Our work provides a more comprehensive physical picture for the long-standing issue about enhanced ionization of diatomic molecules.

  13. Mass spectrometry analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls: chemical ionization and selected ion chemical ionization using methane as a reagent gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAYMOND E. MARCH

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, coupled with a gas chromatograph, was used to compare the electron impact ionization (EI and chemical ionization (Cl technique, in terms of their selectivity in polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs quantitative analysis. The experiments were carried out with a modified Varian SATURN III quadrupole ion-storage mass spectrometer equipped with Varian waveform generator, coupled with a gas chromatograph with DB-5 capillary column. The disadvantage of using EI in the analysis of PCBs congeners is the extensive fragmentation of the molecular ion. The main fragmentation pattern recorded in the EI mass spectra of PCBs was the loss of a chlorine atom from the molecular ion. Therefore the fragment-ion signal overlapped with the molecular-ion cluster of lower mass congener. The fragmentation reactions of PCBs are suppressed if methane is used as a reagent gas for chemical ionization, but fragment ions are also present in the spectrum as an obstruction for quantitative analysis. The most selective method for PCBs quantitative analysis appears to be Cl with mass-selected C2H5+ ions from methane, which results in a mass spectrum with a negligible amount of fragment ions.

  14. Separation of Opiate Isomers Using Electrospray Ionization and Paper Spray Coupled to High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicke, Nicholas E.; Belford, Michael

    2015-05-01

    One limitation in the growing field of ambient or direct analysis methods is reduced selectivity caused by the elimination of chromatographic separations prior to mass spectrometric analysis. We explored the use of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), an ambient pressure ion mobility technique, to separate the closely related opiate isomers of morphine, hydromorphone, and norcodeine. These isomers cannot be distinguished by tandem mass spectrometry. Separation prior to MS analysis is, therefore, required to distinguish these compounds, which are important in clinical chemistry and toxicology. FAIMS was coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, and ionization was performed using either a pneumatically assisted heated electrospray ionization source (H-ESI) or paper spray, a direct analysis method that has been applied to the direct analysis of dried blood spots and other complex samples. We found that FAIMS was capable of separating the three opiate structural isomers using both H-ESI and paper spray as the ionization source.

  15. Two-colour multiphoton ionization of hydrogen by an intense laser field and its third harmonic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potvliege, R.M.; Smith, P.H.G. (Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-28

    We present results of ab initio non-perturbative Floquet calculations of rates for multiphoton ionization of atomic hydrogen by an intense laser field and its third harmonic, discussing in particular resonant ionization and the dependence of the ionization rate on the relative phase of the two fields. (author).

  16. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  17. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  18. Evolutionary Optimization of State Selective Field Ionization for Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, M L; Majeed, H O; Varcoe, B T H

    2009-01-01

    State selective field ionization detection techniques in physics require a specific progression through a complicated atomic state space to optimize state selectivity and overall efficiency. For large principle quantum number n, the theoretical models become computationally intractable and any results are often rendered irrelevant by small deviations from ideal experimental conditions, for example external electromagnetic fields. Several different proposals for quantum information processing rely heavily upon the quality of these detectors. In this paper, we show a proof of principle that it is possible to optimize experimental field profiles in situ by running a genetic algorithm to control aspects of the experiment itself. A simple experiment produced novel results that are consistent with analyses of existing results.

  19. Characterization of nonpolar lipids and steroids by using laser-induced acoustic desorption/chemical ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Z; Daiya, S; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) combined with ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} chemical ionization (CI) was tested for the analysis of nonpolar lipids and selected steroids in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR). The nonpolar lipids studied, cholesterol, 5α-cholestane, cholesta-3,5-diene, squalene, and β-carotene, were found to solely form the desired water replacement product (adduct-H{sub 2}O) upon reaction with the ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} ions. The steroids, androsterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estrone, estradiol, and estriol, also form abundant adduct-H{sub 2}O ions, but less abundant adduct-2H{sub 2}O ions were also observed. Neither (+)APCI nor (+)ESI can ionize the saturated hydrocarbon lipid, cholestane. APCI successfully ionizes the unsaturated hydrocarbon lipids to form exclusively the intact protonated analytes. However, it causes extensive fragmentation for cholesterol and the steroids. The worst case is cholesterol that does not produce any stable protonated molecules. On the other hand, ESI cannot ionize any of the hydrocarbon analytes, saturated or unsaturated. However, ESI can be used to protonate the oxygen-containing analytes with substantially less fragmentation than for APCI in all cases except for cholesterol and estrone. In conclusion, LIAD/ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} chemical ionization is superior over APCI and ESI for the mass spectrometric characterization of underivatized nonpolar lipids and steroids.

  20. Electrospray Post-Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Electrosurgical Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Sabine; Schäfer, Karl-Christian; Balog, Júlia; Dénes, Júlia; Majoros, Tamás; Albrecht, Katalin; Tóth, Miklós; Spengler, Bernhard; Takáts, Zoltán

    2011-11-01

    The feasibility of electrospray (ES) ionization of aerosols generated by electrosurgical disintegration methods was investigated. Although electrosurgery itself was demonstrated to produce gaseous ions, post-ionization methods were implemented to enhance the ion yield, especially in those cases when the ion current produced by the applied electrosurgical method is not sufficient for MS analysis. Post-ionization was implemented by mounting an ES emitter onto a Venturi pump, which is used for ion transfer. The effect of various parameters including geometry, high voltage setting, flow parameters, and solvent composition was investigated in detail. Experimental setups were optimized accordingly. ES post-ionization was found to yield spectra similar to those obtained by the REIMS technique, featuring predominantly lipid-type species. Signal enhancement was 20- to 50-fold compared with electrosurgical disintegration in positive mode, while no improvement was observed in negative mode. ES post-ionization was also demonstrated to allow the detection of non-lipid type species in the electrosurgical aerosol, including drug molecules. Since the tissue specificity of the MS data was preserved in the ES post-ionization setup, feasibility of tissue identification was demonstrated using different electrosurgical methods.

  1. Investigation of structure, dynamics and function of metalloproteins with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltashov, Igor A; Zhang, Mingxuan; Eyles, Stephen J; Abzalimov, Rinat R

    2006-10-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) has emerged recently as a powerful tool for analyzing many structural and behavioral aspects of metalloproteins in great detail. In this review we discuss recent developments in the field, placing particular emphasis on the unique features of ESI MS that lend themselves to metalloprotein characterization at a variety of levels. Direct mass measurement enables the determination of protein-metal ion binding stoichiometry in solution and metalloprotein higher order structure in the case of multi-subunit proteins. MS techniques have been developed for determining the locations of metal-binding centers, metal oxidation states and reaction intermediates of metal-containing enzymes. Other ESI MS techniques are also discussed, such as protein ion charge state distributions and hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies, which can be used to measure metal binding affinities and to shed light on vital dynamic aspects of the functional properties of metalloproteins endowed by metal binding.

  2. Resonantly-enhanced two-photon ionization and mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of 2-hydroxypyridine

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, D H; Choi, K W; Choi, Y S; Kim, S K

    2002-01-01

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectra of 2-hydroxypyridines existing as lactims (2-pyridionl) in a molecular beam are obtained via (1+1') two-photon process to give accurate ionization energies of 8.9344 +- 0.0005 and 8.9284 +- 0.0005 eV for 2-pyridinol (2Py-OH) and its deuterated analogue (2Py-OD), respectively. Resonantly-enhanced two-photon ionization spectra of these compounds are also presented to give vibrational structures of their S sub 1 states. Vibrational frequencies of 2Py-OH and 2Py-OD in ionic ground states are accurately determined from MATI spectra taken via various S sub 1 intermediate states, and associated vibrational modes are assigned with the aid of ab initio calculations.

  3. Mass distributions of a macromolecular assembly based on electrospray ionization mass spectrometric masses of the constituent subunits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leonid Hanin; Brian Green; Franck Zal; Serge Vinogradov

    2003-09-01

    Macromolecular assemblies containing multiple protein subunits and having masses in the megadalton (MDa) range are involved in most of the functions of a living cell. Because of variation in the number and masses of subunits, macromolecular assemblies do not have a unique mass, but rather a mass distribution. The giant extracelular erythrocruorins (Ers), ∼ 3.5 MDa, comprized of at least 180 polypeptide chains, are one of the best characterized assemblies. Three-dimensional reconstructions from cryoelectron microscopic images show them to be hexagonal bilayer complexes of 12 subassemblies, each comprised of 12 globin chains, anchored to a subassembly of 36 nonglobin linker chains. We have calculated the most probable mass distributions for Lumbricus and Riftia assemblies and their globin and linker subassemblies, based on the Lumbricus Er stoichiometry and using accurate subunit masses obtained by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The expected masses of Lumbricus and Riftia Ers are 3.517 MDa and 3.284 MDa, respectively, with a possible variation of ∼ 9% due to the breadth of the mass distributions. The Lumbricus Er mass is in astonishingly good agreement with the mean of 23 known masses, 3.524 ± 0.481 MDa.

  4. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, Y.C.

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent. 8 figs.

  5. Graphene coated silica applied for high ionization matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: A novel approach for environmental and biomolecule analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser Abdelhamid, Hani; Wu, Bo-Sgum; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-08-01

    The integration of nanotechnology with mass spectrometry for sensitive and selective detection of molecules is a hot/important field of research. Synthesis of graphene (G) coated with mesoporous silica (SiO2, G@SiO2) for mass spectrometric application has been demonstrated. For the first time, we proposed the significant role of surfactant that used during the synthesis of mesorporous silicate (SiO2) in mass spectrometry. It was noticed that G could initiate SiO2 via surfactants which work as initiators for further ionization. The porosity of SiO2 trapped the analytes that was released and ionized with the surfactant fragments. Undoubtedly, strong background interferences were present in the case of organic matrix, which greatly obscured the detection of low molecular weight compounds. G@SiO2 nanocomposite affords several advantages, such as the ability to detect small molecules (SiO2 is not only due to the large surface area but also due to high desorption/ionization efficiency of inevitably surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, CATB). Unlike the conventional MALDI-MS, the G@SiO2-MS is capable of generating multiply charged polysaccharides. The present method was validated to detect surfactants with low limits of detection.

  6. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isselhardt, Brett H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  7. Classical electron ionization mass spectra in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Alexander; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2008-09-01

    A major benefit of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with a supersonic molecular beam (SMB) interface and its fly-through ion source is the ability to obtain electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules (cold EI), which show enhanced molecular ions. However, GC/MS with an SMB also has the flexibility to perform 'classical EI' mode of operation which provides mass spectra to mimic those in commercial 70 eV electron ionization MS libraries. Classical EI in SMB is obtained through simple reduction of the helium make-up gas flow rate, which reduces the SMB cooling efficiency; hence the vibrational temperatures of the molecules are similar to those in traditional EI ion sources. In classical EI-SMB mode, the relative abundance of the molecular ion can be tuned and, as a result, excellent identification probabilities and very good matching factors to the NIST MS library are obtained. Classical EI-SMB with the fly-through dual cage ion source has analyte sensitivity similar to that of the standard EI ion source of a basic GC/MS system. The fly-through EI ion source in combination with the SMB interface can serve for cold EI, classical EI-SMB, and cluster chemical ionization (CCI) modes of operation, all easily exchangeable through a simple and quick change (not involving hardware). Furthermore, the fly-through ion source eliminates sample scattering from the walls of the ion source, and thus it offers full sample inertness, tailing-free operation, and no ion-molecule reaction interferences. It is also robust and enables increased column flow rate capability without affecting the sensitivity.

  8. Regional cosmic ray induced ionization and geomagnetic field changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Kovaltsov

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic ray induced ionization (CRII is an important factor of outer space influences on atmospheric properties. Variations of CRII are caused by two different processes – solar activity variations, which modulate the cosmic ray flux in interplanetary space, and changes of the geomagnetic field, which affects the cosmic ray access to Earth. Migration of the geomagnetic dipole axis may greatly alter CRII in some regions on a time scale of centuries and longer. Here we present a study of CRII regional effects of the geomagnetic field changes during the last millennium for two regions: Europe and the Far East. We show that regional effects of the migration of the geomagnetic dipole axis may overcome global changes due to solar activity variations.

  9. Regime transition in electromechanical fluid atomization and implications to analyte ionization for mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2010-11-01

    The physical processes governing the transition from purely mechanical ejection to electromechanical ejection to electrospraying are investigated through complementary scaling analysis and optical visualization. Experimental characterization and visualization are performed with the ultrasonically-driven array of micromachined ultrasonic electrospray (AMUSE) ion source to decouple the electrical and mechanical fields. A new dimensionless parameter, the Fenn number, is introduced to define a transition between the spray regimes, in terms of its dependence on the characteristic Strouhal number for the ejection process. A fundamental relationship between the Fenn and Strouhal numbers is theoretically derived and confirmed experimentally in spraying liquid electrolytes of different ionic strength subjected to a varying magnitude electric field. This relationship and the basic understanding of the charged droplet generation physics have direct implications on the optimal ionization efficiency and mass spectrometric response for different types of analytes. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ˜0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-2 Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10-6 Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  11. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry method for selectively producing either singly or multiply charged molecular ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D; Herath, Thushani N; McEwen, Charles N

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is noted for its ability to produce primarily singly charged ions. This is an attribute when using direct ionization for complex mixtures such as protein digests or synthetic polymers. However, the ability to produce multiply charged ions, as with electrospray ionization (ESI), has advantages such as extending the mass range on mass spectrometers with limited mass-to-charge (m/z) range and enhancing fragmentation for structural characterization. We designed and fabricated a novel field free transmission geometry atmopsheric pressure (AP) MALDI source mounted to a high-mass resolution Orbitrap Exactive mass spectrometer. We report the ability to produce at will either singly charged ions or highly charged ions using a MALDI process by simply changing the matrix or the matrix preparation conditions. Mass spectra with multiply charged ions very similar to those obtained with ESI of proteins such as cytochrome c and ubiquitin are obtained with low femtomole amounts applied to the MALDI target plate and for peptides such as angiotensin I and II with application of attomole amounts. Single scan acquisitions produce sufficient ion current even from proteins.

  12. Spatially resolved thermal desorption/ionization coupled with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for sub-micron analysis of a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The method includes providing a specimen for evaluation and a thermal desorption probe, thermally desorbing an analyte from a target site of said specimen using the thermally active tip to form a gaseous analyte, ionizing the gaseous analyte to form an ionized analyte, and analyzing a chemical composition of the ionized analyte. The thermally desorbing step can include heating said thermally active tip to above 200.degree. C., and positioning the target site and the thermally active tip such that the heating step forms the gaseous analyte. The thermal desorption probe can include a thermally active tip extending from a cantilever body and an apex of the thermally active tip can have a radius of 250 nm or less.

  13. Manganese oxide nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Taira, Kenji Kitajima, Hikaru Katayanagi, Eiichiro Ichiishi and Yuko Ichiyanagi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We prepared and characterized manganese oxide magnetic nanoparticles (d =5.6 nm and developed nanoparticle-assited laser desorption/ionization (nano-PALDI mass spectrometry. The nanoparticles had MnO2 and Mn2O3 cores conjugated with hydroxyl and amino groups, and showed paramagnetism at room temperature. The nanoparticles worked as an ionization assisting reagent in mass spectroscopy. The mass spectra showed no background in the low m/z. The nanoparticles could ionize samples of peptide, drug and proteins (approx. 5000 Da without using matrix, i.e., 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB, 4-hydroxy-α-cinnamic acid (CHCA and liquid matrix, as conventional ionization assisting reagents. Post source decay spectra by nano-PALDI mass spectrometry will yield information of the chemical structure of analytes.

  14. Droplet dynamics and ionization mechanisms in desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Andre; Sojka, Paul E; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-12-15

    A droplet pickup and other mechanisms have been suggested for the ionization of biomolecules like peptides and proteins by desorption electrospray ionization. To verify this hypothesis phase Doppler particle analysis was used to study the sizes and velocities of droplets involved in DESI. It was found that impacting droplets typically have velocities of 120 m/s and average diameters of 2-4 microm. Small differences in sprayer construction influence the operating conditions at which droplets of these dimensions are produced. Under these conditions, the kinetic energy per impacting water molecule is less than 0.6 meV and sputtering through momentum transfer during collisions or ionization by other electronic processes is unlikely. Droplets arrive at the surface with velocities well below the speed of sound in common materials, thereby excluding the possibility of ionization by shockwave formation. Some droplets appear to roll along the surface, increasing contact time and presumably the amount of material that is taken up into droplets during conditions typical of the DESI experiment.

  15. Above threshold ionization by few-cycle spatially inhomogeneous fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Shaaran, T; Biegert, J; Quidant, R; Lewenstein, M

    2012-01-01

    We present theoretical studies of above threshold ionization (ATI) produced by spatially inhomo- geneous fields. This kind of field appears as a result of the illumination of plasmonic nanostructures and metal nanoparticles with a short laser pulse. We use the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (TDSE) in reduced dimensions to understand and characterize the ATI features in these fields. It is demonstrated that the inhomogeneity of the laser electric field plays an important role in the ATI process and it produces appreciable modifications to the energy-resolved photoelectron spectra. In fact, our numerical simulations reveal that high energy electrons can be generated. Specifically, using a linear approximation for the spatial dependence of the enhanced plasmonic field and with a near infrared laser with intensities in the mid- 10^{14} W/cm^{2} range, we show it is possible to drive electrons with energies in the near-keV regime. Furthermore, we study how the carrier envelope phase influences the emission ...

  16. Unusual Fragmentation of Peptide and Protein in Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mitsuo Takayama

    2001-01-01

    Unusual amine - bond fragmentation on the peptide/protein backbone has been reported using matrix - assisted laser desorption/ionization time - of- flight mass spectrometry (MALDI - TOFMS)The amine - bond cleavage occurred without metastable decay, while the peptide - bond cleavage occurred with metastable decay of peptide ions in a drift region of TOF mass analyzer. It was presumed that the amine - bond cleavage occurred as a non - ergodic process independent of the ionization under MALDI conditions.

  17. Negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of synthetic and chemically modified oligonucleotides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potier, N.; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Cordier, Y.; Roch, O.; Bischoff, Rainer

    1994-01-01

    We report here on the analysis of synthetic oligonucleotides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). After intensive removal of salt ions (especially sodium cations), negative ion mass spectra, allowing mass measurement with an accuracy of 0.01%, were obtained on several oligonucleoti

  18. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields semiclassical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers...

  19. Knee structure in double ionization of noble atoms in circularly polarized laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Jingtao

    2017-01-01

    Nonsequential double ionization is characterized by a knee structure in the plot of double-ionization probability versus laser intensity. In circularly polarized (CP) laser fields, this structure has only been observed for Mg atoms. By choosing laser fields according to a scaling law, we exhibit the knee structure in CP laser fields for Ar and He atoms. The collision of the ionized electron with the core enhances the ionization of the second electron and forms the knee structure. The electron recollision is universal in CP laser fields, but the ionization probability in the knee region decreases as the wavelength of the driven field increases. For experimental observations, it is beneficial to use target atoms with small ionization potentials and laser fields with short wavelengths.

  20. Orientation-dependent ionization yields from strong-field ionization of fixed-in-space linear and asymmetric top molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas Lerche; Holmegaard, Lotte; Nielsen, Jens Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    The yield of strong-field ionization, by a linearly polarized probe pulse, is studied experimentally and theoretically as a function of the relative orientation between the laser field and the molecule. Experimentally, carbonyl sulphide (OCS), benzonitrile and naphthalene molecules are aligned in...

  1. First-order correction terms in the weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Vinh H.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    The weak-field asymptotic theory (WFAT) of tunneling ionization in a static electric field is developed to the next order in field. The first-order corrections to the ionization rate and transverse momentum distribution of the ionized electrons are derived. This extends the region of applicability...... of the WFAT at the quantitative level toward stronger fields, practically up to the boundary between tunneling and over-the-barrier regimes of ionization. The results apply to any atom or molecule treated in the single-active-electron and frozen-nuclei approximations. The theory is illustrated by calculations...... for hydrogen and noble-gas atoms....

  2. First-order correction terms in the weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Vinh H.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer;

    2013-01-01

    The weak-field asymptotic theory (WFAT) of tunneling ionization in a static electric field is developed to the next order in field. The first-order corrections to the ionization rate and transverse momentum distribution of the ionized electrons are derived. This extends the region of applicability...... of the WFAT at the quantitative level toward stronger fields, practically up to the boundary between tunneling and over-the-barrier regimes of ionization. The results apply to any atom or molecule treated in the single-active-electron and frozen-nuclei approximations. The theory is illustrated by calculations...

  3. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Peptide and Protein Analyses: A Critical Review of On-Tissue Digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cillero-Pastor, B.; Heeren, R.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has established itself among the plethora of mass spectrometry applications. In the biomedical field, MALDI-MSI is being more frequently recognized as a new method for the discovery of biomarkers and targets of treatme

  4. Comparison of the sensitivity of mass spectrometry atmospheric pressure ionization techniques in the analysis of porphyrinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swider, Paweł; Lewtak, Jan P; Gryko, Daniel T; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2013-10-01

    The porphyrinoids chemistry is greatly dependent on the data obtained in mass spectrometry. For this reason, it is essential to determine the range of applicability of mass spectrometry ionization methods. In this study, the sensitivity of three different atmospheric pressure ionization techniques, electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, was tested for several porphyrinods and their metallocomplexes. Electrospray ionization method was shown to be the best ionization technique because of its high sensitivity for derivatives of cyanocobalamin, free-base corroles and porphyrins. In the case of metallocorroles and metalloporphyrins, atmospheric pressure photoionization with dopant proved to be the most sensitive ionization method. It was also shown that for relatively acidic compounds, particularly for corroles, the negative ion mode provides better sensitivity than the positive ion mode. The results supply a lot of relevant information on the methodology of porphyrinoids analysis carried out by mass spectrometry. The information can be useful in designing future MS or liquid chromatography-MS experiments.

  5. Ionizations and fragmentations of benzene, methylbenzene, and chlorobenzene in strong IR and UV laser fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军峰; 吕航; 左万龙; 徐海峰; 金明星; 丁大军

    2015-01-01

    Ionizations and fragmentations of benzene, methylbenzene, and chlorobenzene are studied in linearly polarized 50-fs, 800-nm and 400-nm strong laser fields using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It is shown that at low laser intensity, the parent ions are dominant for any one of the molecules in an 800-nm strong laser field, while extensive fragmentation is observed in a 400-nm laser field, which can be understood by the resonant photon absorption of molecular cations. The ratio of the yield of the parent ion to the yield of the total ion for each molecule is measured as a function of laser intensity in a range from 1.01013 W/cm2 to 4.01014 W/cm2, in either the 800-nm or 400-nm laser field. The results show that the fragmentation of the aromatic molecules increases significantly as the laser intensity is increased. Possible mechanisms for fragmentation in strong laser fields are discussed. Finally, the saturation intensity of ionization of the titled molecules is also determined.

  6. Membrane-based emitter for coupling microfluidics with ultrasensitive nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuefei; Kelly, Ryan T; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2011-07-15

    An integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane-based microfluidic emitter for high-performance nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been fabricated and evaluated. The ∼100-μm-thick emitter was created by cutting a PDMS membrane that protrudes beyond the bulk substrate. The reduced surface area at the emitter enhances the electric field and reduces wetting of the surface by the electrospray solvent. As such, the emitter enables highly stable electrosprays at flow rates as low as 10 nL/min and is compatible with electrospray solvents containing a large organic component (e.g., 90% methanol). This approach enables facile emitter construction and provides excellent stability, reproducibility, and sensitivity as well as compatibility with multilayer soft lithography.

  7. STRUCTURAL DETERMINATION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL PHOSPHOLIPIDS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents a comprehensive spectral analysis of common bacterial phospholipids using electrospray/mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) under both negative and positive ionization conditions. Phospholipids under positive ionization yield sodium-adduct molecular ions which are mos...

  8. Secondary electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry of illicit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C; Siems, W F; Hill, H H

    2000-01-15

    A secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) method was developed as a nonradioactive ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). This SESI method relied on the gas-phase interaction between charged particles created by electrospray ionization (ESI) and neutral gaseous sample molecules. Mass spectrometry (MS) was used as the detection method after ion mobility separation for ion identification. Preliminary investigations focussed on understanding the ionization process of SESI. The performance of ESI-IMS and SESI-IMS for illicit drug detection was evaluated by determining the analytical figures of merit. In general, SESI had a higher ionization efficiency for small volatile molecules compared with the electrospray method. The potential of developing a universal interface for both GC- and LC-MS with an addition stage of mobility separation was demonstrated.

  9. Insertion of an electron beam ionizer in a quadrupole spectrometer for secondary neutral mass analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ameziane, O; Serrano, J; Guzman, B; Aguilar, M A

    2003-01-01

    An insertable electron beam ionizer into a quadrupole-based secondary ion mass spectrometer instrument has been designed and installed to analyze sputtered neutrals. The optimum design conditions of the ionizer have been obtained by modeling various configurations of the system using a simulation program developed by us. The program has allowed us to compute the potentials and ion trajectories inside the system to test the performance of the ion optics design. We have investigated the advantages of using a large ionization volume with low electron current to minimize the space charge effect in the ionizer, as this is the major problem in this type of instrument. In addition, we have used the simulations to obtain' all electrodes voltages which provide an efficient suppression of residual gas and secondary ions. A good useful yield was obtained, even with low electron densities, thanks to the high geometrical acceptance of the ionizer and its large active volume. This configuration implies less thermal radiati...

  10. Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry using a liquid sampling-atmospheric glow discharge (LS-APGD) ionization source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R Kenneth; Burdette, Carolyn Q; Manard, Benjamin T; Zhang, Lynn X

    2013-10-01

    A novel approach to ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) is described, based on a recently developed liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) ionization source. The device is essentially unmodified relative to its implementation in elemental mass spectrometry, where the operational space is characterized by low operation power (LS-APGD source is mounted onto the source interface of a Thermo Finnigan LCQ Advantage Max quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer without modifications to the instrument faceplate or ion optics. Described here is the initial evaluation of the roles of source geometry and working parameters, including electrolytic solution composition and plasma current, on the response of caffeine residues, with preliminary limits of detection based on the relative standard deviation of the spectral background suggested to be on the 10-pg level. Demonstrative spectra are presented for green tea extracts and raw leaves, coffee beans, a dried (raw) tobacco leaf, an analgesic tablet, and paper currency. Versatility is further revealed through the determination of components in common cigarette smoke. In each case, the spectra are characterized by (M + H)(+) species of the expected constituents. The capacity for a single source to perform both in solution and particulate elemental analysis (as shown previously) and ADI of molecular species is unique in the realm of mass spectrometry.

  11. Ionization signals from diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); CIVIDEC Instrumentation, Wien (Austria); Frais-Koelbl, H. [University of Applied Sciences, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Griesmayer, E.; Kavrigin, P. [CIVIDEC Instrumentation, Wien (Austria); Vienna University of Technology, Wien (Austria)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we introduce a novel analysis technique for measurements with single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields. This method exploits the unique electronic property of sCVD diamond sensors that the signal shape of the detector current is directly proportional to the initial ionization profile. In fast-neutron fields the diamond sensor acts simultaneously as target and sensor. The interaction of neutrons with the stable isotopes {sup 12}C and {sup 13}C is of interest for fast-neutron diagnostics. The measured signal shapes of detector current pulses are used to identify individual types of interactions in the diamond with the goal to select neutron-induced reactions in the diamond and to suppress neutron-induced background reactions as well as γ-background. The method is verified with experimental data from a measurement in a 14.3 MeV neutron beam at JRC-IRMM, Geel/Belgium, where the {sup 13}C(n, α){sup 10}Be reaction was successfully extracted from the dominating background of recoil protons and γ-rays and the energy resolution of the {sup 12}C(n, α){sup 9}Be reaction was substantially improved. The presented analysis technique is especially relevant for diagnostics in harsh radiation environments, like fission and fusion reactors. It allows to extract the neutron spectrum from the background, and is particularly applicable to neutron flux monitoring and neutron spectroscopy. (orig.)

  12. Ionization signals from diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, C.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Griesmayer, E.; Kavrigin, P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel analysis technique for measurements with single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields. This method exploits the unique electronic property of sCVD diamond sensors that the signal shape of the detector current is directly proportional to the initial ionization profile. In fast-neutron fields the diamond sensor acts simultaneously as target and sensor. The interaction of neutrons with the stable isotopes 12 C and 13 C is of interest for fast-neutron diagnostics. The measured signal shapes of detector current pulses are used to identify individual types of interactions in the diamond with the goal to select neutron-induced reactions in the diamond and to suppress neutron-induced background reactions as well as γ-background. The method is verified with experimental data from a measurement in a 14.3 MeV neutron beam at JRC-IRMM, Geel/Belgium, where the 13C(n, α)10Be reaction was successfully extracted from the dominating background of recoil protons and γ-rays and the energy resolution of the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction was substantially improved. The presented analysis technique is especially relevant for diagnostics in harsh radiation environments, like fission and fusion reactors. It allows to extract the neutron spectrum from the background, and is particularly applicable to neutron flux monitoring and neutron spectroscopy.

  13. Investigation of electric field distribution on FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2016-07-01

    One of the important parameters for establishing charge particle equilibrium (CPE) conditions of free-air ionization chamber is an electric field distribution. In this paper, electric field distribution inside the ionization chamber was investigated by finite element method. For this purpose, the effects of adding guard plate and guard strips on the electric field distribution in the ionization chamber were studied. it is necessary to apply a lead box around the ionization chamber body to avoid of scattered radiation effects on the ionization chamber operation, but the lead box changes the electric field distribution. In the following, the effect of lead box on the electric field distribution was studied. Finally, electric field distribution factor (kfield) was calculated by the simulation. The results of the simulation showed that presence of the guard plate and guard strips, and applying a suitable potential to lead box, a convergence of kfield to 1 was achieved.

  14. Aptamer-conjugated multifunctional nanoflowers as a platform for targeting, capture, and detection in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Gulbakan, Basri; Shukoor, Mohammed Ibrahim; Xiong, Xiangling; Chen, Tao; Powell, David H; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-22

    Although many different nanomaterials have been tested as substrates for laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), this emerging field still requires more efficient multifuncional nanomaterials for targeting, enrichment, and detection. Here, we report the use of gold manganese oxide (Au@MnO) hybrid nanoflowers as an efficient matrix for LDI-MS. The nanoflowers were also functionalized with two different aptamers to target cancer cells and capture adenosine triphosphate (ATP). These nanoflowers were successfully used for metabolite extraction from cancer cell lysates. Thus, in one system, our multifunctional nanoflowers can (1) act as an ionization substrate for mass spectrometry, (2) target cancer cells, and (3) detect and analyze metabolites from cancer cells.

  15. Aptamer Conjugated Multifunctional Nanoflowers as a Platform for Targeting, Capture and Detection in Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Gulbakan, Basri; Shukoor, Mohammed Ibrahim; Xiong, Xiangling; Chen, Tao; Powell, David H.; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Although many different nanomaterials have been tested as substrates for laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), this emerging field still requires more efficient multifuncional nanomaterials for targeting, enrichment and detection. Here, we report the use of gold-manganese oxide (Au@MnO) hybrid nanoflowers as an efficient matrix for LDI–MS. The nanoflowers were also functionalized with two different aptamers to target cancer cells and capture adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. These nanoflowers were successfully used for metabolite extraction from cancer cell lysates. Thus, in one system, our multifunctional nanoflowers can 1) act as an ionization substrate for mass spectrometry, 2) target cancer cells, and 3) detect and analyze metabolites from cancer cells. PMID:23211039

  16. Toward a Fieldable Atomic Mass Spectrometer for Safeguards Applications: Sample Preparation and Ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Jones, Sarah MH; Manard, Benjamin T.

    2014-10-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) long-term research and development plan calls for the development of new methods to detect misuse at nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing and enrichment plants. At enrichment plants, for example, the IAEA’s contemporary safeguards approaches are based on a combination of routine and random inspections that include collection of UF6 samples from in-process material and selected cylinders for subsequent analyses. These analyses include destructive analysis (DA) in a laboratory (typically by mass spectrometry [MS]) for isotopic characterization, and environmental sampling (ES) for subsequent laboratory elemental and isotopic analysis (also both typically by MS). One area of new method development includes moving this kind of isotope ratio analytical capability for DA and ES activities into the field. Some of the reasons for these developments include timeliness of results, avoidance of hazardous material shipments, and guidance for additional sample collecting. However, this capability does not already exist for several reasons, such as that most lab-based chemical and instrumental methods rely on laboratory infrastructure (highly trained staff, power, space, hazardous material handling, etc.) and require significant amounts of consumables (power, compressed gases, etc.). In addition, there are no currently available, fieldable instruments for atomic or isotope ratio analysis. To address these issues, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and collaborator, Clemson University, are studying key areas that limit the fieldability of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for atomic ions: sample preparation and ionization, and reducing the physical size of a fieldable mass spectrometer. PNNL is seeking simple and robust techniques that could be effectively used by inspectors who may have no expertise in analytical MS. In this report, we present and describe the preliminary findings for three candidate

  17. Development of electrospray ionization of biomolecules on a magnetic sector mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y

    2002-01-01

    The initial part of this study involves developments made on an electrospray ionization (ESI) source installed on a large-scale double-focusing reverse-geometry two-sector mass spectrometer. The practical considerations and some basic theory have been given in this thesis for each of the improvements made to the ESI source. The process of partial re-designing the ion optical system showed that the ion beam was affected by both gas dynamics and by the field penetration from the lenses of the ion optical system in the region immediately after second skimmer. More than one order magnitude stronger ion signal intensities at the mass spectrometer final detector and easier ESI source operation conditions and stable ion signals has been achieved. Mass-analyzed ion kinetic energy spectroscopy (MIKES) of different charge-states of relatively small peptides (substance P and bradykinin) for collision-induced dissociation (CID) and the metastable dissociation was carried out successfully. The translational energy losses ...

  18. Probing strong field ionization of solids with a Thomson parabola spectrometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malay Dalui; T Madhu Trivikram; Ram Gopal; M Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses are known to generate high-density, high-temperature plasma from any substrate. Copious emission of hot electrons, from a solid substrate, results in strong electrostatic field that accelerates the ions with energies ranging from a few eV to MeV. Ion spectrometry from laser–plasma is convolved with multiple atomic systems, several charge states and a broad energy spread. Conventional mass spectrometric techniques have serious limitations to probe this ionization dynamics. We have developed an imaging ion spectrometer that measures charge/mass-resolved ion kinetic energies over the entire range. Microchannel plate (MCP) is used as the position-sensitive detector to perform online and single shot measurements. The wellresolved spectrum even for the low-energy ions, demonstrates that the spectral width is limited by the space-charge repulsion for the ions generated in the hot dense plasma.

  19. Fast quantitative detection of cocaine in beverages using nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Peng, Xuejiao; Yang, Shuiping; Gu, Haiwei; Chen, Huanwen; Huan, Yanfu; Zhang, Tingting; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2010-02-01

    Without any sample pretreatment, effervescent beverage fluids were manually sprayed into the primary ion plume created by using a nanoelectrospray ionization source for direct ionization, and the analyte ions of interest were guided into an ion trap mass spectrometer for tandem mass analysis. Functional ingredients (e.g., vitamins, taurine, and caffeine, etc.) and spiked impurity (e.g., cocaine) in various beverages, such as Red Bull energy drink, Coco-cola, and Pepsi samples were rapidly identified within 1.5 s. The limit of detection was found to be 7-15 fg (S/N = 3) for cocaine in different samples using the characteristic fragment (m/z 150) observed in the MS(3) experiments. Typical relative standard deviation and recovery of this method were 6.9%-8.6% and 104%-108% for direct analysis of three actual samples, showing that nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is a useful technique for fast screening cocaine presence in beverages.

  20. Are molecular outflows around high-mass stars driven by ionization feedback?

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Thomas; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Klessen, Ralf S; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-01-01

    The formation of massive stars exceeding 10 solar masses usually results in large-scale molecular outflows. Numerical simulations, including ionization, of the formation of such stars show evidence for ionization-driven molecular outflows. We here examine whether the outflows seen in these models reproduce the observations. We compute synthetic ALMA and CARMA maps of CO emission lines of the outflows, and compare their signatures to existing single-dish and interferometric data. We find that the ionization-driven models can only reproduce weak outflows around high-mass star-forming regions. We argue that expanding H II regions probably do not represent the dominant mechanism for driving observed outflows. We suggest instead that observed outflows are driven by the collective action of the outflows from the many lower-mass stars that inevitably form around young massive stars in a cluster.

  1. Characterization of the chemical composition of a block copolymer by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van Suze M.; Tan, BoonHua; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, J.; Karst, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in the positive and negative ion modes was used for the characterization of a block copolymer consisting of methoxy poly(ethylene oxide) (mPEO), an -caprolactone (CL

  2. Characterization of the chemical composition of a block copolymer by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Suze M.; Tan, BoonHua; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Fejen, Jan; Karst, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in the positive and negative ion modes was used for the characterization of a block copolymer consisting of methoxy poly(ethylene oxide) (mPEO), an epsilon-caprolact

  3. Characterization of the chemical composition of a block copolymer by liquid chromotography/mass spectroscopy using atomspheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, S.M.; Tan, B.H.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan; Karst, U.

    2007-01-01

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in the positive and negative ion modes was used for the characterization of a block copolymer consisting of methoxy poly(ethylene oxide) (mPEO), an -caprolactone

  4. In-Spray Supercharging of Peptides and Proteins in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Miladinović, Saša M.; Fornelli, Luca; Lu, Yu; Piech, Krzysztof M.; Girault, Hubert H.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced charging, or supercharging, of analytes in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) facilitates high resolution MS by reducing an ion mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio, increasing tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) efficiency. ESI MS supercharging is usually achieved by adding a supercharging reagent to the electrospray solution. Addition of these supercharging reagents to the mobile phase in liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS increases the average charge of enzymatically derived pept...

  5. Direct analysis of steviol glycosides from Stevia leaves by ambient ionization mass spectrometry performed on whole leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J Isabella; Li, Xin; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2012-07-07

    Leaf spray mass spectrometry is explored as a fast and simple way for direct analysis of sweet glycosides in fresh untreated Stevia leaves without sample pretreatment. In this technique, a fresh triangular piece of Stevia leaf serves as both sample and substrate. Application of a butanol : methanol : water mixture and a high voltage to intact leaf material produces a high electric field at the tip of the leaf. This results in field emission of charged droplets containing the glycosides. The resulting dry ions are detected by mass spectrometry and confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry and exact mass measurements. A comparison between leaf spray and other ambient ionization methods which are successful for screening glycosides in Stevia leaves--desorption electrospray ionization, low temperature plasma and paper spray--shows that leaf spray produces the highest quality spectra. It is also extremely easy to implement with no need for nebulizing gas or sample preparation and is suited to semi-quantitative determinations. The potential for the application of leaf spray mass spectrometry to direct and rapid screening of plant materials is here realized in the case of Stevia sweet glycosides.

  6. Atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry of the phenicol drug family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alechaga, Élida; Moyano, Encarnación; Galceran, M Teresa

    2013-11-01

    In this work, the mass spectrometry behaviour of the veterinary drug family of phenicols, including chloramphenicol (CAP) and its related compounds thiamphenicol (TAP), florfenicol (FF) and FF amine (FFA), was studied. Several atmospheric pressure ionization sources, electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization were compared. In all atmospheric pressure ionization sources, CAP, TAP and FF were ionized in both positive and negative modes; while for the metabolite FFA, only positive ionization was possible. In general, in positive mode, [M + H](+) dominated the mass spectrum for FFA, while the other compounds, CAP, TAP and FF, with lower proton affinity showed intense adducts with species present in the mobile phase. In negative mode, ESI and atmospheric pressure photoionization showed the deprotonated molecule [M-H](-), while atmospheric pressure chemical ionization provided the radical molecular ion by electron capture. All these ions were characterized by tandem mass spectrometry using the combined information obtained by multistage mass spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry in a quadrupole-Orbitrap instrument. In general, the fragmentation occurred via cyclization and losses or fragmentation of the N-(alkyl)acetamide group, and common fragmentation pathways were established for this family of compounds. A new chemical structure for the product ion at m/z 257 for CAP, on the basis of the MS(3) and MS(4) spectra is proposed. Thermally assisted ESI and selected reaction monitoring are proposed for the determination of these compounds by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, achieving instrumental detection limits down to 0.1 pg. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Derivatization of small biomolecules for optimized matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholey, Andreas; Wittmann, Christoph; Kang, Min-Jung; Bungert, Ditte; Hollemeyer, Klaus; Heinzle, Elmar

    2002-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) is a powerful tool for the measurement of low molecular mass compounds of biological interest. The limitations for this method are the volatility of many analytes, possible interference with matrix signals or bad ionization or desorption behavior of the compounds. We investigated the application of well-known and straightforward one-pot derivatization procedures to circumvent these problems. The derivatizations tested allow the measurement and the labeling of alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, alpha-ketocarboxylic acids and amines.

  8. Recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Qian; Liang, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have attracted great interest over past decades owing to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this article, we review recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS). Various types of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon nanodots, nanodiamond, nanofibers, nanohorns, and their derivative forms, are involved. The applications of these materials as new matrices or probes in matrix-assisted or surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI or SELDI MS) are discussed. Finally, we summarize current challenges and give our perspectives on the future of applications of carbon nanomaterials in LDI MS.

  9. Effect of the solvent flow rate on the ionization efficiency in atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauppila, TJ; Bruins, AP; Kostiainen, R

    In the novel atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry the ionization efficiency has been observed to decrease when the solvent flow rate is increased. The effect of the flow rate on the ionization efficiency was studied by comparing the behavior of two analytes, one of which is ionized

  10. Determination of Hexachlorocyclohexane by Gas Chromatography Combined with Femtosecond Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xixiang; Imasaka, Tomoko; Li, Adan; Imasaka, Totaro

    2016-09-01

    Structural isomers and enantiomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) were separated using a chiral column by gas chromatography and quantitatively determined by multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry using an ultraviolet femtosecond laser (200 and 267 nm) as the ionization source. The order of elution of the enantiomers (i.e., (+)-α-HCH and (-)-α-HCH) was predicted from stabilization energies calculated for the complexes using permethylated γ-cyclodextrin as the stationary phase of the column, and the results were compared with the experimental data. The molecular ions observed for HCH were weak, even though they can be ionized through a process of resonance enhanced two-photon ionization at 200 nm. This unfavorable result can be attributed to the dissociation of the molecular ion, as predicted from quantum chemical calculations.

  11. The Application of Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Technique in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/REMPI-TOFMS using a nanosecond laser has been applied to analyze the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The excited-state lifetime, absorption characters, and energy of electronic states of the 16 PAHs were investigated to optimize the ionization yield. A river water sample pretreated by means of solid phase extraction was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the analytical instrument. The results suggested that REMPI is superior to electron impact ionization method for soft ionization and suppresses the background signal due to aliphatic hydrocarbons. Thus, GC/REMPI-TOFMS is a more reliable method for the determination of PAHs present in the environment.

  12. Controlling Nonsequential Double Ionization in Two-Color Circularly Polarized Femtosecond Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Christopher A.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Chaloupka, Jan L.; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dollar, Franklin J.; Knut, Ronny; Grychtol, Patrik; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Gopalakrishnan, Maithreyi; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    2016-09-01

    Atoms undergoing strong-field ionization in two-color circularly polarized femtosecond laser fields exhibit unique two-dimensional photoelectron trajectories and can emit bright circularly polarized extreme ultraviolet and soft-x-ray beams. In this Letter, we present the first experimental observation of nonsequential double ionization in these tailored laser fields. Moreover, we can enhance or suppress nonsequential double ionization by changing the intensity ratio and helicity of the two driving laser fields to maximize or minimize high-energy electron-ion rescattering. Our experimental results are explained through classical simulations, which also provide insight into how to optimize the generation of circularly polarized high harmonic beams.

  13. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  14. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for complex thiophenic mixture analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Hourani, Nadim

    2013-10-01

    Rationale Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) are detrimental species for refining processes in petroleum industry. Current mass spectrometric Methods that determine their composition are often preceded by derivatization and dopant addition approaches. Different ionization Methods have different impact on the molecular assignment of complex PASHs. The analysis of such species under atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is still considered limited due to uncontrolled ion generation with low- and high-mass PASHs. Methods The ionization behavior of a model mixture of five selected PASH standards was investigated using an APCI source with nitrogen as the reagent gas. A complex thiophenic fraction was separated from a vacuum gas oil (VGO) and injected using the same method. The samples were analyzed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). RESULTS PASH model analytes were successfully ionized and mainly [M + H]+ ions were produced. The same ionization pattern was observed for the real thiophenic sample. It was found that S1 class species were the major sulfur-containing species found in the VGO sample. These species indicated the presence of alkylated benzothiophenic (BT), dibenzothiophenic (DBT) and benzonaphthothiophenic (BNT) series that were detected by APCI-FTICR MS. CONCLUSIONS This study provides an established APCI-FTICR MS method for the analysis of complex PASHs. PASHs were detected without using any derivatization and without fragmentation. The method can be used for the analysis of S-containing crude oil samples. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Portable, Battery Operated Capillary Electrophoresis with Optical Isomer Resolution Integrated with Ionization Source for Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moini, Mehdi; Rollman, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a battery operated capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization (CE/ESI) source for mass spectrometry with optical isomer separation capability. The source fits in front of low or high resolution mass spectrometers similar to a nanospray source with about the same weight and size. The source has two high voltage power supplies (±25 kV HVPS) capable of operating in forward or reverse polarity modes and powered by a 12 V rechargeable lithium ion battery with operation time of ~10 h. In ultrafast CE mode, in which short narrow capillaries (≤15 μm i.d., 15-25 cm long) and field gradients ≥1000 V/cm are used, peak widths at the base are <1 s wide. Under these conditions, the source provides high resolution separation, including optical isomer resolution in ~1 min. Using a low resolution mass spectrometer (LTQ Velos) with a scan time of 0.07 s/scan, baseline separation of amino acids and their optical isomers were achieved in ~1 min. Moreover, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was analyzed in ~1 min with 56% coverage using the data-dependent MS/MS. Using a high resolution mass spectrometer (Thermo Orbitrap Elite) with 15,000 resolution, the fastest scan time achieved was 0.15 s, which was adequate for CE-MS analysis when optical isomer separation is not required or when the optical isomers were well separated. Figures of merit including a detection limit of 2 fmol and linear dynamic range of two orders of magnitude were achieved for amino acids.

  16. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI-MS): applications for process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streibel, Thorsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Process analysis is an emerging discipline in analytical sciences that poses special requirements on analytical techniques, especially when conducted in an online manner. Mass spectrometric methods seem exceedingly suitable for this task, particularly if a soft ionization method is applied. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) provides a selective and sensitive means for monitoring (poly)aromatic compounds in process flows. The properties of REMPI and various variations of the ionization process are presented. The potential of REMPI for process analysis is highlighted with several examples, and drawbacks of the method are also noted. Applications of REMPI-TOFMS for the detection and monitoring of aromatic species in a large variety of combustion processes comprising flames, vehicle exhaust, and incinerators are discussed. New trends in technical development and combination with other analytical methods are brought forward.

  17. ARE MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS AROUND HIGH-MASS STARS DRIVEN BY IONIZATION FEEDBACK?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Klaassen, Pamela D. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Banerjee, Robi, E-mail: tpeters@physik.uzh.ch [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-11-20

    The formation of massive stars exceeding 10 M {sub Sun} usually results in large-scale molecular outflows. Numerical simulations, including ionization, of the formation of such stars show evidence for ionization-driven molecular outflows. Here we examine whether the outflows seen in these models reproduce the observations. We compute synthetic ALMA and CARMA maps of CO emission lines of the outflows, and compare their signatures to existing single-dish and interferometric data. We find that the ionization-driven models can only reproduce weak outflows around high-mass star-forming regions. We argue that expanding H II regions probably do not represent the dominant mechanism for driving observed outflows. We suggest instead that observed outflows are driven by the collective action of the outflows from the many lower-mass stars that inevitably form around young massive stars in a cluster.

  18. Study on Non-Sequential Double Ionization of Aligned Diatomic Molecules in Strong Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; CHEN Jing; YANG Shi-Ping; LIU Jie

    2007-01-01

    We develop a semiclassical model to describe the non-sequential double ionization of aligned diatomic molecules in an intense linearly polarized field. It is found that in the tunnelling regime, the oriented molecule shows geometric effects on double ionization process when aligned parallel and perpendicular to the external Geld. Our results are qualitatively consistent with the recent experimental observations.

  19. Resonant three-photon ionization of hydrogenic atoms by a non-monochromatic laser field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakhontov, V.; Santra, R.; Jungmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We present ionization probability and lineshape calculations for the two-step three- photon ionization process, 1S (2(h)over-bar-omega)under-right-arrow, 2S ((h)over-bar-omega)under-right-arrow epsilon P, of the ground state of hydrogenic atoms in a non-monochromatic laser field with a time-dependen

  20. Resonant three-photon ionization of hydrogenic atoms by a non-monochromatic laser field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakhontov, V.; Santra, R.; Jungmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We present ionization probability and lineshape calculations for a specifed two-step three-photon ionization process of the ground state of hydrogenic atoms in a non-monochromatic laser field with a time-dependent amplitude. Within the framework of a three-level model, the AC Stark shifts and non-ze

  1. Spin currents from Helium in intense-field photo-ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, S [Indian Association for Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata (India); Mukherjee, Mahua [Indian Association for Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata (India); Chakrabarti, J [Indian Association for Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata (India); Faisal, F H M [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    Spin dynamics is studied by computing spin-dependent ionization current of He in intense laser field in relativistic field theoretic method. Spin-flip and spin-asymmetry in current generation is obtained with circularly polarized light. The spin-flip is a dynamical effect of intense laser field on an ionized spinning electron. Transformation properties of the up and down spin ionization amplitudes show that the sign of spin can be controlled by a change of helicity of the laser photons from outside.

  2. Non-Sequential Double Ionization by Counter Rotating Circularly Polarized Two-Color Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Eckart, S; Kunitski, M; Hartung, A; Rist, J; Henrichs, K; Schlott, N; Kang, H; Bauer, T; Sann, H; Schmidt, L Ph H; Schöffler, M; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2016-01-01

    We report on non-sequential double ionization of Ar by a laser pulse consisting of two counter rotating circularly polarized fields (390 nm and 780 nm). The double ionization probability depends strongly on the relative intensity of the two fields and shows a "knee"-like structure as function of intensity. We conclude that double ionization is driven by a beam of nearly monoenergetic recolliding electrons, which can be controlled in intensity and energy by the field parameters. The electron momentum distributions show the recolliding electron as well as a second electron which escapes from an intermediate excited state of Ar$^+$.

  3. Simultaneous quantitative analysis of metabolites using ion-pair liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulier, L.; Bas, R.; Jespersen, S.; Verheij, E.; Werf, M.J. van der; Hankemeier, T.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an analytical method, consisting of ion-pair liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (IP-LC-ESI-MS), for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of several key classes of polar metabolites, like nucleotides, coenzyme A esters, sugar nucleotides, an

  4. Identification of tetraacylglycerols in lesquerella oil by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetraacylglycerol (an acylglycerol estolide) contains an acyl chain attached to the hydroxyl group of another acyl chain attached to the glycerol backbone. Lequerolic acid (Ls, OH1420:111) is the main fatty acid in lequerella oil and can be used in industry. We have used electrospray ionization mass...

  5. Investigation of the interaction between HIV-1 DNA and cyclic peptides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Quan Liu; Hui Hui Li; Yun Hua Ye; Gu Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between HIV-I DNA and five cyclic peptides (CPI-CP5) was investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). It revealed that CPI [c(Ala-Tyr-Leu-Ala-Gly)] and CP4 [c(Pro-D-Tyr-Leu-D-Ala-Gly)] have the higher binding affinity with the duplex DNA among the five cyclic peptides.

  6. Tailored nanopost arrays (NAPA) for laser desorption ionization in mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertes, Akos; Walker, Bennett N.; Stolee, Jessica A.; Retterer, Scott T.

    2016-11-08

    The production and use of semiconducting nanopost arrays made by nanofabrication is described herein. These nanopost arrays (NAPA) provide improved laser ionization yields and controllable fragmentation with switching or modulation capabilities for mass spectrometric detection and identification of samples deposited on them.

  7. Feasibility of nonvolatile buffers in capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Jonas H.C.; Mol, Roelof; Somsen, Govert W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L.J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; de Jong, Gerhardus J.

    2004-01-01

    The combination of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) via a triaxial interface was studied as a potential means for the characterization of intact proteins. To evaluate the possibility to use a nonvolatile electrolyte for CE, the effect of sodium ph

  8. ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE-IONIZATION MASS-SPECTROMETRY .2. APPLICATIONS IN PHARMACY, BIOCHEMISTRY AND GENERAL-CHEMISTRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, AP

    1994-01-01

    Mass spectrometer ion sources are normally located inside a high-vacuum envelope. An ion source operating at atmospheric pressure is better suited, it not essential, for a growing number of applications. MS analysis of samples pyrolyzed under controlled conditions makes use of chemical ionization at

  9. Analysis of the Aconitine Alkaloids in Chuanwu by Electrospray Ionization/Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai Min SUN; Hui LI; Zhi Ming HUANG; P.P.H.BUT; Xue Qin DING

    2004-01-01

    An electrospray ionization / tandem mass spectrometric (ESI/MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous identification and analysis of three aconitine alkaloids [ mesacontine (MA), hypaconitine (HA), and aconitine (A)] as intact molecules at low nanogram level in Chinese traditional medicine Chuanwu decoction as well as in human whole blood extract without chromatographic separation.

  10. Real-Time Flavor Release from French Fries Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, W.A.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Boelrijk, A.E.M.; Burgering, M.J.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Flavor release from French fries was measured with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) using both assessors (in vivo) and a mouth model system (in vitro). Several volatiles measured with APCI were identified with MS-MS. The effect of frying time, salt addition, and a

  11. Feasibility of nonvolatile buffers in capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Jonas H.C.; Mol, Roelof; Somsen, Govert W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L.J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; de Jong, Gerhardus J.

    2004-01-01

    The combination of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) via a triaxial interface was studied as a potential means for the characterization of intact proteins. To evaluate the possibility to use a nonvolatile electrolyte for CE, the effect of sodium ph

  12. Examination and Manipulation of Protein Surface Charge in Solution with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Deborah S.; Van Ryswyk, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful tool for examining the charge of proteins in solution. The charge can be manipulated through choice of solvent and pH. Furthermore, solution-accessible, protonated lysine side chains can be specifically tagged with 18-crown-6 ether to form noncovalent adducts. Chemical derivatization…

  13. Tailored nanopost arrays (NAPA) for laser desorption ionization in mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Walker, Bennett N.; Stolee, Jessica A.; Retterer, Scott T.

    2016-11-08

    The production and use of semiconducting nanopost arrays made by nanofabrication is described herein. These nanopost arrays (NAPA) provide improved laser ionization yields and controllable fragmentation with switching or modulation capabilities for mass spectrometric detection and identification of samples deposited on them.

  14. Identification of Bacteria Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedney, Mollie G.; Strunk, Kevin B.; Giaquinto, Lisa M.; Wagner, Jennifer A.; Pollack, Sidney; Patton, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS or simply MALDI) has become ubiquitous in the identification and analysis of biomacromolecules. As a technique that allows for the molecular weight determination of otherwise nonvolatile molecules, MALDI has had a profound impact in the molecular…

  15. Characterization of typical chemical background interferences in atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Xinghua; Bruins, Andries P.; Covey, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    The structures and origins of typical chemical background noise ions in positive atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (API LC/MS) are investigated and summarized in this study. This was done by classifying chemical background ions using precursor and product ion sc

  16. Examination and Manipulation of Protein Surface Charge in Solution with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Deborah S.; Van Ryswyk, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful tool for examining the charge of proteins in solution. The charge can be manipulated through choice of solvent and pH. Furthermore, solution-accessible, protonated lysine side chains can be specifically tagged with 18-crown-6 ether to form noncovalent adducts. Chemical derivatization…

  17. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  18. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  19. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  20. Three-Dimensional Electro-Sonic Flow Focusing Ionization Microfluidic Chip for Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cilong Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing research efforts have been recently devoted to the coupling of microfluidic chip-integrated ionization sources to mass spectrometry (MS. Considering the limitations of microfluidic chips coupled with MS such as liquid spreading, dead volume, and manufacturing troubles, this paper proposed a new three-dimensional (3D flow focusing (FF-based microfluidic ionizing source. This source was fabricated by using the two-layer soft lithography method with the nozzle placed inside the chip. The proposed FF microfluidic chip can realize two-phase FF with liquid in air regardless of the viscosity ratio of the continuous and dispersed phases. MS results indicated that the proposed FF microfluidic chip can work as a typical electrical ionization source when supplied with high voltage and can serve as a sonic ionization source without high voltage. The electro-sonic FF ionization microfluidic chip is expected to have various applications, particularly in the integrated and portable applications of ionization sources coupling with portable MS in the future.

  1. Optimizing sequence coverage for a moderate mass protein in nano-electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ryan; Kolli, Venkata; Woods, Megan; Dodds, Eric D; Hage, David S

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment was optimized to obtain high sequence coverage for human serum albumin (HSA, 66.5 kDa) when using nano-electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (nESI-Q-TOF-MS). Use of the final method with trypsin, Lys-C, and Glu-C digests gave a combined coverage of 98.8%. The addition of peptide fractionation resulted in 99.7% coverage. These results were comparable to those obtained previously with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The sample pretreatment/nESI-Q-TOF-MS method was also used with collision-induced dissociation to analyze HSA digests and to identify peptides that could be employed as internal mass calibrants in future studies of modifications to HSA.

  2. Direct Quantitation of Peptide Mixtures without Standards using Clusters Formed by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Leib, Ryan D.; Flick, Tawnya G.; Williams, Evan R.

    2009-01-01

    In electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, ion abundances depend on a number of different factors, including analyte surface activity, competition between analytes for charge, analyte concentration, as well as instrumental factors, including mass-dependent ion transmission and detection. Here, a novel method for obtaining quantitative information about solution-phase concentrations of peptide mixtures is described and demonstrated for five different peptide mixtures with relative concentra...

  3. Precursor ion scan profiles of acylcarnitines by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglia, Giuseppe; D'Apolito, Oceania; Corso, Gaetano

    2008-12-01

    The fatty acyl esters of L-carnitine (acylcarnitines) are useful biomarkers for the diagnosis of some inborn errors of metabolism analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In this study the acylcarnitines were analyzed by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization using a commercial tandem mass spectrometer (APTDCI-MS/MS). The method is based on the precursor ion scan mode determination of underivatized acylcarnitines desorbed from samples by a hot desolvation gas flow and ionized by a corona pin discharge. During desorption/ionization step the temperature induces the degradation of acylcarnitines; nevertheless, the common fragment to all acylcarnitines [MH-59](+) is useful for analyzing their profile. APTDCI parameters, including angle of collection and incidence, gas flows and temperatures, were optimized for acylcarnitines. The experiments were performed drying 2 microL of an equimolar mixture of acylcarnitine standards on a glass slide. The specificity was evaluated by comparing product ion spectra and the precursor ion spectra of 85 m/z of acylcarnitines obtained by the APTDCI method and by electrospray ionization flow injection analysis (ESI-FIA). The method was also employed to analyze acylcarnitines extracted from a pathological dried blood spot and a control. The method enables analysis of biological samples and recognition of some acylcarnitines that are diagnostic markers of inherited metabolic diseases. The intrinsic high-throughput analysis of the ambient desorption ionization methods offers a new opportunity either for its potential application in clinical chemistry and for the expanded screening of some inborn errors of metabolism.

  4. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  5. A novel sample preparation method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry for polystyrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Zhang; Zhen Wen Zhao; Lei Xiong; Bin Xin; Wei Hua Hu; Shao Xiang Xiong

    2007-01-01

    A novel sample preparation method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for polystyrene was reported.Compared to the conventional dried-droplet method, the efficiency of ionization and signal intensity of mass spectra were improved.The mechanism was also analyzed.

  6. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As(+)) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH(+)) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As(+) through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As(+) signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH(+) signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As(+). Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation of Aqueous C60 Nanoparticles with Size Determination by Dynamic Light Scattering and Quantification by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A size separation method was developed for aqueous C60 fullerene aggregates (aqu/C60) using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a dynamic light scattering detector in flow through mode. Surfactants, which are commonly used in AF4, were avoided as they may al...

  8. Mass spectrometric characterization of a pyrolytic radical source using femtosecond ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H.M.; Beaud, P.; Mischler, B.; Radi, P.P.; Tzannis, A.P.; Gerber, T. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Radicals play, as reactive species, an important role in the chemistry of combustion. In contrast to atmospheric flames where spectra are congested due to high vibrational and rotational excitation, experiments in the cold environment of a molecular beam (MB) yield clean spectra that can be easily attributed to one species by Resonantly Enhanced Multi Photon Ionization (REMP). A pyrolytic radical source has been set up. To characterize the efficiency of the source `soft` ionization with femto second pulses is applied which results in less fragmentation, simplifying the interpretation of the mass spectrum. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  9. An evaluation of the spectral properties of nerve agents for laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasaka, Tomoko; Imasaka, Totaro

    2014-01-01

    Excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and vacuum-ultraviolet/deep-ultraviolet absorption spectra were calculated for nerve agents, such as sarin, soman, VX, tabun, mustard gas, and analogs. We used time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) methods that included B3LYP combined with basis sets of cc-pVDZ and cc-pVTZ, and ωB97XD with cc-pVTZ. The vertical ionization energies were also calculated for these compounds, in order to collect additional information relative to the optimal pathways for multiphoton ionization in mass spectrometry.

  10. TU-F-BRE-03: Application of a Novel Mass-Density Compensation Optimization Method to Improve the Response of a Liquid-Filled Ionization Chamber in Nonstandard Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, Y [CHUM - Notre Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Bouchard, H [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the response of the microLion detector (PTW 31018) in small field conditions by optimizing the density of the detector's non-sensitive components using a novel method based on the detector's dose response function. Methods: The central values h(0,0) of the perturbation functions for the microLion detector and a volume of water equivalent to its sensitive volume were calculated using the Monte Carlo user code egs-chamber by scoring the dose absorbed by a 6 MV photon pencil beam incident on their centroids. Values of h(0,0) were plotted as a function of the density of the microLion's graphite electrode with the detector placed in the axial orientation. The optimized density was found by finding the minimal value of h(0,0). Results: A density of 1.37 g/cm3 was found to minimize the perturbation function of the microLion detector. The modified microLion's response was then evaluated in small square fields with sides in the range of 5 – 40 mm and found to be consistent with highly watere-quivalent detectors such as a scintillating detector (Exradin W1) and a generic alanine detector in both axial and radial orientations. Conclusion: This work illustrates a novel method which can used to optimize the design of radiation detectors in small fields. This method should also work with other optimization parameters (e.g. thickness of electrode). Density-compensated detectors have the potential to eliminate the need to evaluate nonstandard field correction factors as described by the IAEA-AAPM formalism (Alfonso et al.) and simplify future dosimetry protocols for SRS/SBRT modalities. Finally, we also expect an improvement in the response of density-compensated detectors for composite IMRT fields.

  11. Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry Measurement of Aminotransferase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Li, Xin; Zhang, Chengsen; Xu, Yang; Cooks, R. Graham

    2017-06-01

    A change in enzyme activity has been used as a clinical biomarker for diagnosis and is useful in evaluating patient prognosis. Current laboratory measurements of enzyme activity involve multi-step derivatization of the reaction products followed by quantitative analysis of these derivatives. This study simplified the reaction systems by using only the target enzymatic reaction and directly detecting its product. A protocol using paper spray mass spectrometry for identifying and quantifying the reaction product has been developed. Evaluation of the activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was chosen as a proof-of-principle. The volume of sample needed is greatly reduced compared with the traditional method. Paper spray has a desalting effect that avoids sprayer clogging problems seen when examining serum samples by nanoESI. This very simple method does not require sample pretreatment and additional derivatization reactions, yet it gives high quality kinetic data, excellent limits of detection (60 ppb from serum), and coefficients of variation <10% in quantitation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Determination of Aspartame and Caffeine in Carbonated Beverages Utilizing Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, H. Robert, III; Benson, Linda M.; Naylor, Stephen

    2000-10-01

    Mass spectrometry has undergone considerable changes in the past decade. The advent of "soft ionization" techniques such as electrospray ionization (ESI) affords the direct analysis of very polar molecules without need for the complex inefficient derivatization procedures often required in GC-MS. These ionization techniques make possible the direct mass spectral analysis of polar nonvolatile molecules such as DNA and proteins, which previously were difficult or impossible to analyze by MS. Compounds that readily take on a charge (acids and bases) lend themselves to ESI-MS analysis, whereas compounds that do not readily accept a charge (e.g. sugars) are often not seen or are seen only as inefficient adducts (e.g., M+Na+). To gain exposure to this state-of-the-art analytical procedure, high school students utilize ESI-MS in an analysis of aspartame and caffeine. They dilute a beverage sample and inject the diluted sample into the ESI-MS. The lab is procedurally simple and the results clearly demonstrate the potential and limitations of ESI-coupled mass spectrometry. Depending upon the instructional goals, the outlined procedures can be used to quantify the content of caffeine and aspartame in beverages or to understand the capabilities of electrospray ionization.

  13. Matrix-assisted ionization vacuum for high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beixi; Tisdale, Evgenia; Trimpin, Sarah; Wilkins, Charles L

    2014-07-15

    Matrix-assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) produces charge states similar to electrospray ionization (ESI) from the solid state without requiring high voltage or added heat. MAIV differs from matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in that no laser is needed and abundant multiply charged ions are produced from molecules having multiple basic sites such as proteins. Here we introduce simple modifications to the commercial vacuum MALDI and ESI sources of a 9.4 T Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer to perform MAIV from both intermediate and atmospheric pressure. The multiply charged ions are shown for the proteins bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and lysozyme using 3-nitrobenzonitrile as matrix. These are the first examples of MAIV operating at pressures as low as 10(-6) mbar in an FT-ICR mass spectrometer source, and the expected mass resolving power of 100000 to 400000 is achieved. Identical protein charge states are observed with and without laser ablation indicating minimal, if any, role of photochemical ionization for the compounds studied.

  14. Mechanisms of double-electron ionization of atomic systems in a strong laser field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A; Tikhonova, O; Volkova, E

    2001-03-26

    The field-induced double ionization of a model two-electron quantum system is investigated by direct numerical integration of the nonstationary Schroedinger equation. The contribution of different processes to a formation of doubly charged ions is analyzed.

  15. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Fingerprinting the Macondo Oil Spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Maksimova, Ekaterina V; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2016-07-05

    We report the first application of a new mass spectrometry technique (gas chromatography combined to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry, GC/APCI-MS/MS) for fingerprinting a crude oil and environmental samples from the largest accidental marine oil spill in history (the Macondo oil spill, the Gulf of Mexico, 2010). The fingerprinting of the oil spill is based on a trace analysis of petroleum biomarkers (steranes, diasteranes, and pentacyclic triterpanes) naturally occurring in crude oil. GC/APCI enables soft ionization of petroleum compounds that form abundant molecular ions without (or little) fragmentation. The ability to operate the instrument simultaneously in several tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) modes (e.g., full scan, product ion scan, reaction monitoring) significantly improves structural information content and sensitivity of analysis. For fingerprinting the oil spill, we constructed diagrams and conducted correlation studies that measure the similarity between environmental samples and enable us to differentiate the Macondo oil spill from other sources.

  16. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Picosecond Infrared Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization (PIR-LAESI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Talbot, Francis; Tata, Alessandra; Ermini, Leonardo; Franjic, Kresimir; Ventura, Manuela; Zheng, Jinzi; Ginsberg, Howard; Post, Martin; Ifa, Demian R; Jaffray, David; Miller, R J Dwayne; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2015-12-15

    A picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) is capable of cutting through biological tissues in the absence of significant thermal damage. As such, PIRL is a standalone surgical scalpel with the added bonus of minimal postoperative scar tissue formation. In this work, a tandem of PIRL ablation with electrospray ionization (PIR-LAESI) mass spectrometry is demonstrated and characterized for tissue molecular imaging, with a limit of detection in the range of 100 nM for reserpine or better than 5 nM for verapamil in aqueous solution. We characterized PIRL crater size using agar films containing Rhodamine. PIR-LAESI offers a 20-30 μm vertical resolution (∼3 μm removal per pulse) and a lateral resolution of ∼100 μm. We were able to detect 25 fmol of Rhodamine in agar ablation experiments. PIR-LAESI was used to map the distribution of endogenous methoxykaempferol glucoronide in zebra plant (Aphelandra squarrosa) leaves producing a localization map that is corroborated by the literature. PIR-LAESI was further used to image the distribution inside mouse kidneys of gadoteridol, an exogenous magnetic resonance contrast agent intravenously injected. Parallel mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) were performed to corroborate PIR-LAESI images of the exogenous agent. We further show that PIR-LAESI is capable of desorption ionization of proteins as well as phospholipids. This comparative study illustrates that PIR-LAESI is an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry applications. As such, a future PIRL scalpel combined with secondary ionization such as ESI and mass spectrometry has the potential to provide molecular feedback to guide PIRL surgery.

  17. Effects of dc electric fields on multiphoton ionization of rubidium atoms at low and high densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Nathan I.; Compton, Robert N.

    2001-08-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) of rubidium atoms at both low (atomic beam) and high (heat pipe) densities is studied using a tunable OPO laser. At high Rb densities ionization of the laser excited ns, np, and nd states occurs both through photoionization and collisional ionization. Excitation of the np states is found to be induced by the external electric field at both low and high densities. In addition, np signal is also seen at very low (E→0) fields in the heat pipe, providing evidence for collision mixing as well as field mixing. At low densities, signal for the high np states initially increases with applied field, but soon saturates (i.e. becomes field independent) while the signal for high nd states decreases with increasing field. At low Rb densities strong resonance features are observed in the energy region between the zero field limit (IP) and the field ionization limit. These features, as well as the field ionization threshold, are found to be dependent upon the angle between the laser polarization and the direction of the applied dc field. Evidence for tunneling through the barrier created by the -e2/r-eEr potential is also presented for ns and nd states.

  18. Direct quantification of chemical warfare agents and related compounds at low ppt levels: comparing active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization and secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Schaer, Martin; Siegenthaler, Peter; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-06

    A novel active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization (DBDI) technique for mass spectrometry is applied to the direct detection of 13 chemical warfare related compounds, including sarin, and compared to secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) in terms of selectivity and sensitivity. The investigated compounds include an intact chemical warfare agent and structurally related molecules, hydrolysis products and/or precursors of highly toxic nerve agents (G-series, V-series, and "new" nerve agents), and blistering and incapacitating warfare agents. Well-defined analyte gas phase concentrations were generated by a pressure-assisted nanospray with consecutive thermal evaporation and dilution. Identification was achieved by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). The most abundant fragment ion intensity of each compound was used for quantification. For DBDI and SESI, absolute gas phase detection limits in the low ppt range (in MS/MS mode) were achieved for all compounds investigated. Although the sensitivity of both methods was comparable, the active capillary DBDI sensitivity was found to be dependent on the applied AC voltage, thus enabling direct tuning of the sensitivity and the in-source fragmentation, which may become a key feature in terms of field applicability. Our findings underline the applicability of DBDI and SESI for the direct, sensitive detection and quantification of several CWA types and their degradation products. Furthermore, they suggest the use of DBDI in combination with hand-held instruments for CWAs on-site monitoring.

  19. Selective Strong-Field Enhancement and Suppression of Ionization with Short Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Hart, Nathan A; Kolomenskii, Alexandre A; Paulus, Gerhard G; Bauer, Dieter; Schuessler, Hans A

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate robust selective excitation and attenuation of atomic Rydberg level populations in sodium vapor (Na I) using intense laser pulses in the strong field limit ($> 10^{12} W/cm^{2}$). The coherent control of the atomic population and related ionization channels is realized for intensities above the over-the-barrier ionization intensity. A qualitative model predicts that this strong field coherent control arises through the manifestation of a Freeman resonance.

  20. Probing the molecular weight distributions of non-boiling petroleum fractions by Ag+ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussis, Stilianos G; Proulx, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This work explores the possibility of Ag+ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to determine the molecular weight distributions of non-boiling petroleum fractions. Information about the molecular weight distributions is needed for fundamental studies on the nature of heavy crude oils and bitumens and for the development of novel recovery and processing methods. The method does not depend on thermal processes for the introduction of the fractions into the gas phase of the mass spectrometer, which is a considerable advantage over most other ionization methods. The Ag+ electrospray mass spectra of the fractions analyzed by using a toluene/methanol/cyclohexane (60:28:12%) solvent system display bimodal distributions in the ranges m/z approximately 300 to approximately 3000 and m/z 3000 to approximately 20,000. The abundances of the high molecular weight peak distributions can be reduced by in-source collisional activation experiments. Comparisons with the results obtained for model heteroatom-containing compounds (molecular weight method in this study for the saturate, aromatic, and polar fractions in a bitumen are in qualitative agreement with published molecular weight average results obtained for Cold Lake bitumen fractions analyzed by conventional gel permeation chromatography and field desorption mass spectrometry. Further work is needed to study the nature of the bonds and the interactions of the molecules in the asphaltene fractions by Ag+ ESI-MS.

  1. Chemical stabilization of the polar fractions of petroleum for study by field ionization mass spectrometry. Study of the sulfoxides, quinolones and fluorenols in the most polar portion of the maltene fraction of Athabasca bitumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, D.S.; Elbrink, C.

    1983-03-31

    A survey of the chemical types present in the polar fraction of Athabasca maltene revealed the presence of three prominent homologous series of sulfoxides, C/sub n/H sub 2n-2SO, C/sub n/H/sub 2n-4/SO and C/sub n/H/sub 2n-6/SO. The volatile members of these series have been studied to determine the chemical structure and stereochemistry of the leading members of the terpenoid sulfoxides to provide new series of biological markers for geothermal studies and compounds of more appropriate thermal stability to monitor new approaches to refining and upgrading. Of the three oxygen-containing homologous series found to be present, C/sub n/H/sub 2n-18/O, C/sub n/H/sub 2n-24/O and C/sub n/H/sub 2n-16/O, the volatile members belonging to the C/sub n/H/sub 2n-16/O were studied in detail and shown to consist of a series of fluorenols in which the substitutent in the 9 position extends out to C/sub 8/. Mass spectral evidence was also found for methyl substitution on the ring system. Of the various nitrogen- and oxygen-containing species, the elemental composition of the homologous series C/sub n/H/sub 2n-11/NO was confirmed by high resolution mass spectrometry and tentatively assigned to a series of quinolones. The concentration of these nitrogen compounds and the sulfoxides have been found to be extremely variable within the same oil sand quarry, reflecting subtle changes in the biological source material. No relation between the concentration of the acids and sulfoxides has been found which might be related to the oxygen potential of the water during the deposition of the bitumen. 9 refs., 76 figs., 3tabs.

  2. Mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy of 1-bromopropane through dissociative intermediate states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Wang, Yanmei; Tang, Bifeng; Zheng, Qiusha; Zhang, Bing

    2006-02-01

    One-color two-photon ionization of 1-bromopropane, resulting in the 1-C 3H 7Br + ions in the X2E and X2E electronic states, is investigated using mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy. The adiabatic ionization energies of two spin states are found to be 82 257 ± 5 and 84 823 ± 5 cm -1, respectively. The two-photon MATI spectrum exhibits an extensive vibrational structure. The active modes, including the C-Br stretching, the CH 2-Br wagging, the CH 2 and the CH 3 rocking modes, are observed and reliable values for these vibrational frequencies are obtained. We have also performed ab initio and density functional calculations, which provide interpretation for our experimental finding.

  3. Application of atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry to cover gas analysis in fast reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Harano, H

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes to apply atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry to on-line real-time monitoring gas analysis in fast reactors. The experimental results have shown that the quantitative analysis of the low ppt level can be achieved for all isotopes of krypton and xenon contained in argon except for the species, sup 7 sup 8 Kr, sup 8 sup 0 Kr, sup 1 sup 2 sup 4 Xe and sup 1 sup 2 sup 6 Xe that suffer interference by cluster ions. The excellent sensitivity is attributed to an ion concentration effect in an atmospheric pressure ionization process driven by the difference in ionization potential between argon and krypton or xenon. The detection limits (3 sigma) are estimated to be 20 ppt for sup 8 sup 4 Kr and 2.3 ppt for sup 1 sup 3 sup 2 Xe in the present condition.

  4. Non-traditional applications of laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpin, Casey R.

    Seven studies were carried out using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) to develop enhanced methodologies for a variety of analyte systems by investigating analyte chemistries, ionization processes, and elimination of spectral interferences. Applications of LDI and matrix assisted laser/desorption/ionization (MALDI) have been previously limited by poorly understood ionization phenomena, and spectral interferences from matrices. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization MS is well suited to the analysis of proteins. However, the proteins associated with bacteriophages often form complexes which are too massive for detection with a standard MALDI mass spectrometer. As such, methodologies for pretreatment of these samples are discussed in detail in the first chapter. Pretreatment of bacteriophage samples with reducing agents disrupted disulfide linkages and allowed enhanced detection of bacteriophage proteins. The second chapter focuses on the use of MALDI MS for lipid compounds whose molecular mass is significantly less than the proteins for which MALDI is most often applied. The use of MALDI MS for lipid analysis presented unique challenges such as matrix interference and differential ionization efficiencies. It was observed that optimization of the matrix system, and addition of cationization reagents mitigated these challenges and resulted in an enhanced methodology for MALDI MS of lipids. One of the challenges commonly encountered in efforts to expand MALDI MS applications is as previously mentioned interferences introduced by organic matrix molecules. The third chapter focuses on the development of a novel inorganic matrix replacement system called metal oxide laser ionization mass spectrometry (MOLI MS). In contrast to other matrix replacements, considerable effort was devoted to elucidating the ionization mechanism. It was shown that chemisorption of analytes to the metal oxide surface produced acidic adsorbed species which then

  5. omniSpect: an open MATLAB-based tool for visualization and analysis of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, R Mitchell; Galhena, Asiri S; Gamage, Chaminda M; Bennett, Rachel V; Wang, May D; Fernández, Facundo M

    2013-04-01

    We present omniSpect, an open source web- and MATLAB-based software tool for both desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) that performs computationally intensive functions on a remote server. These functions include converting data from a variety of file formats into a common format easily manipulated in MATLAB, transforming time-series mass spectra into mass spectrometry images based on a probe spatial raster path, and multivariate analysis. OmniSpect provides an extensible suite of tools to meet the computational requirements needed for visualizing open and proprietary format MSI data.

  6. Direct analysis of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on concrete by reactive-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeau, D; Reiller, P E; Lamouroux, C

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of organic ligands such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is today an important challenge due to their ability to increase the mobility of radionuclides and metals. Reactive desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (reactive-DESI-MS) was used for direct analysis of EDTA on concrete samples. EDTA forms complexes and those with Fe(III) ions are among the most thermodynamically favored. This complexing capacity was used to improve the specific detection of EDTA directly on a concrete matrix by doping the solvent spray of DESI with a solution of FeCl3 to selectively create the complex between EDTA and Fe(III). Thus, EDTA sensitivity was largely improved by two orders of magnitude with reactive-DESI-MS experiments thanks to the specific detection of EDTA as a [EDTA-4H+Fe(III)](-) complex. The proof of principle that reactive DESI can be applied to concrete samples to detect EDTA has been demonstrated. Its capacity for semi-quantitative determination and localization of EDTA under ambient conditions and with very little sample preparation, minimizing sample manipulations and solvent volumes, two important conditions for the development of new methodologies in the field of analytical chemistry, has been shown.

  7. Chemical Analysis of Organic Aerosols Using Reactive Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Nizkorodov, S.

    2013-12-01

    Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization (nano-DESI) technique integrated with high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) enables molecular level analysis of organic aerosol (OA) samples. In nano-DESI, analyte is desorbed into a small volume solvent bridge formed between two capillaries positioned in contact with analyte and enables fast and efficient characterization of OA collected on substrates without sample preparation. We report applications of the nano-DESI/HR-MS approach in a number of our recent studies focused on molecular identification of organic compounds in laboratory and in field collected OA samples. Reactive nano-DESI approach where selected reagent is added to the solvent is used for examining the presence of individual species containing specific functional groups and for their quantification within complex mixtures of OA. Specifically, we use the Girard's reagent T (GT) to probe and quantify carbonyl compounds in the SOA mixtures. We estimate for the first time the amounts of dimers and trimers in the SOA mixtures. We found that the most abundant dimer in limonene/O3 SOA was detected at the ˜0.5 pg level and the total amount of dimers and trimers in the analyzed sample was ˜11 pg. Understanding of the OA composition at the molecular level allowed us to identify key aging reactions, including the transformation of carbonyls to imines and carbonyl-imine oligomerization, that may contribute to the formation of brown carbon in the atmosphere.

  8. Gas-phase pesticide measurement using iodide ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Murschell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Volatilization and subsequent processing in the atmosphere are an important environmental pathway for the transport and chemical fate of pesticides. However, these processes remain a particularly poorly understood component of pesticide lifecycles due to analytical challenges in measuring pesticides in the atmosphere. Most pesticide measurements require long (hours to days sampling times coupled with offline analysis, inhibiting observation of meteorologically driven events or investigation of rapid oxidation chemistry. Here, we present chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with iodide reagent ions as a fast and sensitive measurement of four current-use pesticides. These semi-volatile pesticides were calibrated with injections of solutions onto a filter and subsequently volatilized to generate gas-phase analytes. Trifluralin and atrazine are detected as iodide–molecule adducts, while permethrin and metolachlor are detected as adducts between iodide and fragments of the parent analyte molecule. Limits of detection (1 s are 0.37, 0.67, 0.56, and 1.1 µg m−3 for gas-phase trifluralin, metolachlor, atrazine, and permethrin, respectively. The sensitivities of trifluralin and metolachlor depend on relative humidity, changing as much as 70 and 59, respectively, as relative humidity of the sample air varies from 0 to 80 %. This measurement approach is thus appropriate for laboratory experiments and potentially near-source field measurements.

  9. Gas chromatography interfaced with atmospheric pressure ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry by low-temperature plasma ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Asger W.; Kofoed-Sorensen, Vivi; Svensmark, Bo

    2013-01-01

    A low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization interface between a gas chromatograph (GC) and an atmospheric pressure inlet mass spectrometer, was constructed. This enabled time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection of GC-eluting compounds. The performance of the setup was evaluated by injection...

  10. Analysis of Norditerpenoid Alkaloids Extracted from Aconitum sinomantanum Nakai by Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry(ESI-MS) was applied simultaneously in determining norditerpenoid alkaloids from the roots of Aconitum sinomantanum Nakai (RAS) based on molecular mass information. The tandem mass spectra(ESI-MSn) provided the alkaloidal structural information, through which the existence of these alkaloids was further confirmed. Accordingly, six known norditerpenoid alkaloids were simultaneously determined on the basis of their ESI-MSn spectra. Furthermore, based on the diagnostic fragmentation pathways of alkaloidal MSn, a rapid method for direct detection and characterization of alkaloids from an ethanolic extract of RAS was described.

  11. Electrospray ionization mass spectral characteristics and fragmentation mechanisms of Angiotensin II and its analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huihui; Yuan, Gu

    2006-05-01

    The characteristic fragmentation pathways of Angiotensin II and eight analogues were investigated by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The main fragmentations involve the cleavages of the CCO and CONH bonds with the loss of water, ammonia or carbon monoxide and rearrangements involving hydrogen atoms, and the MS/MS spectra give significant sequence information of these octapeptides. In addition, the two members of the analogues with the same mass and different elemental composition can be distinguished by the MS/MS spectra of [M + H]+ and fragment ions. These results show that ESI tandem mass spectrometry is an excellent tool for the structural identification of Angiotensin II and its analogues.

  12. Characterization of phosphoantigens by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography-electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry and nanoelectrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont, F; Luciani, B; Belmant, C; Fournié, J J

    2001-08-01

    New phosphorylated microbial metabolites referred to as phosphoantigens activate immune responses in humans. Although these molecules have leading applications in medical research, no direct method allows their rapid and unambiguous structural identification. Here, we interfaced online HPAEC (high performance anion-exchange chromatography) with ESI-ITMS (electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry) to identify such pyrophosphorylated molecules. A self-regenerating anion suppressor located upstream of electrospray ionization enabled the simultaneous detection of pyrophosphoester by conductimetry, UV and MS. By HPAEC-ITMS and HPAEC-ITMS2, a single run permitted characterization of reference phosphoantigens and of related structures. Although all compounds were resolved by HPAEC, MS enabled their detection and identification by [M-H]- and fragment ions. Isobaric phosphoantigen analogues were also separated by HPAEC and distinguished by MS2. The relevance of this device was demonstrated for phosphoantigens analysis in human urine and plasma. Furthermore, identification of natural phosphoantigens by automatically generated 2D mass spectra from nano-ESI-ITMS is presented. This last technique permits the simultaneous performance of molecular screening of natural phosphoantigen extracts and their identification.

  13. Virtual quantification of metabolites by capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry: predicting ionization efficiency without chemical standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalcraft, Kenneth R; Lee, Richard; Mills, Casandra; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2009-04-01

    A major obstacle in metabolomics remains the identification and quantification of a large fraction of unknown metabolites in complex biological samples when purified standards are unavailable. Herein we introduce a multivariate strategy for de novo quantification of cationic/zwitterionic metabolites using capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS) based on fundamental molecular, thermodynamic, and electrokinetic properties of an ion. Multivariate calibration was used to derive a quantitative relationship between the measured relative response factor (RRF) of polar metabolites with respect to four physicochemical properties associated with ion evaporation in ESI-MS, namely, molecular volume (MV), octanol-water distribution coefficient (log D), absolute mobility (mu(o)), and effective charge (z(eff)). Our studies revealed that a limited set of intrinsic solute properties can be used to predict the RRF of various classes of metabolites (e.g., amino acids, amines, peptides, acylcarnitines, nucleosides, etc.) with reasonable accuracy and robustness provided that an appropriate training set is validated and ion responses are normalized to an internal standard(s). The applicability of the multivariate model to quantify micromolar levels of metabolites spiked in red blood cell (RBC) lysates was also examined by CE-ESI-MS without significant matrix effects caused by involatile salts and/or major co-ion interferences. This work demonstrates the feasibility for virtual quantification of low-abundance metabolites and their isomers in real-world samples using physicochemical properties estimated by computer modeling, while providing deeper insight into the wide disparity of solute responses in ESI-MS. New strategies for predicting ionization efficiency in silico allow for rapid and semiquantitative analysis of newly discovered biomarkers and/or drug metabolites in metabolomics research when chemical standards do not exist.

  14. Efficient laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using excitation energy transfer from anthracene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, Kensuke [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Fujino, Tatsuya, E-mail: fujino@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Femtomolar detection of PAHs such as perylene and benzopyrene was achieved. ► Photoexcited anthracene molecules transferred their energy to PAHs. ► Electronically excited PAHs were then excited to be ions. ► Two-photon ionization process was necessary to complete the ionization process. ► The number of defect sites could be reduced by the annealing procedure. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as perylene and benzopyrene, doped at amounts on the order of femtomol (∼10{sup −15} mol) in anthracene crystals could be detected by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Sensitivity was roughly 10{sup 3} times higher than that of LDI method in our experimental conditions. It was revealed from the excitation power dependence of the peak intensity of PAHs on the mass spectra that two-photon excitation in one UV pulse was necessary to complete the ionization process. It was also clarified that the number of defect sites that trap excitons generated in anthracene crystals could be reduced by the annealing procedure, by which an efficient energy transfer between anthracene and PAHs became possible.

  15. Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drosophila Brain Using Matrix Sublimation versus Modification with Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nhu T N; Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-02-02

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is used to image brain lipids in the fruit fly, Drosophila, a common invertebrate model organism in biological and neurological studies. Three different sample preparation methods, including sublimation with two common organic matrixes for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) using gold nanoparticles, are examined for sample profiling and imaging the fly brain. Recrystallization with trifluoroacetic acid following matrix deposition in MALDI is shown to increase the incorporation of biomolecules with one matrix, resulting in more efficient ionization, but not for the other matrix. The key finding here is that the mass fragments observed for the fly brain slices with different surface modifications are significantly different. Thus, these approaches can be combined to provide complementary analysis of chemical composition, particularly for the small metabolites, diacylglycerides, phosphatidylcholines, and triacylglycerides, in the fly brain. Furthermore, imaging appears to be beneficial using modification with gold nanoparticles in place of matrix in this application showing its potential for cellular and subcellular imaging. The imaging protocol developed here with both MALDI and SALDI provides the best and most diverse lipid chemical images of the fly brain to date with LDI.

  16. Photoelectron angular distributions from strong-field ionization of oriented molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegaard, Lotte; Hansen, Jonas Lerche; Kalhøj, Line;

    2010-01-01

    perpendicular to the fixed permanent dipole moment, which are absent for randomly oriented molecules. Furthermore, for benzonitrile oriented in three dimensions, striking suppression of electron emission in the fixed molecular plane appears. Our theoretical analysis, based on tunnelling ionization theory, shows...... ionization, which is limited to species and processes where ionization leads to fragmentation. An alternative is to fix the molecular frame before ionization. The only demonstrations of such spatial orientation involved aligned small linear nonpolar molecules. Here we extend these techniques to the general...... class of polar molecules. Carbonylsulphide and benzonitrile molecules, fixed in space by combined laser and electrostatic fields, are ionized with intense, circularly polarized 30-fs laser pulses. For carbonylsulphide and benzonitrile oriented in one dimension, the MFPADs exhibit pronounced anisotropies...

  17. Staying Alive: Measuring Intact Viable Microbes with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Erica; Fang, Mingliang; Siuzdak, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has traditionally been the technology of choice for small molecule analysis, making significant inroads into metabolism, clinical diagnostics, and pharmacodynamics since the 1960s. In the mid-1980s, with the discovery of electrospray ionization (ESI) for biomolecule analysis, a new door opened for applications beyond small molecules. Initially, proteins were widely examined, followed by oligonucleotides and other nonvolatile molecules. Then in 1991, three intriguing studies reported using mass spectrometry to examine noncovalent protein complexes, results that have been expanded on for the last 25 years. Those experiments also raised the questions: How soft is ESI, and can it be used to examine even more complex interactions? Our lab addressed these questions with the analyses of viruses, which were initially tested for viability following electrospray ionization and their passage through a quadrupole mass analyzer by placing them on an active medium that would allow them to propagate. This observation has been replicated on multiple different systems, including experiments on an even bigger microbe, a spore. The question of analysis was also addressed in the early 2000s with charge detection mass spectrometry. This unique technology could simultaneously measure mass-to-charge and charge, allowing for the direct determination of the mass of a virus. More recent experiments on spores and enveloped viruses have given us insight into the range of mass spectrometry's capabilities (reaching 100 trillion Da), beginning to answer fundamental questions regarding the complexity of these organisms beyond proteins and genes, and how small molecules are integral to these supramolecular living structures.

  18. Overview literature on matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS): basics and its applications in characterizing polymeric materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Jagtap; A H Ambre

    2005-10-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS) is a technique which allows the measurement of molecular mass > 200,000 Daltons by ionization and vapourization without degradation. This technique is useful for the mass analysis of synthetic polymers, which have very low volatility. The basic principles of and its applications for polymer characterization have been discussed in this paper. In addition, the possibilities of combining MALDI MS with chromatographic and other analytical techniques have also been discussed.

  19. Food quality and authenticity screening via easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcari, Andreia M; Fernandes, Gabriel D; Barrera-Arellano, Daniel; Eberlin, Marcos N; Alberici, Rosana M

    2016-02-21

    This review is the first to summarize a decade of studies testing the use of easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS) and its several sister techniques, Venturi (V-EASI), thermal imprinting (TI-EASI) and Spartan (S-EASI) mass spectrometry in food quality control and authentication. Since minimal or no sample preparation is required, such ambient desorption/ionization techniques have been shown to provide direct, fast and selective fingerprinting characterization at the molecular level based on the pools of the most typical components. They have also been found to be applicable on intact, undisturbed samples or on simple solvent extracts. Fundamentals of EASI-MS and its sister techniques, including mechanisms, devices, parameters and strategies, as well as the many applications reported for food analysis, are summarized and discussed.

  20. Interference Effects in Strong-Field Dissociative Ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Yue, Lun

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically study dissociative ionization of H$_2^+$ exposed to strong linearly polarized few-cycle visible, near-infrared and midinfrared laser pulses. We find rich energy-sharing structures in the combined electron and nuclear kinetic energy spectra with features that are a priori at odds with simple energy conservation arguments. We explain the structures as interferences between wave packets released during different optical cycles, and during the same optical cycle, respectively. Both inter- and intracycle interference structures are clearly visible in the joint energy spectra. The shapes of the interference structures depend on the dynamics leading to the double continuum, and carry sub-femtosecond information.

  1. Identification of multiply charged proteins and amino acid clusters by liquid nitrogen assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Kailasa, Suresh; Hasan, Nazim; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2012-08-15

    The development of liquid nitrogen assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry (LNASI MS) for the analysis of multiply charged proteins (insulin, ubiquitin, cytochrome c, α-lactalbumin, myoglobin and BSA), peptides (glutathione, HW6, angiotensin-II and valinomycin) and amino acid (arginine) clusters is described. The charged droplets are formed by liquid nitrogen assisted sample spray through a stainless steel nebulizer and transported into mass analyzer for the identification of multiply charged protein ions. The effects of acids and modifier volumes for the efficient ionization of the above analytes in LNASI MS were carefully investigated. Multiply charged proteins and amino acid clusters were effectively identified by LNASI MS. The present approach can effectively detect the multiply charged states of cytochrome c at 400 nM. A comparison between LNASI and ESI, CSI, SSI and V-EASI methods on instrumental conditions, applied temperature and observed charge states for the multiply charged proteins, shows that the LNASI method produces the good quality spectra of amino acid clusters at ambient conditions without applied any electric field and heat. To date, we believe that the LNASI method is the most simple, low cost and provided an alternative paradigm for production of multiply charged ions by LNASI MS, just as ESI-like ions yet no need for applying any electrical field and it could be operated at low temperature for generation of highly charged protein/peptide ions.

  2. Cold-spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Characterization of Biomolecules in Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kentaro YAMAGUCHI; Shigeru SAKAMOTO

    2003-01-01

    @@ A direct solution analysis method, coldspray ionization (CSI) mass spectrometry (MS)[1], a variant of electrospray (ESI) MS operating at low temperature (ca. - 80 ~ 10℃), allows facile and precise characterization of labile organic species, especially those in which non-covalent bonding interactions are prominent. We have applies this method to investigations of the solution structures of many labile organic species, including unstable reagents and reaction intermediates, asymmetric catalysts, supramolecules, and even primary biomolecules.

  3. Determination of triacetone triperoxide using ultraviolet femtosecond multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezoe, Ryota [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Imasaka, Tomoko [Laboratory of Chemistry, Graduate School of Design, Kyushu University, 4-9-1, Shiobaru, Minami-ku, Fukuoka 815-8540 (Japan); Imasaka, Totaro, E-mail: imasaka@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Division of Optoelectronics and Photonics, Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A UV ultrashort laser pulse was useful for ionization of triacetone triperoxide. • A molecular ion was strongly enhanced in multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry. • Triacetone triperoxide in the human blood was measured without any interferences. • An organic compound of phorone was formed in the human blood from acetone. - Abstract: Triacetone triperoxide (TATP), an explosive compound, was measured using gas chromatography combined with multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/MPI-TOFMS). By decreasing the pulse width of a femtosecond laser from 80 to 35 fs, a molecular ion was drastically enhanced and was measured as one of the major ions in the mass spectrum. The detection limits obtained using the molecular (M·{sup +}) and fragment (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O{sup +}) ions were similar or slightly superior to those obtained using conventional mass spectrometry based on electron and chemical ionization. In order to improve the reliability, an isotope of TATP, i.e., TATP-d18, was synthesized and used as an internal standard in the trace analysis of TATP in a sample of human blood. TATP could be identified in a two-dimensional display, even though numerous interfering compounds were present in the sample. Acetone, which is frequently used as a solvent in sampling TATP, produced a chemical species with a retention time nearly identical to that of TATP and provided a C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O{sup +} fragment ion that was employed for measuring a chromatogram of TATP in conventional MS. This compound, the structure of which was assigned as phorone, was clearly differentiated from TATP based on a molecular ion observable in MPI-TOFMS.

  4. Solvation of Lithium Irons in Mixed Organic Electrolyte Solutions by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUDA, Yoshiharu; FUKUSHIMA, Tsuyoshi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; ARAKAWA, Ryuichi

    2002-01-01

    Solvation of lithium ions in mixed organic electrolyte solutions for secondary lithium batteries was investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy. The electrolyte solutions were mixed binary solutions of diethyl carbonate (DEC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), ethylene carbonate (EC),γ-butyrolactone (GBL), and propylene carbonate (PC) containing LiClO4. Lithium ions solvated mainly to two solvent molecules. The order of the inclination of the solvent molecules solvating to lithium ions...

  5. Fast Differential Analysis of Propolis Using Surface Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xue-yong; Guo, Xia-li; Luo, Huo-lin; Fang, Xiao-wei; Zhu, Teng-gao; Zhang, Xing-lei; Chen, Huan-wen; Luo, Li-ping

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectral fingerprints of 24 raw propolis samples, including 23 from China and one from the United States, were directly obtained using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (SDAPCI-MS) without sample pretreatment. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the most abundant signals were detected in the mass ranges of 70 to 500 m/z and 200 to 350 m/z, respectively. Principal component analyses (PCA) for the two mass ranges showed similarities in that the colors had a significant correlation with the first two PCs; in contrast there was no correlation with the climatic zones from which the samples originated. Analytes such as chrysin, pinocembrin, and quercetin were detected and identified using multiple stage mass spectrometry within 3 min. Therefore, SDAPCI-MS can be used for rapid and reliable high-throughput analysis of propolis. PMID:26339245

  6. Imaging of Proteins in Tissue Samples Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Chou, Pi-Tai; Zare, Richard N

    2015-11-17

    Chemical maps of tissue samples provide important information on biological processes therein. Recently, advances in tissue imaging have been achieved using ambient ionization techniques, such as desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS), but such techniques have been almost exclusively confined to the mapping of lipids and metabolites. We report here the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) that allows us to image proteins in tissue samples in a label-free manner at atmospheric pressure with only minimum sample preparation. Multiply charged proteins with masses up to 15 kDa were successfully detected by nanoDESI using an LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. In an adult mice brain section, expression of proteins including ubiquitin, β-thymosin, myelin basic protein, and hemoglobin were spatially mapped and characterized. We also determined the location of methylation on myelin basic protein. This imaging modality was further implemented to MYC-induced lymphomas. We observed an array of truncated proteins in the region where normal thymus cells were infiltrated by tumor cells, in contrast to healthy tissue.

  7. Easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry combined with thin-layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Renato; Milagre, Humberto M S; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2008-04-15

    On-spot detection and analyte characterization on thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is performed via ambient desorption/ionization and (tandem) mass spectrometry detection, that is, via easy ambient sonic spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS). As proof-of-principle cases, mixtures of semipolar nitrogenated compounds as well as pharmaceutical drugs and vegetable oils have been tested. The technique has also been applied to monitor a chemical reaction of synthetic importance. EASI is the simplest and gentlest ambient ionization technique currently available, assisted solely by N2 (or air). It uses no voltages, no electrical discharges; no UV or laser beams, and no high temperature and is most easily implemented in all API mass spectrometers. TLC is also the simplest, fastest, and most easily performed chromatographic technique. TLC plus EASI-MS therefore provide a simple and advantageous combination of chromatographic separation and sensitive detection of the TLC spots as well as on-spot MS or MS/MS characterization. The favorable characteristics of TLC-EASI-MS indicate advantageous applications in several areas such as drug and oil analysis, phytochemistry and synthetic chemistry, forensics via reliable counterfeit detection, and quality control.

  8. Identification of Microalgae by Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Multiple Nanomatrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lung-Hsiang; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Shih, Chi-Yu; Hsiung, Tung-Ming; Chang, Jeng; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Chiu, Tai-Chia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a simple method to identify microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) using three different substrates: HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe nanostructures. The fragmentation/ionization processes of complex molecules in algae varied according to the heat absorption and transfer efficiency of the nanostructured matrices (NMs). Therefore, the mass spectra obtained for microalgae showed different patterns of m/z values for different NMs. The spectra contained both significant and nonsignificant peaks. Constructing a Venn diagram with the significant peaks obtained for algae when using HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe NMs in m/z ratio range 100-1000, a unique relationship among the three sets of values was obtained. This unique relationship of sets is different for each species of microalgae. Therefore, by observing the particular relationship of sets, we successfully identified different algae such as Isochrysis galbana, Emiliania huxleyi, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Nannochloris sp., Skeletonema cf. costatum, and Tetraselmis chui. This simple and cost-effective SALDI-MS analysis method coupled with multi-nanomaterials as substrates may be extended to identify other microalgae and microorganisms in real samples. Graphical Abstract Identification of microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry coupled with three different mercury-based nanosubstrates.

  9. Strong Field Molecular Ionization in the Impulsive Limit: Freezing Vibrations with Short Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Sándor, Péter; Zhao, Arthur; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Marquetand, Philipp; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We study strong-field molecular ionization as a function of pulse duration. Experimental measurements of the photoelectron yield for a number of molecules reveal competition between different ionization continua (cationic states) which depends strongly on pulse duration. Surprisingly, in the limit of short pulse duration, we find that a single ionic continuum dominates the yield, whereas multiple continua are produced for longer pulses. Using calculations which take vibrational dynamics into account, we interpret our results in terms of nuclear motion and non-adiabatic dynamics during the ionization process.

  10. Field ionization process of Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婧; 沈礼; 戴长建

    2015-01-01

    The field ionization process of the Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states, converging to the first ionization limit, 4f76s 9S4, is systematically investigated. The spectra of the Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states are populated with three-step laser excitation, and detected by electric field ionization (EFI) method. Two different kinds of the EFI pulses are applied after laser excitation to observe the possible impacts on the EFI process. The exact EFI ionization thresholds for the 4f76snp Rydberg states can be determined by observing the corresponding EFI spectra. In particular, some structures above the EFI threshold are found in the EFI spectra, which may be interpreted as the effect from black body radiation (BBR). Finally, the scaling law of the EFI threshold for the Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states with the effective quantum number is built.

  11. Theory of recombination x-ray lasers based on optical-field ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, D.C.; Amendt, P.; DaSilva, L.B.; London, R.A.; Rosen, M.D.; Wilks, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Donnelly, T.D.; Falcone, R.W. [Univ. of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Ultrashort-pulse, high-intensity laser drivers have the potential for creating tabletop-size x-ray lasers by ionizing the target gas via the electric field of the laser pulse. For appropriate plasma conditions following ionization, lasing can occur during the subsequent rapid recombination. A review of the theory and modeling for these optical-field-ionized x-ray lasers is presented. Particular attention is given to the issues of electron beating and ionization-induced refraction. We summarize modeling in support of experiments where evidence of lasing in H-like Li at 135 {Angstrom} was obtained. In addition, we present modeling results for lasing in Li-like N at 247 {Angstrom}. We briefly discuss new applications appropriate for tabletop-size high-repetition-rate x-ray lasers.

  12. Standard addition strip for quantitative electrostatic spray ionization mass spectrometry analysis: determination of caffeine in drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobolkina, Elena; Qiao, Liang; Roussel, Christophe; Girault, Hubert H

    2014-12-01

    Standard addition strips were prepared for the quantitative determination of caffeine in different beverages by electrostatic spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESTASI-MS). The gist of this approach is to dry spots of caffeine solutions with different concentrations on a polymer strip, then to deposit a drop of sample mixed with an internal standard, here theobromine on each spot and to measure the mass spectrometry signals of caffeine and theobromine by ESTASI-MS. This strip approach is very convenient and provides quantitative analyses as accurate as the classical standard addition method by MS or liquid chromatography.

  13. Standard test method for uranium and plutonium concentrations and isotopic abundances by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the concentration and isotopic composition of uranium and plutonium in solutions. The purified uranium or plutonium from samples ranging from nuclear materials to environmental or bioassay matrices is loaded onto a mass spectrometric filament. The isotopic ratio is determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry, the concentration is determined by isotope dilution. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Ionization Suppression and Recovery in Direct Biofluid Analysis Using Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Carolina; Spence, Corina; Zhang, Chengsen; Bills, Brandon J.; Manicke, Nicholas E.

    2016-04-01

    Paper spray mass spectrometry is a method for the direct analysis of biofluid samples in which extraction of analytes from dried biofluid spots and electrospray ionization occur from the paper on which the dried sample is stored. We examined matrix effects in the analysis of small molecule drugs from urine, plasma, and whole blood. The general method was to spike stable isotope labeled analogs of each analyte into the spray solvent, while the analyte itself was in the dried biofluid. Intensity of the labeled analog is proportional to ionization efficiency, whereas the ratio of the analyte intensity to the labeled analog in the spray solvent is proportional to recovery. Ion suppression and recovery were found to be compound- and matrix-dependent. Highest levels of ion suppression were obtained for poor ionizers (e.g., analytes lacking basic aliphatic amine groups) in urine and approached -90%. Ion suppression was much lower or even absent for good ionizers (analytes with aliphatic amines) in dried blood spots. Recovery was generally highest in urine and lowest in blood. We also examined the effect of two experimental parameters on ion suppression and recovery: the spray solvent and the sample position (how far away from the paper tip the dried sample was spotted). Finally, the change in ion suppression and analyte elution as a function of time was examined by carrying out a paper spray analysis of dried plasma spots for 5 min by continually replenishing the spray solvent.

  15. Field Ionization Mass Spectrometric Rapid Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    of the 39 peaks of each of the 24 duplicate spectra of - 1ýthv normal and of the hepatitic spectra have been averaged and normalized to give two...COMPOSITE SPECTRA OF NORMAL AND HEPATITIC URINES 42 Table 2 ""j amu A.(C) A(P) p 1 70 0.0201 0.0475 0 2 71 0.0050 0.0358 0.0001 3 72 0.0152 0.0326 0.0139 4...24 hepatitic patienta as sick and we miss only on two patients. Even these two subjects may belong to a different population and might have been

  16. Observation of Self-Sustaining Relativistic Ionization Wave Launched by a Sheath Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, M.; Arefiev, A. V.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bengtson, R. D.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental evidence supported by simulations of a relativistic ionization wave launched into a surrounding gas by the sheath field of a plasma filament with high energy electrons. Such a filament is created by irradiating a clustering gas jet with a short pulse laser (115 fs) at a peak intensity of 5×1017 W/cm2. We observe an ionization wave propagating radially through the gas for about 2 ps at 0.2-0.5 c after the laser has passed, doubling the initial radius of the filament. The gas is ionized by the sheath field, while the longevity of the wave is explained by a moving field structure that traps the high energy electrons near the boundary, maintaining a strong sheath field despite the significant expansion of the plasma.

  17. Observation of Self-Sustaining Relativistic Ionization Wave Launched by Sheath Field

    CERN Document Server

    McCormick, M W; Quevedo, H J; Bengtson, R D; Ditmire, T

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental evidence supported by simulations of a relativistic ionization wave launched into surrounding gas by the sheath field of a plasma filament with high energy electrons. Such filament is created by irradiating a clustering gas jet with a short pulse laser ($\\sim$115 fs) at a peak intensity of $5 \\times 10^{17}$ W/cm$^2$. We observe an ionization wave propagating radially through the gas for about 2 ps at 0.2-0.5 $c$ after the laser has passed, doubling the initial radius of the filament. The gas is ionized by the sheath field, while the longevity of the wave is explained by a moving field structure that traps the high energy electrons near the boundary, maintaining a strong sheath field despite the significant expansion of the plasma.

  18. Wave-packet analysis of strong-field ionization of sodium in the quasistatic regime*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunjac, Andrej; Popović, Duška B.; Simonović, Nenad S.

    2016-05-01

    Strong field ionization of the sodium atom in the tunnelling and over-the-barrier regimes is studied by examining the valence electron wave-packet dynamics in the static electric field. The lowest state energy and the ionization rate determined by this method for different strengths of the applied field agree well with the results obtained using other methods. The initial period of the nonstationary decay after switching the field on is analyzed and discussed. It is demonstrated that, if the Keldysh parameter is significantly lower than one (quasistatic regime), the probability of ionization by a laser pulse can be obtained from the static rates. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  19. Molecular resolution and fragmentation of fulvic acid by electrospray ionization/multistage tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, J.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Gates, Paul M.; Furlong, E.T.; Ferrer, I.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular weight distributions of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, were investigated by electrospray ionization/quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI/QMS), and fragmentation pathways of specific fulvic acid masses were investigated by electrospray ionization/ion trap multistage tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MST/MS). ESI/QMS studies of the free acid form of low molecular weight poly(carboxylic acid) standards in 75% methanol/25% water mobile phase found that negative ion detection gave the optimum generation of parent ions that can be used for molecular weight determinations. However, experiments with poly(acrylic acid) mixtures and specific high molecular weight standards found multiply charged negative ions that gave a low bias to molecular mass distributions. The number of negative charges on a molecule is dependent on the distance between charges. ESI/MST/MS of model compounds found characteristic water loss from alcohol dehydration and anhydride formation, as well as CO2 loss from decarboxylation, and CO loss from ester structures. Application of these fragmentation pathways to specific masses of fulvic acid isolated and fragmented by ESI/MST/MS is indicative of specific structures that can serve as a basis for future structural confirmation after these hypothesized structures are synthesized.

  20. Quantum theory of recollisional (e, 2e) process in strong field nonsequential double ionization of helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangjin; Liang, Yaqiu; Lin, C D

    2010-06-25

    Based on the full quantal recollision model and field-free electron impact ionization theory, we calculate the correlated momentum spectra of the two outgoing electrons in strong field nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of helium to compare with recent experiments. By analyzing the relative strength of binary versus recoil collisions exhibited in the photoelectron spectra, we confirm that the observed fingerlike structure in the experiment is a consequence of the Coulomb interaction between the two emitted electrons. Our result supports the recollision mechanism of strong field NSDI at the most fundamental level.

  1. Quantum-orbit analysis of above threshold ionization by intense spatially inhomogeneous field

    CERN Document Server

    Shaaran, T; Lewenstein, M

    2013-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of above threshold ionization (ATI) in atoms within the strong field approximation (SFA) by considering spatially inhomogeneous monochromatic laser fields. The locally enhanced field induced by resonance plasmons is an example for such inhomogeneous fields. We investigate how the individual pairs of quantum orbits contribute to the photoelectron spectra and the angular electron momentum distributions. We demonstrate that the quantum orbits have a very different behavior in the spatially inhomogeneous field when compared to the homogeneous field. In the case of inhomogeneous fields, the ionization and rescattering times differ between neighboring cycles, despite the field being monochromatic. Indeed, the contributions from one cycle may lead to a lower cutoff, while another may develop a higher cutoff. Within our model, we show that the ATI cutoff extends far beyond the semiclassical cutoff, as a function of inhomogeneity strength. Furthermore, the angular momentum distributions ...

  2. Critical comparison of mass analyzers for forensic hair analysis by ambient ionizations mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duvivier, W.F.; Beek, van T.A.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale
    Recently, several direct and/or ambient mass spectrometry (MS) approaches have been suggested for drugs of abuse imaging in hair. The use of mass spectrometers with insufficient selectivity could result in false-positive measurements due to isobaric interferences. Different mass analyz

  3. Adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: resistance to ionizing radiation-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, Anna; Zeni, Olga; Romeo, Stefania; Massa, Rita; Gialanella, Giancarlo; Grossi, Gianfranco; Manti, Lorenzo; Vijayalaxmi; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to assess whether human peripheral blood lymphocytes which have been pre-exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields exhibit an adaptive response (AR) by resisting the induction of genetic damage from subsequent exposure to ionizing radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from four healthy donors were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin for 24 h and then exposed for 20 h to 1950 MHz radiofrequency fields (RF, adaptive dose, AD) at an average specific absorption rate of 0.3 W/kg. At 48 h, the cells were subjected to a challenge dose (CD) of 1.0 or 1.5 Gy X-irradiation (XR, challenge dose, CD). After a 72 h total culture period, cells were collected to examine the incidence of micronuclei (MN). There was a significant decrease in the number of MN in lymphocytes exposed to RF + XR (AD + CD) as compared with those subjected to XR alone (CD). These observations thus suggested a RF-induced AR and induction of resistance to subsequent damage from XR. There was variability between the donors in RF-induced AR. The data reported in our earlier investigations also indicated a similar induction of AR in human blood lymphocytes that had been pre-exposed to RF (AD) and subsequently treated with a chemical mutagen, mitomycin C (CD). Since XR and mitomycin-C induce different kinds of lesions in cellular DNA, further studies are required to understand the mechanism(s) involved in the RF-induced adaptive response.

  4. Electric-field-induced ionization of acceptors in p-GaAs

    CERN Document Server

    Dargys, A; Cesna, A; Zurauskiene, N

    1999-01-01

    Hole de-trapping dynamics out of shallow acceptors subjected to high pulsed electric fields is investigated in pure p-GaAs used in radiation detectors. The characteristic de-trapping times are found from current transients due to impact and tunnel ionization of the acceptors. The de-trapping times are presented as a function of electric field strength. (author)

  5. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometric analysis of intact bikunin glycosaminoglycan from normal human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laremore, Tatiana N; Leach, Franklin E; Amster, I Jonathan; Linhardt, Robert J

    2011-08-15

    A mixture of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains from a plasma proteoglycan bikunin was fractionated using native, continuous-elution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the resulting fractions were analyzed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ESI FTMS). Molecular mass analysis of the intact GAG afforded information about the length and composition of GAG chains in the mixture. Ambiguity in the interpretation of the intact GAG mass spectra was eliminated by conducting an additional experiment in which the GAG chains of known molecular mass were treated with a GAG-degrading enzyme, chondroitinase ABC, and the digestion products were analyzed by ESI FTMS. The plasma bikunin GAG chains consisted predominantly of odd number of saccharides, although few chains consisting of even number of saccharides were also detected. Majority of the analyzed chains were tetrasulfated or pentasulfated and comprised by 29 to 41 monosaccharides.

  6. Characteristic Fragmentation Behavior of Steroidal Phosphoramidate Conjugates in Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI, San-Hao; JU, Yong; XIAO, Qiang; ZHAO, Yu-Fen

    2006-01-01

    Novel steroidal phosphoramidate conjugates of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) and amino acid esters were synthesized and determined by positive and negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The MS fragmentation behaviors of the steroidal phosphoramidate conjugates have been investigated in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry of ESI-MS/MS. There were three characteristic fragment ions in the positive ion ESI mass spectra, which were the Na adduct ions with loss of steroidal moiety, amino acid ester moiety from pseudo molecular ion (M+Na)+, and the phosphoamino acid methyl ester Na adduct ion by a-cleavage of the phosphoramidate respectively. The main fragment ions in negative ion ESI mass spectra were the ion (M-HN3)-, the ion (M - AZT - H)- , and the ion (M-steroidal moiety-H)- besides the pseudo molecular ion (M-H)-. The fragmentation patterns did not depend on the attached amino acid ester moiety.

  7. A huge reservoir of ionized gas around the Milky Way: Accounting for the Missing Mass?

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, A; Krongold, Y; Nicastro, F; Galeazzi, M

    2012-01-01

    Most of the baryons from galaxies have been "missing" and several studies have attempted to map the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of galaxies in their quest. Recent studies with the Hubble Space Telescope have shown that many galaxies contain a large reservoir of ionized gas with temperatures of about 10^5 K. Here we report on X-ray observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory probing an even hotter phase of the CGM of our Milky Way at about 10^6 K. We show that this phase of the CGM is massive, extending over a large region around the Milky Way, with a radius of over 100 kpc. The mass content of this phase is over ten billion solar masses, many times more than that in cooler gas phases and comparable to the total baryonic mass in the disk of the Galaxy. The missing mass of the Galaxy appears to be in this warm-hot gas phase.

  8. The Field White Dwarf Mass Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Tremblay, P -E; Kalirai, J S; Gaensicke, B T; Gentile-Fusillo, N; Raddi, R

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the properties and astrophysical implications of the field white dwarf mass distribution in preparation of Gaia applications. Our study is based on the two samples with the best established completeness and most precise atmospheric parameters, the volume-complete survey within 20 pc and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) magnitude-limited sample. We explore the modelling of the observed mass distributions with Monte Carlo simulations, but find that it is difficult to constrain independently the initial mass function (IMF), the initial-to-final-mass relation (IFMR), the stellar formation history (SFH), the variation of the Galactic disk vertical scale height as a function of stellar age, and binary evolution. Each of these input ingredients has a moderate effect on the predicted mass distributions, and we must also take into account biases owing to unidentified faint objects (20 pc sample), as well as unknown masses for magnetic white dwarfs and spectroscopic calibration issues (SDSS sample). Never...

  9. Derivatization of Dextran for Multiply Charged Ion Formation and Electrospray Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jesus B.; Hibbard, Hailey A. J.; Reynolds, Melissa M.

    2017-10-01

    We present the use of a simple, one-pot derivatization to allow the polysaccharide dextran to carry multiple positive charges, shifting its molecular weight distribution to a lower m/ z range. We performed this derivatization because molecular weight measurements of polysaccharides by mass spectrometry are challenging because of their lack of readily ionizable groups. The absence of ionizable groups limits proton abstraction and suppresses proton adduction during the ionization process, producing mass spectra with predominantly singly charged metal adduct ions, thereby limiting the detection of large polysaccharides. To address this challenge, we derivatized dextran T1 (approximately 1 kDa) by attaching ethylenediamine, giving dextran readily ionizable, terminal amine functional groups. The attached ethylenediamine groups facilitated proton adduction during the ionization process in positive ion mode. Using the low molecular weight dextran T1, we tracked the number of ethylenediamine attachments by measuring the mass shift from underivatized to derivatized dextran T1. Using electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we observed derivatized dextran chains ranging from two to nine glucose residues with between one and four attachments/charges. Our success in shifting derivatized dextran T1 toward the low m/ z range suggests potential for this derivatization as a viable route for analysis of high molecular weight polysaccharides using electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Determination of iodine in oyster tissue by isotope dilution laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, J D; Murphy, T J

    1990-02-15

    The technique of laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been combined with isotope dilution analysis to determine iodine in oyster tissue. The long-lived radioisotope, 129I, was used to spike the samples. Samples were equilibrated with the 129I, wet ashed under controlled conditions, and iodine separated by coprecipitation with silver chloride. The analyte was dried as silver ammonium iodide upon a tantalum filament from which iodine was thermally desorbed in the resonance ionization mass spectrometry instrument. A single-color, two-photon resonant plus one-photon ionization scheme was used to form positive iodine ions. Long-lived iodine signals were achieved from 100 ng of iodine. The precision of 127I/129I measurement has been evaluated by replicate determinations of the spike, the spike calibration samples, and the oyster tissue samples and was 1.0%. Measurement precision among samples was 1.9% for the spike calibration and 1.4% for the oyster tissue. The concentration of iodine determined in SRM 1566a, Oyster Tissue, was 4.44 micrograms/g with an estimate of the overall uncertainty for the analysis of +/- 0.12 microgram/g.

  11. Gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Luosujärvi, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Grigoras, Kestas; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-05-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) microchip is presented for combining a gas chromatograph (GC) to a mass spectrometer (MS). The chip includes capillary insertion channel, stopper, vaporizer channel, nozzle and nebulizer gas inlet fabricated on the silicon wafer, and a platinum heater sputtered on a glass wafer. These two wafers are joined by anodic bonding creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI microchip. The sample from GC is directed via heated transfer line capillary to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle forms narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona discharge needle, and the ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The GC-microchip APCI-MS combination provides an efficient method for qualitative and quantitative analysis. The spectra produced by microchip APCI show intensive protonated molecule and some fragmentation products as in classical chemical ionization for structure elucidation. In quantitative analysis the GC-microchip APCI-MS showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.9989) and repeatability (relative standard deviation 4.4%). The limits of detection with signal-to-noise ratio of three were between 0.5 and 2 micromol/L with MS mode using selected ion monitoring and 0.05 micromol/L with MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring.

  12. Chemical characterization of synthetic cannabinoids by electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kill, Jade B; Oliveira, Izabela F; Tose, Lilian V; Costa, Helber B; Kuster, Ricardo M; Machado, Leandro F; Correia, Radigya M; Rodrigues, Rayza R T; Vasconcellos, Géssica A; Vaz, Boniek G; Romão, Wanderson

    2016-09-01

    The synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) represent the most recent advent of the new psychotropic substances (NPS) and has become popularly known to mitigate the effects of the Δ(9)-THC. The SCs are dissolved in organic solvents and sprayed in a dry herbal blend. However, little information is reported on active ingredients of SCs as well as the excipients or diluents added to the herbal blend. In this work, the direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry technique (ESI-FT-ICR MS) was applied to explore the chemical composition of nine samples of herbal extract blends, where a total of 11 SCs (UR-144, JWH-073, XLR-11, JWH-250, JWH-122, AM-2201, AKB48, JWH-210, JWH-081, MAM-2201 and 5F-AKB48) were identified in the positive ionization mode, ESI(+), and other 44 chemical species (saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, sugars, flavonoids, etc.) were detected in the negative ionization mode, ESI(-). Additionally, CID experiments were performed, and fragmentation pathways were proposed to identify the connectivity of SCs. Thus, the direct infusion ESI-FT-ICR MS technique is a powerful tool in forensic chemistry that enables the rapid and unequivocal way for the determination of molecular formula, the degree of unsaturation (DBE-double bond equivalent) and exact mass (<1ppm) of a total of 55 chemical species without the prior separation step.

  13. Air flow assisted ionization for remote sampling of ambient mass spectrometry and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiuming; Tang, Fei; Luo, Zhigang; Chen, Yi; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Ruiping; Wang, Xiaohao; Abliz, Zeper

    2011-04-15

    Ambient ionization methods are an important research area in mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Under ambient conditions, the gas flow and atmospheric pressure significantly affect the transfer and focusing of ions. The design and implementation of air flow assisted ionization (AFAI) as a novel and effective, remote sampling method for ambient mass spectrometry are described herein. AFAI benefits from a high extracting air flow rate. A systematic investigation of the extracting air flow in the AFAI system has been carried out, and it has been demonstrated not only that it plays a role in the effective capture and remote transport of charged droplets, but also that it promotes desolvation and ion formation, and even prevents ion fragmentation during the ionization process. Moreover, the sensitivity of remote sampling ambient MS analysis was improved significantly by the AFAI method. Highly polar and nonpolar molecules, including dyes, pharmaceutical samples, explosives, drugs of abuse, protein and volatile compounds, have been successfully analyzed using AFAI-MS. The successful application of the technique to residue detection on fingers, large object analysis and remote monitoring in real time indicates its potential for the analysis of a variety of samples, especially large objects. The ability to couple this technique with most commercially available MS instruments with an API interface further enhances its broad applicability.

  14. All-solid-state deep ultraviolet laser for single-photon ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chengqian; Liu, Xianhu; Zeng, Chenghui; Zhang, Hanyu; Jia, Meiye; Wu, Yishi; Luo, Zhixun; Fu, Hongbing; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-02-01

    We report here the development of a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer utilizing single-photon ionization based on an all-solid-state deep ultraviolet (DUV) laser system. The DUV laser was achieved from the second harmonic generation using a novel nonlinear optical crystal KBe2BO3F2 under the condition of high-purity N2 purging. The unique property of this laser system (177.3-nm wavelength, 15.5-ps pulse duration, and small pulse energy at ∼15 μJ) bears a transient low power density but a high single-photon energy up to 7 eV, allowing for ionization of chemicals, especially organic compounds free of fragmentation. Taking this advantage, we have designed both pulsed nanospray and thermal evaporation sources to form supersonic expansion molecular beams for DUV single-photon ionization mass spectrometry (DUV-SPI-MS). Several aromatic amine compounds have been tested revealing the fragmentation-free performance of the DUV-SPI-MS instrument, enabling applications to identify chemicals from an unknown mixture.

  15. Microplasma discharge vacuum ultraviolet photoionization source for atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Joshua M; Gann, Reuben N; Fernández, Facundo M; Orlando, Thomas M

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first use of an atmospheric pressure microplasma-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization source in atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry applications. The device is a robust, easy-to-operate microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) that enables generation of VUV photons from Ne and Ne/H(2) gas mixtures. Photons were detected by excitation of a microchannel plate detector and by analysis of diagnostic sample ions using a mass spectrometer. Reactive ions, charged particles, and metastables produced in the discharge were blocked from entering the ionization region by means of a lithium fluoride window, and photoionization was performed in a nitrogen-purged environment. By reducing the output pressure of the MHCD, we observed heightened production of higher-energy photons, making the photoionization source more effective. The initial performance of the MHCD VUV source has been evaluated by ionizing model analytes such as acetone, azulene, benzene, dimethylaniline, and glycine, which were introduced in solid or liquid phase. These molecules represent species with both high and low proton affinities, and ionization energies ranging from 7.12 to 9.7 eV.

  16. Study of Electrochemical Reactions Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pengyuan; Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Laskin, Julia; Dewald, Howard D.; Chen, Hao

    2012-07-03

    The combination of electrochemistry (EC) and mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical tool for studying mechanisms of redox reactions, identification of products and intermediates, and online derivatization/recognition of analytes. This work reports a new coupling interface for EC/MS by employing nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), a recently developed ambient ionization method. We demonstrate online coupling of nano-DESI-MS with a traditional electrochemical flow cell, in which the electrolyzed solution emanating from the cell is ionized by nano-DESI for MS analysis. Furthermore, we show first coupling of nano-DESI-MS with an interdigitated array (IDA) electrode enabling chemical analysis of electrolyzed samples directly from electrode surfaces. Because of its inherent sensitivity, nano-DESI enables chemical analysis of small volumes and concentrations of sample solution. Specifically, good-quality signal of dopamine and its oxidized form, dopamine ortho-quinone, was obtained using 10 μL of 1 μM solution of dopamine on the IDA. Oxidation of dopamine, reduction of benzodiazepines, and electrochemical derivatization of thiol groups were used to demonstrate the performance of the technique. Our results show the potential of nano-DESI as a novel interface for electrochemical mass spectrometry research.

  17. Hole dynamics and spin currents after ionization in strong circularly polarized laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    We apply the time-dependent analytical R-matrix theory to develop a movie of hole motion in a Kr atom upon ionization by strong circularly polarized field. We find rich hole dynamics, ranging from rotation to swinging motion. The motion of the hole depends on the final energy and the spin of the photoelectron and can be controlled by the laser frequency and intensity. Crucially, hole rotation is a purely non-adiabatic effect, completely missing in the framework of quasistatic (adiabatic) tunneling theories. We explore the possibility to use hole rotation as a clock for measuring ionization time. Analysing the relationship between the relative phases in different ionization channels we show that in the case of short-range electron-core interaction the hole is always initially aligned along the instantaneous direction of the laser field, signifying zero delays in ionization. Finally, we show that strong-field ionization in circular fields creates spin currents (i.e. different flow of spin-up and spin-down densi...

  18. Quantum dots assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection of carbohydrates: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Aisha; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-04-01

    A quantum dots (QDs) assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (QDA-LDI-MS) strategy was proposed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a series of carbohydrates. The adsorption of carbohydrates on the modified surface of different QDs as the matrices depended mainly on the formation of hydrogen bonding, which led to higher MS intensity than those with conventional organic matrix. The effects of QDs concentration and sample preparation method were explored for improving the selective ionization process and the detection sensitivity. The proposed approach offered a new dimension to the application of QDs as matrices for MALDI-MS research of carbohydrates. It could be used for quantitative measurement of glucose concentration in human serum with good performance. The QDs served as a matrix showed the advantages of low background, higher sensitivity, convenient sample preparation and excellent stability under vacuum. The QDs assisted LDI-MS approach has promising application to the analysis of carbohydrates in complex biological samples.

  19. Applications of electrospray laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for document examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Lin, Yu-Shan; Huang, Ming-Zong; Shiea, Jentaie

    2010-01-01

    We have employed electrospray laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (ELDI-MS) to rapidly characterize certain classes of compounds--the inks within the characters made by inks and inkjet printer on regular paper and the chemical compounds within thermal papers. This ELDI-MS approach allowed the ink and paper samples to be distinguished in terms of their chemical compositions. Sample pretreatment was unnecessary and the documents were practically undamaged after examination. The ink chemicals on the documents were desorbed through laser irradiation (sampling spot area: <100 microm(2)); the desorbed molecules then entered an electrospray plume--prepared from an acidic methanol/water solution (50%)--where they became ionized through fusion or ion-molecule reactions with the charged solvent species and droplets in the plume.

  20. The Ionization of Accretion Flows in High Mass Star Formation: W51e2

    CERN Document Server

    Keto, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Previous observations show that the hypercompact HII region W51e2 is surrounded by a massive molecular accretion flow centered on the HII region. New observations of the H53alpha radio recombination line made with the VLA at 0.45 arc second angular resolution show a velocity gradient in the ionized gas within the HII region of > 500 kms-1 pc-1 comparable to the velocity gradient seen in the molecular accretion flow. New CO line observations made with the SMA at arc second angular resolution detect a molecular bipolar outflow immediately around the W51e2 HII region and extending along the axis of rotation of the molecular flow. These observations are consistent with an evolutionary phase for high mass star formation in which a newly formed massive star first begins to ionize its surroundings including its own accretion flow.

  1. Detection of plutonium isotopes at lowest quantities using in-source resonance ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, S; Hakimi, A; Stöbener, N; Trautmann, N; Wendt, K

    2012-11-01

    The in-source resonance ionization mass spectrometry technique was applied for quantification of ultratrace amounts of plutonium isotopes as a proof of principle study. In addition to an overall detection limit of 10(4) to 10(5) atoms, this method enables the unambiguous identification and individual quantification of the plutonium isotopes (238)Pu and (241)Pu which are of relevance for dating of radiogenic samples. Due to the element-selective ionization process, these isotopes can be measured even under a high surplus of isobaric contaminations from (238)U or (241)Am, which considerably simplifies chemical preparation. The technique was developed, tested, and characterized on a variety of synthetic and calibration samples and is presently applied to analyze environmental samples.

  2. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  3. Laser-Ionization TOF Mass Spectrometer Characterization of Benzene Destruction in Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiahong; XIAO Qingmei; WANG Liping; YAO Zhi; DING Hongbin

    2009-01-01

    Benzene is.a major industrial air pollutant and can cause serious human health disorders. In this paper an investigation on benzene destruction, in an atmospheric-pressure fast-flow pulsed DC-discharge by means of laser ionization combined with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, is reported. Most by-products including transient reactive species from the benzene discharge were characterized by molecular beam sampling combined with TOF mass spectrometry.It is showed that, with a gas mixture of 0.5% C6H6 in Ar, benzene can be effectively destroyed by discharge plasma. The intermediate species consisted of small fragments of CNHm (n=3~5,m =1~11), cycle-chain species of CNHm (n=6~9, m = 7~10) and polycyclic species CNHm (n ≥9,m = 8~12). The alternation of mass peaks (intensity) with even/odd electrons was observed in the measured mass spectra. The results indicated that the alternation is mainly due to the different ionization potentials of the open shell and close shell species. Based on the examination of the features of the species' composition, the primary reaction pathways are proposed and discussed.

  4. Quality control for building libraries from electrospray ionization tandem mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Neta, Pedatsur; Stein, Stephen E

    2014-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry coupled with liquid chromatography is a routine technique for identifying and quantifying compounds in complex mixtures. The identification step can be aided by matching acquired tandem mass spectra (MS(2)) against reference library spectra as is routine for electron ionization (EI) spectra from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, unlike the latter spectra, ESI MS(2) spectra are likely to originate from various precursor ions for a given target molecule and may be acquired at varying energies and resolutions and have characteristic noise signatures, requiring processing methods very different from EI to obtain complete and high quality reference spectra for individual analytes. This paper presents procedures developed for creating a tandem mass spectral library that addresses these factors. Library building begins by acquiring MS(2) spectra for all major MS(1) peaks in an infusion run, followed by assigning MS(2) spectra to clusters and creating a consensus spectrum for each. Intensity-based constraints for cluster membership were developed, as well as peak testing to recognize and eliminate suspect peaks and reduce noise. Consensus spectra were then examined by a human evaluator using a number of criteria, including a fraction of annotated peaks and consistency of spectra for a given ion at different energies. These methods have been developed and used to build a library from >9000 compounds, yielding 230,000 spectra.

  5. Rapid differentiation of tea products by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanwen; Liang, Huazheng; Ding, Jianhua; Lai, Jinhu; Huan, Yanfu; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2007-12-12

    Protonated water molecules generated by an ambient corona discharge were directed to impact tea leaves for desorption/ionization at atmospheric pressure. Thus, a novel method based on surface desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS) has been developed for rapid analysis of tea products without any sample pretreatment. Under the optimized experimental conditions, DAPCI MS spectra of various tea samples are recorded rapidly, and the resulting mass spectra are chemical fingerprints that characterize the tea samples. On the basis of the mass spectral fingerprints, 40 tea samples including green tea, oolong tea, and jasmine tea were successfully differentiated by principal component analysis (PCA) of the mass spectral raw data. The PCA results were also validated with cluster analysis and supervised PCA analysis. The alteration of signal intensity caused by rough surfaces of tea leaves did not cause failure in the separation of the tea products. The experimental findings show that DAPCI-MS creates ions of both volatile and nonvolatile compounds in tea products at atmospheric pressure, providing a practical and convenient tool for high-throughput differentiation of tea products.

  6. Studying the Chemistry of Cationized Triacylglycerols Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Density Functional Theory Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossert, J. Stuart; Herrera, Lisandra Cubero; Ramaley, Louis; Melanson, Jeremy E.

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs), found as complex mixtures in living organisms, is typically accomplished using liquid chromatography, often coupled to mass spectrometry. TAGs, weak bases not protonated using electrospray ionization, are usually ionized by adduct formation with a cation, including those present in the solvent (e.g., Na+). There are relatively few reports on the binding of TAGs with cations or on the mechanisms by which cationized TAGs fragment. This work examines binding efficiencies, determined by mass spectrometry and computations, for the complexation of TAGs to a range of cations (Na+, Li+, K+, Ag+, NH4 +). While most cations bind to oxygen, Ag+ binding to unsaturation in the acid side chains is significant. The importance of dimer formation, [2TAG + M]+ was demonstrated using several different types of mass spectrometers. From breakdown curves, it became apparent that two or three acid side chains must be attached to glycerol for strong cationization. Possible mechanisms for fragmentation of lithiated TAGs were modeled by computations on tripropionylglycerol. Viable pathways were found for losses of neutral acids and lithium salts of acids from different positions on the glycerol moiety. Novel lactone structures were proposed for the loss of a neutral acid from one position of the glycerol moiety. These were studied further using triple-stage mass spectrometry (MS3). These lactones can account for all the major product ions in the MS3 spectra in both this work and the literature, which should allow for new insights into the challenging analytical methods needed for naturally occurring TAGs.

  7. Ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer for evaluating krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Y., E-mail: iwata.yoshihiro@jaea.go.jp [Experimental Fast Reactor Department, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Sekiya, H. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Ito, C. [Experimental Fast Reactor Department, Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2015-10-11

    An ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer that can be applied to evaluate krypton (Kr) contamination in xenon (Xe) dark matter detectors has been developed for measuring Kr at the parts-per-trillion (ppt) or sub-ppt level in Xe. The gas sample is introduced without any condensation into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer through a pulsed supersonic valve. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 212.6 nm, {sup 84}Kr atoms in the sample are resonantly ionized along with other Kr isotopes. {sup 84}Kr ions are then mass separated and detected by the mass spectrometer in order to measure the Kr impurity concentration. With our current setup, approximately 0.4 ppt of Kr impurities contained in pure argon (Ar) gas are detectable with a measurement time of 1000 s. Although Kr detection sensitivity in Xe is expected to be approximately half of that in Ar, our spectrometer can evaluate Kr contamination in Xe to the sub-ppt level.

  8. Field emission mechanism from nanotubes through gas ionization induced nanoscale surface charging

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Changhua

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidences reported in this letter show that the gas ionization induced positive charge accumulation can lead to the electron field emission from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an electrode system with proper range of gap spacing, where the CNT film with ethocel was covered with ZnO nanorods. The hypothesis for illustration is suggested that: 1) the cosmic ray ionization frequency increases 108~1010 times due to the metastable population resulted from the interaction between the gases and the CNTs; 2) the flux of positive charges is enhanced in the converged field due to the ZnO nanostructures. The resulted positive charge local density is high enough to trigger the field emission of the CNTs. The methodology may be useful in particle detectors and ionization gas sensors.

  9. Evaluation of ionization techniques for mass spectrometric detection of contact allergenic hydroperoxides formed by autoxidation of fragrance terpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, J; Carlberg, J; Abrahamsson, P; Hulthe, G; Persson, B-A; Karlberg, A-T

    2008-11-01

    Hydroperoxides formed by autoxidation of common fragrance terpenes are strong allergens and known to cause allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), a common skin disease caused by low molecular weight chemicals. Until now, no suitable methods for chemical analyses of monoterpene hydroperoxides have been available. Their thermolability prohibits the use of gas chromatography and their low UV-absorption properties do not promote sensitive analytical methods by liquid chromatography based on UV detection. In our study, we have investigated different liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) ionization techniques, electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), for detection of hydroperoxides from linalool and limonene.Flow injection analysis was used to evaluate the three different techniques to ionize the monoterpene hydroperoxides, linalool hydroperoxide and limonene hydroperoxide, by estimating the signal efficacy under experimental conditions for positive and negative ionization modes. The intensities for the species [M+H]+ and [M+H-H2O]+ in positive ionization mode and [M-H]- and [M-H-H2O]- in negative ionization mode were monitored. It was demonstrated that the mobile phase composition and instrumental parameters have major influences on the ionization efficiency of these compounds. ESI and APCI were both found to be appropriate as ionization techniques for detection of the two hydroperoxides. However, APPI was less suitable as ionization technique for the investigated hydroperoxides.

  10. An iodide-adduct high-resolution time-of-flight chemical-ionization mass spectrometer: application to atmospheric inorganic and organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ben H; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D; Mohr, Claudia; Kurtén, Theo; Worsnop, Douglas R; Thornton, Joel A

    2014-06-03

    A high-resolution time-of-flight chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) using Iodide-adducts has been characterized and deployed in several laboratory and field studies to measure a suite of organic and inorganic atmospheric species. The large negative mass defect of Iodide, combined with soft ionization and the high mass-accuracy (5500) of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer, provides an additional degree of separation and allows for the determination of elemental compositions for the vast majority of detected ions. Laboratory characterization reveals Iodide-adduct ionization generally exhibits increasing sensitivity toward more polar or acidic volatile organic compounds. Simultaneous retrieval of a wide range of mass-to-charge ratios (m/Q from 25 to 625 Th) at a high frequency (>1 Hz) provides a comprehensive view of atmospheric oxidative chemistry, particularly when sampling rapidly evolving plumes from fast moving platforms like an aircraft. We present the sampling protocol, detection limits and observations from the first aircraft deployment for an instrument of this type, which took place aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) 2013 field campaign.

  11. Field-assisted ionization of molecular doping in conjugated polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    The field- and temperature dependence of the charge transport in solution-processed poly[2-methoxy-5-(2′-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) doped with tetrafluoro- tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) is investigated. Conventional charge transport models based on a density- and field-depen

  12. TD-CI simulation of the strong-field ionization of polyenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonk, Jason A; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2012-07-05

    Ionization of ethylene, butadiene, hexatriene, and octatetraene by short, intense laser pulses was simulated using the time-dependent single-excitation configuration-interaction (TD-CIS) method and Klamroth's heuristic model for ionization (J. Chem. Phys.2009, 131, 114304). The calculations used the 6-31G(d,p) basis set augmented with up to three sets of diffuse sp functions on each heavy atom as well as the 6-311++G(2df,2pd) basis set. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine pulse (ω = 0.06 au, 760 nm) with intensities up to 3.5 × 10(14) W cm(-2) (E(max) = 0.10 au) directed along the vector connecting the end carbons of the linear polyenes. TD-CIS simulations for ionization were carried out as a function of the escape distance parameter, the field strength, the number of states, and the basis set size. With a distance parameter of 1 bohr, calculations with Klamroth's heuristic model reproduce the expected trend that the ionization rate increases as the molecular length increases. While the ionization rates are too high at low intensities, the ratios of ionization rates for ethylene, butadiene, hexatriene, and octatetraene are in good agreement with the ratios obtained from the ADK model. As compared to earlier work on the optical response of polyenes to intense laser pulses, ionization using Klamroth's model is less sensitive to the number of diffuse functions in the basis set, and only a fraction of the total possible CIS states are needed to model the strong field ionizations.

  13. Thin-Layer Chromatography/Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Investigation of Goldenseal Alkaloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was investigated as a means to qualitatively identify and to quantify analytes directly from developed normal-phase thin layer chromatography plates. The atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial ion trap mass spectrometer was extended to permit sampling and ionization of analytes in bands separated on intact TLC plates (up to 10 cm x 10 cm). A surface positioning software package and the appropriate hardware enabled computer-controlled surface scanning along the length of development lanes or at fixed RF value across the plates versus the stationary desorption electrospray emitter. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and related alkaloids and commercial dietary supplements were used as standards and samples. Alkaloid standards and samples were spotted and separated on aluminum- or glass-backed plates using established literature methods. The mass spectral signal levels as a function of desorption spray solvent were investigated with acetonitrile proving superior to methanol. The detection levels (ca. 5 ng each or 14 -28 pmol) in mass spectral full scan mode were determined statistically from the calibration curves (2.5 - 100 pmol) for the standards berberine, palmatine and hydrastinine spotted as a mixture and separated on the plates. Qualitative screening of the major alkaloids present in six different over-the-counter "goldenseal" dietary supplements was accomplished by obtaining full scan mass spectra during surface scans along the development lane in the direction of increasing RF value. In one sample, alkaloids were detected that strongly suggested the presence of at least one additional herb undeclared on the product label. These same data indicated the misidentification of one of the alkaloids in the TLC literature. Quantities of the alkaloids present in two of the samples determined using the mass spectral data were in reasonable agreement with the label values indicating the quantitative ability of

  14. Thermal desorption counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for direct mass spectrometry of ecstasy tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Iwata, Yuko T; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kuwayama, Kenji; Tachi, Noriyuki; Uetake, Naohito

    2009-09-01

    A novel approach to the analysis of ecstasy tablets by direct mass spectrometry coupled with thermal desorption (TD) and counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (CFI-APCI) is described. Analytes were thermally desorbed with a metal block heater and introduced to a CFI-APCI source with ambient air by a diaphragm pump. Water in the air was sufficient to act as the reactive reagent responsible for the generation of ions in the positive corona discharge. TD-CFI-APCI required neither a nebulizing gas nor solvent flow and the accompanying laborious optimizations. Ions generated were sent in the direction opposite to the air flow by an electric field and introduced into an ion trap mass spectrometer. The major ions corresponding to the protonated molecules ([M + H](+)) were observed with several fragment ions in full scan mass spectrometry (MS) mode. Collision-induced dissociation of protonated molecules gave characteristic product-ion mass spectra and provided identification of the analytes within 5 s. The method required neither sample pretreatment nor a chromatographic separation step. The effectiveness of the combination of TD and CFI-APCI was demonstrated by application to the direct mass spectrometric analysis of ecstasy tablets and legal pharmaceutical products.

  15. S-matrix analysis of vibrational and alignment effects in intense-field multiphoton ionization of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Requate, A.

    2007-03-15

    Theoretical analysis of the vibrational excitation of small molecules during multiphoton ionization in intense laser fields of optical and infrared frequencies. Analysis of the alignment dependence of the electron impact ionization of diatomic molecules in the presence of an intense laser field as the final step in the process of Nonsequential Double Ionization. Quantum mechanical description using S-matrix theory in Strong Field Approximation (SFA), i.e. beyond perturbation theory. (orig.)

  16. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdian, David C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  17. Relativistic mean-field mass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Arteaga, D.; Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new effort to develop viable mass models within the relativistic mean-field approach with density-dependent meson couplings, separable pairing and microscopic estimations for the translational and rotational correction energies. Two interactions, DD-MEB1 and DD-MEB2, are fitted to essentially all experimental masses, and also to charge radii and infinite nuclear matter properties as determined by microscopic models using realistic interactions. While DD-MEB1 includes the σ, ω and ρ meson fields, DD-MEB2 also considers the δ meson. Both mass models describe the 2353 experimental masses with a root mean square deviation of about 1.1 MeV and the 882 measured charge radii with a root mean square deviation of 0.029 fm. In addition, we show that the Pb isotopic shifts and moments of inertia are rather well reproduced, and the equation of state in pure neutron matter as well as symmetric nuclear matter are in relatively good agreement with existing realistic calculations. Both models predict a maximum neutron-star mass of more than 2.6 solar masses, and thus are able to accommodate the heaviest neutron stars observed so far. However, the new Lagrangians, like all previously determined RMF models, present the drawback of being characterized by a low effective mass, which leads to strong shell effects due to the strong coupling between the spin-orbit splitting and the effective mass. Complete mass tables have been generated and a comparison with other mass models is presented.

  18. Relativistic mean-field mass models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Arteaga, D.; Goriely, S.; Chamel, N. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP-226, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-10-15

    We present a new effort to develop viable mass models within the relativistic mean-field approach with density-dependent meson couplings, separable pairing and microscopic estimations for the translational and rotational correction energies. Two interactions, DD-MEB1 and DD-MEB2, are fitted to essentially all experimental masses, and also to charge radii and infinite nuclear matter properties as determined by microscopic models using realistic interactions. While DD-MEB1 includes the σ, ω and ρ meson fields, DD-MEB2 also considers the δ meson. Both mass models describe the 2353 experimental masses with a root mean square deviation of about 1.1 MeV and the 882 measured charge radii with a root mean square deviation of 0.029 fm. In addition, we show that the Pb isotopic shifts and moments of inertia are rather well reproduced, and the equation of state in pure neutron matter as well as symmetric nuclear matter are in relatively good agreement with existing realistic calculations. Both models predict a maximum neutron-star mass of more than 2.6 solar masses, and thus are able to accommodate the heaviest neutron stars observed so far. However, the new Lagrangians, like all previously determined RMF models, present the drawback of being characterized by a low effective mass, which leads to strong shell effects due to the strong coupling between the spin-orbit splitting and the effective mass. Complete mass tables have been generated and a comparison with other mass models is presented. (orig.)

  19. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, S.M.; Mowry, C.D.; Keenan, M.R.; Bender, S.F.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Gas Analysis Lab.; Owen, T. [Intel Corp., Rio Rancho, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission to the atmosphere is of great concern to semiconductor manufacturing industries, research laboratories, the public, and regulatory agencies. Some industries are seeking ways to reduce emissions by reducing VOCs at the point of use (or generation). This paper discusses the requirements, design, calibration, and use of a sampling inlet/quadrupole mass spectrometer system for monitoring VOCs in a semiconductor manufacturing production line. The system uses chemical ionization to monitor compounds typically found in the lithography processes used to manufacture semiconductor devices (e.g., acetone, photoresist). The system was designed to be transportable from tool to tool in the production line and to give the operator real-time feedback so the process(es) can be adjusted to minimize VOC emissions. Detection limits ranging from the high ppb range for acetone to the low ppm range fore other lithography chemicals were achieved using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy at a data acquisition rate of approximately 1 mass spectral scan (30 to 200 daltons) per second. A demonstration of exhaust VOC monitoring was performed at a working semiconductor fabrication facility during actual wafer processing.

  20. Enzyme kinetics by directly imaging a porous silicon microfluidic reactor using desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kevin P; Azoz, Seyla; Gardeniers, Han J G E

    2008-11-01

    Enzyme kinetics were obtained in a porous silicon microfluidic channel by combining an enzyme and substrate droplet, allowing them to react and deposit a small amount of residue on the channel walls, and then analyzing this residue by directly ionizing the channel walls using a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) laser source. The porous silicon of the channel walls functions in a manner analogous to the matrix in MALDI-MS, and is referred to as a desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) target when used in this configuration. Mass spectrometry signal intensity of substrate residue correlates with relative concentration, and position in the microchannel correlates with time, thus allowing determination of kinetic parameters. The system is especially suitable for initial reaction velocity determination. This microreactor is broadly applicable to time-resolved kinetic assays as long as at least one substrate or product of the reaction is ionizable by DIOS-MS.

  1. Field-dependent molecular ionization and excitation energies: Implications for electrically insulating liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Davari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular ionization potential has a relatively strong electric-field dependence as compared to the excitation energies which has implications for electrical insulation since the excited states work as an energy sink emitting light in the UV/VIS region. At some threshold field, all the excited states of the molecule have vanished and the molecule is a two-state system with the ground state and the ionized state, which has been hypothesized as a possible origin of different streamer propagation modes. Constrained density-functional theory is used to calculate the field-dependent ionization potential of different types of molecules relevant for electrically insulating liquids. The low singlet-singlet excitation energies of each molecule have also been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. It is shown that low-energy singlet-singlet excitation of the type n → π* (lone pair to unoccupied π* orbital has the ability to survive at higher fields. This type of excitation can for example be found in esters, diketones and many color dyes. For alkanes (as for example n-tridecane and cyclohexane on the other hand, all the excited states, in particular the σ → σ* excitations vanish in electric fields higher than 10 MV/cm. Further implications for the design of electrically insulating dielectric liquids based on the molecular ionization potential and excitation energies are discussed.

  2. Effects of inner electrons on atomic strong-field ionization dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rapp, J

    2013-01-01

    The influence of inner electrons on the ionization dynamics in strong laser fields is investigated in a wavelength regime where the inner electron dynamics is usually assumed to be negligible. The role of inner electrons is of particular interest for the application of frozen-core approximations and pseudopotentials in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and the single-active-electron (SAE) approximation in strong-field laser physics. Results of TDDFT and SAE calculations are compared with exact ones obtained by the numerical ab initio solution of the three-electron time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation for a lithium model atom. It is found that dynamical anti-screening may substantially alter the ionization rate in the single-photon regime. Requirements for the validity of the approximations in the single and multiphoton ionization domain are identified.

  3. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effects in strong-field photoelectron holography

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Xiaohong; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C D; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back to the ion where it scatters off (the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to retrieve the target information. However, unlike conventional optical holography, the propagations of electron wave packets are affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. In addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. We showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the nonadiabatic effect in ionization i...

  4. Theory of tunneling ionization of molecules: Weak-field asymptotics including dipole effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of the parabolic adiabatic expansion approach to the problem of ionization of atomic systems in a static electric field, originally developed for the axially symmetric case [ Phys. Rev. A 82 023416 (2010)], is generalized to arbitrary potentials. This approach is used to rederive...... the asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization in the weak-field limit. In the atomic case, the resulting formulas for the ionization rate coincide with previously known results. In addition, the present theory accounts for the possible existence of a permanent dipole moment of the unperturbed system and, hence......, applies to polar molecules. Accounting for dipole effects constitutes an important difference of the present theory from the so-called molecular Ammosov-Delone-Krainov theory. The theory is illustrated by comparing exact and asymptotic results for a set of model polar molecules and a realistic molecular...

  5. High-order harmonic generation and multi-photon ionization of Na2 in laser fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yan-Ping; Zhang Feng-Shou; Meng Ke-Lai; Xiao Guo-Qing

    2007-01-01

    In this paper high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectra and the ionization probabilities of various charge states of small cluster Na2 in the multiphoton regimes are calculated by using time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) for one-colour (1064 nm) and two-colour (1064 nm and 532 nm) ultrashort (25 fs) laser pulses. HHG spectra of Na2 have not the large extent of plateaus due to pronounced collective effects of electron dynamics. In addition, the two-colour laser field can result in the breaking of the symmetry and generation of the even order harmonic such as the second order harmonic. The results of ionization probabilities show that a two-colour laser field can increase the ionization probability of higher charge state.

  6. Photon Energy Deposition in Strong-Field Single Ionization of Multielectron Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenbin; Li, Zhichao; Lu, Peifen; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Ma, Junyang; He, Feng; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Molecules exposed to strong laser fields may coherently absorb multiple photons and deposit the energy into electrons and nuclei, triggering the succeeding dynamics as the primary stage of the light-molecule interaction. We experimentally explore the electron-nuclear sharing of the absorbed photon energy in above-threshold multiphoton single ionization of multielectron molecules. Using CO as a prototype, vibrational and orbital resolved electron-nuclear sharing of the photon energy is observed. Different from the simplest one- or two-electron systems, the participation of the multiple orbitals and the coupling of various electronic states in the strong-field ionization and dissociation processes alter the photon energy deposition dynamics of the multielectron molecule. The population of numerous vibrational states of the molecular cation as the energy reservoir in the ionization process plays an important role in photon energy sharing between the emitted electron and the nuclear fragments.

  7. Merits of online electrochemistry liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EC/LS DESI MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Wen Donq; Brown, Blake; Chamand, Laura; Brajter-Toth, Anna

    2016-03-01

    A new online electrochemistry/liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EC/LS DESI MS) system with a simple electrochemical thin-layer flow-through cell was developed and tested using N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPA) as a model probe. Although oxidation of DMPA is observed as a result of ionization of LS in positive ion mode LS DESI, application of voltage to the online electrochemical (EC) cell in EC/LS DESI MS increases yields of oxidation products. An advantage of LS DESI MS is its sensitivity in aqueous electrolyte solutions, which improves efficiency of electrochemical reactions in EC/LS DESI MS. In highly conductive low pH aqueous buffer solutions, oxidation efficiency is close to 100%. EC/ESI MS typically requires mixed aqueous/organic solvents and low electrolyte concentrations for efficient ionization in MS, limiting efficiency of electrochemistry online with MS. Independently, the results verify higher electrochemical oxidation efficiency during positive mode ESI than during LS DESI.

  8. Sinapine detection in radish taproot using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dejuan; Luo, Liping; Jiang, Cuicui; Han, Jing; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Tingting; Jiang, Jie; Zhou, Zhiquan; Chen, Huanwen

    2011-03-23

    Plant research and natural product detection are of sustainable interests. Benefited by direct detection with no sample preparation, sinapine, a bioactive chemical usually found in various seeds of Brassica plants, has been unambiguously detected in radish taproot (Raphanus sativus) tissue using a liquid-assisted surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). A methanol aqueous solution (1:1) was nebulized by a nitrogen sheath gas toward the corona discharge, resulting in charged ambient small droplets, which affected the radish tissue for desorption/ionization of analytes on the tissue surface. Thus, sinapine was directly detected and identified by tandem DAPCI-MS experiments without sample pretreatment. The typical relative standard deviation (RSD) of this method for sinapine detection was 5-8% for six measurements (S/N=3). The dynamic response range was 10(-12)-10(-7) g/cm2 for sinapine on the radish skin surface. The discovery of sinapine in radish taproot was validated by using HPLC-UV methods. The data demonstrated that DAPCI assisted by solvent enhanced the overall efficiency of the desorption/ionization process, enabling sensitive detection of bioactive compounds in plant tissue.

  9. Search for ionized jets towards high-mass young stellar objects

    CERN Document Server

    Guzmán, Andrés E; Brooks, Kate J; Voronkov, Maxim A

    2012-01-01

    We are carrying out multi-frequency radio continuum observations, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, to systematically search for collimated ionized jets towards high-mass young stellar objects (HMYSOs). Here we report observations at 1.4, 2.4, 4.8 and 8.6 GHz, made with angular resolutions of about 7, 4, 2, and 1 arcsec, respectively, towards six objects of a sample of 33 southern HMYSOs thought to be in very early stages of evolution. The objects in the sample were selected from radio and infrared catalogs by having positive radio spectral indices and being luminous (L_bol > 20,000 L_sun), but underluminous in radio emission compared to that expected from its bolometric luminosity. This criteria makes the radio sources good candidates for being ionized jets. As part of this systematic search, two ionized jets have been discovered: one previously published and the other reported here. The rest of the observed candidates correspond to three hypercompact hii regions and two ultracompact hii regions. ...

  10. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry coupled using proximal probe thermal desorption with electrospray or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-06-30

    An atmospheric pressure proximal probe thermal desorption sampling method coupled with secondary ionization by electrospray or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was demonstrated for the mass spectrometric analysis of a diverse set of compounds (dyestuffs, pharmaceuticals, explosives and pesticides) separated on various high-performance thin-layer chromatography plates. Line scans along or through development lanes on the plates were carried out by moving the plate relative to a stationary heated probe positioned close to or just touching the stationary phase surface. Vapors of the compounds thermally desorbed from the surface were drawn into the ionization region of a combined electrospray ionization/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source where they merged with reagent ions and/or charged droplets from a corona discharge or an electrospray emitter and were ionized. The ionized components were then drawn through the atmospheric pressure sampling orifice into the vacuum region of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and detected using full scan, single ion monitoring, or selected reaction monitoring mode. Studies of variable parameters and performance metrics including the proximal probe temperature, gas flow rate into the ionization region, surface scan speed, read-out resolution, detection limits, and surface type are discussed.

  11. Cosmetic Analysis Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ramos Catharino

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A new “omic” platform—Cosmetomics—that proves to be extremely simple and effective in terms of sample preparation and readiness for data acquisition/interpretation is presented. This novel approach employing Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI for cosmetic analysis has proven to readily identify and quantify compounds of interest. It also allows full control of all the production phases, as well as of the final product, by integration of both analytical and statistical data. This work has focused on products of daily use, namely nail polish, lipsticks and eyeliners of multiple brands sold in the worldwide market.

  12. Electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry of mixtures of triterpene glycosides with paracetamol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekar, A. V.; Vetrova, E. V.; Borisenko, N. I.; Yakovishin, L. A.; Grishkovets, V. I.

    2010-11-01

    Molecular complexation of paracetamol with hederagenin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside (α-hederin) and its 28-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-O-β-Dglucopyranosyl ether (hederasaponin C) was investigated for the first time using electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The glycosides form complexes with paracetamol in a 1:1 molar ratio. The hederasaponin C complex is more stable. The structures of the glycosides and paracetamol are concluded to have an impact on the complexation process.

  13. Measurement of Chiral Recognition Properties of Crown Ethers Using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    SAWADA, Masami; Harada, Manabu; TAKAI, Yoshio; NAKANO, Kazurou; Kuroda, Masao; ARAKAWA, Ryuichi; 荒川, 隆一

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding host-guest complex ions between chiral crown ethers and chiral amino acid ester salts, detected by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) with a DHBA or MSA matrix, were studied on the view point of chiral recognition properties of the chiral crown hosts. The chiral recognition property (IR/IS-dn value≅1.0) obtained by the present MALDI-MS is sharply different from the IR/IS-dn value obtained by FAB-MS or ESI-MS (≠1.0) in the same host-gues...

  14. Tunneling time, exit time and exit momentum in strong field tunnel ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeny, Nicolas

    2016-10-18

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. It is still an open question when does the electron tunnel ionize and how long is the duration of tunneling. In this work we solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in one and two dimensions and use ab initio quantum calculations in order to answer these questions. Additionally, we determine the exit momentum of the tunnel ionized electron from first principles. We find out results that are different from the assumptions of the commonly employed two-step model, which assumes that the electron ionizes at the instant of electric field maximum with a zero momentum. After determining the quantum final momentum distribution of tunnel ionized electrons we show that the two-step model fails to predict the correct final momentum. Accordingly we suggest how to correct the two-step model. Furthermore, we determine the instant at which tunnel ionization starts, which turns out to be different from the instant usually assumed. From determining the instant at which it is most probable for the electron to enter the tunneling barrier and the instant at which it exits we determine the most probable time spent under the barrier. Moreover, we apply a quantum clock approach in order to determine the duration of tunnel ionization. From the quantum clock we determine an average tunneling time which is different in magnitude and origin with respect to the most probable tunneling time. By defining a probability distribution of tunneling times using virtual detectors we relate both methods and explain the apparent discrepancy. The results found have in general an effect on the interpretation of experiments that measure the spectra of tunnel ionized electrons, and specifically on the calibration of the so called attoclock experiments, because models with imprecise assumptions are usually employed in order to interpret experimental results.

  15. A Study of the Complexation of Mercury(II) with Dicysteinyl Tetrapeptides by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlo, Johanna; Ngu-Schwemlein, Maria

    2016-01-08

    In this study we evaluated a method for the characterization of complexes, formed in different relative ratios of mercury(II) to dicysteinyl tetrapeptide, by electrospray ionization orbitrap mass spectrometry. This strategy is based on previous successful characterization of mercury-dicysteinyl complexes involving tripeptides by utilizing mass spectrometry among other techniques. Mercury(II) chloride and a dicysteinyl tetrapeptide were incubated in a degassed buffered medium at varying stoichiometric ratios. The complexes formed were subsequently analyzed on an electrospray mass spectrometer consisting of a hybrid linear ion- and orbi- trap mass analyzer. The electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) spectra were acquired in the positive mode and the observed peaks were then analyzed for distinct mercury isotopic distribution patterns and associated monoisotopic peak. This work demonstrates that an accurate stoichiometry of mercury and peptide in the complexes formed under specified electrospray ionization conditions can be determined by using high resolution ESI MS based on distinct mercury isotopic distribution patterns.

  16. Field ionization characteristics of an ion source array for neutron generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargsten Johnson, B.; Schwoebel, P. R. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Resnick, P. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Holland, C. E. [SRI International, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Hertz, K. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Chichester, D. L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    A new deuterium ion source is being developed to improve the performance of existing compact neutron generators. The ion source is a microfabricated array of metal tips with an integrated gate (i.e., grid) and produces deuterium ions by field ionizing (or field desorbing) a supply of deuterium gas. Deuterium field ion currents from arrays at source temperatures of 77 K and 293 K are studied. Ion currents from single etched-wire tips operating under the same conditions are used to help understand array results. I-F characteristics of the arrays were found to follow trends similar to those of the better understood single etched-wire tip results; however, the fields achieved by the arrays are limited by electrical breakdown of the structure. Neutron production by field ionization at 293 K was demonstrated for the first time from microfabricated array structures with integrated gates.

  17. Field ionization characteristics of an ion source array for neutron generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Bargsten Johnson; P. R. Schwoebel; P. J. Resnick; C. E. Holland; L. Hertz; D. L. Chichester

    2013-11-01

    A new deuterium ion source is being developed to improve the performance of existing compact neutron generators. The ion source is a microfabricated array of metal tips with an integrated gate (i.e., grid) and produces deuterium ions by field ionizing (or field desorbing) a supply of deuterium gas. Deuterium field ion currents from arrays at source temperatures of 77?K and 293?K are studied. Ion currents from single etched-wire tips operating under the same conditions are used to help understand array results. I-F characteristics of the arrays were found to follow trends similar to those of the better understood single etched-wire tip results; however, the fields achieved by the arrays are limited by electrical breakdown of the structure. Neutron production by field ionization at 293?K was demonstrated for the first time from microfabricated array structures with integrated gates.

  18. Field ionization characteristics of an ion source array for neutron generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargsten Johnson, B.; Schwoebel, P. R.; Resnick, P. J.; Holland, C. E.; Hertz, K. L.; Chichester, D. L.

    2013-11-01

    A new deuterium ion source is being developed to improve the performance of existing compact neutron generators. The ion source is a microfabricated array of metal tips with an integrated gate (i.e., grid) and produces deuterium ions by field ionizing (or field desorbing) a supply of deuterium gas. Deuterium field ion currents from arrays at source temperatures of 77 K and 293 K are studied. Ion currents from single etched-wire tips operating under the same conditions are used to help understand array results. I-F characteristics of the arrays were found to follow trends similar to those of the better understood single etched-wire tip results; however, the fields achieved by the arrays are limited by electrical breakdown of the structure. Neutron production by field ionization at 293 K was demonstrated for the first time from microfabricated array structures with integrated gates.

  19. Detection and imaging of thermochromic ink compounds in erasable pens using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Amin; Prova, Shamina S; Bagga, Aafreen K; Yan Chi Ting, Michelle; Brar, Gurnoor; Ifa, Demian R

    2017-06-30

    Thermochromic ink pens are widely accessible worldwide and have gained popularity among the general public. These pens are very useful to undo mistakes while writing important documents or exams. They are also, however, misused in committing crimes such as counterfeiting checks or wills. Thus, the forensics community is in need of techniques that will allow these forgeries to be detected rapidly, reliably and conveniently. Thermochromic ink compounds were investigated using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) coupled with an LTQ mass spectrometer and Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis was conducted using Electrospray Ionization (ESI) coupled with an Orbitrap LTQ mass spectrometer performing Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) for identification of ink traces. Chemical marker ions characteristic of the state of ink (visible or invisible) were identified and mapped in ink traces by the use of DESI-MS imaging. These ions can be employed by forensic experts as fingerprint markers in forged documents. The marker ions were also characterised by conducting tandem mass spectrometry using paper spray in an Orbitrap LTQ mass spectrometer. Specific chemical components yielding ions of m/z 400, 405, 615 and 786 were distinguished as only being apparent in the invisible and reappeared state of the ink. The absence of these compounds in the original state of the ink enabled their recognition as useful chemical determinants in detecting forgery. DESI-MSI was thus shown to be a very useful, convenient and reliable technique for detecting forgery in paper documents due to its fast and reproducible mode of analysis, with no sample preparation and minimal damage to the document under investigation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Principles of hydrogen radical mediated peptide/protein fragmentation during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Daiki

    2016-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) is a very easy way to obtain large sequence tags and, thereby, reliable identification of peptides and proteins. Recently discovered new matrices have enhanced the MALDI-ISD yield and opened new research avenues. The use of reducing and oxidizing matrices for MALDI-ISD of peptides and proteins favors the production of fragmentation pathways involving "hydrogen-abundant" and "hydrogen-deficient" radical precursors, respectively. Since an oxidizing matrix provides information on peptide/protein sequences complementary to that obtained with a reducing matrix, MALDI-ISD employing both reducing and oxidizing matrices is a potentially useful strategy for de novo peptide sequencing. Moreover, a pseudo-MS(3) method provides sequence information about N- and C-terminus extremities in proteins and allows N- and C-terminal side fragments to be discriminated within the complex MALDI-ISD mass spectrum. The combination of high mass resolution of a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) analyzer and the software suitable for MALDI-ISD facilitates the interpretation of MALDI-ISD mass spectra. A deeper understanding of the MALDI-ISD process is necessary to fully exploit this method. Thus, this review focuses first on the mechanisms underlying MALDI-ISD processes, followed by a discussion of MALDI-ISD applications in the field of proteomics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 35:535-556, 2016.

  1. Atomic force microscope controlled topographical imaging and proximal probe thermal desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nanothermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed, and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 μm × 0.8 μm) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 μm × 2.0 μm), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  2. Strong-field ionization via high-order Coulomb corrected strong-field approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Klaiber, Michael; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Keitel, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    Signatures of the Coulomb corrections in the photoelectron momentum distribution during laser-induced ionization of atoms or ions in tunneling and multiphoton regimes are investigated analytically in the case of an one-dimensional problem. High-order Coulomb corrected strong-field approximation is applied, where the exact continuum state in the S-matrix is approximated by the eikonal Coulomb-Volkov state including the second-order corrections to the eikonal. Although, without high-order corrections our theory coincides with the known analytical R-matrix (ARM) theory, we propose a simplified procedure for the matrix element derivation. Rather than matching the eikonal Coulomb-Volkov wave function with the bound state as in the ARM-theory to remove the Coulomb singularity, we calculate the matrix element via the saddle-point integration method as by time as well as by coordinate, and in this way avoiding the Coulomb singularity. The momentum shift in the photoelectron momentum distribution with respect to the A...

  3. Interaction Between Cytochrome c and the Hapten 2,4-Dinitro-fluorobenzene by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Chu, Yan-qiu; Dai, Zhao-yun; Ding, Chuan-fan

    2008-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which results from skin exposure to low molecular weight chemicals such as haptens. To clarify the pathogenic mechanism, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange, as well as UV spectroscopy, were applied to determine the interaction between the model protein cytochrome c (cyt c) and the hapten 2,4-dinitro-fluorobenzene (DNFB). The ESI-MS results demonstrate that the conformation of cyt c can change from native folded state into partially unfolded state with the increase of DNFB. The equilibrium state H/D exchange followed by ESI-MS further confirms the above results. UV spectroscopy indicates that the strong-field coordination between iron of heme (prosthetic group) and His18 or Met80 of cyt c is not obviously affected by the hapten.

  4. Interaction Between Cytochrome c and the Hapten 2,4-Dinitro-fluorobenzene by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Wu; Yan-qiu Chu; Zhao-yun Dai; Chuan-fan Ding

    2008-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which results from skin exposure to low molecular weight chemicals such as haptens. To clarify the pathogenic mechanism, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange, as well as UV spectroscopy, were applied to determine the interaction between the model protein cytochrome c (cyt c) and the hapten 2,4- dinitro-fluorobenzene (DNFB). The ESI-MS results demonstrate that the conformation of cyt c can change from native folded state into partially unfolded state with the increase of DNFB. The equilibrium state H/D exchange followed by ESI-MS further confirms the above results. UV spectroscopy indicates that the strong- field coordination between iron of heme (prosthetic group) and Hisl8 or Met80 of cyt c is not obviously affected by the hapten.

  5. Ehrenfest's theorem and the validity of the two-step model for strong-field ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shvetsov-Shilovskiy, Nikolay; Dimitrovski, Darko; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    By comparison with the solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation we explore the validity of the two-step semiclassical model for strong-field ionization in elliptically polarized laser pulses. We find that the discrepancy between the two-step model and the quantum theory correlates...

  6. Single photon ionization and chemical ionization combined ion source based on a vacuum ultraviolet lamp for orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Wu, Qinghao; Hou, Keyong; Cui, Huapeng; Chen, Ping; Wang, Weiguo; Li, Jinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2011-07-01

    A novel combined ion source based on a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp with both single photon ionization (SPI) and chemical ionization (CI) capabilities has been developed for an orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer (oaTOFMS). The SPI was accomplished using a commercial 10.6 eV krypton discharge lamp with a photon flux of about 10(11) photons s(-1), while the CI was achieved through ion-molecule reactions with O(2)(+) reactant ions generated by photoelectron ionization at medium vacuum pressure (MVP). To achieve high ionization efficiency, the ion source pressure was elevated to 0.3 mbar and the photoionization length was extended to 36 mm. As a result, limits of detection (LODs) down to 3, 4, and 6 ppbv were obtained for benzene, toluene, and p-xylene in MVP-SPI mode, and values of 8 and 10 ppbv were obtained for toluene and chloroform, respectively, in SPI-CI mode. As it is feasible to switch between MVP-SPI mode and SPI-CI mode rapidly, this system is capable of monitoring complex organic mixtures with a wide range of ionization energies (IEs). The analytical capacity of this system was demonstrated by measuring dehydrogenation products of long-chain paraffins to olefins through direct capillary sampling and drinking water disinfection byproducts from chlorine through a membrane interface.

  7. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  8. Optical field ionization of atoms and ions using ultrashort laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittinghoff, D.N.

    1993-12-01

    This dissertation research is an investigation of the strong optical field ionization of atoms and ions by 120-fs, 614-run laser pulses and 130-fs, 800-nm laser pulses. The experiments have shown ionization that is enhanced above the predictions of sequential tunneling models for He{sup +2}, Ne{sup +2} and Ar{sup +2}. The ion yields for He{sup +l}, Ne{sup +l} and Ar{sup +l} agree well with the theoretical predictions of optical tunneling models. Investigation of the polarization dependence of the ionization indicates that the enhancements are consistent with a nonsequential ionization mechanism in which the linearly polarized field drives the electron wavefunction back toward the ion core and causes double ionization through inelastic e-2e scattering. These investigations have initiated a number of other studies by other groups and are of current scientific interest in the fields of high-irradiance laser-matter interactions and production of high-density plasmas. This work involved: (1) Understanding the characteristic nature of the ion yields produced by tunneling ionization through investigation of analytic solutions for tunneling at optical frequencies. (2) Extensive characterization of the pulses produced by 614-nm and 800-ran ultrashort pulse lasers. Absolute calibration of the irradiance scale produced shows the practicality of the inverse problem--measuring peak laser irradiance using ion yields. (3) Measuring the ion yields for three noble gases using linear, circular and elliptical polarizations of laser pulses at 614-nm and 800-nm. The measurements are some of the first measurements for pulse widths as low as 120-fs.

  9. Isobutane Made Practical as a Reagent Gas for Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, G. Asher; Steinkamp, F. Lucus; Giordano, Braden C.

    2016-11-01

    As a reagent gas for positive- and negative-mode chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS), isobutane ( i-C4H10) produces superior analyte signal abundance to methane. Isobutane has never been widely adopted for CI-MS because it fouls the ion source more rapidly and produces positive CI spectra that are more strongly dependent on reagent gas pressure compared with methane. Isobutane was diluted to various concentrations in argon for use as a reagent gas with an unmodified commercial gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Analyte spectra were directly compared using methane, isobutane, and isobutane/argon mixtures. A mixture of 10% i-C4H10 in argon produced twice the positive-mode analyte signal of methane, equal to pure isobutane, and reduced spectral dependence on reagent gas pressure. Electron capture negative chemical ionization using 1% i-C4H10 in argon tripled analyte signal compared with methane and was reproducible, unlike pure isobutane. The operative lifetime of the ion source using isobutane/argon mixtures was extended exponentially compared with pure isobutane, producing stable and reproducible CI signal throughout. By diluting the reagent gas in an inert buffer gas, isobutane CI-MS experiments were made as practical to use as methane CI-MS experiments but with superior analytical performance.

  10. Revisiting the quantitative features of surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Yi; Lee, Kai-Chieh; Kuo, Yen-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-10-28

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) is frequently used to analyse small organics owing to its clean background. Inorganic materials can be used as energy absorbers and the transfer medium to facilitate the desorption/ionization of analytes; thus, they are used as SALDI-assisting materials. Many studies have demonstrated the usefulness of SALDI-MS in quantitative analysis of small organics. However, some characteristics occurring in SALDI-MS require certain attention to ensure the reliability of the quantitative analysis results. The appearance of a coffee-ring effect in SALDI sample preparation is the primary factor that can affect quantitative SALDI-MS analysis results. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports relating to quantitative SALDI-MS analysis that discuss or consider this effect. In this study, the coffee-ring effect is discussed using nanoparticles and nanostructured substrates as SALDI-assisting materials to show how this effect influences SALDI-MS analysis results. Potential solutions for overcoming the existing problems are also suggested.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  11. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Gregory T.; Wilhide, Joshua A.; LaCourse, William R.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  12. Thin layer chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for direct analysis of raw samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Xin, Gui-zhong; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2015-10-09

    Conventional mass spectrometric analysis of raw samples commonly requires sample pretreatment and chromatographic separation using high performance liquid chromatography or gas chromatography, which could be time-consuming and laborious. In this study, thin layer chromatography (TLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was developed for direct analysis of raw samples. The sorbent material of the TLC plate was found to be able to retain the interfering compounds and allow interested analytes to be extracted, ionized and detected by ESI-MS with much reduced matrix interference. Our results showed that this method could be effectively applied in direct analysis of samples containing common interfering compounds, e.g., salts and detergents, and rapid detection and quantitation of target analytes in raw samples. Offline and online separation and detection of different components in mixture samples, e.g., plant extracts, using TLC-ESI-MS were also demonstrated. Overall, this study revealed that TLC-ESI-MS could be a simple, rapid and efficient method for analysis of raw samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  14. Fast Screening of Chicken Egg Lysozyme in White Wine Products by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-quan; JIANG Jie; LI Ming; ZHAO Zhan-feng; FU Jun

    2012-01-01

    Fast detection of trace lysozyme,one of the most important food allergens in white wine samples,was achieved by extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry without sample pretreatment in this study.The multiply-charged ions of m/z 1587 were chosen for the quantitative detection of lysozyme in white wine,showing linear dynamic signal responses in a range of 5-75 μg/mL with a linearity coefficient of 0.999 and an acceptable relative standard deviation(RSD)of 8.0%-15.0% for directly measuring lysozyme in the complex food samples.The limit of detection for lysozyme in white wine sample was calculated to be 5 μg/mL,which was lower than the amounts that can provoke allergic reactions(oral test with 3 mg or labial test with 1 mg/mL).A single sample analysis was completed within 1 min.The data demonstrate that extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is a useful tool for fast screening lysozyme in the complex matrix,showing promising application in the rapid detection of food allergen.

  15. Chemical derivatization for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. 1. Alkyl halides, alcohols, phenols, thiols, and amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirke, J.M.E.; Adams, C.L.; Van Berkel, G.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1994-04-15

    Derivatization strategies and specific derivatization reactions for conversion of simple alkyl halides, alcohols, phenols, thiols, and amines to ionic or solution-ionizable derivatives, that is [open quotes]electrospray active[close quotes] (ES-active) forms of the analyte, are presented. Use of these reactions allows detection of analytes among those listed that are not normally amenable to analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ES-MS). In addition, these reactions provide for analysis specificity and flexibility through functional group specific derivatization and through the formation of derivatives that can be detected in positive ion or in negative ion mode. For a few of the functional groups, amphoteric derivatives are formed that can be analyzed in either positive or negative ion modes. General synthetic strategies for transformation of members of these five compound classes to ES-active species are presented along with illustrative examples of suitable derivatives. Selected derivatives were prepared using model compounds and the ES mass spectra obtained for these derivatives are discussed. The analytical utility of derivatization for ES-MS analysis is illustrated in three experiments: (1) specific detection of the major secondary alcohol in oil of peppermint, (2) selective detection of phenols within a synthetic mixture of phenols, and (3) identification of the medicinal amines within a commercially available cold medication as primary, secondary or tertiary. 65 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Desorption ElectroSpray Ionization - Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry of synthetic polymers and copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friia, Manel; Legros, Véronique; Tortajada, Jeanine; Buchmann, William

    2012-08-01

    Desorption ElectroSpray Ionization (DESI) - Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry (MS) was evaluated as a new tool for the characterization of various industrial synthetic polymers (poly(ethylene glycol), poly(propylene glycol), poly(methylmethacrylate), poly(dimethylsiloxane)) and copolymers, with masses ranging from 500 g.mol(-1) up to more than 20 000 g.mol(-1) . Satisfying results in terms of signal stability and sensitivity were obtained from hydrophobic surfaces (HTC Prosolia) with a mixture water/methanol (10/90) as spray solvent in the presence of sodium salt. Taking into account the formation of multiplied charged species by DESI-MS, a strategy based on the use of a deconvolution software followed by the automatic assignment of the ions was described allowing the rapid determination of M(n) , M(w) and PDI values. DESI-Orbitrap MS results were compared to those obtained from matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization- time-of-flight MS and gel permeation chromatography. An application of DESI-Orbitrap MS for the detection and identification of polymers directly from cosmetics was described. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rondo, L.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosolnucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detectionof gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased inthe presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was setup at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection ofH2SO4in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time inthe CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF(Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutralsulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presenceof dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS...

  18. Direct quantitation of peptide mixtures without standards using clusters formed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Ryan D; Flick, Tawnya G; Williams, Evan R

    2009-05-15

    In electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, ion abundances depend on a number of different factors, including analyte surface activity, competition between analytes for charge, analyte concentration, as well as instrumental factors, including mass-dependent ion transmission and detection. Here, a novel method for obtaining quantitative information about solution-phase concentrations of peptide mixtures is described and demonstrated for five different peptide mixtures with relative concentrations ranging from 0.05% to 50%. In this method, the abundances of large clusters containing anywhere from 0 to 13 impurity molecules are measured and directly related to the relative solution-phase concentration of the peptides. For clusters containing approximately 15 or more peptides, the composition of the clusters approaches the statistical value indicating that these clusters are formed nonspecifically and that any differences in ion detection or ionization efficiency are negligible at these large cluster sizes. This method is accurate to within approximately 20% or better, even when the relative ion intensities of the protonated monomers can differ by over an order of magnitude compared to their solution-phase concentrations. Although less accurate than other quantitation methods that employ internal standards, this method does have the key advantages of speed, simplicity, and the ability to quantitate components in solution even when the identities of the components are unknown.

  19. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric studies on the characteristic fragmentation of Asp/cyclen conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunying; Li, Chao; Luan, Xingrong; Zhang, Jin; Qiao, Renzhong; Zhao, Yufen

    2014-03-30

    Differentiation and structural characterization of Asp/cyclen conjugates by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) are significantly important for their biomedical application. Hence, the present study is conducted. The fragmentations of Asp/cyclen conjugates generated by positive ion mode electrospray ionization were examined here by low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). ESI-MS(n) spectra of cyclen were acquired to confirm cyclen contraction products derived from the studied compounds. The fragments derived from the Asp/cyclen conjugates were proved by deuterium-exchange experiments. Asp/cyclen conjugates displayed characteristic dissociation pathways, including cleavages of amide bonds, loss of NH3 and cyclen contraction pathways. It was observed that cleavages of C-terminal amide bonds generated b2 and b2  + H2O ions from the protonated CyclenAspAspAsp and a b1  + H2O ion from the protonated CyclenAspAsp. In addition, various cyclen contraction products were also observed. In ESI-MS(n) spectra of studied compounds, fragments of bn-1  + H2O or cyclic anhydride were generated due to facile mobilization of C-terminal or side-chain COOH protons. In addition, the cyclen contraction products were detected. These results might provide sufficient information for the identification of Asp/cyclen conjugates by mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Rapid level-3 characterization of therapeutic antibodies by capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Clarence; Gallegos-Perez, Jose-Luis; Fonslow, Bryan; Lies, Mark; Guttman, Andras

    2015-03-01

    With the increase of the number of approved protein therapeutics in the market, comprehensive and reproducible characterization of these new generation drugs is crucial for the biopharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies. One of the largest groups of biotherapeutics is monoclonal antibodies (mABs) possessing various posttranslational modifications and potential degradation hotspots during the manufacturing process that may affect efficacy and immunogenicity. The exceptionally high separation power of capillary electrophoresis (CE) in conjunction with mass spectrometry fulfills Level-3 characterization requirements necessary to reveal such modifications and degradations. In this paper, a comprehensive characterization example will be given for a representative mAB Trastuzumab (Herceptin), illustrating the benefits of the integration of CE and electrospray ionization in a unified bioanalytical process coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry. Peptides separated in a wide size range (3-65 amino acids) were identified with 100% sequence coverage and quantified, including degradative hotspots such as glutamic acid cyclization, methionine oxidation, aspargine deamidation and C-terminal lysine heterogeneity using only 100 fmol of a single protease digest sample. The low flow rate of the system (>20 nL/min) ensured maximized ionization efficiency and dramatically reduced ion suppression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Ammonium Ion Exchanged Zeolite for Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Phosphorylated Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengrui Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA, an organic matrix molecule for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, was adsorbed to NH4+-type zeolite surface, and this new matrix was used for the detection of low-molecular-weight compounds. It was found that this matrix could simplify the mass spectrum in the low-molecular-weight region and prevent interference from fragments and alkali metal ion adducted species. CHCA adsorbed to NH4+-type ZSM5 zeolite (CHCA/NH4ZSM5 was used to measure atropine and aconitine, two toxic alkaloids in plants. In addition, CHCA/NH4ZSM5 enabled us to detect phosphorylated peptides; peaks of the protonated peptides had higher intensities than the peaks observed using CHCA only.

  2. Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometric characterization of Harpagophytum in equine urine and plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Cyril; Garcia, Patrice; Popot, Marie-Agnès; Bonnaire, Yves; Bouchonnet, Stéphane

    2006-01-01

    A method has been developed for the analysis and characterization in equine urine and plasma of iridoid glycosides: harpagide, harpagoside and 8-para-coumaroyl harpagide, which are the main active principles of Harpagophytum, a plant with antiinflammatory properties. The method involves liquid chromatography coupled with positive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The addition of sodium or lithium chloride instead of formic acid in the eluting solvent has been studied in order to enhance the signal and to modify the ion's internal energy. Fragmentation pathways and associated patterns are proposed for each analyte. A comparison of three types of mass spectrometer: a 3D ion trap, a triple quadrupole and a linear ion trap, has been conducted. The 3D ion trap was selected for drug screening analysis whereas the linear ion trap was retained for identification and quantitation analysis.

  3. Development of a Compact Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Trace Element Analysis of Potassium

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Minowa, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    A compact resonance ionization mass spectrometer is developed using two laser diodes and a quadrupole mass spectrometer to perform trace element analysis of potassium. With the help of a narrow linewidth of the laser diode, the isotope shifts of $^{40}{\\rm K}$ and $^{41}{\\rm K}$ of the 405~nm line with respect to $^{39}{\\rm K}$, corresponding to the transition of $4\\,^2$S$_{1/2}\\rightarrow$ $5\\,^2$P$^\\circ_{1/2}$, are measured to be $207\\pm13$~MHz and $451\\pm10$~MHz, respectively, by comparing them to the known hyperfine splitting widths of the $4\\,^2{\\rm S}_{1/2}$ ground state of each potassium isotope. The overall detection efficiency of an order of $\\sim10^{-6}$ in our setup indicates the availability of RIMS to the analysis of the trace metal impurities on or in a certain material such as the contamination assessment of semiconductor wafers.

  4. Direct imaging of plant metabolites in leaves and petals by Desorption Electrospray Ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Hansen, Steen Honore'; Janfelt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Publication date: Available online 24 April 2013 Source:International Journal of Mass Spectrometry Author(s): Bin Li , Steen Honoré Hansen , Christian Janfelt Two different approaches to direct imaging of plant material with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry are presented...... and demonstrated on leaves and petals of Hypericum perforatum. The direct imaging approaches are in contrast to previous DESI imaging studies where indirect analysis via imprints were used in order to overcome the morphological barrier presented by the layer of cuticular waxes covering the surface of a leaf...... or a petal. In order to enable direct imaging of such plant materials, a new ternary solvent system is introduced, providing a higher and more stable signal from soft plant materials than the binary solvent systems typically used in DESI. With this ternary solvent system, it was possible to image a number...

  5. The field white dwarf mass distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Cummings, J.; Kalirai, J. S.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Gentile-Fusillo, N.; Raddi, R.

    2016-09-01

    We revisit the properties and astrophysical implications of the field white dwarf mass distribution in preparation of Gaia applications. Our study is based on the two samples with the best established completeness and most precise atmospheric parameters, the volume-complete survey within 20 pc and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) magnitude-limited sample. We explore the modelling of the observed mass distributions with Monte Carlo simulations, but find that it is difficult to constrain independently the initial mass function (IMF), the initial-to-final-mass relation (IFMR), the stellar formation history (SFH), the variation of the Galactic disc vertical scale height as a function of stellar age, and binary evolution. Each of these input ingredients has a moderate effect on the predicted mass distributions, and we must also take into account biases owing to unidentified faint objects (20 pc sample), as well as unknown masses for magnetic white dwarfs and spectroscopic calibration issues (SDSS sample). Nevertheless, we find that fixed standard assumptions for the above parameters result in predicted mean masses that are in good qualitative agreement with the observed values. It suggests that derived masses for both studied samples are consistent with our current knowledge of stellar and Galactic evolution. Our simulations overpredict by 40-50 per cent the number of massive white dwarfs (M > 0.75 M⊙) for both surveys, although we can not exclude a Salpeter IMF when we account for all biases. Furthermore, we find no evidence of a population of double white dwarf mergers in the observed mass distributions.

  6. Spectroscopic analysis of high electric field enhanced ionization in laser filaments in air for corona guiding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingxia Wei; Yaoxiang Liu; Tie-Jun Wang; Na Chen; Jingjing Ju; Yonghong Liu; Haiyi Sun; Cheng Wang; Jiansheng Liu; Haihe Lu; See Leang Chin; Ruxin Li

    2016-01-01

    We report on a systematic experimental study on the fluorescence spectra produced from a femtosecond laser filament in air under a high electric field. The electric field alone was strong enough to create corona discharge(CD). Fluorescence spectra from neutral and ionic air molecules were measured and compared with pure high-voltage CD and pure laser filamentation(FIL). Among them, high electric field assisted laser FIL produced nitrogen fluorescence more efficiently than either pure CD or pure FIL processes. The nonlinear enhancement of fluorescence from the interaction of the laser filament and corona discharging electric field resulted in a more efficient ionization along the laser filament zone, which was confirmed by the spectroscopic measurement of both ionization-induced fluorescence and plasma-scattered 800 nm laser pulses. This is believed to be the key precursor process for filament-guided discharge.

  7. Studying the universality of field induced tunnel ionization times via high-order harmonic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Soifer, Hadas; Negro, Matteo; Devetta, Michele; Faccialà, Davide; Vozzi, Caterina; de Silvestri, Sandro; Stagira, Salvatore; Dudovich, Nirit

    2014-01-01

    High-harmonics generation spectroscopy is a promising tool for resolving electron dynamics and structure in atomic and molecular systems. This scheme, commonly described by the strong field approximation, requires a deep insight into the basic mechanism that leads to the harmonics generation. Recently, we have demonstrated the ability to resolve the first stage of the process -- field induced tunnel ionization -- by adding a weak perturbation to the strong fundamental field. Here we generalize this approach and show that the assumptions behind the strong field approximation are valid over a wide range of tunnel ionization conditions. Performing a systematic study -- modifying the fundamental wavelength, intensity and atomic system -- we observed a good agreement with quantum path analysis over a range of Keldysh parameters. The generality of this scheme opens new perspectives in high harmonics spectroscopy, holding the potential of probing large, complex molecular systems.

  8. Strong field dissociative ionization of the D2+: Nuclear wave packet analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, A.; Borbély, S.; Halász, G. J.; Vibók, Á.

    2017-09-01

    Theoretical ab initio investigation of strong field dissociative ionization of the D2+ molecule in the multiphoton regime is reported. The dynamics is initiated by ultrashort laser pulses for fixed molecular axis orientations. Nuclear wave packet calculations are performed to provide the joint energy spectra (JES): ionization-dissociation probability density via electron (Ee) and nuclear (En) kinetic energy. Analyzing the time-dependent nuclear wave packet densities we have successfully identified the exact path followed by the D2+ target for each multiphoton peak.

  9. Total ionizing dose effects in multiple-gate field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillardin, Marc; Marcandella, Claude; Martinez, Martial; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Richard, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    This paper focuses on total ionizing dose (TID) effects induced in multiple-gate field-effect transistors. The impact of device architecture, geometry and scaling on the TID response of multiple-gate transistors is reviewed in both bulk and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies. These innovating devices exhibit specific ionizing dose responses which strongly depend on their three-dimensional nature. Their TID responses may look like the one usually observed in planar two-dimensional bulk or SOI transistors, but multiple-gate devices can also behave like any other CMOS device.

  10. A new approach for strong-field ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, V D

    2016-01-01

    A model describing the electronic transitions in an atom subject to a strong high frequency laser pulse is proposed in the velocity gauge. The model accounts for the initial state coupling with the the remaining discrete and continuum spectra. Continuum-continuum transitions are also taken into account following well known strong-field approximation. A single integro-differential equation for the initial state amplitude has been obtained. Exact numerical solutions of this equation are computed and compared with the full time dependent Schr{\\"o}dinger equation solution for Hydrogen atoms. The initial state amplitude is well described by two versions of the model: with and without the continuum-continuum coupling model. However the electron energy spectrum is only well described when the model accounts for the coupling between continuum states. Improvement on SFA arise from using Coulomb final wave function as well as regarding the initial state probability depletion.

  11. Real time monitoring of accelerated chemical reactions by ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hsuan; Lo, Ta-Ju; Kuo, Fang-Yin; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonication has been used to accelerate chemical reactions. It would be ideal if ultrasonication-assisted chemical reactions could be monitored by suitable detection tools such as mass spectrometry in real time. It would be helpful to clarify reaction intermediates/products and to have a better understanding of reaction mechanism. In this work, we developed a system for ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry (UASI-MS) with an ~1.7 MHz ultrasonic transducer to monitor chemical reactions in real time. We demonstrated that simply depositing a sample solution on the MHz-based ultrasonic transducer, which was placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, the analyte signals can be readily detected by the mass spectrometer. Singly and multiply charged ions from small and large molecules, respectively, can be observed in the UASI mass spectra. Furthermore, the ultrasonic transducer used in the UASI setup accelerates the chemical reactions while being monitored via UASI-MS. The feasibility of using this approach for real-time acceleration/monitoring of chemical reactions was demonstrated. The reactions of Girard T reagent and hydroxylamine with steroids were used as the model reactions. Upon the deposition of reactant solutions on the ultrasonic transducer, the intermediate/product ions are readily generated and instantaneously monitored using MS within 1 s. Additionally, we also showed the possibility of using this reactive UASI-MS approach to assist the confirmation of trace steroids from complex urine samples by monitoring the generation of the product ions.

  12. Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI Mass Spectrometric Imaging of the Distribution of Rohitukine in the Seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. F.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Mohana Kumara

    Full Text Available Ambient ionization mass spectrometric imaging of all parts of the seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. f (Meliaceae was performed to reconstruct the molecular distribution of rohitukine (Rh and related compounds. The species accumulates Rh, a prominent chromone alkaloid, in its seeds, fruits, and stem bark. Rh possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and immuno-modulatory properties. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI MSI and electrospray ionization (ESI tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS analysis detected Rh as well as its glycosylated, acetylated, oxidized, and methoxylated analogues. Rh was predominantly distributed in the main roots, collar region of the stem, and young leaves. In the stem and roots, Rh was primarily restricted to the cortex region. The identities of the metabolites were assigned based on both the fragmentation patterns and exact mass analyses. We discuss these results, with specific reference to the possible pathways of Rh biosynthesis and translocation during seedling development in D. binectariferum.

  13. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Hans G.J.; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS

  14. Application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization to on-line aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stowers, M.A.; Wuijckhuijse, A.L. van; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.; Baar, B.L.M. van; Kientz, Ch.E.

    2000-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectra were obtained from single biological aerosol particles using an aerosol time-of- flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS). The inlet to the ATOFMS was coupled with an evaporation/condensation flow cell that allowed the aerosol to be coated wi

  15. Field ionization of high-Rydberg fragments produced after inner-shell photoexcitation and photoionization of the methane molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, A.; Sankari, A.; Kettunen, J. A.; Strâhlman, C.; Álvarez Ruiz, J.; Richter, R.

    2015-09-01

    We have studied the production of neutral high-Rydberg (HR) fragments from the CH4 molecule at the C 1s → 3p excitation and at the C 1s ionization threshold. Neutral fragments in HR states were ionized using a pulsed electric field and the resulting ions were mass-analyzed using an ion time-of-flight spectrometer. The atomic fragments C(HR) and H(HR) dominated the spectra, but molecular fragments CHx(HR), x = 1-3, and H2(HR) were also observed. The production of HR fragments is attributed to dissociation of CH4+ and CH42+ ions in HR states. Just above the C 1s ionization threshold, such molecular ionic states are created when the C 1s photoelectron is recaptured after single or double Auger decay. Similar HR states may be reached directly following resonant Auger decay at the C 1s → 3p resonance. The energies and geometries of the parent and fragment ions have been calculated in order to gain insight into relevant dissociation pathways.

  16. Field ionization of high-Rydberg fragments produced after inner-shell photoexcitation and photoionization of the methane molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivimäki, A., E-mail: kivimaki@iom.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche–Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Sankari, A. [Department of Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Kettunen, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Stråhlman, C. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Álvarez Ruiz, J. [Colegio Los Naranjos, Fuenlabrada, 28941 Madrid (Spain); Richter, R. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-09-21

    We have studied the production of neutral high-Rydberg (HR) fragments from the CH{sub 4} molecule at the C 1s → 3p excitation and at the C 1s ionization threshold. Neutral fragments in HR states were ionized using a pulsed electric field and the resulting ions were mass-analyzed using an ion time-of-flight spectrometer. The atomic fragments C(HR) and H(HR) dominated the spectra, but molecular fragments CH{sub x}(HR), x = 1-3, and H{sub 2}(HR) were also observed. The production of HR fragments is attributed to dissociation of CH{sub 4}{sup +} and CH{sub 4}{sup 2+} ions in HR states. Just above the C 1s ionization threshold, such molecular ionic states are created when the C 1s photoelectron is recaptured after single or double Auger decay. Similar HR states may be reached directly following resonant Auger decay at the C 1s → 3p resonance. The energies and geometries of the parent and fragment ions have been calculated in order to gain insight into relevant dissociation pathways.

  17. Nonadiabatic dynamics and multiphoton resonances in strong field molecular ionization with few cycle laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliamonti, Vincent; Zhao, Arthur; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Marquetand, Philipp; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We study strong field molecular ionization using few- (four to ten) cycle laser pulses. Employing a supercontinuum light source, we are able to tune the optical laser wavelength (photon energy) over a range of about $\\sim$200 nm (500 meV). We measure the photoelectron spectrum for a series of different molecules as a function of laser intensity, frequency, and bandwidth and illustrate how the ionization dynamics vary with these parameters. We find that multiphoton resonances and nonadiabatic dynamics (internal conversion) play an important role and result in ionization to different ionic continua. Interestingly, while nuclear dynamics can be "frozen" for sufficiently short laser pulses, we find that resonances strongly influence the photoelectron spectrum and final cationic state of the molecule regardless of pulse duration -- even for pulses that are less than four cycles in duration.

  18. VUV excitation of a vibrational wavepacket in D2 measured through strong-field dissociative ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, A. R.; Harrington, J.; Kirrander, A.; Cacho, C.; Springate, E.; Bryan, W. A.; Minns, R. S.

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet pulses from a monochromated high harmonic generation source excite vibrational wavepackets in the {B}1{{{Σ }}}{{g}}+ state of D2. The wavepacket motion is measured through strong field ionization into bound and dissociative ion states yielding {{{D}}}2+ and D+ products. The time dependence of the {{{D}}}2+ and D+ ion signals provides a sensitive fingerprint of the quantum nuclear wavepacket, due to the different ionization rates for the two channels. The experiments are modelled with excitation and ionization processes included explicitly, with the results of the model showing a very good agreement with the experimental observations. The experiment demonstrates the level of detail attainable when studying ultrafast quantum nuclear dynamics using high harmonic sources.

  19. Pathways of the single and double ionization of H$_2$ in intense laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Sami, Firoozeh; Shokri, Babak

    2010-01-01

    The time dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger and Newton equations are solved simultaneously for the electrons and the nuclei of H$_2$ respectively. The electrons and nuclei dynamics is separated on the base of the adiabatic approximation. The soft-core potential is used to model the electrostatic interaction between the electrons and the nuclei. The high intensity ultrashort laser pulse is used in three different wavelengths, 390 nm, 532 nm and 780 nm and a sinus second order envelope function is used for all of laser fields. The distinguishable pathways and regions of the single and sequential double ionization are determined and discussed. It is shown that there are two distinguishable pathways for the single ionization and four distinct pathways for the sequential double ionization. It is also shown that there are two different regions which are related to the single ionization. Three different regions can also be recognized which are related to the double ionization. The bound-hardening is observed for the initial ...

  20. Coherent time evolution of highly excited Rydberg states in pulsed electric field Opening a stringent way to selectively field-ionize the highly excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Tada, M; Ogawa, I; Funahashi, H; Yamamoto, K; Matsuki, S

    2000-01-01

    Coherent time evolution of highly excited Rydberg states in Rb (98 < n < 150) under pulsed electric field in high slew-rate regime was investigated with the field ionization detection. The electric field necessary to ionize the Rydberg states was found to take discrete values successively depending on the slew rate. Specifically the slew-rate dependence of the ionization field varies with the quantum defect value of the states, i.e. with the energy position of the states relative to the adjacent manifold. This discrete transitional behavior of the ionization field observed for the first time is considered to be a manifestation of the strong coherence effect in the time evolution of the Rydberg states in pulsed electric field and opens a new effective way to stringently select a low-l state from the nearby states by field ionization.

  1. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  2. Improved strong-field approximation and quantum-orbit theory: Application to ionization by a bicircular laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošević, D. B.; Becker, W.

    2016-06-01

    A theory of above-threshold ionization of atoms by a strong laser field is formulated. Two versions of the strong-field approximation (SFA) are considered, the direct SFA and the improved SFA, which do not and do, respectively, take into account rescattering of the freed electron off the parent ion. The atomic bound state is included in two different ways: as an expansion in terms of Slater-type orbitals or as an asymptotic wave function. Even though we are using the single-active-electron approximation, multielectron effects are taken into account in two ways: by a proper choice of the ground state and by an adequate definition of the ionization rate. For the case of the asymptotic bound-state wave functions, using the saddle-point method, a simple expression for the T -matrix element is derived for both the direct and the improved SFA. The theory is applied to ionization by a bicircular field, which consists of two coplanar counterrotating circularly polarized components with frequencies that are integer multiples of a fundamental frequency ω . Special emphasis is on the ω -2 ω case. In this case, the threefold rotational symmetry of the field carries over to the velocity map of the liberated electrons, for both the direct and the improved SFA. The results obtained are analyzed in detail using the quantum-orbit formalism, which gives good physical insight into the above-threshold ionization process. For this purpose, a specific classification of the saddle-point solutions is introduced for both the backward-scattered and the forward-scattered electrons. The high-energy backward-scattering quantum orbits are similar to those discovered for high-order harmonic generation. The short forward-scattering quantum orbits for a bicircular field are similar to those of a linearly polarized field. The conclusion is that these orbits are universal, i.e., they do not depend much on the shape of the laser field.

  3. Clustering, methodology, and mechanistic insights into acetate chemical ionization using high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Patrick; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of cluster control and transmission through the Tofwerk atmospheric pressure interface installed on various chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometers using authentic standards. This characterization of the atmospheric pressure interface allows for a detailed investigation of the acetate chemical ionization mechanisms and the impact of controlling these mechanisms on sensitivity, selectivity, and mass spectral ambiguity with the aim of non-targeted analysis. Chemical ionization with acetate reagent ions is controlled by a distribution of reagent ion-neutral clusters that vary with relative humidity and the concentration of the acetic anhydride precursor. Deprotonated carboxylic acids are primarily detected only if sufficient declustering is employed inside the atmospheric pressure interface. The configuration of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS) using an acetate chemical ionization source for non-targeted analysis is discussed. Recent approaches and studies characterizing acetate chemical ionization as it applies to the HR-TOF-CIMS are evaluated in light of the work presented herein.

  4. Atmospheric-Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (APGC/MS/MS) an Alternative to High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) for the Determination of Dioxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bavel, Van Bert; Geng, Dawei; Cherta, Laura; Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Portolés, Tania; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Abad, Esteban; Dunstan, Jody; Jones, Rhys; Kotz, Alexander; Winterhalter, Helmut; Malisch, Rainer; Traag, Wim; Hagberg, Jessika; Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid; Beltran, Joaquim; Hernández, Félix

    2015-01-01

    The use of a new atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization source for gas chromatography (APGC) coupled with a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) system, as an alternative to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), for the determination of PCDDs/PCDFs is described. The potential of usin

  5. Enhanced capabilities for imaging gangliosides in murine brain with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled to ion mobility separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrášková, Karolina; Claude, Emmanuelle; Jones, Emrys A; Towers, Mark; Ellis, Shane R; Heeren, Ron M A

    2016-07-15

    The increased interest in lipidomics calls for improved yet simplified methods of lipid analysis. Over the past two decades, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been established as a powerful technique for the analysis of molecular distribution of a variety of compounds across tissue surfaces. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI is widely used to study the spatial distribution of common lipids. However, a thorough sample preparation and necessity of vacuum for efficient ionization might hamper its use for high-throughput lipid analysis. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is a relatively young MS technique. In DESI, ionization of molecules occurs under ambient conditions, which alleviates sample preparation. Moreover, DESI does not require the application of an external matrix, making the detection of low mass species more feasible due to the lack of chemical matrix background. However, irrespective of the ionization method, the final information obtained during an MSI experiment is very complex and its analysis becomes challenging. It was shown that coupling MSI to ion mobility separation (IMS) simplifies imaging data interpretation. Here we employed DESI and MALDI MSI for a lipidomic analysis of the murine brain using the same IMS-enabled instrument. We report for the first time on the DESI IMS-MSI of multiply sialylated ganglioside species, as well as their acetylated versions, which we detected directly from the murine brain tissue. We show that poly-sialylated gangliosides can be imaged as multiply charged ions using DESI, while they are clearly separated from the rest of the lipid classes based on their charge state using ion mobility. This represents a major improvement in MSI of intact fragile lipid species. We additionally show that complementary lipid information is reached under particular conditions when DESI is compared to MALDI MSI.

  6. Structural characterization of wax esters by electron ionization mass spectrometry[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanová, Klára; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Valterová, Irena; Háková, Martina; Cvacˇka, Josef

    2012-01-01

    The interpretation of the electron ionization mass spectra of straight-chain and methyl-branched saturated and unsaturated wax esters (WEs) is discussed in this study based on the spectra of 154 standards. The most important fragments indicative of the structure of the acid and alcohol chains are identified and summarized for WEs with various number of double bonds in the chains. Briefly, most WEs provide acylium ions allowing structural characterization of the acid part, whereas the alcohol part gives corresponding alkyl radical cations. The elemental composition of selected important fragments is established from a high-resolution accurate mass analysis. The ion abundances are discussed with respect to the length and unsaturation of the aliphatic chains. The interpretation of the spectra of branched or unsaturated WEs requires the recognition of small but important peaks that are difficult to discern among the other fragments. We demonstrate that such fragments are easily detected in differential mass spectra. This approach requires spectra of WE standards (e.g., straight-chain analogs in the case of branched WEs) recorded under the same experimental conditions. The WEs mass spectral database provided in the supplemental data can be used as a reference for the analysis of the GC/EI-MS data. PMID:22058425

  7. Structure-response relationship in electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of sartans by artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubović, Jelena; Birkemeyer, Claudia; Protić, Ana; Otašević, Biljana; Zečević, Mira

    2016-03-18

    Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) methods are based on the hypothesis that changes in the molecular structure are reflected in changes in the observed property of the molecule. Artificial neural network is a technique of data analysis, which sets out to emulate the human brain's way of working. For the first time a quantitative structure-response relationship in electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) by means of artificial neural networks (ANN) on the group of angiotensin II receptor antagonists--sartans has been established. The investigated descriptors correspond to different properties of the analytes: polarity (logP), ionizability (pKa), surface area (solvent excluded volume) and number of proton acceptors. The influence of the instrumental parameters: methanol content in mobile phase, mobile phase pH and flow rate was also examined. Best performance showed a multilayer perceptron network with the architecture 6-3-3-1, trained with backpropagation algorithm. It showed high prediction ability on the previously unseen (test) data set with a coefficient of determination of 0.994. High prediction ability of the model would enable prediction of ESI-MS responsiveness under different conditions. This is particularly important in the method development phase. Also, prediction of responsiveness can be important in case of gradient-elution LC-MS and LC-MS/MS methods in which instrumental conditions are varied during time. Polarity, chargeability and surface area all appeared to be crucial for electrospray ionization whereby signal intensity appeared to be the result of a simultaneous influence of the molecular descriptors and their interactions. Percentage of organic phase in the mobile phase showed a positive, while flow rate showed a negative impact on signal intensity.

  8. Low Mass Ions in Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry of 1-Methoxy-5-aminotetrazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Gyeong; Bae, Kwang Tae; Goh, Eun Mee; Bae, Se Won [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ik-Soo [Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The development of novel energetic molecules (EMs) with high power, good safety features, great chemical stability, and environmentally less harmful nature is of great interest in the satellite launcher, missile warhead, ammunition, and pyrotechnic researches. Recently, many researchers have focused on aromatic nitrogen heterocycles such as pyrazole, imidazole, triazole, tetrazole, and pentazole as promising candidates to replace the current EMs used in civilian and military applications. We performed MALDI and LDI experiments with energetic tetrazole derivatives which were of great interest for the application of high performance explosives and fast burning propellants. Particularly, LDI experiments provided low mass ion peaks from decomposition of MAT, which were useful to analyze decomposition mechanism of tetrazoles at TOF MS in high vacuum. The LDI experiments showed various decomposed ion products, which implied several decomposition mechanisms including the detachment of side function groups and the fragmentation of tetrazole ring. The high-level DFT calculations also supported the peaks obtained from LDI experiments.

  9. DC field response of one-dimensional flames using an ionized layer model

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-11-18

    We develop a simplified model to better explain electric current response when direct current (DC) is applied to a flame. In particular, different current responses have been observed by changing the polarity of the DC in a sub-saturated current regime that results from the presence of ions and electrons in the flame zone. A flame zone was modeled as a thin, ionized layer located in one-dimensional DC electric fields. We derived simplified model-governing equations from species equations by implementing mobility differences dependent on the type of charged particle, particularly between ions and electrons; we performed experiments to substantiate the model. Results showed that the sub-saturated current and local field intensity were significantly influenced by the polarity of the DC because of the combined effect of unequal mobility of charged particles and the position of the ionized layer in the gap relative to two electrodes. When an energized electrode is close to the ionized layer, applying a negative DC causes a more rapid increase in current than by applying a positive DC to the same electrode. Results from our experimental measurement of current using counterflow diffusion flames agreed qualitatively well with the model predictions. A sensitivity analysis using dimensional and non-dimensional parameters also supported the importance of the mobility difference and the relative location of the ionized layer on the electric current response.

  10. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effect in strong-field photoelectron holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaohong; Lin, Cheng; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C. D.; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back and scatters off the ion(the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to extract target information embedded in the collision process. Unlike conventional optical holography, however, propagation of the electron wave packet is affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. In addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. We showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the effect of nonadiabatic ionization is accounted for, and Coulomb potential can be neglected only in the tunnel ionization regime. Our results help paving the way for establishing photoelectron holography for probing spatial and dynamic properties of atoms and molecules.

  11. Search for efficient laser resonance ionization schemes of tantalum using a newly developed time-of-flight mass-spectrometer in KISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, M.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Jung, H. S.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Kimura, S.; Ozawa, A.; Jeong, S. C.; Sonoda, T.

    2016-06-01

    The technique of laser resonance ionization is employed for an element-selective ionization of multi-nucleon transfer reaction products which are stopped and neutralized in a gas cell filled with argon gas at 50 kPa. We have been searching for efficient laser ionization schemes for refractory elements of Z = 73-78 using a time-of-flight mass-spectrometer (TOF-MS) chamber. To evaluate the isotope shift and ionization efficiency for each candidate of the ionization scheme, isotope separation using the TOF-MS was devised. The TOF-MS was designed to separate the isotopes using two-stage linear acceleration with a mass resolving power M / ΔM of >350. A mass resolving power of 250 was experimentally confirmed by measuring the TOF of laser-ionized tantalum (Z = 73) ions with mass number 181. We searched for a laser resonance ionization scheme of tantalum using the TOF-MS.

  12. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: A Technique to Access the Information beyond the Molecular Weight of the Analyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibdas Banerjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Electrospray Ionization (ESI is a soft ionization technique extensively used for production of gas phase ions (without fragmentation of thermally labile large supramolecules. In the present review we have described the development of Electrospray Ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS during the last 25 years in the study of various properties of different types of biological molecules. There have been extensive studies on the mechanism of formation of charged gaseous species by the ESI. Several groups have investigated the origin and implications of the multiple charge states of proteins observed in the ESI-mass spectra of the proteins. The charged analytes produced by ESI can be fragmented by activating them in the gas-phase, and thus tandem mass spectrometry has been developed, which provides very important insights on the structural properties of the molecule. The review will highlight recent developments and emerging directions in this fascinating area of research.

  13. Analysis of boronic acids by nano liquid chromatography-direct electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flender, Cornelia; Leonhard, Peter; Wolf, Christian; Fritzsche, Matthias; Karas, Michael

    2010-05-15

    A new method, based on a direct-electron ionization (EI) interface, is presented for the analysis of compounds insufficiently amenable to usual MS methods. The instrumentation is composed of a nano liquid chromatograph (LC) and a mass spectrometer (MS) directly coupled by a transfer capillary. The eluent is directly introduced into the heated electron impact ion source of the MS. Significant advantages are the generation of reproducible spectra and the ability to ionize highly polar compounds. Boronic acids are used as coupling reagents to produce drugs, agrochemicals, or herbicides. The purity of educts is of high importance because impurities in the educt are directly associated with impurities in the product. Because of their high polarity and tendency to form boroxines, boronic acids require derivatization for GC analysis. The presented nano-LC-EI/MS method is easily applicable for a broad range of boronic acids. The method shows good detection limits for boronic acids up to 200 pg, is perfectly linear, and shows a very high robustness and reproducibility. A mixture of compounds could easily be separated on a monolithic RP18e column. The method represents a new, simple, robust, and reproducible approach for the detection of polar analytes. It is a good candidate to become a standard method for industrial applications.

  14. Synthesis and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectra of N-(1,3,2-Dioxaphosphorinan-2-ylmethyl)thiophosphoramidates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO,Zhi-Wei; FU,Cui-Rong; WANG,Bin; CUI,Zhan-Wei; ZHANG,Jian-Feng; CHEN,Ru-Yu

    2007-01-01

    N-(1,3,2-Dioxaphosphorinan-2-ylmethyl) thiophosphoramidates were synthesized and determined by NMR spectra and positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The fragmentation pathways were investigated. The results show that these characteristic ions in ESI mass spectra are useful in the structural determination of N-(1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-2-ylmethyl)thiophosphoramidates.

  15. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some methylated xanthines and the laser desorption of caffeine and theophylline from thin layer chromatography plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption/laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and xanthine are reported. These mass spectra are compared with published spectra obtained using electron impact ionization. Mass spectra of caffeine and theophylline obtained by IR laser desorption from thin layer chromatography plates are also described. The laser desorption of materials from thin layer chromatography plates is discussed.

  16. Differentiation of flavonoid glycoside isomers by using metal complexation and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikulski, Michael; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2003-12-01

    The elucidation of flavonoid isomers is accomplished by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) via formation and collisional activated dissociation (CAD) of metal/flavonoid complexes containing an auxiliary ligand. Addition of a metal salt and a suitable neutral auxiliary ligand to flavonoids in solution results in the formation of [M(II) (flavonoid-H) ligand]+ complexes by ESI which, upon collisional activated dissociation, often result in more distinctive fragmentation patterns than observed for conventional protonated or deprotonated flavonoids. Previously, 2,2'-bipyridine was used as an auxiliary ligand, and now we compare and explore the use of alternative pyridyl ligands, including 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline. Using this technique, three groups of flavonoid glycoside isomers are differentiated, including glycosides of apigenin, quercetin, and luteolin.

  17. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry conformational analysis of isolated domains of an intrinsically disordered protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Lorenzo; Brocca, Stefania; Samalikova, Maria; Santambrogio, Carlo; Alberghina, Lilia; Grandori, Rita

    2011-01-01

    The highly dynamic and heterogeneous molecular ensembles characterizing intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) in solution pose major challenges to the conventional methods for structural analysis. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) allows direct detection of distinct conformational components, effectively capturing also partially folded and short-lived states. We report the description of two complementary fragments (1-186 and 187-284) of the IDP Sic1, a cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Structural heterogeneity is noted in both cases, but the two fragments reveal slightly different conformational properties. The results are consistent with previously reported differences between the two protein moieties and corroborate the feasibility of IDP conformational analysis by ESI-MS.

  18. Separation Techniques for Uranium and Plutonium at Trace Levels for the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Han, S. H.; Kim, J. G.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, W. H

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the state of the art and the progress of the chemical separation and purification techniques required for the thermal ionization mass spectrometric determination of uranium and plutonium in environmental samples at trace or ultratrace levels. Various techniques, such as precipitation, solvent extraction, extraction chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography, for separation of uranium and plutonium were evaluated. Sample preparation methods and dissolution techniques for environmental samples were also discussed. Especially, both extraction chromatographic and anion exchange chromatographic procedures for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples, such as soil, sediment, plant, seawater, urine, and bone ash were reviewed in detail in order to propose some suitable methods for the separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from the safeguards environmental or swipe samples. A survey of the IAEA strengthened safeguards system, the clean room facility of IAEA's NWAL(Network of Analytical Laboratories), and the analytical techniques for safeguards environmental samples was also discussed here.

  19. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  20. Ortho effect in electron ionization mass spectrometry of N-acylanilines bearing a proximal halo substituent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariwala, Freneil B; Figus, Margaret; Attygalle, Athula B

    2008-08-01

    Electron ionization (EI) mass spectra are not very helpful for characterizing ortho, meta, and para isomers of underivatized haloanilines since their spectra are virtually identical. In contrast, when the amino group of chloro-, bromo-, or iodoanilines is transformed to an N-formyl, N-acetyl, or N-benzoyl derivative, the spectra of the derivatives reveal a highly dramatic loss of a halogen radical, instead of an HX elimination usually expected from an "ortho effect." For example, the spectra of N-formyl, N-acetyl, and N-benzoyl derivatives of ortho isomers of chloro-, bromo-, and iodoanilines show a very prominent peak at m/z 120, 134, and 196, respectively, for the loss of the corresponding halogen atom.

  1. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) of actinides: Pushing the limits of accuracy and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, Stefan; Boulyga, Sergei; Cunningham, Alan; Klose, Dilani; Koepf, Andreas; Poths, Jane [Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Richter, Stephan [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, JRC-EU, Geel (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    New method developments in multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) for actinide isotope ratio analysis to improve accuracy and limits of detection will be presented. With respect to limits of detection, results on improving work function using various carbon additives will be reviewed and presented as well as developments in cavity ion source (as compared to standard flat ribbon filament ion source) for femto- and attogram levels of uranium, plutonium, and americium. With respect to accuracy, results on isotope ratio measurements of isotopes of uranium (relative accuracy of 0.3% to 0.01%) are presented with an example being U-234-Th-230 age-dating (NBL CRM 112-A). In this context, the importance of traceability (to the S.I. units) and the use of (certified) reference materials are emphasized. The focus of this presentation is on applications to nuclear safeguards / forensics.

  2. New methods and instrumentation for the characterization of biopolymers using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Rockwood, A.L.; Winger, B.E.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Goodlett, D.R.; Light-Wahl, K.J.

    1992-09-01

    The technique of electrospray ionization (ESI) has significantly extended the ability to characterize large molecules by mass spectrometry. Proteins to at least 200,000 D can be transferred intact to the gas phase and molecular weights determined with precisions as high as 0.001% if individual charge states can be resolved. The ESI-MS can also serve as a near ideal interface and detector for capillary column separations providing a basis for highly efficient sample utilization. Using capillary electrophoresis (CE)-MS, injection quantities in the 10[sup [minus]18] mole range can be detected for smaller polypeptides using selected ion monitoring, and separation efficiencies as high as 5[center dot]10[sup 5] theoretical plates have been realized. We have recently shown that the use of small 5 [mu]m i.d. capillaries allows CE-MS with scanning detection for proteins for injection of 600 attomoles.

  3. New methods and instrumentation for the characterization of biopolymers using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Rockwood, A.L.; Winger, B.E.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Goodlett, D.R.; Light-Wahl, K.J.

    1992-09-01

    The technique of electrospray ionization (ESI) has significantly extended the ability to characterize large molecules by mass spectrometry. Proteins to at least 200,000 D can be transferred intact to the gas phase and molecular weights determined with precisions as high as 0.001% if individual charge states can be resolved. The ESI-MS can also serve as a near ideal interface and detector for capillary column separations providing a basis for highly efficient sample utilization. Using capillary electrophoresis (CE)-MS, injection quantities in the 10{sup {minus}18} mole range can be detected for smaller polypeptides using selected ion monitoring, and separation efficiencies as high as 5{center_dot}10{sup 5} theoretical plates have been realized. We have recently shown that the use of small 5 {mu}m i.d. capillaries allows CE-MS with scanning detection for proteins for injection of 600 attomoles.

  4. Molecular identification of Mucorales in human tissues: contribution of PCR electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanio, A; Garcia-Hermoso, D; Mercier-Delarue, S; Lanternier, F; Gits-Muselli, M; Menotti, J; Denis, B; Bergeron, A; Legrand, M; Lortholary, O; Bretagne, S

    2015-06-01

    Molecular methods are crucial for mucormycosis diagnosis because cultures are frequently negative, even if microscopy suggests the presence of hyphae in tissues. We assessed PCR/electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) for Mucorales identification in 19 unfixed tissue samples from 13 patients with proven or probable mucormycosis and compared the results with culture, quantitative real-time PCR, 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer region (ITS PCR) and 18S PCR sequencing. Concordance with culture identification to both genus and species levels was higher for PCR/ESI-MS than for the other techniques. Thus, PCR/ESI-MS is suitable for Mucorales identification, within 6 hours, for tissue samples for which microscopy results suggest the presence of hyphae.

  5. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  6. Large Scale Nanoparticle Screening for Small Molecule Analysis in Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, Gargey B; Hansen, Rebecca L; Korte, Andrew R; Reichert, Malinda D; Vela, Javier; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-09-20

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as efficient matrixes for small molecule profiling and imaging by laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), but so far there has been no systematic study comparing different NPs in the analysis of various classes of small molecules. Here, we present a large scale screening of 13 NPs for the analysis of two dozen small metabolite molecules. Many NPs showed much higher LDI efficiency than organic matrixes in positive mode and some NPs showed comparable efficiencies for selected analytes in negative mode. Our results suggest that a thermally driven desorption process is a key factor for metal oxide NPs, but chemical interactions are also very important, especially for other NPs. The screening results provide a useful guideline for the selection of NPs in the LDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

  7. Screening of dimethoate in food by isotope dilution and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Fabio; Di Donna, Leonardo; Macchione, Barbara; Maiuolo, Loredana; Perri, Enzo; Sindona, Giovanni

    2009-05-01

    Crop control is an important issue in both developed and developing countries. An environmentally friendly approach is represented by the so-called Integrated Pest Management (IPM), whereby synthetic pesticides are only applied as a last resort, under the strict control of suitable experts. European and US regulatory authorities, such as the US EPA, are constantly assessing the risks of exposure to the organophosphate (OP) class of pesticides and, among these, specifically dimethoate. The use of dimethoate is still allowed in many crops, including olives, which once was based in the Mediterranean area but now is expanding rapidly throughout the world. An important aspect of IPM protocols is represented by the availability of reliable and sensitive methods to detect pesticides residues. This paper describes an isotope dilution dimethoate assay based on the application of electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) by means of a deuterium-labeled internal standard.

  8. Detection of histamine in beer by nano extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiuxiao; Li, Ming; Xiong, Xingchuang; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Ruifeng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, rapid quantitative detection of histamine in beer was achieved by using nano extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano EESI-MS) coupling with standard addition method. Based on the MS(2) experiment, histamine concentrations in three beer samples were determined to be 1.10 ± 0.12 µg/ml, 0.81 ± 0.09 µg/ml and 0.79 ± 0.09 µg/ml. The limit of detection for this method was calculated to be 0.02 µg/ml. These results show that this novel method can be used for direct, rapid and sensitive detection of histamine in beer without any tedious sample pretreatment.

  9. Direct Surface Analysis of Fungal Species by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, Nancy B.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wahl, Jon H.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Kingsley, Mark T.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wahl, Karen L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2001-12-01

    Intact spores and/or hyphae of Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus oryzae, Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). This study investigates various methods of sample preparation and matrices to determine optimum collection and analysis criteria for fungal analysis by MALDI-MS. Fungi are applied to the MALDI sample target as untreated, sonicated, acid/heat treated, or blotted directly from the fungal culture with double-stick tape. Ferulic acid or sinapinic acid matrix solution is layered over the dried samples and analyzed by MALDI-MS. Statistical analysis of the data show that simply using double stick tape to collect and transfer to a MALDI sample plate typically worked as well as the other preparation methods, but requires the least sample handling.

  10. Rapid separation of phosphopeptides by microchip electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollikainen, Elisa; Bonabi, Ashkan; Nordman, Nina; Jokinen, Ville; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto; Sikanen, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a significant biological process, but separation of phosphorylated peptide isomers is often challenging for many analytical techniques. We developed a microchip electrophoresis (MCE) method for rapid separation of phosphopeptides with on-chip electrospray ionization (ESI) facilitating online sample introduction to the mass spectrometer (MS). With the method, two monophosphorylated positional isomers of insulin receptor peptide (IR1A and IR1B) and a triply phosphorylated insulin receptor peptide (IR3), all with the same amino acid sequence, were separated from the nonphosphorylated peptide (IR0) in less than one minute. For efficient separation of the positional peptide isomers from each other derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyl reagents (either chloroformate, Fmoc-Cl, or N-succinimidyl carbonate, Fmoc-OSu) was required before the analysis. The derivatization improved not only the separation of the monophosphorylated positional peptide isomers in MCE, but also identification of the phosphorylation site based on MS/MS.

  11. Plasma lipid analysis by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonomura, Kazuhiro; Kudoh, Shinobu; Sato, Taka-Aki; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2015-06-01

    A novel method for the analysis of endogenous lipids and related compounds was developed employing hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with carbamoyl stationary phase achieved clear separation of phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, ceramide, and mono-hexsosyl ceramide groups with good peak area repeatability (RSD% 0.99). The established method was applied to human plasma assays and a total of 117 endogenous lipids were successfully detected and reproducibly identified. In addition, we investigated the simultaneous detection of small polar metabolites such as amino and organic acids co-existing in the same biological samples processed in a single analytical run with lipids. Our results show that hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography is a useful tool for human plasma lipidome analysis and offers more comprehensive metabolome coverage.

  12. Absolute isotopic composition and atomic weight of neodymium using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Motian; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Jun; Lu, Hai; Fang, Xiang; Guo, Chunhua; Li, Qiuli; Li, Chaofeng

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic mixtures prepared gravimetrically from highly enriched isotopes of neodymium in the form of oxides of well-defined purity were used to calibrate a thermal ionization mass spectrometer. A new error analysis was applied to calculate the final uncertainty of the atomic weight value. Measurements on natural neodymium samples yielded an absolute isotopic composition of 27.153(19) atomic percent (at.%) 142Nd, 12.173(18) at.% 143Nd, 23.798(12) at.% 144Nd, 8.293(7) at.% 145Nd, 17.189(17) at.% 146Nd, 5.756(8) at.% 148Nd, and 5.638(9) at.% 150Nd, and the atomic weight of neodymium as 144.2415(13), with uncertainties given on the basis of 95% confidence limits. No isotopic fractionation was found in terrestrial neodymium materials.

  13. Screening of agrochemicals in foodstuffs using low-temperature plasma (LTP) ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Joshua S; García-Reyes, Juan F; Harper, Jason D; Charipar, Nicholas A; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2010-05-01

    Low-temperature plasma (LTP) permits direct ambient ionization and mass analysis of samples in their native environment with minimal or no prior preparation. LTP utilizes dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) to create a low power plasma which is guided by gas flow onto the sample from which analytes are desorbed and ionized. In this study, the potential of LTP-MS for the detection of pesticide residues in food is demonstrated. Thirteen multi-class agricultural chemicals were studied (ametryn, amitraz, atrazine, buprofezin, DEET, diphenylamine, ethoxyquin, imazalil, isofenphos-methyl, isoproturon, malathion, parathion-ethyl and terbuthylazine). To evaluate the potential of the proposed approach, LTP-MS experiments were performed directly on fruit peels as well as on fruit/vegetable extracts. Most of the agrochemicals examined displayed remarkable sensitivity in the positive ion mode, giving limits of detection (LOD) for the direct measurement in the low picogram range. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to confirm identification of selected pesticides by using for these experiments spiked fruit/vegetable extracts (QuEChERS, a standard sample treatment protocol) at levels as low as 1 pg, absolute, for some of the analytes. Comparisons of the data obtained by direct LTP-MS were made with the slower but more accurate conventional LC-MS/MS procedure. Herbicides spiked in aqueous solutions were detectable at LODs as low as 0.5 microg L(-1) without the need for any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that ambient LTP-MS can be applied for the detection and confirmation of traces of agrochemicals in actual market-purchased produce and in natural water samples. Quantitative analysis was also performed in a few selected cases and displayed a relatively high degree of linearity over four orders of magnitude.

  14. Capillary liquid chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Jäntti, Sirkku; Grigoras, Kestas; Saarela, Ville; Ketola, Raimo A; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-07-01

    A miniaturized nebulizer chip for capillary liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS) is presented. The APCI chip consists of two wafers, a silicon wafer and a Pyrex glass wafer. The silicon wafer has a DRIE etched through-wafer nebulizer gas inlet, an edge capillary insertion channel, a stopper, a vaporizer channel and a nozzle. The platinum heater electrode and pads for electrical connection were patterned on to the Pyrex glass wafer. The two wafers were joined by anodic bonding, creating a microchip version of an APCI-source. The sample inlet capillary from an LC column is directly connected to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle in the microchip forms a narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona needle, and the formed ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The nebulizer chip enables for the first time the use of low flow rate separation techniques with APCI-MS. The performance of capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS was tested with selected neurosteroids. The capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS provides quantitative repeatability and good linearity. The limits of detection (LOD) with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 in MS/MS mode for the selected neurosteroids were 20-1000 fmol (10-500 nmol l(-1)). LODs (S/N = 3) with commercial macro APCI with the same compounds using the same MS were about 10 times higher. Fast heat transfer allows the use of the optimized temperature for each compound during an LC run. The microchip APCI-source provides a convenient and easy method to combine capillary LC to any API-MS equipped with an APCI source. The advantages and potentials of the microchip APCI also make it a very attractive interface in microfluidic APCI-MS.

  15. Matrix-enhanced surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ME-SALDI-MS) for mass spectrometry imaging of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Victoria L; Liu, Qiang; He, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS), a parallel technique to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), utilizes inorganic particles or porous surfaces to aid in the desorption/ionization of low-molecular-weight (MW) analytes. As a matrix-free and "soft" LDI approach, SALDI offers the benefit of reduced background noise in the low MW range, allowing for easier detection of biologically significant small MW species. Despite the inherent advantages of SALDI-MS, it has not reached comparable sensitivity levels to MALDI-MS. In relation to mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), intense efforts have been made in order to improve sensitivity and versatility of SALDI-MSI. We describe herein a detailed protocol that utilizes a hybrid LDI method, matrix-enhanced SALDI-MS (ME-SALDI MS), to detect and image low MW species in an imaging mode.

  16. Effects of Temperature and Energy on Stability of Oligomeric Enzyme Probed on Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-li

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli 3-Deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate(KDO8P) synthase catalyzed the condensation reaction between D-arabinose 5-phosphate(A5P) and phosphoenolpyruvate(PEP) to form KDO8P and inorganic phosphate(P1).The noncovalent tetrameric association of KDO8P synthase was observed and dissociated in gas phase by means of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry under the very "soft" conditions.The results indicate that PEP-bound enzyme generated abundant tetrameric species as well as monomeric species at the "soft" conditions,whereas,the unbound enzyme favored the formation of a dimeric species.The mass spectra of the mixture of the enzyme with one of substrates,PEP,and A5P or one of products,KDO8P and Pi show that the complex of the unbound enzyme with PEP or P1 was prone to the formation of a monomeric species,whereas,that of the unbound enzyme with ASP or KDO8P was similar to the unbound enzyme.The intensity of the dimeric species increased with the increase of temperature at a collision voltage of 10 V.Taken together,the results presented here suggest that mass spectrometry will be a powerful tool to explore subtile conformational changes and/or subunit-subunit interactions of multiprotein assembly induced by ligand-binding and/or the changes of environmental conditions.

  17. Applications of a catch and release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry assay for carbohydrate library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hawiet, Amr; Shoemaker, Glen K; Daneshfar, Rambod; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S

    2012-01-03

    Applications of a catch and release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay for screening carbohydrate libraries against target proteins are described. Direct ESI-MS measurements were performed on solutions containing a target protein (a single chain antibody, an antigen binding fragment, or a fragment of a bacterial toxin) and a library of carbohydrates containing multiple specific ligands with affinities in the 10(3) to 10(6) M(-1) range. Ligands with moderate affinity (10(4) to 10(6) M(-1)) were successfully detected from mixtures containing >200 carbohydrates (at concentrations as low as 0.25 μM each). Additionally, the absolute affinities were estimated from the abundance of free and ligand-bound protein ions determined from the ESI mass spectrum. Multiple low affinity ligands (~10(3) M(-1)) were successfully detected in mixtures containing >20 carbohydrates (at concentrations of ~10 μM each). However, identification of specific interactions required the use of the reference protein method to correct the mass spectrum for the occurrence of nonspecific carbohydrate-protein binding during the ESI process. The release of the carbohydrate ligands, as ions, was successfully demonstrated using collision-induced dissociation performed on the deprotonated ions of the protein-carbohydrate complexes. The use of ion mobility separation, performed on deprotonated carbohydrate ions following their release from the complex, allowed for the positive identification of isomeric ligands.

  18. In situ analysis of corrosion inhibitors using a portable mass spectrometer with paper spray ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark

    2013-01-01

    Paper spray (PS) ambient ionization is implemented using a portable mass spectrometer and applied to the detection of alkyl quaternary ammonium salts in a complex oil matrix. These salts are commonly used as active components in the formulation of corrosion inhibitors. They were identified in oil and confirmed by their fragmentation patterns recorded using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The cations of alkyl and benzyl-substituted quaternary ammonium salts showed characteristic neutral losses of CnH2n (n carbon number of the longest chain) and C7H8, respectively. Individual quaternary ammonium compounds were detected at low concentrations (<1 ng μL-1) and over a dynamic range of ∼5 pg μL-1 to 500 pg μL-1 (ppb). Direct detection of these compounds in complex oil samples without prior sample preparation or pre-concentration was also demonstrated using a home-built miniature mass spectrometer at levels below 1 ng μL-1.© 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. In situ analysis of corrosion inhibitors using a portable mass spectrometer with paper spray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Li, Anyin; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham; Wei, Pu; Li, Linfan; Ouyang, Zheng; Roqan, Iman S; Cooks, R Graham

    2013-07-01

    Paper spray (PS) ambient ionization is implemented using a portable mass spectrometer and applied to the detection of alkyl quaternary ammonium salts in a complex oil matrix. These salts are commonly used as active components in the formulation of corrosion inhibitors. They were identified in oil and confirmed by their fragmentation patterns recorded using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The cations of alkyl and benzyl-substituted quaternary ammonium salts showed characteristic neutral losses of CnH2n (n carbon number of the longest chain) and C7H8, respectively. Individual quaternary ammonium compounds were detected at low concentrations (<1 ng μL(-1)) and over a dynamic range of ∼5 pg μL(-1) to 500 pg μL(-1) (ppb). Direct detection of these compounds in complex oil samples without prior sample preparation or pre-concentration was also demonstrated using a home-built miniature mass spectrometer at levels below 1 ng μL(-1).

  20. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  1. Ultrasensitive Nanoelectrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry using Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Microchips with Monolithically Integrated Emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xuefei; Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-09-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is the most widely used substrate for microfluidic devices as it enables facile fabrication and has other distinctive properties. However, for applications involving highly sensitive nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) detection, the use of PDMS microdevices has been hindered by the leaching of uncross-linked oligomers and other contaminants from the substrate that yields a large background of chemical noise in the mass spectra. A more general challenge is that microfluidic devices containing integrated electrospray emitters are frequently unable to operate stably in the nanoflow regime where the best sensitivity is achieved. In this report, we extracted the contaminants from PDMS substrates using a series of solvents, eliminating the background observed when untreated PDMS microchips are used for nanoESI-MS. Optimization of the integrated emitter geometry enabled stable operation at flow rates as low as 10 nL/min. Peptide concentrations of 1 nM were readily detected, representing ~170 zmol of consumed analyte, and an extrapolated detection limit of ~40 zmol; these are the lowest mass and concentration detection limits reported to date for a microchip having an integrated electrospray emitter.

  2. Controlled-resonant surface tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-03-18

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonant surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed, and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan, and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types, including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 μm based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  3. Characterization of N,N-dimethyl amino acids by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh Chary, V; Sudarshana Reddy, B; Kumar, Ch Dinesh; Srinivas, R; Prabhakar, S

    2015-05-01

    Methylation is an essential metabolic process for a number of critical reactions in the body. Methyl groups are involved in the healthy function of the body life processes, by conducting methylation process involving specific enzymes. In these processes, various amino acids are methylated, and the occurrence of methylated amino acids in nature is diverse. Nowadays, mass-spectrometric-based identification of small molecules as biomarkers for diseases is a growing research. Although all dimethyl amino acids are metabolically important molecules, mass spectral data are available only for a few of them in the literature. In this study, we report synthesis and characterization of all dimethyl amino acids, by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments on protonated molecules. The MS/MS spectra of all the studied dimethyl amino acids showed preliminary loss of H2O + CO to form corresponding immonium ions. The other product ions in the spectra are highly characteristic of the methyl groups on the nitrogen and side chain of the amino acids. The amino acids, which are isomeric and isobaric with the studied dimethyl amino acids, gave distinctive MS/MS spectra. The study also included MS/MS analysis of immonium ions of dimethyl amino acids that provide information on side chain structure, and it is further tested to determine the N-terminal amino acid of the peptides.

  4. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-07

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  5. Salecker-Wigner-Peres quantum clock applied to strong-field tunnel ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Teeny, Nicolas; Bauke, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The Salecker-Wigner-Peres quantum-clock approach is applied in order to determine the tunneling time of an electron in strong-field tunnel ionization via a time-dependent electric field. Our results show that the ionization of the electron takes a nonvanishing period of time. This tunneling time is of the order of the Keldysh time but strictly larger than the Keldysh time. Comparing the quantum-clock tunneling time to the mean tunneling time as obtained by the virtual-detector approach, one finds that these two complementary methods give very similar results. Due to the asymmetric distribution of the tunneling time, there is a nonnegligible discrepancy between the mean tunneling time and the most probable tunneling time.

  6. Strong-field ionization inducing multi-electron-hole coherence probed by attosecond pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new scenario to apply IR-pump-XUV-probe schemes to resolving strong field ionization induced and attosecond pulse driven electron-hole dynamics and coherence in real time. The coherent driving of both the infrared laser and the attoscond pulse correlates the dynamics of the core-hole and the valence-hole which leads to the otherwise forbidden absorption and emission of XUV photon. An analytical model is developed based on the strong-field approximation by taking into account of the essential multielectron configurations. The emission spectra from the core-valence transition and the core-hole recombination are found modulating strongly as functions of the time delay between the two pulses, which provides a unique insight into the instantaneous ionization and the interplay of the multi-electron-hole coherence.

  7. Surface-activated chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry in the analysis of amphetamines in diluted urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristoni, Simone; Bernardi, Luigi Rossi; Gerthoux, Piermario; Gonella, Elisabetta; Mocarelli, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    A new ionization method, named surface-activated chemical ionization (SACI), was employed for the analysis of five amphetamines (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDE), amphetamine and methamphetamine) by ion trap mass spectrometry. The results so obtained have been compared with those achieved by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) using the same instrument, clearly showing that SACI is the most sensitive of the three. The limit of detection and linearity range for SACI were compared with those obtained using APCI and ESI, showing that the new SACI approach provides the best results for both criteria. SACI was used to analyze MDA, MDMA MDE, amphetamine and methamphetamine in four urine samples, and the quantitation results are compared with those achieved using ESI.

  8. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Nicholas B. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  9. Semi-quantitative proteomics of mammalian cells upon short-term exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzniar, Arnold; Laffeber, Charlie; Eppink, Berina; Bezstarosti, Karel; Dekkers, Dick; Woelders, Henri; Zwamborn, A Peter M; Demmers, Jeroen; Lebbink, Joyce H G; Kanaar, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The potential effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), such as those emitted by power-lines (in extremely low frequency range), mobile cellular systems and wireless networking devices (in radio frequency range) on human health have been intensively researched and debated. However, how exposure to these EMFs may lead to biological changes underlying possible health effects is still unclear. To reveal EMF-induced molecular changes, unbiased experiments (without a priori focusing on specific biological processes) with sensitive readouts are required. We present the first proteome-wide semi-quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of human fibroblasts, osteosarcomas and mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to three types of non-ionizing EMFs (ELF 50 Hz, UMTS 2.1 GHz and WiFi 5.8 GHz). We performed controlled in vitro EMF exposures of metabolically labeled mammalian cells followed by reliable statistical analyses of differential protein- and pathway-level regulations using an array of established bioinformatics methods. Our results indicate that less than 1% of the quantitated human or mouse proteome responds to the EMFs by small changes in protein abundance. Further network-based analysis of the differentially regulated proteins did not detect significantly perturbed cellular processes or pathways in human and mouse cells in response to ELF, UMTS or WiFi exposure. In conclusion, our extensive bioinformatics analyses of semi-quantitative mass spectrometry data do not support the notion that the short-time exposures to non-ionizing EMFs have a consistent biologically significant bearing on mammalian cells in culture.

  10. Semi-quantitative proteomics of mammalian cells upon short-term exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffeber, Charlie; Eppink, Berina; Bezstarosti, Karel; Dekkers, Dick; Woelders, Henri; Zwamborn, A. Peter M.; Demmers, Jeroen; Lebbink, Joyce H. G.; Kanaar, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The potential effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), such as those emitted by power-lines (in extremely low frequency range), mobile cellular systems and wireless networking devices (in radio frequency range) on human health have been intensively researched and debated. However, how exposure to these EMFs may lead to biological changes underlying possible health effects is still unclear. To reveal EMF-induced molecular changes, unbiased experiments (without a priori focusing on specific biological processes) with sensitive readouts are required. We present the first proteome-wide semi-quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of human fibroblasts, osteosarcomas and mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to three types of non-ionizing EMFs (ELF 50 Hz, UMTS 2.1 GHz and WiFi 5.8 GHz). We performed controlled in vitro EMF exposures of metabolically labeled mammalian cells followed by reliable statistical analyses of differential protein- and pathway-level regulations using an array of established bioinformatics methods. Our results indicate that less than 1% of the quantitated human or mouse proteome responds to the EMFs by small changes in protein abundance. Further network-based analysis of the differentially regulated proteins did not detect significantly perturbed cellular processes or pathways in human and mouse cells in response to ELF, UMTS or WiFi exposure. In conclusion, our extensive bioinformatics analyses of semi-quantitative mass spectrometry data do not support the notion that the short-time exposures to non-ionizing EMFs have a consistent biologically significant bearing on mammalian cells in culture. PMID:28234898

  11. Iberian ham typification by direct infusion electrospray and photospray ionization mass spectrometry fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Dominguez, R; García-Barrera, T; Gómez-Ariza, J-L

    2012-04-15

    Iberian ham is a product of high commercial value whose quality mainly depends on breeding and feeding of pigs in an authorized way. Simple, fast, simple, reliable and high-throughput analytical methods are necessary to assure the quality of ham and for fraud prevention. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is proposed as an advantageous alternative over other analytical techniques commonly used in this industry for product authentication. The analytical approach is based on direct infusion electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI(+)-MS) of dichloromethane/methanol (60:40) extracts of ham intramuscular fat. Similarly, atmospheric pressure photoionization ionization mass spectrometry (APPI(+)-MS) was used with a flow injection analysis system for sample introduction with methanol/water (50%) as the mobile phase and toluene as the dopant. All experiments were performed on an API QSTAR® XL Hybrid system using both ESI and APPI sources. The ESI(+)-MS mass spectra present several clusters of peaks attributed to ammonium adducts [M + NH(4) (+) ] of lipid compounds (mono-, di- and triacylglycerols - MGs, DGs, TGs, and free fatty acids - FFAs), that can be identified by MS/MS spectra. On the other hand, the APPI(+)-MS spectra present [M + H(+) ] ions and reflect a higher fragmentation of the sample. Five different types of Iberian ham samples were successfully classified using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) of data from these samples. The application of direct infusion tandem mass spectrometry to dichloromethane/methanol extracts from intramuscular fat ham allows the simple, fast and reliable fingerprinting typification of different Iberian ham samples from pigs with different diets. With the proposed method, sample handling is minimal and chromatographic separation is not necessary, which represents an evident advantage over other analytical procedures usually used for this purpose. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Quantitative Caffeine Analysis Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Deibel, Michael A. [Earlham College; Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  13. Time-dependent density functional theory for strong-field ionization by circularly polarized pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirilă, Ciprian C.; Lein, Manfred

    2017-03-01

    By applying time-dependent density functional theory to a two-dimensional multielectron atom subject to strong circularly polarized light pulses, we confirm that the ionization of p orbitals with defined angular momentum depends on the sense of rotation of the applied field. A simple ad-hoc modification of the adiabatic local-density exchange-correlation functional is proposed to remedy its unphysical behavior under orbital depletion.

  14. Ab initio verification of the analytical R-matrix theory for strong field ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlina, Lisa; Morales, Felipe; Muller, H. G.; Smirnova, Olga

    2014-10-01

    We summarize the key aspects of the recently developed analytical R-matrix (ARM) theory for strong field ionization (Torlina and Smirnova 2012 Phys. Rev. A 86 043408; Kaushal and Smirnova 2013 Phys. Rev. A 88 013421), and present tests of this theory using ab initio numerical simulations for hydrogen and helium atoms in long circularly polarized laser pulses. We find excellent agreement between the predictions of ARM and the numerical calculations.

  15. Determination of stimulants using gas chromatography/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and a soft ionization source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Avila, Viorica; Cooley, James; Urdahl, Randall; Thevis, Mario

    2012-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mass spectral fragmentation of a small set of stimulants in a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a soft ionization source using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons emitted from different plasma gases. It was postulated that the use of a plasma gas such as Xe, which emits photons at a lower energy than Kr or Ar, would lead to softer ionization of the test compounds, and thus to less fragmentation. A set of nine stimulants: cocaine, codeine, nicotine, methadone, phenmetrazine, pentylenetetrazole, niketamide, fencamfamine, and caffeine, was analyzed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOFMS) in positive ion mode with this soft ionization source, using either Xe, Kr, or Ar as plasma gases. Working solutions of the test compounds at 0.1 to 100 ng/μL were used to establish instrument sensitivity and linearity. All test compounds, except methadone and pentylenetetrazole, exhibited strong molecular ions and no fragmentation with Xe-microplasma photoionization (MPPI). Methadone exhibited significant fragmentation not only with Xe, but also with Kr and Ar, and pentylenetetrazole could not be ionized with Xe, probably because its ionization energy is above 8.44 eV. The Kr- and Ar-MPPI mass spectra of the test compounds showed that the relative intensity of the molecular ion decreased as the photon energy increased. When coupled to a TOF mass spectrometer this soft ionization source has demonstrated signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios from 7 to 730 at 100 pg per injection (depending on the compound), and a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude (100 pg to 100 ng) for some of the test compounds. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Ultraviolet photochemistry of 2-bromothiophene explored using universal ionization detection and multi-mass velocity-map imaging with a PImMS2 sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, R. A.; Hansen, C. S.; Elsdon, E.; Bain, M.; King, S. J.; Lee, J. W. L.; Brouard, M.; Vallance, C.; Turchetta, R.; Ashfold, M. N. R.

    2017-07-01

    The ultraviolet photochemistry of 2-bromothiophene (C4H3SBr) has been studied across the wavelength range 265-245 nm using a velocity-map imaging (VMI) apparatus recently modified for multi-mass imaging and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 118.2 nm) universal ionization. At all wavelengths, molecular products arising from the loss of atomic bromine were found to exhibit recoil velocities and anisotropies consistent with those reported elsewhere for the Br fragment [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 224303 (2015)]. Comparison between the momentum distributions of the Br and C4H3S fragments suggests that bromine is formed primarily in its ground (2P3/2) spin-orbit state. These distributions match well at high momentum, but relatively fewer slow moving molecular fragments were detected. This is explained by the observation of a second substantial ionic product, C3H3+. Analysis of ion images recorded simultaneously for several ion masses and the results of high-level ab initio calculations suggest that this fragment ion arises from dissociative ionization (by the VUV probe laser) of the most internally excited C4H3S fragments. This study provides an excellent benchmark for the recently modified VMI instrumentation and offers a powerful demonstration of the emerging field of multi-mass VMI using event-triggered, high frame-rate sensors, and universal ionization.

  17. Detection of polychlorinated biphenyls in transformer oils in Vietnam by multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry using a far-ultraviolet femtosecond laser as an ionization source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Thi Thuy Duong; Vu, Duong; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Imasaka, Tomoko; Tang, Yuanyuan; Shibuta, Shinpei; Hamachi, Akifumi; Do, Quang Hoa; Imasaka, Totaro

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in transformer and food oils were measured using gas chromatography combined with multiphoton ionization mass spectroscopy. An ultrashort laser pulse emitting in the far-ultraviolet region was utilized for efficient ionization of the analytes. Numerous signal peaks were clearly observed for a standard sample mixture of PCBs when the third and fourth harmonic emissions (267 and 200nm) of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (800nm) were employed. The signal intensities were found to be greater when measured at 200nm compared with those measured at 267nm, providing lower detection limits especially for highly chlorinated PCBs at shorter wavelengths. After simple pretreatment using disposable columns, PCB congeners were measured and found to be present in the transformer oils used in Vietnam.

  18. High-Resolution Live-Cell Imaging and Analysis by Laser Desorption/Ionization Droplet Delivery Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Jansson, Erik T; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2016-05-17

    We have developed a new ambient-ionization mass spectrometric technique named laser desorption/ionization droplet delivery mass spectrometry (LDIDD-MS). LDIDD-MS permits high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging of tissue samples as well as measurements of both single-cell apoptosis and live-cell exocytosis. A pulsed (15 Hz) UV laser beam (266 nm) is focused on a surface covered with target analytes to trigger their desorption and ionization. A spray of liquid droplets is simultaneously directed onto the laser-focused surface region to capture the ionized analytes and deliver them to a mass spectrometer. The approach of rapid and effective capturing of molecules after laser desorption/ionization allows the limit of detection for the amino acid lysine to be as low as 2 amol under ambient ionization conditions. Two-dimensional maps of the desorbed/ionized species are recorded by moving the sample on an XY translational stage. The spatial resolution for imaging with LDIDD-MS was determined to be 2.4 μm for an ink-printed pattern and 3 μm for mouse brain tissue. We applied LDIDD-MS to single-cell analysis of apoptotic HEK cells. Differences were observed in the profiles of fatty acids and lipids between healthy HEK cells and those undergoing apoptosis. We observed upregulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) with a relatively shorter carbon chain length and downregulation of PC with a relatively longer carbon chain length. We also applied LDIDD-MS for a real-time direct measurements of live-cell exocytosis. The catecholamine dopamine and trace amines (phenethylamine and tyramine) were detected from live PC12 cells without damaging them.

  19. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric and electron impact mass spectrometric characterization of mycosporine-like amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kenia; Hedges, John I

    2003-01-01

    Positive-ion mass spectral fragmentations of seven mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are reported and discussed. The MAAs studied are small compounds composed of a cycloheximine ring substituted with amino acid or amino alcohol units. Techniques used include electron impact (EI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). ESI-MS/MS showed unusual small radical losses, generally resulting from the loss of a methyl group with the exception of shinorine and porphyra for which the initial losses were 30 and 44 Da, respectively. As expected from structural similarities, porphyra, shinorine and palythinol displayed similar fragmentation patterns, while palythenic acid and palythene fragmented in a similar manner. Overall, the ESI-MS/MS fragmentations at m/z <200 exhibited a distinctive pattern for all seven MAAs with characteristic ions at m/z 137, 168, 186, and 197 or 199. Several ions were observed for each of the MAAs analyzed, and together provide a useful and potentially diagnostic pattern for identification of MAAs and as an aid in structure elucidation of novel MAAs. For GC/EI-MS analysis, trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives were made. The EI-MS fragmentation patterns of TMS-MAAs showed many features typical of TMS-derivatized alpha-amines. The precursor TMS-MAA ion was not detected, but a [M-90](+ radical) ion was the highest-mass intense peak observed for palythine, palythinol and shinorine, while palythene gave a [M-116](+ radical) ion. Besides determining the number of acidic hydrogens, EI-MS of TMS-derivatized MAAs will aid in structure elucidation of novel MAAs. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Direct identification of prohibited substances in cosmetics and foodstuffs using ambient ionization on a miniature mass spectrometry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Bai, Hua; Li, Wentao; Wang, Chao; Li, Xinshi; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2016-03-17

    Significantly simplified work flows were developed for rapid analysis of various types of cosmetic and foodstuff samples by employing a miniature mass spectrometry system and ambient ionization methods. A desktop Mini 12 ion trap mass spectrometer was coupled with paper spray ionization, extraction spray ionization and slug-flow microextraction for direct analysis of Sudan Reds, parabens, antibiotics, steroids, bisphenol and plasticizer from raw samples with complex matrices. Limits of detection as low as 5 μg/kg were obtained for target analytes. On-line derivatization was also implemented for analysis of steroid in cosmetics. The developed methods provide potential analytical possibility for outside-the-lab screening of cosmetics and foodstuff products for the presence of illegal substances.

  1. Effect of the ionizing radiation on the rain-time atmospheric electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Takeda, Masahiko; Makino, Masahiko; Owada, Takeshi

    2013-04-01

    The atmospheric electric field, or potential gradient (PG) at Kakioka, 150 southwest of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) shows peculiar behaviors after the accident, March 2012 due to the conductivity enhancement in the air by the ionizing radiation. This means that the PG provides significant information on the dynamics of the radioactive materials. During last EGU assembly 2012, we showed that the fine-weather PG decreased by one-two orders of magnitudes at the arrival of the radioactive plume, and that the PG recovered in various way depending on various types of re-suspension processes in addition to the physical decay of the deposited radioactive materials. We extended this work to the rain-time PG, which is very simple because of high variability of the PG depending on the cloud types and distribution. We yet found a statistical difference between rain-time PGs before and after the Fukushima NPP Accident: one-hour averaged rain-time PG during the first 45 days after the accident is not as much scattered to the negative side as those during the same period of different years or during 40 days before accident. Further examination of one-minute averaged data (1 Hz sampling) during the second half March for 2006-2012 revealed that this difference comes from short time-spans of negative peaks rather than the peak value after the accident compared to those before the accident. On the other hand, characteristics of positive peaks (cloud without rain) are unchanged. The results suggest either (1) the effect on the local charges in the rain cloud is narrowed under high dose of ionized radiation, making positive charges in the cloud less shielded by the negative charges, or (2) negative charge of ionized aerosol decays much faster under higher dose of ionized radiation due to the shortened time constant of the ionized aerosol (? 1-?, where ? is the atmospheric electric conductivity).

  2. Interference in strong-field ionization of a two-centre atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, Z; Boettcher, M; Manschwetus, B; Rottke, H; Sandner, W [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Verhoef, A; Lezius, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Paulus, G G [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Saenz, A [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Milosevic, D B [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina)], E-mail: rottke@mbi-berlin.de

    2008-09-15

    Strong-field photoionization of argon dimers by a few-cycle laser pulse is investigated using electron-ion coincidence momentum spectroscopy. The momentum distribution of the photoelectrons exhibits interference due to the emission from the two atomic argon centres, in analogy with a Young's double-slit experiment. However, a simulation of the dimer photoelectron momentum spectrum based on the atomic spectrum supplemented with a theoretically derived interference term leads to distinct deviations from the experimental result. The deviations may have their origin in a complex electron dynamics during strong-field ionization of the Ar{sub 2} dimer.

  3. The Effect of Solvent on the Analysis of Secondary Organic Aerosol Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, Adam P. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Walser, Maggie L. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Dessiaterik, Yury [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Laskin, Julia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Laskin, Alexander [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Nizkorodov, Serguei [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2008-08-29

    Solvent-analyte reactions in organic aerosol (OA) extracts prepared for analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) were examined. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced by ozonation of d-limonene as well as several test organic chemicals with functional groups typical for OA constituents were dissolved and stored in methanol, d3-methanol, acetonitrile, and d3-acetonitrile to investigate the extent and relative rates of reactions between analyte and solvent. High resolution ESI-MS showed that reactions of carbonyls with methanol produce significant amounts of hemiacetals and acetals on time scales ranging from several minutes to several days, with the reaction rates increasing in acidified solutions. Carboxylic acid groups were observed to react with methanol resulting in the formation of esters. In contrast, acetonitrile extracts showed no evidence of reactions with analyte molecules, suggesting that acetonitrile is the preferred solvent for SOA extraction. The use of solvent-analyte reactivity as an analytical chemistry tool for the improved characterization of functional groups in complex organic mixtures was also demonstrated. Direct comparison between ESI mass spectra of the same SOA samples extracted in reactive (methanol) versus non-reactive (acetonitrile) solvents was used to estimate the relative fractions of ketones (≥38%), aldehydes (≥6%), and carboxylic acids (≥55%) in d-limonene SOA.

  4. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry fingerprinting of whisky: immediate proof of origin and authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Jens K S; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2005-06-01

    Authentic samples of whisky produced in Scotland and USA and counterfeit whisky samples commercialized in Brazil have been directly submitted to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis in both the negative and positive ion modes to assess the potential of this technique for simple and rapid quality control and proof of authenticity of whisky samples. ESI in the negative ion mode yields the most characteristic whisky fingerprinting mass spectra in just a few seconds by direct infusion of the samples, detecting the most polar or acidic components of each sample in their deprotonated anionic forms. No pre-treatment of the sample, such as extraction or derivatization or even dilution, is required. The analysis of the ESI(-)-MS data both by simple visual inspection but more particularly by chemometric data treatment enables separation of the whisky samples into three unequivocally distinct groups: Scotch, American and counterfeit whisky, whereas single malt and blended Scotch whiskies are also distinguished to some extent. As indicated by ESI-MS/MS analysis, the diagnostic anions are simple sugars, disaccharides and phenolic compounds. Direct infusion ESI-MS therefore provides immediate chemical fingerprinting of whisky samples for type, origin and quality control, as demonstrated herein for American, Scottish and counterfeit samples, whereas ESI-MS/MS analysis of diagnostic ions adds a second dimension of fingerprinting characterization when improved selectivity is desired.

  5. Enhanced Ionization of Phosphatidylcholines during MALDI Mass Spectrometry Using DCTB as Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莹; 陆豪杰

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholines (PCs) are the most abundant phospholipids constituents of the cellular membrane, which exhibit a variety of biological functions. The distinct critical roles in cellular function make their analysis quite de- manding. Although MALDI-MS is one of the most powerful tools for biomolecules identification, it is still limited to phospholipids studies. The ionization of phosphatidylcholines is insufficient, and signals of PCs are frequently confused and suppressed by matrix clusters occurring in the same mass range. As an alternative matrix, T-2-(3-(4-t-butyl-phenyl)-2-methyl-2-propenylidene) malononitrile (DCTB) was introduced to overcome these problems in our study. Specifically, the signal intensity of phosphatidylcholines from soybean was enhanced more than several ten-folds using DCTB during positive ion MALDI-TOFMS. Peak overlaps caused by the wide distri- butions of series fatty acid residues from phospholipids were separated by introducing cesium cation. The occurred mass shift of 131.90 Da between [M+Cs]+ and [M+H]~ ("M" represents the molecular weight of the corre- sponding neutral hosphatidylcholine) was approved to be helpful in the assignments of ambiguous peaks of PCs from soybean. For real sample analysis, employing cesium chloride as an auxiliary reagent successfully facilitated the profiling and characterizing of PCs extracted from mouse lung and egg yolk followed by analysis with MALDI-TOFMS using DCTB as matrix.

  6. Microfluidic cell culture and metabolism detection with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dan; Wei, Huibin; Guo, Guang-Sheng; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2010-07-01

    A novel method for the characterization of drug metabolites was developed by integrating chip-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) with an online electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-fight mass spectrometer (ESI-Q-TOF-MS). The integrated microfluidic device was composed of circular chambers for cell culture and straight microchannels with shrink ends to pack the solid-phase material for sample cleanup and concentration prior to mass analysis. By connecting the two separated microchannels with polyethylene tubes, drug metabolism studies related to functional units, including cell culture, metabolism generation, sample pretreatment, and detection, were all integrated into the microfluidic device. To verify the feasibility of a drug metabolism study on the microfluidic device, the metabolism of vitamin E in human lung epithelial A549 cells was studied. The metabolites were successfully detected by online ESI-Q-TOF-MS with high sensitivity and short analysis time (8 min). By integrating several parallel channels, the desalting and concentration process could be simultaneously achieved. The total sample pretreatment time only needed about 15 min, and solvent consumption could be reduced to less than 100 microL. All this demonstrated that the developed microfluidic device could be a potential useful tool for cellular drug metabolism research.

  7. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  8. A low-mass dark matter search using ionization signals in XENON100

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E; Agostini, F; Alfonsi, M; Amaro, F D; Anthony, M; Arneodo, F; Barrow, P; Baudis, L; Bauermeister, B; Benabderrahmane, M L; Berger, T; Breur, P A; Breskin, A; Brown, A; Bruenner, E Brown S; Bruno, G; Budnik, R; Buss, A; Bütikofer, L; Cardoso, J M R; Cervantes, M; Cichon, D; Coderre, D; Colijn, A P; Conrad, J; Cussonneau, J P; Decowski, M P; de Perio, P; Di Gangi, P; Di Giovanni, A; Duchovni, E; Ferella, A D; Fieguth, A; Franco, D; Fulgione, W; Galloway, M; Garbini, M; Geis, C; Goetzke, L W; Greene, Z; Grignon, C; Gross, E; Hasterok, C; Hogenbirk, E; Itay, R; Kaminsky, B; Kessler, G; Kish, A; Landsman, H; Lang, R F; Levinson, L; Calloch, M Le; Levy, C; Linde, F; Lindemann, S; Lindner, M; Lopes, J A M; Lyashenko, A; Manfredini, A; Undagoitia, T Marrodán; Masbou, J; Massoli, F V; Masson, D; Mayani, D; Fernandez, A J Melgarejo; Meng, Y; Messina, M; Micheneau, K; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Murra, M; Naganoma, J; Oberlack, U; Orrigo, S E A; Pakarha, P; Pelssers, B; Persiani, R; Piastra, F; Pienaar, J; Plante, G; Priel, N; Rauch, L; Reichard, S; Reuter, C; Rizzo, A; Rosendahl, S; Rupp, N; Santos, J M F dos; Sartorelli, G; Scheibelhut, M; Schindler, S; Schreiner, J; Schumann, M; Lavina, L Scotto; Selvi, M; Shagin, P; Simgen, H; Stein, A; Thers, D; Tiseni, A; Trinchero, G; Tunnell, C D; von Sivers, M; Wall, R; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wei, Y; Weinheimer, C; Wulf, J; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    We perform a low-mass dark matter search using an exposure of 30 kg$\\times$yr with the XENON100 detector. By dropping the requirement of a scintillation signal and using only the ionization signal to determine the interaction energy, we lowered the energy threshold for detection to 0.7 keV for nuclear recoils. No dark matter detection can be claimed because a complete background model cannot be constructed without a primary scintillation signal. Instead, we compute an upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section under the assumption that every event passing our selection criteria could be a signal event. Using an energy interval from 0.7 keV to 9.1 keV, we derive a limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section that excludes WIMPs with a mass of 6 GeV/$c^2$ above $1.2 \\times 10^{-41}$ cm$^2$ at 90\\% confidence level.

  9. An electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method for identifying chlorinated drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangru; Minear, Roger A; Guo, Yingbo; Hwang, Cordelia J; Barrett, Sylvia E; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Matsui, Saburo

    2004-11-01

    Identification of chlorinated drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) was investigated by using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Chlorine-containing compounds were found to form chloride ion fragments by MS/MS, which can be used as a 'fingerprint' for chlorinated DBPs. Instrumental parameters that affect the formation of chloride ions by ESI-MS/MS were examined, and appropriate conditions for use in finding specific structural information were evaluated. The results show that maximizing the formation of chloride ions by MS/MS required a relatively high collision energy and collision gas pressure; also, limiting the scan range to m/z 30-40 allowed improved sensitivity for detection; but obtaining structural information required the use of lower collision energies. The conditions obtained were demonstrated to be effective in identifying chlorinated DBPs in a standard sample with relatively low concentrations of each component and in a chlorinated humic substance sample. Sample pretreatment techniques including ultrafiltration and size exclusion chromatography appeared to be helpful for identifying highly polar or high molecular weight chlorine-containing DBPs by ESI-MS/MS.

  10. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-07

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  11. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  12. High impact ionization rate in silicon by sub-picosecond THz electric field pulses (Conference Presentation)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Hirori, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Summary form only given. Metallic antenna arrays fabricated on high resistivity silicon are used to localize and enhance the incident THz field resulting in high electric field pulses with peak electric field strength reaching several MV/cm on the silicon surface near the antenna tips. In such high...... electric field strengths high density of carriers are generated in silicon through impact ionization process. The high density of generated carriers induces a change of refractive index in silicon. By measuring the change of reflectivity of tightly focused 800 nm light, the local density of free carriers...... near the antenna tips is measured. Using the NIR probing technique, we observed that the density of carriers increases by over 8 orders of magnitude in a time duration of approximately 500 fs with an incident THz pulse of peak electric field strength 700 kV/cm. This shows that a single impact...

  13. Airborne observations of formic acid using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Le Breton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The first airborne measurements of formic acid mixing ratios over the United Kingdom were measured on the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft on 16 March 2010 with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer using I reagent ions. The I ionization scheme was able to measure formic acid mixing ratios at 1 Hz in the boundary layer.

    In-flight standard addition calibrations from a formic acid source were used to determine the instrument sensitivity of 35 ± 6 ion counts pptv−1 s−1 and a limit of detection of 25 pptv. Routine measurements were made through a scrubbed inlet to determine the instrumental background. Three plumes of formic acid were observed over the UK, originating from London, Humberside and Tyneside. The London plume had the highest formic acid mixing ratio throughout the flight, peaking at 358 pptv. No significant correlations of formic acid with NOx and ozone were found, but a positive correlation was observed between CO and HCOOH within the two plumes where coincident data were recorded.

    A trajectory model was employed to determine the sources of the plumes and compare modelled mixing ratios with measured values. The model underestimated formic acid concentrations by up to a factor of 2. This is explained by missing sources in the model, which were considered to be both primary emissions of formic acid of mainly anthropogenic origin and a lack of precursor emissions, such as isoprene, from biogenic sources, whose oxidation in situ would lead to formic acid formation.

  14. Molecular characterization of ongoing enzymatic reactions in raw garlic cloves using extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-03-03

    Characterization of enzymatic reactions occurring in untreated biological samples is of increasing interest. Herein, the chemical conversion of alliin to allicin, catalyzed by allinase, in raw garlic cloves has been followed in vivo by internal extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (iEESI-MS). Both precursors and products of the enzymatic reaction were instantaneously extracted by infused solution running throughout the tissue and directly electrospray ionized on the edge of the bulk sample for online MS analysis. Compared to the room-temperature (+25 °C) scenario, the alliin conversion in garlic cloves decreased by (7.2 ± 1.4) times upon heating to +80 °C and by (5.9 ± 0.8) times upon cooling to -16 °C. Exposure of garlic to gentle ultrasound irradiation for 3 h accelerated the reaction by (1.2 ± 0.1) times. A 10 s microwave irradiation promoted alliin conversion by (1.6 ± 0.4) times, but longer exposure to microwave irradiation (90 s) slowed the reaction by (28.5 ± 7.5) times compared to the reference analysis. This method has been further employed to monitor the germination process of garlic. These data revealed that over a 2 day garlic sprouting, the allicin/alliin ratio increased by (2.2 ± 0.5) times, and the averaged degree of polymerization for the detected oligosaccharides/polysaccharides decreased from 11.6 to 9.4. Overall, these findings suggest the potential use of iEESI-MS for in vivo studies of enzymatic reactions in native biological matrices.

  15. On-chip electromembrane extraction for monitoring drug metabolism in real time by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nickolaj J.; Pedersen, Jacob Sønderby; Poulsen, Nicklas Nørgård

    2012-01-01

    A temperature controlled (37 °C) metabolic reaction chamber with a volume of 1 mL was coupled directly to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) by the use of a 50 µm deep counter flow micro-chip electromembrane extraction (EME) system. The EME/ESI-MS system was used to study the in v...

  16. Basic matrices in the analysis of non-covalent complexes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespersen, S.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der

    1998-01-01

    A number of potential matrix candidates were investigated with regard to the importance of the pH in the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS) analysis of non-covalently bound protein complexes. The matrices examined were 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), 4-hydroxy-

  17. Study on the Reaction of Salicylic Acid with Dialkyl Phosphite by NMR and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓岚; 屈凌波; 郭蕾; 卢建莎; 刘艳; 吴建丽; 赵玉芬

    2005-01-01

    The reaction between salicylic acid and dialkyl phosphite was traced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and 31P NMR. All reactants, unstable intermediates and products were detected. The mechanism was proposed based on ESI-MS results and 31P NMR profiles.

  18. Development of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for plant metabolite analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, Andrew R [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This thesis presents efforts to improve the methodology of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) as a method for analysis of metabolites from plant tissue samples. The first chapter consists of a general introduction to the technique of MALDI-MSI, and the sixth and final chapter provides a brief summary and an outlook on future work.

  19. Basic matrices in the analysis of non-covalent complexes by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespersen, S.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der

    1998-01-01

    A number of potential matrix candidates were investigated with regard to the importance of the pH in the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS) analysis of non-covalently bound protein complexes. The matrices examined were 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), 4-hydroxy-

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF DANSYLATED CYSTEINE, CYSTINE, GLUTATHIONE, AND GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE BY NARROW BORE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method using reversed phase high performance liquid chromtography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (RP-LC/ESI-MS) has been developed to confirm the dientity of dansylated derivatives of cysteine (C) and glutathione (GSH), and their respective dimers, cystine (CSSC) and...

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF DANSYLATED CYSTEINE, GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE, CYSTEINE AND CYSTINE BY NARROW BORE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric (RP-LC/ESI-MS) method has been developed to confirm the identity of dansylated derivatives of cysteine and glutathione, and their respective dimers. Cysteine, GSH, CSSC...

  2. Accurate quantitation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and its degradation products using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brust, H.; Asten, A. van; Koeberg, M.; Dalmolen, J.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Schoenmakers, P.

    2014-01-01

    After an explosion of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), its degradation products pentaerythritol trinitrate (PETriN), dinitrate (PEDiN) and mononitrate (PEMN) were detected using liquid chromatography-atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). Discrimination between

  3. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  4. Rapid analysis of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in hair using direct analysis in real time ambient ionization orbitrap mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duvivier, W.F.; Beek, van T.A.; Pennings, E.J.M.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE - Forensic hair analysis methods are laborious, time-consuming and provide only a rough retrospective estimate of the time of drug intake. Recently, hair imaging methods using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) were reported, but these methods require

  5. Electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometric analysis of hexamethylenediamine-modified maltodextrin and dextran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sisu, E.; Bosker, W.T.E.; Norde, W.; Slaghek, T.M.; Timmermans, J.W.; Peter-Katalinić, J.; Cohen-Stuart, M.A.; Zamfir, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    A combined methodology for obtaining at the preparative scale and characterization by nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem MS (MS/MS) of linear polysaccharides modified at the reducing end is presented. Two polydisperse maltodextrin

  6. BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry: Reagentless Detection of Individual Airborne Spores and Other Bioagent Particles Based on Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Paul Thomas [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Better devices are needed for the detection of aerosolized biological warfare agents. Advances in the ongoing development of one such device, the BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system, are described here in detail. The system samples individual, micrometer-sized particles directly from the air and analyzes them in real-time without sample preparation or use of reagents. At the core of the BAMS system is a dual-polarity, single-particle mass spectrometer with a laser based desorption and ionization (DI) system. The mass spectra produced by early proof-of-concept instruments were highly variable and contained limited information to differentiate certain types of similar biological particles. The investigation of this variability and subsequent changes to the DI laser system are described. The modifications have reduced the observed variability and thereby increased the usable information content in the spectra. These improvements would have little value without software to analyze and identify the mass spectra. Important improvements have been made to the algorithms that initially processed and analyzed the data. Single particles can be identified with an impressive level of accuracy, but to obtain significant reductions in the overall false alarm rate of the BAMS instrument, alarm decisions must be made dynamically on the basis of multiple analyzed particles. A statistical model has been developed to make these decisions and the resulting performance of a hypothetical BAMS system is quantitatively predicted. The predictions indicate that a BAMS system, with reasonably attainable characteristics, can operate with a very low false alarm rate (orders of magnitude lower than some currently fielded biodetectors) while still being sensitive to small concentrations of biological particles in a large range of environments. Proof-of-concept instruments, incorporating some of the modifications described here, have already performed well in independent testing.

  7. BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry: Reagentless Detection of Individual Airborne Spores and Other Bioagent Particles Based on Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, P T

    2004-07-20

    Better devices are needed for the detection of aerosolized biological warfare agents. Advances in the ongoing development of one such device, the BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system, are described here in detail. The system samples individual, micrometer-sized particles directly from the air and analyzes them in real-time without sample preparation or use of reagents. At the core of the BAMS system is a dual-polarity, single-particle mass spectrometer with a laser based desorption and ionization (DI) system. The mass spectra produced by early proof-of-concept instruments were highly variable and contained limited information to differentiate certain types of similar biological particles. The investigation of this variability and subsequent changes to the DI laser system are described. The modifications have reduced the observed variability and thereby increased the usable information content in the spectra. These improvements would have little value without software to analyze and identify the mass spectra. Important improvements have been made to the algorithms that initially processed and analyzed the data. Single particles can be identified with an impressive level of accuracy, but to obtain significant reductions in the overall false alarm rate of the BAMS instrument, alarm decisions must be made dynamically on the basis of multiple analyzed particles. A statistical model has been developed to make these decisions and the resulting performance of a hypothetical BAMS system is quantitatively predicted. The predictions indicate that a BAMS system, with reasonably attainable characteristics, can operate with a very low false alarm rate (orders of magnitude lower than some currently fielded biodetectors) while still being sensitive to small concentrations of biological particles in a large range of environments. Proof-of-concept instruments, incorporating some of the modifications described here, have already performed well in independent testing.

  8. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz [Department of Physics, Kharazmi University, 49 Mofateh Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); The Plasma Physics and Fusion Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdanpanah, Jam, E-mail: jamal.yazdan@gmail.com; Chakhmachi, Amir [The Plasma Physics and Fusion Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahanpanah, Jafar [Department of Physics, Kharazmi University, 49 Mofateh Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani, Elnaz [Laser and Optics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  9. Detailed instantaneous ionization rate of H$_2^+$ in intense laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Vafaee, M; Vafaee, Z; Katanforoush, A; Vafaee, Mohsen; Sabzyan, Hassan; Vafaee, Zahra; Katanforoush, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Component of the instantaneous ionization rate (IIR) is introduced and calculated for H$_2^+$ in a linearly polarized laser field with $1.0 \\times 10^{14}$W cm$^{-2}$ intensity and $\\lambda \\sim 1064 $nm wavelength by direct solution of the fixed-nuclei full dimensional time-dependent Schr \\"odinger equation. The component ionization rates, calculated for different values of inter-nuclear distance, are compared with those calculated via the virtual detector method (VD). Details of the time dependent behavior of the outgoing and incoming electron wavepakets of the H$_2^+$ system in intense laser field at attosecond time scale are studied based on the calculated component ionization rates. It has been shown clearly that the positive signals of the IIR (outgoing electron wavepacket signals) are strong and sharp but the negative signals of the IIR (returning electron wavepacket signals) are smooth and weak. It is also shown that for H-H distance R<5.6, when the laser pulse is turned on with a ramp, the R-depen...

  10. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-01-01

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is here investigated. The optical response of plasma is initially modeled by using the concept of two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. The solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared to the case without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will significantly be changed by applying a minor change to the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in sufficient long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave for triggering the stochastic e...

  11. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-01

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  12. Strong-field ionization inducing multi-electron-hole coherence probed by attosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in attosecond spectroscopy has enabled resolving electron-hole dynamics in real time. The correlated electron-hole dynamics and the resulted coherence are directly related to how fast the ionization is completed. How the laser-induced electron-hole coherence evolves and whether it can be utilized to probe the core dynamics are among the key questions in attosecond physics or even attosecond chemistry. In this work, we propose a new scenario to apply IR-pump-XUV-probe schemes to resolving strong field ionization induced and attosecond pulse driven electron-hole dynamics and coherence in real time. The coherent driving of both the infrared laser and the attosecond pulse correlates the dynamics of the core-hole and the valence-hole which leads to the otherwise forbidden absorption and emission of XUV photon. An analytical model is developed based on the strong-field approximation by taking into account of the essential multielectron configurations. The emission spectra from the core-valence transition and the core-hole recombination are found modulating strongly as functions of the time delay between the two pulses, which provides a unique insight into the instantaneous ionization and the interplay of the multi-electron-hole coherence.

  13. Sensitive monitoring of volatile chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry with counter-flow introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Tsuge, Koichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Iura, Kazumitsu; Itoi, Teruo; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Koji; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Waki, Izumi; Ezawa, Naoya; Tanimoto, Hiroyuki; Honjo, Shigeru; Fukano, Masumi; Okada, Hidehiro

    2013-03-05

    A new method for sensitively and selectively detecting chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in air was developed using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Four volatile and highly toxic CWAs were examined, including the nerve gases sarin and tabun, and the blister agents mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1). Soft ionization was performed using corona discharge to form reactant ions, and the ions were sent in the direction opposite to the airflow by an electric field to eliminate the interfering neutral molecules such as ozone and nitrogen oxide. This resulted in efficient ionization of the target CWAs, especially in the negative ionization mode. Quadrupole MS (QMS) and ion trap tandem MS (ITMS) instruments were developed and investigated, which were movable on the building floor. For sarin, tabun, and HD, the protonated molecular ions and their fragment ions were observed in the positive ion mode. For L1, the chloride adduct ions of L1 hydrolysis products were observed in negative ion mode. The limit of detection (LOD) values in real-time or for a 1 s measurement monitoring the characteristic ions were between 1 and 8 μg/m(3) in QMS instrument. Collision-induced fragmentation patterns for the CWAs were observed in an ITMS instrument, and optimized combinations of the parent and daughter ion pairs were selected to achieve real-time detection with LOD values of around 1 μg/m(3). This is a first demonstration of sensitive and specific real-time detection of both positively and negatively ionizable CWAs by MS instruments used for field monitoring.

  14. Study of bis(bibenzyls) in bryophytes using electron ionization time-of-flight and electrospray ionization triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huaifang; Xing, Jie; Xie, Chunfeng; Qu, Jianbo; Gao, Yanhui; Lou, Hongxiang

    2007-01-01

    A detailed analysis of mass spectra generated from bis(bibenzyl) compounds in bryophytes under electron ionization time-of-flight (EI-TOF) and electrospray ionization triple-quadrupole (ESI-TQ) mass spectrometry conditions is reported. Proposed structures of the fragment ions were obtained by tracking the functional groups of 15 bis(bibenzyls), the structures of which are similar except for some alkoxyl substituents and linkage sites of biphenyl ether bonds. The elucidation was aided by the use of accurate mass measurements. Attempts have been made to provide rational pathways for the formation of these fragment ions, and a generalized fragmentation mechanism is proposed. The bis(bibenzyls) mentioned in this study include three types according to their structure characteristics, i.e. one biphenyl ether bond (A-type), two biphenyl ether bonds (B-type), one biphenyl ether and one biphenyl bond (C-type). The three types display different EI-MS and ESI-MS/MS product profiles, by which the bis(bibenzyl) type and the number of alkoxyl substituents can be identified. Isomers of bis(bibenzyls) can be differentiated to some extent, while the linkage sites of biphenyl ether bonds are difficult to identify. The structure-fragmentation relationships will facilitate the characterization of other bis(bibenzyls) and this will be of value for the high-throughput screening of novel bis(bibenzyls) in bryophytes.

  15. Study of a complex environmental mixture by electrospray ionization and laser desorption ionization high resolution mass spectrometry: the cigarette smoke aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Carré

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols from the mainstream cigarette smoke have been analyzed by electrospray ionization (ESI coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS. Measurements have been conducted in positive ion mode. The chemical composition of cigarette smoke aerosol is significant because it gives insights of one complex indoor environmental mixture. Almost 1300 chemical compositions relative to nitrogen species were successfully determined through the accurate mass measurement and the good ion production of the used technique. The most abundant class of compounds corresponds to N2 one (hydrocarbons with two nitrogen atoms. For other classes, the van Krevelen diagrams ensured to define that other nitrogen and oxygen-nitrogen compounds adopted similar behavior in terms of unsaturation and alkylation range. The detailed composition of cigarette smoke aerosol provided a typical chemical fingerprint from the biomass pyrolysis with tobacco-specific compounds. We examined also the contribution of laser desorption ionization (LDI technique coupled to FTICRMS for the acute analysis of cigarette smoke aerosol. While a part of the chemical composition were found similar to ESI results, LDI achieved a broader range of poly-aromatic compounds and highlight new class compounds as pure hydrocarbon and oxygen-containing species. The combination of ESI and LDI with high resolution mass spectrometry clearly increased significantly the coverage of the “whole composition” of environmental aerosols such as cigarette smoke aerosol.

  16. Quasi-trapping chemical ionization source based on a commercial VUV lamp for time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Hou, Keyong; Hua, Lei; Xie, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Wuduo; Chen, Wendong; Chen, Chuang; Li, Haiyang

    2014-02-04

    The application of VUV lamp-based single photon ionization (SPI) was limited due to low photon energy and poor photon flux density. In this work, we designed a quasi-trapping chemical ionization (QT-CI) source with a commercial VUV 10.6 eV krypton lamp for time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The three electrode configuration ion source with RF voltage on the second electrode constitutes a quasi-trapping region, which has two features: accelerating the photoelectrons originated from the photoelectric effect with VUV light to trigger the chemical ionization through ion-molecule reaction and increasing the collisions between reactant ion O2(+) and analyte molecules to enhance the efficiency of chemical ionization. Compared to single SPI based on VUV krypton lamp, the QT-CI ion source not only apparently improved the sensitivity (e.g., 12-118 fold enhancement were achieved for 13 molecules, including aromatic hydrocarbon, chlorinated hydrocarbon, hydrogen sulfide, etc.) but also extended the range of ionizable molecules with ionization potential (IP) higher than 10.6 eV, such as propane, dichloroethane, and trichloromethane.

  17. Boosting terahertz generation in laser-field ionized gases using a sawtooth wave shape

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, P González de Alaiza; Bergé, L; Skupin, S; Cabrera-Granado, E; Köhler, C; Morgner, U; Husakou, A; Herrmann, J

    2014-01-01

    Broadband ultrashort terahertz (THz) pulses can be produced using plasma generation in a noble gas ionized by femtosecond two-color pulses. Here we demonstrate that, by using multiple-frequency laser pulses, one can obtain a waveform which optimizes the free electron trajectories in such a way that they reach the highest velocity at the electric field extrema. This allows to increase the THz conversion efficiency to the percent level, an unprecedented performance for THz generation in gases. Besides the analytical study of THz generation using a local current model, we perform comprehensive 3D simulations accounting for propagation effects which confirm this prediction. Our results show that THz conversion via tunnel ionization can be greatly improved with well-designed multicolor pulses.

  18. Superelastic rescattering in single ionization of helium in strong laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Chao; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; He, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Rescattering is a central process in ultrafast physics, in which an electron, freed from an atom and accelerated by a laser field, loses its energy by producing high-order harmonics or multiple ionization. Here, taking helium as a prototypical atom, we demonstrate numerically superelastic rescattering in single ionization of an atom. In this scenario, the absorption of a high-energy extreme ultraviolet photon leads to emission of one electron and excitation of the second one into its first excited state, forming He+*. A time-delayed midinfrared laser pulse accelerates the freed electron, drives it back to the He+*, and induces the transition of the bound electron to the ground state of the ion. Identification of the superelastic rescattering process in the photoelectron momentum spectra provides a means to determine the photoelectron momentum at the time of rescattering without using any information of the time-delayed probe laser pulse.

  19. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makito, K.; Shin, J.-H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Masuda, S. [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kodama, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of {approx}3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  20. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makito, K.; Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Shin, J.-H.; Masuda, S.; Kodama, R.

    2012-10-01

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of ˜3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  1. Calibration of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight peptide mass fingerprinting spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjernø, Karin; Højrup, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes a number of aspects important for calibration of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight spectra prior to peptide mass fingerprinting searches. Both multipoint internal calibration and mass defect-based calibration is illustrated. The chapter describes ho...... potential internal calibrants, like tryptic autodigest peptides and keratin-related peptides, can be identified and used for high-precision calibration. Furthermore, the construction of project/user-specific lists of potential calibrants is illustrated....

  2. Use of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study binding interactions between a replication terminator protein and DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Kapur, Amit; Beck, Jennifer L.; Brown, Susan E.; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Sheil, Margaret M.

    2002-01-01

    Tus protein binds tightly to specific DNA sequences (Ter) on the Escherichia coli chromosome halting replication. We report here conditions for detecting the 1 : 1 Tus–Ter complex by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). ESI mass spectra of a mixture of Tus and nonspecific DNA showed ions predominantly from uncomplexed Tus protein, indicating that the Tus–Ter complex observed in the gas phase was the result of a specific interaction rather than nonspecific associations in the io...

  3. The amino acid sequences of eleven tryptic peptides of papaya mosaic virus protein by electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, A; Short, M N; Self, R; Parsley, K R

    1982-04-01

    Eleven of the fourteen tryptic peptides of papaya mosaic virus protein have been sequenced by electron ionization mass spectrometry using chemical and enzymic hydrolyses and mixture analysis as required. Mid-chain cleavages of N-C bonds produced secondary ion series which allowed up to 16 residues to be sequenced without further hydrolysis. Mixture analysis on hydrolysis products enabled a 24 residue tryptic peptide to be sequenced from the data recorded in a single mass spectrum.

  4. High Precision Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Dating of Corals and Its Application to Paleo—Environmental Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆荣; 张兆峰; 等

    2001-01-01

    Global change has become a hot spot in Quaternary geology,and high-precision,high-sensitivity dating is also an urgent problem which needs to be solved.This paper presents some achievements in U-servies dating of marine corals by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and its application to the study of paleo-environments.Recently,coral samples were determined for their ages on a MAT-262 mass spectrometer and satisfactory results have been obtained.

  5. High Precision Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Dating of Corals and Its Application to Paleo-Environmental Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆荣; 张兆峰; 彭子成; 马志邦

    2001-01-01

    Global change has become a hot spot in Quaternary geology, and high-precision,high-sensitivity dating is also an urgent problem which needs to be solved. This paper presents some achievements in U-series dating of marine corals by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and its application to the study of paleo-environments. Recently, coral samples were determined for their ages on a MAT-262 mass spectrometer and satisfactory results have been obtained.

  6. Surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for direct ambient sample analysis without toxic chemical contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanwen; Zheng, Jian; Zhang, Xie; Luo, Mingbiao; Wang, Zhichang; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2007-08-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry, pioneered with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) technique, is of increasing interest in recent years. In this study, a corona discharge ionization source is adapted for direct surface desorption chemical ionization of compounds on various surfaces at atmospheric pressure. Ambient air, with about 60% relative humidity, is used as a reagent to generate primary ions such as H(3)O(+), which is then directed to impact the sample surface for desorption and ionization. Under experimental conditions, protonated or deprotonated molecules of analytes present on various samples are observed using positive or negative corona discharge. Fast detection of trace amounts of analytes present in pharmaceutical preparations, viz foods, skins and clothes has been demonstrated without any sample pretreatment. Taking the advantage of the gasless setup, powder samples such as amino acids and mixtures of pharmaceutical preparations are rapidly analyzed. Impurities such as sudan dyes in tomato sauce are detected semiquantitatively. Molecular markers (e.g. putrescine) for meat spoilage are successfully identified from an artificially spoiled fish sample. Chemical warfare agent stimulants, explosives and herbicides are directly detected from the skin samples and clothing exposed to these compounds. This provides a detection limit of sub-pg (S/N > or = 3) range in MS2. Metabolites and consumed chemicals such as glucose are detected successfully from human skins. Conclusively, surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) mass spectrometry, without toxic chemical contamination, detects various compounds in complex matrices, showing promising applications for analyses of human related samples.

  7. Quantitative determination of acetylcholine in microdialysis samples using liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Lehtonen, Marko; Ihalainen, Jouni; Sarajärvi, Timo; Auriola, Seppo

    2007-01-01

    A fast, simple and sensitive liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of acetylcholine in rat brain microdialysis samples. The chromatographic separation was achieved in 3 min on a reversed-phase column with isocratic conditions using a mobile phase containing 2% (v/v) of acetonitrile and 0.05% (v/v) of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). A stable isotope-labeled internal standard was included in the analysis and detection was carried out with a linear ion trap mass spectrometer using selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Analyte ionization was performed with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source without applying discharge current (atmospheric pressure spray ionization). This special ionization technique offered significant advantages over electrospray ionization for the analysis of acetylcholine with reversed-phase ion-pairing chromatography. The lower limit of quantification was 0.15 nM (1.5 fmol on-column) and linearity was maintained over the range of 0.15-73 nM, providing a concentration range that is significantly wider than that of the existing LC/MS methods. Good accuracy and precision were obtained for concentrations within the standard curve range. The method was validated and has been used extensively for the determination of acetylcholine in rat brain microdialysis samples.

  8. The coupling of direct analysis in real time ionization to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for ultrahigh-resolution mass analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Julia L; McKenna, Amy M; Marshall, Alan G; Eyler, John R; Powell, David H

    2010-03-01

    Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) is an ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry that provides rapid and sensitive analyses with little or no sample preparation. DART has been reported primarily for mass analyzers of low to moderate resolving power such as quadrupole ion traps and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers. In the current work, a custom-built DART source has been successfully coupled to two different Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometers for the first time. Comparison of spectra of the isobaric compounds, diisopropyl methylphosphonate and theophylline, acquired by 4.7 T FT-ICR MS and TOF MS, demonstrates that the TOF resolving power can be insufficient for compositionally complex samples. 9.4 T FT-ICR MS yielded the highest mass resolving power yet reported with DART ionization for 1,2-benzanthracene and 9,10-diphenylanthracene. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit a spatial dependence in ionization mechanisms between the DART source and the mass spectrometer. The feasibility of analyzing a variety of samples was established with the introduction and analysis of food products and crude oil samples. DART FT-ICR MS provides complex sample analysis that is rapid, highly selective and information-rich, but limited to relatively low-mass analytes.

  9. Probe electrospray ionization (PESI) mass spectrometry with discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Usmanov, Dilshadbek T; Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Mandal, Mridul K; Saha, Subhrakanti

    2015-01-01

    Probe electrospray ionization (PESI) using a 0.2 mm outside diameter titanium wire was performed and the generated ions were introduced into the mass spectrometer via a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface using a pinch valve. Time-lapse PESI mass spectra were acquired by gradually increasing delay time for the pinch valve opening with respect to the start of each electrospray event when a high voltage was applied. The opening time of the pinch valve was 20 ms. Time-resolved PESI mass spectra showed marked differences for 10 mM NaCl, 10(-5) M gramicidin S and insulin in H(2)O/CH(3)OH/CH(3)COOH/CH(3)COONH(4) (65/35/1) with and without the addition of 10 mM CH(3)COONH(4). This was ascribed to the pH change of the liquid attached to the needle caused by electrochemical reactions taking place at the interface between the metal probe and the solution. NaCl cluster ions appeared only after the depletion of analytes. For the mixed solution of 10(-5) M cytochrome c, insulin, and gramicidin S in H(2)O/CH(3)OH/CH(3)COOH (65/35/1), a sequential appearance of analyte ions in the order of cytochrome c→insulin→gramicidin S was observed. The present technique was applied to three narcotic samples; methamphetamine, morphine and codeine. Limits of detection for these compounds were 10 ppb in H(2)O/CH(3)OH (1/1) for the single sampling with a pinch valve opening time of 200 ms.

  10. Fabrication of a polystyrene microfluidic chip coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for protein analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xianqiao; Dong, Yuanyuan; He, Qiaohong; Chen, Hengwu; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2015-05-15

    A highly integrated polystyrene (PS) microfluidic chip coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for on-chip protein digestion and online analysis was developed. The immobilized enzymatic microreactor for on-chip protein digestion was integrated onto microchip via the novel method of region-selective UV-modification combined with glutaraldehyde-based immobilization. The micro film electric contact for applying high voltage was prepared on chips by using UV-directed electroless plating technique. A micro-tip was machined at the end of main channel, serving as the interface between microchip and mass spectrometric detector. On-chip digestion and online detection of protein was carried out by coupling the microchip with mass spectrometry (MS). The influences of methanol flow rate in side channel on the stability of spray and intensity of signals were investigated systematically. Also the influence of sample flow rate on the performance of immobilized enzymatic reactor were investigated. Stable spray was obtained at the spray voltage of 2.8-3.0kV and the methanol flow rate of 500-700nLmin(-1) with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of total ion current (TIC) less than 10%. The influence of sample flow rate on the performance of immobilized enzymatic reactor was also studied. The sequence coverage of protein identification decreased with the increase of flow rate of the sample solution. A sequence coverage of 96% was obtained with immobilized enzymatic reactor at the sample flow rate of 100nLmin(-1) with the reaction time of 8.4min. It could detect cytochrome c as low as 10μgmL(-1) with the developed system. No obvious decrease in protein digestion efficiency was observed after the chip continuously performed for 4h and stored for 15d.

  11. Alkaloid profiling of the Chinese herbal medicine Fuzi by combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Heijden, R. van der; Spijksma, G.; Reijmers, T.; Wang, M.; Xu, G.; Hankemeier, T.; Greef, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) method was developed for the high throughput and robust qualitative profiling of alkaloids in Fuzi-the processed lateral roots of the Chinese herbal medicine Aconitum carmichaeli Debx (A. carmichaeli). After optimization, pow

  12. Magnetometer Searches for Ultra Low Mass Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romalis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    New spin interactions arise in a variety of extensions to the Standard Model. Well-known spin-dependent effects, such as permanent electric dipole moments and violations of Lorentz and CPT symmetries, have been searched for in many experiments. The existence of low-mass axion-like particles would also generate spin-dependent effects that can be searched for in similar experiments, but often with unique signatures. Since particles with spin also have a magnetic moment, such experiments are automatically sensitive to ordinary magnetic fields and one of the challenges is to eliminate such effects, using for example, two different spin species in a co-magnetometer arrangement. I will describe several past and on-going experiments using co-magnetometers based on nuclear spin-polarized noble gases. These experiments are used to search for both axion-like dark matter and for axion-mediated forces that are independent of dark matter.

  13. Measurement of 26Al in Iron Meteorites by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langellier, C.; Birck, J. L.; Allegre, C. J.

    1992-07-01

    We report here the measurement of ^26Al by thermal ionization mass spectrometry in iron meteorites. Nuclides produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with meteoritic bodies are widely used to reconstruct the parental history of meteorites and also to address the problem of constancy of cosmic rays in the past. In iron meteorites the half life of ^26Al is much shorter than the exposure age and saturation is reached. Its concentration is then directly related to the preatmospheric shielding of the analyzed sample. It can be also used together, with other short-lived nuclides, to calculate the terrestrial residence time for found meteorites. Natural contents of ^26Al in iron meteorites are very small (a few dpm per kg) and have been measured earlier by counting techniques and AMS. For thermal ionization the difficulty resides mostly in the measurement of the ^26Al/^27Al ratio. ^27Al may be contained in the sample and also is introduced by the chemical separation. ^27Al beams of 10^-11 A are readily obtained with a few ng of aluminium and are measured on a standard faraday cup. ^26Al was measured on a low background electron multiplier operated in the ion counter mode. ^27Al content was measured by isotope dilution using a ^26Al spike. The ^26Al ion beam can be interfered by traces of ^26Mg. Usually the ^26Mg background could be brought lower than 10^-9 relative to ^27Al. This is sufficient for the present experiment. No organic interference was present at the same level. The abundance sensitivity stemming from the ^27Al beam on mass 26 is 3 10^-9. Results: Samples sizes for this study range from 100 to 300 mg of iron. Ratios are measured with a precision of about 1% thereby leading to a final ^26Al content with an accuracy around 2%. Two meteorites were investigated so far: Grant and Canyon Diablo. Grant is one of the best documented meteorites with regard to spallation effects. The result on Grant is an agreement with literature AMS data (Graf et al., 1987

  14. Use of electron ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spetrometry for screening and identification of organic pollutants in waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portoles, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Hernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for multiclass screening of organic contaminants in water based on the use of gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC–(APCI)QTOF MS). The soft ionization promo

  15. Statistics of magnetic field fluctuations in a partially ionized space plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer, E-mail: dastgeer.shaikh@uah.ed [Department of Physics and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomy Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2010-07-05

    Voyager 1 and 2 data reveals that magnetic field fluctuations are compressive and exhibit a Gaussian distribution in the compressed heliosheath plasma, whereas they follow a lognormal distribution in a nearly incompressible supersonic solar wind plasma. To describe the evolution of magnetic field, we develop a nonlinear simulation model of a partially ionized plasma based on two-dimensional time-dependent multifluid model. Our model self-consistently describes solar wind plasma ions, electrons, neutrals and pickup ions. It is found from our simulations that the magnetic field evolution is governed by mode conversion process that leads to the suppression of vortical modes, whereas the compressive modes are amplified. An implication of the mode conversion process is to quench the Alfvenic interactions associated with the vortical motions. Consequently anisotropic cascades are reduced. This is accompanied by the amplification of compressional modes that tend to isotropize the plasma fluctuations and lead to a Gaussian distribution of the magnetic field.

  16. Matrix influence on derivatization and ionization processes during selenoamino acid liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebane, Riin; Oldekop, Maarja-Liisa; Herodes, Koit

    2014-04-01

    Considering the importance of derivatization in LC/ESI/MS analysis, the objective of this work was to develop a method for evaluation of matrix effect that would discriminate between matrix effect due to the derivatization reaction yield and from the ESI. Four derivatization reagents (TAHS, DEEMM, DNS, FMOC-Cl) were studied with respect to matrix effects using two selenoamino acids and onion matrix as model system. A novel method for assessing matrix effects of LC/ESI/MS analyses involving derivatization is proposed, named herein post-derivatization spiking, that allows evaluating effect of matrix on ESI ionization without derivatization reaction yield contribution. The proposed post-derivatization spiking method allowed to demonstrate that the reason of reduced analytical signal can be signal suppression in ESI (as in case of DNS derivatives with matrix effects 38-99%), alteration of derivatization reaction yield (TAHS, matrix effects 92-113%, but reaction yields 20-50%) or both (FMOC-Cl, matrix effects 28-88% and reaction yields 50-70%). In case of DEEMM derivatives, matrix reduces reaction yield but enhances ESI/MS signal. A method for matrix effect evaluation was developed. It was also confirmed that matrix effects can be reduced by dilution.

  17. Detection and measurement of delay in the yield of negative ions from the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, V. G.; Khvostenko, O. G.; Tuimedov, G. M.

    2016-02-01

    The times of extraction of negative ions from the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer have been measured. The obtained values amount to several dozen microseconds or above—that is, significantly exceed the time of free ion escape from the chamber. It is established that ions are retained in the ionization chamber because of their adsorption on the inner surface. This leads to distortion of the experimentally measured lifetimes of negative ions that become unstable with respect to autodetachment of the excess electron.

  18. Investigation of the energy levels of the gadolinium atom using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J T; Rhee, Y J; Lee, J M

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the ionization processes, the energy values, and the strengths of ion signals by using a dye laser frequency in the ultra-violet range with one-color multi-photon ionization. Also, two color multi-photon ionization by using another near infrared photon has been done to investigate energy levels with odd-parity in the energy range of between 35500 cm sup - sup 1 and 37700 cm sup - sup 1

  19. Constraining the sensitivity of iodide adduct chemical ionization mass spectrometry to multifunctional organic molecules using the collision limit and thermodynamic stability of iodide ion adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Iyer, Siddarth; Mohr, Claudia; Lee, Ben H.; D'Ambro, Emma L.; Kurtén, Theo; Thornton, Joel A.

    2016-04-01

    The sensitivity of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ions formed per number density of analytes) is fundamentally limited by the collision frequency between reagent ions and analytes, known as the collision limit, the ion-molecule reaction time, and the transmission efficiency of product ions to the detector. We use the response of a time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) to N2O5, known to react with iodide at the collision limit, to constrain the combined effects of ion-molecule reaction time, which is strongly influenced by mixing and ion losses in the ion-molecule reaction drift tube. A mass spectrometric voltage scanning procedure elucidates the relative binding energies of the ion adducts, which influence the transmission efficiency of molecular ions through the electric fields within the vacuum chamber. Together, this information provides a critical constraint on the sensitivity of a ToF-CIMS towards a wide suite of routinely detected multifunctional organic molecules for which no calibration standards exist. We describe the scanning procedure and collision limit determination, and we show results from the application of these constraints to the measurement of organic aerosol composition at two different field locations.

  20. Comparison of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the detection of lignans from sesame seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, K.; Vincken, J.P.; Gruppen, H.

    2008-01-01

    In sesame seeds, high concentrations of lignans are present. When these lignans are fermented in the human colon, a range of structurally different lignans is formed. A good liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) protocol for the analysis of lignans in complex mixtures is lacking. In order