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Sample records for field curie-weiss model

  1. Large deviations of the finite-time magnetization of the Curie-Weiss random-field Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paga, Pierre; Kühn, Reimer

    2017-08-01

    We study the large deviations of the magnetization at some finite time in the Curie-Weiss random field Ising model with parallel updating. While relaxation dynamics in an infinite-time horizon gives rise to unique dynamical trajectories [specified by initial conditions and governed by first-order dynamics of the form mt +1=f (mt) ] , we observe that the introduction of a finite-time horizon and the specification of terminal conditions can generate a host of metastable solutions obeying second-order dynamics. We show that these solutions are governed by a Newtonian-like dynamics in discrete time which permits solutions in terms of both the first-order relaxation ("forward") dynamics and the backward dynamics mt +1=f-1(mt) . Our approach allows us to classify trajectories for a given final magnetization as stable or metastable according to the value of the rate function associated with them. We find that in analogy to the Freidlin-Wentzell description of the stochastic dynamics of escape from metastable states, the dominant trajectories may switch between the two types (forward and backward) of first-order dynamics. Additionally, we show how to compute rate functions when uncertainty in the quenched disorder is introduced.

  2. A Conditional Curie-Weiss Model for Stylized Multi-group Binary Choice with Social Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku, Alex Akwasi; Edusei, Kwame Owusu; Ansah, Richard Kwame

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposes a conditional Curie-Weiss model as a model for decision making in a stylized society made up of binary decision makers that face a particular dichotomous choice between two options. Following Brock and Durlauf (Discrete choice with social interaction I: theory, 1955), we set-up both socio-economic and statistical mechanical models for the choice problem. We point out when both the socio-economic and statistical mechanical models give rise to the same self-consistent equilibrium mean choice level(s). Phase diagram of the associated statistical mechanical model and its socio-economic implications are discussed.

  3. Misjudging frustrations in spin liquids from oversimplified use of Curie-Weiss law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nag, Abhishek, E-mail: msan@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Ray, Sugata [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Centre for Advanced Materials, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2017-02-15

    Absence of a single smoking-gun experiment to identify a quantum spin liquid, has kept their characterisation difficult till date. Featureless dc magnetic susceptibility and large antiferromagnetic frustration are always considered as the essential pointers to these systems. However, we show that the amount of frustration estimated by using generalised Curie-Weiss law on these susceptibility data are prone to errors and thus should be dealt with caution. We measure and analyse susceptibility data of Ba{sub 3}ZnIr{sub 2}O{sub 9}, a spin orbital liquid candidate and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, a 1.5 K antiferromagnet and show the distinguishing features between them. A continuous and significant change in Curie and Weiss constants is seen to take place in Ba{sub 3}ZnIr{sub 2}O{sub 9} and other reported spin liquids with the change in the range of fitting temperatures showing the need of a temperature ‘range-of-fit’ analysis before commenting on the Weiss constants of spin liquids. The variation observed is similar to fluctuations among topological sectors persisting over a range of temperature in spin-ice candidates. On the other hand, even though we find correlations to exist at even 100 times the ordering temperature in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, no such fluctuation is observed which may be used as an additional distinguishing signature of spin liquids over similarly featureless correlated paramagnets. - Highlights: • Curie-Weiss fitting may give erroneous frustration parameters in spin-liquids. • The results depend upon choice of fitting method and temperature range used. • More appropriate method is to use a ʽrange of fit’ analysis. • Can distinguish between spin-liquids and correlated paramagnets.

  4. Purity analyses of high-purity organic compounds with nitroxyl radicals based on the Curie-Weiss law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Shimosaka, Takuya

    2015-05-01

    This work reports an attempt to quantify the purities of powders of high-purity organic compounds with stable nitroxyl radicals (namely, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO), 1-oxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine (TEMPOL), and 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl benzoate (4-hydroxy-TEMPO benzoate)) in terms of mass fractions by using our "effective magnetic moment method," which is based on both the Curie-Weiss law and a fundamental equation of electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR). The temperature dependence of the magnetic moment resulting from the radicals was measured with a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The g value for each compound was measured with an X-band ESR spectrometer. The results of the purities were (0.998 ± 0.064) kg kg-1 for TEMPO, (1.019 ± 0.040) kg kg-1 for TEMPOL, and (1.001 ± 0.048) kg kg-1 for 4-hydroxy-TEMPO benzoate. These results demonstrate that this analytical method as a future candidate of potential primary direct method can measure the purities with expanded uncertainties of approximately 5%.

  5. A mechanical approach to mean field spin models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Giuseppe; Barra, Adriano

    2009-05-01

    Inspired by the bridge pioneered by Guerra among statistical mechanics on lattice and analytical mechanics on 1+1 continuous Euclidean space time, we built a self-consistent method to solve for the thermodynamics of mean field models defined on lattice, whose order parameters self-average. We show the whole procedure by analyzing in full detail the simplest test case, namely, the Curie-Weiss model. Further, we report some applications also to models whose order parameters do not self-average by using the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass as a guide.

  6. Low-field magnetoresistance of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} perovskite synthesized by reactive milling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manh, D.H., E-mail: manhdh@ims.vast.ac.v [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay Distr., Hanoi (Viet Nam); Phong, P.T. [Nha Trang Pedagogic College, 1 Nguyen Chanh St., Khanh Hoa Province (Viet Nam); Thanh, T.D.; Hong, L.V.; Phuc, N.X. [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay Distr., Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2010-06-11

    Nanocrystalline, granular samples of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) were synthesized by reactive milling method and annealed at various temperatures. Effect of grain size on the low-field magnetoresistance (LFMR) has been investigated. Based upon a phenomenological model taking into account the spin-polarized transport across grain boundaries, we explained magnetic field dependence of magnetoresistance in LCMO samples. The contribution to the magnetoresistance coming from spin-polarized tunneling was separated out from the intergranular contribution. The fitted results showed that the temperature dependence of the LFMR displays a Curie-Weiss law-like behavior.

  7. Neither Goodenough ionic model nor Zener polaron model for Bi 0.5Ca 0.5Mn 1- xNi xO 3- δ system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulemonde, O.; Skovsen, I.; Mesguich, F.; Gaudin, E.

    2008-04-01

    The magnetic susceptibilities of three Bi 0.5Ca 0.5MnO 3- δ compounds synthesised by three different methods were characterised and analysed. Large magnetic Mn x clusters ( x ≥ 4) were considered to explain the high value of the Curie-Weiss constant. Unlike previous studies on similar systems, Goodenough ionic model or Zener polaron model is not suitable. In all cases, cluster behaviour is observed at low field and at low temperature. The influence of the oxygen stoichiometry and the homogeneity of the cation distribution depending on the method of the synthesis used is discussed. Finally, the effects of nickel doping on the magnetic properties were studied and the cluster behaviour was confirmed. The distribution in size of the clusters depends on the amount of nickel and it induces a glassy magnetic behaviour.

  8. Electron spin resonance study of the demagnetization fields of the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Gimazov, Yu.I. Talanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the electron spin resonance study of the La1-xCaxMnO3 manganite and the diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl thin films for the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to plane of the films are presented. The temperature dependence of the demagnetizing field is obtained. The parameters of the Curie-Weiss law are estimated for the paramagnetic thin film.

  9. Mean field spin glasses treated with PDE techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Adriano; Del Ferraro, Gino; Tantari, Daniele

    2013-07-01

    Following an original idea of Guerra, in these notes we analyze the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model from different perspectives, all sharing the underlying approach which consists in linking the resolution of the statistical mechanics of the model (e.g. solving for the free energy) to well-known partial differential equation (PDE) problems (in suitable spaces). The plan is then to solve the related PDE using techniques involved in their native field and lastly bringing back the solution in the proper statistical mechanics framework. Within this strand, after a streamlined test-case on the Curie-Weiss model to highlight the methods more than the physics behind, we solve the SK both at the replica symmetric and at the 1-RSB level, obtaining the correct expression for the free energy via an analogy to a Fourier equation and for the self-consistencies with an analogy to a Burger equation, whose shock wave develops exactly at critical noise level (triggering the phase transition). Our approach, beyond acting as a new alternative method (with respect to the standard routes) for tackling the complexity of spin glasses, links symmetries in PDE theory with constraints in statistical mechanics and, as a novel result from the theoretical physics perspective, we obtain a new class of polynomial identities (namely of Aizenman-Contucci type, but merged within the Guerra's broken replica measures), whose interest lies in understanding, via the recent Panchenko breakthroughs, how to force the overlap organization to the ultrametric tree predicted by Parisi.

  10. Local magnetic moments in dilute Cr-Nb alloys: the effects of applied magnetic field and Nb concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, P E N de; Oliveira, L M de; Ortiz, W A; Camargo, P C de; Oliveira, A J A de

    2005-01-01

    In this work we present magnetic susceptibility results for Cr-x at.% Nb alloys (x = 0.2, 0.6, 0.7, 1.4, and 2.0), showing that a local short-range order spin-density wave (L-SDW) appears at a characteristic temperature (T loc ) above the Neel temperature. The evidence for L-SDW is based on a Curie-Weiss-like behaviour, which is suppressed when large magnetic fields are applied or for alloys with Nb concentration above x = 2.0 at.%

  11. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2017-09-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  12. Model of unified gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite Lopes, J.

    1998-04-01

    In this work, we discuss the physical ideas which represents the basis for the unified gauge field model. Despite of the difficulties that we presently have for embodying in a natural manner muons and hadrons in that model, we have the feeling that we are on the way which seems to lead to the construction of a theory in which the Maxwell electromagnetic field and the Fermi weak interaction field are manifestations of a unique subjacent physical entity - the unified gauge fields. (author)

  13. Field Model: An Object-Oriented Data Model for Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Patrick J.

    2001-01-01

    We present an extensible, object-oriented data model designed for field data entitled Field Model (FM). FM objects can represent a wide variety of fields, including fields of arbitrary dimension and node type. FM can also handle time-series data. FM achieves generality through carefully selected topological primitives and through an implementation that leverages the potential of templated C++. FM supports fields where the nodes values are paired with any cell type. Thus FM can represent data where the field nodes are paired with the vertices ("vertex-centered" data), fields where the nodes are paired with the D-dimensional cells in R(sup D) (often called "cell-centered" data), as well as fields where nodes are paired with edges or other cell types. FM is designed to effectively handle very large data sets; in particular FM employs a demand-driven evaluation strategy that works especially well with large field data. Finally, the interfaces developed for FM have the potential to effectively abstract field data based on adaptive meshes. We present initial results with a triangular adaptive grid in R(sup 2) and discuss how the same design abstractions would work equally well with other adaptive-grid variations, including meshes in R(sup 3).

  14. An equilibrium approach to modelling social interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Ignacio

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to put forward a statistical mechanics theory of social interaction, generalizing econometric discrete choice models. After showing the formal equivalence linking econometric multinomial logit models to equilibrium statical mechanics, a multi-population generalization of the Curie-Weiss model for ferromagnets is considered as a starting point in developing a model capable of describing sudden shifts in aggregate human behaviour. Existence of the thermodynamic limit for the model is shown by an asymptotic sub-additivity method and factorization of correlation functions is proved almost everywhere. The exact solution of the model is provided in the thermodynamical limit by finding converging upper and lower bounds for the system's pressure, and the solution is used to prove an analytic result regarding the number of possible equilibrium states of a two-population system. The work stresses the importance of linking regimes predicted by the model to real phenomena, and to this end it proposes two possible procedures to estimate the model's parameters starting from micro-level data. These are applied to three case studies based on census type data: though these studies are found to be ultimately inconclusive on an empirical level, considerations are drawn that encourage further refinements of the chosen modelling approach.

  15. Renormalization of gauge fields models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becchi, C.; Rouet, A.; Stora, R.

    1974-01-01

    A new approach to gauge field models is described. It is based on the Bogoliubov-Parasiuk-Hepp-Zimmermann (BPHZ) renormalization scheme making extensive use of the quantum action principle, and the Slavnov invariance. The quantum action principle being first summarized in the framework of the BPHZ is then applied to a global symmetry problem. The symmetry property of the gauge field Lagrangians in the tree approximation is exhibited, and the preservation of this property at the quantum level is discussed. The main results relative to the Abelian and SU(2) Higgs-Kibble models are briefly reviewed [fr

  16. A model unified field equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perring, J.K.; Skyrme, T.H.R.

    1994-01-01

    The classical solutions of a unified field theory in a two-dimensional space-time are considered. This system, a model of a interacting mesons and baryons, illustrates how the particle can be built from a wave-packet of mesons and how reciprocally the meson appears as a tightly bound combination of particle and antiparticle. (author). 6 refs

  17. Field testing of bioenergetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Doubly labeled water provides a direct measure of the rate of carbon dioxide production by free-living animals. With appropriate conversion factors, based on chemical composition of the diet and assimilation efficiency, field metabolic rate (FMR), in units of energy expenditure, and field feeding rate can be estimated. Validation studies indicate that doubly labeled water measurements of energy metabolism are accurate to within 7% in reptiles, birds, and mammals. This paper discusses the use of doubly labeled water to generate empirical models for FMR and food requirements for a variety of animals

  18. The magnetic moment of Ni in the Laves phase compound GdNi2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Kazuo; Umehara, Izuru; Miyazawa, Tomoaki; Adachi, Yoshiya; Sato, Kiyoo

    2005-01-01

    Magnetization and inverse susceptibility of the Laves phase compound GdNi 2 were investigated and analyzed in detail by employing molecular-field analysis. Both the temperature dependence of the magnetization and the Curie-Weiss (C-W) law-like linear relationship of inverse susceptibility are reproduced in terms of a two-sublattice model and it is seen that the magnetic structure of GdNi 2 is ferrimagnetic and Ni in GdNi 2 retains a magnetic moment of about 0.24μ B

  19. Correlation Models for Temperature Fields

    KAUST Repository

    North, Gerald R.

    2011-05-16

    This paper presents derivations of some analytical forms for spatial correlations of evolving random fields governed by a white-noise-driven damped diffusion equation that is the analog of autoregressive order 1 in time and autoregressive order 2 in space. The study considers the two-dimensional plane and the surface of a sphere, both of which have been studied before, but here time is introduced to the problem. Such models have a finite characteristic length (roughly the separation at which the autocorrelation falls to 1/e) and a relaxation time scale. In particular, the characteristic length of a particular temporal Fourier component of the field increases to a finite value as the frequency of the particular component decreases. Some near-analytical formulas are provided for the results. A potential application is to the correlation structure of surface temperature fields and to the estimation of large area averages, depending on how the original datastream is filtered into a distribution of Fourier frequencies (e.g., moving average, low pass, or narrow band). The form of the governing equation is just that of the simple energy balance climate models, which have a long history in climate studies. The physical motivation provided by the derivation from a climate model provides some heuristic appeal to the approach and suggests extensions of the work to nonuniform cases.

  20. Unified molecular field theory for collinear and noncollinear Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, David C.

    2015-02-01

    A unified molecular field theory (MFT) is presented that applies to both collinear and planar noncollinear Heisenberg antiferromagnets (AFs) on the same footing. The spins in the system are assumed to be identical and crystallographically equivalent. This formulation allows calculations of the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility χ versus temperature T below the AF ordering temperature TN to be carried out for arbitrary Heisenberg exchange interactions Ji j between arbitrary neighbors j of a given spin i without recourse to magnetic sublattices. The Weiss temperature θp in the Curie-Weiss law is written in terms of the Ji j values and TN in terms of the Ji j values and an assumed AF structure. Other magnetic and thermal properties are then expressed in terms of quantities easily accessible from experiment as laws of corresponding states for a given spin S . For collinear ordering these properties are the reduced temperature t =T /TN , the ratio f =θp/TN , and S . For planar noncollinear helical or cycloidal ordering, an additional parameter is the wave vector of the helix or cycloid. The MFT is also applicable to AFs with other AF structures. The MFT predicts that χ (T ≤TN) of noncollinear 120∘ spin structures on triangular lattices is isotropic and independent of S and T and thus clarifies the origin of this universally observed behavior. The high-field magnetization and heat capacity for fields applied perpendicular to the ordering axis (collinear AFs) and ordering plane (planar noncollinear AFs) are also calculated and expressed for both types of AF structures as laws of corresponding states for a given S , and the reduced perpendicular field versus reduced temperature phase diagram is constructed.

  1. The Swarm Initial Field Model for the 2014 geomagnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Hulot, Gauthier; Lesur, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Data from the first year of ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive the Swarm Initial Field Model (SIFM), a new model of the Earth's magnetic field and its time variation. In addition to the conventional magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites...... agreement (up to at least degree 60) with recent field models derived from CHAMP data, providing an initial validation of the quality of the Swarm magnetic measurements. Use of gradient data improves the determination of both the static field and its secular variation, with the mean misfit for East...

  2. The Swarm Initial Field Model for the 2014 Geomagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nils; Hulot, Gauthier; Lesur, Vincent; Finlay, Christopher C.; Beggan, Ciaran; Chulliat, Arnaud; Sabaka, Terence J.; Floberghagen, Rune; Friis-Christensen, Eigil; Haagmans, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Data from the first year of ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive the Swarm Initial Field Model (SIFM), a new model of the Earth's magnetic field and its time variation. In addition to the conventional magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites, explicit advantage is taken of the constellation aspect by including east-west magnetic intensity gradient information from the lower satellite pair. Along-track differences in magnetic intensity provide further information concerning the north-south gradient. The SIFM static field shows excellent agreement (up to at least degree 60) with recent field models derived from CHAMP data, providing an initial validation of the quality of the Swarm magnetic measurements. Use of gradient data improves the determination of both the static field and its secular variation, with the mean misfit for east-west intensity differences between the lower satellite pair being only 0.12 nT.

  3. Mercury's Internal Magnetic Field: Modeling Core Fields with Smooth Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, H.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    MESSENGER's second flyby (M2) of Mercury on 6 October 2008 will provide significantly improved geographical sampling of the planet's internal magnetic field over previous measurements. Latitudinal coverage and spacecraft altitudes will be similar to those during MESSENGER's first encounter (M1), but the spacecraft trajectory will be displaced by about 180° in longitude, yielding the first magnetic measurements in the western hemisphere. We investigate spatial structure in Mercury's internal magnetic field by applying methods from inverse theory to construct low-degree-and-order spherical harmonic models. External fields predicted by a parameterized magnetospheric model are subtracted from the vector field observations. The approach takes into account noise contributions from long-wavelength uncertainties in the external field models, unexplained short-wavelength features, and spacecraft attitude errors. We investigate the effect of different regularization (smoothness) constraints on our inversions. Analyses of data from M1 and the two Mariner 10 flybys that penetrated the magnetosphere yield a preferred spherical harmonic solution to degree and order eight with the centered, axial dipole term g10 dominating. The model shows structure at low and mid-latitude regions near the flybys. Terms predicted by an analytical model for long- wavelength crustal fields - namely g10, g30 and g32 - are present, but their relative amplitudes are not consistent with such a field. We conclude that structure in our models is dominated by core, rather than by crustal, fields. We also investigate, through simulations, field morphologies that are recoverable while the spacecraft is in orbit about Mercury, under the assumption that the long-wavelength contributions from external sources can be accurately modeled and removed. Although the elliptical orbit of MESSENGER will impede the recovery of southern hemisphere structure, we obtain excellent recovery of the dipole field and of

  4. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rutz, K. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany)]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, P.G. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  5. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Rutz, K.; Reinhard, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  6. Geostatistical methods applied to field model residuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maule, Fox; Mosegaard, K.; Olsen, Nils

    consists of measurement errors and unmodelled signal), and is typically assumed to be uncorrelated and Gaussian distributed. We have applied geostatistical methods to analyse the residuals of the Oersted(09d/04) field model [http://www.dsri.dk/Oersted/Field_models/IGRF_2005_candidates/], which is based......The geomagnetic field varies on a variety of time- and length scales, which are only rudimentary considered in most present field models. The part of the observed field that can not be explained by a given model, the model residuals, is often considered as an estimate of the data uncertainty (which...... on 5 years of Ørsted and CHAMP data, and includes secular variation and acceleration, as well as low-degree external (magnetospheric) and induced fields. The analysis is done in order to find the statistical behaviour of the space-time structure of the residuals, as a proxy for the data covariances...

  7. RESICALC: Magnetic field modeling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    RESICALC, Version 1.0, is a Microsoft Windows application that describes the magnetic field environment produced by user-defined arrays of transmission lines, distribution lines, and custom conductors. These arrays simulate specific situations that may be encountered in real-world community settings. RESICALC allows the user to define an area or ''world'' that contains the transmission and/or distribution lines, user-defined conductors, and locations of residences. The world contains a ''reference grid'' within which RESICALC analyzes the magnetic field environment due to all conductors within the world. Unique physical parameters (e.g., conductor height and spacing) and operating characteristics can be assigned to all electrical conductors. RESICALC's output is available for the x, y, z axis separately, the resultant (the three axes added in quadrature), and the major axis, each in three possible formats: a three-dimensional map of the magnetic field, two dimensional-contours, and as a table with statistical values. All formats may be printed, accompanied by a three-dimensional view of the world the user has drawn. The view of the world and the corresponding three-dimensional field map may be adjusted to the elevation and rotation angle of the user's preference

  8. Uncertainty Quantification in Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulliat, A.; Nair, M. C.; Alken, P.; Meyer, B.; Saltus, R.; Woods, A.

    2017-12-01

    Geomagnetic field models are mathematical descriptions of the various sources of the Earth's magnetic field, and are generally obtained by solving an inverse problem. They are widely used in research to separate and characterize field sources, but also in many practical applications such as aircraft and ship navigation, smartphone orientation, satellite attitude control, and directional drilling. In recent years, more sophisticated models have been developed, thanks to the continuous availability of high quality satellite data and to progress in modeling techniques. Uncertainty quantification has become an integral part of model development, both to assess the progress made and to address specific users' needs. Here we report on recent advances made by our group in quantifying the uncertainty of geomagnetic field models. We first focus on NOAA's World Magnetic Model (WMM) and the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF), two reference models of the main (core) magnetic field produced every five years. We describe the methods used in quantifying the model commission error as well as the omission error attributed to various un-modeled sources such as magnetized rocks in the crust and electric current systems in the atmosphere and near-Earth environment. A simple error model was derived from this analysis, to facilitate usage in practical applications. We next report on improvements brought by combining a main field model with a high resolution crustal field model and a time-varying, real-time external field model, like in NOAA's High Definition Geomagnetic Model (HDGM). The obtained uncertainties are used by the directional drilling industry to mitigate health, safety and environment risks.

  9. A combinatorial wind field model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soleimanzadeh, Maryam; Wisniewski, Rafal; Sloth, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    of ordinary dierential equations (ODE). Considering some assumptions on the ow model (e.g. steadiness), the sys- tem can be approximated by a linear n dimensional system. Partitioning the state space into cells is performed by dening Lyapunov function sets, such that each cell is the region between two......This report is the deliverable 2.4 in the project Distributed Control of Large-Scale Oshore Wind Farms with the acronym Aeolus. The objective of this deliverable is to provide an understanding of the wind eld model and dynamic variations superimposed on the mean eld. In this report a dynamical...... model is developed for the wind ow in a wind farm based on nite volume method. Afterwards the model is transferred into a discrete framework called combinatorial, which determines the future behavior of the discrete system. In this regard, the dynamical model is de- rived and it is explained in terms...

  10. Alien wavelength modeling tool and field trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sambo, N.; Sgambelluri, A.; Secondini, M.

    2015-01-01

    A modeling tool is presented for pre-FEC BER estimation of PM-QPSK alien wavelength signals. A field trial is demonstrated and used as validation of the tool's correctness. A very close correspondence between the performance of the field trial and the one predicted by the modeling tool has been...

  11. Building analytical three-field cosmological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J. R. L.; Moraes, P. H. R. S.; Ferreira, D. A.; Neta, D. C. Vilar

    2018-02-01

    A difficult task to deal with is the analytical treatment of models composed of three real scalar fields, as their equations of motion are in general coupled and hard to integrate. In order to overcome this problem we introduce a methodology to construct three-field models based on the so-called "extension method". The fundamental idea of the procedure is to combine three one-field systems in a non-trivial way, to construct an effective three scalar field model. An interesting scenario where the method can be implemented is with inflationary models, where the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian is coupled with the scalar field Lagrangian. We exemplify how a new model constructed from our method can lead to non-trivial behaviors for cosmological parameters.

  12. The CHAOS-4 geomagnetic field model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Lühr, H.; Finlay, Chris

    2014-01-01

    determined. More than 14 yr of data from the satellites Ørsted, CHAMP and SAC-C, augmented with magnetic observatory monthly mean values have been used for this model. Maximum spherical harmonic degree of the static (lithospheric) field is n = 100. The core field is expressed by spherical harmonic expansion...... high-degree lithospheric field part is solely determined from low-altitude CHAMP satellite observations taken during the last 2 yr (2008 September-2010 September) of the mission. We obtain a good agreement with other recent lithospheric field models like MF7 for degrees up to n = 85, confirming...

  13. Modelling electricity forward markets by ambit fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Fred Espen Benth, Fred Espen; Veraart, Almut

    This paper proposes a new modelling framework for electricity forward markets, which is based on ambit fields. The new model can capture many of the stylised facts observed in energy markets. One of the main differences to the traditional models lies in the fact that we do not model the dynamics......, but the forward price directly, where we focus on models which are stationary in time. We give a detailed account on the probabilistic properties of the new model and we discuss martingale conditions and change of measure within the new model class. Also, we derive a model for the spot price which is obtained...... from the forward model through a limiting argument....

  14. Phase Field Modeling Using PetIGA

    KAUST Repository

    Vignal, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    Phase field modeling has become a widely used framework in the computational material science community. Its ability to model different problems by defining appropriate phase field parameters and relating it to a free energy functional makes it highly versatile. Thermodynamically consistent partial differential equations can then be generated by assuming dissipative dynamics, and setting up the problem as one of minimizing this free energy. The equations are nonetheless challenging to solve, and having a highly efficient and parallel framework to solve them is necessary. In this work, a brief review on phase field models is given, followed by a short analysis of the Phase Field Crystal Model solved with Isogeometric Analysis us- ing PetIGA. We end with an introduction to a new modeling concept, where free energy functions are built with a periodic equilibrium structure in mind.

  15. Field Models in Electricity and Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Barba, Paolo Di; Wiak, S

    2008-01-01

    Covering the development of field computation in the past forty years, Field Models in Electricity and Magnetism intends to be a concise, comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to field models in electricity and magnetism, ranging from basic theory to numerical applications. The approach assumed throughout the whole book is to solve field problems directly from partial differential equations in terms of vector quantities. Theoretical issues are illustrated by practical examples. In particular, a single example is solved by different methods so that, by comparison of results, limitations and advantages of the various methods are made clear. The subjects of the synthesis of fields and of the optimal design of devices, which are growing in research and so far have not been adequately covered in textbooks, are developed in addition to more classical subjects of analysis. Topics covered include: vector fields: electrostatics, magnetostatics, steady conduction; analytical methods for solving boundary-value probl...

  16. Reconstructing bidimensional scalar field theory models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Gabriel H.; Svaiter, N.F.

    2001-07-01

    In this paper we review how to reconstruct scalar field theories in two dimensional spacetime starting from solvable Scrodinger equations. Theree different Schrodinger potentials are analyzed. We obtained two new models starting from the Morse and Scarf II hyperbolic potencials, the U (θ) θ 2 In 2 (θ 2 ) model and U (θ) = θ 2 cos 2 (In(θ 2 )) model respectively. (author)

  17. Flow field mapping in data rack model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matěcha J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to map the flow field inside the data rack model, fitted with three 1U server models. The server model is based on the common four-processor 1U server. The main dimensions of the data rack model geometry are taken fully from the real geometry. Only the model was simplified with respect to the greatest possibility in the experimental measurements. The flow field mapping was carried out both experimentally and numerically. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry method was used for the experimental flow field mapping, when the flow field has been mapped for defined regions within the 2D/3D data rack model. Ansys CFX and OpenFOAM software were used for the numerical solution. Boundary conditions for numerical model were based on data obtained from experimental measurement of velocity profile at the output of the server mockup. This velocity profile was used as the input boundary condition in the calculation. In order to achieve greater consistency of the numerical model with experimental data, the numerical model was modified with regard to the results of experimental measurements. Results from the experimental and numerical measurements were compared and the areas of disparateness were identified. In further steps the obtained proven numerical model will be utilized for the real geometry of data racks and data.

  18. A Hamiltonian five-field gyrofluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keramidas Charidakos, I.; Waelbroeck, F. L.; Morrison, P. J. [Institute for Fusion Studies and Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A Lie-Poisson bracket is presented for a five-field gyrofluid model, thereby showing the model to be Hamiltonian. The model includes the effects of magnetic field curvature and describes the evolution of the electron and ion gyro-center densities, the parallel component of the ion and electron velocities, and the ion temperature. The quasineutrality property and Ampère's law determine, respectively, the electrostatic potential and magnetic flux. The Casimir invariants are presented, and shown to be associated with five Lagrangian invariants advected by distinct velocity fields. A linear, local study of the model is conducted both with and without Landau and diamagnetic resonant damping terms. Stability criteria and dispersion relations for the electrostatic and the electromagnetic cases are derived and compared with their analogs for fluid and kinetic models.

  19. Mathematical Properties Relevant to Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    Geomagnetic field modeling consists in converting large numbers of magnetic observations into a linear combination of elementary mathematical functions that best describes those observations.The set of numerical coefficients defining this linear combination is then what one refers.......The relevant elementary mathematical functions are introduced, their properties are reviewed, and how they can be used to describe the magnetic field in a source-free (such as the Earth’s neutral atmosphere) or source-dense (such as the ionosphere) environment is explained. Completeness and uniqueness...... be directly measured. In this chapter, the mathematical foundation of global (as opposed to regional) geomagnetic field modeling is reviewed, and the spatial modeling of the field in spherical coordinates is focussed. Time can be dealt with as an independent variable and is not explicitly considered...

  20. Integrated field modelling[Oil and gas fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarian, Bamshad

    2002-07-01

    This research project studies the feasibility of developing and applying an integrated field simulator to simulate the production performance of an entire oil or gas field. It integrates the performance of the reservoir, the wells, the chokes, the gathering system, the surface processing facilities and whenever applicable, gas and water injection systems. The approach adopted for developing the integrated simulator is to couple existing commercial reservoir and process simulators using available linking technologies. The simulators are dynamically linked and customised into a single hybrid application that benefits from the concept of open software architecture. The integrated field simulator is linked to an optimisation routine developed based on the genetic algorithm search strategies. This enables optimisation of the system at field level, from the reservoir to the process. Modelling the wells and the gathering network is achieved by customising the process simulator. This study demonstrated that the integrated simulation improves current capabilities to simulate the performance of the entire field and optimise its design. This is achieved by evaluating design options including spread and layout of the wells and gathering system, processing alternatives, reservoir development schemes and production strategies. Effectiveness of the integrated simulator is demonstrated and tested through several field-level case studies that discuss and investigate technical problems relevant to offshore field development. The case studies cover topics such as process optimisation, optimum tie-in of satellite wells into existing process facilities, optimal well location and field layout assessment of a high pressure high temperature deepwater oil field. Case study results confirm the viability of the total field simulator by demonstrating that the field performance simulation and optimal design were obtained in an automated process with treasonable computation time. No significant

  1. Modeling and Field Results from Seismic Stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, E.; Pride, S.; Lo, W.; Daley, T.; Nakagawa, Seiji; Sposito, Garrison; Roberts, P.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling the effect of seismic stimulation employing Maxwell-Boltzmann theory shows that the important component of stimulation is mechanical rather than fluid pressure effects. Modeling using Biot theory (two phases) shows that the pressure effects diffuse too quickly to be of practical significance. Field data from actual stimulation will be shown to compare to theory

  2. Twinlike models in scalar field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Dantas, J. D.; Gomes, A. R.; Menezes, R.

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with the presence of defect structures in models described by a real scalar field in a diversity of scenarios. The defect structures that we consider are static solutions of the equations of motion that depend on a single spatial dimension. We search for different models, which support the same defect solution, with the very same energy density. We work in flat spacetime, where we introduce and investigate a new class of models. We also work in curved spacetime, within the braneworld context, with a single extra dimension of infinite extent, and there we show how the brane is formed from the static field configuration.

  3. Field based model for pedestrian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Zhang, Michael; Wang, Zhongren

    2018-03-01

    A pedestrian’s physical movement is simulated as a response to the pedestrian subjective evaluation of the objective environment. The objective environment is modeled by presumed fields statically or dynamically superposed. Regulation functions, which consider not only force caused by presumed fields but also local crowd densities around pedestrians, are introduced for consideration of pedestrians’ intelligence. Numerical experiments indicate that the model can be calibrated to reproduce a fundamental diagram that matches an empirical one proposed by Weidmann. Such experiments prove the model to be a useful tool for study of pedestrian dynamics.

  4. Spatio-Temporal Modeling of Neuron Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Adam

    The starting point and focal point for this thesis was stochastic dynamical modelling of neuronal imaging data with the declared objective of drawing inference, within this model framework, in a large-scale (high-dimensional) data setting. Implicitly this objective entails carrying out three......-temporal array data. This framework was developed with neuron field models in mind but may in turn be applied to other settings conforming to the spatio-temporal array data setup....

  5. Field modeling for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielscher, Axel; Antunes, Andre; Saturnino, Guilherme B

    2015-01-01

    ) improving the usability of the tools for field calculation to the level that they can be easily used by non-experts. We then introduce a new version of our pipeline for field calculations (www.simnibs.org) that substantially simplifies setting up and running TMS and tDCS simulations based on Finite......Electric field calculations based on numerical methods and increasingly realistic head models are more and more used in research on Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). However, they are still far from being established as standard tools for the planning and analysis in practical applications...... of TMS. Here, we start by delineating three main challenges that need to be addressed to unravel their full potential. This comprises (i) identifying and dealing with the model uncertainties, (ii) establishing a clear link between the induced fields and the physiological stimulation effects, and (iii...

  6. A Hamiltonian Five-Field Gyrofluid Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramidas Charidakos, Ioannis; Waelbroeck, Francois; Morrison, Philip

    2015-11-01

    Reduced fluid models constitute versatile tools for the study of multi-scale phenomena. Examples include magnetic islands, edge localized modes, resonant magnetic perturbations, and fishbone and Alfven modes. Gyrofluid models improve over Braginskii-type models by accounting for the nonlocal response due to particle orbits. A desirable property for all models is that they not only have a conserved energy, but also that they be Hamiltonian in the ideal limit. Here, a Lie-Poisson bracket is presented for a five-field gyrofluid model, thereby showing the model to be Hamiltonian. The model includes the effects of magnetic field curvature and describes the evolution of electron and ion densities, the parallel component of ion and electron velocities and ion temperature. Quasineutrality and Ampere's law determine respectively the electrostatic potential and magnetic flux. The Casimir invariants are presented, and shown to be associated to five Lagrangian invariants advected by distinct velocity fields. A linear, local study of the model is conducted both with and without Landau and diamagnetic resonant damping terms. Stability criteria and dispersion relations for the electrostatic and the electromagnetic cases are derived and compared with their analogs for fluid and kinetic models. This work was funded by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  7. Field-induced transition of the magnetic ground state from A-type antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic order in CsCo2Se2

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rohr, Fabian; Krzton-Maziopa, Anna; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Grundmann, Henrik; Guguchia, Zurab; Schnick, Wolfgang; Schilling, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of CsCo2Se2 with ThCr2Si2 structure, which we have characterized through a series of magnetization and neutron diffraction measurements. We find that CsCo2Se2 undergoes a phase transition to an antiferromagnetically ordered state with a Néel temperature of {{T}\\text{N}}≈ 66 K. The nearest neighbour interactions are ferromagnetic as observed by the positive Curie-Weiss temperature of \\Theta≈ 51.0 K. We find that the magnetic structure of CsCo2Se2 consists of ferromagnetic sheets, which are stacked antiferromagnetically along the tetragonal c-axis, generally referred to as A-type antiferromagnetic order. The observed magnitude of the ordered magnetic moment at T  =  1.5 K is found to be only 0.20(1){μ\\text{Bohr}}  / Co. Already in comparably small magnetic fields of {μ0}H{{}\\text{MM}}(5~K)≈ 0.3 T, we observe a metamagnetic transition that can be attributed to spin-rearrangements of CsCo2Se2, with the moments fully ferromagnetically saturated in a magnetic field of {μ0}{{H}\\text{FM}}(5~K)≈ 6.4 T. We discuss the entire experimentally deduced magnetic phase diagram for CsCo2Se2 with respect to its unconventionally weak magnetic coupling. Our study characterizes CsCo2Se2, which is chemically and electronically posed closely to the A x Fe2-y Se2 superconductors, as a host of versatile magnetic interactions.

  8. The CHAOS-4 Geomagnetic Field Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris; Lühr, H.

    We present CHAOS-4, a new version in the CHAOS model series, which aims at describing the Earth's magnetic field with high spatial resolution (terms up to spherical degree n=90 for the crustal field, and up to n=16 for the time-varying core field are robustly determined) and high temporal...... (with expansions in the GSM and SM coordinate system up to degree n = 2 and parameterization of the time dependence using the decomposition of Dst into external (Est) and induced (Ist) parts) and perform an in-flight alignment of the vector data (co-estimation of the Euler describing the rotation...

  9. Reversed-Field Pinch plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Nebel, R.A.; Moses, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The stability of a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is strongly dependent on the plasma profile and the confining sheared magnetic field. Magnetic diffusion and thermal transport produce changing conditions of stability. Despite the limited understanding of RFP transport, modelling is important to predict general trends and to study possible field programming options. To study the ZT-40 experiment and to predict the performance of future RFP reactors, a one-dimensional transport code has been developed. This code includes a linear, ideal MHD stability check based on an energy principle. The transport section integrates plasma profiles forward in time while the stability section periodically checks the stability of the evolving plasma profile

  10. Modeling emotional dynamics : currency versus field.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallach, D .L.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-08-01

    Randall Collins has introduced a simplified model of emotional dynamics in which emotional energy, heightened and focused by interaction rituals, serves as a common denominator for social exchange: a generic form of currency, except that it is active in a far broader range of social transactions. While the scope of this theory is attractive, the specifics of the model remain unconvincing. After a critical assessment of the currency theory of emotion, a field model of emotion is introduced that adds expressiveness by locating emotional valence within its cognitive context, thereby creating an integrated orientation field. The result is a model which claims less in the way of motivational specificity, but is more satisfactory in modeling the dynamic interaction between cognitive and emotional orientations at both individual and social levels.

  11. Mean-field models and superheavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, P.G.; Bender, M.; Maruhn, J.A.; Frankfurt Univ.

    2001-03-01

    We discuss the performance of two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field theory (RMF) and the non-relativistic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach (SHF), with particular emphasis on the description of superheavy elements (SHE). We provide a short introduction to the SHF and RMF, the relations between these two approaches and the relations to other nuclear structure models, briefly review the basic properties with respect to normal nuclear observables, and finally present and discuss recent results on the binding properties of SHE computed with a broad selection of SHF and RMF parametrisations. (orig.)

  12. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yulan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Ke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suter, Jonathan D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCloy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Bradley R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This interim report presents progress towards the development of meso-scale models of magnetic behavior that incorporate microstructural information. Modeling magnetic signatures in irradiated materials with complex microstructures (such as structural steels) is a significant challenge. The complexity is addressed incrementally, using the monocrystalline Fe (i.e., ferrite) film as model systems to develop and validate initial models, followed by polycrystalline Fe films, and by more complicated and representative alloys. In addition, the modeling incrementally addresses inclusion of other major phases (e.g., martensite, austenite), minor magnetic phases (e.g., carbides, FeCr precipitates), and minor nonmagnetic phases (e.g., Cu precipitates, voids). The focus of the magnetic modeling is on phase-field models. The models are based on the numerical solution to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. From the computational standpoint, phase-field modeling allows the simulation of large enough systems that relevant defect structures and their effects on functional properties like magnetism can be simulated. To date, two phase-field models have been generated in support of this work. First, a bulk iron model with periodic boundary conditions was generated as a proof-of-concept to investigate major loop effects of single versus polycrystalline bulk iron and effects of single non-magnetic defects. More recently, to support the experimental program herein using iron thin films, a new model was generated that uses finite boundary conditions representing surfaces and edges. This model has provided key insights into the domain structures observed in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Simulation results for single crystal thin-film iron indicate the feasibility of the model for determining magnetic domain wall thickness and mobility in an externally applied field. Because the phase-field model dimensions are limited relative to the size of most specimens used in

  13. Staircase Models from Affine Toda Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dorey, P; Dorey, Patrick; Ravanini, Francesco

    1993-01-01

    We propose a class of purely elastic scattering theories generalising the staircase model of Al. B. Zamolodchikov, based on the affine Toda field theories for simply-laced Lie algebras g=A,D,E at suitable complex values of their coupling constants. Considering their Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz equations, we give analytic arguments in support of a conjectured renormalisation group flow visiting the neighbourhood of each W_g minimal model in turn.

  14. A field theoretic model for static friction

    OpenAIRE

    Mahyaeh, I.; Rouhani, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a field theoretic model for friction, where the friction coefficient between two surfaces may be calculated based on elastic properties of the surfaces. We assume that the geometry of contact surface is not unusual. We verify Amonton's laws to hold that friction force is proportional to the normal load.This model gives the opportunity to calculate the static coefficient of friction for a few cases, and show that it is in agreement with observed values. Furthermore we show that the ...

  15. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

  16. Mathematical Properties Relevant to Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Geomagnetic field modeling consists in converting large numbers of magnetic observations into a linear combination of elementary mathematical functions that best describes those observations. The set of numerical coefficients defining this linear combination is then what one refers to as a geomag...

  17. Modeling Field Line Resonances in the Inner Plasmasphere with the Field Line Interhemispheric Plasma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, N. M.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Stone, W. D.; Zesta, E.

    2010-12-01

    Equatorial plasma mass density in the Inner Magnetosphere of the Earth has been traditionally derived from measurements of Field Line Resonances from pairs of ground magnetometers closely spaced in latitude. The full plasma mass density along the flux tube can be determined using such measurements in an inversion of the Field Line Resonance Equation. Cummings et al [1969] developed the Field Line Resonance equation and numerically solved for the Field Line Resonances by assuming a power law distribution that varied with the geocentric distance from the equatorial crossing point of the field lines and a dipole model for the Earth's magnetic field. So far all numerical solutions of the Field Line Resonance Equation use some form of a power law distribution of the mass density along the field line, that depends on the magnetic field model, typically assumed to be a dipole, with only one recent work exploring deviations from a dipole magnetic field. Another fundamental assumption in the solution of the Field Line Resonance Equation is that of perfectly conducting, flat ionospheres as the two boundaries of the field line. While this assumption is considered valid for L values greater than 2, recent works have found it to be invalid for L values of 3 or less. In the present paper we solve the Field Line Resonance Equation for L values less than 3.5 using a three dimensional ionosphere, and without assuming a power law for the mass density distribution along the field line. Instead we use plasma mass density data from the Field Line Interhemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model to numerically solve the Field Line Resonance Equation for the eigenfrequencies. We also examine how the resonance frequencies vary as a function of the driving parameters. Finally we examine two events in which we compare the derived frequencies with measurements from the SAMBA magnetometer array.

  18. Effective field theory and the quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Loyal; Ha, Phuoc; Jaczko, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the connections between the quark model (QM) and the description of hadrons in the low-momentum limit of heavy-baryon effective field theory in QCD. By using a three-flavor-index representation for the effective baryon fields, we show that the 'nonrelativistic' constituent QM for baryon masses and moments is completely equivalent through O(m s ) to a parametrization of the relativistic field theory in a general spin-flavor basis. The flavor and spin variables can be identified with those of effective valence quarks. Conversely, the spin-flavor description clarifies the structure and dynamical interpretation of the chiral expansion in effective field theory, and provides a direct connection between the field theory and the semirelativistic models for hadrons used in successful dynamical calculations. This allows dynamical information to be incorporated directly into the chiral expansion. We find, for example, that the striking success of the additive QM for baryon magnetic moments is a consequence of the relative smallness of the non-additive spin-dependent corrections

  19. Dynamical Field Model of Hand Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschetti, Donald R.; Cantalupo, Claudio

    2000-11-01

    Dynamical field models of information processing in the nervous system are being developed by a number of groups of psychologists and physicists working together to explain The details of behaviors exhibited by a number of animal species. Here we adapt such a model to the expression of hand preference in a small primate, the bushbaby (Otolemur garnetti) . The model provides a theoretical foundation for the interpretation of an experiment currently underway in which a several of these animals are forced to extend either right or left hand to retrieve a food item from a rotating turntable.

  20. Modeling quantization effects in field effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Troger, C

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulation in the field of semiconductor device development advanced to a valuable, cost-effective and flexible facility. The most widely used simulators are based on classical models, as they need to satisfy time and memory constraints. To improve the performance of field effect transistors such as MOSFETs and HEMTs these devices are continuously scaled down in their dimensions. Consequently the characteristics of such devices are getting more and more determined by quantum mechanical effects arising from strong transversal fields in the channel. In this work an approach based on a two-dimensional electron gas is used to describe the confinement of the carriers. Quantization is considered in one direction only. For the derivation of a one-dimensional Schroedinger equation in the effective mass framework a non-parabolic correction for the energy dispersion due to Kane is included. For each subband a non-parabolic dispersion relation characterized by subband masses and subband non-parabolicity coeffi...

  1. High-performance phase-field modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Vignal, Philippe

    2015-04-27

    Many processes in engineering and sciences involve the evolution of interfaces. Among the mathematical frameworks developed to model these types of problems, the phase-field method has emerged as a possible solution. Phase-fields nonetheless lead to complex nonlinear, high-order partial differential equations, whose solution poses mathematical and computational challenges. Guaranteeing some of the physical properties of the equations has lead to the development of efficient algorithms and discretizations capable of recovering said properties by construction [2, 5]. This work builds-up on these ideas, and proposes novel discretization strategies that guarantee numerical energy dissipation for both conserved and non-conserved phase-field models. The temporal discretization is based on a novel method which relies on Taylor series and ensures strong energy stability. It is second-order accurate, and can also be rendered linear to speed-up the solution process [4]. The spatial discretization relies on Isogeometric Analysis, a finite element method that possesses the k-refinement technology and enables the generation of high-order, high-continuity basis functions. These basis functions are well suited to handle the high-order operators present in phase-field models. Two-dimensional and three dimensional results of the Allen-Cahn, Cahn-Hilliard, Swift-Hohenberg and phase-field crystal equation will be presented, which corroborate the theoretical findings, and illustrate the robustness of the method. Results related to more challenging examples, namely the Navier-Stokes Cahn-Hilliard and a diusion-reaction Cahn-Hilliard system, will also be presented. The implementation was done in PetIGA and PetIGA-MF, high-performance Isogeometric Analysis frameworks [1, 3], designed to handle non-linear, time-dependent problems.

  2. Near Field Environment Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Wagner

    2000-11-14

    Waste emplacement and activities associated with construction of a repository system potentially will change environmental conditions within the repository system. These environmental changes principally result from heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, which elevates temperatures within the repository system. Elevated temperatures affect distribution of water, increase kinetic rates of geochemical processes, and cause stresses to change in magnitude and orientation from the stresses resulting from the overlying rock and from underground construction activities. The recognition of this evolving environment has been reflected in activities, studies and discussions generally associated with what has been termed the Near-Field Environment (NFE). The NFE interacts directly with waste packages and engineered barriers as well as potentially changing the fluid composition and flow conditions within the mountain. As such, the NFE defines the environment for assessing the performance of a potential Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The NFe evolves over time, and therefore is not amenable to direct characterization or measurement in the ambient system. Analysis or assessment of the NFE must rely upon projections based on tests and models that encompass the long-term processes of the evolution of this environment. This NFE Process Model Report (PMR) describes the analyses and modeling based on current understanding of the evolution of the near-field within the rock mass extending outward from the drift wall.

  3. Subgrid geoelectric field specification for GIC modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, M.; Grawe, M.; Kamalabadi, F.; Makela, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) result from surface geomagnetic field (ěc{B}) variation driven by space weather disturbances. For the most intense disturbances, the consequences can range from power grid instability to even widespread failure. Modeling GICs to assess vulnerability requires the specification of the surface geoelectric field (ěc{E}) at all spatial locations coincident with the electric power system. In this study, we investigate how to best reproduce ěc{E} given the available sparse, irregularly spaced magnetometer measurements of ěc{B} and suitable electromagnetic transfer functions (EMTFs) to transform the local ěc{B} to ěc{E}. The assessment is made against ground truth from publicly available ěc{E} measurements provided by the EarthScope magnetotelluric (MT) array, a set of 7 fixed and several transportable joint ěc{B} and ěc{E} sensors. The scope of this study spans several dimensions: geomagnetic disturbance intensity, spatial interpolation scheme, and EMTF type, i.e., 1-D models based on studies of local geology and 3-D models derived from the EarthScope MT data.

  4. Optimization Models for Petroleum Field Exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsbraaten, Tore Wiig

    1998-12-31

    This thesis presents and discusses various models for optimal development of a petroleum field. The objective of these optimization models is to maximize, under many uncertain parameters, the project`s expected net present value. First, an overview of petroleum field optimization is given from the point of view of operations research. Reservoir equations for a simple reservoir system are derived and discretized and included in optimization models. Linear programming models for optimizing production decisions are discussed and extended to mixed integer programming models where decisions concerning platform, wells and production strategy are optimized. Then, optimal development decisions under uncertain oil prices are discussed. The uncertain oil price is estimated by a finite set of price scenarios with associated probabilities. The problem is one of stochastic mixed integer programming, and the solution approach is to use a scenario and policy aggregation technique developed by Rockafellar and Wets although this technique was developed for continuous variables. Stochastic optimization problems with focus on problems with decision dependent information discoveries are also discussed. A class of ``manageable`` problems is identified and an implicit enumeration algorithm for finding optimal decision policy is proposed. Problems involving uncertain reservoir properties but with a known initial probability distribution over possible reservoir realizations are discussed. Finally, a section on Nash-equilibrium and bargaining in an oil reservoir management game discusses the pool problem arising when two lease owners have access to the same underlying oil reservoir. Because the oil tends to migrate, both lease owners have incentive to drain oil from the competitors part of the reservoir. The discussion is based on a numerical example. 107 refs., 31 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. A matrix model from string field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syoji Zeze

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that a Hermitian matrix model can be derived from level truncated open string field theory with Chan-Paton factors. The Hermitian matrix is coupled with a scalar and U(N vectors which are responsible for the D-brane at the tachyon vacuum. Effective potential for the scalar is evaluated both for finite and large N. Increase of potential height is observed in both cases. The large $N$ matrix integral is identified with a system of N ZZ branes and a ghost FZZT brane.

  6. Non standard analysis, polymer models, quantum fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albeverio, S.

    1984-01-01

    We give an elementary introduction to non standard analysis and its applications to the theory of stochastic processes. This is based on a joint book with J.E. Fenstad, R. Hoeegh-Krohn and T. Lindstroeem. In particular we give a discussion of an hyperfinite theory of Dirichlet forms with applications to the study of the Hamiltonian for a quantum mechanical particle in the potential created by a polymer. We also discuss new results on the existence of attractive polymer measures in dimension d 1 2 phi 2 2 )sub(d)-model of interacting quantum fields. (orig.)

  7. Migration model for the near field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, G.; Rasmusson, A.; Neretnieks, I.

    1982-11-01

    The near field model describes the transport of substances dissolved in the groundwater to and from a canister in which radioactive materials are stored. The migration of substances that can cause corrosion (oxidants) of the canister is described by means of a mathematical model. The model takes into account diffusion through the buffer material and water flow in the rock fractures. Two distinct transport resistances can be distinguished in this transport process. The first consists of the diffusion resistance in the buffer material and the second arises due to diffusion resistance in the flowing water in the thin fractures in the rock. The model can also be used to calculate the non-steady-state phase of the inward or outward transport of dissolved species. The model has also been used to calculate how a redox front caused by radiolytically produced oxidants moves out through the clay and into the rock. It has been shown that the migration rate of the redox front can be calculated with good accuracy by means of simple mass balance computations. The transport of radiolytically formed hydrogen away from the fuel has been calculated. When dissolved in the water, hydrogen can be transported through the clay barrier by means of diffusion without the partial pressure of the hydrogen exceeding the hydrostatic pressure. (author)

  8. Field space entanglement entropy, zero modes and Lifshitz models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffel, Helmuth; Kelnhofer, Gerald

    2017-12-01

    The field space entanglement entropy of a quantum field theory is obtained by integrating out a subset of its fields. We study an interacting quantum field theory consisting of massless scalar fields on a closed compact manifold M. To this model we associate its Lifshitz dual model. The ground states of both models are invariant under constant shifts. We interpret this invariance as gauge symmetry and subject the models to proper gauge fixing. By applying the heat kernel regularization one can show that the field space entanglement entropies of the massless scalar field model and of its Lifshitz dual are agreeing.

  9. Field space entanglement entropy, zero modes and Lifshitz models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmuth Huffel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The field space entanglement entropy of a quantum field theory is obtained by integrating out a subset of its fields. We study an interacting quantum field theory consisting of massless scalar fields on a closed compact manifold M. To this model we associate its Lifshitz dual model. The ground states of both models are invariant under constant shifts. We interpret this invariance as gauge symmetry and subject the models to proper gauge fixing. By applying the heat kernel regularization one can show that the field space entanglement entropies of the massless scalar field model and of its Lifshitz dual are agreeing.

  10. Computer Forensics Field Triage Process Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus K. Rogers

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available With the proliferation of digital based evidence, the need for the timely identification, analysis and interpretation of digital evidence is becoming more crucial. In many investigations critical information is required while at the scene or within a short period of time - measured in hours as opposed to days. The traditional cyber forensics approach of seizing a system(s/media, transporting it to the lab, making a forensic image(s, and then searching the entire system for potential evidence, is no longer appropriate in some circumstances. In cases such as child abductions, pedophiles, missing or exploited persons, time is of the essence. In these types of cases, investigators dealing with the suspect or crime scene need investigative leads quickly; in some cases it is the difference between life and death for the victim(s. The Cyber Forensic Field Triage Process Model (CFFTPM proposes an onsite or field approach for providing the identification, analysis and interpretation of digital evidence in a short time frame, without the requirement of having to take the system(s/media back to the lab for an in-depth examination or acquiring a complete forensic image(s. The proposed model adheres to commonly held forensic principles, and does not negate the ability that once the initial field triage is concluded, the system(s/storage media be transported back to a lab environment for a more thorough examination and analysis. The CFFTPM has been successfully used in various real world cases, and its investigative importance and pragmatic approach has been amply demonstrated. Furthermore, the derived evidence from these cases has not been challenged in the court proceedings where it has been introduced. The current article describes the CFFTPM in detail, discusses the model’s forensic soundness, investigative support capabilities and practical considerations.

  11. Wind gust models derived from field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski, W.

    1995-01-01

    Wind data measured during a field experiment were used to verify the analytical model of wind gusts. Good coincidence was observed; the only discrepancy occurred for the azimuth error in the front and back winds, where the simulated errors were smaller than the measured ones. This happened because of the assumption of the spatial coherence of the wind gust model, which generated a symmetric antenna load and, in consequence, a low azimuth servo error. This result indicates a need for upgrading the wind gust model to a spatially incoherent one that will reflect the real gusts in a more accurate manner. In order to design a controller with wind disturbance rejection properties, the wind disturbance should be known at the input to the antenna rate loop model. The second task, therefore, consists of developing a digital filter that simulates the wind gusts at the antenna rate input. This filter matches the spectrum of the measured servo errors. In this scenario, the wind gusts are generated by introducing white noise to the filter input.

  12. Dynamics of the Random Field Ising Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian

    The Random Field Ising Model (RFIM) is a general tool to study disordered systems. Crackling noise is generated when disordered systems are driven by external forces, spanning a broad range of sizes. Systems with different microscopic structures such as disordered mag- nets and Earth's crust have been studied under the RFIM. In this thesis, we investigated the domain dynamics and critical behavior in two dipole-coupled Ising ferromagnets Nd2Fe14B and LiHoxY 1-xF4. With Tc well above room temperature, Nd2Fe14B has shown reversible disorder when exposed to an external transverse field and crosses between two universality classes in the strong and weak disorder limits. Besides tunable disorder, LiHoxY1-xF4 has shown quantum tunneling effects arising from quantum fluctuations, providing another mechanism for domain reversal. Universality within and beyond power law dependence on avalanche size and energy were studied in LiHo0.65Y0.35 F4.

  13. Geomagnetic Core Field Secular Variation Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Lesur, V.; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    We analyse models describing time changes of the Earth’s core magnetic field (secular variation) covering the historical period (several centuries) and the more recent satellite era (previous decade), and we illustrate how both the information contained in the data and the a priori information...... (regularisation) affect the result of the ill-posed geomagnetic inverse problem. We show how data quality, frequency and selection procedures govern part of the temporal changes in the secular variation norms and spectra, which are sometimes difficult to dissociate from true changes of the core state. We...... highlight the difficulty of resolving the time variability of the high degree secular variation coefficients (i.e. the secular acceleration), arising for instance from the challenge to properly separate sources of internal and of external origin. In addition, the regularisation process may also result...

  14. Long-time predictability in disordered spin systems following a deep quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J.; Gheissari, R.; Machta, J.; Newman, C. M.; Stein, D. L.

    2017-04-01

    We study the problem of predictability, or "nature vs nurture," in several disordered Ising spin systems evolving at zero temperature from a random initial state: How much does the final state depend on the information contained in the initial state, and how much depends on the detailed history of the system? Our numerical studies of the "dynamical order parameter" in Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glasses and random ferromagnets indicate that the influence of the initial state decays as dimension increases. Similarly, this same order parameter for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick infinite-range spin glass indicates that this information decays as the number of spins increases. Based on these results, we conjecture that the influence of the initial state on the final state decays to zero in finite-dimensional random-bond spin systems as dimension goes to infinity, regardless of the presence of frustration. We also study the rate at which spins "freeze out" to a final state as a function of dimensionality and number of spins; here the results indicate that the number of "active" spins at long times increases with dimension (for short-range systems) or number of spins (for infinite-range systems). We provide theoretical arguments to support these conjectures, and also study analytically several mean-field models: the random energy model, the uniform Curie-Weiss ferromagnet, and the disordered Curie-Weiss ferromagnet. We find that for these models, the information contained in the initial state does not decay in the thermodynamic limit—in fact, it fully determines the final state. Unlike in short-range models, the presence of frustration in mean-field models dramatically alters the dynamical behavior with respect to the issue of predictability.

  15. Lattice Ising model in a field: E8 scattering theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazhanov, V.V.; Nienhuis, B.; Warnaar, S.O.

    1994-01-01

    Zamolodchikov found an integrable field theory related to the Lie algebra E8, which describes the scaling limit of the Ising model in a magnetic field. He conjectured that there also exist solvable lattice models based on E8 in the universality class of the Ising model in a field. The dilute A3

  16. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, E. L., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal units. These units are made up of moderately to densely welded, devitrified, fractured tuff. The rock's chemical composition is comparable to that of typical granite, but has textural features and mineralogical characteristics of large-scale, silicic volcanism. Because the repository horizon will be approximately 300 m below the ground surface and 200 m above the water table, the repository will be partially saturated. The welded tuff matrix in the host units is highly impermeable, but water and gas flow readily through fractures. The degree of fracturing in these units is highly variable, and the hydrologic significance of fracturing is an important aspect of site investigation. This report describes the characterization and modeling of a region around the potential repository--the altered zone--a region in which the temperature will be increased significantly by waste-generated heat. Numerical simulation has shown that, depending on the boundary conditions, rock properties, and repository design features incorporated in the models, the altered zone (AZ) may extend from the water table to the ground surface. This report also describes models of the near field, the region comprising the repository emplacement drifts and the surrounding rock, which are critical to the performance of engineered components. Investigations of near-field and altered-zone (NF/AZ) processes support the design of underground repository facilities and engineered barriers and also provide constraint data for probabilistic calculations of waste-isolation performance (i.e., performance assessment). The approach to investigation, which is an iterative process involving hypothesis testing and experimentation, has relied on conceptualizing engineered barriers and on performance analysis. This report is a collection, emphasizing conceptual and numerical models, of the recent results contributed from studies of NF/AZ processes and of quantitative measures of NF

  17. Model for predicting mountain wave field uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiens, Florentin; Lott, François; Millet, Christophe; Plougonven, Riwal

    2017-04-01

    Studying the propagation of acoustic waves throughout troposphere requires knowledge of wind speed and temperature gradients from the ground up to about 10-20 km. Typical planetary boundary layers flows are known to present vertical low level shears that can interact with mountain waves, thereby triggering small-scale disturbances. Resolving these fluctuations for long-range propagation problems is, however, not feasible because of computer memory/time restrictions and thus, they need to be parameterized. When the disturbances are small enough, these fluctuations can be described by linear equations. Previous works by co-authors have shown that the critical layer dynamics that occur near the ground produces large horizontal flows and buoyancy disturbances that result in intense downslope winds and gravity wave breaking. While these phenomena manifest almost systematically for high Richardson numbers and when the boundary layer depth is relatively small compare to the mountain height, the process by which static stability affects downslope winds remains unclear. In the present work, new linear mountain gravity wave solutions are tested against numerical predictions obtained with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. For Richardson numbers typically larger than unity, the mesoscale model is used to quantify the effect of neglected nonlinear terms on downslope winds and mountain wave patterns. At these regimes, the large downslope winds transport warm air, a so called "Foehn" effect than can impact sound propagation properties. The sensitivity of small-scale disturbances to Richardson number is quantified using two-dimensional spectral analysis. It is shown through a pilot study of subgrid scale fluctuations of boundary layer flows over realistic mountains that the cross-spectrum of mountain wave field is made up of the same components found in WRF simulations. The impact of each individual component on acoustic wave propagation is discussed in terms of

  18. A physical data model for fields and agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Kor; de Bakker, Merijn; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Two approaches exist in simulation modeling: agent-based and field-based modeling. In agent-based (or individual-based) simulation modeling, the entities representing the system's state are represented by objects, which are bounded in space and time. Individual objects, like an animal, a house, or a more abstract entity like a country's economy, have properties representing their state. In an agent-based model this state is manipulated. In field-based modeling, the entities representing the system's state are represented by fields. Fields capture the state of a continuous property within a spatial extent, examples of which are elevation, atmospheric pressure, and water flow velocity. With respect to the technology used to create these models, the domains of agent-based and field-based modeling have often been separate worlds. In environmental modeling, widely used logical data models include feature data models for point, line and polygon objects, and the raster data model for fields. Simulation models are often either agent-based or field-based, even though the modeled system might contain both entities that are better represented by individuals and entities that are better represented by fields. We think that the reason for this dichotomy in kinds of models might be that the traditional object and field data models underlying those models are relatively low level. We have developed a higher level conceptual data model for representing both non-spatial and spatial objects, and spatial fields (De Bakker et al. 2016). Based on this conceptual data model we designed a logical and physical data model for representing many kinds of data, including the kinds used in earth system modeling (e.g. hydrological and ecological models). The goal of this work is to be able to create high level code and tools for the creation of models in which entities are representable by both objects and fields. Our conceptual data model is capable of representing the traditional feature data

  19. Testing of a one dimensional model for Field II calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Field II is a program for simulating ultrasound transducer fields. It is capable of calculating the emitted and pulse-echoed fields for both pulsed and continuous wave transducers. To make it fully calibrated a model of the transducer’s electro-mechanical impulse response must be included. We...... examine an adapted one dimensional transducer model originally proposed by Willatzen [9] to calibrate Field II. This model is modified to calculate the required impulse responses needed by Field II for a calibrated field pressure and external circuit current calculation. The testing has been performed...... to the calibrated Field II program for 1, 4, and 10 cycle excitations. Two parameter sets were applied for modeling, one real valued Pz27 parameter set, manufacturer supplied, and one complex valued parameter set found in literature, Alguer´o et al. [11]. The latter implicitly accounts for attenuation. Results show...

  20. Use of along-track magnetic field differences in lithospheric field modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    , using 2 yr of low altitude data from the CHAMP satellite, we show that use of along-track differences of vector field data results in an enhanced recovery of the small scale lithospheric field, compared to the use of the vector field data themselves. We show that the along-track technique performs......, will be important in building the next generation of lithospheric field models....

  1. Lattice models and conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleur, H.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical studies concerning the connection between critical physical systems and the conformal theories are reviewed. The conformal theory associated to a critical (integrable) lattice model is derived. The obtention of the central charge, critical exponents and torus partition function, using renormalization group arguments, is shown. The quantum group structure, in the integrable lattice models, and the theory of Visaro algebra representations are discussed. The relations between off-critical integrable models and conformal theories, in finite geometries, are studied

  2. Development of the near field geochemistry model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos, D.; Bruno, J.; Duro, L.; Grive, M.

    2000-01-01

    This report discusses in a quantitative manner the evolution of the near field geochemistry as a result of the interactions between two different introducing granitic groundwaters and the FEBEX bentonite as a buffer material. The two granitic groundwaters considered are: SR-5 water, sampled in a borehole at 500 m depth in Mina Ratones, and a mean composition of different granitic groundwaters from the iberian Massif. The steel canister has also been introduced by considering the iron corrosion in anoxic conditions. (Author)

  3. Propulsion Physics Under the Changing Density Field Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    To grow as a space faring race, future spaceflight systems will requires new propulsion physics. Specifically a propulsion physics model that does not require mass ejection without limiting the high thrust necessary to accelerate within or beyond our solar system and return within a normal work period or lifetime. In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they called Chameleon Cosmology, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. This theory represents a scalar field within and about an object, even in the vacuum. Whereby, these scalar fields can be viewed as vacuum energy fields with definable densities that permeate all matter; having implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties; implying a new force mechanism for propulsion physics. Using Chameleon Cosmology, the author has developed a new propulsion physics model, called the Changing Density Field (CDF) Model. This model relates to density changes in these density fields, where the density field density changes are related to the acceleration of matter within an object. These density changes in turn change how an object couples to the surrounding density fields. Whereby, thrust is achieved by causing a differential in the coupling to these density fields about an object. Since the model indicates that the density of the density field in an object can be changed by internal mass acceleration, even without exhausting mass, the CDF model implies a new propellant-less propulsion physics model

  4. Shape Modelling Using Markov Random Field Restoration of Point Correspondences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Hilger, Klaus Baggesen

    2003-01-01

    A method for building statistical point distribution models is proposed. The novelty in this paper is the adaption of Markov random field regularization of the correspondence field over the set of shapes. The new approach leads to a generative model that produces highly homogeneous polygonized...

  5. The U(1) Higgs model in an external electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damgaard, P.H.; Heller, U.M.

    1988-01-01

    An external electromagnetic field is coupled to the lattice-regularized U(1) Higgs model. We study the phase diagram of this model by both analytical and numerical techniques for different values of the external field strength tensor. The results are compared with expectations based on the analogy with superconducting systems, as described by the phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau theory. (orig.)

  6. Cosmological model of interacting phantom and Yang–Mills fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    equation previously considered in FRW cosmology [30–34], we generalize the model investigated in [30] in the case of interacting phantom and YM fields. This allows us to obtain some exact solutions for the accelerated expansion of FRW cosmological model. Besides, we derive the induced potentials of phantom field ...

  7. Dipole-magnet field models based on a conformal map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Walstrom

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In general, generation of charged-particle transfer maps for conventional iron-pole-piece dipole magnets to third and higher order requires a model for the midplane field profile and its transverse derivatives (soft-edge model to high order and numerical integration of map coefficients. An exact treatment of the problem for a particular magnet requires use of measured magnetic data. However, in initial design of beam transport systems, users of charged-particle optics codes generally rely on magnet models built into the codes. Indeed, if maps to third order are adequate for the problem, an approximate analytic field model together with numerical map coefficient integration can capture the important features of the transfer map. The model described in this paper is based on the fact that, except at very large distances from the magnet, the magnetic field for parallel pole-face magnets with constant pole gap height and wide pole faces is basically two dimensional (2D. The field for all space outside of the pole pieces is given by a single (complex analytic expression and includes a parameter that controls the rate of falloff of the fringe field. Since the field function is analytic in the complex plane outside of the pole pieces, it satisfies two basic requirements of a field model for higher-order map codes: it is infinitely differentiable at the midplane and also a solution of the Laplace equation. It is apparently the only simple model available that combines an exponential approach to the central field with an inverse cubic falloff of field at large distances from the magnet in a single expression. The model is not intended for detailed fitting of magnetic field data, but for use in numerical map-generating codes for studying the effect of extended fringe fields on higher-order transfer maps. It is based on conformally mapping the area between the pole pieces to the upper half plane, and placing current filaments on the pole faces. An

  8. Post-processing scheme for modelling the lithospheric magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lesur

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how the noise in satellite magnetic data affects magnetic lithospheric field models derived from these data in the special case where this noise is correlated along satellite orbit tracks. For this we describe the satellite data noise as a perturbation magnetic field scaled independently for each orbit, where the scaling factor is a random variable, normally distributed with zero mean. Under this assumption, we have been able to derive a model for errors in lithospheric models generated by the correlated satellite data noise. Unless the perturbation field is known, estimating the noise in the lithospheric field model is a non-linear inverse problem. We therefore proposed an iterative post-processing technique to estimate both the lithospheric field model and its associated noise model. The technique has been successfully applied to derive a lithospheric field model from CHAMP satellite data up to spherical harmonic degree 120. The model is in agreement with other existing models. The technique can, in principle, be extended to all sorts of potential field data with "along-track" correlated errors.

  9. Mean field models for spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Talagrand, Michel

    2011-01-01

    This is a new, completely revised, updated and enlarged edition of the author's Ergebnisse vol. 46: "Spin Glasses: A Challenge for Mathematicians". This new edition will appear in two volumes, the present first volume presents the basic results and methods, the second volume is expected to appear in 2011. In the eighties, a group of theoretical physicists introduced several models for certain disordered systems, called "spin glasses". These models are simple and rather canonical random structures, of considerable interest for several branches of science (statistical physics, neural networks and computer science). The physicists studied them by non-rigorous methods and predicted spectacular behaviors. This book introduces in a rigorous manner this exciting new area to the mathematically minded reader. It requires no knowledge whatsoever of any physics. The first volume of this new and completely rewritten edition presents six fundamental models and the basic techniques to study them.

  10. New parameterization of external and induced fields in geomagnetic field modeling, and a candidate model for IGRF 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Sabaka, T.J.; Lowes, F.

    2005-01-01

    When deriving spherical harmonic models of the Earth's magnetic field, low-degree external field contributions are traditionally considered by assuming that their expansion coefficient q(1)(0) varies linearly with the D-st-index, while induced contributions are considered assuming a constant ratio......)(0) for each of the 67 months of Orsted and CHAMP data that have been used. We discuss the advantage of this new parameterization of external and induced field for geomagnetic field modeling, and describe the derivation of candidate models for IGRF 2005....

  11. The random field Blume-Capel model revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, P. V.; da Costa, F. A.; de Araújo, J. M.

    2018-04-01

    We have revisited the mean-field treatment for the Blume-Capel model under the presence of a discrete random magnetic field as introduced by Kaufman and Kanner (1990). The magnetic field (H) versus temperature (T) phase diagrams for given values of the crystal field D were recovered in accordance to Kaufman and Kanner original work. However, our main goal in the present work was to investigate the distinct structures of the crystal field versus temperature phase diagrams as the random magnetic field is varied because similar models have presented reentrant phenomenon due to randomness. Following previous works we have classified the distinct phase diagrams according to five different topologies. The topological structure of the phase diagrams is maintained for both H - T and D - T cases. Although the phase diagrams exhibit a richness of multicritical phenomena we did not found any reentrant effect as have been seen in similar models.

  12. Regularity of solutions of a phase field model

    KAUST Repository

    Amler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Phase field models are widely-used for modelling phase transition processes such as solidification, freezing or CO2 sequestration. In this paper, a phase field model proposed by G. Caginalp is considered. The existence and uniqueness of solutions are proved in the case of nonsmooth initial data. Continuity of solutions with respect to time is established. In particular, it is shown that the governing initial boundary value problem can be considered as a dynamical system. © 2013 International Press.

  13. A Phase-Field Model for Grain Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.Q.; Fan, D.N.; Tikare, V.

    1998-12-23

    A phase-field model for grain growth is briefly described. In this model, a poly-crystalline microstructure is represented by multiple structural order parameter fields whose temporal and spatial evolutions follow the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations. Results from phase-field simulations of two-dimensional (2D) grain growth will be summarized and preliminary results on three-dimensional (3D) grain growth will be presented. The physical interpretation of the structural order parameter fields and the efficient and accurate semi-implicit Fourier spectral method for solving the TDGL equations will be briefly discussed.

  14. The LUE data model for representation of agents and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Kor; Schmitz, Oliver; Karssenberg, Derek

    2017-04-01

    Traditionally, agents-based and field-based modelling environments use different data models to represent the state of information they manipulate. In agent-based modelling, involving the representation of phenomena as objects bounded in space and time, agents are often represented by classes, each of which represents a particular kind of agent and all its properties. Such classes can be used to represent entities like people, birds, cars and countries. In field-based modelling, involving the representation of the environment as continuous fields, fields are often represented by a discretization of space, using multidimensional arrays, each storing mostly a single attribute. Such arrays can be used to represent the elevation of the land-surface, the pH of the soil, or the population density in an area, for example. Representing a population of agents by class instances grouped in collections is an intuitive way of organizing information. A drawback, though, is that models in which class instances grouping properties are stored in collections are less efficient (execute slower) than models in which collections of properties are grouped. The field representation, on the other hand, is convenient for the efficient execution of models. Another drawback is that, because the data models used are so different, integrating agent-based and field-based models becomes difficult, since the model builder has to deal with multiple concepts, and often multiple modelling environments. With the development of the LUE data model [1] we aim at representing agents and fields within a single paradigm, by combining the advantages of the data models used in agent-based and field-based data modelling. This removes the barrier for writing integrated agent-based and field-based models. The resulting data model is intuitive to use and allows for efficient execution of models. LUE is both a high-level conceptual data model and a low-level physical data model. The LUE conceptual data model is

  15. One biquaternion model of electro-gravimagnetic field. Field analogues of Newton laws

    OpenAIRE

    Alexeyeva, Lyudmila A.

    2007-01-01

    Using the biquaternions algebra with involution and mutual quaternional gradients the equations of one model of electro-gravimagnetic (EGM) field are constructed on the base of Hamilton form of Maxwell equations. For this field the hypothesis of equivalence of magnetic charge to gravitational mass is implied. The equations of interaction of generated by different charges and currents EGM-fields are built. On its base the analogies of three Newton's laws are obtained. The laws of transformatio...

  16. Model checking two layers of mean-field models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolesnichenko, A.V.; Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Fiondella, Lance; Puliafito, Antonio

    Recently, many systems that consist of a large number of interacting objects have been analysed using the mean-field method, which allows a quick and accurate analysis of such systems, while avoiding the state-space explosion problem. To date, the mean-field method has primarily been used for

  17. Anisotropy in wavelet-based phase field models

    KAUST Repository

    Korzec, Maciek

    2016-04-01

    When describing the anisotropic evolution of microstructures in solids using phase-field models, the anisotropy of the crystalline phases is usually introduced into the interfacial energy by directional dependencies of the gradient energy coefficients. We consider an alternative approach based on a wavelet analogue of the Laplace operator that is intrinsically anisotropic and linear. The paper focuses on the classical coupled temperature/Ginzburg--Landau type phase-field model for dendritic growth. For the model based on the wavelet analogue, existence, uniqueness and continuous dependence on initial data are proved for weak solutions. Numerical studies of the wavelet based phase-field model show dendritic growth similar to the results obtained for classical phase-field models.

  18. Stability of a Noncanonical Scalar Field Model during Cosmological Date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golanbari, T.; Sheikhahmadi, H.; Saaidi, Kh.; Ossoulian, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Using the noncanonical model of scalar field, the cosmological consequences of a pervasive, self-interacting, homogeneous, and rolling scalar field are studied. In this model, the scalar field potential is “nonlinear” and decreases in magnitude with increasing the value of the scalar field. A special solution of the nonlinear field equations of ϕ that has time dependency as fixed point is obtained. The fixed point relies on the noncanonical term of action and γ-parameter; this parameter appeared in energy density of scalar field redshift. By means of such fixed point the different eigenvalues of the equation of motion will be obtained. In different epochs in the evolution of the Universe for different values of q and n, the potentials as a function of scalar field are attained. The behavior of baryonic perturbations in linear perturbation scenario as a considerable amount of energy density of scalar field at low redshifts prevents the growth of perturbations in the ordinary matter fluid. The energy density in the scalar field is not appreciably perturbed by nonrelativistic gravitational fields, in either the radiation or matter dominant or scalar field dominated epoch.

  19. An electrodynamic model to analyse field emission thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardelli, E.; Del Zoppo, R.; Venturini, G.

    1987-12-01

    After a short description of the working principle of field emission thrusters, a surface emission electrodynamic model, capable of describing the required propulsive effects, is shown. The model, developed according to cylindrical geometry, provides one-dimensional differential relations and, therefore, easy resolution. The characteristic curves obtained are graphed. Comparison with experimental data confirms the validity of the proposed model.

  20. Use of along-track magnetic field differences in lithospheric field modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that first differences of polar orbiting satellite magnetic data in the along-track direction can be used to obtain high resolution models of the lithospheric field. Along-track differences approximate the north–south magnetic field gradients for non-polar latitudes. In a test case, using 2 yr of low altitude data from the CHAMP satellite, we show that use of along-track differences of vector field data results in an enhanced recovery of the small scale lithospheric field, comp...

  1. A simplified model of polar cap electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, N.

    1977-01-01

    A simple-minded 'model' is used in order to visualize the gross features of polar cap electric fields, in particular the 'diode' effect which had emerged already from earlier observations and the asymmetry between the electric fields observed on the dawn and dusk sides of the polar cap, which depends on Bsub(y)

  2. Two Populations Mean-Field Monomer-Dimer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberici, Diego; Mingione, Emanuele

    2018-04-01

    A two populations mean-field monomer-dimer model including both hard-core and attractive interactions between dimers is considered. The pressure density in the thermodynamic limit is proved to satisfy a variational principle. A detailed analysis is made in the limit of one population is much smaller than the other and a ferromagnetic mean-field phase transition is found.

  3. Numerical simulation of interior flow field of nuclear model pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunlin; Peng Na; Kang Can; Zhao Baitong; Zhang Hao

    2009-01-01

    Reynolds time-averaged N-S equations and the standard k-ε turbulent model were adopted, and three-dimensional non-structural of tetrahedral mesh division was used for modeling. Multiple reference frame model of rotating fluid mechanical model was used, under the design condition, the three-dimensional incompressible turbulent flow of nuclear model pump was simulated, and the results preferably post the characteristics of the interior flow field. This paper first analyzes the total pressure and velocity distribution in the flow field, and then describes the interior flow field characteristics of each part such as the impeller, diffuser and spherical shell, and also discusses the reasons that cause these characteristics. The study results can be used to estimate the performance of nuclear model pump, and will provide some useful references for its hydraulic optimized design. (authors)

  4. Fate of pesticides in field ditches: the TOXSWA simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, P.I.

    1996-01-01

    The TOXSWA model describes the fate of pesticides entering field ditches by spray drift, atmospheric deposition, surface run-off, drainage or leaching. It considers four processes: transport, transformation, sorption and volatilization. Analytical andnumerical solutions corresponded well. A sample

  5. Probabilistic data modelling with adaptive TAP mean-field theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opper, M.; Winther, Ole

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate for the case of single-layer neural networks how an extension of the TAP mean-field approach of disorder physics can be applied to the computation of approximate averages in probabilistic models for real data.......We demonstrate for the case of single-layer neural networks how an extension of the TAP mean-field approach of disorder physics can be applied to the computation of approximate averages in probabilistic models for real data....

  6. Multilayer piezoelectric transducer models combined with Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    with a polymer ring, and submerged into water. The transducer models are developed to account for any external electrical loading impedance in the driving circuit. The models are adapted to calculate the surface acceleration needed by the Field II software in predicting pressure pulses at any location in front....... If the three-dimensional model is restricted in its radial movement at the circular boundary both models exhibit identical results. The Field II predicted pressure pulses are found to have oscillating consistency with a 2.0 dB overshoot on the maximum amplitude using the one-dimensional compared to the three...

  7. The phase field technique for modeling multiphase materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer-Loginova, I.; Singer, H. M.

    2008-10-01

    This paper reviews methods and applications of the phase field technique, one of the fastest growing areas in computational materials science. The phase field method is used as a theory and computational tool for predictions of the evolution of arbitrarily shaped morphologies and complex microstructures in materials. In this method, the interface between two phases (e.g. solid and liquid) is treated as a region of finite width having a gradual variation of different physical quantities, i.e. it is a diffuse interface model. An auxiliary variable, the phase field or order parameter \\phi(\\vec{x}) , is introduced, which distinguishes one phase from the other. Interfaces are identified by the variation of the phase field. We begin with presenting the physical background of the phase field method and give a detailed thermodynamical derivation of the phase field equations. We demonstrate how equilibrium and non-equilibrium physical phenomena at the phase interface are incorporated into the phase field methods. Then we address in detail dendritic and directional solidification of pure and multicomponent alloys, effects of natural convection and forced flow, grain growth, nucleation, solid-solid phase transformation and highlight other applications of the phase field methods. In particular, we review the novel phase field crystal model, which combines atomistic length scales with diffusive time scales. We also discuss aspects of quantitative phase field modeling such as thin interface asymptotic analysis and coupling to thermodynamic databases. The phase field methods result in a set of partial differential equations, whose solutions require time-consuming large-scale computations and often limit the applicability of the method. Subsequently, we review numerical approaches to solve the phase field equations and present a finite difference discretization of the anisotropic Laplacian operator.

  8. Geomagnetic core field models in the satellite era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils; Thomson, Alan W. P.

    2011-01-01

    After a brief review of the theoretical basis and difficulties that modelers are facing, we present three recent models of the geomagnetic field originating in the Earth’s core. All three modeling approaches are using recent observatory and near-Earth orbiting survey satellite data. In each case...... between models are generally small. They do not exceed 16 nT which gives an idea of the accuracy of the models. Secular variation models are robustly resolved up to spherical harmonic degree 13, but only on time scale as large as 10 years. On time scale of a year, secular variation models are resolved...

  9. Mean-field theory and self-consistent dynamo modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2001-12-01

    Mean-field theory of dynamo is discussed with emphasis on the statistical formulation of turbulence effects on the magnetohydrodynamic equations and the construction of a self-consistent dynamo model. The dynamo mechanism is sought in the combination of the turbulent residual-helicity and cross-helicity effects. On the basis of this mechanism, discussions are made on the generation of planetary magnetic fields such as geomagnetic field and sunspots and on the occurrence of flow by magnetic fields in planetary and fusion phenomena. (author)

  10. H+3 WZNW model from Liouville field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikida, Yasuaki; Schomerus, Volker

    2007-01-01

    There exists an intriguing relation between genus zero correlation functions in the H + 3 WZNW model and in Liouville field theory. We provide a path integral derivation of the correspondence and then use our new approach to generalize the relation to surfaces of arbitrary genus g. In particular we determine the correlation functions of N primary fields in the WZNW model explicitly through Liouville correlators with N+2g-2 additional insertions of certain degenerate fields. The paper concludes with a list of interesting further extensions and a few comments on the relation to the geometric Langlands program

  11. TMS field modelling-status and next steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thielscher, Axel

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, an increasing number of studies used geometrically accurate head models and finite element (FEM) or finite difference methods (FDM) to estimate the electric field induced by non-invasive neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or transcranial...... necessary.Focusing on motor cortex stimulation by TMS, our goal is to explore to which extent the field estimates based on advanced models correlate with the physiological stimulation effects. For example, we aim at testing whether interindividual differences in the field estimates are also reflected...... in differences in the MEP responses. This would indicate that the field calculations accurately capture the impact of individual macroanatomical features of the head and brain on the induced field distribution, in turn strongly supporting their plausibility.Our approach is based on the SimNIBS software pipeline...

  12. modelling of far modelling of far-field mixing o field mixing o ambient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    quality[3]. Although many studies have addressed biochemical analysis of the polluted water. 8067349981. FIELD MIXING OF INDUSTRIAL. FIELD MIXING OF INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT PLUM ... and also ascertain the extent of its effect from discharge location to downs .... control and concluded by drawing attention to the.

  13. Model-Checking Mean-Field Models: Algorithms & Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolesnichenko, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Large systems of interacting objects are highly prevalent in today's world. Such system usually consist of a large number of relatively simple identical objects, and can be observed in many different field as, e.g., physics (interactions of molecules in gas), chemistry (chemical reactions),

  14. Theoretical models of magnetic field line merging. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasyliunas, V.M.

    1975-01-01

    Models of magnetic field line merging that consider processes in a limited region around the magnetic X line, within which the external magnetic fields are roughly uniform and antiparallel, are reviewed. Part I describes the concept of magnetic merging and then considers the models based on a hydromagnetic approach. The models developed by Sweet and Parker, by Petschek, and by Sonnerup and Yeh and Axford are shown to be fundamentally consistent, representing different aspects of the same problem. The model of Sweet and Parker describes the small region around the neutral line where magnetic field diffusion is the dominant process. The inclusion of inertial as well as finite resistivity effects allows an extension of their model to collisionless plasmas. Petschek's model represents a system with a boundary condition of uniform field at the sides; it has been extended and formulated in a mathematically precise manner. The nonsingular model of Sonnerup and of Yeh and Axford has special boundary conditions at the sides producing localized slow mode MHD expansion fans in the external flow; the singular models and the compressible similarity models are physically unrealizable. The maximum merging rate corresponds to flow into the diffusion region of the local Alfven speed, which, however, can be made arbitrarily large by slow mode MHD expansion if suitable boundary condi []ions are present. (auth)

  15. Plasma pressure and anisotropy inferred from the Tsyganenkomagnetic field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cao

    Full Text Available A numerical procedure has been developed to deduce the plasma pressure and anisotropy from the Tsyganenko magnetic field model. The Tsyganenko empirical field model, which is based on vast satellite field data, provides a realistic description of magnetic field configuration in the magnetosphere. When the force balance under the static condition is assumed, the electromagnetic J×B force from the Tsyganenko field model can be used to infer the plasma pressure and anisotropy distributions consistent with the field model. It is found that the J×B force obtained from the Tsyganenko field model is not curl-free. The curl-free part of the J×B force in an empirical field model can be balanced by the gradient of the isotropic pressure, while the nonzero curl of the J×B force can only be associated with the pressure anisotropy. The plasma pressure and anisotropy in the near-Earth plasma sheet are numerically calculated to obtain a static equilibrium consistent with the Tsyganenko field model both in the noon-midnight meridian and in the equatorial plane. The plasma pressure distribution deduced from the Tsyganenko 1989 field model is highly anisotropic and shows this feature early in the substorm growth phase. The pressure anisotropy parameter αP, defined as αP=1-PVertP, is typically ~0.3 at x ≈ -4.5RE and gradually decreases to a small negative value with an increasing tailward distance. The pressure anisotropy from the Tsyganenko 1989 model accounts for 50% of the cross-tail current at maximum and only in a highly localized region near xsim-10RE. In comparison, the plasma pressure anisotropy inferred from the Tsyganenko 1987 model is much smaller. We also find that the boundary

  16. Mean Field Games Models-A Brief Survey

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2013-11-20

    The mean-field framework was developed to study systems with an infinite number of rational agents in competition, which arise naturally in many applications. The systematic study of these problems was started, in the mathematical community by Lasry and Lions, and independently around the same time in the engineering community by P. Caines, Minyi Huang, and Roland Malhamé. Since these seminal contributions, the research in mean-field games has grown exponentially, and in this paper we present a brief survey of mean-field models as well as recent results and techniques. In the first part of this paper, we study reduced mean-field games, that is, mean-field games, which are written as a system of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation and a transport or Fokker-Planck equation. We start by the derivation of the models and by describing some of the existence results available in the literature. Then we discuss the uniqueness of a solution and propose a definition of relaxed solution for mean-field games that allows to establish uniqueness under minimal regularity hypothesis. A special class of mean-field games that we discuss in some detail is equivalent to the Euler-Lagrange equation of suitable functionals. We present in detail various additional examples, including extensions to population dynamics models. This section ends with a brief overview of the random variables point of view as well as some applications to extended mean-field games models. These extended models arise in problems where the costs incurred by the agents depend not only on the distribution of the other agents, but also on their actions. The second part of the paper concerns mean-field games in master form. These mean-field games can be modeled as a partial differential equation in an infinite dimensional space. We discuss both deterministic models as well as problems where the agents are correlated. We end the paper with a mean-field model for price impact. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  17. Covariant field equations, gauge fields and conservation laws from Yang-Mills matrix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinacker, Harold

    2009-01-01

    The effective geometry and the gravitational coupling of nonabelian gauge and scalar fields on generic NC branes in Yang-Mills matrix models is determined. Covariant field equations are derived from the basic matrix equations of motions, known as Yang-Mills algebra. Remarkably, the equations of motion for the Poisson structure and for the nonabelian gauge fields follow from a matrix Noether theorem, and are therefore protected from quantum corrections. This provides a transparent derivation and generalization of the effective action governing the SU(n) gauge fields obtained in [1], including the would-be topological term. In particular, the IKKT matrix model is capable of describing 4-dimensional NC space-times with a general effective metric. Metric deformations of flat Moyal-Weyl space are briefly discussed.

  18. A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

  19. Modelling of evapotranspiration at field and landscape scales. Abstract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jesper; Butts, M.B.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2002-01-01

    observations from a nearby weather station. Detailed land-use and soil maps were used to set up the model. Leaf area index was derived from NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) images. To validate the model at field scale the simulated evapotranspiration rates were compared to eddy...

  20. The Sport Education Model: A Track and Field Unit Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Kason; Krause, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Track and field is a traditional instructional unit often taught in secondary physical education settings due to its history, variety of events, and potential for student interest. This article provides an approach to teaching this unit using the sport education model (SEM) of instruction, which has traditionally been presented as a model for team…

  1. New exact models for anisotropic matter with electric field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-05

    Sep 5, 2017 ... We can also obtain particular anisotropic models obtained by Maharaj, Sunzu, and Ray. The exact solutions corresponding to our models are found explicitly in terms of elementary functions. The graphical plots generated for the matter variables and the electric field are well behaved. We also generate ...

  2. Integrable lattice models, graphs and modular invariant conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francesco, P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the construction of integrable height models attached to graphs in connection with compact Lie groups. The continuum limit of these models yields conformally invariant field theories. A direct relation between graphs and (Kac-Moody or coset) modular invariants is proposed

  3. Archaeomagnetic Dating in Europe Using a Global Geomagnetic Field Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, A.; Suttie, N.; Holme, R.; Shaw, J.; Hill, M. J.; Linford, P.

    2009-12-01

    Using up-to-date archaeomagnetic data from Europe and CALS7K.2 as an apriori model, we produce a global geomagnetic field model to be used for archaeomagnetic dating in Europe. More details on the modelling process will be presented elsewhere (in session GP12, abstract: Geophysical insights from archaeomagnetic dating). Here we apply the global geomagnetic field model to a series of test cases from both recently published data and unpublished data to demonstrate its application to archaeomagnetic dating. We compare the results produced using our model with those from the spherical cap harmonic model, SCHA.DIF.3K (Pavón-Carrasco et al., 2009), the global geomagnetic field model, ARCH3K.1 (Korte et al., 2009) and those produced using the palaeosecular variation curves generated using Bayesian statistics (Lanos, 2004). We include examples which emphasise the importance of using three component data (declination, inclination and intensity) to produce an improved archaeomagnetic date. In addition to the careful selection of an appropriate model for archaeomagnetic dating, the choice of errors on the model curves is vital for providing archaeologists with an age range of possible dates. We discuss how best to constrain the errors on the model curves and alternative ways to the mathematical method of Lanos (2004) for producing an archaeomagnetic date for archaeologists.

  4. Phase field modeling of flexoelectricity in solid dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. T.; Zhang, S. D.; Soh, A. K.; Yin, W. Y.

    2015-07-01

    A phase field model is developed to study the flexoelectricity in nanoscale solid dielectrics, which exhibit both structural and elastic inhomogeneity. The model is established for an elastic homogeneous system by taking into consideration all the important non-local interactions, such as electrostatic, elastic, polarization gradient, as well as flexoelectric terms. The model is then extended to simulate a two-phase system with strong elastic inhomogeneity. Both the microscopic domain structures and the macroscopic effective piezoelectricity are thoroughly studied using the proposed model. The results obtained show that the largest flexoelectric induced polarization exists at the interface between the matrix and the inclusion. The effective piezoelectricity is greatly influenced by the inclusion size, volume fraction, elastic stiffness, and the applied stress. The established model in the present study can provide a fundamental framework for computational study of flexoelectricity in nanoscale solid dielectrics, since various boundary conditions can be easily incorporated into the phase field model.

  5. Benchmark problems for numerical implementations of phase field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokisaari, A. M.; Voorhees, P. W.; Guyer, J. E.; Warren, J.; Heinonen, O. G.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the first set of benchmark problems for phase field models that are being developed by the Center for Hierarchical Materials Design (CHiMaD) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). While many scientific research areas use a limited set of well-established software, the growing phase field community continues to develop a wide variety of codes and lacks benchmark problems to consistently evaluate the numerical performance of new implementations. Phase field modeling has become significantly more popular as computational power has increased and is now becoming mainstream, driving the need for benchmark problems to validate and verify new implementations. We follow the example set by the micromagnetics community to develop an evolving set of benchmark problems that test the usability, computational resources, numerical capabilities and physical scope of phase field simulation codes. In this paper, we propose two benchmark problems that cover the physics of solute diffusion and growth and coarsening of a second phase via a simple spinodal decomposition model and a more complex Ostwald ripening model. We demonstrate the utility of benchmark problems by comparing the results of simulations performed with two different adaptive time stepping techniques, and we discuss the needs of future benchmark problems. The development of benchmark problems will enable the results of quantitative phase field models to be confidently incorporated into integrated computational materials science and engineering (ICME), an important goal of the Materials Genome Initiative.

  6. Effective-field theory on the kinetic Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xiaoling; Wei Guozhu; Li Lin

    2008-01-01

    As an analytical method, the effective-field theory (EFT) is used to study the dynamical response of the kinetic Ising model in the presence of a sinusoidal oscillating field. The effective-field equations of motion of the average magnetization are given for the square lattice (Z=4) and the simple cubic lattice (Z=6), respectively. The dynamic order parameter, the hysteresis loop area and the dynamic correlation are calculated. In the field amplitude h 0 /ZJ-temperature T/ZJ plane, the phase boundary separating the dynamic ordered and the disordered phase has been drawn, and the dynamical tricritical point has been observed. We also make the compare results of EFT with that given by using the mean field theory (MFT)

  7. Modeling electric fields in two dimensions using computer aided design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, D.W.; Giovanetti, D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe a method for analyzing static electric fields in two dimensions using AutoCAD. The algorithm is coded in LISP and is modeled after Coloumb's Law. The software platform allows for facile graphical manipulations of field renderings and supports a wide range of hardcopy-output and data-storage formats. More generally, this application is representative of the ability to analyze data that is the solution to known mathematical functions with computer aided design (CAD)

  8. Modeling of Local Magnetic Field Enhancements within Solar Flux Ropes

    OpenAIRE

    Romashets, E; Vandas, M; Poedts, Stefaan

    2010-01-01

    To model and study local magnetic-field enhancements in a solar flux rope we consider the magnetic field in its interior as a superposition of two linear (constant alpha) force-free magnetic-field distributions, viz. a global one, which is locally similar to a part of the cylinder, and a local torus-shaped magnetic distribution. The newly derived solution for a toroid with an aspect ratio close to unity is applied. The symmetry axis of the toroid and that of the cylinder may or may not coinci...

  9. The Zimanyi and Moszkowski model in thermo field dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, R.; Civitarese, O.; Paoli, A.L. de

    1996-01-01

    The effective Lagrangian introduced by Zimanyi and Moszkowski is used to calculate the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter at finite densities and temperatures. The model is treated in the mean field approximation and one-loop perturbative corrections are added to the mean field value of relevant propagators. Green functions for baryons and mesons are constructed in the framework of thermo field dynamics. An effective residual interaction, with coupling coefficients which are dependent on density and temperature, is introduced. This effective coupling is used to calculate perturbative corrections to the baryon mass, the equation of state and the compressibility of the system. (orig.)

  10. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    von Schwerin, Erik

    2010-03-17

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  11. Evaluation of candidate geomagnetic field models for IGRF-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Maus, S.; Beggan, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was agreed in December 2009 by a task force appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) Division V Working Group V-MOD. New spherical harmonic main field models for epochs 2005.0 (DGRF......-2005) and 2010.0 (IGRF-2010), and predictive linear secular variation for the interval 2010.0–2015.0 (SV-2010-2015) were derived from weighted averages of candidate models submitted by teams led by DTU Space, Denmark (team A); NOAA/NGDC, U.S.A. (team B); BGS, U.K. (team C); IZMIRAN, Russia (team D...... include calculations of root mean square vector field differences between the candidates, comparisons of the power spectra, and degree correlations between the candidates and a mean model. Coefficient by coefficient analysis including determination of weighting factors used in a robust estimation of mean...

  12. Integrable models in 1+1 dimensional quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faddeev, Ludvig.

    1982-09-01

    The goal of this lecture is to present a unifying view on the exactly soluble models. There exist several reasons arguing in favor of the 1+1 dimensional models: every exact solution of a field-theoretical model can teach about the ability of quantum field theory to describe spectrum and scattering; some 1+1 d models have physical applications in the solid state theory. There are several ways to become acquainted with the methods of exactly soluble models: via classical statistical mechanics, via Bethe Ansatz, via inverse scattering method. Fundamental Poisson bracket relation FPR and/or fundamental commutation relations FCR play fundamental role. General classification of FPR is given with promizing generalizations to FCR

  13. Modeling the Earth's Gravity Field in Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, S.; Panet, I.; Ramillien, G.; Guilloux, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth constantly deforms as it undergoes dynamic phenomena, such as earthquakes, post-glacial rebound and water displacement in its fluid envelopes. These processes have different spatial and temporal scales and are accompanied by mass displacements, which create temporal variations of the gravity field. Since 2002, satellite missions such as GOCE and GRACE provide an unprecedented view of the spatial and temporal variations of the Earth's gravity field. Gravity models built from these data are essential to study the Earth's dynamic processes. The gravity field and its time variations are usually modelled using spatial spherical harmonics functions averaged over a fixed period, as 10 days or 1 month. This approach is well suited for modeling global phenomena. To better estimate gravity variations related to local and/or transient processes, such as earthquakes or floods, and take into account the trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution resulting from the satellites sampling, we propose to model the gravity field as a four-dimensional quantity using localized functions in space and time. For that, we first design a four-dimensional multi-scale basis, well localized both in space and time, by combining spatial Poisson wavelets with an orthogonal temporal wavelet basis. In such approach, the temporal resolution can be adjusted to the spatial one. Then, we set-up the inverse problem to model potential differences between the twin GRACE satellites in 4D, and propose a regularization using prior knowledge on the water cycle signal amplitude. We validate our 4D modelling method on a synthetic test over Africa, using synthetic data on potential differences along the orbits constructed from a global hydrological model. A perspective of this work is to apply it on real data, in order to better model and understand the non-stationnary gravity field variations and associated processes at regional scales.

  14. The Research of the Driver Attention Field Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Tao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For expanding the application scope of car-following, based on the basic idea of the noncontact interaction of the objects in physics, establish an attention field model to describe the driving behavior. Firstly, propose the time distance concept to describe the degree of driver perception to the front one-dimensional space and extend its application range to the two-dimensional space. Secondly, connect the point which has the same time distance to constitute the equipotential line of drivers’ attention field equipotent, and establish a model to describe it. Thirdly, define the effective range of the driver’s psychological field with the feature of the driver’s visual distance range increasing and the angle decreasing. Finally, design the calculation method to collect projection of the object in the psychological field scope and calculate the curve points to determine the object’s intensity of psychological field. Preliminarily build the driving behavior model and use the numerical simulation method to simulate the simple transport scenarios; initially verify the validity of the model.

  15. Structural Model of the Tucupita Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, L. A.

    2013-05-01

    The Tucupita Field has an area of 73,51 Km2, is located between the states of Monagas and Delta Amacuro, geologically is located at the greater Temblador area in the Eastern Venezuela Basin, where the Oficina Formation's sands represent the main hydrocarbons reservoirs. From the results of the seismic reprocessing realized by Fusion Petroleum Technologies, Inc., the structural model of this field was done as initial step to the geocellular model of the Oficina-40 Reservoir, which was defined as a Faulted Relay Ramp, where the normal faults are dominant with NE-SW orientation Introduction The Tucupita Field is a mature oilfield at the greater Temblador area, however most of the wells were completed in the upper sands, therefore the main study is focused in the geological characterization of the Oficina-40 Reservoir's lower sands, starting by the structural model Previous Studies 1. Proyecto Tucupita 3D The seismic data of the Tucupita Field were adquired in 1996 by Western Atlas of Venezuela for the Benton Vinccler Company. The UTM coordinates of the wells used in this project, have been taken to make this geological model 2. Soporte Geofísico Integrado The seismic project Tucupita was processed by Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc., in Houston and consisted of reprocessing and pre-stack migration in time (PSTM) and pre-stack migration in depth (PSDM), this data belong to the Petrodelta Company Based on the regional stratigraphy, were validated the "picks" to make the structural sections to support research with hard data. After, it proceeded to interpret the structural style of the field from the seismic amplitude cube. Then, it was done the faults modelling and the stratigraphic horizons to carry out the geocellular model Three structural sections were realized, which was interpreted like a faulted monocline, whose peak is located southward, where justly the wells are located. The contact oil-water was interpreted to -5648'. Echelon faults were interpreted in a

  16. Modeling Enzymatic Transition States by Force Field Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Jensen, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The SEAM method, which models a transition structure as a minimum on the seam of two diabatic surfaces represented by force field functions, has been used to generate 20 transition structures for the decarboxylation of orotidine by the orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase enzyme. The dependence...... by various electronic structure methods, where part of the enzyme is represented by a force field description and the effects of the solvent are represented by a continuum model. The relative energies vary by several hundreds of kJ/mol between the transition structures, and tests showed that a large part...

  17. Model (1:10) of the Split-Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The photo shows Klaus Brand from the ISR BOM group with the working model of the Split-Field Magnet, while setting up the field measuring bench. The bench used Hall probes for which he had developed the electronics instrumentation (ISR-BOM Int. Note 12-01-1977). The SFM model made of mild steel with copper coils had been measured in the years 1969-1970. This new mapping campaign was related to the installation of a large calorimeter to one side of the magnet.

  18. The combined gravity field model GOCO05c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecher, Thomas; Pail, Roland; Gruber, Thomas; GOCO Project Team

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the static gravity field is of importance for various scientific disciplines, such as geodesy, geophysics and oceanography. While for geophysics the gravity field provides insight into the Earth's interior, the geoid serves as an important reference surface for oceanographic applications. Moreover this reference surface is a key parameter on the way to a globally unified height system. In order to exploit the full potential of gravity measurements and to achieve the best gravity field solution, all kinds of complementary gravity field information have to be combined. By combining GRACE and GOCE information, a state of the art satellite-only gravity field is available, which is highly accurate at the very long to medium wavelengths (80-100 km). By adding information from terrestrial/airborne gravimetry and satellite altimetry, which both are measurement techniques providing short wavelength gravity information beyond the resolution of GOCE, the full gravity field spectrum can be obtained. This paper focuses on the presentation of the combined gravity field model GOCO05c, a global gravity field model up to degree and order 720 based on full normal equation systems (more than 500,000 parameters). During the calculation of GOCO05c we put emphasis on the question how the complementary data types can be combined in a global gravity field model in the way that all data types keep their specific strengths and are not degraded by the combination with other information in certain wavelengths. Realistic stochastic modelling and a tailored weighting scheme among all available data results in different regional relative weighting of satellite and terrestrial data in the combined solution, mainly depending on the quality of the available terrestrial gravity information. From this procedure, as complementary product realistic error estimates are available in terms of a full-covariance matrix, which can be mapped in a spatial error grid reflecting regionally specific

  19. 2d Model Field Theories at Finite Temperature and Density

    OpenAIRE

    Schoen, Verena; Thies, Michael

    2000-01-01

    In certain 1+1 dimensional field theoretic toy models, one can go all the way from microscopic quarks via the hadron spectrum to the properties of hot and dense baryonic matter in an essentially analytic way. This "miracle" is illustrated through case studies of two popular large N models, the Gross-Neveu and the 't Hooft model - caricatures of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and real QCD, respectively. The main emphasis will be on aspects related to spontaneous symmetry breaking (discrete or co...

  20. Optimization of Saturn paraboloid magnetospheric field model parameters using Cassini equatorial magnetic field data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetosphere describes the magnetic field as being due to the sum of contributions from the internal field of the planet, the ring current, and the tail current, all contained by surface currents inside a magnetopause boundary which is taken to be a paraboloid of revolution about the planet-Sun line. The parameters of the model have previously been determined by comparison with data from a few passes through Saturn's magnetosphere in compressed and expanded states, depending on the prevailing dynamic pressure of the solar wind. Here we significantly expand such comparisons through examination of Cassini magnetic field data from 18 near-equatorial passes that span wide ranges of local time, focusing on modelling the co-latitudinal field component that defines the magnetic flux passing through the equatorial plane. For 12 of these passes, spanning pre-dawn, via noon, to post-midnight, the spacecraft crossed the magnetopause during the pass, thus allowing an estimate of the concurrent subsolar radial distance of the magnetopause R1 to be made, considered to be the primary parameter defining the scale size of the system. The best-fit model parameters from these passes are then employed to determine how the parameters vary with R1, using least-squares linear fits, thus providing predictive model parameters for any value of R1 within the range. We show that the fits obtained using the linear approximation parameters are of the same order as those for the individually selected parameters. We also show that the magnetic flux mapping to the tail lobes in these models is generally in good accord with observations of the location of the open-closed field line boundary in Saturn's ionosphere, and the related position of the auroral oval. We then investigate the field data on six passes through the nightside magnetosphere, for which the spacecraft did not cross the magnetopause, such that in this case we compare the

  1. TESTING GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS USING NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P.; Pinnick, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    This work combines new observations of NIR starlight linear polarimetry with previously simulated observations in order to constrain dynamo models of the Galactic magnetic field. Polarimetric observations were obtained with the Mimir instrument on the Perkins Telescope in Flagstaff, AZ, along a line of constant Galactic longitude (l = 150°) with 17 pointings of the 10' × 10' field of view between –75° < b < 10°, with more frequent pointings toward the Galactic midplane. A total of 10,962 stars were photometrically measured and 1116 had usable polarizations. The observed distribution of polarization position angles with Galactic latitude and the cumulative distribution function of the measured polarizations are compared to predicted values. While the predictions lack the effects of turbulence and are therefore idealized, this comparison allows significant rejection of A0-type magnetic field models. S0 and disk-even halo-odd magnetic field geometries are also rejected by the observations, but at lower significance. New predictions of spiral-type, axisymmetric magnetic fields, when combined with these new NIR observations, constrain the Galactic magnetic field spiral pitch angle to –6° ± 2°.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Electromagnetic Field Effects on the Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Psenakova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of electromagnetic field (EMF with environment and with tissue of human beings are still under discussion and many research teams are investigating it. The human simulation models are used for biomedical research in a lot of areas, where it is advantage to replace real human body (tissue by the numerical model. Biological effects of EMF are one of the areas, where numerical models are used with many advantages. On the other side, this research is very specific and it is always quite hard to simulate realistic human tissue. This paper deals with different possibilities of numerical modelling of electromagnetic field effects on the human body (especially calculation of the specific absorption rate (SAR distribution in human body and thermal effect.

  3. On the Predictiveness of Single-Field Inflationary Models

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C.P.; Trott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We re-examine the predictiveness of single-field inflationary models and discuss how an unknown UV completion can complicate determining inflationary model parameters from observations, even from precision measurements. Besides the usual naturalness issues associated with having a shallow inflationary potential, we describe another issue for inflation, namely, unknown UV physics modifies the running of Standard Model (SM) parameters and thereby introduces uncertainty into the potential inflationary predictions. We illustrate this point using the minimal Higgs Inflationary scenario, which is arguably the most predictive single-field model on the market, because its predictions for $A_s$, $r$ and $n_s$ are made using only one new free parameter beyond those measured in particle physics experiments, and run up to the inflationary regime. We find that this issue can already have observable effects. At the same time, this UV-parameter dependence in the Renormalization Group allows Higgs Inflation to occur (in prin...

  4. Two dimensional analytical model for a reconfigurable field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjith, R.; Jayachandran, Remya; Suja, K. J.; Komaragiri, Rama S.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents two-dimensional potential and current models for a reconfigurable field effect transistor (RFET). Two potential models which describe subthreshold and above-threshold channel potentials are developed by solving two-dimensional (2D) Poisson's equation. In the first potential model, 2D Poisson's equation is solved by considering constant/zero charge density in the channel region of the device to get the subthreshold potential characteristics. In the second model, accumulation charge density is considered to get above-threshold potential characteristics of the device. The proposed models are applicable for the device having lightly doped or intrinsic channel. While obtaining the mathematical model, whole body area is divided into two regions: gated region and un-gated region. The analytical models are compared with technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation results and are in complete agreement for different lengths of the gated regions as well as at various supply voltage levels.

  5. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  6. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  7. Agent-based modelling of shifting cultivation field patterns, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Martin Rudbeck; Leisz, S.; Rasmussen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Shifting cultivation in the Nghe An Province of Vietnam's Northern Mountain Region produces a characteristic land-cover pattern of small and larger fields. The pattern is the result of farmers cultivating either individually or in spatially clustered groups. Using spatially explicit agent......-based modelling, and relying on empirical data from fieldwork and observations for parameterization of variables, the level of clustering in agricultural fields observed around a study village is reproduced. Agents in the model act to maximize labour productivity, which is based on potential yield and labour...... costs associated with fencing of fields, and are faced with physical constraints. The simulation results are compared with land-cover data obtained from remote sensing. Comparisons are made on patterns as detected visually and using the mean nearest-neighbour ratio. Baseline simulation outputs show high...

  8. Antiferromagnetic Ising model with transverse and longitudinal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kischinhevsky, M.

    1985-01-01

    We study the quantum hamiltonian version of the Ising Model in one spacial dimension under an external longitudinal (uniform) field at zero temperature. A phenomenological renormalization group procedure is used to obtain the phase diagram; the transverse and longitudinal zero field limits are studied and we verify the validity of universality at non zero transverse fields, where two-dimensional critical behaviour is obtained. To perform the numerical calculations we use the Lanczos scheme, which gives highly precise results with rather short processing times. We also analyse the possibility of using these techniques to extend the present work to the quantum hamiltonian version of the q-state Potts Model (q>2) in larger system. (author) [pt

  9. Construction of classical and quantum integrable field models ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    85, No. 5. — journal of. November 2015 physics pp. 899–913. Construction of classical and quantum integrable field models unravelling hidden possibilities .... It is interesting to note that the infinite set of conserved quantities associated with an inte- ..... that taking c2 as the Hamiltonian would lead to a NLS-type equation.

  10. The dilute random field Ising model by finite cluster approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyoussef, A.; Saber, M.

    1987-09-01

    Using the finite cluster approximation, phase diagrams of bond and site diluted three-dimensional simple cubic Ising models with a random field have been determined. The resulting phase diagrams have the same general features for both bond and site dilution. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  11. Two-dimensional models in statistical mechanics and field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koberle, R.

    1980-01-01

    Several features of two-dimensional models in statistical mechanics and Field theory, such as, lattice quantum chromodynamics, Z(N), Gross-Neveu and CP N-1 are discussed. The problems of confinement and dynamical mass generation are also analyzed. (L.C.) [pt

  12. Correlation effects in the Ising model in an external field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, H.E.; Silva, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the spin-1/2 Ising Model in an external field are evaluated through the use of the exponential differential operator method and Callen's exact relations. The correlations effects are treated in a phenomenological approach and the results are compared with other treatments. (Author) [pt

  13. The dual of the Carroll-Field-Jackiw model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, M.S.; Grigorio, L.; Wotzasek, C.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we apply different duality techniques, both the dual projection, based on the soldering formalism and the master action, in order to obtain and study the dual description of the Carroll- Field-Jackiw model [1], a theory with a Chern-Simons-like explicitly Lorentz and CPT violating term, including the interaction with external charges. This Maxwell-Chern-Simons-like model may be rewritten in terms of the interacting modes of a massless scalar model and a topologically massive model [2], that are mapped, through duality, into interacting massless Maxwell and massive self-dual modes [3]. It is also shown that these dual modes might be represented into an unified rank-two self-dual model that represents the direct dual of the vector Maxwell-Chern-Simons-like model

  14. Electronic Model of a Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat Duen; Russell, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A pair of electronic models has been developed of a Ferroelectric Field Effect transistor. These models can be used in standard electrical circuit simulation programs to simulate the main characteristics of the FFET. The models use the Schmitt trigger circuit as a basis for their design. One model uses bipolar junction transistors and one uses MOSFET's. Each model has the main characteristics of the FFET, which are the current hysterisis with different gate voltages and decay of the drain current when the gate voltage is off. The drain current from each model has similar values to an actual FFET that was measured experimentally. T'he input and o Output resistance in the models are also similar to that of the FFET. The models are valid for all frequencies below RF levels. No attempt was made to model the high frequency characteristics of the FFET. Each model can be used to design circuits using FFET's with standard electrical simulation packages. These circuits can be used in designing non-volatile memory circuits and logic circuits and is compatible with all SPICE based circuit analysis programs. The models consist of only standard electrical components, such as BJT's, MOSFET's, diodes, resistors, and capacitors. Each model is compared to the experimental data measured from an actual FFET.

  15. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.mcmahon@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Karl T. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Trainor, Colman [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  16. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O’Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  17. Modeling water outflow from tile-drained agricultural fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanovski, Vladimir; Trajanov, Aneta; Leprince, Florence; Džeroski, Sašo; Debeljak, Marko

    2015-02-01

    The estimation of the pollution risk of surface and ground water with plant protection products applied on fields depends highly on the reliable prediction of the water outflows over (surface runoff) and through (discharge through sub-surface drainage systems) the soil. In previous studies, water movement through the soil has been simulated mainly using physically-based models. The most frequently used models for predicting soil water movement are MACRO, HYDRUS-1D/2D and Root Zone Water Quality Model. However, these models are difficult to apply to a small portion of land due to the information required about the soil and climate, which are difficult to obtain for each plot separately. In this paper, we focus on improving the performance and applicability of water outflow modeling by using a modeling approach based on machine learning techniques. It allows us to overcome the major drawbacks of physically-based models e.g., the complexity and difficulty of obtaining the information necessary for the calibration and the validation, by learning models from data collected from experimental fields that are representative for a wider area (region). We evaluate the proposed approach on data obtained from the La Jaillière experimental site, located in Western France. This experimental site represents one of the ten scenarios contained in the MACRO system. Our study focuses on two types of water outflows: discharge through sub-surface drainage systems and surface runoff. The results show that the proposed modeling approach successfully extracts knowledge from the collected data, avoiding the need to provide the information for calibration and validation of physically-based models. In addition, we compare the overall performance of the learned models with the performance of existing models MACRO and RZWQM. The comparison shows overall improvement in the prediction of discharge through sub-surface drainage systems, and partial improvement in the prediction of the surface

  18. An approach to adjustment of relativistic mean field model parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Tuncay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Relativistic Mean Field (RMF model with a small number of adjusted parameters is powerful tool for correct predictions of various ground-state nuclear properties of nuclei. Its success for describing nuclear properties of nuclei is directly related with adjustment of its parameters by using experimental data. In the present study, the Artificial Neural Network (ANN method which mimics brain functionality has been employed for improvement of the RMF model parameters. In particular, the understanding capability of the ANN method for relations between the RMF model parameters and their predictions for binding energies (BEs of 58Ni and 208Pb have been found in agreement with the literature values.

  19. Seasonal Gravity Field Variations from GRACE and Hydrological Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Hinderer, Jacques; Lemoine, Frank G.

    2004-01-01

    . Four global hydrological models covering the same period in 2002–2003 as the GRACE observations were investigated to for their mutual consistency in estimates of annual variation in terrestrial water storage and related temporal changes in gravity field. The hydrological models differ by a maximum of 2...... µGal or nearly 5 cm equivalent water storage in selected regions. Integrated over all land masses the standard deviation among the annual signal from the four hydrological models are 0.6 µGal equivalent to around 1.4 cm in equivalent water layer thickness. The estimated accuracy of the annual...

  20. Models with oscillator terms in noncommutative quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronberger, E.

    2010-01-01

    The main focus of this Ph.D. thesis is on noncommutative models involving oscillator terms in the action. The first one historically is the successful Grosse-Wulkenhaar (G.W.) model which has already been proven to be renormalizable to all orders of perturbation theory. Remarkably it is furthermore capable of solving the Landau ghost problem. In a first step, we have generalized the G.W. model to gauge theories in a very straightforward way, where the action is BRS invariant and exhibits the good damping properties of the scalar theory by using the same propagator, the so-called Mehler kernel. To be able to handle some more involved one-loop graphs we have programmed a powerful Mathematica package, which is capable of analytically computing Feynman graphs with many terms. The result of those investigations is that new terms originally not present in the action arise, which led us to the conclusion that we should better start from a theory where those terms are already built in. Fortunately there is an action containing this complete set of terms. It can be obtained by coupling a gauge field to the scalar field of the G.W. model, integrating out the latter, and thus 'inducing' a gauge theory. Hence the model is called Induced Gauge Theory. Despite the advantage that it is by construction completely gauge invariant, it contains also some unphysical terms linear in the gauge field. Advantageously we could get rid of these terms using a special gauge dedicated to this purpose. Within this gauge we could again establish the Mehler kernel as gauge field propagator. Furthermore we where able to calculate the ghost propagator, which turned out to be very involved. Thus we were able to start with the first few loop computations showing the expected behavior. The next step is to show renormalizability of the model, where some hints towards this direction will also be given. (author) [de

  1. Spiking patterns of a hippocampus model in electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Men Cong; Wang Jiang; Qin Ying-Mei; Wei Xi-Le; Deng Bin; Che Yan-Qiu

    2011-01-01

    We develop a model of CA3 neurons embedded in a resistive array to mimic the effects of electric fields from a new perspective. Effects of DC and sinusoidal electric fields on firing patterns in CA3 neurons are investigated in this study. The firing patterns can be switched from no firing pattern to burst or from burst to fast periodic firing pattern with the increase of DC electric field intensity. It is also found that the firing activities are sensitive to the frequency and amplitude of the sinusoidal electric field. Different phase-locking states and chaotic firing regions are observed in the parameter space of frequency and amplitude. These findings are qualitatively in accordance with the results of relevant experimental and numerical studies. It is implied that the external or endogenous electric field can modulate the neural code in the brain. Furthermore, it is helpful to develop control strategies based on electric fields to control neural diseases such as epilepsy. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  2. Magnetic field measurements of model SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Gilbert, W.S.; Green, M.I.; Barale, P.J.

    1986-10-01

    To qualify for use in the Superconducting Super Collider, the 8000 or so 16 m long dipole magnets must pass a series of tests. One of these will be a set of warm measurements of field quality, which must be precise to about 0.001% of the 100 G field produced by 10 A, the maximum current the coils are allowed to carry for an extended period at room temperature. Field measurements of better than this accuracy have already been carried out on 1 m long model dipoles. These measurements have included determinations of the dipole fields and the higher harmonics in the central or two dimensional region and in the total magnet. In addition, axial scans of the dipole and higher harmonic magnetic fields have been made to determine the local variations, which might reflect fabrication and assembly tolerances. This paper describes the equipment developed for these measurements, the results of a representative set of measurements of the central and integral fields and axial scans, and a comparison between warm and cold measurements. Reproducibility, accuracy and precision will be described for some of the measurements. The significance of the warm measurements as a part of the certification process for the SSC dipoles will be discussed

  3. Modeling of Geological Objects and Geophysical Fields Using Haar Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Dolgal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a presentation of application of the fast wavelet transform with basic Haar functions for modeling the structural surfaces and geophysical fields, characterized by fractal features. The multiscale representation of experimental data allows reducing significantly a cost of the processing of large volume data and improving the interpretation quality. This paper presents the algorithms for sectionally prismatic approximation of geological objects, for preliminary estimation of the number of equivalent sources for the analytical approximation of fields, and for determination of the rock magnetization in the upper part of the geological section.

  4. Traffic data reconstruction based on Markov random field modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Shun; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Yasuda, Muneki; Furtlehner, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    We consider the traffic data reconstruction problem. Suppose we have the traffic data of an entire city that are incomplete because some road data are unobserved. The problem is to reconstruct the unobserved parts of the data. In this paper, we propose a new method to reconstruct incomplete traffic data collected from various sensors. Our approach is based on Markov random field modeling of road traffic. The reconstruction is achieved by using a mean-field method and a machine learning method. We numerically verify the performance of our method using realistic simulated traffic data for the real road network of Sendai, Japan. (paper)

  5. Modeling of the temperature field of the casting ladle lining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotsky, A. V.

    2011-03-01

    We propose a method for calculating the temperature field of the casting ladle lining by a modified relaxation method. Given such initial data as the metal temperature in the ladle, the ambient temperature, and the lining structure, this method permits calculating the stationary temperature fields both inside the lining and on the surface of the ladle jacket. The model was tested by comparing experimentally measured temperature values on the surface of the ladle jacket with calculated temperatures. A satisfactory agreement between calculated and experimental temperature values of the ladle surface has been obtained.

  6. Fluid analog model for boundary effects in field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L. H.; Svaiter, N. F.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations in the density of a fluid with a linear phonon dispersion relation are studied. In particular, we treat the changes in these fluctuations due to nonclassical states of phonons and to the presence of boundaries. These effects are analogous to similar effects in relativistic quantum field theory, and we argue that the case of the fluid is a useful analog model for effects in field theory. We further argue that the changes in the mean squared density are, in principle, observable by light scattering experiments.

  7. Geosynchronous magnetic field responses to fast solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements: MHD field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Sun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed global MHD simulations of the geosynchronous magnetic field in response to fast solar wind dynamic pressure (Pd enhancements. Taking three Pd enhancement events in 2000 as examples, we found that the main features of the total field B and the dominant component Bz can be efficiently predicted by the MHD model. The predicted B and Bz varies with local time, with the highest level near noon and a slightly lower level around mid-night. However, it is more challenging to accurately predict the responses of the smaller component at the geosynchronous orbit (i.e., Bx and By. In contrast, the limitations of T01 model in predicting responses to fast Pd enhancements are presented.

  8. Kinetic Ising model in a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field: effective-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Canko, Osman; Keskin, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Recently, Shi et al. [2008 Phys. Lett. A 372 5922] have studied the dynamical response of the kinetic Ising model in the presence of a sinusoidal oscillating field and presented the dynamic phase diagrams by using an effective-field theory (EFT) and a mean-field theory (MFT). The MFT results are in conflict with those of the earlier work of Tomé and de Oliveira, [1990 Phys. Rev. A 41 4251]. We calculate the dynamic phase diagrams and find that our results are similar to those of the earlier work of Tomé and de Oliveira; hence the dynamic phase diagrams calculated by Shi et al. are incomplete within both theories, except the low values of frequencies for the MFT calculation. We also investigate the influence of external field frequency (ω) and static external field amplitude (h 0 ) for both MFT and EFT calculations. We find that the behaviour of the system strongly depends on the values of ω and h 0 . (general)

  9. Zero-field-cooled/field-cooled magnetization study of Dendrimer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arejdal, M., E-mail: arejdal.achdad@gmail.com [Laboratory of Magnetism and Physics of High Energies, Department of Physics, L.M.P.H.E (URAC-12), Faculty of Sciences, Mohammed V University, Rabat (Morocco); Bahmad, L. [Laboratory of Magnetism and Physics of High Energies, Department of Physics, L.M.P.H.E (URAC-12), Faculty of Sciences, Mohammed V University, Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco)

    2017-01-01

    Being motivated by Dendrimer model with mixed spins σ=3 and S=7/2, we investigated the magnetic nanoparticle system in this study. We analyzed and discussed the ground-state phase diagrams and the stable phases. Then, we elaborated and explained the magnetic properties of the system by using Monte Carlo Simulations (MCS) in the framework of the Ising model. In this way, we determined the blocking temperature, which is deduced through studying the partial-total magnetization and susceptibility as a function of the temperature, and we established the effects of both the exchange coupling interaction and the crystal field on the hysteresis loop.

  10. Magnetic field dissipation and fractal model of current sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yankov, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    A model of magnetic field dissipation is suggested, which possesses features of both the Kolmogorov model of turbulence of ideal fluid and the Sweet endash Parker model of magnetic reconnection. It is suggested that current sheets are smooth along the magnetic lines but have fractal structure in the transverse dimension. The fractal dimension d=2.5 of the current sheet was found instead of d=3 in Kolmogorov-like models and d=2 in the Sweet endash Parker model. The reconnection time is the geometrical mean of the Alfvacute en time and the Sweet endash Parker time. The magnetic energy dissipation time can be even shorter, up to the Alfvacute en time. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  11. MODELLING SYNERGISTIC EYE MOVEMENTS IN THE VISUAL FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARITZ Mihaela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Some theoretical and practical considerations about eye movements in visual field are presented in the first part of this paper. These movements are developed into human body to be synergistic and are allowed to obtain the visual perception in 3D space. The theoretical background of the eye movements’ analysis is founded on the establishment of movement equations of the eyeball, as they consider it a solid body with a fixed point. The exterior actions, the order and execution of the movements are ensured by the neural and muscular external system and thus the position, stability and movements of the eye can be quantified through the method of reverse kinematic. The purpose of these researches is the development of a simulation model of human binocular visual system, an acquisition methodology and an experimental setup for data processing and recording regarding the eye movements, presented in the second part of the paper. The modeling system of ocular movements aims to establish the binocular synergy and limits of visual field changes in condition of ocular motor dysfunctions. By biomechanical movements of eyeball is established a modeling strategy for different sort of processes parameters like convergence, fixation and eye lens accommodation to obtain responses from binocular balance. The results of modelling processes and the positions of eye ball and axis in visual field are presented in the final part of the paper.

  12. Linear time domain model of the acoustic potential field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesniewski, Peter J

    2002-08-01

    A new time domain formulation of the acoustic wave is developed to avoid approximating assumptions of the linearized scalar wave equation that limit its validity to low Mach particle velocity modeling or to a smooth potential field in a stationary medium. The proposed model offers precision of the moving frame while retaining the form of the widely used linearized scalar wave equation although with respect to modified coordinates. It is applicable to field calculations involving transient waves with unlimited particle velocity, propagating in inhomogenous fluids or in those with time varying density. The model is based on the exact flux continuity equation and the equation of motion, both using the moving reference frame. The resulting closed-form free space scalar wave equation employing total derivatives is converted back to the partial differential form by using modified independent variables. The modified variables are related to the common coordinates of space and time following integral expressions involving transient particle velocity representing wave radiated by each point of a stationary source. Consequently, transient field produced by complex surface velocity sources can be calculated following existing surface integrals of the radiation theory although using modified coordinates. The use of the proposed model is presented in a numerical simulation of a transient velocity source vibrating at selected magnitudes, leading to the determination of the propagating pressure and velocity wave at any point.

  13. Reconstructing Holocene geomagnetic field variation: new methods, models and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andreas; Holme, Richard; Korte, Monika; Suttie, Neil; Hill, Mimi

    2014-07-01

    Reconstructions of the Holocene geomagnetic field and how it varies on millennial timescales are important for understanding processes in the core but may also be used to study long-term solar-terrestrial relationships and as relative dating tools for geological and archaeological archives. Here, we present a new family of spherical harmonic geomagnetic field models spanning the past 9000 yr based on magnetic field directions and intensity stored in archaeological artefacts, igneous rocks and sediment records. A new modelling strategy introduces alternative data treatments with a focus on extracting more information from sedimentary data. To reduce the influence of a few individual records all sedimentary data are resampled in 50-yr bins, which also means that more weight is given to archaeomagnetic data during the inversion. The sedimentary declination data are treated as relative values and adjusted iteratively based on prior information. Finally, an alternative way of treating the sediment data chronologies has enabled us to both assess the likely range of age uncertainties, often up to and possibly exceeding 500 yr and adjust the timescale of each record based on comparisons with predictions from a preliminary model. As a result of the data adjustments, power has been shifted from quadrupole and octupole to higher degrees compared with previous Holocene geomagnetic field models. We find evidence for dominantly westward drift of northern high latitude high intensity flux patches at the core mantle boundary for the last 4000 yr. The new models also show intermittent occurrence of reversed flux at the edge of or inside the inner core tangent cylinder, possibly originating from the equator.

  14. Nonequilibrium Dynamical Mean-Field Theory for Bosonic Lattice Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo U. R. Strand

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We develop the nonequilibrium extension of bosonic dynamical mean-field theory and a Nambu real-time strong-coupling perturbative impurity solver. In contrast to Gutzwiller mean-field theory and strong-coupling perturbative approaches, nonequilibrium bosonic dynamical mean-field theory captures not only dynamical transitions but also damping and thermalization effects at finite temperature. We apply the formalism to quenches in the Bose-Hubbard model, starting from both the normal and the Bose-condensed phases. Depending on the parameter regime, one observes qualitatively different dynamical properties, such as rapid thermalization, trapping in metastable superfluid or normal states, as well as long-lived or strongly damped amplitude oscillations. We summarize our results in nonequilibrium “phase diagrams” that map out the different dynamical regimes.

  15. Bayesian analysis of inflation: Parameter estimation for single field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortonson, Michael J.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Easther, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Future astrophysical data sets promise to strengthen constraints on models of inflation, and extracting these constraints requires methods and tools commensurate with the quality of the data. In this paper we describe ModeCode, a new, publicly available code that computes the primordial scalar and tensor power spectra for single-field inflationary models. ModeCode solves the inflationary mode equations numerically, avoiding the slow roll approximation. It is interfaced with CAMB and CosmoMC to compute cosmic microwave background angular power spectra and perform likelihood analysis and parameter estimation. ModeCode is easily extendable to additional models of inflation, and future updates will include Bayesian model comparison. Errors from ModeCode contribute negligibly to the error budget for analyses of data from Planck or other next generation experiments. We constrain representative single-field models (φ n with n=2/3, 1, 2, and 4, natural inflation, and 'hilltop' inflation) using current data, and provide forecasts for Planck. From current data, we obtain weak but nontrivial limits on the post-inflationary physics, which is a significant source of uncertainty in the predictions of inflationary models, while we find that Planck will dramatically improve these constraints. In particular, Planck will link the inflationary dynamics with the post-inflationary growth of the horizon, and thus begin to probe the ''primordial dark ages'' between TeV and grand unified theory scale energies.

  16. Leaching of saltstone: Laboratory and field testing and mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, M.W.; Langton, C.A.; Oblath, S.B.; Pepper, D.W.; Wallace, R.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1987-01-01

    A low-level alkaline salt solution will be a byproduct in the processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). This solution will be incorporated into a wasteform, saltstone, and disposed of in surface vaults. Laboratory and field leach testing and mathematical modeling have demonstrated the predictability of contaminant release from cement wasteforms. Saltstone disposal in surface vaults will meet the design objective, which is to meet drinking water standards in shallow groundwater at the disposal area boundary. Diffusion is the predominant mechanism for release of contaminants to the environment. Leach testing in unsaturated soil, at soil moisture levels above 1 wt %, has shown no difference in leach rate compared to leaching in distilled water. Field leach testing of three thirty-ton blocks of saltstone in lysimeters has been underway since January 1984. Mathematical models were applied to assess design features for saltstone disposal. One dimensional infinite-composite and semi-infinite analytical models were developed for assessing diffusion of nitrate from saltstone through a cement barrier. Numerical models, both finite element and finite difference, were validated by comparison of model predictions with the saltstone lysimeter results. Validated models were used to assess the long-term performance of the saltstone stored in surface vaults. The maximum concentrations of all contaminants released from saltstone to shallow groundwater are predicted to be below drinking water standards at the disposal area boundary. 5 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  17. Primordial black holes from single field models of inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan

    Primordial black holes (PBH) have been shown to arise from high peaks in the matter power spectra of multi-field models of inflation. Here we show, with a simple toy model, that it is also possible to generate a peak in the curvature power spectrum of single-field inflation. We assume that the effective dynamics of the inflaton field presents a near-inflection point which slows down the field right before the end of inflation and gives rise to a prominent spike in the fluctuation power spectrum at scales much smaller than those probed by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and Large Scale Structure (LSS) observations. This peak will give rise, upon reentry during the radiation era, to PBH via gravitational collapse. The mass and abundance of these PBH is such that they could constitute the totality of the Dark Matter today. We satisfy all CMB and LSS constraints and predict a very broad range of PBH masses. Some of these PBH are light enough that they will evaporate before structure formation, leaving behind a ...

  18. Numerical modeling of the sound fields in urban squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian

    2005-06-01

    This paper studies the basic characteristics of sound fields in urban squares surrounded by reflecting building façades and the effectiveness of architectural changes and urban design options. A radiosity model and an image source model are developed, and a parametric study is carried out in hypothetical squares. The results show that the reverberation time (RT) is rather even in a square, whereas the early decay time (EDT) is very low in the near field, and then becomes close to RT after a rapid increase. Compared to diffuse boundaries, with geometrical boundaries the RT and EDT are significantly longer and the sound pressure level (SPL) attenuation with distance is generally smaller unless the height/side ratio is high. With a boundary diffusion coefficient of 0.2, the sound field is already close to that resulting from purely diffusely reflecting boundaries. The SPL in far field is typically 6-9 dB lower if the square side is doubled; 8 dB lower if the height of building façades is decreased from 50 m to 6 m (diffuse boundaries); 5 dB (diffuse boundaries) or 2 dB (geometrical boundaries) lower if the length/width ratio is increased from 1 to 4; and 10-12 dB lower if the boundary absorption coefficient is increased from 0.1 to 0.9.

  19. Modeling study of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field, Kamchatka, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiryukhin, A.V. [Institute of Volcanology, Kamchatsky (Russian Federation); Yampolsky, V.A. [Kamchatskburgeotermia State Enterprise, Elizovo (Russian Federation)

    2004-08-01

    Exploitation of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field started in 1966 with a 5 MW{sub e} power plant. A hydrogeological model of the Pauzhetsky field has been developed based on an integrated analysis of data on lithological units, temperature, pressure, production zones and natural discharge distributions. A one-layer 'well by well' model with specified vertical heat and mass exchange conditions has been used to represent the main features of the production reservoir. Numerical model development was based on the TOUGH2 code [Pruess, 1991. TOUGH2 - A General Purpose Numerical Simulator for Multiphase Fluid and Heat Flow, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Report, Berkeley, CA; Pruess et al., 1999. TOUGH2 User's Guide, Version 2.0, Report LBNL-43134, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA] coupled with tables generated by the HOLA wellbore simulator [Aunzo et al., 1991. Wellbore Models GWELL, GWNACL, and HOLA, Users Guide, Draft, 81 pp.]. Lahey Fortran-90 compiler and computer graphical packages (Didger-3, Surfer-8, Grapher-3) were also used to model the development process. The modeling study of the natural-state conditions was targeted on a temperature distribution match to estimate the natural high-temperature upflow parameters: the mass flow-rate was estimated at 220 kg/s with enthalpy of 830-920 kJ/kg. The modeling study for the 1964-2000 exploitation period of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field was targeted at matching the transient reservoir pressure and flowing enthalpies of the production wells. The modeling study of exploitation confirmed that 'double porosity' in the reservoir, with a 10-20% active volume of 'fractures', and a thermo-mechanical response to reinjection (including changes in porosity due to compressibility and expansivity), were the key parameters of the model. The calibrated model of the Pauzhetsky geothermal field was used to forecast reservoir behavior under different exploitation scenarios for

  20. Electrical Circuit Modeling for Somatosensory Evoked Fields in Magnetoencephalogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Shinichi; Tanaka, Keita; Uchikawa, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Koichiro

    We measured somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) by applying on electric stimulus to the right finger (medium nerve and ulnar nerve) and the right ankle (posterior tibial nerve) with a 39-channel SQUID system, which can measure magnetic-field components perpendicular (Br) and tangential to the scalp (Bθ, Bφ) simultaneously. To investigate the relationship between phase lag and stimulus repetition frequency (SRF), the delay time of a component synchronized with the SRFs was calculated by convoluting the reference signal and the measured SEF. The phase lag was linear to SRF for at least three different ranges of the SRFs in each SEF data. We simulated the SEF responses based on the results of phase-lag characteristics and determined the parameters for modeling. To quantitatively characterize the component of SEF, we proposed electric circuit model for the characteristics of phase-lag of the SEF with stimuli frequency.

  1. Supermarket refrigeration modeling and field demonstration: Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.H.; Deming, G.I.

    1989-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a project to investigate supermarket refrigeration. The objectives of this project are (1) to develop an energy use and demand model of supermarket refrigeration systems and (2) to carry out an extensive field test of such systems in an operating supermarket. To accomplish these goals, a supermarket owned by Safeway Stores, Inc., and located in Menlo Park, CA, with an existing conventional refrigeration system utilizing single compressor units, was equipped with a state-of-the-art system with multiplexed parallel compressors. The store and both refrigeration systems were thoroughly instrumented and a test schedule was prepared and executed. Presented in this report are the preliminary results of this field test along with the initial validation of the energy use and demand model. 62 figs., 47 tabs.

  2. Domain decomposition methods in FVM approach to gravity field modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macák, Marek

    2017-04-01

    The finite volume method (FVM) as a numerical method can be straightforwardly implemented for global or local gravity field modelling. This discretization method solves the geodetic boundary value problems in a space domain. In order to obtain precise numerical solutions, it usually requires very refined discretization leading to large-scale parallel computations. To optimize such computations, we present a special class of numerical techniques that are based on a physical decomposition of the global solution domain. The domain decomposition (DD) methods like the Multiplicative Schwarz Method and Additive Schwarz Method are very efficient methods for solving partial differential equations. We briefly present their mathematical formulations and we test their efficiency. Presented numerical experiments are dealing with gravity field modelling. Since there is no need to solve special interface problems between neighbouring subdomains, in our applications we use the overlapping DD methods.

  3. Electromagnetic fields in small systems from a multiphase transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin-Li; Ma, Yu-Gang; Ma, Guo-Liang

    2018-02-01

    We calculate the electromagnetic fields generated in small systems by using a multiphase transport (AMPT) model. Compared to A +A collisions, we find that the absolute electric and magnetic fields are not small in p +Au and d +Au collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and in p +Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We study the centrality dependencies and the spatial distributions of electromagnetic fields. We further investigate the azimuthal fluctuations of the magnetic field and its correlation with the fluctuating geometry using event-by-event simulations. We find that the azimuthal correlation 〈" close="〉cos(ϕα+ϕβ-2 ΨRP)〉">cos2 (ΨB-Ψ2) between the magnetic field direction and the second-harmonic participant plane is almost zero in small systems with high multiplicities, but not in those with low multiplicities. This indicates that the charge azimuthal correlation is not a valid probe to study the chiral magnetic effect (CME) in small systems with high multiplicities. However, we suggest searching for possible CME effects in small systems with low multiplicities.

  4. Three-field modeling for MARS 1-D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Moonkyu; Lim, Ho-Gon; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Chung, Bub-Dong

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the three-field modeling of the two-phase mixture is developed. The finite difference equations for the three-field equations thereafter are devised. The solution scheme has been implemented into the MARS 1-D code. The three-field formulations adopted are similar to those for MARS 3-D module, in a sense that the mass and momentum are treated separately for the entrained liquid and continuous liquid. As in the MARS-3D module, the entrained liquid and continuous liquid are combined into one for the energy equation, assuming thermal equilibrium between the two. All the non-linear terms are linearized to arrange the finite difference equation set into a linear matrix form with respect to the unknown arguments. The problems chosen for the assessment of the newly added entrained field consist of basic conceptual tests. Among the tests are gas-only test, liquid-only test, gas-only with supplied entrained liquid test, Edwards pipe problem, and GE level swell problem. The conceptual tests performed confirm the sound integrity of the three-field solver

  5. A model of Bremsstrahlung: classical orbits coupled to quantized field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, G.

    1989-01-01

    A charged particle velocity variation induces a displacement of the equilibrium point of the electromagnetic field oscillators. Projecting the displaced initial wave function on the oscillators eigenstates we get a straightforward calculation of various multiphotonic Bremsstrahlung effects. The model is realistic only if the velocity change occurs in a time small versus the oscillators periods. Our results which are in substantial agreement with previous calculations may help to clarify a few points [fr

  6. Force Fields and Point Charges for Crystal Structure Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Svärd, Michael; Rasmuson, Åke C.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular simulation is increasingly used by chemical engineers and industrial chemists in process and product development. In particular, the possibility to predict the structure and stability of potential polymorphs of a substance is of tremendous interest to the pharmaceutical and specialty chemicals industry. Molecular mechanics modeling relies on the use of parametrized force fields and methods of assigning point charges to the atoms in the molecules. In commercial molecular simulation s...

  7. Modeling of Geological Objects and Geophysical Fields Using Haar Wavelets

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Dolgal

    2014-01-01

    This article is a presentation of application of the fast wavelet transform with basic Haar functions for modeling the structural surfaces and geophysical fields, characterized by fractal features. The multiscale representation of experimental data allows reducing significantly a cost of the processing of large volume data and improving the interpretation quality. This paper presents the algorithms for sectionally prismatic approximation of geological objects, for preliminary estimation of th...

  8. Immune Response to Electromagnetic Fields through Cybernetic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; Segura, M. A. Rodríguez; Cadena, S. Reyes; Sierra, L. C. Gaitán

    2008-08-01

    We study the optimality of the humoral immune response through a mathematical model, which involves the effect of electromagnetic fields over the large lymphocytes proliferation. Are used the so called cybernetic variables in the context of the matching law of microeconomics or mathematical psychology, to measure the large lymphocytes population and to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate in time during the immunologic response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen.

  9. Immune Response to Electromagnetic Fields through Cybernetic Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez; Cadena, S. Reyes; Sierra, L. C. Gaitan

    2008-01-01

    We study the optimality of the humoral immune response through a mathematical model, which involves the effect of electromagnetic fields over the large lymphocytes proliferation. Are used the so called cybernetic variables in the context of the matching law of microeconomics or mathematical psychology, to measure the large lymphocytes population and to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate in time during the immunologic response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen

  10. Disorder Chaos in the Spherical Mean-Field Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Kuo; Hsieh, Hsi-Wei; Hwang, Chii-Ruey; Sheu, Yuan-Chung

    2015-07-01

    We study the problem of disorder chaos in the spherical mean-field model. It concerns the behavior of the overlap between two independently sampled spin configurations from two Gibbs measures with the same external parameters. The prediction states that if the disorders in the Hamiltonians are slightly decoupled, then the overlap will be concentrated near a constant value. Following Guerra's replica symmetry breaking scheme, we establish this at the levels of the free energy and the Gibbs measure.

  11. Prediction Models of Free-Field Vibrations from Railway Traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmborg, Jens; Persson, Kent; Persson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Many cities experience an increasing population leading to a need for urban densification. In these cities, unused land close to railways will have to be developed with new residential and office buildings. The infrastructural demand will also increase, resulting in heavily trafficked roads and r...... is studied by comparing the response in a three-dimensional finite-element model. Transfer functions at several positions in the free-field are compared....

  12. Stress field modelling from digital geological map data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Gáspár; Barancsuk, Ádám; Szentpéteri, Krisztián

    2016-04-01

    To create a model for the lithospheric stress a functional geodatabase is required which contains spatial and geodynamic parameters. A digital structural-geological map is a geodatabase, which usually contains enough attributes to create a stress field model. Such a model is not accurate enough for engineering-geological purposes because simplifications are always present in a map, but in many cases maps are the only sources for a tectonic analysis. The here presented method is designed for field geologist, who are interested to see the possible realization of the stress field over the area, on which they are working. This study presents an application which can produce a map of 3D stress vectors from a kml-file. The core application logic is implemented on top of a spatially aware relational database management system. This allows rapid and geographically accurate analysis of the imported geological features, taking advantage of standardized spatial algorithms and indexing. After pre-processing the map features in a GIS, according to the Type-Property-Orientation naming system, which was described in a previous study (Albert et al. 2014), the first stage of the algorithm generates an irregularly spaced point cloud by emitting a pattern of points within a user-defined buffer zone around each feature. For each point generated, a component-wise approximation of the tensor field at the point's position is computed, derived from the original feature's geodynamic properties. In a second stage a weighted moving average method calculates the stress vectors in a regular grid. Results can be exported as geospatial data for further analysis or cartographic visualization. Computation of the tensor field's components is based on the implementation of the Mohr diagram of a compressional model, which uses a Coulomb fracture criterion. Using a general assumption that the main principal stress must be greater than the stress from the overburden, the differential stress is

  13. Effective potential in Lorentz-breaking field theory models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeta Scarpelli, A.P. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica, Nova Gameleira Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Setor Tecnico-Cientifico, Departamento de Policia Federal, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Brito, L.C.T. [Universidade Federal de Lavras, Departamento de Fisica, Lavras, MG (Brazil); Felipe, J.C.C. [Universidade Federal de Lavras, Departamento de Fisica, Lavras, MG (Brazil); Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Instituto de Engenharia, Ciencia e Tecnologia, Veredas, Janauba, MG (Brazil); Nascimento, J.R.; Petrov, A.Yu. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil)

    2017-12-15

    We calculate explicitly the one-loop effective potential in different Lorentz-breaking field theory models. First, we consider a Yukawa-like theory and some examples of Lorentz-violating extensions of scalar QED. We observe, for the extended QED models, that the resulting effective potential converges to the known result in the limit in which Lorentz symmetry is restored. Besides, the one-loop corrections to the effective potential in all the cases we study depend on the background tensors responsible for the Lorentz-symmetry violation. This has consequences for physical quantities like, for example, in the induced mass due to the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. (orig.)

  14. Generalized Magnetic Field Effects in Burgers' Nanofluid Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Rashidi

    Full Text Available Analysis has been conducted to present the generalized magnetic field effects on the flow of a Burgers' nanofluid over an inclined wall. Mathematical modelling for hydro-magnetics reveals that the term "[Formula: see text]" is for the Newtonian model whereas the generalized magnetic field term (as mentioned in Eq 4 is for the Burgers' model which is incorporated in the current analysis to get the real insight of the problem for hydro-magnetics. Brownian motion and thermophoresis phenomenon are presented to analyze the nanofluidics for the non-Newtonian fluid. Mathematical analysis is completed in the presence of non-uniform heat generation/absorption. The constructed set of partial differential system is converted into coupled nonlinear ordinary differential system by employing the suitable transformations. Homotopy approach is employed to construct the analytical solutions which are shown graphically for sundr5y parameters including Deborah numbers, magnetic field, thermophoresis, Brownian motion and non-uniform heat generation/absorption. A comparative study is also presented showing the comparison of present results with an already published data.

  15. Integration of field data into operational snowmelt-runoff models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, M.; Bergström, S.

    1994-01-01

    Conceptual runoff models have become standard tools for operational hydrological forecasting in Scandinavia. These models are normally based on observations from the national climatological networks, but in mountainous areas the stations are few and sometimes not representative. Due to the great economic importance of good hydrological forecasts for the hydro-power industry attempts have been made to improve the model simulations by support from field observations of the snowpack. The snowpack has been mapped by several methods; airborne gamma-spectrometry, airborne georadars, satellites and by conventional snow courses. The studies cover more than ten years of work in Sweden. The conclusion is that field observations of the snow cover have a potential for improvement of the forecasts of inflow to the reservoirs in the mountainous part of the country, where the climatological data coverages is poor. This is pronounced during years with unusual snow distribution. The potential for model improvement is smaller in the climatologically more homogeneous forested lowlands, where the climatological network is denser. The costs of introduction of airborne observations into the modelling procedure are high and can only be justified in areas of great hydropower potential. (author)

  16. Correlators in integrable quantum field theory: the scaling RSOS models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the scaling limit of two-dimensional models of statistical mechanics within the framework of integrable field theory is illustrated through the example of the RSOS models. Starting from the exact description of regime III in terms of colliding particles, we compute the correlation functions of the thermal, phi (cursive,open) Greek 1,2 and (for some cases) spin operators in the two-particle approximation. The accuracy obtained for the moments of these correlators is analysed by computing the central charge and the scaling dimensions and comparing with the exact results. We further consider the (generally non-integrable) perturbation of the critical points with both the operators phi (cursive,open) Greek 1,3 and phi (cursive,open) Greek 1,2 and locate the branches solved on the lattice within the associated two-dimensional phase diagram. Finally we discuss the fact that the RSOS models, the dilute q-state Potts model at and the O(n) vector model are all described by the same perturbed conformal field theory

  17. Wind field and trajectory models for tornado-propelled objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    1978-01-01

    This report contains the results of the second phase of a research program which has as its objective the development of a mathematical model to predict the trajectory of tornado-borne objects postulated to be in the vicinity of nuclear power plants. An improved tornado wind field model satisfies the no-slip ground boundary condition of fluid mechanics and includes the functional dependence of eddy viscosity with altitude. Sub-scale wind tunnel data are obtained for all of the missiles currently specified for nuclear plant design. Confirmatory full-scale data are obtained for a 12-inch pipe and automobile. The original six-degree-of-freedom trajectory model is modified to include the improved wind field and increased capability as to body shapes and inertial characteristics that can be handled. The improved trajectory model is used to calculate maximum credible speeds, which for all of the heavy missiles are considerably less than those currently specified for design. Equivalent coefficients for use in three-degree-of-freedom models are developed and the sensitivity of range and speed to various trajectory parameters for the 12-inch diameter pipe is examined

  18. Electronic field emission models beyond the Fowler-Nordheim one

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Bruno

    2017-12-01

    We propose several quantum mechanical models to describe electronic field emission from first principles. These models allow us to correlate quantitatively the electronic emission current with the electrode surface details at the atomic scale. They all rely on electronic potential energy surfaces obtained from three dimensional density functional theory calculations. They differ by the various quantum mechanical methods (exact or perturbative, time dependent or time independent), which are used to describe tunneling through the electronic potential energy barrier. Comparison of these models between them and with the standard Fowler-Nordheim one in the context of one dimensional tunneling allows us to assess the impact on the accuracy of the computed current of the approximations made in each model. Among these methods, the time dependent perturbative one provides a well-balanced trade-off between accuracy and computational cost.

  19. Vortex ring state by full-field actuator disc model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, J.N.; Shen, W.Z.; Munduate, X. [DTU, Dept. of Energy Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1997-08-01

    One-dimensional momentum theory provides a simple analytical tool for analysing the gross flow behavior of lifting propellers and rotors. Combined with a blade-element strip-theory approach, it has for many years been the most popular model for load and performance predictions of wind turbines. The model works well at moderate and high wind velocities, but is not reliable at small wind velocities, where the expansion of the wake is large and the flow field behind the rotor dominated by turbulent mixing. This is normally referred to as the turbulent wake state or the vortex ring state. In the vortex ring state, momentum theory predicts a decrease of thrust whereas the opposite is found from experiments. The reason for the disagreement is that recirculation takes place behind the rotor with the consequence that the stream tubes past the rotor becomes effectively chocked. This represents a condition at which streamlines no longer carry fluid elements from far upstream to far downstream, hence one-dimensional momentum theory is invalid and empirical corrections have to be introduced. More sophisticated analytical or semi-analytical rotor models have been used to describe stationary flow fields for heavily loaded propellers. In recent years generalized actuator disc models have been developed, but up to now no detailed computations of the turbulent wake state or the vortex ring state have been performed. In the present work the phenomenon is simulated by direct simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations, where the influence of the rotor on the flow field is modelled simply by replacing the blades by an actuator disc with a constant normal load. (EG) 13 refs.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Seismoelectric Fields through Thin-Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobbe, N.; Slob, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    The seismoelectric effect might help improving our knowledge of the subsurface. This complex physical phenomenon can be described by Biot's poroelasticity equations coupled to Maxwell's electromagnetic equations. Besides simultaneously offering seismic resolution and electromagnetic sensitivity, the coefficient coupling these two types of fields can in principal provide us with direct information on important medium parameters like porosity and permeability. Two types of seismoelectric coupling can be distinguished: 1) localized coupling generating an electromagnetic field that is present inside the seismic wave and travels with its velocity, referred to as the coseismic field 2) An independent electromagnetic field diffusing with electromagnetic velocity, referred to as the seismoelectric conversion, providing us with information at depth. One of the major challenges of seismoelectrics is the very weak signal-to-noise ratio of especially the seismoelectric conversion. In order to make seismoelectrics applicable in the field, we need to find ways to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of this second order effect. Can nature help us? It is well-known that a seismic wave travelling through a package of thin-beds, can experience amplitude-tuning effects that result in anomalously high amplitudes for the seismic signal. Can similar enhancing signal effects occur for seismoelectric phenomena? Using our analytically based, numerical modeling code ESSEMOD (ElectroSeismic and Seismoelectric Modeling), we investigate what effects thin-beds can have on the seismoelectric signal, thereby focusing especially on the seismoelectric conversion. We will highlight the factors that play a role in the possible enhancement of the seismoelectric signal-to-noise ratio by thin-beds. We show that the seismoelectric method is sensitive to changes in medium parameters on a spatial scale that is much smaller than the seismic resolution. Acknowledgements: This research was funded as a Shell

  1. Integrated modeling and field study of potential mechanisms forinduced seismicity at The Geysers Goethermal Field, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Majer, Ernie; Oldenburg, Curt; Peterson, John; Vasco, Don

    2006-06-07

    In this paper, we present progress made in a study aimed atincreasing the understanding of the relative contributions of differentmechanisms that may be causing the seismicity occurring at The Geysersgeothermal field, California. The approach we take is to integrate: (1)coupled reservoir geomechanical numerical modeling, (2) data fromrecently upgraded and expanded NCPA/Calpine/LBNL seismic arrays, and (3)tens of years of archival InSAR data from monthly satellite passes. Wehave conducted a coupled reservoir geomechanical analysis to studypotential mechanisms induced by steam production. Our simulation resultscorroborate co-locations of hypocenter field observations of inducedseismicity and their correlation with steam production as reported in theliterature. Seismic and InSAR data are being collected and processed foruse in constraining the coupled reservoir geomechanicalmodel.

  2. New parameterization of external and induced fields in geomagnetic field modeling, and a candidate model for IGRF 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Sabaka, T.J.; Lowes, F.

    2005-01-01

    Q(1) of induced to external coefficients. A value of Q(1) = 0.27 was found from Magsat data and has been used by several authors when deriving recent field models from Orsted and CHAMP data. We describe a new approach that considers external and induced field based on a separation of D-st = E-st + I......-st into external (E-st) and induced (I-st) parts using a 1D model of mantle conductivity. The temporal behavior of q(1)(0) and of the corresponding induced coefficient are parameterized by E-st and I-st, respectively. In addition, we account for baseline-instabilities of D-st by estimating a value of q(1...

  3. Particle spectrum in model field theories from semiclassical solutions of the field equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.; Krejs, F.

    1976-01-01

    Bound-state spectra (of mesons or of solitons-antisolitons) are studied for the sine-Gordon and quartic-coupling nonlinear boson models in one-plus-one dimensions using methods developed previously by the authors for the example of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation. In addition to reproducing the spectra first derived by Dashen, Hasslacher, and Neveu (DHN) up to the order of the first quantum correction, we have also calculated (in the semiclassical approximation) all bound-state form factors as well as the matrix elements of the field between any bound state and any continuum state for the scattering of a meson on a bound state. For the sine-Gordon theory the results have been obtained in two ways: first, by an algorithm, derived in due course, for transcribing an exact classical solution into a quantum operator; second, by a systematic expansion about the weak-coupling limit which requires the techniques used previously for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation. Only this latter technique is available for the quartic model, but its (more complicated) application here leads to an explanation of why in leading order the same form of bound-state spectra are obtained for the two models. Compared to the work of DHN, aside from methodology, the main new results are the matrix elements of the field operators, but we also present a complete quantum interpretation of all their classical calculations as well as an explanation of why our methods are equivalent

  4. Modeling nuclear field shift isotope fractionation in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this study nuclear field shift fractionations in solids (and chemically similar liquids) are estimated using calibrated density functional theory calculations. The nuclear field shift effect is a potential driver of mass independent isotope fractionation(1,2), especially for elements with high atomic number such as Hg, Tl and U. This effect is caused by the different shapes and volumes of isotopic nuclei, and their interactions with electronic structures and energies. Nuclear field shift isotope fractionations can be estimated with first principles methods, but the calculations are computationally difficult, limiting most theoretical studies so far to small gas-phase molecules and molecular clusters. Many natural materials of interest are more complex, and it is important to develop ways to estimate field shift effects that can be applied to minerals, solutions, in biomolecules, and at mineral-solution interfaces. Plane-wave density functional theory, in combination with the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), is much more readily adapted to complex materials than the relativistic all-electron calculations that have been the focus of most previous studies. DFT-PAW is a particularly effective tool for studying crystals with periodic boundary conditions, and may also be incorporated into molecular dynamics simulations of solutions and other disordered phases. Initial calibrations of DFT-PAW calculations against high-level all-electron models of field shift fractionation suggest that there may be broad applicability of this method to a variety of elements and types of materials. In addition, the close relationship between the isomer shift of Mössbauer spectroscopy and the nuclear field shift isotope effect makes it possible, at least in principle, to estimate the volume component of field shift fractionations in some species that are too complex even for DFT-PAW models, so long as there is a Mössbauer isotope for the element of interest. Initial results

  5. Individual based and mean-field modeling of direct aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin

    2013-10-01

    We introduce two models of biological aggregation, based on randomly moving particles with individual stochasticity depending on the perceived average population density in their neighborhood. In the firstorder model the location of each individual is subject to a density-dependent random walk, while in the second-order model the density-dependent random walk acts on the velocity variable, together with a density-dependent damping term. The main novelty of our models is that we do not assume any explicit aggregative force acting on the individuals; instead, aggregation is obtained exclusively by reducing the individual stochasticity in response to higher perceived density. We formally derive the corresponding mean-field limits, leading to nonlocal degenerate diffusions. Then, we carry out the mathematical analysis of the first-order model, in particular, we prove the existence of weak solutions and show that it allows for measure-valued steady states. We also perform linear stability analysis and identify conditions for pattern formation. Moreover, we discuss the role of the nonlocality for well-posedness of the first-order model. Finally, we present results of numerical simulations for both the first- and second-order model on the individual-based and continuum levels of description. 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling Atmospheric Electromagnetic Field Following a Lightning Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydenko, S.; Mareev, E.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical model describing the electromagnetic field in the vicinity of an isolated lightning discharge is developed. Both the slow transient (quasistatic) electric field caused by the Maxwell relaxation of the charge disturbance and fast transient (electromagnetic pulse) are calculated in a plane atmosphere using the FDTD method. The lightning discharge is presented as a pulse current producing a distributed charge dipole inside the thundercloud in a case of intra-cloud (IC) flash or monopole charge in a case of cloud-to-ground (CG) flash. A temporal profile of the discharge current implies an existence of the return stroke, continuous current, and its fine features like the M-component. Temporal and spatial dependences of the atmospheric electric field on the flash type (IC or CG), distance to the discharge, disturbance of the electric conductivity inside the thundercloud, altitude(s) and lateral scale(s) of the charge region(s), temporal profile of the discharge current, and velocity of the return stroke are considered. A dependence of the net electric charge transferred to the upper atmospheric layers on the parameters of IC and CG flashes is studied. It is shown that both IC and CG flashes could serve as effective sources in the global electric circuit. A retrieval of the basic discharge parameters on the results of the one- or multipoint measurements of the both electromagnetic and quasistatic electric fields is discussed.

  7. Gravity field models derived from Swarm GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira da Encarnação, João; Arnold, Daniel; Bezděk, Aleš; Dahle, Christoph; Doornbos, Eelco; van den IJssel, Jose; Jäggi, Adrian; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Sebera, Josef; Visser, Pieter; Zehentner, Norbert

    2017-04-01

    The Swarm satellites, with primary mission to measure Earth's Magnetic Field, continue to provide high-quality hl-SST data. We use these data to derive the time-varying gravity field of the Earth up to Spherical Harmonic degree and order 12, on a monthly basis since December 2013. We combine the gravity field solutions computed with the data of all three satellites, as provided by a number of institutes, namely at the Astronomical Institute (ASU) of the Czech Academy of Sciences (Bezděk et al., 2016), the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB, Jäggi et al., 2016) and the Institute of Geodesy (IfG) of the Graz University of Technology (Zehentner et al., 2015) and demonstrate that this uninterrupted time series of gravity field models are in good agreement with the temporal variations observed by the GRACE satellites. Therefore, these data can be used to study large-scale mass changes globally, e.g. i) in the context of low-latency applications, such as the European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management project (http://egsiem.eu), ii) in those months where GRACE solutions are not available, and iii) as an important source of independent information for mitigating the GRACE/GRACE Follow-On gap.

  8. Phase-field modelling of microstructural evolution and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingzhi

    As one of the most powerful techniques in computational materials science, the diffuse-interface phase-field model has been widely employed for simulating various meso-scale microstructural evolution processes. The main purpose of this thesis is to develop a quantitative phase-field model for predicting microstructures and properties in real alloy systems which can be linked to existing thermodynamic/kinetic databases and parameters obtained from experimental measurements or first-principle calculations. To achieve this goal; many factors involved in complicated real systems are investigated, many of which are often simplified or ignored in existing models, e.g. the dependence of diffusional atomic mobility and elastic constants on composition. Efficient numerical techniques must be developed to solve those partial differential equations that are involved in modelling microstructural evolutions and properties. In this thesis, different spectral methods were proposed for the time-dependent phase-field kinetic equations and diffusion equations. For solving the elastic equilibrium equation with the consideration of elastic inhomogeneity, a conjugate gradient method was utilized. The numerical approaches developed were generally found to be more accurate and efficient than conventional approach such as finite difference method. A composition-dependent Cahn-Hilliard equation was solved by using a semi-implicit Fourier-spectral method. It was shown that the morphological evolutions in bulk-diffusion-controlled coarsening and interface-diffusion-controlled developed similar patterns and scaling behaviors. For bulk-diffusion-controlled coarsening, a cubic growth law was obeyed in the scaling regime, whereas a fourth power growth law was observed for interface-diffusion-controlled coarsening. The characteristics of a microstructure under the influence of elastic energy depend on elastic properties such as elastic anisotropy, lattice mismatch, elastic inhomogeneity and

  9. Discriminative Random Field Models for Subsurface Contamination Uncertainty Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, M.; Abriola, L. M.; Miller, E. L.; De Paolis Kaluza, C.

    2017-12-01

    Application of flow and transport simulators for prediction of the release, entrapment, and persistence of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) and associated contaminant plumes is a computationally intensive process that requires specification of a large number of material properties and hydrologic/chemical parameters. Given its computational burden, this direct simulation approach is particularly ill-suited for quantifying both the expected performance and uncertainty associated with candidate remediation strategies under real field conditions. Prediction uncertainties primarily arise from limited information about contaminant mass distributions, as well as the spatial distribution of subsurface hydrologic properties. Application of direct simulation to quantify uncertainty would, thus, typically require simulating multiphase flow and transport for a large number of permeability and release scenarios to collect statistics associated with remedial effectiveness, a computationally prohibitive process. The primary objective of this work is to develop and demonstrate a methodology that employs measured field data to produce equi-probable stochastic representations of a subsurface source zone that capture the spatial distribution and uncertainty associated with key features that control remediation performance (i.e., permeability and contamination mass). Here we employ probabilistic models known as discriminative random fields (DRFs) to synthesize stochastic realizations of initial mass distributions consistent with known, and typically limited, site characterization data. Using a limited number of full scale simulations as training data, a statistical model is developed for predicting the distribution of contaminant mass (e.g., DNAPL saturation and aqueous concentration) across a heterogeneous domain. Monte-Carlo sampling methods are then employed, in conjunction with the trained statistical model, to generate realizations conditioned on measured borehole data

  10. On the predictiveness of single-field inflationary models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, C. P.; Patil, Subodh P.; Trott, Michael

    2014-06-01

    We re-examine the predictiveness of single-field inflationary models and discuss how an unknown UV completion can complicate determining inflationary model parameters from observations, even from precision measurements. Besides the usual naturalness issues associated with having a shallow inflationary potential, we describe another issue for inflation, namely, unknown UV physics modifies the running of Standard Model (SM) parameters and thereby introduces uncertainty into the potential inflationary predictions. We illustrate this point using the minimal Higgs Inflationary scenario, which is arguably the most predictive single-field model on the market, because its predictions for A S , r and n s are made using only one new free parameter beyond those measured in particle physics experiments, and run up to the inflationary regime. We find that this issue can already have observable effects. At the same time, this UV-parameter dependence in the Renormalization Group allows Higgs Inflation to occur (in principle) for a slightly larger range of Higgs masses. We comment on the origin of the various UV scales that arise at large field values for the SM Higgs, clarifying cut off scale arguments by further developing the formalism of a non-linear realization of SU L (2) × U(1) in curved space. We discuss the interesting fact that, outside of Higgs Inflation, the effect of a non-minimal coupling to gravity, even in the SM, results in a non-linear EFT for the Higgs sector. Finally, we briefly comment on post BICEP2 attempts to modify the Higgs Inflation scenario.

  11. Modeling the shape of a noncircular toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Marshall, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    Operating and transient forces acting on toroidal field coils may cause conductors and insulation to slide or break and may lead to quenching of the coil. Therefore, it is essential that each individual turn of the coil be modeled for detailed analysis of the coil structure. For this, a special purpose computer program is needed. As a first step in developing such a computer program, the authors present a finite element analysis of a turn of noncircular coil subjected to electromagnetic loading. A turn of superconducting coil is represented by a thin ring modeled by curved finite elements. Of the several curved beam elements reported in the literature, the strain element with two nodes, six degrees-of-freedom, and constant radius of curvature converges fastest for thin-deep arches whose geometrical characteristics are similar to those of a turn of toroidal field coil. They present an algorithm to model a noncircular ring using the number of strain elements satisfying the continuity of slopes at their nodes. This paper verifies the finite element model of a coil shape subjected to a toroidal magnetic field by solving three problems: circular and elliptic coils with the same inner and outer radii, a D-shaped coil, and a compound coil consisting of C- and D-shaped segments. The first problem shows that the resultant vertical force in the upper half of the coil is independent of coil shape. The remaining two problems calculate stresses that represent the constant tension in the D-shaped coil and in each segment of the compound coil. The results of the three problems compare well with the analytical results

  12. Neural field model of memory-guided search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P; Poll, Daniel B

    2017-12-01

    Many organisms can remember locations they have previously visited during a search. Visual search experiments have shown exploration is guided away from these locations, reducing redundancies in the search path before finding a hidden target. We develop and analyze a two-layer neural field model that encodes positional information during a search task. A position-encoding layer sustains a bump attractor corresponding to the searching agent's current location, and search is modeled by velocity input that propagates the bump. A memory layer sustains persistent activity bounded by a wave front, whose edges expand in response to excitatory input from the position layer. Search can then be biased in response to remembered locations, influencing velocity inputs to the position layer. Asymptotic techniques are used to reduce the dynamics of our model to a low-dimensional system of equations that track the bump position and front boundary. Performance is compared for different target-finding tasks.

  13. Coalescing colony model: Mean-field, scaling, and geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, Giulia; Mallick, Kirone; Barthelemy, Marc

    2017-12-01

    We analyze the coalescing model where a `primary' colony grows and randomly emits secondary colonies that spread and eventually coalesce with it. This model describes population proliferation in theoretical ecology, tumor growth, and is also of great interest for modeling urban sprawl. Assuming the primary colony to be always circular of radius r (t ) and the emission rate proportional to r (t) θ , where θ >0 , we derive the mean-field equations governing the dynamics of the primary colony, calculate the scaling exponents versus θ , and compare our results with numerical simulations. We then critically test the validity of the circular approximation for the colony shape and show that it is sound for a constant emission rate (θ =0 ). However, when the emission rate is proportional to the perimeter, the circular approximation breaks down and the roughness of the primary colony cannot be discarded, thus modifying the scaling exponents.

  14. Neural field model of memory-guided search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Poll, Daniel B.

    2017-12-01

    Many organisms can remember locations they have previously visited during a search. Visual search experiments have shown exploration is guided away from these locations, reducing redundancies in the search path before finding a hidden target. We develop and analyze a two-layer neural field model that encodes positional information during a search task. A position-encoding layer sustains a bump attractor corresponding to the searching agent's current location, and search is modeled by velocity input that propagates the bump. A memory layer sustains persistent activity bounded by a wave front, whose edges expand in response to excitatory input from the position layer. Search can then be biased in response to remembered locations, influencing velocity inputs to the position layer. Asymptotic techniques are used to reduce the dynamics of our model to a low-dimensional system of equations that track the bump position and front boundary. Performance is compared for different target-finding tasks.

  15. Limitations in paleomagnetic data and modelling techniques and their impact on Holocene geomagnetic field models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panovska, S.; Korte, M.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    in individual archeomagnetic data so that these data or models derived from them can be used for reliable initial relative paleointensity calibration and declination orientation in sediments. More work will be needed to assess whether co-estimation or an iterative approach to inversion is more efficient overall......Characterization of geomagnetic field behaviour on timescales of centuries to millennia is necessary to understand the mechanisms that sustain the geodynamo and drive its evolution. As Holocene paleomagnetic and archeomagnetic data have become more abundant, strategies for regularized inversion...... of modern field data have been adapted to produce numerous timevarying global field models. We evaluate the effectiveness of several approaches to inversion and data handling, by assessing both global and regional properties of the resulting models. Global Holocene field models cannot resolve Southern...

  16. Modelling of the Global Geopotential Energy & Stress Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Nielsen, S.B.

    Lateral density and topography variations yield in and important contribution to the lithospheric stress field. The leading quantity is the Geopotential Energy, the integrated lithostatic pressure in a rock column. The horizontal gradient of this quantity is related to horizontal stresses through...... the Equations of equilibrium of stresses. The Geopotential Energy furthermore can be linearly related to the Geoid under assumption of local isostasy. Satellite Geoid measurements contain, however, also non-isostatic deeper mantle responses of long wavelength. Unfortunately, high-pass filtering of the Geoid...... flow in the presence of local isostasy and a steady state geotherm. Subsequently we use a FEM code to solve the Equations of equilibrium of stresses for a three dimensional elastic shell. The modelled results are shown and compared with the global stress field and other publications....

  17. FDTD modeling of EM field inside microwave cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, Shiv; Kanth, V Krushna

    2017-01-01

    This book deals with the EM analysis of closed microwave cavities based on a three-dimensional FDTD method. The EM analysis is carried out for (i) rectangular microwave ovens and (ii) hybrid-cylindrical microwave autoclaves at 2.45 GHz. The field distribution is first estimated inside domestic rectangular ovens in xy-, yz-, and zx-plane. Further, the RF leakage from the oven door is determined to study the effect of leakage radiation on wireless communication at 2.45 GHz. Furthermore, the EM analysis of the autoclave is carried out based on 3D FDTD using staircase approximation. In order to show the capability of autoclaves (excited with five source) for curing the aerospace components and materials, the field distribution inside autoclave cavity is studied in presence of aerospace samples. The FDTD based modelling of oven and autoclave are explained with the appropriate expressions and illustrations.

  18. Consistent constraints on the Standard Model Effective Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthier, Laure; Trott, Michael [Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen,Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-02-10

    We develop the global constraint picture in the (linear) effective field theory generalisation of the Standard Model, incorporating data from detectors that operated at PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, SpS, Tevatron, SLAC, LEPI and LEP II, as well as low energy precision data. We fit one hundred and three observables. We develop a theory error metric for this effective field theory, which is required when constraints on parameters at leading order in the power counting are to be pushed to the percent level, or beyond, unless the cut off scale is assumed to be large, Λ≳ 3 TeV. We more consistently incorporate theoretical errors in this work, avoiding this assumption, and as a direct consequence bounds on some leading parameters are relaxed. We show how an S,T analysis is modified by the theory errors we include as an illustrative example.

  19. GRACE gravity field modeling with an investigation on correlation between nuisance parameters and gravity field coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan; Cai, Hua; Liu, Xianglin

    2011-05-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) monthly gravity models have been independently produced and published by several research institutions, such as Center for Space Research (CSR), GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Delft Institute of Earth Observation and Space Systems (DEOS). According to their processing standards, above institutions use the traditional variational approach except that the DEOS exploits the acceleration approach. The background force models employed are rather similar. The produced gravity field models generally agree with one another in the spatial pattern. However, there are some discrepancies in the gravity signal amplitude between solutions produced by different institutions. In particular, 10%-30% signal amplitude differences in some river basins can be observed. In this paper, we implemented a variant of the traditional variational approach and computed two sets of monthly gravity field solutions using the data from January 2005 to December 2006. The input data are K-band range-rates (KBRR) and kinematic orbits of GRACE satellites. The main difference in the production of our two types of models is how to deal with nuisance parameters. This type of parameters is necessary to absorb low-frequency errors in the data, which are mainly the aliasing and instrument errors. One way is to remove the nuisance parameters before estimating the geopotential coefficients, called NPARB approach in the paper. The other way is to estimate the nuisance parameters and geopotential coefficients simultaneously, called NPESS approach. These two types of solutions mainly differ in geopotential coefficients from degree 2 to 5. This can be explained by the fact that the nuisance parameters and the gravity field coefficients are highly correlated, particularly at low degrees. We compare these solutions with the official and published ones by means of spectral analysis. It is

  20. A novel mathematical model for controllable near-field electrospinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ru, Changhai; Chen, Jie; Shao, Zhushuai; Pang, Ming; Luo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Near-field electrospinning (NFES) had better controllability than conventional electrospinning. However, due to the lack of guidance of theoretical model, precise deposition of micro/nano fibers could only accomplished by experience. To analyze the behavior of charged jet in NFES using mathematical model, the momentum balance equation was simplified and a new expression between jet cross-sectional radius and axial position was derived. Using this new expression and mass conservation equation, expressions for jet cross-sectional radius and velocity were derived in terms of axial position and initial jet acceleration in the form of exponential functions. Based on Slender-body theory and Giesekus model, a quadratic equation for initial jet acceleration was acquired. With the proposed model, it was able to accurately predict the diameter and velocity of polymer fibers in NFES, and mathematical analysis rather than experimental methods could be applied to study the effects of the process parameters in NFES. Moreover, the movement velocity of the collector stage can be regulated by mathematical model rather than experience. Therefore, the model proposed in this paper had important guiding significance to precise deposition of polymer fibers

  1. A novel mathematical model for controllable near-field electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Changhai; Chen, Jie; Shao, Zhushuai; Pang, Ming; Luo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Near-field electrospinning (NFES) had better controllability than conventional electrospinning. However, due to the lack of guidance of theoretical model, precise deposition of micro/nano fibers could only accomplished by experience. To analyze the behavior of charged jet in NFES using mathematical model, the momentum balance equation was simplified and a new expression between jet cross-sectional radius and axial position was derived. Using this new expression and mass conservation equation, expressions for jet cross-sectional radius and velocity were derived in terms of axial position and initial jet acceleration in the form of exponential functions. Based on Slender-body theory and Giesekus model, a quadratic equation for initial jet acceleration was acquired. With the proposed model, it was able to accurately predict the diameter and velocity of polymer fibers in NFES, and mathematical analysis rather than experimental methods could be applied to study the effects of the process parameters in NFES. Moreover, the movement velocity of the collector stage can be regulated by mathematical model rather than experience. Therefore, the model proposed in this paper had important guiding significance to precise deposition of polymer fibers.

  2. A novel mathematical model for controllable near-field electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, Changhai, E-mail: rchhai@gmail.com, E-mail: luojun@shu.edu.cn [College of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Robotics and Microsystems Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China); Chen, Jie; Shao, Zhushuai [Robotics and Microsystems Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China); Pang, Ming [College of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Luo, Jun, E-mail: rchhai@gmail.com, E-mail: luojun@shu.edu.cn [School of Mechatronics Engineering and Automation, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Near-field electrospinning (NFES) had better controllability than conventional electrospinning. However, due to the lack of guidance of theoretical model, precise deposition of micro/nano fibers could only accomplished by experience. To analyze the behavior of charged jet in NFES using mathematical model, the momentum balance equation was simplified and a new expression between jet cross-sectional radius and axial position was derived. Using this new expression and mass conservation equation, expressions for jet cross-sectional radius and velocity were derived in terms of axial position and initial jet acceleration in the form of exponential functions. Based on Slender-body theory and Giesekus model, a quadratic equation for initial jet acceleration was acquired. With the proposed model, it was able to accurately predict the diameter and velocity of polymer fibers in NFES, and mathematical analysis rather than experimental methods could be applied to study the effects of the process parameters in NFES. Moreover, the movement velocity of the collector stage can be regulated by mathematical model rather than experience. Therefore, the model proposed in this paper had important guiding significance to precise deposition of polymer fibers.

  3. MODELING OF TEMPERATURE FIELDS IN A SOLID HEAT ACCUMULLATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Belimenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Currently, one of the priorities of energy conservation is a cost savings for heating in commercial and residential buildings by the stored thermal energy during the night and its return in the daytime. Economic effect is achieved due to the difference in tariffs for the cost of electricity in the daytime and at night. One of the most common types of devices that allow accumulating and giving the resulting heat are solid heat accumulators. The main purpose of the work: 1 software development for the calculation of the temperature field of a flat solid heat accumulator, working due to the heat energy accumulation in the volume of thermal storage material without phase transition; 2 determination the temperature distribution in its volumes at convective heat transfer. Methodology. To achieve the study objectives a heat transfer theory and Laplace integral transform were used. On its base the problems of determining the temperature fields in the channels of heat accumulators, having different cross-sectional shapes were solved. Findings. Authors have developed the method of calculation and obtained solutions for the determination of temperature fields in channels of the solid heat accumulator in conditions of convective heat transfer. Temperature fields over length and thickness of channels were investigated. Experimental studies on physical models and industrial equipment were conducted. Originality. For the first time the technique of calculating the temperature field in the channels of different cross-section for the solid heat accumulator in the charging and discharging modes was proposed. The calculation results are confirmed by experimental research. Practical value. The proposed technique is used in the design of solid heat accumulators of different power as well as full-scale production of them was organized.

  4. Multiagent model and mean field theory of complex auction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinghua; Huang, Zi-Gang; Wang, Yougui; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in analyzing a variety of socio-economic phenomena using methods from statistical and nonlinear physics. We study a class of complex systems arising from economics, the lowest unique bid auction (LUBA) systems, which is a recently emerged class of online auction game systems. Through analyzing large, empirical data sets of LUBA, we identify a general feature of the bid price distribution: an inverted J-shaped function with exponential decay in the large bid price region. To account for the distribution, we propose a multi-agent model in which each agent bids stochastically in the field of winner’s attractiveness, and develop a theoretical framework to obtain analytic solutions of the model based on mean field analysis. The theory produces bid-price distributions that are in excellent agreement with those from the real data. Our model and theory capture the essential features of human behaviors in the competitive environment as exemplified by LUBA, and may provide significant quantitative insights into complex socio-economic phenomena.

  5. Pesticide uptake in potatoes: model and field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraske, Ronnie; Vivas, Carmen S Mosquera; Velásquez, Alexander Erazo; Santos, Glenda García; Moreno, Mónica B Berdugo; Gomez, Jaime Diaz; Binder, Claudia R; Hellweg, Stefanie; Dallos, Jairo A Guerrero

    2011-01-15

    A dynamic model for uptake of pesticides in potatoes is presented and evaluated with measurements performed within a field trial in the region of Boyacá, Colombia. The model takes into account the time between pesticide applications and harvest, the time between harvest and consumption, the amount of spray deposition on soil surface, mobility and degradation of pesticide in soil, diffusive uptake and persistence due to crop growth and metabolism in plant material, and loss due to food processing. Food processing steps included were cleaning, washing, storing, and cooking. Pesticide concentrations were measured periodically in soil and potato samples from the beginning of tuber formation until harvest. The model was able to predict the magnitude and temporal profile of the experimentally derived pesticide concentrations well, with all measurements falling within the 90% confidence interval. The fraction of chlorpyrifos applied on the field during plant cultivation that eventually is ingested by the consumer is on average 10(-4)-10(-7), depending on the time between pesticide application and ingestion and the processing step considered.

  6. Multi-objective optimization of the management of a waterworks using an integrated well field model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Kirstine; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This study uses multi-objective optimization of an integrated well field model to improve the management of a waterworks. The well field model, called WELLNES (WELL field Numerical Engine Shell) is a dynamic coupling of a groundwater model, a pipe network model, and a well model. WELLNES is capab...

  7. Yanqing solar field: Dynamic optical model and operational safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Dongming; Wang, Zhifeng; Xu, Ershu; Zhu, Lingzhi; Lei, Dongqiang; Xu, Li; Yuan, Guofeng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A dynamic optical model of the Yanqing solar field was built. • Tracking angle characteristics were studied with different SCA layouts and time. • The average energy flux was simulated across four clear days. • Influences of defocus angles for energy flux were analyzed. - Abstract: A dynamic optical model was established for the Yanqing solar field at the parabolic trough solar thermal power plant and a simulation was conducted on four separate days of clear weather (March 3rd, June 2nd, September 25th, December 17th). The solar collector assembly (SCA) was comprised of a North-South and East-West layout. The model consisted of the following modules: DNI, SCA operational, and SCA optical. The tracking angle characteristics were analyzed and the results showed that the East-West layout of the tracking system was the most viable. The average energy flux was simulated for a given time period and different SCA layouts, yielding an average flux of 6 kW/m 2 , which was then used as the design and operational standards of the Yanqing parabolic trough plant. The mass flow of North-South layout was relatively stable. The influences of the defocus angles on both the average energy flux and the circumferential flux distribution were also studied. The results provided a theoretical basis for the following components: solar field design, mass flow control of the heat transfer fluid, design and operation of the tracking system, operational safety of SCAs, and power production prediction in the Yanqing 1 MW parabolic trough plant.

  8. Effective Orthorhombic Anisotropic Models for Wave field Extrapolation

    KAUST Repository

    Ibanez Jacome, Wilson

    2013-05-01

    Wavefield extrapolation in orthorhombic anisotropic media incorporates complicated but realistic models, to reproduce wave propagation phenomena in the Earth\\'s subsurface. Compared with the representations used for simpler symmetries, such as transversely isotropic or isotropic, orthorhombic models require an extended and more elaborated formulation that also involves more expensive computational processes. The acoustic assumption yields more efficient description of the orthorhombic wave equation that also provides a simplified representation for the orthorhombic dispersion relation. However, such representation is hampered by the sixth-order nature of the acoustic wave equation, as it also encompasses the contribution of shear waves. To reduce the computational cost of wavefield extrapolation in such media, I generate effective isotropic inhomogeneous models that are capable of reproducing the first-arrival kinematic aspects of the orthorhombic wavefield. First, in order to compute traveltimes in vertical orthorhombic media, I develop a stable, efficient and accurate algorithm based on the fast marching method. The derived orthorhombic acoustic dispersion relation, unlike the isotropic or transversely isotropic one, is represented by a sixth order polynomial equation that includes the fastest solution corresponding to outgoing P-waves in acoustic media. The effective velocity models are then computed by evaluating the traveltime gradients of the orthorhombic traveltime solution, which is done by explicitly solving the isotropic eikonal equation for the corresponding inhomogeneous isotropic velocity field. The inverted effective velocity fields are source dependent and produce equivalent first-arrival kinematic descriptions of wave propagation in orthorhombic media. I extrapolate wavefields in these isotropic effective velocity models using the more efficient isotropic operator, and the results compare well, especially kinematically, with those obtained from the

  9. Fourier Simulation of a Non-Isotropic Wind Field Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, J.; Krenk, S.

    -spectra. In this paper a method is described which builds on a recently developed model of a spectral tensor for atmospheric surface layer turbulence at high wind speeds. Although the tensor does not in principle contain more information than the cross-spectra, it leads to a more natural and direct representation...... the vertical velocity fluctuations give rise to loads. There may even be structures where combinations of velocity fluctuations in different direction are of importance. Most methods that have been developed to simulate the turbulent wind field are based on one-point (cross-)spectra and two-point cross...

  10. A mean-field game economic growth model

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2016-08-05

    Here, we examine a mean-field game (MFG) that models the economic growth of a population of non-cooperative, rational agents. In this MFG, agents are described by two state variables - the capital and consumer goods they own. Each agent seeks to maximize his/her utility by taking into account statistical data about the whole population. The individual actions drive the evolution of the players, and a market-clearing condition determines the relative price of capital and consumer goods. We study the existence and uniqueness of optimal strategies of the agents and develop numerical methods to compute these strategies and the equilibrium price.

  11. Accuracy Improvement in Magnetic Field Modeling for an Axisymmetric Electromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilin, Andrew V.; Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Gurieva, Yana L.; Il,in, Valery P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the accuracy and calculation speed for the magnetic field computation in an axisymmetric electromagnet. Different numerical techniques, based on an adaptive nonuniform grid, high order finite difference approximations, and semi-analitical calculation of boundary conditions are considered. These techniques are being applied to the modeling of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket. For high-accuracy calculations, a fourth-order scheme offers dramatic advantages over a second order scheme. For complex physical configurations of interest in plasma propulsion, a second-order scheme with nonuniform mesh gives the best results. Also, the relative advantages of various methods are described when the speed of computation is an important consideration.

  12. Dispersion of tracers by the oceanic eddy field modelling programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed to study the dispersion of tracers by the oceanic eddy field. The study is designed to investigate the horizontal and vertical structure of the eddies and how this structure is influenced by the bottom topography. It is found that hills and valleys have a strong effect on the eddies above them. The flow close to the bottom has a tendency to be steered by the height contours. The surface and bottom flows become decorrelated and the vertical variation of the kinetic energy of the eddies is increased with higher topographic features. (author)

  13. Reactor burning calculations for a model reversed field pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, B.C.; Long, J.W.; Newton, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    An outline pinch reactor scheme and a study of electrical engineering problems for cyclic operation has been further developed and a comparison of physics aspects and capital cost made with Tokamak which has many similar features. Since the properties of reversed field pinches (RFP) are now better understood more detailed studies have been made and first results of burn calculations given. Results of the burn calculations are summarised. These are based on a D-T burning model used for Tokamak with changes appropriate for RFP. (U.K.)

  14. How to use the Standard Model effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, Brian; Lu, Xiaochuan [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley,Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Murayama, Hitoshi [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley,Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-01-05

    We present a practical three-step procedure of using the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT) to connect ultraviolet (UV) models of new physics with weak scale precision observables. With this procedure, one can interpret precision measurements as constraints on a given UV model. We give a detailed explanation for calculating the effective action up to one-loop order in a manifestly gauge covariant fashion. This covariant derivative expansion method dramatically simplifies the process of matching a UV model with the SM EFT, and also makes available a universal formalism that is easy to use for a variety of UV models. A few general aspects of RG running effects and choosing operator bases are discussed. Finally, we provide mapping results between the bosonic sector of the SM EFT and a complete set of precision electroweak and Higgs observables to which present and near future experiments are sensitive. Many results and tools which should prove useful to those wishing to use the SM EFT are detailed in several appendices.

  15. How to use the Standard Model effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Brian; Lu, Xiaochuan; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We present a practical three-step procedure of using the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT) to connect ultraviolet (UV) models of new physics with weak scale precision observables. With this procedure, one can interpret precision measurements as constraints on a given UV model. We give a detailed explanation for calculating the effective action up to one-loop order in a manifestly gauge covariant fashion. This covariant derivative expansion method dramatically simplifies the process of matching a UV model with the SM EFT, and also makes available a universal formalism that is easy to use for a variety of UV models. A few general aspects of RG running effects and choosing operator bases are discussed. Finally, we provide mapping results between the bosonic sector of the SM EFT and a complete set of precision electroweak and Higgs observables to which present and near future experiments are sensitive. Many results and tools which should prove useful to those wishing to use the SM EFT are detailed in several appendices.

  16. Equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) isproposed to be an ignition device with a low safety factor (q approx. = 2.0), rf or rf-assisted startup, long inductive burn pulse (approx. 300 s), and an elongated plasma cross section (kappa = 1.6) with moderate triangularity (delta = 0.3). System trade studies have been carried out to assist in choosing an appropriate candidate for TFCX conceptual design. This report describes an important element in these system studies - the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field (PF) coil system and its impact on the choice of machine size. Reference design points for the all-super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coil (TFCX-S) and hybrid (TFCX-H) options are presented that satisfy given PF system criteria, including volt-second requirements during burn, mechanical configuration constraints, maximum field constraints at the superconducting PF coils, and plasma shape parameters. Poloidal coil current waveforms for the TFCX-S and TFCX-H reference designs consistent with the equilibrium requirements of the plasma startup, heating, and burn phases of a typical discharge scenario are calculated. Finally, a possible option for quasi-steady-state operation is discussed

  17. Multi-field plasma sandpile model in tokamaks and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, X. D.; Xu, J. Q.

    2016-08-01

    A multi-field sandpile model of tokamak plasmas is formulated for the first time to simulate the dynamic process with interaction between avalanche events on the fast/micro time-scale and diffusive transports on the slow/macro time-scale. The main characteristics of the model are that both particle and energy avalanches of sand grains are taken into account simultaneously. New redistribution rules of a sand-relaxing process are defined according to the transport properties of special turbulence which allows the uphill particle transport. Applying the model, we first simulate the steady-state plasma profile self-sustained by drift wave turbulences in the Ohmic discharge of a tokamak. A scaling law as f = a q0 b + c for the relation of both center-density n ( 0 ) and electron (ion) temperatures T e ( 0 ) ( T i ( 0 ) ) with the center-safety-factor q 0 is found. Then interesting work about the nonlocal transport phenomenon observed in tokamak experiments proceeds. It is found that the core electron temperature increases rapidly in response to the edge cold pulse and inversely it decreases in response to the edge heat pulse. The results show that the nonlocal response of core electron temperature depending on the amplitudes of background plasma density and temperature is more remarkable in a range of gas injection rate. Analyses indicate that the avalanche transport caused by plasma drift instabilities with thresholds is a possible physical mechanism for the nonlocal transport in tokamaks. It is believed that the model is capable of being applied to more extensive questions occurring in the transport field.

  18. An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Cardinal, M.G.; Fraser, B.J.; Hattori, P.; Kakinami, Y.; Liu, J.Y.; Lynn, K.J.W.; Marshall, R.; McNamara, D.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nikiforov, V.M.; Otadoy, R.E.; Ruhimat, M.; Shevtsov, B.M.; Shiokawa, K.; Abe, S.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical model of the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation has been constructed based on geomagnetic data obtained from 21 stations along the 210 Magnetic Meridian of the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) from 1996 to 2007. Using the least squares fitting method for geomagnetically quiet days (Kp ??? 2+), the quiet daily geomagnetic field variation at each station was described as a function of solar activity SA, day of year DOY, lunar age LA, and local time LT. After interpolation in latitude, the model can describe solar-activity dependence and seasonal dependence of solar quiet daily variations (S) and lunar quiet daily variations (L). We performed a spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) on these S and L variations to examine average characteristics of the equivalent external current systems. We found three particularly noteworthy results. First, the total current intensity of the S current system is largely controlled by solar activity while its focus position is not significantly affected by solar activity. Second, we found that seasonal variations of the S current intensity exhibit north-south asymmetry; the current intensity of the northern vortex shows a prominent annual variation while the southern vortex shows a clear semi-annual variation as well as annual variation. Thirdly, we found that the total intensity of the L current system changes depending on solar activity and season; seasonal variations of the L current intensity show an enhancement during the December solstice, independent of the level of solar activity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. On unified field theories, dynamical torsion and geometrical models: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirilo-Lombardo, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze in this letter the same space-time structure as that presented in our previous reference (Part. Nucl, Lett. 2010. V.7, No.5. P.299-307), but relaxing now the condition a priori of the existence of a potential for the torsion. We show through exact cosmological solutions from this model, where the geometry is Euclidean RxO 3 ∼ RxSU(2), the relation between the space-time geometry and the structure of the gauge group. Precisely this relation is directly connected with the relation of the spin and torsion fields. The solution of this model is explicitly compared with our previous ones and we find that: i) the torsion is not identified directly with the Yang-Mills type strength field, ii) there exists a compatibility condition connected with the identification of the gauge group with the geometric structure of the space-time: this fact leads to the identification between derivatives of the scale factor a with the components of the torsion in order to allow the Hosoya-Ogura ansatz (namely, the alignment of the isospin with the frame geometry of the space-time), and iii) of two possible structures of the torsion the 'tratorial' form (the only one studied here) forbid wormhole configurations, leading only to cosmological instanton space-time in eternal expansion

  20. Dispersion of tracers by the oceanic eddy field modelling programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, K.J.; O'Farrell, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed to study the dispersion of tracers by the oceanic eddy field. The present study is designed to study the dispersion of particles in a mesoscale eddy field produced by the numerical model. Dispersion rates are calculated for flows above three types of topography, a flat bottom, a random collection of hills and a ridge. The presence of topography is found to significantly affect the flow. The effective diffusion coefficient of the flow near the bottom is reduced by 20% for the random topography and 60% for the ridge from that for the flat bottom case. Estimates are given of the number of float years required to obtain a given accuracy for the diffusion coefficient. At the surface a modest number of floats (order 5) are required to obtain a 50% accuracy. However at the bottom, to be within a factor of 2 of the true value for the flows considered requires respectively 26, 42 and 103 float years for the flat, random and ridge cases. (author)

  1. Joint modeling of ChIP-seq data via a Markov random field model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, Yanchun; Vinciotti, Veronica; Wit, Ernst; 't Hoen, Peter A C

    Chromatin ImmunoPrecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments have now become routine in biology for the detection of protein-binding sites. In this paper, we present a Markov random field model for the joint analysis of multiple ChIP-seq experiments. The proposed model naturally accounts for

  2. Finite element modeling of TFTR poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, J.A.; O'Toole, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Poloidal Field (PF) coils were originally analyzed to TFTR design conditions. The coils have been reanalyzed by PPPL and Grumman to determine operating limits under as-built conditions. Critical stress levels, based upon data obtained from the reanalysis of each PF coil, are needed for input to the TFTR simulation code algorithms. The primary objective regarding structural integrity has been to ascertain the magnitude and location of critical internal stresses in each PF coil due to various combinations of electromagnetic and thermally induced loads. For each PF coil, a global finite element model (FEM) of a coil sector is being analyzed to obtain the basic coil internal loads and displacements. Subsequent fine mesh local models of the coil lead stem and lead spur regions produce the magnitudes and locations of peak stresses. Each copper turn and its surrounding insulation are modeled using solid finite elements. The corresponding electromagnetic and thermal analyses are similarly modeled. A series of test beams were developed to determine the best combination of MSC/NASTRAN-type finite elements for use in PF coil analysis. The results of this analysis compare favorably with those obtained by the earlier analysis which was limited in scope

  3. Lorentz Violation of the Photon Sector in Field Theory Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingli Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We compare the Lorentz violation terms of the pure photon sector between two field theory models, namely, the minimal standard model extension (SME and the standard model supplement (SMS. From the requirement of the identity of the intersection for the two models, we find that the free photon sector of the SMS can be a subset of the photon sector of the minimal SME. We not only obtain some relations between the SME parameters but also get some constraints on the SMS parameters from the SME parameters. The CPT-odd coefficients (kAFα of the SME are predicted to be zero. There are 15 degrees of freedom in the Lorentz violation matrix Δαβ of free photons of the SMS related with the same number of degrees of freedom in the tensor coefficients (kFαβμν, which are independent from each other in the minimal SME but are interrelated in the intersection of the SMS and the minimal SME. With the related degrees of freedom, we obtain the conservative constraints (2σ on the elements of the photon Lorentz violation matrix. The detailed structure of the photon Lorentz violation matrix suggests some applications to the Lorentz violation experiments for photons.

  4. Atomistic modeling of metal surfaces under electric fields: direct coupling of electric fields to a molecular dynamics algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Djurabekova, Flyura; Pohjonen, Aarne; Nordlund, Kai

    2011-01-01

    The effect of electric fields on metal surfaces is fairly well studied, resulting in numerous analytical models developed to understand the mechanisms of ionization of surface atoms observed at very high electric fields, as well as the general behavior of a metal surface in this condition. However, the derivation of analytical models does not include explicitly the structural properties of metals, missing the link between the instantaneous effects owing to the applied field and the consequent response observed in the metal surface as a result of an extended application of an electric field. In the present work, we have developed a concurrent electrodynamic–molecular dynamic model for the dynamical simulation of an electric-field effect and subsequent modification of a metal surface in the framework of an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The partial charge induced on the surface atoms by the electric field is assessed by applying the classical Gauss law. The electric forces acting on the partially...

  5. Geomechanical Model Calibration Using Field Measurements for a Petroleum Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Sobolik, Steven R.; Herrick, Courtney G.

    2018-03-01

    A finite element numerical analysis model has been constructed that consists of a mesh that effectively captures the geometries of Bayou Choctaw (BC) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site and multimechanism deformation (M-D) salt constitutive model using the daily data of actual wellhead pressure and oil-brine interface location. The salt creep rate is not uniform in the salt dome, and the creep test data for BC salt are limited. Therefore, the model calibration is necessary to simulate the geomechanical behavior of the salt dome. The cavern volumetric closures of SPR caverns calculated from CAVEMAN are used as the field baseline measurement. The structure factor, A 2, and transient strain limit factor, K 0, in the M-D constitutive model are used for the calibration. The value of A 2, obtained experimentally from BC salt, and the value of K 0, obtained from Waste Isolation Pilot Plant salt, are used for the baseline values. To adjust the magnitude of A 2 and K 0, multiplication factors A 2 F and K 0 F are defined, respectively. The A 2 F and K 0 F values of the salt dome and salt drawdown skins surrounding each SPR cavern have been determined through a number of back analyses. The cavern volumetric closures calculated from this model correspond to the predictions from CAVEMAN for six SPR caverns. Therefore, this model is able to predict behaviors of the salt dome, caverns, caprock, and interbed layers. The geotechnical concerns associated with the BC site from this analysis will be explained in a follow-up paper.

  6. Mass segregation phenomena using the Hamiltonian Mean Field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, J. R.; Zolacir, T. O.

    2018-02-01

    Mass segregation problem is thought to be entangled with the dynamical evolution of young stellar clusters (Olczak, 2011 [1]). This is a common sense in the astrophysical community. In this work, the Hamiltonian Mean Field (HMF) model with different masses is studied. A mass segregation phenomenon (MSP) arises from this study as a dynamical feature. The MSP in the HMF model is a consequence of the Landau damping (LD) and it appears in systems that the interactions belongs to a long range regime. Actually HMF is a toy model known to show up the main characteristics of astrophysical systems due to the mean field character of the potential and for different masses, as stellar and galaxies clusters, also exhibits MSP. It is in this sense that computational simulations focusing in what happens over the mass distribution in the phase space are performed for this system. What happens through the violent relaxation period and what stands for the quasi-stationary states (QSS) of this dynamics is analyzed. The results obtained support the fact that MSP is observed already in the violent relaxation time and is maintained during the QSS. Some structures in the mass distribution function are observed. As a result of this study the mass distribution is determined by the system dynamics and is independent of the dimensionality of the system. MSP occurs in a one dimensional system as a result of the long range forces that acts in the system. In this approach MSP emerges as a dynamical feature. We also show that for HMF with different masses, the dynamical time scale is N.

  7. Numerical solution of a model for a superconductor field problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsop, L.E.; Goodman, A.S.; Gustavson, F.G.; Miranker, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    A model of a magnetic field problem occurring in connection with Josephson junction devices is derived, and numerical solutions are obtained. The model is of mathematical interest, because the magnetic vector potential satisfies inhomogeneous Helmholtz equations in part of the region, i.e., the superconductors, and the Laplace equation elsewhere. Moreover, the inhomogeneities are the guage constants for the potential, which are different for each superconductor, and their magnitudes are proportional to the currents flowing in the superconductors. These constants are directly related to the self and mutual inductances of the superconducting elements in the device. The numerical solution is obtained by the iterative use of a fast Poisson solver. Chebyshev acceleration is used to reduce the number of iterations required to obtain a solution. A typical problem involves solving 100,000 simultaneous equations, which the algorithm used with this model does in 20 iterations, requiring three minutes of CPU time on an IBM VM/370/168. Excellent agreement is obtained between calculated and observed values for the inductances

  8. The link between laboratory/field observations and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, C.R.; Foley, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The various linkages in system performance assessments that integrate disposal program elements must be understood. The linkage between model development and field/laboratory observations is described as the iterative program of site and system characterization for development of an observational-confirmatory data base. This data base is designed to develop, improve, and support conceptual models for site and system behavior. The program consists of data gathering and experiments to demonstrate understanding at various spatial and time scales and degrees of complexity. Understanding and accounting for the decreasing characterization certainty that arises with increasing space and time scales is an important aspect of the link between models and observations. The performance allocation process for setting performance goals and confidence levels, coupled with a performance assessment approach that provides these performance and confidence estimates, will determine when sufficient characterization has been achieved. At each iteration, performance allocation goals are reviewed and revised as necessary. The updated data base and appropriate performance assessment tools and approaches are utilized to identify and design additional tests and data needs necessary to meet current performance allocation goals

  9. Fractal planetary rings: Energy inequalities and random field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarenko, Anatoliy; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2017-12-01

    This study is motivated by a recent observation, based on photographs from the Cassini mission, that Saturn’s rings have a fractal structure in radial direction. Accordingly, two questions are considered: (1) What Newtonian mechanics argument in support of such a fractal structure of planetary rings is possible? (2) What kinematics model of such fractal rings can be formulated? Both challenges are based on taking planetary rings’ spatial structure as being statistically stationary in time and statistically isotropic in space, but statistically nonstationary in space. An answer to the first challenge is given through an energy analysis of circular rings having a self-generated, noninteger-dimensional mass distribution [V. E. Tarasov, Int. J. Mod Phys. B 19, 4103 (2005)]. The second issue is approached by taking the random field of angular velocity vector of a rotating particle of the ring as a random section of a special vector bundle. Using the theory of group representations, we prove that such a field is completely determined by a sequence of continuous positive-definite matrix-valued functions defined on the Cartesian square F2 of the radial cross-section F of the rings, where F is a fat fractal.

  10. Phase-field theories for mathematical modeling of biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, Guillermo R; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Hernández-Machado, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex structures whose mechanics are usually described at a mesoscopic level, such as the Helfrich bending theory. In this article, we present the phase-field methods, a useful tool for studying complex membrane problems which can be applied to very different phenomena. We start with an overview of the general theory of elasticity, paying special attention to its derivation from a molecular scale. We then study the particular case of membrane elasticity, explicitly obtaining the Helfrich bending energy. Within the framework of this theory, we derive a phase-field model for biological membranes and explore its physical basis and interpretation in terms of membrane elasticity. We finally explain three examples of applications of these methods to membrane related problems. First, the case of vesicle pearling and tubulation, when lipidic vesicles are exposed to the presence of hydrophobic polymers that anchor to the membrane, inducing a shape instability. Finally, we study the behavior of red blood cells while flowing in narrow microchannels, focusing on the importance of membrane elasticity to the cell flow capabilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Using the Agent-Based Modeling in Economic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Mihail

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The last ten years of the XX century has been the witnesses of the apparition of a new scientific field, which is usually defined as the study of “Complex adaptive systems”. This field, generic named Complexity Sciences, shares its subject, the general proprieties of complex systems across traditional disciplinary boundaries, with cybernetics and general systems theory. But the development of Complexity Sciences approaches is determined by the extensive use of Agent-Based-Models (ABM as a research tool and an emphasis on systems, such as markets, populations or ecologies, which are less integrated or “organized” than the ones, such as companies and economies, intensively studied by the traditional disciplines. For ABM, a complex system is a system of individual agents who have the freedom to act in ways that are not always totally predictable, and whose actions are interconnected such that one agent’s actions changes the context (environment for other agents. These are many examples of such complex systems: the stock market, the human body immune system, a business organization, an institution, a work-team, a family etc.

  12. Level set methods for modelling field evaporation in atom probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Daniel; Moody, Michael P; Smith, George D W

    2013-12-01

    Atom probe is a nanoscale technique for creating three-dimensional spatially and chemically resolved point datasets, primarily of metallic or semiconductor materials. While atom probe can achieve local high-level resolution, the spatial coherence of the technique is highly dependent upon the evaporative physics in the material and can often result in large geometric distortions in experimental results. The distortions originate from uncertainties in the projection function between the field evaporating specimen and the ion detector. Here we explore the possibility of continuum numerical approximations to the evaporative behavior during an atom probe experiment, and the subsequent propagation of ions to the detector, with particular emphasis placed on the solution of axisymmetric systems, such as isolated particles and multilayer systems. Ultimately, this method may prove critical in rapid modeling of tip shape evolution in atom probe tomography, which itself is a key factor in the rapid generation of spatially accurate reconstructions in atom probe datasets.

  13. On the possibility on constructing covariant chromomagnetic field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabo, A.; Penaranda, S.; Martinez, R.

    1995-03-01

    Expressions for SO(4) invariant euclidean QCD generating functionals are introduced which should produce non-vanishing gluon condensates. Their investigation is started here by initially considering the loop expansion of the corresponding effective action searching for a description differing from the usual perturbation theory. At this level, we consider special free propagators showing a sort or off-diagonal long range order. The calculation of the polarization tensor leads to a gluon mass term which is proportional to the squared root of the also finite value for 2 >. The summation of all the one-loop contributions to the energy having only mass insertions, indicates the spontaneous generation of the condensate from the perturbative grounds state in a way resembling the similar effect in the case of the chromomagnetic field models. This initial inspection suggests the need for a closer investigation which will be considered elsewhere. (author). 22 refs

  14. DsixTools: the standard model effective field theory toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celis, Alejandro [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Munich (Germany); Fuentes-Martin, Javier; Vicente, Avelino [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Virto, Javier [University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern (Switzerland)

    2017-06-15

    We present DsixTools, a Mathematica package for the handling of the dimension-six standard model effective field theory. Among other features, DsixTools allows the user to perform the full one-loop renormalization group evolution of the Wilson coefficients in the Warsaw basis. This is achieved thanks to the SMEFTrunner module, which implements the full one-loop anomalous dimension matrix previously derived in the literature. In addition, DsixTools also contains modules devoted to the matching to the ΔB = ΔS = 1, 2 and ΔB = ΔC = 1 operators of the Weak Effective Theory at the electroweak scale, and their QCD and QED Renormalization group evolution below the electroweak scale. (orig.)

  15. Models of Quantum Space Time: Quantum Field Planes

    OpenAIRE

    Mack, G.; Schomerus, V.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum field planes furnish a noncommutative differential algebra $\\Omega$ which substitutes for the commutative algebra of functions and forms on a contractible manifold. The data required in their construction come from a quantum field theory. The basic idea is to replace the ground field ${\\bf C}$ of quantum planes by the noncommutative algebra ${\\cal A}$ of observables of the quantum field theory.

  16. Zealots in the mean-field noisy voter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Nagi; San Miguel, Maxi; Toral, Raul

    2018-01-01

    The influence of zealots on the noisy voter model is studied theoretically and numerically at the mean-field level. The noisy voter model is a modification of the voter model that includes a second mechanism for transitions between states: Apart from the original herding processes, voters may change their states because of an intrinsic noisy-in-origin source. By increasing the importance of the noise with respect to the herding, the system exhibits a finite-size phase transition from a quasiconsensus state, where most of the voters share the same opinion, to one with coexistence. Upon introducing some zealots, or voters with fixed opinion, the latter scenario may change significantly. We unveil new situations by carrying out a systematic numerical and analytical study of a fully connected network for voters, but allowing different voters to be directly influenced by different zealots. We show that this general system is equivalent to a system of voters without zealots, but with heterogeneous values of their parameters characterizing herding and noisy dynamics. We find excellent agreement between our analytical and numerical results. Noise and herding or zealotry acting together in the voter model yields a nontrivial mixture of the scenarios with the two mechanisms acting alone: It represents a situation where the global-local (noise-herding) competition is coupled to a symmetry breaking (zealots). In general, the zealotry enhances the effective noise of the system, which may destroy the original quasiconsensus state, and can introduce a bias towards the opinion of the majority of zealots, hence breaking the symmetry of the system and giving rise to new phases. In the most general case we find two different transitions: a discontinuous transition from an asymmetric bimodal phase to an extreme asymmetric phase and a second continuous transition from the extreme asymmetric phase to an asymmetric unimodal phase.

  17. 3D MODELING OF STRESS FIELDS IN MILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadii YOUSFI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Given the complexity of the physical phenomena present in machining, orthogonal cutting was the most exploited configuration in the analytical modelling of cutting. This configuration is no longer valid if we consider the orientations of the tool in space such as the milling process. A along the cutting edge the geometric and kinematic parameters vary greatly and the speed vector of each point is very sensitive to the position [1]. This study incorporates the kinematic evolutions in the volume, with significant gradients of speeds, in 3D machining configuration and this in each shear zone. These gradients velocity generate additional displacements of the chip, in three dimensions, therefore a new force component with the appearance of cutting moments. This study presents a brief description of orthogonal cutting model developed followed by the determination of the velocity field in each shear zone. From the overall expression of the velocity vector, the contributions of the kinematic variations to the strain and the strain rate between the two extreme points of the edge are determined.

  18. Phase Field Modeling of Microstructure Banding in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalekian, Mehran; Azizi-Alizamini, Hamid; Militzer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    A phase field model (PFM) is applied to simulate the effects of microsegregation, cooling rate, and austenite grain size on banding in a C-Mn steel. The PFM simulations are compared with experimental observations of continuous cooling transformation tests in the investigated steel. Using electron probe microanalysis, the microsegregation characteristics of Mn were determined and introduced into the model. Ferrite nucleation is assumed to occur at austenite grain boundaries, and ferrite growth is simulated as mixed-mode reaction for para-equilibrium conditions. The driving pressure for the austenite to ferrite transformation depends on Mn concentration and thus varies between the alternating microsegregation layers. In agreement with experimental observations, the simulation results demonstrate that by increasing the cooling rate and/or austenite grain size, banding tends to disappear as the transformation shifts to lower temperatures such that ferrite also forms readily in the layers with higher Mn levels. Further, a parametric study is conducted by changing thickness and Mn content of the bands. In accordance with experimental observations, it is shown that for sufficiently large band thickness, band splitting takes place where ferrite grains form close to the center of the Mn-rich band. Changing the degree of Mn segregation indicates that a segregation level of 0.2 wt pct is necessary in the present case to achieve banded microstructures.

  19. Conditional random field modelling of interactions between findings in mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Thijs; Mordang, Jan-Jurre; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2017-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in training deep neural network architectures, in particular deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), made a big impact on vision research and are increasingly responsible for advances in Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD). Since many natural scenes and medical images vary in size and are too large to feed to the networks as a whole, two stage systems are typically employed, where in the first stage, small regions of interest in the image are located and presented to the network as training and test data. These systems allow us to harness accurate region based annotations, making the problem easier to learn. However, information is processed purely locally and context is not taken into account. In this paper, we present preliminary work on the employment of a Conditional Random Field (CRF) that is trained on top the CNN to model contextual interactions such as the presence of other suspicious regions, for mammography CAD. The model can easily be extended to incorporate other sources of information, such as symmetry, temporal change and various patient covariates and is general in the sense that it can have application in other CAD problems.

  20. Form factors of exponential fields for two-parametric family of integrable models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fateev, V.A.; Lashkevich, M.

    2004-01-01

    A two-parametric family of integrable models (the SS model) that contains as particular cases several well known integrable quantum field theories is considered. After the quantum group restriction it describes a wide class of integrable perturbed conformal field theories. Exponential fields in the SS model are closely related to the primary fields in these perturbed theories. We use the bosonization approach to derive an integral representation for the form factors of the exponential fields in the SS model. The same representations for the sausage model and the cosine-cosine model are obtained as limiting cases. The results are tested at the special points, where the theory contains free particles

  1. Form factors of exponential fields for two-parametric family of integrable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fateev, V. A.; Lashkevich, M.

    2004-09-01

    A two-parametric family of integrable models (the SS model) that contains as particular cases several well known integrable quantum field theories is considered. After the quantum group restriction it describes a wide class of integrable perturbed conformal field theories. Exponential fields in the SS model are closely related to the primary fields in these perturbed theories. We use the bosonization approach to derive an integral representation for the form factors of the exponential fields in the SS model. The same representations for the sausage model and the cosine-cosine model are obtained as limiting cases. The results are tested at the special points, where the theory contains free particles.

  2. Determining Student Competency in Field Placements: An Emerging Theoretical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twyla L. Salm

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a qualitative case study that explores how twenty-three field advisors, representing three human service professions including education, nursing, and social work, experience the process of assessment with students who are struggling to meet minimum competencies in field placements. Five themes emerged from the analysis of qualitative interviews. The field advisors primary concern was the level of professional competency achieved by practicum students. Related to competency were themes concerned with the field advisor's role in being accountable and protecting the reputation of his/her profession as well as the reputation of the professional program affiliated with the practicum student's professional education. The final theme – teacher-student relationship –emerged from the data, both as a stand-alone and global or umbrella theme. As an umbrella theme, teacher-student relationship permeated each of the other themes as the participants interpreted their experiences of the process of assessment through the mentor relationships. A theoretical model was derived from these findings and the description of the model is presented. Cet article décrit une étude de cas qualitative qui explore comment vingt-trois conseillers de stages, représentant trois professions de services sociaux comprenant l’éducation, les soins infirmiers et le travail social, ont vécu l’expérience du processus d’évaluation avec des étudiants qui ont des difficultés à acquérir les compétences minimales durant les stages. Cinq thèmes ont été identifiés lors de l’analyse des entrevues qualitatives. La préoccupation principale des conseillers de stages était le niveau de compétence professionnelle acquis par les stagiaires. Les thèmes liés à la compétence étaient le rôle des conseillers de stages dans leur responsabilité pour protéger la réputation de leur profession ainsi que la réputation d’un programme professionnel

  3. Modeling field scale unsaturated flow and transport processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelhar, L.W.; Celia, M.A.; McLaughlin, D.

    1994-08-01

    The scales of concern in subsurface transport of contaminants from low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities are in the range of 1 to 1,000 m. Natural geologic materials generally show very substantial spatial variability in hydraulic properties over this range of scales. Such heterogeneity can significantly influence the migration of contaminants. It is also envisioned that complex earth structures will be constructed to isolate the waste and minimize infiltration of water into the facility. The flow of water and gases through such facilities must also be a concern. A stochastic theory describing unsaturated flow and contamination transport in naturally heterogeneous soils has been enhanced by adopting a more realistic characterization of soil variability. The enhanced theory is used to predict field-scale effective properties and variances of tension and moisture content. Applications illustrate the important effects of small-scale heterogeneity on large-scale anisotropy and hysteresis and demonstrate the feasibility of simulating two-dimensional flow systems at time and space scales of interest in radioactive waste disposal investigations. Numerical algorithms for predicting field scale unsaturated flow and contaminant transport have been improved by requiring them to respect fundamental physical principles such as mass conservation. These algorithms are able to provide realistic simulations of systems with very dry initial conditions and high degrees of heterogeneity. Numerical simulation of the movement of water and air in unsaturated soils has demonstrated the importance of air pathways for contaminant transport. The stochastic flow and transport theory has been used to develop a systematic approach to performance assessment and site characterization. Hypothesis-testing techniques have been used to determine whether model predictions are consistent with observed data

  4. Positive random fields for modeling material stiffness and compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasofer, Abraham Michael; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Tarp-Johansen, Niels Jacob

    1998-01-01

    Positive random fields with known marginal properties and known correlation function are not numerous in the literature. The most prominent example is the log\\-normal field for which the complete distribution is known and for which the reciprocal field is also lognormal. It is of interest to supp...

  5. Approach of regional gravity field modeling from GRACE data for improvement of geoid modeling for Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroishi, Y.; Lemoine, F. G.; Rowlands, D. D.

    2006-12-01

    The latest gravimetric geoid model for Japan, JGEOID2004, suffers from errors at long wavelengths (around 1000 km) in a range of +/- 30 cm. The model was developed by combining surface gravity data with a global marine altimetric gravity model, using EGM96 as a foundation, and the errors at long wavelength are presumably attributed to EGM96 errors. The Japanese islands and their vicinity are located in a region of plate convergence boundaries, producing substantial gravity and geoid undulations in a wide range of wavelengths. Because of the geometry of the islands and trenches, precise information on gravity in the surrounding oceans should be incorporated in detail, even if the geoid model is required to be accurate only over land. The Kuroshio Current, which runs south of Japan, causes high sea surface variability, making altimetric gravity field determination complicated. To reduce the long-wavelength errors in the geoid model, we are investigating GRACE data for regional gravity field modeling at long wavelengths in the vicinity of Japan. Our approach is based on exclusive use of inter- satellite range-rate data with calibrated accelerometer data and attitude data, for regional or global gravity field recovery. In the first step, we calibrate accelerometer data in terms of scales and biases by fitting dynamically calculated orbits to GPS-determined precise orbits. The calibration parameters of accelerometer data thus obtained are used in the second step to recover a global/regional gravity anomaly field. This approach is applied to GRACE data obtained for the year 2005 and resulting global/regional gravity models are presented and discussed.

  6. Predictive hydrogeochemical modelling of bauxite residue sand in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissmeier, Laurin; Barry, David A; Phillips, Ian R

    2011-07-15

    The suitability of residue sand (the coarse fraction remaining from Bayer's process of bauxite refining) for constructing the surface cover of closed bauxite residue storage areas was investigated. Specifically, its properties as a medium for plant growth are of interest to ensure residue sand can support a sustainable ecosystem following site closure. The geochemical evolution of the residue sand under field conditions, its plant nutrient status and soil moisture retention were studied by integrated modelling of geochemical and hydrological processes. For the parameterization of mineral reactions, amounts and reaction kinetics of the mineral phases natron, calcite, tricalcium aluminate, sodalite, muscovite and analcime were derived from measured acid neutralization curves. The effective exchange capacity for ion adsorption was measured using three independent exchange methods. The geochemical model, which accounts for mineral reactions, cation exchange and activity corrected solution speciation, was formulated in the geochemical modelling framework PHREEQC, and partially validated in a saturated-flow column experiment. For the integration of variably saturated flow with multi-component solute transport in heterogeneous 2D domains, a coupling of PHREEQC with the multi-purpose finite-element solver COMSOL was established. The integrated hydrogeochemical model was applied to predict water availability and quality in a vertical flow lysimeter and a cover design for a storage facility using measured time series of rainfall and evaporation from southwest Western Australia. In both scenarios the sand was fertigated and gypsum-amended. Results show poor long-term retention of fertilizer ions and buffering of the pH around 10 for more than 5 y of leaching. It was concluded that fertigation, gypsum amendment and rainfall leaching alone were insufficient to render the geochemical conditions of residue sand suitable for optimal plant growth within the given timeframe. The

  7. Near-field modeling in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlmann, K.; Shirley, C.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the effects of nuclear testing in underground test areas (the UGTA program) at the Nevada Test Site. The principal focus of the UGTA program is to better understand and define subsurface radionuclide migration. The study described in this report focuses on the development of tools for generating maps of hydrogeologic characteristics of subsurface Tertiary volcanic units at the Frenchman Flat corrective Action Unit (CAU). The process includes three steps. The first step involves generation of three-dimensional maps of the geologic structure of subsurface volcanic units using geophysical logs to distinguish between two classes: densely welded tuff and nonwelded tuff. The second step generates three-dimensional maps of hydraulic conductivity utilizing the spatial distribution of the two geologic classes obtained in the first step. Each class is described by a correlation structure based on existing data on hydraulic conductivity, and conditioned on the generated spatial location of each class. The final step demonstrates the use of the maps of hydraulic conductivity for modeling groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in volcanic tuffs from an underground nuclear test at the Frenchman Flat CAU. The results indicate that the majority of groundwater flow through the volcanic section occurs through zones of densely welded tuff where connected fractures provide the transport pathway. Migration rates range between near zero to approximately four m/yr, with a mean rate of 0.68 m/yr. This report presents the results of work under the FY96 Near-Field Modeling task of the UGTA program

  8. Imagining Future Forests: What Models Can Learn from Field Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, E. J.; Domec, J. C.; Laviner, M. A.; Fox, T. D.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S. G.; King, J.; Noormets, A.

    2014-12-01

    General circulation models predict that future forests in the U.S. Southeast will experience higher temperatures and more variable precipitation in the future, resulting in a moderate decrease in water availability (precipitation minus evapotranspiration), though considerable uncertainty in and disagreement between projections remain. The Pine Integrated Network: Education, Mitigation, and Adaptation Project (PINEMAP) represents an effort to understand the future of 20 million acres of planted pine forests managed by private landowners in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal states. Decades of productivity research on loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) has led to a widespread practice of mid-rotation fertilization of loblolly plantations, supplying additional nutrients as stands approach canopy closure. It remains an open question what the effects of fertilization of pine forests in this region will be in the face of periodic or persistent droughts, in terms of forest water use and its implications to other water uses downstream. Therefore, we will review key results from past ecophysiological research on the responses of loblolly pine to fertilization, elevated CO2 and water availability, as well as a recent PINEMAP field trial of fertilization and drought imposed through rainfall displacement over two growing seasons. Despite high rainfall in 2013 (1224 mm compared an average 1120 mm) and a lack of leaf area response, transpiration decreased in response to fertilization and through rainfall displacement. Treatment differences were greatest in the growing season of 2013, when transpiration was on average 13.6, 20.2 and 28.7% lower in the rainfall displacement, fertilization and combined treatment than the control (46 mm/month), respectively. We will conclude by reviewing the important lessons from this research for regional models of future forests in this region in terms of LAI, transpiration, growth and water use efficiency.

  9. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Amlôt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS. The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit.

  10. Numerical modelling of GPR electromagnetic fields for locating burial sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, José M.; Karczewski, Jerzy; Mazurkiewicz, Ewelina; Tadeusiewicz, Ryszard; Tomecka-Suchoń, Sylwia

    2017-11-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is commonly used for locating burial sites. In this article, we acquired radargrams at a site where a domestic pig cadaver was buried. The measurements were conducted with the ProEx System GPR manufactured by the Swedish company Mala Geoscience with an antenna of 500MHz. The event corresponding to the pig can be clearly seen in the measurements. In order to improve the interpretation, the electromagnetic field is compared to numerical simulations computed with the pseudo-spectral Fourier method. A geological model has been defined on the basis of assumed electromagnetic properties (permittivity, conductivity and magnetic permeability). The results, when compared with the GPR measurements, show a dissimilar amplitude behaviour, with a stronger reflection event from the bottom of the pit. We have therefore performed another simulation by decreasing the electrical conductivity of the body very close to that of air. The comparison improved, showing more reflections, which could be an indication that the body contains air or has been degraded to a certain extent that the electrical resistivity has greatly increased.

  11. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Joseph R.; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit. PMID:23202768

  12. Isospin-dependent properties of asymmetric nuclear matter in relativistic mean-field models

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An

    2007-01-01

    Using various relativistic mean-field models, including the nonlinear ones with meson field self-interactions, those with density-dependent meson-nucleon couplings, and the point-coupling models without meson fields, we have studied the isospin-dependent bulk and single-particle properties of asymmetric nuclear matter. In particular, we have determined the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy from these different relativistic mean-field models and compare the results with the constra...

  13. Near-field and far-field modeling of scattered surface waves. Application to the apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, J.; Parent, G.; Fumeron, S.; Jeandel, G.; Lacroix, D.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of surface waves through scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) is a promising technique for thermal measurements at very small scales. Recent studies have shown that electromagnetic waves, in the vicinity of a scattering structure such as an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip, can be scattered from near to far-field and thus detected. In the present work, a model based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method and the near-field to far-field (NFTFF) transformation for electromagnetic waves propagation is presented. This model has been validated by studying the electromagnetic field of a dipole in vacuum and close to a dielectric substrate. Then simulations for a tetrahedral tip close to an interface are presented and discussed.

  14. Bioenergy Ecosystem Land-Use Modelling and Field Flux Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Niall; Bottoms, Emily; Donnison, Iain; Dondini, Marta; Farrar, Kerrie; Finch, Jon; Harris, Zoe; Ineson, Phil; Keane, Ben; Massey, Alice; McCalmont, Jon; Morison, James; Perks, Mike; Pogson, Mark; Rowe, Rebecca; Smith, Pete; Sohi, Saran; Tallis, Mat; Taylor, Gail; Yamulki, Sirwan

    2013-04-01

    Climate change impacts resulting from fossil fuel combustion and concerns about the diversity of energy supply are driving interest to find low-carbon energy alternatives. As a result bioenergy is receiving widespread scientific, political and media attention for its potential role in both supplying energy and mitigating greenhouse (GHG) emissions. It is estimated that the bioenergy contribution to EU 2020 renewable energy targets could require up to 17-21 million hectares of additional land in Europe (Don et al., 2012). There are increasing concerns that some transitions into bioenergy may not be as sustainable as first thought when GHG emissions from the crop growth and management cycle are factored into any GHG life cycle assessment (LCA). Bioenergy is complex and encapsulates a wide range of crops, varying from food crop based biofuels to dedicated second generation perennial energy crops and forestry products. The decision on the choice of crop for energy production significantly influences the GHG mitigation potential. It is recognised that GHG savings or losses are in part a function of the original land-use that has undergone change and the management intensity for the energy crop. There is therefore an urgent need to better quantify both crop and site-specific effects associated with the production of conventional and dedicated energy crops on the GHG balance. Currently, there is scarcity of GHG balance data with respect to second generation crops meaning that process based models and LCAs of GHG balances are weakly underpinned. Therefore, robust, models based on real data are urgently required. In the UK we have recently embarked on a detailed program of work to address this challenge by combining a large number of field studies with state-of-the-art process models. Through six detailed experiments, we are calculating the annual GHG balances of land use transitions into energy crops across the UK. Further, we are quantifying the total soil carbon gain or

  15. Bianchi type-I model with conformally invariant scalar and electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accioly, A.J.; Vaidya, A.N.; Som, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    A Bianchi type-I exact solution of the Einstein theory representing the homogeneous anisotropic models with the electromagnetic field and the conformally invariant scalar field is studied. The solution contains Kasner model, pure electromagnetic and pure scalar models as special cases. It is found that the models evolve from an initial Kasner type to a final open Friedmann type universe. (Author) [pt

  16. A comprehensive model of the quiet-time, near-Earth magnetic field: phase 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, T.J.; Olsen, Nils; Langel, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The near-Earth magnetic field is caused by sources in the Earth's core, ionosphere, magnetosphere, lithosphere and from coupling currents between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, and between hemispheres. Traditionally, the main field (low degree internal field) and magnetospheric field have......, and includes an accounting for main field influences on the magnetosphere, main field and solar activity influences on the ionosphere, seasonal influences on the coupling currents, a priori characterization of the influence of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere on Earth-induced fields, and an explicit...... been modelled simultaneously, with fields from other sources being modelled separately. Such a scheme, however, can introduce spurious features, especially when the spatial and temporal scales of the fields overlap. A new model, designated CM3 (Comprehensive Model: phase 3), is the third in a series...

  17. Improved compact model for double-gate tunnel field-effect transistors by the rigorous consideration of gate fringing field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwan; Choi, Woo Young

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the accuracy of a compact current-voltage (I-V) model for double-gate n-channel tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) is improve by considering outer and inner gate fringing field effects. The refined model is benchmarked against technology computer-aided design (TCAD) device simulations and compared against a previously published compact model. The normalized root-mean-square error for current in the linear region of operation (i.e., for 0.05 V drain voltage) is reduced from ˜593 to ˜5%.

  18. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Global Lithospheric Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kother, Livia Kathleen; Hammer, Magnus Danel; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for modelling the global lithospheric magnetic field at Earth’s surface based on the estimation of equivalent potential field sources. As a demonstration we show an application to magnetic field measurements made by the CHAMP satellite during the period 2009–2010 when...... are also employed to minimize the influence of the ionospheric field. The model for the remaining lithospheric magnetic field consists of magnetic equivalent potential field sources (monopoles) arranged in an icosahedron grid at a depth of 100 km belowthe surface. The corresponding model parameters...

  19. Magnetic field modeling with a set of individual localized coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A

    2010-06-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In-situ electric field and current density in Japanese male and female models for uniform magnetic field exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, A.; Wake, K.; Watanabe, S.; Taki, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study quantified the in situ electric field and induced current density in anatomically based numeric Japanese male and female models for exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields. A quasi-static FDTD method was applied to analyse this problem. The computational results obtained herein reveal that the 99. percentile value of the in situ electric field in the nerve tissue and the current density averaged over an area of 1 cm 2 of the nerve tissue (excluding non-nerve tissues in the averaging region) in the female models were less than 35 and 25%, respectively. These induced quantities in the Japanese models were smaller than those for European models reported in a previous study, which is mainly due to the difference in cross-sectional area of the body. (authors)

  1. Modelling and comparison of trapped fields in (RE)BCO bulk superconductors for activation using pulsed field magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.; Ujiie, T.; Zou, J.; Dennis, A. R.; Shi, Y.-H.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    The ability to generate a permanent, stable magnetic field unsupported by an electromotive force is fundamental to a variety of engineering applications. Bulk high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials can trap magnetic fields of magnitude over ten times higher than the maximum field produced by conventional magnets, which is limited practically to rather less than 2 T. In this paper, two large c-axis oriented, single-grain YBCO and GdBCO bulk superconductors are magnetized by the pulsed field magnetization (PFM) technique at temperatures of 40 and 65 K and the characteristics of the resulting trapped field profile are investigated with a view of magnetizing such samples as trapped field magnets (TFMs) in situ inside a trapped flux-type superconducting electric machine. A comparison is made between the temperatures at which the pulsed magnetic field is applied and the results have strong implications for the optimum operating temperature for TFMs in trapped flux-type superconducting electric machines. The effects of inhomogeneities, which occur during the growth process of single-grain bulk superconductors, on the trapped field and maximum temperature rise in the sample are modelled numerically using a 3D finite-element model based on the H-formulation and implemented in Comsol Multiphysics 4.3a. The results agree qualitatively with the observed experimental results, in that inhomogeneities act to distort the trapped field profile and reduce the magnitude of the trapped field due to localized heating within the sample and preferential movement and pinning of flux lines around the growth section regions (GSRs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), respectively. The modelling framework will allow further investigation of various inhomogeneities that arise during the processing of (RE)BCO bulk superconductors, including inhomogeneous Jc distributions and the presence of current-limiting grain boundaries and cracks, and it can be used to assist optimization of

  2. Realistic edge field model code REFC for designing and study of isochronous cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.

    1989-01-01

    The focussing properties and the requirements for isochronism in cyclotron magnet configuration are well-known in hard edge field model. The fact that they quite often change considerably in realistic field can be attributed mainly to the influence of the edge field. A solution to this problem requires a field model which allows a simple construction of equilibrium orbit and yield simple formulae. This can be achieved by using a fitted realistic edge field (Hudson et al 1975) in the region of the pole edge and such a field model is therefore called a realistic edge field model. A code REFC based on realistic edge field model has been developed to design the cyclotron sectors and the code FIELDER has been used to study the beam properties. In this report REFC code has been described along with some relevant explaination of the FIELDER code. (author). 11 refs., 6 figs

  3. Flow field bipolar plates in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Analysis & modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahraman, Huseyin; Orhan, Mehmet F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Covers a comprehensive review of available flow field channel configurations. • Examines the main design considerations and limitations for a flow field network. • Explores the common materials and material properties used for flow field plates. • Presents a case study of step-by-step modeling for an optimum flow field design. - Abstract: This study investigates flow fields and flow field plates (bipolar plates) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. In this regard, the main design considerations and limitations for a flow field network have been examined, along with a comprehensive review of currently available flow field channel configurations. Also, the common materials and material properties used for flow field plates have been explored. Furthermore, a case study of step-by-step modeling for an optimum flow field design has been presented in-details. Finally, a parametric study has been conducted with respect to many design and performance parameters in a flow field plate.

  4. Reduction of static field equation of Faddeev model to first order PDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Minoru; Shi Changguang

    2007-01-01

    A method to solve the static field equation of the Faddeev model is presented. For a special combination of the concerned field, we adopt a form which is compatible with the field equation and involves two arbitrary complex functions. As a result, the static field equation is reduced to a set of first order partial differential equations

  5. A New Model for Simulating Gas Metal Arc Welding based on Phase Field Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongyue; Li, Li; Zhao, Zhijiang

    2017-11-01

    Lots of physical process, such as metal melting, multiphase fluids flow, heat and mass transfer and thermocapillary effect (Marangoni) and so on, will occur in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) which should be considered as a mixture system. In this paper, based on the previous work, we propose a new model to simulate GMAW including Navier-Stokes equation, the phase field model and energy equation. Unlike most previous work, we take the thermocapillary effect into the phase field model considering mixture energy which is different of volume of fluid method (VOF) widely used in GMAW before. We also consider gravity, electromagnetic force, surface tension, buoyancy effect and arc pressure in momentum equation. The spray transfer especially the projected transfer in GMAW is computed as numerical examples with a continuous finite element method and a modified midpoint scheme. Pulse current is set as welding current as the numerical example to show the numerical simulation of metal transfer which fits the theory of GMAW well. From the result compared with the data of high-speed photography and VOF model, the accuracy and stability of the model and scheme are easily validated and also the new model has the higher precieion.

  6. Application of the weighted total field-scattering field technique to 3D-PSTD light scattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuai; Gao, Taichang; Liu, Lei; Li, Hao; Chen, Ming; Yang, Bo

    2018-04-01

    PSTD (Pseudo Spectral Time Domain) is an excellent model for the light scattering simulation of nonspherical aerosol particles. However, due to the particularity of its discretization form of the Maxwell's equations, the traditional Total Field/Scattering Field (TF/SF) technique for FDTD (Finite Differential Time Domain) is not applicable to PSTD, and the time-consuming pure scattering field technique is mainly applied to introduce the incident wave. To this end, the weighted TF/SF technique proposed by X. Gao is generalized and applied to the 3D-PSTD scattering model. Using this technique, the incident light can be effectively introduced by modifying the electromagnetic components in an inserted connecting region between the total field and the scattering field region with incident terms, where the incident terms are obtained by weighting the incident field by a window function. To optimally determine the thickness of connection region and the window function type for PSTD calculations, their influence on the modeling accuracy is firstly analyzed. To further verify the effectiveness and advantages of the weighted TF/SF technique, the improved PSTD model is validated against the PSTD model equipped with pure scattering field technique in both calculation accuracy and efficiency. The results show that, the performance of PSTD seems to be not sensitive to variation of window functions. The number of the connection layer required decreases with the increasing of spatial resolution, where for spatial resolution of 24 grids per wavelength, a 6-layer region is thick enough. The scattering phase matrices and integral scattering parameters obtained by the improved PSTD show an excellent consistency with those well-tested models for spherical and nonspherical particles, illustrating that the weighted TF/SF technique can introduce the incident precisely. The weighted TF/SF technique shows higher computational efficiency than pure scattering technique.

  7. Determining Student Competency in Field Placements: An Emerging Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salm, Twyla L.; Johner, Randy; Luhanga, Florence

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a qualitative case study that explores how twenty-three field advisors, representing three human service professions including education, nursing, and social work, experience the process of assessment with students who are struggling to meet minimum competencies in field placements. Five themes emerged from the analysis of…

  8. Seismicity and coupled deformation modeling at the Coso Geothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaven, J. O.; Hickman, S. H.; Davatzes, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    Micro-seismicity in geothermal reservoirs, in particular in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), is a beneficial byproduct of injection and production, as it can indicate the generation of high-permeability pathways on either pre-existing or newly generated faults and fractures. The hazard of inducing an earthquake large enough to be felt at the surface, however, is not easily avoided and has led to termination of some EGS projects. To explore the physical processes leading to permeability creation and maintenance in geothermal systems and the physics of induced earthquakes , we investigated the evolution of seismicity and the factors controlling the migration, moment release rate, and timing of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). We report on seismicity in the CGF that has been relocated with high precision double-difference relocation techniques and simultaneous velocity inversions to understand hydrologic reservoir compartmentalization and the nature of subsurface boundaries to fluid flow. We find that two distinct compartments are present within the CGF, which are divided by an aseismic gap showing a relatively low Vp/Vs ratio, likely indicating lower temperatures or lower pore pressures within the gap than in the adjacent reservoir compartments. Well-located events with Mw> 3.5 tend to map onto reactivated fault structures that were revealed when imaged by the relocated micro-seismicity. We relate the temporal and spatial migration of moment release rate to the injection and production histories in the reservoir by employing a thermo-poro-elastic finite element model that takes into account the compartment boundaries defined by the seismicity. We find that pore pressure effects alone are not responsible for the migration of seismicity and that poro-elastic and thermo-elastic stress changes are needed in addition to fluid pressure effects to account for the observed moment release rates.

  9. The Vlasov equation with strong magnetic field and oscillating electric field as a model for isotop resonant separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Frenod

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the qualitative behavior of solutions to the Vlasov equation with strong external magnetic field and oscillating electric field. This model is relevant to the understanding of isotop resonant separation. We show that the effective equation is a kinetic equation with a memory term. This memory term involves a pseudo-differential operator whose kernel is characterized by an integral equation involving Bessel functions. The kernel is explicitly given in some particular cases.

  10. Tabulated Neutron Star Equations of State Modelled within the Chiral Mean Field Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexheimer, V.

    2017-12-01

    In this special issue article, I review some of the accomplishments of the chiral mean field (CMF) model, which contains nucleon, hyperon, and quark degrees of freedom, and its applications to proto-neutron and neutron stars. I also present a set of equation of state and particle population tables built using the CMF model subject to physical constraints necessary to reproduce different environments, such as those present in cold neutron stars, core-collapse supernova explosions, and different stages of compact star mergers.

  11. Magnetic field of Mercury and models of thermal evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, H.N.; Strangway, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    Recent planetary probes have performed in situ measurements of the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets. Consideration is given to the origin of these fields, with attention to the equilibrium-- condensation hypothesis for the formation of the solar system. In particular, it is shown that Mercury's present day magnetic field could have been acquired during or shortly after a cold accretion or that it could be due to a presently operating dynamo, resulting from a 'hot evolution'. Two parameters which would help to distinguish between these possibilities are the present-day surface heat flow and the moment of inertia

  12. Hidden spin-3/2 field in the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demir, Durmus; Karahan, Canan; Sargin, Ozan [Izmir Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Urla (Turkey); Korutlu, Beste [TUeBITAK National Metrology Institute, Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2017-09-15

    Here we show that a massive spin-3/2 field can hide in the SM spectrum in a way revealing itself only virtually. We study collider signatures and loop effects of this field, and determine its role in Higgs inflation and its potential as dark matter. We show that this spin-3/2 field has a rich linear collider phenomenology and motivates consideration of a neutrino-Higgs collider. We also show that the study of Higgs inflation, dark matter and dark energy can reveal more about the neutrino and dark sector. (orig.)

  13. Modelling soil properties in a crop field located in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogunovic, Igor; Pereira, Paulo; Millan, Mesic; Percin, Aleksandra; Zgorelec, Zeljka

    2016-04-01

    Development of tillage activities had negative effects on soil quality as destruction of soil horizons, compacting and aggregates destruction, increasing soil erosion and loss of organic matter. For a better management in order to mitigate the effects of intensive soil management in land degradation it is fundamental to map the spatial distribution of soil properties (Brevik et al., 2016). The understanding the distribution of the variables in space is very important for a sustainable management, in order to identify areas that need a potential intervention and decrease the economic losses (Galiati et al., 2016). The objective of this work is study the spatial distribution of some topsoil properties as clay, fine silt, coarse silt, fine sand, coarse sand, penetration resistance, moisture and organic matter in a crop field located in Croatia. A grid with 275x25 (625 m2) was designed and a total of 48 samples were collected. Previous to data modelling, data normality was checked using the Shapiro wilk-test. As in previous cases (Pereira et al., 2015), data did not followed the normal distribution, even after a logarithmic (Log), square-root, and box cox transformation. Thus, for modeling proposes, we used the log transformed data, since was the closest to the normality. In order to identify groups among the variables we applied a principal component analysis (PCA), based on the correlation matrix. On average clay content was 15.47% (±3.23), fine silt 24.24% (±4.08), coarse silt 35.34% (±3.12), fine sand 20.93% (±4.68), coarse sand 4.02% (±1.69), penetration resistance 0.66 MPa (±0.28), organic matter 1.51% (±0.25) and soil moisture 32.04% (±3.27). The results showed that the PCA identified three factors explained at least one of the variables. The first factor had high positive loadings in soil clay, fine silt and organic matter and a high negative loading in fine sand. The second factor had high positive loadings in coarse sand and moisture and a high

  14. Influence of the mode of deformation on recrystallisation behaviour of titanium through experiments, mean field theory and phase field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athreya, C. N.; Mukilventhan, A.; Suwas, Satyam; Vedantam, Srikanth; Subramanya Sarma, V.

    2018-04-01

    The influence of the mode of deformation on recrystallisation behaviour of Ti was studied by experiments and modelling. Ti samples were deformed through torsion and rolling to the same equivalent strain of 0.5. The deformed samples were annealed at different temperatures for different time durations and the recrystallisation kinetics were compared. Recrystallisation is found to be faster in the rolled samples compared to the torsion deformed samples. This is attributed to the differences in stored energy and number of nuclei per unit area in the two modes of deformation. Considering decay in stored energy during recrystallisation, the grain boundary mobility was estimated through a mean field model. The activation energy for recrystallisation obtained from experiments matched with the activation energy for grain boundary migration obtained from mobility calculation. A multi-phase field model (with mobility estimated from the mean field model as a constitutive input) was used to simulate the kinetics, microstructure and texture evolution. The recrystallisation kinetics and grain size distributions obtained from experiments matched reasonably well with the phase field simulations. The recrystallisation texture predicted through phase field simulations compares well with experiments though few additional texture components are present in simulations. This is attributed to the anisotropy in grain boundary mobility, which is not accounted for in the present study.

  15. A model for the receptive field of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myoung Won; Choi, M Y

    2014-01-01

    Most retina ganglion cells have center-surround receptive fields, where the center may be either ON or OFF while the surround is the opposite. We clarify the functional roles of the receptive field structure, on the basis of the modern theory of natural data processing. It is suggested that the retina shares the principal mechanism and performance of image processing with a video codec in computers, where the antagonism in spatial or temporal receptive fields originates from the orthogonality condition between linear filters for optimal coding of visual signals. We also reveal what visual information is multiplexed across the discharges of an ensemble of ganglion cells. Our theory makes it possible to predict the cross-correlations between ganglion cell spikes, which are optimized for LGN cells to respond accurately and quickly to their receptive fields. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The generalized Fenyes-Nelson model for free scalar field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, M.

    1980-01-01

    The generalized Fenyes-Nelson model of quantum mechanics is applied to the free scalar field. The resulting Markov field is equivalent to the Euclidean Markov field with the times scaled by a common factor which depends on the diffusion parameter. This result is consistent with Guerra's earlier work on stochastic quantization of scalar fields. It suggests a deep connection between Euclidean field theory and the stochastic interpretation of quantum mechanics. The question of Lorentz covariance is also discussed. (orig.)

  17. Force-free field model of ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, K. H.

    2001-03-01

    Due to the nature that the force-free magnetic field, whose current carried by the conducting plasma is everywhere parallel to the magnetic field it generates, is the minimum energy configuration under the constraint of magnetic helicity conservation, ball lightning is considered as a self-organized phenomenon with a plasma fireball immersed in a spherical force-free magnetic field. Since this field does not exert force on the plasma, the plasma pressure, by itself, is in equilibrium with the surrounding environment, and the force-free magnetic field can take on any value without affecting the plasma. Due to this second feature, singular solutions of the magnetic field that are otherwise excluded are allowed, which enable a large amount of energy to be stored to sustain the ball lightning. The singularity is truncated only by the physical limit of current density that a plasma can carry. Scaling the customary soccer-size fireball to larger dimensions could account for day and night sightings of luminous objects in the sky.

  18. String cloud cosmologies for Bianchi type-III models with electromagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, S. K.; Sahu, S. K.; Routray, T. R.

    2008-06-01

    The Saez-Ballester field equations for spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-III cosmological models have been solved for pure geometric cosmic string cloud pervading the universe either in the absence or in presence of electromagnetic field. It has been established here that the model does not survive for geometric cosmic string cloud pervading the universe when there is no electromagnetic field. But in presence of electromagnetic field the model can have plausible solutions fostering the idea that strings forming the surface of the world sheet have to co-exist with electromagnetic field.

  19. Development of a numerical modelling tool for combined near field and far field wave transformations using a coupling of potential flow solvers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbrugghe, Tim; Troch, Peter; Kortenhaus, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    is complex; it is difficult to simulate both near field and far field effects with a single numerical model, with relatively fast computing times. Within this research a numerical tool is developed to model near-field and far-field wave transformations caused by WECs. The tool is based on the coupling...

  20. Updating the CHAOS series of field models using Swarm data and resulting candidate models for IGRF-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    Ten months of data from ESA's Swarm mission, together with recent ground observatory monthly means, are used to update the CHAOS series of geomagnetic field models with a focus on time-changes of the core field. As for previous CHAOS field models quiet-time, night-side, data selection criteria......th order spline representation with knot points spaced at 0.5 year intervals. The resulting field model is able to consistently fit data from six independent low Earth orbit satellites: Oersted, CHAMP, SAC-C and the three Swarm satellites. As an example, we present comparisons of the excellent model...... fit obtained to both the Swarm data and the CHAMP data. The new model also provides a good description of observatory secular variation, capturing rapid field evolution events during the past decade. Maps of the core surface field and its secular variation can already be extracted in the Swarm-era. We...

  1. A Note on Equivalence Among Various Scalar Field Models of Dark Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Jyotirmay Das; Debnath, Ujjal

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we have tried to find out similarities between various available models of scalar field dark energies (e.g., quintessence, k-essence, tachyon, phantom, quintom, dilatonic dark energy, etc). We have defined an equivalence relation from elementary set theory between scalar field models of dark energies and used fundamental ideas from linear algebra to set up our model. Consequently, we have obtained mutually disjoint subsets of scalar field dark energies with similar properties and discussed our observation.

  2. A device for planimetry of magnetic field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, F.; Cassar, I.; Morales, P.; Nogueira, A.

    1992-01-01

    The proper design of a mass, or energy, magnetic spectrograph, requires a prior knowledge of the magnetic field along the ion-beam trajectory, particularly at the magnet's entrance and exit. With such data, a computer program may be developed which would enable us to define the trajectory of a charged particle in the measured field. An electromagnet has been built, having a variable magnetic-gap ranging from zero to six centimeters. This aparatus is able to generate a field of 1 tesla (10 4 gauss) with a magnetic-gap of 2 cm. It has provision for interchangeable edges either flat or curved, to simulate the field that should be used in the future construction of a spectrograph. The electromagnet's coils were built according to a new technique developed by us to facilitate the construction work and which favors heat from inside out. A, X, Y, Z meter was also designed and built which use a Hall detector to measure the 'Z' component of the magnetic field 'Bz' to an accuracy of less than 1 gauss. It provides a direct reading for the spacial position X, Y, Z with a 0.05 milimeters resolution. (Author)

  3. Results of verification and investigation of wind velocity field forecast. Verification of wind velocity field forecast model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Takeshi; Kayano, Mitsunaga; Kikuchi, Hideo; Abe, Takeo; Saga, Kyoji

    1995-01-01

    In Environmental Radioactivity Research Institute, the verification and investigation of the wind velocity field forecast model 'EXPRESS-1' have been carried out since 1991. In fiscal year 1994, as the general analysis, the validity of weather observation data, the local features of wind field, and the validity of the positions of monitoring stations were investigated. The EXPRESS which adopted 500 m mesh so far was improved to 250 m mesh, and the heightening of forecast accuracy was examined, and the comparison with another wind velocity field forecast model 'SPEEDI' was carried out. As the results, there are the places where the correlation with other points of measurement is high and low, and it was found that for the forecast of wind velocity field, by excluding the data of the points with low correlation or installing simplified observation stations to take their data in, the forecast accuracy is improved. The outline of the investigation, the general analysis of weather observation data and the improvements of wind velocity field forecast model and forecast accuracy are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Scaling up from field to region for wind erosion prediction using a field-scale wind erosion model and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobeck, T.M.; Parker, N.C.; Haskell, S.; Guoding, K.

    2000-01-01

    Factors that affect wind erosion such as surface vegetative and other cover, soil properties and surface roughness usually change spatially and temporally at the field-scale to produce important field-scale variations in wind erosion. Accurate estimation of wind erosion when scaling up from fields to regions, while maintaining meaningful field-scale process details, remains a challenge. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of using a field-scale wind erosion model with a geographic information system (GIS) to scale up to regional levels and to quantify the differences in wind erosion estimates produced by different scales of soil mapping used as a data layer in the model. A GIS was used in combination with the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ), a field-scale wind erosion model, to estimate wind erosion for two 50 km2 areas. Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery from 1993 with 30 m resolution was used as a base map. The GIS database layers included land use, soils, and other features such as roads. The major land use was agricultural fields. Data on 1993 crop management for selected fields of each crop type were collected from local government agency offices and used to 'train' the computer to classify land areas by crop and type of irrigation (agroecosystem) using commercially available software. The land area of the agricultural land uses was overestimated by 6.5% in one region (Lubbock County, TX, USA) and underestimated by about 21% in an adjacent region (Terry County, TX, USA). The total estimated wind erosion potential for Terry County was about four times that estimated for adjacent Lubbock County. The difference in potential erosion among the counties was attributed to regional differences in surface soil texture. In a comparison of different soil map scales in Terry County, the generalised soil map had over 20% more of the land area and over 15% greater erosion potential in loamy sand soils than did the detailed soil map. As

  5. Constraints on Interacting Scalars in 2T Field Theory and No Scale Models in 1T Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bars, Itzhak

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I determine the general form of the physical and mathematical restrictions that arise on the interactions of gravity and scalar fields in the 2T field theory setting, in d+2 dimensions, as well as in the emerging shadows in d dimensions. These constraints on scalar fields follow from an underlying Sp(2,R) gauge symmetry in phase space. Determining these general constraints provides a basis for the construction of 2T supergravity, as well as physical applications in 1T-field theory, that are discussed briefly here, and more detail elsewhere. In particular, no scale models that lead to a vanishing cosmological constant at the classical level emerge naturally in this setting.

  6. A note on moving average models for Gaussian random fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Linda Vadgård; Thorarinsdottir, Thordis L.

    basis, a general modeling framework which includes several types of non-Gaussian models. We propose a new one-parameter spatial correlation model which arises from a power kernel and show that the associated Hausdorff dimension of the sample paths can take any value between 2 and 3. As a result...

  7. TESTING MAGNETIC FIELD MODELS FOR THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR L1527

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J. A.; Li, Z.-Y.; Hull, C. L. H.; Plambeck, R. L.; Kwon, W.; Crutcher, R. M.; Looney, L. W.; Novak, G.; Chapman, N. L.; Matthews, B. C.; Stephens, I. W.; Tobin, J. J.; Jones, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    For the Class 0 protostar L1527 we compare 131 polarization vectors from SCUPOL/JCMT, SHARP/CSO, and TADPOL/CARMA observations with the corresponding model polarization vectors of four ideal-MHD, nonturbulent, cloud core collapse models. These four models differ by their initial magnetic fields before collapse; two initially have aligned fields (strong and weak) and two initially have orthogonal fields (strong and weak) with respect to the rotation axis of the L1527 core. Only the initial weak orthogonal field model produces the observed circumstellar disk within L1527. This is a characteristic of nearly all ideal-MHD, nonturbulent, core collapse models. In this paper we test whether this weak orthogonal model also has the best agreement between its magnetic field structure and that inferred from the polarimetry observations of L1527. We found that this is not the case; based on the polarimetry observations, the most favored model of the four is the weak aligned model. However, this model does not produce a circumstellar disk, so our result implies that a nonturbulent, ideal-MHD global collapse model probably does not represent the core collapse that has occurred in L1527. Our study also illustrates the importance of using polarization vectors covering a large area of a cloud core to determine the initial magnetic field orientation before collapse; the inner core magnetic field structure can be highly altered by a collapse, and so measurements from this region alone can give unreliable estimates of the initial field configuration before collapse

  8. Algebraic structure of cohomological field theory models and equivariant cohomology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stora, R.; Thuillier, F.; Wallet, J.Ch.

    1994-01-01

    The definition of observables within conventional gauge theories is settled by general consensus. Within cohomological theories considered as gauge theories of an exotic type, that question has a much less obvious answer. It is shown here that in most cases these theories are best defined in terms of equivariant cohomologies both at the field level and at the level of observables. (author). 21 refs

  9. New exact models for anisotropic matter with electric field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jefta M Sunzu

    2017-09-05

    Sep 5, 2017 ... elementary functions. The graphical plots generated for the matter variables and the electric field are well behaved. We also generate relativistic stellar masses consistent with observations. Keywords. Einstein–Maxwell equations; anisotropy; charged matter; equation of state. PACS Nos 04.20.Jb; 04.40.

  10. Mesoscale Modelling of Block Copolymers under External Fields.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyakhova, Kateryna S.

    2005-01-01

    A remarkable feature of block copolymer systems is their ability to self-assemble into a variety of ordered structures with domain sizes in the mesoscale range. One of the open questions is the dynamics of structure formation, which can be highly dependent on external fields often present in

  11. Magnetism of insulator phase in SrRu1-x Mn x O3 (0.4≤x≤0.6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanaka, H.; Satoh, C.; Yokoyama, M.; Kitazawa, H.; Suzuki, O.; Kido, G.; Bando, H.; Nishihara, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Temperature dependence of magnetization was measured in the insulator phase of SrRu 1- x Mn x O 3 (0.4≤x≤0.6) at magnetic fields up to 15 T. For the sample with x=0.6, the peak of the magnetization changes from 210 to 250 K with increasing magnetic field up to 5 T and slightly decreases above it. The paramagnetic Curie-Weiss temperature is positive (180 K). The anti-ferromagnetic Neel temperature obtained from the neutron diffraction experiment agrees with the peak temperature measured in high magnetic fields. Discussion of the magnetization peak in high and low magnetic fields is given

  12. Modeling the wind-fields of accidental releases with an operational regional forecast model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albritton, J.R.; Lee, R.L.; Sugiyama, G.

    1995-01-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency preparedness and response organization supported primarily by the Departments of Energy and Defense. ARAC can provide real-time assessments of atmospheric releases of radioactive materials at any location in the world. ARAC uses robust three-dimensional atmospheric transport and dispersion models, extensive geophysical and dose-factor databases, meteorological data-acquisition systems, and an experienced staff. Although it was originally conceived and developed as an emergency response and assessment service for nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has been adapted to also simulate non-radiological hazardous releases. For example, in 1991 ARAC responded to three major events: the oil fires in Kuwait, the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, and the herbicide spill into the upper Sacramento River in California. ARAC's operational simulation system, includes two three-dimensional finite-difference models: a diagnostic wind-field scheme, and a Lagrangian particle-in-cell transport and dispersion scheme. The meteorological component of ARAC's real-time response system employs models using real-time data from all available stations near the accident site to generate a wind-field for input to the transport and dispersion model. Here we report on simulation studies of past and potential release sites to show that even in the absence of local meteorological observational data, readily available gridded analysis and forecast data and a prognostic model, the Navy Operational Regional Atmospheric Prediction System, applied at an appropriate grid resolution can successfully simulate complex local flows

  13. On open and closed field line regions in Tsyganenko's field model and their possible associations with horse collar auroras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Craven, J.D.; Frank, L.A.; Elphinstone, R.D.; Stern, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    Using the empirical Tsyganenko (1987) long model as a prime example of a megnetospheric field model, the authors have attempted to identify the boundary between open and closed field lines. They define as closed all field lines that are connested with the Earth at both ends and cross the equatorial plane earthward of x = -70 R E , the tailward validity limit of the Tsyganenko model. They find that the form of the open/closed boundary at the Earth's surface, identified with the polar cap boundary, can exhibit the arrowhead shape, pointed toward the Sun, observed in horse collar auroras (Hones et al., 1989). The polar cap size in the Tsyganenko model increases with increasing K p values, and it becomes rounder and less pointed. The superposition of a net B y field, which is the expected consequence of an IMF B y , rotates the polar cap pattern and, for larger values, degrades the arrowhead shape, resulting in polar cap configurations consistent with known asymmetries in the aurora. The pointedness of the polar cap shape also diminishes or even completely disappears if the low-latitude magnetopause is assumed open and located considerably inside of the outermost magnetic flux surface in the Tsyganenko model. The arrowhead shape of the polar cap is found to be associated with a strong increase of B z from midnight toward the tail flanks, which is observed independently, and is possibly related to the NBZ field-aligned current system, observed during quiet times and strongly northward IMF B z . The larger B z values near the flanks of the tail cause more magnetic flux to close through these regions than through the midnight equatorial region

  14. 3-dimensional computer model of electrospinning multicapillary unit used for electrostatic field analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firych-Nowacka, Anna; Smółka, Krzysztof; Wiak, Sławomir; Gliścińska, Eulalia; Krucińska, Izabella; Chrzanowski, Michał

    2017-12-01

    Electrospinning is an experimental method of the polymer super thin fibres formation using the electrostatic field. The distribution of electrostatic field affects the effectiveness of the electrospinning. In order to analyse the electrostatic field for given technological parameters the 3-D computer model of an electrospinning device must be applied.

  15. Modeling Callisto's Ionosphere, Airglow and Magnetic Field Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Hartkorn, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Previous observations of the Galileo spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope indicate that Callisto possesses a neutral atmosphere which is mostly composed of O2 and additionally contains H2O and CO2. The first aim of our study is to constrain density and structure of the atmospheric O2. Based on existent observations and findings, we construct a phenomenological model of Callisto's atmosphere. Then, we use this atmosphere model as input information for an ionosphere model, which ...

  16. Enabling full-field physics-based optical proximity correction via dynamic model generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael; Clifford, Chris; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Fenger, Germain; Adam, Kostas

    2017-07-01

    As extreme ultraviolet lithography becomes closer to reality for high volume production, its peculiar modeling challenges related to both inter and intrafield effects have necessitated building an optical proximity correction (OPC) infrastructure that operates with field position dependency. Previous state-of-the-art approaches to modeling field dependency used piecewise constant models where static input models are assigned to specific x/y-positions within the field. OPC and simulation could assign the proper static model based on simulation-level placement. However, in the realm of 7 and 5 nm feature sizes, small discontinuities in OPC from piecewise constant model changes can cause unacceptable levels of edge placement errors. The introduction of dynamic model generation (DMG) can be shown to effectively avoid these dislocations by providing unique mask and optical models per simulation region, allowing a near continuum of models through the field. DMG allows unique models for electromagnetic field, apodization, aberrations, etc. to vary through the entire field and provides a capability to precisely and accurately model systematic field signatures.

  17. A field-theoretic approach to Spin Foam models in Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    We present an introduction to Group Field Theory models, motivating them on the basis of their relationship with discretized BF models of gravity. We derive the Feynmann rules and compute quantum corrections in the coherent states basis.

  18. Cognitive models of choice: comparing decision field theory to the proportional difference model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg; González-Vallejo, Claudia

    2009-07-01

    People often face preferential decisions under risk. To further our understanding of the cognitive processes underlying these preferential choices, two prominent cognitive models, decision field theory (DFT; Busemeyer & Townsend, 1993) and the proportional difference model (PD; González-Vallejo, 2002), were rigorously tested against each other. In two consecutive experiments, the participants repeatedly had to choose between monetary gambles. The first experiment provided the reference to estimate the models' free parameters. From these estimations, new gamble pairs were generated for the second experiment such that the two models made maximally divergent predictions. In the first experiment, both models explained the data equally well. However, in the second generalization experiment, the participants' choices were much closer to the predictions of DFT. The results indicate that the stochastic process assumed by DFT, in which evidence in favor of or against each option accumulates over time, described people's choice behavior better than the trade-offs between proportional differences assumed by PD. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  19. Interacting viscous ghost tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models of dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K; Fahimi, K

    2013-01-01

    We study the correspondence between the interacting viscous ghost dark energy model with the tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models in the framework of Einstein gravity. We consider a spatially non-flat FRW universe filled with interacting viscous ghost dark energy and dark matter. We reconstruct both the dynamics and potential of these scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting viscous ghost dark energy model, which can describe the accelerated expansion of the universe. Our numerical results show that the interaction and viscosity have opposite effects on the evolutionary properties of the ghost scalar field models. (paper)

  20. Modeling transducer impulse responses for predicting calibrated pressure pulses with the ultrasound simulation program Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    FIELD II is a simulation software capable of predicting the field pressure in front of transducers having any complicated geometry. A calibrated prediction with this program is, however, dependent on an exact voltage-to-surface acceleration impulse response of the transducer. Such impulse response...... is not calculated by FIELD II. This work investigates the usability of combining a one-dimensional multilayer transducer modeling principle with the FIELD II software. Multilayer here refers to a transducer composed of several material layers. Measurements of pressure and current from Pz27 piezoceramic disks...... transducer model and the FIELD II software in combination give good agreement with measurements....

  1. A Plane-Symmetric Inhomogeneous Cosmological Model of Perfect Fluid Distribution with Electromagnetic Field I

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, Anirudh; Singh, P. K.; Yadav, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    A plane-symmetric inhomogeneous cosmological model of perfect fluid distribution with electro-magnetic field is obtained. The source of the magnetic field is due to an electric current produced along the z-axis. $F_{12}$ is the non-vanishing component of electromagnetic field tensor. To get a deterministic solution, we assume the free gravitational field is Petrov type-II non-degenerate. The behaviour of the electro-magnetic field tensor together with some physical aspects of the model are al...

  2. Modeling and characterization of charged particle trajectories in an oscillating magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawan, Dani; Viridi, Sparisoma; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Latief, Fourier Dzar Eljabbar; Novitrian

    2015-04-01

    A constant magnetic field has frequently been discussed and has been known that it can cause a charged particle to form interesting trajectories such as cycloid and helix in presence of electric field, but a changing magnetic field is rarely discussed. In this work, modeling and characterization of charged particle trajectories in oscillating magnetic field is reported. The modeling is performed using Euler method with speed corrector. The result shows that there are two types of trajectory patterns that will recur for every 180nT0 (n = 0, 1, 2, ..) in increasing of magnetic field oscillation period, where T0 is about 6.25 × 10-7 s.

  3. Weak-field limit of Kaluza-Klein models with spherically symmetric static scalar field. Observational constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuk, Alexander [The International Center of Future Science of the Jilin University, Changchun City (China); Odessa National University, Astronomical Observatory, Odessa (Ukraine); Chopovsky, Alexey; Fakhr, Seyed Hossein [Odessa National University, Astronomical Observatory, Odessa (Ukraine); Shulga, Valerii [The International Center of Future Science of the Jilin University, Changchun City (China); Institut of Radio Astronomy of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkov (Ukraine); Wei, Han [The International Center of Future Science of the Jilin University, Changchun City (China)

    2017-11-15

    In a multidimensional Kaluza-Klein model with Ricci-flat internal space, we study the gravitational field in the weak-field limit. This field is created by two coupled sources. First, this is a point-like massive body which has a dust-like equation of state in the external space and an arbitrary parameter Ω of equation of state in the internal space. The second source is a static spherically symmetric massive scalar field centered at the origin where the point-like massive body is. The found perturbed metric coefficients are used to calculate the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameter γ. We define under which conditions γ can be very close to unity in accordance with the relativistic gravitational tests in the solar system. This can take place for both massive or massless scalar fields. For example, to have γ ∼ 1 in the solar system, the mass of scalar field should be μ >or similar 5.05 x 10{sup -49} g ∝ 2.83 x 10{sup -16} eV. In all cases, we arrive at the same conclusion that to be in agreement with the relativistic gravitational tests, the gravitating mass should have tension: Ω = -1/2. (orig.)

  4. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Osteoporosis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaowei, Yang; Liming, Wang; Guan, Z. C.; Yaou, Zhang; Xiangpeng, Wang

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the preventive effects and long term effects of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs), generated by circular coils and pulsed electromagnetic fields stimulators, on osteoporosis in bilaterally ovariectomized rats. In preventive experiment, thirty three-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three different groups: sham (SHAM), ovariectomy (OVX), PEMFs stimulation (PEMFs). All rats were subjected to bilaterally ovariectomy except those in SHAM group. The PEMFs group was exposed to pulsed electromagnetic fields with frequency 15 Hz, peak magnetic induction density 2.2mT and exposure time 2 hours per day. The bone mineral density (BMD) of vertebra and left femur were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at eighth week, twelfth week and sixteenth week after surgery. In long term effects experiment, forty four rats were randomly divided into sham (14 rats, SHAM), ovariectomy group (10 rats, OVX), 15Hz PEMFs group(10 rats, 15Hz) and 30Hz PEMFs group(10 rats, 30Hz) at twenty-sixth week after surgery. Rats in PEMFs groups were stimulated sixteen weeks. In preventive experiment, the Corrected BMD of vertebra and femur was significantly higher than that of OVX group after 16 weeks (P<0.001, P<0.001 respectively). In long term effects experiment, the vertebral BMD of 15Hz PEMFs group and 30Hz PEMFs group was significantly higher than that of OVX groups (P<0.01, P<0.05 respectively). The experimental results demonstrated that extremely low intensity, low frequency, single pulsed electromagnetic fields significantly slowed down the loss of corrected vertebral and femoral BMD in bilaterally ovariectomized rats and suggest that PEMFs may be beneficial in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  5. Magnetic field and radiative transfer modelling of a quiescent prominence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gunár, S.; Schwartz, Pavol; Dudík, J.; Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, Petr; Jurčák, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 567, July (2014), A123/1-A123/16 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0906; GA ČR GAP209/12/0287 Grant - others:SAV(SK) VEGA2/0108/12 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun: filaments * prominence * magnetic fields Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  6. Cosmological model of interacting phantom and Yang–Mills fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (3) where the first invariant of Yang–Mills field I = Fa αβ. Faαβ. We assume that the Universe is described by a FRW geometry with a scale factor a(t) and the sign of space curvature k = +1, 0, −1. The nontrivial solution for the YM equation obtained in [30] has such a valuable feature that the YM invariant built on this solution ...

  7. Effective field treatment of the annealed bond-dilute transverse Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P.R.; Sa Barreto, F.C. de

    1983-01-01

    The dilution of the spin-1/2 transverse Ising Model is studied by means of an effective field type treatment based on an extension of Callen's relation to the present model. The thermodynamics of the diluted model is obtained and the results are shown to be an improvement over the standard mean field treatment. The results are also compared with the Monte Carlo calculation for the spin-infinite transverse Ising Model. (Author) [pt

  8. Replication/Implementation Model Field Test: Project SHAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. M.; Young, Rufus, Jr.

    This document reports findings of a study that evaluated the implementation model developed for Project SHAL, an "effective schools" reform model. Implemented in 1980 in Area I of the St. Louis Public School District (Missouri), Project SHAL is an acronym for the four original participating schools--Stowe, Hempstead, Arlington, and…

  9. Data Modeling for Measurements in the Metrology and Testing Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Pavese, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Offers a comprehensive set of modeling methods for data and uncertainty analysis. This work develops methods and computational tools to address general models that arise in practice, allowing for a more valid treatment of calibration and test data and providing an understanding of complex situations in measurement science

  10. Theory and Practice: An Integrative Model Linking Class and Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Joan Granucci; Cooper, Marlene

    2006-01-01

    Social work has evolved over the years taking on the challenges of the times. The profession now espouses a breadth of theoretical approaches and treatment modalities. We have developed a model to help graduate social work students master the skill of integrating theory and social work practice. The Integrative Model has five components: (l) The…

  11. Benchmark Modeling of the Near-Field and Far-Field Wave Effects of Wave Energy Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E; Haller, Merrick C; Ozkan-Haller, H Tuba

    2013-01-26

    This project is an industry-led partnership between Columbia Power Technologies and Oregon State University that will perform benchmark laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the near-field and far-field impacts of wave scattering from an array of wave energy devices. These benchmark experimental observations will help to fill a gaping hole in our present knowledge of the near-field effects of multiple, floating wave energy converters and are a critical requirement for estimating the potential far-field environmental effects of wave energy arrays. The experiments will be performed at the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (Oregon State University) and will utilize an array of newly developed Buoys' that are realistic, lab-scale floating power converters. The array of Buoys will be subjected to realistic, directional wave forcing (1:33 scale) that will approximate the expected conditions (waves and water depths) to be found off the Central Oregon Coast. Experimental observations will include comprehensive in-situ wave and current measurements as well as a suite of novel optical measurements. These new optical capabilities will include imaging of the 3D wave scattering using a binocular stereo camera system, as well as 3D device motion tracking using a newly acquired LED system. These observing systems will capture the 3D motion history of individual Buoys as well as resolve the 3D scattered wave field; thus resolving the constructive and destructive wave interference patterns produced by the array at high resolution. These data combined with the device motion tracking will provide necessary information for array design in order to balance array performance with the mitigation of far-field impacts. As a benchmark data set, these data will be an important resource for testing of models for wave/buoy interactions, buoy performance, and far-field effects on wave and current patterns due to the presence of arrays. Under the proposed project we will initiate

  12. Magnetic field measurements and data acquisition of a model magnet for the B-factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wenming; Endo, Kuninori

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe magnetic field measurements and the field data-acquisition system used to measure the model magnet for the B-factory booster. The results of the measurements indicate that the method adopted here is good for acquiring field data. This type of measurement is highly accurate and involves almost no temperature coefficient. The instrument is used not only for ac, but also dc field measurements. It is especially good for field measurements in the case of simultaneous ac and dc field excitation. (author)

  13. Fuzzy Universal Model Approximator for Distributed Solar Collector Field Control

    KAUST Repository

    Elmetennani, Shahrazed

    2014-07-01

    This paper deals with the control of concentrating parabolic solar collectors by forcing the outlet oil temperature to track a set reference. A fuzzy universal approximate model is introduced in order to accurately reproduce the behavior of the system dynamics. The proposed model is a low order state space representation derived from the partial differential equation describing the oil temperature evolution using fuzzy transform theory. The resulting set of ordinary differential equations simplifies the system analysis and the control law design and is suitable for real time control implementation. Simulation results show good performance of the proposed model.

  14. Phase-field modeling of unstable infiltration coupled with evapotranspiration and stochastic rainfall in heterogeneous field soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beljadid, A.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    Feedbacks between climate, soil moisture and vegetation are essential in the sustainability of arid and semiarid ecosystems. Models of the water balance in ecohydrology estimate deep drainage by coupling rainfall, water flow and evapotranspiration in the vadose zone. When rainfall water infiltrates into dry soil, a hydrodynamic instability leads to the onset of columnar preferential flow paths, or fingers (Hill and Parlange, 1972; Glass et al., 1989; Ritsema et al., 1998). The stability of infiltration fronts varies with the properties of the soil and the infiltrating flux; in general, fingering is the dominant mode of infiltration for medium- and coarse-textured dry soils, and low to intermediate infiltration rates (Glass et al., 1989). Here, we develop a multiphase flow model that is able to describe gravity fingering during infiltration in heterogeneous soils, based on the phase-field methodology (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, 2008, 2009). We design the free energy of the system such that it leads to a nonlinear square saturation-gradient term, which leads to the formation of "compactons" and a quantitative agreement with laboratory experiments in heterogeneous media. We apply this model to numerically investigate the impact of stochastic rainfall, evapotranspiration and soil heterogeneity on unsaturated flow. From our analysis, we develop a quantitative understanding of the field soil conditions and climatic conditions under which gravity fingering is expected to promote deep drainage, potentially increasing the resilience of water-stressed ecosystems, moderating their response to climate variability. Keywords: Infiltration, gravity fingering, phase-field model, unsaturated soil, heterogeneity.

  15. Model and Full Scale Predictions of a Carrier Flow Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorski, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    .... These calculations are for a bare hull with skeg, bilge keels and outboard propeller shaft. The calculations indicate there are extensive differences between the model and full scale wakes entering the propeller disks...

  16. Seismically integrated geologic modelling: Guntong Field, Malay Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvert, Craig S.; Bhuyan, K.; Sterling, J. Helwick; Hill, Rob E.; Hubbard, R. Scott; Khare, Vijay; Wahrmund, Leslie A.; Wang, Gann-Shyong

    1998-12-31

    This presentation relates to a research project on offshore seismically reservoir modelling. The goal of the project was to develop and test a process for interpreting reservoir properties from 3-D seismic data and for integrating these data into the building of 3-D geologic models that would be suitable for use in flow simulation studies. The project produced a 3-D geologic model for three reservoir intervals and three predominantly non-reservoir intervals. Each reservoir interval was subdivided into faces that were determined by integrating core, well log, and seismic interpretations. predictions of porosity and lithology used in building the geologic model were made using seismic attributes calculated from acoustic impedance data. 8 figs.

  17. Lyapunov exponent and criticality in the Hamiltonian mean field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, L. H. Miranda; Amato, M. A.; Rocha Filho, T. M.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the dependence of the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) of an N-particle self-gravitating ring model at equilibrium with respect to the number of particles and its dependence on energy. This model has a continuous phase-transition from a ferromagnetic to homogeneous phase, and we numerically confirm with large scale simulations the existence of a critical exponent associated to the LLE, although at variance with the theoretical estimate. The existence of strong chaos in the magnetized state evidenced by a positive Lyapunov exponent is explained by the coupling of individual particle oscillations to the diffusive motion of the center of mass of the system and also results in a change of the scaling of the LLE with the number of particles. We also discuss thoroughly for the model the validity and limits of the approximations made by a geometrical model for their analytic estimate.

  18. Modelling of Particles Aglomeration in the Acoustic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Grinbergienė

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article includes particles agglomeration principles analysis. Forces describes with the equations operating particle of its moving in the vibes. It presents equations of particle movement speed and trajectory estimation. It have performed agglomerations simulation of two identical (5 m and 5 m and different (5 m and 10 m diameters particles in the acoustic field using the discrete element method (DEM. The results showed that the two equal diameter particle agglomeration gravity affects at 8 kHz acoustic signal frequency.

  19. Parallel modeling of the electric field distribution in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    De Marco, Tommaso

    2011-01-01

    The term "Brain Imaging" identi�es a set of techniques to analyze the structure and/or functional behavior of the brain in normal and/or pathological situations. These techniques are largely used in the study of brain activity. In addition to clinical usage, analysis of brain activity is gaining popularity in others recent �fields, i.e. Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and the study of cognitive processes. In this context, usage of classical solutions (e.g. f MRI, PET-CT) could be unfeasib...

  20. Substance-field Model for Functional Pneumatic Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z. G.; Yang, D. Y.; Shen, W. D.; Liu, T. T.

    2017-07-01

    The Substance-field analysis is put forward. The functional analysis method is studied to find out the problem, and an improved algorithm is put forward. The internal combustion engine is taken as an example, the harmful function is recognized, and is improved, i.e, high pressure gas is introduced to remove polluted air. The working principle of pneumatic engine is described, the thermodynamic engineering is analyzed, the energy release amounts are analyzed in the isothermal, polymorphism and adiabatic processes. It is concluded that, the isothermal process releases the most energy than the others. The expansion process of the pneumatic engine should be as close as possible to the isothermal process.

  1. Sustainability analysis of the Ahuachapan geothermal field: management and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monterrosa, Manuel; Montalvo Lopez, Francisco E. [LaGeo S.A. de C.V., Reservoir Engineering, 15 Av. Sur, Colonia Utila, Santa Tecla, La Libertad (El Salvador)

    2010-12-15

    The Ahuachapan geothermal field (AGF) is located in north western El Salvador. To date, 53 wells (20 producers and 8 injectors) have been drilled in the Ahuachapan geothermal field and the adjacent Chipilapa area. Over the past 33 years, 550 Mtonnes have been extracted from the reservoir, and the reservoir pressure has declined by more than 15 bars. By 1985, the large pressure drawdown due to over-exploitation of the resource reduced the power generation capacity to only 45 MW{sub e}. Several activities were carried out in the period 1997-2005 as part of ''stabilization'' and ''optimization'' projects to increase the electric energy generation to 85 MW{sub e}, with a total mass extraction of 850 kg/s. LaGeo is assessing the sustainability of geothermal reservoir utilization. Preliminary results indicate the planned power production and mass extraction (95 MW, 900 kg/s) cannot be sustained for more than 50 years using current power plant technology. To sustain the exploitation for at least 100 years, the following changes should be implemented: (1) improve the gathering system using large-diameter steam pipelines, (2) expand the exploitation area to the southeast and southwest, and (3) reduce the inlet pressure of the turbines to less than 4 bars. (author)

  2. Classical-field model of the hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashkovskiy, Sergey A.

    2017-06-01

    It is shown that all of the basic properties of the hydrogen atom can be consistently described in terms of classical electrodynamics if instead of considering the electron to be a particle, we consider an electrically charged classical wave field—an "electron wave"—which is held by the electrostatic field of the proton. It is shown that quantum mechanics must be considered not as a theory of particles but as a classical field theory in the spirit of classical electrodynamics. In this case, we are not faced with difficulties in interpreting the results of the theory. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, all of the well-known regularities of the spontaneous emission of the hydrogen atom are obtained, which is usually derived in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that there are no discrete states and discrete energy levels of the atom: the energy of the atom and its states change continuously. An explanation of the conventional corpuscular-statistical interpretation of atomic phenomena is given. It is shown that this explanation is only a misinterpretation of continuous deterministic processes. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation is obtained, which accounts for the inverse action of self-electromagnetic radiation of the electron wave and completely describes the spontaneous emissions of an atom.

  3. Modeling approaches in avian conservation and the role of field biologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beissinger, Steven R.; Walters, J.R.; Catanzaro, D.G.; Smith, Kimberly G.; Dunning, J.B.; Haig, Susan M.; Noon, Barry; Stith, Bradley M.

    2006-01-01

    This review grew out of our realization that models play an increasingly important role in conservation but are rarely used in the research of most avian biologists. Modelers are creating models that are more complex and mechanistic and that can incorporate more of the knowledge acquired by field biologists. Such models require field biologists to provide more specific information, larger sample sizes, and sometimes new kinds of data, such as habitat-specific demography and dispersal information. Field biologists need to support model development by testing key model assumptions and validating models. The best conservation decisions will occur where cooperative interaction enables field biologists, modelers, statisticians, and managers to contribute effectively. We begin by discussing the general form of ecological models—heuristic or mechanistic, "scientific" or statistical—and then highlight the structure, strengths, weaknesses, and applications of six types of models commonly used in avian conservation: (1) deterministic single-population matrix models, (2) stochastic population viability analysis (PVA) models for single populations, (3) metapopulation models, (4) spatially explicit models, (5) genetic models, and (6) species distribution models. We end by considering their unique attributes, determining whether the assumptions that underlie the structure are valid, and testing the ability of the model to predict the future correctly.

  4. Switching Characteristics and High-Temperature Dielectric Relaxation Behaviours of Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)0.91Ti0.09O₃ Single Crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi; Tang, Xingui; Jiang, Yanping; Liu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Tianfu; Li, Wenhua

    2017-03-28

    This work evaluated the resistance switching characteristics in the (100)-oriented Pb(Zn 1/3 Nb 2/3 ) 0.91 Ti 0.09 O₃ (PZNT) single crystal. The current hysteresis can be closely related to the ferroelectric polarization and we provided a possible explanation using a model about oxygen vacancies to analyze the mechanism of switching. The obvious frequency dispersion of the relative permittivity signified the relaxer-type behavior of the sample. The value of the relaxation parameter γ = 1.48 was estimated from the linear fit of the modified Curie-Weiss law, indicating the relaxer nature. High-temperature dielectric relaxation behaviors were revealed in the temperature region of 400-650 °C. In addition, under the measuring frequency of 10 kHz, ε r was tunable by changing the electric field and the largest tunability of ε r reached 14.78%. At room temperature, the high pyroelectric coefficient and detectivity figure of merit were reported.

  5. Topological-Sector Fluctuations and Curie-Law Crossover in Spin Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. C. Jaubert

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available At low temperatures, a spin ice enters a Coulomb phase—a state with algebraic correlations and topologically constrained spin configurations. We show how analytical and numerical approaches for model spin-ice systems reveal a crossover between two Curie laws. One of these laws characterizes the high-temperature paramagnetic regime, while the other, which we call the “spin-liquid Curie law,” characterizes the low-temperature Coulomb-phase regime, which provides implicit evidence that the topological sector fluctuates. We compare our theory with experiment for Ho_{2}Ti_{2}O_{7}, where this process leads to a nonstandard temperature evolution of the bulk susceptibility and the wave-vector-dependent magnetic susceptibility, as measured by neutron scattering. Theory and experiment agree for bulk quantities and at large scattering wave vectors, but differences at small wave vectors indicate that the classical spin-ice states are not equally populated at low temperatures. More generally, the crossover appears to be a generic property of the emergent gauge field for a classical spin liquid, and it sheds light on the experimental difficulty of measuring a precise Curie-Weiss temperature in frustrated materials. The susceptibility at finite wave vectors is shown to be a local probe of fluctuations among topological sectors on varying length scales.

  6. LRS Bianchi Type II Massive String Cosmological Models with Magnetic Field in Lyra's Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bianchi type II massive string cosmological models with magnetic field and time dependent gauge function ( in the frame work of Lyra's geometry are investigated. The magnetic field is in -plane. To get the deterministic solution, we have assumed that the shear ( is proportional to the expansion (. This leads to , where and are metric potentials and is a constant. We find that the models start with a big bang at initial singularity and expansion decreases due to lapse of time. The anisotropy is maintained throughout but the model isotropizes when . The physical and geometrical aspects of the model in the presence and absence of magnetic field are also discussed.

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON MAIN SOLVENCY ASSESSMENT MODELS FOR INSURANCE FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Nicoleta SAHLIAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the recent financial crisis of insurance domain, there were imposed new aspects that have to be taken into account concerning the risks management and surveillance activity. The insurance societies could develop internal models in order to determine the minimum capital requirement imposed by the new regulations that are to be adopted on 1 January 2016. In this respect, the purpose of this research paper is to offer a real presentation and comparing with the main solvency regulation systems used worldwide, the accent being on their common characteristics and current tendencies. Thereby, we would like to offer a better understanding of the similarities and differences between the existent solvency regimes in order to develop the best regime of solvency for Romania within the Solvency II project. The study will show that there are clear differences between the existent Solvency I regime and the new approaches based on risk and will also point out the fact that even the key principles supporting the new solvency regimes are convergent, there are a lot of approaches for the application of these principles. In this context, the question we would try to find the answer is "how could the global solvency models be useful for the financial surveillance authority of Romania for the implementation of general model and for the development of internal solvency models according to the requirements of Solvency II" and "which would be the requirements for the implementation of this type of approach?". This thing makes the analysis of solvency models an interesting exercise.

  8. A hybrid analytical model for open-circuit field calculation of multilayer interior permanent magnet machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhen [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xia, Changliang [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Engineering Center of Electric Machine System Design and Control, Tianjin 300387 (China); Yan, Yan, E-mail: yanyan@tju.edu.cn [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Geng, Qiang [Tianjin Engineering Center of Electric Machine System Design and Control, Tianjin 300387 (China); Shi, Tingna [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid analytical model is developed for field calculation of multilayer IPM machines. • The rotor magnetic field is calculated by the magnetic equivalent circuit method. • The field in the stator and air-gap is calculated by subdomain technique. • The magnetic scalar potential on rotor surface is modeled as trapezoidal distribution. - Abstract: Due to the complicated rotor structure and nonlinear saturation of rotor bridges, it is difficult to build a fast and accurate analytical field calculation model for multilayer interior permanent magnet (IPM) machines. In this paper, a hybrid analytical model suitable for the open-circuit field calculation of multilayer IPM machines is proposed by coupling the magnetic equivalent circuit (MEC) method and the subdomain technique. In the proposed analytical model, the rotor magnetic field is calculated by the MEC method based on the Kirchhoff’s law, while the field in the stator slot, slot opening and air-gap is calculated by subdomain technique based on the Maxwell’s equation. To solve the whole field distribution of the multilayer IPM machines, the coupled boundary conditions on the rotor surface are deduced for the coupling of the rotor MEC and the analytical field distribution of the stator slot, slot opening and air-gap. The hybrid analytical model can be used to calculate the open-circuit air-gap field distribution, back electromotive force (EMF) and cogging torque of multilayer IPM machines. Compared with finite element analysis (FEA), it has the advantages of faster modeling, less computation source occupying and shorter time consuming, and meanwhile achieves the approximate accuracy. The analytical model is helpful and applicable for the open-circuit field calculation of multilayer IPM machines with any size and pole/slot number combination.

  9. Modelling the Grimsel migration field experiments at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heer, W.

    1997-01-01

    For several years tracer migration experiments have been performed at Nagra's Grimsel Test Site as a joint undertaking of Nagra, PNC and PSI. The aims of modelling the migration experiments are (1) to better understand the nuclide transport through crystalline rock; (2) to gain information on validity of methods and correlating parameters; (3) to improve models for safety assessments. The PSI modelling results, presented here, show a consistent picture for the investigated tracers (the non-sorbing uranine, the weakly sorbing sodium, the moderately sorbing strontium and the more strongly sorbing cesium). They represent an important step in building up confidence in safety assessments for radioactive waste repositories. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs

  10. Stochastic forecasting of the geomagnetic field from the COV-OBS.x1 geomagnetic field model, and candidate models for IGRF-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Barrois, Olivier; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We present the geomagnetic field model COV-OBS.x1, covering 1840 to 2020, from which have been derived candidate models for the IGRF-12. Towards the most recent epochs, it is primarily constrained by first differences of observatory annual means and measurements from the Oersted, Champ, and Swarm...... filter algorithm. We show that the envelope of forecasts includes the observed secular variation of the geomagnetic field over 5-year intervals, even in the case of rapid changes. In a purpose of testing hypotheses about the core dynamics, this prototype method could be implemented to build the ‘state...... zero’ of the ability to forecast the geomagnetic field, by measuring what can be predicted when no deterministic physics is incorporated into the dynamical model....

  11. Impact Of GOCE On The Nordic Gravity Field Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yidiz, Hasan; Forsberg, René; Tscherning, C. C.

    2011-01-01

    GOCE level-2 Tzz and Txx gravity gradients at satellite altitude are used in combination as input data to predict surface free air gravity anomalies over the Nordic region using Least Square Collocation. We test the performance of using covariance functions created separately from Tzz gradients a...... Surface model, both the NKG-2004 quasi-geoid model of the Nordic and Baltic Area and the one obtained using second generation GOCE spherical harmonic coefficients based on time-wise method can successfully reproduce the higher level of the Baltic Sea relative to the Atlantic Ocean....

  12. Fermion: field nontopological solitons. II. Models for hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedberg, R.; Lee, T.D.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility, and its consequences, are examined that in a relativistic local field theory, consisting of color quarks q, scalar gluon sigma, color gauge field V/sub mu/ and color Higgs field phi, the mass of the soliton solution may be much lower than any mass of the plane wave solutions; i.e., m/sub q/ the quark mass, m/sub sigma/ the gluon mass, etc. There appears a rather clean separation between the physics of these low mass solitons and that of the high energy excitations, in the range of m/sub q/ and m/sub sigma/, provided that the parameters xi identical with (μ/m/sub q/) 2 and eta identical with μ/m/sub sigma/ are both much less than 1, where μ is an overall low energy scale appropriate for the solitons (but the ratio eta/xi is assumed to be O(1), though otherwise arbitrary). Under very general assumptions, it is shown that independently of the number of parameters in the original Lagrangian, the mathematical problem of finding the quasiclassical soliton solutions reduces, through scaling, to that of a simple set of two coupled first-order differential equations, neither of which contains any explicit free parameters. The general properties and the numerical solutions of this reduced set of differential equations are given. The resulting solitons exhibit physical characteristics very similar to those of a ''gas bubble'' immersed in a ''medium'': there is a constant surface tension and a constant pressure exerted by the medium on the gas; in addition, there are the ''thermodynamical'' energy of the gas and the related gas pressure, which are determined by the solutions of the reduced equations. Both a SLAC-like bag and the Creutz-Soh version of the MIT bag may appear, but only as special limiting cases. These soliton solutions are applied to the physical hadrons; their static properties are calculated and, within a 10 to 15 percent accuracy, agree with observations

  13. Numerical simulation of interior ballistic process of railgun based on the multi-field coupled model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Lin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Railgun launcher design relies on appropriate models. A multi-field coupled model of railgun launcher was presented in this paper. The 3D transient multi-field was composed of electromagnetic field, thermal field and structural field. The magnetic diffusion equations were solved by a finite-element boundary-element coupling method. The thermal diffusion equations and structural equations were solved by a finite element method. A coupled calculation was achieved by the transfer data from the electromagnetic field to the thermal and structural fields. Some characteristics of railgun shot, such as velocity skin effect, melt-wave erosion and magnetic sawing, which are generated under the condition of large-current and high-speed sliding electrical contact, were demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  14. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields semiclassical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers...

  15. An analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite indium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shulong; Liu, Hongxia; Song, Xin; Guo, Yulong; Yang, Zhaonian [Xidian University, School of Microelectronics, Key Laboratory of Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, Xi' an (China)

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of anisotropic transport properties and develops an anisotropic low-field electron analytical mobility model for wurtzite indium nitride (InN). For the different effective masses in the Γ-A and Γ-M directions of the lowest valley, both the transient and steady state transport behaviors of wurtzite InN show different transport characteristics in the two directions. From the relationship between velocity and electric field, the difference is more obvious when the electric field is low in the two directions. To make an accurate description of the anisotropic transport properties under low field, for the first time, we present an analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite InN. The effects of different ionized impurity scattering models on the low-field mobility calculated by Monte Carlo method (Conwell-Weisskopf and Brooks-Herring method) are also considered. (orig.)

  16. A Comparison of Different Engineering Models for Computation of Lightning Magnetic Field of Negative First Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Javor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of different engineering models results for a lightning magnetic field of negative first strokes is presented in this paper. A new function for representing double-peaked channel-base current is used for lightning stroke modeling. This function includes the initial and subsidiary peak in a current waveform. For experimentally measured currents, a magnetic field is calculated for the three engineering models: transmission line (TL model, TL model with linear decay (MTLL, and TL model with exponential decay (MTLE.

  17. Absence of Replica Symmetry Breaking in the Transverse and Longitudinal Random Field Ising Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, C.

    2018-02-01

    It is proved that replica symmetry is not broken in the transverse and longitudinal random field Ising model. In this model, the variance of spin overlap of any component vanishes in any dimension almost everywhere in the coupling constant space in the infinite volume limit. The weak Fortuin-Kasteleyn-Ginibre property in this model and the Ghirlanda-Guerra identities in artificial models in a path integral representation based on the Lie-Trotter-Suzuki formula enable us to extend Chatterjee's proof for the random field Ising model to the quantum model.

  18. Finite element modeling of electromagnetic fields and waves using NASTRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, E. Thomas, Jr.; Schroeder, Erwin

    1989-01-01

    The various formulations of Maxwell's equations are reviewed with emphasis on those formulations which most readily form analogies with Navier's equations. Analogies involving scalar and vector potentials and electric and magnetic field components are presented. Formulations allowing for media with dielectric and conducting properties are emphasized. It is demonstrated that many problems in electromagnetism can be solved using the NASTRAN finite element code. Several fundamental problems involving time harmonic solutions of Maxwell's equations with known analytic solutions are solved using NASTRAN to demonstrate convergence and mesh requirements. Mesh requirements are studied as a function of frequency, conductivity, and dielectric properties. Applications in both low frequency and high frequency are highlighted. The low frequency problems demonstrate the ability to solve problems involving media inhomogeneity and unbounded domains. The high frequency applications demonstrate the ability to handle problems with large boundary to wavelength ratios.

  19. Force field modeling of amino acid conformational energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaminský, Jakub; Jensen, F.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 5 (2007), s. 1774-1788 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : amino acids * modeling * MP2 * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.308, year: 2007

  20. New exact models for anisotropic matter with electric field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jefta M Sunzu

    2017-09-05

    Sep 5, 2017 ... In our models, we consider the stellar object that is anisotropic and charged with linear equation of state consistent with quark stars. ... Einstein–Maxwell equations; anisotropy; charged matter; equation of state. PACS Nos 04.20. .... Sunzu et al [3] which was a general cubic polynomial. However, our choice ...

  1. A model of Saturn inferred from its measured gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, John D.

    2018-04-01

    We present an interior model of Saturn with an ice-rock core, a metallic region, an outer molecular envelope and a thin transition layer between the metallic and molecular regions. The shape of Saturn’s 1 bar surface is irregular and determined fully self-consistently by the required equilibrium condition. While the ice-rock core is assumed to have a uniform density, three different equations of state are adopted for the metallic, molecular and transition regions. The Saturnian model is constrained by its known mass, its known equatorial and polar radii, and its known zonal gravitational coefficients, J 2n , n = 1, 2, 3. The model produces an ice-rock core with equatorial radius 0.203 R S, where R S is the equatorial radius of Saturn at the 1-bar pressure surface; the core density ρ c = 10388.1 kgm‑3 corresponding to 13.06 Earth masses; and an analytical expression describing the Saturnian irregular shape of the 1-bar pressure level. The model also predicts the values of the higher-order gravitational coefficients, J 8, J 10 and J 12, for the hydrostatic Saturn and suggests that Saturn’s convective dynamo operates in the metallic region approximately defined by 0.2 R S < r e < 0.7 R S, where r e denotes the equatorial radial distance from the Saturnian center of figure.

  2. Modelling production of field crops and its requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de C.T.; Keulen, van H.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation models are being developed that enable quantitative estimates of the growth and production of the main agricultural crops under a wide range of weather and soil conditions. For this purpose, several hierarchically ordered production situations are distinguished in such a way that the

  3. Thermalization in integrable models and conformal field theories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Mandal TIFR, Mumbai

    Introduction. Critical quench: model building. Quantum Ergodicity and integrability. Relaxation rates. Holography. Thermalization in gravity: gravitational collapse. No hair theorem: different forms and descriptions of matter, collapse into a black hole characterized by only the to- tal mass (and angular momentum and charge) ...

  4. Cosmological model of interacting phantom and Yang–Mills fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we consider a model of interacting phantom and Yang–Mills (YM) fields by assuming dilaton-type coupling. Using the specific solution for YM equation previously found by the author, we obtain simple exact solutions for the accelerated expansion of the Friedmann–Robertson–Walker (FRW) cosmological ...

  5. Aquatic Exposure Predictions of Insecticide Field Concentrations Using a Multimedia Mass-Balance Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knäbel, Anja; Scheringer, Martin; Stehle, Sebastian; Schulz, Ralf

    2016-04-05

    Highly complex process-driven mechanistic fate and transport models and multimedia mass balance models can be used for the exposure prediction of pesticides in different environmental compartments. Generally, both types of models differ in spatial and temporal resolution. Process-driven mechanistic fate models are very complex, and calculations are time-intensive. This type of model is currently used within the European regulatory pesticide registration (FOCUS). Multimedia mass-balance models require fewer input parameters to calculate concentration ranges and the partitioning between different environmental media. In this study, we used the fugacity-based small-region model (SRM) to calculate predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) for 466 cases of insecticide field concentrations measured in European surface waters. We were able to show that the PECs of the multimedia model are more protective in comparison to FOCUS. In addition, our results show that the multimedia model results have a higher predictive power to simulate varying field concentrations at a higher level of field relevance. The adaptation of the model scenario to actual field conditions suggests that the performance of the SRM increases when worst-case conditions are replaced by real field data. Therefore, this study shows that a less complex modeling approach than that used in the regulatory risk assessment exhibits a higher level of protectiveness and predictiveness and that there is a need to develop and evaluate new ecologically relevant scenarios in the context of pesticide exposure modeling.

  6. A joint-constraint model for human joints using signed distance-fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Abel, Sarah Maria Niebe; Erleben, Kenny

    2012-01-01

    models for kinematic figures. Our model is compared to existing joint-constraint models, both in terms of generality and computational cost. The presented method supports joint-constraints of up to three degrees of freedom and works well with sampled motion data. Our model can be extended to handle inter......We present a local joint-constraint model for a single joint which is based on distance fields. Our model is fast, general, and well suited for modeling human joints. In this work, we take a geometric approach and model the geometry of the boundary of the feasible region, i.e., the boundary of all...... allowed poses. A region of feasible poses can be built by embedding motion captured data points in a signed distance field. The only assumption is that the feasible poses form a single connected set of angular values. We show how signed distance fields can be used to generate fast and general joint-constraint...

  7. Modelling the Earth's Main Magnetic Field by the spinning Astrid-2 satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, Jose Maria Garcia; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Risbo, T.

    1999-01-01

    and therefore the mapping of the Earth's magnetic field may be possible. The spinning of the spacecraft about a certain axis makes the stabilisation in space possible. This fact and the well distributed data over the globe makes the magnetic data well suited for the estimation of the magnetic field model...... at the spacecraft altitude (circa 1000km). Several methods for field modelling are presented in this paper with the assumption that the direction of the spin axis is nearly constant. In any case the orientation of the magnetometer is to bedetermined simultaneously with the instrument calibration and main field...

  8. Optimizing Global Coronal Magnetic Field Models Using Image-Based Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Mecholsky, Shaela I.; Davila, Joseph M.; Uritskiy, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field directly or indirectly affects a majority of the phenomena studied in the heliosphere. It provides energy for coronal heating, controls the release of coronal mass ejections, and drives heliospheric and magnetospheric activity, yet the coronal magnetic field itself has proven difficult to measure. This difficulty has prompted a decades-long effort to develop accurate, timely, models of the field, an effort that continues today. We have developed a method for improving global coronal magnetic field models by incorporating the type of morphological constraints that could be derived from coronal images. Here we report promising initial tests of this approach on two theoretical problems, and discuss opportunities for application.

  9. The effective field treatment of the spin-1 Ashkin–Teller model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Jander P., E-mail: jander@ufsj.edu.br [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, C.P. 110, CEP 36301-160, São João del Rei, MG (Brazil); Departamento de Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, C.P. 110, CEP 36301-160, São João del Rei, MG (Brazil); Sá Barreto, F.C., E-mail: fcsabarreto@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, C.P. 110, CEP 36301-160, São João del Rei, MG (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, C.P. 110, CEP 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-01

    Spin correlation identities for the spin-1 Ashkin–Teller model are derived. From the spin correlation identities and effective field approximation results for the magnetization, the critical frontiers and tricritical points are obtained in the hexagonal lattice. The results of the effective field approximation are compared to those obtained by other methods. - Highlights: • Correlation identities for spin-1 Ashkin–Teller model on a hexagonal lattice are obtained. • From the spin correlation identities the effective-field theory is applied. • The effective-field theory is extended to locate first-order transitions. • Multicritical points are obtained according to this procedure.

  10. Decay of the standard model Higgs field after inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Figueroa, Daniel G; Torrenti, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    We study the nonperturbative dynamics of the Standard Model (SM) after inflation, in the regime where the SM is decoupled from (or weakly coupled to) the inflationary sector. We use classical lattice simulations in an expanding box in (3+1) dimensions, modeling the SM gauge interactions with both global and Abelian-Higgs analogue scenarios. We consider different post-inflationary expansion rates. During inflation, the Higgs forms a condensate, which starts oscillating soon after inflation ends. Via nonperturbative effects, the oscillations lead to a fast decay of the Higgs into the SM species, transferring most of the energy into $Z$ and $W^{\\pm}$ bosons. All species are initially excited far away from equilibrium, but their interactions lead them into a stationary stage, with exact equipartition among the different energy components. From there on the system eventually reaches equilibrium. We have characterized in detail, in the different expansion histories considered, the evolution of the Higgs and of its ...

  11. Modeling and analysis of elastic fields in tibia and fibula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Chowdhury, B. U.; Parvej, M. S.; Afsar, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, stress analysis of tibia and fibula subjected to body weight in static condition was carried out. The tibia and fibula were fabricated by casting process. A 3-D solid model of tibia and fibula was developed in SolidWorks by using the geometry of cross sections at different locations of the fabricated tibia and fibula. The 3-D model was analyzed by ANSYS to evaluate the stress, strain, and deformation for identifying the critical sections of tibia and fibula. It is found that, in terms of deformation, the critical zone is the contact zone between tibia-fibula and patella. However, in terms of stress, the critical zone is located on fibula between 25% and 40% height from the lower mating portion of the tibia and fibula.

  12. Modeling strong-field above-threshold ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, B.; Armstrong, L. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Above-threshold ionization (ATI) by intense, short-pulse lasers is studied numerically, using the stretched hydrogen atom Hamiltonian. Within our model system, we isolate several mechanisms that contribute to the ATI process. These mechanisms, which involve both excited bound states and continuum states, all invoke intermediate, off-energy shell transitions. In particular, the importance of excited bound states and off-energy shell bound-free processes to the ionization mechanism are shown to relate to a simple physical criterion. These processes point to importance differences in the interpretation of ionization characteristics for short pulses from that for longer pulses. Our analysis concludes that although components of ATI admit of simple, few-state modeling, the ultimate synthesis points to a highly complex mechanism

  13. Hydrologic modeling and field testing at Yucca mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoxie, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is being evaluated as a possible site for a mined geologic repository for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The repository is proposed to be constructed in fractured, densely welded tuff within the thick (500 to 750 meters) unsaturated zone at the site. Characterization of the site unsaturated-zone hydrogeologic system requires quantitative specification of the existing state of the system and the development of numerical hydrologic models to predict probable evolution of the hydrogeologic system over the lifetime of the repository. To support development of hydrologic models for the system, a testing program has been designed to characterize the existing state of the system, to measure hydrologic properties for the system and to identify and quantify those processes that control system dynamics. 12 refs

  14. High Fidelity Modeling of Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-22

    particles com- prise electrons and positively singly charged ions . The set S stores the chemical components, and the heavy - particles are stored in the set...torch is made of electrons, atoms and molecules. Charged particles comprise elec- trons and positively singly charged ions . The set S stores the chemical...that the electron and ion number density must always be equal, thereby enforcing charge neutrality. The MHD model is often further simplified to an

  15. 3D MODELING OF STRESS FIELDS IN MILLING

    OpenAIRE

    Wadii YOUSFI; Raynald LAHEURTE; Philippe DARNIS; Olivier CAHUC; Madalina CALAMAZ

    2015-01-01

    Given the complexity of the physical phenomena present in machining, orthogonal cutting was the most exploited configuration in the analytical modelling of cutting. This configuration is no longer valid if we consider the orientations of the tool in space such as the milling process. A along the cutting edge the geometric and kinematic parameters vary greatly and the speed vector of each point is very sensitive to the position [1]. This study incorporates the kinematic evolutions in the volum...

  16. Dynamically broken gauge model without fundamental scalar fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyderman, N. J.; Guralnik, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the structure that must be generated by dynamical symmetry breaking solutions to gauge theories can be explicitly implemented with a 4-fermion interaction. This structure arises in order to obtain consistency with the constraints imposed by a Goldstone commutator proportional to (anti psi psi). One demonstrates these ideas within the context of axial electrodynamics, dynamically breaking chiral symmetry. As a pre-requisite it is shown how the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model becomes renormalizable with respect to a systematic approximation scheme that respects the Goldstone commutator of dynamically broken chiral symmetry to each order of approximation. (This approximation scheme is equivalent to a l/N expansion, where N is set to unity at the end of the calculations). This solution generates new interactions not explicitly present in the original Lagrangian and does not have a 4-fermion contact interaction. The renormalized Green's functions are shown to correspond to those of the sigma-model, summed as though the fermions had N components, and for which lambda/sub 0/ = 2g/sub 0//sup 2/. This correspondence is exact except for the possibility that the renormalized coupling of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model may be a determined number.

  17. Dynamically broken gauge model without fundamental scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyderman, N.J.; Guralnik, G.S.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the structure that must be generated by dynamical symmetry breaking solutions to gauge theories can be explicitly implemented with a 4-fermion interaction. This structure arises in order to obtain consistency with the constraints imposed by a Goldstone commutator proportional to [anti psi psi]. One demonstrates these ideas within the context of axial electrodynamics, dynamically breaking chiral symmetry. As a pre-requisite it is shown how the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model becomes renormalizable with respect to a systematic approximation scheme that respects the Goldstone commutator of dynamically broken chiral symmetry to each order of approximation. (This approximation scheme is equivalent to a l/N expansion, where N is set to unity at the end of the calculations). This solution generates new interactions not explicitly present in the original Lagrangian and does not have a 4-fermion contact interaction. The renormalized Green's functions are shown to correspond to those of the sigma-model, summed as though the fermions had N components, and for which lambda 0 = 2g 0 2 . This correspondence is exact except for the possibility that the renormalized coupling of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model may be a determined number

  18. Using Microwave Limb Sounder Data to Validate Model Ice Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliser, Duane E.; Li, Jui-Lin; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Tompkins, Adrian; Chern, J.-D.; Tao, W.-K.; Khairoutdinov, M.

    2006-01-01

    MLS IWC overall tends to be higher relative to ECMWF after considering MLS track sampling and sensitivity (cutoff application). Disagreement tends to be accentuated over Indian and Western Pacific Oceans and over tropical landmasses. Large disagreement occur at upper level at 147 hPa but small at lower levels at 215 and 316 hPa suggesting the need to investigate the strength of model large-scale circulation and physics associated with the IWC formation. Future work includes: Present MMF/ECMWF Comparisons at AGU/Baltimore Session on MMF/Cloud Resolving Modeling, GMAO/GSFC & at the WPac/Bejing/AGU in Tao's Cloud-Radiation Session. Write-up Results on ECMWF/MLS Comparisons for GRL. Continue with MLS vs ECMWF Water Vapor & Temperature comparisons - will seek more interaction with other MLS colleagues. Investigate the Development of Biases in ECMWF Forecasts - i.e. in the actual model. Work with GMAO-5 development team regarding their cloud microphysics performance. Integrate CloudSat into IWC Analyses.

  19. Surface and Flow Field Measurements on the FAITH Hill Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James H.; Heineck, James T.; Zilliac, Gregory; Mehta, Rabindra D.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2012-01-01

    A series of experimental tests, using both qualitative and quantitative techniques, were conducted to characterize both surface and off-surface flow characteristics of an axisymmetric, modified-cosine-shaped, wall-mounted hill named "FAITH" (Fundamental Aero Investigates The Hill). Two separate models were employed: a 6" high, 18" base diameter machined aluminum model that was used for wind tunnel tests and a smaller scale (2" high, 6" base diameter) sintered nylon version that was used in the water channel facility. Wind tunnel and water channel tests were conducted at mean test section speeds of 165 fps (Reynolds Number based on height = 500,000) and 0.1 fps (Reynolds Number of 1000), respectively. The ratio of model height to boundary later height was approximately 3 for both tests. Qualitative techniques that were employed to characterize the complex flow included surface oil flow visualization for the wind tunnel tests, and dye injection for the water channel tests. Quantitative techniques that were employed to characterize the flow included Cobra Probe to determine point-wise steady and unsteady 3D velocities, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to determine 3D velocities and turbulence statistics along specified planes, Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) to determine mean surface pressures, and Fringe Imaging Skin Friction (FISF) to determine surface skin friction (magnitude and direction). This initial report summarizes the experimental set-up, techniques used, data acquired and describes some details of the dataset that is being constructed for use by other researchers, especially the CFD community. Subsequent reports will discuss the data and their interpretation in more detail

  20. A numerical model to evaluate the flow distribution in a large solar collector field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bava, Federico; Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a numerical model to evaluate the flow distribution in a large solar collector field, with solar collectors connected both in series and in parallel. The boundary conditions of the systems, such as flow rate, temperature, fluid type and layout of the collector field can...... be easily changed in the model. The model was developed in Matlab and the calculated pressure drop and flow distribution were compared with measurements from a solar collector field. A good agreement between model and measurements was found. The model was then used to study the flow distribution...... in different conditions. Balancing valves proved to be an effective way to achieve uniform flow distribution also in conditions different from those for which the valves were regulated. For small solar collector fields with limited number of collector rows connected in parallel, balancing valves...

  1. How the scalar field of unified dark matter models can cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertacca, Daniele [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Torino and INFN Sezione di Torino, via P Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Galileo Galilei' , Universita di Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via F Marzolo, 8 I-35131 Padova (Italy); Diaferio, Antonaldo, E-mail: bertacca@to.infn.it, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: diaferio@to.infn.it, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale ' Amedeo Avogadro' , Universita di Torino and INFN Sezione di Torino, via P Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    We use scalar field Lagrangians with a non-canonical kinetic term to obtain unified dark matter models where both the dark matter and the dark energy, the latter mimicking a cosmological constant, are described by the scalar field itself. In this framework, we propose a technique for reconstructing models where the effective speed of sound is small enough that the scalar field can cluster. These models avoid the strong time evolution of the gravitational potential and the large integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect which have been serious drawbacks of models considered previously. Moreover, these unified dark matter scalar field models can be easily generalized to behave as dark matter plus a dark energy component behaving like any type of quintessence fluid.

  2. Markov Random Field Restoration of Point Correspondences for Active Shape Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilger, Klaus Baggesen; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    In this paper it is described how to build a statistical shape model using a training set with a sparse of landmarks. A well defined model mesh is selected and fitted to all shapes in the training set using thin plate spline warping. This is followed by a projection of the points of the warped...... model mesh to the target shapes. When this is done by a nearest neighbour projection it can result in folds and inhomogeneities in the correspondence vector field. The novelty in this paper is the use and extension of a Markov random field regularisation of the correspondence field. The correspondence...... distribution is a smoothness term and the observation model is the curvature of the shapes. The Markov Random Field is optimised using a combination of Gibbs sampling and the Metropolis-Hasting algorithm. The parameters of the model is found using a leave-one-out approach. The method leads to a generative...

  3. The Swarm Initial Field Model – a Model of the Earth’s Magnetic Field for 2014 Determined From One Year of Swarm Satellite Constellation Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Hulot, Gauthier; Lesur, Vincent

    Almost one year of data from ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive a model of the Earth’s magnetic field and its time variation (secular variation). The model describes contributions from the core and lithosphere as well as large-scale contributions from the magnetosphere (and its......) frame. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites we include the East-west magnetic gradient information provided by the lower Swarm satellite pair, thereby explicitly taking advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm. We assess the spatial...... and temporal model resolution that can be obtained from one year of Swarm satellite data by comparison with other recent models that also include non-Swarm magnetic observations....

  4. Computational Model Prediction and Biological Validation Using Simplified Mixed Field Exposures for the Development of a GCR Reference Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Rhone, J.; Beitman, A.; Saganti, P.; Plante, I.; Ponomarev, A.; Slaba, T.; Patel, Z.

    2018-01-01

    The yield of chromosomal aberrations has been shown to increase in the lymphocytes of astronauts after long-duration missions of several months in space. Chromosome exchanges, especially translocations, are positively correlated with many cancers and are therefore a potential biomarker of cancer risk associated with radiation exposure. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the induction of chromosomal aberrations by low- and high-LET radiation in human lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and epithelial cells exposed in vitro, there is a lack of data on chromosome aberrations induced by low dose-rate chronic exposure and mixed field beams such as those expected in space. Chromosome aberration studies at NSRL will provide the biological validation needed to extend the computational models over a broader range of experimental conditions (more complicated mixed fields leading up to the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) simulator), helping to reduce uncertainties in radiation quality effects and dose-rate dependence in cancer risk models. These models can then be used to answer some of the open questions regarding requirements for a full GCR reference field, including particle type and number, energy, dose rate, and delivery order. In this study, we designed a simplified mixed field beam with a combination of proton, helium, oxygen, and iron ions with shielding or proton, helium, oxygen, and titanium without shielding. Human fibroblasts cells were irradiated with these mixed field beam as well as each single beam with acute and chronic dose rate, and chromosome aberrations (CA) were measured with 3-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting methods. Frequency and type of CA induced with acute dose rate and chronic dose rates with single and mixed field beam will be discussed. A computational chromosome and radiation-induced DNA damage model, BDSTRACKS (Biological Damage by Stochastic Tracks), was updated to simulate various types of CA induced by

  5. Development of Plasma Fluid Model for a Microwave Rocket Supported by a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayuki

    2017-10-01

    A uid model of plasma transport is developed to reproduce a plasma pattern induced by microwave irradiation when an external magnetic field is applied to the breakdown volume. Transport coefficients in the uid model are evaluated using a fully kinetic simulation under a magnetic field to maintain consistency of electron transport between the particle and uid models. The electron-density profile and propagation speed of the ionization front obtained by the uid model agree with those of the particle model. Multidimensional or longer time-scale simulations can be conducted using the uid model in the case of the application of an external magnetic field, with the simulation reducing computational cost compared to the fully kinetic model.

  6. Numerical simulation of the aerodynamic field in complex terrain wind farm based on actuator disk model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Chen Qi; Han, Xing Xing

    2015-01-01

    Study on the aerodynamic field in complex terrain is significant to wind farm micro-sitting and wind power prediction. This paper modeled the wind turbine through an actuator disk model, and solved the aerodynamic field by CFD to study the influence of meshing, boundary conditions and turbulence...... model on the calculation results. Comparison with the measured data of a wind farm was applied to find an appropriate method for simulating the aerodynamic field in the complex terrain wind farm. Related research can provide reference for wind farm micro-siting and wind power prediction....

  7. Wind-Tunnel Survey of an Oscillating Flow Field for Application to Model Helicopter Rotor Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, Paul H.; Hamouda, M-Nabil H.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A survey was conducted of the flow field produced by the Airstream Oscillator System (AOS) in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The magnitude of a simulated gust field was measured at 15 locations in the plane of a typical model helicopter rotor when tested in the TDT using the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES) model. These measurements were made over a range of tunnel dynamic pressures typical of those used for an ARES test. The data indicate that the gust field produced by the AOS is non-uniform across the tunnel test section, but should be sufficient to excite a model rotor.

  8. A New Model of Jupiter's Magnetic Field from Juno's First Nine Orbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Kotsiaros, S.; Oliversen, R. J.

    2018-01-01

    A spherical harmonic model of the magnetic field of Jupiter is obtained from vector magnetic field observations acquired by the Juno spacecraft during its first nine polar orbits about the planet. Observations acquired during eight of these orbits provide the first truly global coverage of Jupiter...... currents. Partial solution of the underdetermined inverse problem using generalized inverse techniques yields a model (“Juno Reference Model through Perijove 9”) of the planetary magnetic field with spherical harmonic coefficients well determined through degree and order 10, providing the first detailed...

  9. Implementation and Evaluation of the Virtual Fields Method: Determining Constitutive Model Parameters From Full-Field Deformation Data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Sharlotte Lorraine Bolyard; Scherzinger, William M.

    2014-09-01

    The Virtual Fields Method (VFM) is an inverse method for constitutive model parameter identication that relies on full-eld experimental measurements of displacements. VFM is an alternative to standard approaches that require several experiments of simple geometries to calibrate a constitutive model. VFM is one of several techniques that use full-eld exper- imental data, including Finite Element Method Updating (FEMU) techniques, but VFM is computationally fast, not requiring iterative FEM analyses. This report describes the im- plementation and evaluation of VFM primarily for nite-deformation plasticity constitutive models. VFM was successfully implemented in MATLAB and evaluated using simulated FEM data that included representative experimental noise found in the Digital Image Cor- relation (DIC) optical technique that provides full-eld displacement measurements. VFM was able to identify constitutive model parameters for the BCJ plasticity model even in the presence of simulated DIC noise, demonstrating VFM as a viable alternative inverse method. Further research is required before VFM can be adopted as a standard method for constitu- tive model parameter identication, but this study is a foundation for ongoing research at Sandia for improving constitutive model calibration.

  10. Substorm Electric And Magnetic Fields In The Earth's Magnetotail: Observations Compared To The WINDMI Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, P. G.; Spencer, E. A.; Vadepu, S. K.; Horton, W., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    We compare satellite observations of substorm electric fields and magnetic fields to the output of a low dimensional nonlinear physics model of the nightside magnetosphere called WINDMI. The electric and magnetic field satellite data are used to calculate the E X B drift, which is one of the intermediate variables of the WINDMI model. The model uses solar wind and IMF measurements from the ACE spacecraft as input into a system of 8 nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The state variables of the differential equations represent the energy stored in the geomagnetic tail, central plasma sheet, ring current and field aligned currents. The output from the model is the ground based geomagnetic westward auroral electrojet (AL) index, and the Dst index.Using ACE solar wind data, IMF data and SuperMAG identification of substorm onset times up to December 2015, we constrain the WINDMI model to trigger substorm events, and compare the model intermediate variables to THEMIS and GEOTAIL satellite data in the magnetotail. By forcing the model to be consistent with satellite electric and magnetic field observations, we are able to track the magnetotail energy dynamics, the field aligned current contributions, energy injections into the ring current, and ensure that they are within allowable limts. In addition we are able to constrain the physical parameters of the model, in particular the lobe inductance, the plasma sheet capacitance, and the resistive and conductive parameters in the plasma sheet and ionosphere.

  11. Modelling of the temperature field that accompanies friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosal Przemysław

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal modelling of the Friction Stir Welding process allows for better recognition and understanding of phenomena occurring during the joining process of different materials. It is of particular importance considering the possibilities of process technology parameters, optimization and the mechanical properties of the joint. This work demonstrates the numerical modelling of temperature distribution accompanying the process of friction stir welding. The axisymmetric problem described by Fourier’s type equation with internal heat source is considered. In order to solve the diffusive initial value problem a fully implicit scheme of the finite difference method is applied. The example under consideration deals with the friction stir welding of a plate (0.7 cm thick made of Al 6082-T6 by use of a tool made of tungsten alloy, whereas the material subjected to welding was TiC powder. Obtained results confirm both quantitatively and qualitatively experimental observations that the superior temperature corresponds to the zone where the pin joints the shoulder.

  12. Evaluation of field development plans using 3-D reservoir modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, D.; Lewis, J.J.M. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Newbery, J.D.H. [Conoco, UK Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Three-dimensional reservoir modelling has become an accepted tool in reservoir description and is used for various purposes, such as reservoir performance prediction or integration and visualisation of data. In this case study, a small Northern North Sea turbiditic reservoir was to be developed with a line drive strategy utilising a series of horizontal producer and injector pairs, oriented north-south. This development plan was to be evaluated and the expected outcome of the wells was to be assessed and risked. Detailed analyses of core, well log and analogue data has led to the development of two geological {open_quotes}end member{close_quotes} scenarios. Both scenarios have been stochastically modelled using the Sequential Indicator Simulation method. The resulting equiprobable realisations have been subjected to detailed statistical well placement optimisation techniques. Based upon bivariate statistical evaluation of more than 1000 numerical well trajectories for each of the two scenarios, it was found that the wells inclinations and lengths had a great impact on the wells success, whereas the azimuth was found to have only a minor impact. After integration of the above results, the actual well paths were redesigned to meet external drilling constraints, resulting in substantial reductions in drilling time and costs.

  13. Assessing and modelling ecohydrologic processes at the agricultural field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    One of the primary goals of agricultural management is to increase the amount of crop produced per unit of fertilizer and water used. World record corn yields demonstrated that water use efficiency can increase fourfold with improved agronomic management and cultivars able to tolerate high densities. Planting crops with higher plant density can lead to significant yield increases, and increase plant transpiration vs. soil water evaporation. Precision agriculture technologies have been adopted for the last twenty years but seldom have the data collected been converted to information that led farmers to different agronomic management. These methods are intuitively appealing, but yield maps and other spatial layers of data need to be properly analyzed and interpreted to truly become valuable. Current agro-mechanic and geospatial technologies allow us to implement a spatially variable plan for agronomic inputs including seeding rate, cultivars, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, and water. Crop models are valuable tools to evaluate the impact of management strategies (e.g., cover crops, tile drains, and genetically-improved cultivars) on yield, soil carbon sequestration, leaching and greenhouse gas emissions. They can help farmers identify adaptation strategies to current and future climate conditions. In this paper I illustrate the key role that precision agriculture technologies (yield mapping technologies, within season soil and crop sensing), crop modeling and weather can play in dealing with the impact of climate variability on soil ecohydrologic processes. Case studies are presented to illustrate this concept.

  14. High-latitude dayside electric fields and currents during strong northward interplanetary magnetic field: Observations and model simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauer, C.R.; Friis-Christensen, E.

    1988-01-01

    On July 23, 1983, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field turned strongly northward, becoming about 22 nT for several hours. Using a combined data set of ionospheric convection measurements made by the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar and convection inferred from Greenland magnetometer measurements, we observe the onset of the reconfiguration of the high-latitude ionospheric currents to occur about 3 min following the northward IMF encountering the magnetopause. The large-scale reconfiguration of currents, however, appears to evolve over a period of about 22 min. Using a computer model in which the distribution of field-aligned current in the polar cleft is directly determined by the strength and orientation of the interplanetary electric field, we are able to simulate the time-varying pattern of ionospheric convection, including the onset of high-latitude ''reversed convection'' cells observed to form during the interval of strong northward IMF. These observations and the simulation results indicate that the dayside polar cap electric field observed during strong northward IMF is produced by a direct electrical current coupling with the solar wind. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  15. Modeling segregated in- situ combustion processes through a vertical displacement model applied to a Colombian field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra Aristizabal, Jose Julian; Grosso Vargas, Jorge Luis

    2005-01-01

    Recently it has been proposed the incorporation of horizontal well technologies in thermal EOR processes like the in situ combustion process (ISC). This has taken to the conception of new recovery mechanisms named here as segregated in-situ combustion processes, which are conventional in-situ combustion process with a segregated flow component. Top/Down combustion, Combustion Override Split-production Horizontal-well and Toe-to-Heel Air Injection are three of these processes, which incorporate horizontal producers and gravity drainage phenomena. When applied to thick reservoirs a process of this nature could be reasonably modeled under concepts of conventional in-situ combustion and Crestal Gas injection, especially for heavy oils mobile at reservoir conditions. A process of this nature has been studied through an analytic model conceived for the particular conditions of the Castilla field, a homogeneous thick anticline structure containing high mobility heavy oil, which seems to be an excellent candidate for the application of these technologies

  16. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations. II. Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I. O. I.; Virtanen, I. I.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Yeates, A.; Mursula, K.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. Methods: We tested the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and studied how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affected the simulation. We compared the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion, and input data. We also compared the simulated magnetic field with observations. Results: We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. Although the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, which often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are somewhat minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  17. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations: Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Iiro; Virtanen, Ilpo; Pevtsov, Alexei; Yeates, Anthony; Mursula, Kalevi

    2017-04-01

    We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. We test the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and study how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affect the simulation. We compare the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion and input data. We also compare the simulated magnetic field with observations. We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. While the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, that often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are rather minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  18. Generalized Whittle-Matern random field as a model of correlated fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers a generalization of the Gaussian random field with covariance function of the Whittle-Matern family. Such a random field can be obtained as the solution to the fractional stochastic differential equation with two fractional orders. Asymptotic properties of the covariance functions belonging to this generalized Whittle-Matern family are studied, which are used to deduce the sample path properties of the random field. The Whittle-Matern field has been widely used in modeling geostatistical data such as sea beam data, wind speed, field temperature and soil data. In this paper we show that the generalized Whittle-Matern field provides a more flexible model for wind speed data

  19. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Lithospheric Magnetic Field Using Satellite and Airborne Magnetic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kother, Livia Kathleen; Hammer, Magnus Danel; Finlay, Chris

    We present a technique for modelling the lithospheric magnetic field based on estimation of equivalent potential field sources. As a first demonstration we present an application to magnetic field measurements made by the CHAMP satellite during the period 2009-2010. Three component vector field...... for the remaining lithospheric magnetic field consists of magnetic point sources (monopoles) arranged in an icosahedron grid with an increasing grid resolution towards the airborne survey area. The corresponding source values are estimated using an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm that includes model....... Advantages of the equivalent source method include its local nature and the ease of transforming to spherical harmonics when needed. The method can also be applied in local, high resolution, investigations of the lithospheric magnetic field, for example where suitable aeromagnetic data is available...

  20. Prediction of Geological Subsurfaces Based on Gaussian Random Field Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamsen, Petter

    1997-12-31

    During the sixties, random functions became practical tools for predicting ore reserves with associated precision measures in the mining industry. This was the start of the geostatistical methods called kriging. These methods are used, for example, in petroleum exploration. This thesis reviews the possibilities for using Gaussian random functions in modelling of geological subsurfaces. It develops methods for including many sources of information and observations for precise prediction of the depth of geological subsurfaces. The simple properties of Gaussian distributions make it possible to calculate optimal predictors in the mean square sense. This is done in a discussion of kriging predictors. These predictors are then extended to deal with several subsurfaces simultaneously. It is shown how additional velocity observations can be used to improve predictions. The use of gradient data and even higher order derivatives are also considered and gradient data are used in an example. 130 refs., 44 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. Mathematical model of SPOC with a time dependent reactive field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtaki, Masako [Department of Physics, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2006-03-21

    In general the muscle is in one of the two state possible states, relaxation or contraction. These contractions result from relative sliding of myosin and actin in the sarcomere, which is the contraction structure unit of skeletal muscle. The switching between two states is depending on the Ca2{sup +} concentrations. However another state has been detected between these two states. In the third state, that is SPontaneous Oscillatory Contraction (SPOC), sarcomere repeats contraction and extension spontaneously. Muscle fibers are composed of hundreds of sarcomeres in series and one sarcomea also is composed of hundreds of myosin. In microscopic, the force generated by actin and myosin interaction occurs stochastically. SPOC, however, is macroscopically observable and there are regular oscillations. To understand SPOC mechanism, we propose a model for SPOC based on chemical reaction including mechanical process.

  2. Evaluation of recommended REACH exposure modeling tools and near-field, far-field model in assessing occupational exposure to toluene from spray paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Elizabeth; Spencer, John W; Hiteshew, Kathleen; Coutu, Michelle; Nealley, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Predictive modeling is an available tool to assess worker exposures to a variety of chemicals in different industries and product-use scenarios. The European Chemical Agency (ECHA)'s guidelines for manufacturers to fulfill the European Union's legal requirements pursuant to the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) initiative include recommendations for the use of modeling to predict worker exposures. ECHA recommends different models for different target populations (i.e. workers, consumers, environment) and routes of exposure (i.e. skin absorption, ingestion, inhalation), and presents them hierarchically, with Tier 1 models presented as the most simplistic, conservative models and Tier 2 models recommended for further intensive evaluation of substances or preparations. In order to assess these models for one exposure (product-use) scenario, a simulation of the scenario was completed in a controlled environment and the measured results were compared with the modeling outputs. The authors predicted, based on the design of the modeling tools, that all models would overestimate worker exposures under the simulated product-use scenario, with the lower-tiered model producing the most conservative estimate of exposure. In this study, a Tier 1 model and a Tier 2 model were evaluated for comparison with the near-field, far-field (NF-FF) deterministic model and measured experimental results in a real-time worker inhalation exposure assessment. Modeling was conducted prior to actual air monitoring. The exposure scenario that was evaluated involved the application of a toluene-containing spray paint to a work surface. Air samples were collected to evaluate short-term (15-min) and long-term (240-min) exposures. Eight-hour time-weighted averages (8-h TWAs) were calculated and compared with the modeling outputs from the recommended REACH modeling tools and the NF-FF model. A comparison of each of the modeling tools with measured

  3. A valence force field-Monte Carlo algorithm for quantum dot growth modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barettin, Daniele; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel kinetic Monte Carlo version for the atomistic valence force fields algorithm in order to model a self-assembled quantum dot growth process. We show our atomistic model is both computationally favorable and capture more details compared to traditional kinetic Monte Carlo models...

  4. Brittle fracture phase-field modeling of a short-rod specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Ivana [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tupek, Michael R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bishop, Joseph E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Predictive simulation capabilities for modeling fracture evolution provide further insight into quantities of interest in comparison to experimental testing. Based on the variational approach to fracture, the advent of phase-field modeling achieves the goal to robustly model fracture for brittle materials and captures complex crack topologies in three dimensions.

  5. Model to Test Electric Field Comparisons in a Composite Fairing Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Burford, Janessa

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to sensitive spacecraft. This study shows cumulative distribution function (CDF) comparisons of composite a fairing electromagnetic field data obtained by computational electromagnetic 3D full wave modeling and laboratory testing. This work is an extension of the bare aluminum fairing perfect electric conductor (PEC) model. Test and model data correlation is shown.

  6. Inverse magnetic catalysis in Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model beyond mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    We study inverse magnetic catalysis in the Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model beyond mean field approximation. The feed-down from mesons to quarks is embedded in an effective coupling constant at finite temperature and magnetic field. While the magnetic catalysis is still the dominant effect at low temperature, the meson dressed quark mass drops down with increasing magnetic field at high temperature due to the dimension reduction of the Goldstone mode in the Pauli–Villars regularization scheme.

  7. Regional models of the gravity field from terrestrial gravity data of heterogeneous quality and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talvik, Silja; Oja, Tõnis; Ellmann, Artu; Jürgenson, Harli

    2014-05-01

    Gravity field models in a regional scale are needed for a number of applications, for example national geoid computation, processing of precise levelling data and geological modelling. Thus the methods applied for modelling the gravity field from surveyed gravimetric information need to be considered carefully. The influence of using different gridding methods, the inclusion of unit or realistic weights and indirect gridding of free air anomalies (FAA) are investigated in the study. Known gridding methods such as kriging (KRIG), least squares collocation (LSCO), continuous curvature (CCUR) and optimal Delaunay triangulation (ODET) are used for production of gridded gravity field surfaces. As the quality of data collected varies considerably depending on the methods and instruments available or used in surveying it is important to somehow weigh the input data. This puts additional demands on data maintenance as accuracy information needs to be available for each data point participating in the modelling which is complicated by older gravity datasets where the uncertainties of not only gravity values but also supplementary information such as survey point position are not always known very accurately. A number of gravity field applications (e.g. geoid computation) demand foran FAA model, the acquisition of which is also investigated. Instead of direct gridding it could be more appropriate to proceed with indirect FAA modelling using a Bouguer anomaly grid to reduce the effect of topography on the resulting FAA model (e.g. near terraced landforms). The inclusion of different gridding methods, weights and indirect FAA modelling helps to improve gravity field modelling methods. It becomes possible to estimate the impact of varying methodical approaches on the gravity field modelling as statistical output is compared. Such knowledge helps assess the accuracy of gravity field models and their effect on the aforementioned applications.

  8. Field Distribution of Transcranial Static Magnetic Stimulation in Realistic Human Head Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharayil, Joseph J; Goetz, Stefan M; Bernabei, John M; Peterchev, Angel V

    2017-10-10

    The objective of this work was to characterize the magnetic field (B-field) that arises in a human brain model from the application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS). The spatial distribution of the B-field magnitude and gradient of a cylindrical, 5.08 cm × 2.54 cm NdFeB magnet were simulated in air and in a human head model using the finite element method and calibrated with measurements in air. The B-field was simulated for magnet placements over prefrontal, motor, sensory, and visual cortex targets. The impact of magnetic susceptibility of head tissues on the B-field was quantified. Peak B-field magnitude and gradient respectively ranged from 179-245 mT and from 13.3-19.0 T/m across the cortical targets. B-field magnitude, focality, and gradient decreased with magnet-cortex distance. The variation in B-field strength and gradient across the anatomical targets largely arose from the magnet-cortex distance. Head magnetic susceptibilities had negligible impact on the B-field characteristics. The half-maximum focality of the tSMS B-field ranged from 7-12 cm 3 . This is the first presentation and characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) spatial distribution of the B-field generated in a human brain model by tSMS. These data can provide quantitative dosing guidance for tSMS applications across various cortical targets and subjects. The finding that the B-field gradient is high near the magnet edges should be considered in studies where neural tissue is placed close to the magnet. The observation that susceptibility has negligible effects confirms assumptions in the literature. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  9. Comparison of Echo 7 field line length measurements to magnetospheric model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemzek, R.J.; Winckler, J.R.; Malcolm, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Echo 7 sounding rocket experiment injected electron beams on central tail field lines near L = 6.5. Numerous injections returned to the payload as conjugate echoes after mirroring in the southern hemisphere. The authors compare field line lengths calculated from measured conjugate echo bounce times and energies to predictions made by integrating electron trajectories through various magnetospheric models: the Olson-Pfitzer Quiet and Dynamic models and the Tsyganenko-Usmanov model. Although Kp at launch was 3-, quiet time magnetic models est fit the echo measurements. Geosynchronous satellite magnetometer measurements near the Echo 7 field lies during the flight were best modeled by the Olson-Pfitzer Dynamic Model and the Tsyganenko-Usmanov model for Kp = 3. The discrepancy between the models that best fit the Echo 7 data and those that fit the satellite data was most likely due to uncertainties in the small-scale configuration of the magnetospheric models. The field line length measured by the conjugate echoes showed some temporal variation in the magnetic field, also indicated by the satellite magnetometers. This demonstrates the utility an Echo-style experiment could have in substorm studies

  10. Wide-field schematic eye models with gradient-index lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Alexander V; Dainty, Chris

    2007-08-01

    We propose a wide-field schematic eye model, which provides a more realistic description of the optical system of the eye in relation to its anatomical structure. The wide-field model incorporates a gradient-index (GRIN) lens, which enables it to fulfill properties of two well-known schematic eye models, namely, Navarro's model for off-axis aberrations and Thibos's chromatic on-axis model (the Indiana eye). These two models are based on extensive experimental data, which makes the derived wide-field eye model also consistent with that data. A mathematical method to construct a GRIN lens with its iso-indicial contours following the optical surfaces of given asphericity is presented. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated with three variants related to different age groups. The role of the GRIN structure in relation to the lens paradox is analyzed. The wide-field model with a GRIN lens can be used as a starting design for the eye inverse problem, i.e., reconstructing the optical structure of the eye from off-axis wavefront measurements. Anatomically more accurate age-dependent optical models of the eye could ultimately help an optical designer to improve wide-field retinal imaging.

  11. Experiments and Modeling to Support Field Test Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Peter Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bourret, Suzanne Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zyvoloski, George Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weaver, Douglas James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Disposition of heat-generating nuclear waste (HGNW) remains a continuing technical and sociopolitical challenge. We define HGNW as the combination of both heat generating defense high level waste (DHLW) and civilian spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Numerous concepts for HGNW management have been proposed and examined internationally, including an extensive focus on geologic disposal (c.f. Brunnengräber et al., 2013). One type of proposed geologic material is salt, so chosen because of its viscoplastic deformation that causes self-repair of damage or deformation induced in the salt by waste emplacement activities (Hansen and Leigh, 2011). Salt as a repository material has been tested at several sites around the world, notably the Morsleben facility in Germany (c.f. Fahland and Heusermann, 2013; Wollrath et al., 2014; Fahland et al., 2015) and at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. Evaluating the technical feasibility of a HGNW repository in salt is an ongoing process involving experiments and numerical modeling of many processes at many facilities.

  12. Morphodynamics of Wadden Sea Areas – Field Measurements and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Albers

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Wadden Sea areas of the German North Sea coast are affected by intense morphodynamics. Especially in the mouths of the estuaries sedimentation and erosion occur on different temporal and spatial scales and therefore challenge the decision-makers. To satisfy the requirements, which modern maritime traffic demands, a sustainable concept for sediment management has to be developed to grant an economic and ecologic balanced system. To evaluate different actions and their effects, e.g. by means of numerical models, an improved knowledge of morphodynamic processes on tidal flats is required. The Institute of River and Coastal Engineering at the Hamburg University of Technology runs detailed measurements to collect hydrodynamic and morphodynamic data of tidal flats in the estuary Elbe, that is the approach to the port of Hamburg. Water levels, flow and wave parameters and concentrations of suspended sediments are recorded in high resolution. Furthermore, the bathymetry is determined in frequent intervals with a multi-beam echo sounder.

  13. A Field Training Model for Creative Arts Therapies: Report from a 3-Year Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkibi, Hod

    2012-01-01

    Clinical field training is an essential component of educating future therapists. This article discusses a creative arts therapies field training model in Israel as designed and modified from 3 years of program evaluation in a changing regulatory context. A clinical seminar structure puts beginning students in the role of participant-observer in…

  14. Magnetic-Field-Driven Artificial Muscle based on the H. Huxley Model: Fundamental Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Makoto; Nishimoto, Yoshiko; Nashima, Shigeki

    2007-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an artificial muscle driven by an externally applied magnetic field. The drive mechanism simulated a model proposed by H. Huxley for bionic muscle contraction. Small magnetic needles swing with a time-varying magnetic field and enable linear motion of an object on the needles. In the future, this fundamental mechanism could prove useful for realizing linear actuators for robots.

  15. An Exploration of the System Dynamics Field : A Model-Based Policy Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rose, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a first look study at the field of System Dynamics. The objective of the study is to perform a model-based policy analysis in order to investigate the future advancement of the System Dynamics field. The aim of this investigation is to determine what this advancement should look

  16. Microscopic model of the THz field enhancement in a metal nanoslit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Malureanu, Radu

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the strong THz-field enhancement effect in a metal slit of dozens of nanometers sizes reported recently. Proposed simple microscopic model considers electric charges induced at the edges of the slit by a polarized incident wave. These charges contribute then to the field in the slit...

  17. The linear σ-ω model in the thermo field dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, R.; Civitarese, O.; De Paoli, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    The relativistic linear σ-ω model is used to describe symmetric nuclear matter at finite temperature. The thermo field dynamics is applied to compute, perturbatively, quantum corrections to the temperature-dependent Hartree mean field. The effect of these corrections upon nuclear-matter properties at saturation is studied. ((orig.))

  18. Modeling and analysis of solar wind generated contributions to the near-Earth magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Moretto, T.; Rastatter, L.

    2006-01-01

    . At high latitudes the field-aligned component is of partidular interest in connection with internal field-modelling. In the attitude regime of 400-800 km (typical for low Earth orbit satellites) the ionospheric currents are found to contribute significantly to the disturbancance, and account for more than...

  19. Temperature dependence of critical magnetic fields for the Abelian Higgs model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magpantay, J.; Mukku, C.; Sayed, W.A.

    1981-05-01

    One loop temperature and external electromagnetic field effects on the Abelian Higgs model are studied using the momentum space heat kernel. We obtain expressions for the critical fields necessary for symmetry restoration at some finite temperature and display the critical B vs. T curve separating the broken and restored phases in the B-T plane. (author)

  20. Modeling of Diamond Field-Emitter-Arrays for high brightness photocathode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Thomas; Huang, Chengkun; Piryatinski, Andrei; Lewellen, John; Nichols, Kimberly; Choi, Bo; Pavlenko, Vitaly; Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Nguyen, Dinh; Andrews, Heather; Simakov, Evgenya

    2017-10-01

    We propose to employ Diamond Field-Emitter-Arrays (DFEAs) as high-current-density ultra-low-emittance photocathodes for compact laser-driven dielectric accelerators capable of generating ultra-high brightness electron beams for advanced applications. We develop a semi-classical Monte-Carlo photoemission model for DFEAs that includes carriers' transport to the emitter surface and tunneling through the surface under external fields. The model accounts for the electronic structure size quantization affecting the transport and tunneling process within the sharp diamond tips. We compare this first principle model with other field emission models, such as the Child-Langmuir and Murphy-Good models. By further including effects of carrier photoexcitation, we perform simulations of the DFEAs' photoemission quantum yield and the emitted electron beam. Details of the theoretical model and validation against preliminary experimental data will be presented. Work ssupported by LDRD program at LANL.

  1. Spherical cap modelling of Orsted magnetic field vectors over southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotze, PB

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Vector magnetic field observations by the Orsted satellite during geomagnetic quiet conditions around January 1, 2000, have been employed to derive a spherical cap harmonic model (Haines, 1985) over the southern African region between 10 degrees...

  2. SSWL and BWL: finite element models of compressed magnetic field current generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, T.J.; Leeman, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Documentation is presented for two new computer codes modeling the behavior of compressed magnetic field current generators. Code output results for the typical generator configurations are presented and compared to experimental results. (auth)

  3. Classification of integrable two-dimensional models of relativistic field theory by means of computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getmanov, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    The results of classification of two-dimensional relativistic field models (1) spinor; (2) essentially-nonlinear scalar) possessing higher conservation laws using the system of symbolic computer calculations are presented shortly

  4. Influence of magnetic field on swap operation in Heisenberg XXZ model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jia [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang Guofeng, E-mail: gf1978zhang@buaa.edu.c [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen Ziyu [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2009-05-01

    Swap operation based on a two-qubit Heisenberg XXZ model under a uniform magnetic field in arbitrary direction and magnitude is investigated. It is shown that swap gate can be implemented on some conditions and its feasibility is established.

  5. Influence of magnetic field on swap operation in Heisenberg XXZ model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jia; Zhang Guofeng; Chen Ziyu

    2009-01-01

    Swap operation based on a two-qubit Heisenberg XXZ model under a uniform magnetic field in arbitrary direction and magnitude is investigated. It is shown that swap gate can be implemented on some conditions and its feasibility is established.

  6. Spectral and scattering theory for translation invariant models in quantum field theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Grud

    This thesis is concerned with a large class of massive translation invariant models in quantum field theory, including the Nelson model and the Fröhlich polaron. The models in the class describe a matter particle, e.g. a nucleon or an electron, linearly coupled to a second quantised massive scalar...... field e.g. describing mesons or phonons. The models are given by three inputs: - the dispersion relation for the matter particle, - the dispersion relation for the field particle, and - the (UV cut-off) coupling function. The assumptions imposed on , and are rather weak and are satisfied...... by the physically relevant choices. The translation invariance implies that the Hamiltonian may be decomposed into a direct integral over the space of total momentum where the fixed momentum fiber Hamiltonians are given by , where denotes total momentum and is the Segal field operator. The fiber Hamiltonians...

  7. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  8. Using convex quadratic programming to model random media with Gaussian random fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintanilla, John A.; Jones, W. Max

    2007-01-01

    Excursion sets of Gaussian random fields (GRFs) have been frequently used in the literature to model two-phase random media with measurable phase autocorrelation functions. The goal of successful modeling is finding the optimal field autocorrelation function that best approximates the prescribed phase autocorrelation function. In this paper, we present a technique which uses convex quadratic programming to find the best admissible field autocorrelation function under a prescribed discretization. Unlike previous methods, this technique efficiently optimizes over all admissible field autocorrelation functions, instead of optimizing only over a predetermined parametrized family. The results from using this technique indicate that the GRF model is significantly more versatile than observed in previous studies. An application to modeling a base-catalyzed tetraethoxysilane aerogel system given small-angle neutron scattering data is also presented

  9. A Self-Interaction Leading to Fluctuations of Order $n^{5/6}$

    OpenAIRE

    Gorny, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In arXiv:1301.6911, we built and studied a Curie-Weiss model exhibiting self-organized criticality : it is a model with a self-interaction leading to fluctuations of order $n^{3/4}$ and a limiting law proportional to $\\exp(-x^4/12)$. In this paper we modify our model in order to "kill the term $x^4$" and to obtain a self-interaction leading to fluctuations of order $n^{5/6}$ and a limiting law $C\\,\\exp(-\\lambda x^6)\\,dx$, for suitable positive constants $C$ and $\\lambda$.

  10. First Use of Synoptic Vector Magnetograms for Global Nonlinear, Force-Free Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims. For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting threedimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content E(sub free) = E(sub nlfff) - E(sub pot), which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results. For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  11. A Model for Periodic Nonlinear Electric Field Structures in Space Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M.N.S.; Shi Jiankui; Liu Zhenxing

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present a physical model to explain the generation mechanism of nonlinear periodic waves with a large amplitude electric field structures propagating obliquely and exactly parallel to the magnetic field. The 'Sagdeev potential' from the MHD equations is derived and the nonlinear electric field waveforms are obtained when the Mach number, direction of propagation, and the initial electric field satisfy certain plasma conditions. For the parallel propagation, the amplitude of the electric field waves with ion-acoustic mode increases with the increase of initial electric field and Mach number but its frequency decreases with the increase of Mach number. The amplitude and frequency of the electric field waves with ion-cyclotron mode decrease with the increase of Mach number and become less spiky, and its amplitude increases with the increase of initial electric field. For the oblique propagation, only periodic electric field wave with an ion-cyclotron mode obtained, its amplitude and frequency increase with the increase of Mach number and become spiky. From our model the electric field structures show periodic, spiky, and saw-tooth behaviours corresponding to different plasma conditions.

  12. The BGS magnetic field candidate models for the 12th generation IGRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Brian; Ridley, Victoria A.; Beggan, Ciarán D.; Macmillan, Susan

    2015-05-01

    We describe the candidate models submitted by the British Geological Survey for the 12th generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field. These models are extracted from a spherical harmonic `parent model' derived from vector and scalar magnetic field data from satellite and observatory sources. These data cover the period 2009.0 to 2014.7 and include measurements from the recently launched European Space Agency (ESA) Swarm satellite constellation. The parent model's internal field time dependence for degrees 1 to 13 is represented by order 6 B-splines with knots at yearly intervals. The parent model's degree 1 external field time dependence is described by periodic functions for the annual and semi-annual signals and by dependence on the 20-min Vector Magnetic Disturbance index. Signals induced by these external fields are also parameterized. Satellite data are weighted by spatial density and by two different noise estimators: (a) by standard deviation along segments of the satellite track and (b) a larger-scale noise estimator defined in terms of a measure of vector activity at the geographically closest magnetic observatories to the sample point. Forecasting of the magnetic field secular variation beyond the span of data is by advection of the main field using core surface flows.

  13. Numerical modeling of positive streamer in air in nonuniform fields: Efficiency of radicals production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikovsky, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency of streamer corona depends on a number of factors such as geometry of electrodes, voltage pulse parameters, gas pressure etc. In a past 5 years a two-dimensional models of streamer in nonuniform fields in air have been developed. These models allow to simulate streamer dynamics and generation of species and to investigate the influence of external parameters on species production. In this work the influence of Laplacian field on efficiency of radicals generation is investigated

  14. Colloids and Radionuclide Transport: A Field, Experimental and Modeling Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P.; Zavarin, M.; Sylwester, E. E.; Allen, P. G.; Williams, R. W.; Kersting, A. B.

    2002-05-01

    Natural inorganic colloids (colloid-facilitated transport to the transport of low-solubility actinides, such as Pu, is still not well understood. In an effort to better understand the dominant geochemical mechanisms that control Pu transport, we have performed a series of sorption/desorption experiments using mineral colloids. We focused on natural colloidal minerals present in water samples collected from both saturated and vadose zone waters at the Nevada Test Site. These minerals include zeolites, clays, silica, Mn-oxides, Fe-oxides, and calcite. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy ( both XANES and EXAFS) was performed in order to characterize the speciation of sorbed plutonium. The XANES spectra show that only Pu(IV) was detected (within experimental error) on these mineral surfaces when the starting Pu oxidation state was +5, indicating that Pu(V) was reduced to Pu(IV) during sorption. The EXAFS detected Pu-M and Pu-C interactions (where M=Fe, Mn, or Si) indicating Pu(IV) surface complexation along with carbonate ternary complex formation on most of the minerals tested. Although the plutonium sorption as Pu(IV) species is mineral independent, the actual sorption paths are different for different minerals. The sorption rates were compared to the rates of plutonium disproportionation under similar conditions. The batch sorption/desorption experiments of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) onto colloidal zeolite (clinoptilolite, colloids particle size 171 ñ 25 nm) were conducted in synthetic groundwater (similar to J-13, Yucca Mountain standard) with a pH range from 4 to 10 and initial plutonium concentration of 10-9 M. The results show that Pu(IV) sorption takes place within an hour, while the rates of Pu(V) sorption onto the colloids is much slower and mineral dependent. The kinetic results from the batch sorption/desorption experiments, coupled with redox kinetics of plutonium in solution will be used in geochemical modeling of Pu surface complexation to colloids and

  15. Deflection modeling of permanent magnet spherical chains in the presence of external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, Kilian; Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig

    2013-01-01

    This work examines the interaction of permanently magnetised spheres in the presence of external magnetic fields at the millimetre scale. Static chain formation and deflection models are described for N spheres in the presence of an external magnetic field. Analytical models are presented for the two sphere case by neglecting the effects of magnetocrystalline anisotropy while details of a numerical approach to solve a chain of N spheres are shown. The model is experimentally validated using chain deflections in 4.5 mm diameter spheres in groups of 2, 3 and 4 magnets in the presence of uniform magnetic fields, neglecting gravitational effects, with good agreement between the theoretical model and experimental results. This spherical chain structure could be used as an end effector for catheters as a deflection mechanism for magnetic guidance. The spherical point contacts result in large deflections for navigation around tight corners in endoluminal minimally invasive clinical applications. - Highlights: • We model the interaction of magnetic spheres with uniform external fields. • Analytical models are presented for two spheres interacting with an external field. • Numerical methods are used to model the interaction of N spheres in chain formations. • These models are tested experimentally. • We report good agreement between experiment and theory

  16. The lithospheric stress field from joint modeling of lithosphere and mantle circulation using constraints from the latest global tomography models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Holt, W. E.; Ghosh, A.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the lithospheric stress field is important because these stresses are one indication of processes within the Earth's interior. In order to calculate the lithosphere stress field it is necessary to take into account the effects of lithosphere structure and topography along with coupling with 3-D mantle flow. We separate these effects into two parts: (1) contributions from topography and lithosphere structure are calculated by computing the stresses associated with gravitational potential energy (GPE) differences, and (2) stresses associated with mantle tractions are computed using the latest tomography models. The contributions from GPE and tractions are then combined to obtain model estimates of the lithospheric stress field, strain rate field, and surface velocity field. We simultaneously use the World Stress Map, the Global Strain Rate Model, and the No-Net-Rotation (NNR) surface velocity vectors to constrain models. We systematically test the latest global tomography models (SEMum [Lekic and Romanowicz, 2011], S40RTS [Ritsema et al., 2011], and S362ANI_PREM [Kustowski et al., 2008]) and the composite tomography model (SMEAN [Becker and Boschi, 2002]), along with the influence of different mantle radial viscosity models. We find that a coupled model with a weak viscosity channel, sandwiched between a strong lithosphere and strong lower mantle is best able to match the observational constraints, although there is a slight difference in stress field among the different tomography models. There is considerable evidence that the contributions from shallow versus deeper sources vary dramatically over the surface of the globe. We quantify these relative contributions as a function of position on the globe and systematically compare the results of different tomography models. Subduction zones are dominated by the effects of GPE differences, whereas within many of the plate interiors the contributions from mantle flow dominate.

  17. The limiting behavior of the estimated parameters in a misspecified random field regression model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian Møller; Qin, Yu

    This paper examines the limiting properties of the estimated parameters in the random field regression model recently proposed by Hamilton (Econometrica, 2001). Though the model is parametric, it enjoys the flexibility of the nonparametric approach since it can approximate a large collection...... convenient new uniform convergence results that we propose. This theory may have applications beyond those presented here. Our results indicate that classical statistical inference techniques, in general, works very well for random field regression models in finite samples and that these models succesfully...

  18. Extending comprehensive models of the Earth's magnetic field with Orsted and CHAMP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, T.J.; Olsen, Nils; Purucker, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    A new model of the quiet-time, near-Earth magnetic field has been derived using a comprehensive approach, which includes not only POGO and Magsat satellite data, but also data from the Orsted and CHAMP satellites. The resulting model shows great improvement over its predecessors in terms of compl......A new model of the quiet-time, near-Earth magnetic field has been derived using a comprehensive approach, which includes not only POGO and Magsat satellite data, but also data from the Orsted and CHAMP satellites. The resulting model shows great improvement over its predecessors in terms...

  19. Development of Spherical Near Field Model for Geological Radioactive Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Lee, K. J.; Chang, S. H.; Lee, K. J.; Chang, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling for geological radioactive waste repository can be divided into 3 parts. They are near field modeling related to engineered barrier, far field modeling related to natural barrier and biosphere modeling. In order to make the general application for safety assessment of geological waste repository, spherical geometry near field model has been developed. This model can be used quite extensively when users calculate equivalent spherical geometry for specific engineered barrier like equivalent waste radius, equivalent barrier radius and etc. Only diffusion was considered for general purpose but advection part can be updated. Goldsim and Goldsim Radionuclide Transport (RT) module were chosen and used as developing tool for the flexible modeling. Developer can freely make their own model with developer friendly graphic interface by using Goldsim. Furthermore, model with user friendly graphic interface can be developed by using Goldsim Dashboard Authoring module. The model has been validated by comparing the result with that of another model, inserting similar inputs and conditions. The model has been proved to be reasonably operating from the comparison result by validation process. Cylindrical model can be developed as a further work based on the knowledge and experience from this research

  20. Capturing the complex behavior of hydraulic fracture stimulation through multi-physics modeling, field-based constraints, and model reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S.; Chiaramonte, L.; Cruz, L.; Izadi, G.

    2016-12-01

    Advances in the accuracy and fidelity of numerical methods have significantly improved our understanding of coupled processes in unconventional reservoirs. However, such multi-physics models are typically characterized by many parameters and require exceptional computational resources to evaluate systems of practical importance, making these models difficult to use for field analyses or uncertainty quantification. One approach to remove these limitations is through targeted complexity reduction and field data constrained parameterization. For the latter, a variety of field data streams may be available to engineers and asset teams, including micro-seismicity from proximate sites, well logs, and 3D surveys, which can constrain possible states of the reservoir as well as the distributions of parameters. We describe one such workflow, using the Argos multi-physics code and requisite geomechanical analysis to parameterize the underlying models. We illustrate with a field study involving a constraint analysis of various field data and details of the numerical optimizations and model reduction to demonstrate how complex models can be applied to operation design in hydraulic fracturing operations, including selection of controllable completion and fluid injection design properties. The implication of this work is that numerical methods are mature and computationally tractable enough to enable complex engineering analysis and deterministic field estimates and to advance research into stochastic analyses for uncertainty quantification and value of information applications.

  1. Phase-field modeling of corrosion kinetics under dual-oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, You-Hai; Chen, Long-Qing; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2012-04-01

    A phase-field model is proposed to simulate corrosion kinetics under a dual-oxidant atmosphere. It will be demonstrated that the model can be applied to simulate corrosion kinetics under oxidation, sulfidation and simultaneous oxidation/sulfidation processes. Phase-dependent diffusivities are incorporated in a natural manner and allow more realistic modeling as the diffusivities usually differ by many orders of magnitude in different phases. Simple free energy models are then used for testing the model while calibrated free energy models can be implemented for quantitative modeling.

  2. Runoff of pesticides from rice fields in the Ile de Camargue (Rhone river delta, France): Field study and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comoretto, Laetitia; Arfib, Bruno; Talva, Romain; Chauvelon, Philippe; Pichaud, Marc; Chiron, Serge; Hoehener, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    A field study on the runoff of pesticides was conducted during the cultivation period in 2004 on a hydraulically isolated rice farm of 120 ha surface with one central water outlet. Four pesticides were studied: Alphamethrin, MCPA, Oxadiazon, and Pretilachlor. Alphamethrin concentrations in runoff never exceeded 0.001 μg L -1 . The three other pesticides were found in concentrations between 5.2 and 28.2 μg L -1 in the runoff water shortly after the application and decreased thereafter. The data for MCPA compared reasonably well with predictions by an analytical runoff model, accounting for volatilization, degradation, leaching to groundwater, and sorption to soil. The runoff model estimated that runoff accounted for as much as 18-42% of mass loss for MCPA. Less runoff is observed and predicted for Oxadiazon and Pretilachlor. It was concluded that runoff from rice paddies carries important loads of dissolved pesticides to the wetlands in the Ile de Camargue, and that the model can be used to predict this runoff. - Runoff of dissolved pesticides was measured on a rice farm in the Camargue (France) and modeled with an analytical model

  3. Investigation on stresses of superconductors under pulsed magnetic fields based on multiphysics model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaobin, E-mail: yangxb@lzu.edu.cn; Li, Xiuhong; He, Yafeng; Wang, Xiaojun; Xu, Bo

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The differential equation including temperature and magnetic field was derived for a long cylindrical superconductor. • Thermal stress and electromagnetic stress were studied at the same time under pulse field magnetizing. • The distributions of the magnetic field, the temperature and stresses are studied and compared for two pulse fields of the different duration. • The Role thermal stress and electromagnetic stress play in the process of pulse field magnetizing is discussed. - Abstract: A multiphysics model for the numerical computation of stresses, trapped field and temperature distribution of a infinite long superconducting cylinder is proposed, based on which the stresses, including the thermal stresses and mechanical stresses due to Lorentz force, and trapped fields in the superconductor subjected to pulsed magnetic fields are analyzed. By comparing the results under pulsed magnetic fields with different pulse durations, it is found that the both the mechanical stress due to the electromagnetic force and the thermal stress due to temperature gradient contribute to the total stress level in the superconductor. For pulsed magnetic field with short durations, the thermal stress is the dominant contribution to the total stress, because the heat generated by AC-loss builds up significant temperature gradient in such short durations. However, for a pulsed field with a long duration the gradient of temperature and flux, as well as the maximal tensile stress, are much smaller. And the results of this paper is meaningful for the design and manufacture of superconducting permanent magnets.

  4. Rainfall-induced fecal indicator organisms transport from manured fields: model sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gonzalo; Pachepsky, Yakov A; Whelan, Gene; Yakirevich, Alexander M; Guber, Andrey; Gish, Timothy J

    2014-02-01

    Microbial quality of surface waters attracts attention due to food- and waterborne disease outbreaks. Fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) are commonly used for the microbial pollution level evaluation. Models predicting the fate and transport of FIOs are required to design and evaluate best management practices that reduce the microbial pollution in ecosystems and water sources and thus help to predict the risk of food and waterborne diseases. In this study we performed a sensitivity analysis for the KINEROS/STWIR model developed to predict the FIOs transport out of manured fields to other fields and water bodies in order to identify input variables that control the transport uncertainty. The distributions of model input parameters were set to encompass values found from three-year experiments at the USDA-ARS OPE3 experimental site in Beltsville and publicly available information. Sobol' indices and complementary regression trees were used to perform the global sensitivity analysis of the model and to explore the interactions between model input parameters on the proportion of FIO removed from fields. Regression trees provided a useful visualization of the differences in sensitivity of the model output in different parts of the input variable domain. Environmental controls such as soil saturation, rainfall duration and rainfall intensity had the largest influence in the model behavior, whereas soil and manure properties ranked lower. The field length had only moderate effect on the model output sensitivity to the model inputs. Among the manure-related properties the parameter determining the shape of the FIO release kinetic curve had the largest influence on the removal of FIOs from the fields. That underscored the need to better characterize the FIO release kinetics. Since the most sensitive model inputs are available in soil and weather databases or can be obtained using soil water models, results indicate the opportunity of obtaining large-scale estimates of FIO

  5. A phase transition between small- and large-field models of inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itzhaki, Nissan; Kovetz, Ely D

    2009-01-01

    We show that models of inflection point inflation exhibit a phase transition from a region in parameter space where they are of large-field type to a region where they are of small-field type. The phase transition is between a universal behavior, with respect to the initial condition, at the large-field region and non-universal behavior at the small-field region. The order parameter is the number of e-foldings. We find integer critical exponents at the transition between the two phases.

  6. The spinning Astrid-2 satellite used for modeling the Earth's main magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Jørgensen, P.S.; Risbo, T.

    2002-01-01

    , and therefore mapping of the Earth's magnetic field was possible. The spacecraft spins about a highly stable axis in space. This fact and the globally distributed data make the magnetic measurements well suited for the estimate of a magnetic field model at the spacecraft altitude (about 1000 km). This paper...... to better than 5 nT(rms) for latitudes Equatorward of 50degrees. Several methods for field modeling are discussed in this paper under the assumption that the direction of the spin axis in inertial space is nearly constant, and this assumption is corroborated by the observations. The approximate inertial...

  7. Qualitative models of magnetic field accelerated propagation in a plasma due to the Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, A.B.; Cherepanov, K.V.

    2000-01-01

    Two qualitatively new models of accelerated magnetic field propagation (relative to normal diffusion) in a plasma due to the Hall effect are developed within the frames of the electron magnetic hydrodynamics. The first model is based on a simple hydrodynamic approach, which, in particular, reproduces the number of known theoretical results. The second one makes it possible to obtain exact analytical description of the basic characteristics of the magnetic field accelerated propagation in a inhomogeneous iso-thermic plasma, namely, the magnetic field front and its effective width [ru

  8. Phase Structure Of Fuzzy Field Theories And Multi trace Matrix Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekel, J.

    2015-01-01

    We review the interplay of fuzzy field theories and matrix models, with an emphasis on the phase structure of fuzzy scalar field theories. We give a self-contained introduction to these topics and give the details concerning the saddle point approach for the usual single trace and multi trace matrix models. We then review the attempts to explain the phase structure of the fuzzy field theory using a corresponding random matrix ensemble, showing the strength and weaknesses of this approach. We conclude with a list of challenges one needs to overcome and the most interesting open problems one can try to solve. (author)

  9. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Global Lithospheric Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kother, Livia Kathleen; Hammer, Magnus Danel; Finlay, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We present a new technique for modelling the global lithospheric magnetic field at Earth's surface based on the estimation of equivalent potential field sources. As a demonstration we show an application to magnetic field measurements made by the CHAMP satellite during the period 2009-2010 when...... in the CHAOS-4 and MF7 models using more conventional spherical harmonic based approaches. Advantages of the equivalent source method include its local nature, allowing e.g. for regional grid refinement, and the ease of transforming to spherical harmonics when needed. Future applications will make use of Swarm...

  10. Brief communication "Modeling tornado dynamics and the generation of infrasound, electric and magnetic fields"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Schmitter

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations endorse earlier measurements of time varying electric and magnetic fields generated by tornadoes and dust devils. These signals may provide a means for early warning but together with a proper modeling approach can also provide insight into geometry and dynamics of the vortices. Our model calculations show the existence of pressure resonances characterized as acoustic duct modes with well defined frequencies. These resonances not only generate infrasound but also modulate the charge density and the velocity field and in this way lead to electric and magnetic field oscillations in the 0.5–20-Hz range that can be monitored from a distance of several kilometers.

  11. Cortical information flow in Parkinson's disease: a composite network/field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliff C. Kerr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play a crucial role in the execution of movements, as demonstrated by the severe motor deficits that accompany Parkinson's disease (PD. Since motor commands originate in the cortex, an important question is how the basal ganglia influence cortical information flow, and how this influence becomes pathological in PD. To explore this, we developed a composite neuronal network/neural field model. The network model consisted of 4950 spiking neurons, divided into 15 excitatory and inhibitory cell populations in the thalamus and cortex. The field model consisted of the cortex, thalamus, striatum, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus. Both models have been separately validated in previous work. Three field models were used: one with basal ganglia parameters based on data from healthy individuals, one based on data from individuals with PD, and one purely thalamocortical model. Spikes generated by these field models were then used to drive the network model. Compared to the network driven by the healthy model, the PD-driven network had lower firing rates, a shift in spectral power towards lower frequencies, and higher probability of bursting; each of these findings is consistent with empirical data on PD. In the healthy model, we found strong Granger causality in the beta and low gamma bands between cortical layers, but this was largely absent in the PD model. In particular, the reduction in Granger causality from the main "input" layer of the cortex (layer 4 to the main "output" layer (layer 5 was pronounced. This may account for symptoms of PD that seem to reflect deficits in information flow, such as bradykinesia. In general, these results demonstrate that the brain's large-scale oscillatory environment, represented here by the field model, strongly influences the information processing that occurs within its subnetworks. Hence, it may be preferable to drive spiking network models with physiologically realistic inputs rather than

  12. On the relation between phase-field crack approximation and gradient damage modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Christian; Zreid, Imadeddin; Kaliske, Michael

    2017-05-01

    The finite element implementation of a gradient enhanced microplane damage model is compared to a phase-field model for brittle fracture. Phase-field models and implicit gradient damage models share many similarities despite being conceived from very different standpoints. In both approaches, an additional differential equation and a length scale are introduced. However, while the phase-field method is formulated starting from the description of a crack in fracture mechanics, the gradient method starts from a continuum mechanics point of view. At first, the scope of application for both models is discussed to point out intersections. Then, the analysis of the employed mathematical methods and their rigorous comparison are presented. Finally, numerical examples are introduced to illustrate the findings of the comparison which are summarized in a conclusion at the end of the paper.

  13. On the use of mass-conserving wind fields in chemistry-transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bregman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method has been developed that provides mass-conserving wind fields for global chemistry-transport models. In previous global Eulerian modeling studies a mass-imbalance was found between the model mass transport and the surface pressure tendencies. Several methods have been suggested to correct for this imbalance, but so far no satisfactory solution has been found. Our new method solves these problems by using the wind fields in a spherical harmonical form (divergence and vorticity by mimicing the physics of the weather forecast model as closely as possible. A 3-D chemistry-transport model was used to show that the calculated ozone fields with the new processing method agree remarkably better with ozone observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. In addition, the calculated age of air in the lower stratosphere show better agreement with observations, although the air remains still too young in the extra-tropical stratosphere.

  14. CHAOS-2-a geomagnetic field model derived from one decade of continuous satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Mandea, M.; Sabaka, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    We have derived a model of the near-Earth's magnetic field using more than 10 yr of high-precision geomagnetic measurements from the three satellites Orsted, CHAMP and SAC-C. This model is an update of the two previous models, CHAOS (Olsen et al. 2006) and xCHAOS (Olsen & Mandea 2008). Data...... coefficients up to n = 20 are described by order 5 splines (with 6-month knot spacing) spanning the years from 1997.0 to 2009.5. Compared to its predecessors, the temporal regularization of the CHAOS-2 model is also modified. Indeed, second and higher order time derivatives of the core field are damped...... by minimizing the second time derivative of the squared magnetic field intensity at the core-mantle boundary. The CHAOS-2 model describes rapid time changes, as monitored by the ground magnetic observatories, much better than its predecessors....

  15. A general circuit model for spintronic devices under electric and magnetic fields

    KAUST Repository

    Alawein, Meshal

    2017-10-25

    In this work, we present a circuit model of diffusive spintronic devices capable of capturing the effects of both electric and magnetic fields. Starting from a modified version of the well-established drift-diffusion equations, we derive general equivalent circuit models of semiconducting/metallic nonmagnets and metallic ferromagnets. In contrast to other models that are based on steady-state transport equations which might also neglect certain effects such as thermal fluctuations, spin dissipation in the ferromagnets, and spin precession under magnetic fields, our model incorporates most of the important physics and is based on a time-dependent formulation. An application of our model is shown through simulations of a nonlocal spin-valve under the presence of a magnetic field, where we reproduce experimental results of electrical measurements that demonstrate the phenomena of spin precession and dephasing (“Hanle effect”).

  16. Reply to comment on 'Model calculation of the scanned field enhancement factor of CNTs'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Amir; Tripathi, V K

    2010-01-01

    In the paper (Ahmad and Tripathi 2006 Nanotechnology 17 3798), we derived an expression to compute the field enhancement factor of CNTs under any positional distribution of CNTs by using the model of a floating sphere between parallel anode and cathode plates. Using this expression we can compute the field enhancement factor of a CNT in a cluster (non-uniformly distributed CNTs). This expression was used to compute the field enhancement factor of a CNT in an array (uniformly distributed CNTs). We used an approximation to calculate the field enhancement factor. Hence, our expressions are correct in that assumption only. Zhbanov et al (2010 Nanotechnology 21 358001) suggest a correction that can calculate the field enhancement factor without using the approximation. Hence, this correction can improve the applicability of this model. (reply)

  17. Renormalization of the Nambu-Jona Lasinio model and spontaneously broken Abelian Gauge model without fundamental scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyderman, N.J.

    1976-01-01

    The Schwinger-Dyson equation for the Nambu-Jona Lasinio model is solved systematically subject to the constraint of spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. The solution to this equation generates interactions not explicitly present in the original Lagrangian, and the original 4-fermion interaction is not present in the solution. The theory creates bound-states with respect to which a perturbation theory consistent with the chiral symmetry is set up. The analysis suggests that this theory is renormalizable in the sense that all divergences can be grouped into a few arbitrary parameters. The renormalized propagators of this model are shown to be identical to those of a new solution to the sigma-model in which the bare 4-field coupling lambda 0 is chosen to be twice the π-fermion coupling g 0 . Also considered is spontaneously broken abelian gauge model without fundamental scalar fields by coupling an axial vector gauge field to the N ambu-Jona Lasinio model. It is shown how the Goldstone consequence of spontaneous symmetry breaking is avoided in the radiation gauge, and verify the Guralnik, Hagen, and Kibble theorem that under these conditions the global charge conservation is lost even though there is still local current conservation. This is contrasted with the Lorentz gauge situation. This also demonstrated the way the various noncovariant components of the massive gauge field combine in a gauge invariant scattering amplitude to propagate covariantly as a massive spin-1 particle, and this is compared with the Lorentz gauge calculation. F inally, a new model of interacting massless fermions is introduced, based on the models of Nambu and Jona Lasinio, and the Bjorken, which spontaneously breaks both chiral symmetry and Lorentz invariance. The content of this model is the same as that of the gauge model without fundamental scalar fields, but without fundamental gauge fields as well

  18. Transient interaction model of electromagnetic field generated by lightning current pulses and human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iváncsy, T; Kiss, I; Tamus, Z Á; Szücs, L

    2015-01-01

    The lightning current generates time-varying magnetic field near the down-conductor and the down-conductors are mounted on the wall of the buildings where residential places might be situated. It is well known that the rapidly changing magnetic fields can generate dangerous eddy currents in the human body.The higher duration and gradient of the magnetic field can cause potentially life threatening cardiac stimulation. The coupling mechanism between the electromagnetic field and the human body is based on a well-known physical phenomena (e.g. Faradays law of induction). However, the calculation of the induced current is very complicated because the shape of the organs is complex and the determination of the material properties of living tissues is difficult, as well. Our previous study revealed that the cardiac stimulation is independent of the rising time of the lightning current and only the peak of the current counts.In this study, the authors introduce an improved model of the interaction of electromagnetic fields of lighting current near down-conductor and human body. Our previous models are based on the quasi stationer field calculations, the new improved model is a transient model. This is because the magnetic field around the down-conductor and in the human body can be determined more precisely, therefore the dangerous currents in the body can be estimated. (paper)

  19. Critical behavior of entropy production and learning rate: Ising model with an oscillating field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yirui; Barato, Andre C.

    2016-11-01

    We study the critical behavior of the entropy production of the Ising model subject to a magnetic field that oscillates in time. The mean-field model displays a phase transition that can be either first or second-order, depending on the amplitude of the field and on the frequency of oscillation. Within this approximation the entropy production rate is shown to have a discontinuity when the transition is first-order and to be continuous, with a jump in its first derivative, if the transition is second-order. In two dimensions, we find with numerical simulations that the critical behavior of the entropy production rate is the same, independent of the frequency and amplitude of the field. Its first derivative has a logarithmic divergence at the critical point. This result is in agreement with the lack of a first-order phase transition in two dimensions. We analyze a model with a field that changes at stochastic time-intervals between two values. This model allows for an informational theoretic interpretation, with the system as a sensor that follows the external field. We calculate numerically a lower bound on the learning rate, which quantifies how much information the system obtains about the field. Its first derivative with respect to temperature is found to have a jump at the critical point.

  20. Calculation of the Initial Magnetic Field for Mercury's Magnetosphere Hybrid Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Igor; Parunakian, David; Dyadechkin, Sergey; Belenkaya, Elena; Khodachenko, Maxim; Kallio, Esa; Alho, Markku

    2018-03-01

    Several types of numerical models are used to analyze the interactions of the solar wind flow with Mercury's magnetosphere, including kinetic models that determine magnetic and electric fields based on the spatial distribution of charges and currents, magnetohydrodynamic models that describe plasma as a conductive liquid, and hybrid models that describe ions kinetically in collisionless mode and represent electrons as a massless neutralizing liquid. The structure of resulting solutions is determined not only by the chosen set of equations that govern the behavior of plasma, but also by the initial and boundary conditions; i.e., their effects are not limited to the amount of computational work required to achieve a quasi-stationary solution. In this work, we have proposed using the magnetic field computed by the paraboloid model of Mercury's magnetosphere as the initial condition for subsequent hybrid modeling. The results of the model have been compared to measurements performed by the Messenger spacecraft during a single crossing of the magnetosheath and the magnetosphere. The selected orbit lies in the terminator plane, which allows us to observe two crossings of the bow shock and the magnetopause. In our calculations, we have defined the initial parameters of the global magnetospheric current systems in a way that allows us to minimize paraboloid magnetic field deviation along the trajectory of the Messenger from the experimental data. We have shown that the optimal initial field parameters include setting the penetration of a partial interplanetary magnetic field into the magnetosphere with a penetration coefficient of 0.2.

  1. Studies of Westward Electrojets and Field-Aligned Currents in the Magnetotail During Substorms: Implications for Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Harlan E.

    1996-01-01

    This section outlines those tasks undertaken in the final year that contribute integrally to the overarching project goals. Fast, during the final year, it is important to note that the project benefited greatly with the addition of a Boston University graduate student, Ms. Karen Hirsch. Jointly, we made substantial progress on the development of and improvements to magnetotail magnetic field and plasma models. The ultimate aim of this specific task was to assess critically the utility of such models for mapping low-altitude phenomena into the magnetotail (and vice-versa). The bulk of this effort centered around the finite-width- magnetotail convection model developed by and described by Spence and Kivelson (J. Geophys. Res., 98, 15,487, 1993). This analytic, theoretical model specifies the bulk plasma characteristics of the magnetotail plasma sheet (number density, temperature, pressure) across the full width of the tail from the inner edge of the plasma sheet to lunar distances. Model outputs are specified by boundary conditions of the source particle populations as well as the magnetic and electric field configuration. During the reporting period, we modified this code such that it can be interfaced with the auroral particle precipitation model developed by Dr. Terry Onsager. Together, our models provide a simple analytic specification of the equatorial distribution of fields and plasma along with their low-altitude consequences. Specifically, we have built a simple, yet powerful tool which allows us to indirectly 'map' auroral precipitation signatures (VDIS, inverted-V's, etc.) measured by polar orbiting spacecraft in the ionosphere, to the magnetospheric equatorial plane. The combined models allow us to associate latitudinal gradients measured in the ion energy fluxes at low-altitudes with the large-scale pressure gradients in the equatorial plane. Given this global, quasi-static association, we can then make fairly strong statements regarding the location of

  2. Modular model for Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within the average observed magnetopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Haje; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Johnson, Catherine L; Philpott, Lydia C; Anderson, Brian J; Al Asad, Manar M; Solomon, Sean C; McNutt, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft. The field of internal origin is approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT R M 3 , where R M is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis. External field sources include currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is described by a disk-shaped current near the planet and a sheet current at larger (≳ 5  R M ) antisunward distances. The tail currents are constrained by minimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) residual between the model and the magnetic field observed within the magnetosphere. The magnetopause current contributions are derived by shielding the field of each module external to the magnetopause by minimizing the RMS normal component of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. The new model yields improvements over the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause and the nightside magnetic equatorial plane. Magnetic field residuals remain that are distributed systematically over large areas and vary monotonically with magnetic activity. Further advances in empirical descriptions of Mercury's magnetospheric external field will need to account for the dependence of the tail and magnetopause currents on magnetic activity and additional sources within the magnetosphere associated with Birkeland currents and plasma distributions near the dayside magnetopause.

  3. Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

  4. Using a Monte Carlo model to predict dosimetric properties of small radiotherapy photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Alison J. D.; Nahum, Alan E.; Fenwick, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate characterization of small-field dosimetry requires measurements to be made with precisely aligned specialized detectors and is thus time consuming and error prone. This work explores measurement differences between detectors by using a Monte Carlo model matched to large-field data to predict properties of smaller fields. Measurements made with a variety of detectors have been compared with calculated results to assess their validity and explore reasons for differences. Unshielded diodes are expected to produce some of the most useful data, as their small sensitive cross sections give good resolution whilst their energy dependence is shown to vary little with depth in a 15 MV linac beam. Their response is shown to be constant with field size over the range 1-10 cm, with a correction of 3% needed for a field size of 0.5 cm. BEAMnrc has been used to create a 15 MV beam model, matched to dosimetric data for square fields larger than 3 cm, and producing small-field profiles and percentage depth doses (PDDs) that agree well with unshielded diode data for field sizes down to 0.5 cm. For fields sizes of 1.5 cm and above, little detector-to-detector variation exists in measured output factors, however for a 0.5 cm field a relative spread of 18% is seen between output factors measured with different detectors--values measured with the diamond and pinpoint detectors lying below that of the unshielded diode, with the shielded diode value being higher. Relative to the corrected unshielded diode measurement, the Monte Carlo modeled output factor is 4.5% low, a discrepancy that is probably due to the focal spot fluence profile and source occlusion modeling. The large-field Monte Carlo model can, therefore, currently be used to predict small-field profiles and PDDs measured with an unshielded diode. However, determination of output factors for the smallest fields requires a more detailed model of focal spot fluence and source occlusion.

  5. A Simple Model of Fields Including the Strong or Nuclear Force and a Cosmological Speculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Spencer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Reexamining the assumptions underlying the General Theory of Relativity and calling an object's gravitational field its inertia, and acceleration simply resistance to that inertia, yields a simple field model where the potential (kinetic energy of a particle at rest is its capacity to move itself when its inertial field becomes imbalanced. The model then attributes electromagnetic and strong forces to the effects of changes in basic particle shape. Following up on the model's assumption that the relative intensity of a particle's gravitational field is always inversely related to its perceived volume and assuming that all black holes spin, may create the possibility of a cosmic rebound where a final spinning black hole ends with a new Big Bang.

  6. Comparison of two mean-field based theoretical analysis methods for SIS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaquan; Lu, Dan; Yang, Shunkun

    2017-11-01

    Epidemic spreading has been intensively studied in SIS epidemic model. Although the mean-field theory of SIS model has been widely used in the research, there is a lack of comparative results between different theoretical calculations, and the differences between them should be systematically explained. In this paper, we have compared different theoretical solutions for mean-field theory and explained the underlying reason. We first describe the differences between different equations for mean-field theory in different networks. The results show that the difference between mean-field reaction equations is due to the different probability consideration for the infection process. This finding will help us to design better theoretical solutions for epidemic models.

  7. Tricritical behavior in the diluted transverse spin-1 Ising model with a longitudinal crystal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Htoutou, K.; Oubelkacem, A.; Ainane, A.; Saber, M.

    2005-01-01

    The transverse spin-1 Ising model with a longitudinal crystal field exhibits a tricritical behavior. Within the effective field theory with a probability distribution technique that accounts for the self-spin correlations, we have studied the influence of site dilution on this behavior and have calculated the temperature-transverse field-longitudinal crystal field-concentration phase diagrams and determined, in particular, the influence of the concentration of magnetic atoms c on the tricritical behavior. We have found that the tricritical point appears for large values of the concentration c of magnetic atoms and disappears with the increase in dilution (small values of c). Results for square lattice are calculated numerically and some interesting results are obtained. In certain ranges of values of the strength of the longitudinal crystal field D/J when it becomes sufficiently negative, we found re-entrant phenomenon, which disappears with increase in the value of the strength of the transverse field

  8. Recent developments in high-resolution global altimetric gravity field modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Berry, P. A .M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, dedicated effort has been made to improve high-resolution global marine gravity fields. One new global field is the Danish National Space Center (DNSC) 1-minute grid called DNSC08GRA, released in 2008. DNSC08GRA was derived from double-retracked satellite altimetry, mainly from...... older gravity fields show accuracy improvement of the order of 20-40% due to a combination of retracking, enhanced processing, and the use of the new EGM2008 geoid model. In coastal and polar regions, accuracy improved in many places by 40-50% (or more) compared with older global marine gravity fields....... the ERS-1 geodetic mission data, augmented with new retracked GEOSAT data which have significantly enhanced the range and hence the gravity field accuracy. DNSC08GRA is the first high-resolution global gravity field to cover the entire Arctic Ocean all the way to the North Pole. Comparisons with other...

  9. Restoration of dimensional reduction in the random-field Ising model at five dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fytas, Nikolaos G.; Martín-Mayor, Víctor; Picco, Marco; Sourlas, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    The random-field Ising model is one of the few disordered systems where the perturbative renormalization group can be carried out to all orders of perturbation theory. This analysis predicts dimensional reduction, i.e., that the critical properties of the random-field Ising model in D dimensions are identical to those of the pure Ising ferromagnet in D -2 dimensions. It is well known that dimensional reduction is not true in three dimensions, thus invalidating the perturbative renormalization group prediction. Here, we report high-precision numerical simulations of the 5D random-field Ising model at zero temperature. We illustrate universality by comparing different probability distributions for the random fields. We compute all the relevant critical exponents (including the critical slowing down exponent for the ground-state finding algorithm), as well as several other renormalization-group invariants. The estimated values of the critical exponents of the 5D random-field Ising model are statistically compatible to those of the pure 3D Ising ferromagnet. These results support the restoration of dimensional reduction at D =5 . We thus conclude that the failure of the perturbative renormalization group is a low-dimensional phenomenon. We close our contribution by comparing universal quantities for the random-field problem at dimensions 3 ≤D <6 to their values in the pure Ising model at D -2 dimensions, and we provide a clear verification of the Rushbrooke equality at all studied dimensions.

  10. Exactly solvable Ogston model of gel electrophoresis. IX. Generalizing the lattice model to treat high field intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Michel G.; Slater, Gary W.

    2002-10-01

    Traditionally, the Ogston regime is studied solely in the limit of low field intensities. This explains why the theoretical discussion has focused until now on the relative roles of the fractional volume available to the analyte and the subtleties of the gel architecture. Over the past several years, we have developed a lattice model of gel electrophoresis that has allowed us to revisit the fundamental assumptions of the standard Ogston model. In particular, we demonstrated that the fractional free volume is not the relevant parameter for gel sieving. In this article, we continue the development of this model and we generalize our mathematical approach to treat nonvanishing electric field intensities. To do so, we must revisit the way biased random walks are normally modeled by stochastic processes. Straightforward generalizations based on standard Metropolis-like schemes fail at high field intensities. Moreover, our generalization requires the complete decoupling of the spatial directions parallel and perpendicular to the field direction. We show that our novel theoretical approach makes it possible to calculate exact mobilities in the presence of lattice obstacles. Several two-dimensional examples are then studied, including one that includes topological dead ends that act like traps. In the latter case, we recover results very similar to those reported by Serwer et al. [Biopolymers 29, 1863 (1990)] on the trapping electrophoresis of charged spheres in agarose gels. In the absence of such traps, the mobility is shown to be a very weak function of the electric field, thus validating the historical neglect of the field intensity in the development of obstruction models for the Ogston sieving regime of small analytes. Finally, we describe how the present model could be improved to treat more realistic cases and we discuss the problem of the field dependence of the diffusion coefficient during electrophoresis.

  11. Quasi-realistic distribution of interaction fields leading to a variant of Ising spin glass model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanasa, Radu; Enachescu, Cristian; Stancu, Alexandru; Linares, Jorge; Varret, Francois

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of interaction fields of an Ising-like system, obtained by Monte Carlo entropic sampling is used for modeling the hysteretic behavior of patterned media made of magnetic particles with a common anisotropy axis; a variant of the canonical Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass model is introduced

  12. A Direct inverse model to determine permeability fields from pressure and flow rate measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, G.K.; Fokker, P.A.; Wilschut, F.; Zijl, W.

    2008-01-01

    The determination of the permeability field from pressure and flow rate measurements in wells is a key problem in reservoir engineering. This paper presents a Double Constraint method for inverse modeling that is an example of direct inverse modeling. The method is used with a standard

  13. Comparing i-Tree modeled ozone deposition with field measurements in a periurban Mediterranean forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Morani; D. Nowak; S. Hirabayashi; G. Guidolotti; M. Medori; V. Muzzini; S. Fares; G. Scarascia Mugnozza; C. Calfapietra

    2014-01-01

    Ozone flux estimates from the i-Tree model were compared with ozone flux measurements using the Eddy Covariance technique in a periurban Mediterranean forest near Rome (Castelporziano). For the first time i-Tree model outputs were compared with field measurements in relation to dry deposition estimates. Results showed generally a...

  14. Prediction of the Acoustic Field Associated with Instability Wave Source Model for a Compressible Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Mankbadi, Reda R.; Dahl, Milo D.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides preliminary results of the study of the acoustic radiation from the source model representing spatially-growing instability waves in a round jet at high speeds. The source model is briefly discussed first followed by the analysis of the produced acoustic directivity pattern. Two integral surface techniques are discussed and compared for prediction of the jet acoustic radiation field.

  15. PIEteR: a field specific production model for sugar beet growing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A.B.; Struik, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    PIEteR is a field-specific production model for sugar-beet growing. It can provide quantitative information about the technical, economic and environmental consequences of plant density, nitrogen application and harvest date. Its core is a growth model that simulates rates of emergence, development,

  16. Comment on 'Model calculation of the scanned field enhancement factor of CNTs'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhbanov, A I; Lee, Yong-Gu; Pogorelov, E G; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2010-01-01

    The model proposed by Ahmad and Tripathi (2006 Nanotechnology 17 3798) demonstrates that the field enhancement factor of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reaches a maximum at a certain length. Here, we show that this behavior should not occur and suggest our correction to this model. (comment)

  17. Towards a phase field model of the microstructural evolution of duplex steel with experimental verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Voorhees, P.W.; Lauridsen, Erik Mejdal

    2012-01-01

    A phase field model to study the microstructural evolution of a polycrystalline dual-phase material with conserved phase fraction has been implemented, and 2D simulations have been performed. For 2D simulations, the model predicts the cubic growth well-known for diffusion-controlled systems. Some...

  18. An analysis of the intermediate field theory of T{sup 4} tensor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Viet Anh [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Université Paris 11, Bat 210, Faculté des Sciences, Orsay Cedex, 91405 (France); IPhT, Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA/DSM/IPhT, CEA/Saclay,Orme des Merisiers batiment 774, Point courrier 136, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, 91191 (France); LAREMA, CNRS UMR 6093, Université d’Anger, Département de mathématiques,Faculté des Sciences, 2 Boulevard Lavoisier, Angers, 49045 (France); Dartois, Stéphane [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS UMR 8627, Université Paris 11, Bat 210, Faculté des Sciences, Orsay Cedex, 91405 (France); LIPN, Institut Galilée, CNRS UMR, Université Paris 13,99 avenue Jean Baptiste Clément, Villetaneuse, 93430 (France); Eynard, Bertrand [IPhT, Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA/DSM/IPhT, CEA/Saclay,Orme des Merisiers batiment 774, Point courrier 136, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, 91191 (France); Centre de Recherches Mathématiques, Université de Montréal, Pavillon André-Aisenstadt,2920, Chemin de la tour, bur. 5357, Montréal, Québec, H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2015-01-07

    In this paper we analyze the multi-matrix model arising from the intermediate field representation of the tensor model with all quartic melonic interactions. We derive the saddle point equation and the Schwinger-Dyson constraints. We then use them to describe the leading and next-to-leading eigenvalues distribution of the matrices.

  19. Modelling indoor electromagnetic fields (EMF) from mobile phone base stations for epidemiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekhuizen, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34472641X; Vermeulen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; van Eijsden, M.; van Strien, R.; Bürgi, A.; Loomans, E.; Guxens, M.; Kromhout, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; Huss, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/331385880

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from mobile phone base stations can be reliably modelled for outdoor locations, using 3D radio wave propagation models that consider antenna characteristics and building geometry. For exposure assessment in epidemiological studies, however, it is

  20. Ehrenfest's theorem and the validity of the two-step model for strong-field ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shvetsov-Shilovskiy, Nikolay; Dimitrovski, Darko; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    By comparison with the solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation we explore the validity of the two-step semiclassical model for strong-field ionization in elliptically polarized laser pulses. We find that the discrepancy between the two-step model and the quantum theory correlates...

  1. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k c and k ¯ and

  2. A GOCE-only global gravity field model by the space-wise approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migliaccio, Federica; Reguzzoni, Mirko; Gatti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The global gravity field model computed by the spacewise approach is one of three official solutions delivered by ESA from the analysis of the GOCE data. The model consists of a set of spherical harmonic coefficients and the corresponding error covariance matrix. The main idea behind this approac...

  3. Coupling Ocean Models and Satellite Derived Optical Fields to Estimate LIDAR Penetration and Detection Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    thermohaline circulation , we compute a density-based MLD for the Gulf of Mexico from the model daily- averaged temperature and salinity fields using the...resolution which coincides with the MODIS-Aqua 4Km dataset. The model is data-assimilative and has been shown to well-represent the circulation of the

  4. Self-consistent field modeling of adsorption from polymer/surfactant mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmus, B.R.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of a self-consistent field model that describes the competitive adsorption of nonionic alkyl-(ethylene oxide) surfactants and nonionic polymer poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) from aqueous solutions onto silica. The model explicitly describes the response to the pH and the

  5. Definition of zones with different levels of productivity within an agricultural field using fuzzy modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoning of agricultural fields is an important task for utilization of precision farming technology. One method for the definition of zones with different levels of productivity is based on fuzzy indicator model. Fuzzy indicator model for identification of zones with different levels of productivit...

  6. Development and Analysis of Volume Multi-Sphere Method Model Generation using Electric Field Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, G. J.

    Electrostatic modeling of spacecraft has wide-reaching applications such as detumbling space debris in the Geosynchronous Earth Orbit regime before docking, servicing and tugging space debris to graveyard orbits, and Lorentz augmented orbits. The viability of electrostatic actuation control applications relies on faster-than-realtime characterization of the electrostatic interaction. The Volume Multi-Sphere Method (VMSM) seeks the optimal placement and radii of a small number of equipotential spheres to accurately model the electrostatic force and torque on a conducting space object. Current VMSM models tuned using force and torque comparisons with commercially available finite element software are subject to the modeled probe size and numerical errors of the software. This work first investigates fitting of VMSM models to Surface-MSM (SMSM) generated electrical field data, removing modeling dependence on probe geometry while significantly increasing performance and speed. A proposed electric field matching cost function is compared to a force and torque cost function, the inclusion of a self-capacitance constraint is explored and 4 degree-of-freedom VMSM models generated using electric field matching are investigated. The resulting E-field based VMSM development framework is illustrated on a box-shaped hub with a single solar panel, and convergence properties of select models are qualitatively analyzed. Despite the complex non-symmetric spacecraft geometry, elegantly simple 2-sphere VMSM solutions provide force and torque fits within a few percent.

  7. Thermodynamically Consistent Algorithms for the Solution of Phase-Field Models

    KAUST Repository

    Vignal, Philippe

    2016-02-11

    Phase-field models are emerging as a promising strategy to simulate interfacial phenomena. Rather than tracking interfaces explicitly as done in sharp interface descriptions, these models use a diffuse order parameter to monitor interfaces implicitly. This implicit description, as well as solid physical and mathematical footings, allow phase-field models to overcome problems found by predecessors. Nonetheless, the method has significant drawbacks. The phase-field framework relies on the solution of high-order, nonlinear partial differential equations. Solving these equations entails a considerable computational cost, so finding efficient strategies to handle them is important. Also, standard discretization strategies can many times lead to incorrect solutions. This happens because, for numerical solutions to phase-field equations to be valid, physical conditions such as mass conservation and free energy monotonicity need to be guaranteed. In this work, we focus on the development of thermodynamically consistent algorithms for time integration of phase-field models. The first part of this thesis focuses on an energy-stable numerical strategy developed for the phase-field crystal equation. This model was put forward to model microstructure evolution. The algorithm developed conserves, guarantees energy stability and is second order accurate in time. The second part of the thesis presents two numerical schemes that generalize literature regarding energy-stable methods for conserved and non-conserved phase-field models. The time discretization strategies can conserve mass if needed, are energy-stable, and second order accurate in time. We also develop an adaptive time-stepping strategy, which can be applied to any second-order accurate scheme. This time-adaptive strategy relies on a backward approximation to give an accurate error estimator. The spatial discretization, in both parts, relies on a mixed finite element formulation and isogeometric analysis. The codes are

  8. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy) and L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin str. 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Manti, S. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-02-21

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  9. New holographic scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fehri, J. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-08

    Motivated by the work of Granda and Oliveros [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199], we generalize their work to the non-flat case. We study the correspondence between the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the new holographic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe. In the limiting case of a flat universe, i.e. k=0, all results given in [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199] are obtained.

  10. New holographic scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K.; Fehri, J.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the work of Granda and Oliveros [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199], we generalize their work to the non-flat case. We study the correspondence between the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the new holographic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe. In the limiting case of a flat universe, i.e. k=0, all results given in [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199] are obtained.

  11. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Manti, S.

    2013-01-01

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  12. A Navier-Stokes phase-field crystal model for colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Simon; Voigt, Axel

    2015-04-21

    We develop a fully continuous model for colloidal suspensions with hydrodynamic interactions. The Navier-Stokes Phase-Field Crystal model combines ideas of dynamic density functional theory with particulate flow approaches and is derived in detail and related to other dynamic density functional theory approaches with hydrodynamic interactions. The derived system is numerically solved using adaptive finite elements and is used to analyze colloidal crystallization in flowing environments demonstrating a strong coupling in both directions between the crystal shape and the flow field. We further validate the model against other computational approaches for particulate flow systems for various colloidal sedimentation problems.

  13. Using global magnetospheric models for simulation and interpretation of Swarm external field measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretto, T.; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    simulated external contributions relevant for internal field modeling. These have proven very valuable for the design and planning of the up-coming multi-satellite Swarm mission. In addition, a real event simulation was carried out for a moderately active time interval when observations from the Orsted...... it consistently underestimates the dayside region 2 currents and overestimates the horizontal ionospheric closure currents in the dayside polar cap. Furthermore, with this example we illustrate the great benefit of utilizing the global model for the interpretation of Swarm external field observations and......, likewise, the potential of using Swarm measurements to test and improve the global model....

  14. A possible gravitational origin of the Higgs field in the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flato, M.

    1988-01-01

    A standard model for weak and electromagnetic interactions with the inclusion of a partially quantized gravitational field g={g αβ } is considered. The imposition of the causality condition on g αβ reduces them to the form g αβ (x)=Ω(x)g αβ (x) where Ω(x) is a scalar quantum field and g αβ (x) is a dynamical c-number metric. Expressing Ω as a local function of some other scalar field φ, whose kinetic term has the conventional form, we get Ω(x)=-4/3G 0 :φ 2 (x): where G 0 is the Newton constant. The gravitational action integral S(g,φ) for g αβ and φ fields admits the spontaneous symmetry breaking. This implies that in the standard model with gravitational field included the scalar graviton field φ may play the role of Higgs field and may generate the masses of W and Z bosons, leptons and quarks. This shows that gravity may be responsible for all particle masses of the standard model. (orig.)

  15. Photometry and Multipolar Magnetic Field Modeling of Polars: BY Camelopardalis and FL Ceti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Mason

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present new broad band optical photometry of two magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, the asynchronous polar BY Camelopardalis and the short period polar FL Ceti. Observations were obtained at the 2.1-m Otto Struve Telescope of McDonald Observatory with 3s and 1s integration times respectively. In an attempt to understand the observed complex changes in accretion flow geometry observed in BY Cam, we performed full 3D MHD simulations assuming a variety of white dwarf magnetic field structures. We investigate fields with increasing complexity including both aligned and non-aligned dipole plus quadrupole field components. We compare model predictions with photometry at various phases of the beat cycle and find that synthetic light curves derived from a multipolar field structure are broadly consistent with optical photometry. FL Ceti is observed to have two very small accretion regions at the foot-points of the white dwarf’s magnetic field. Both accretion regions are visible at the same time in the high state and are about 100 degrees apart. MHD modeling using a dipole plus quadrupole field structure yields quite similar accretion regions as those observed in FL Ceti. We conclude that accretion flows calculated from MHD modeling of multi-polar magnetic fields produce synthetic light curves consistent with photometry of these magnetic cataclysmic variables.

  16. Extending comprehensive models of the Earth's magnetic field with Orsted and CHAMP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, T.J.; Olsen, Nils; Purucker, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    A new model of the quiet-time, near-Earth magnetic field has been derived using a comprehensive approach, which includes not only POGO and Magsat satellite data, but also data from the Orsted and CHAMP satellites. The resulting model shows great improvement over its predecessors in terms...... of completeness of sources, time span and noise reduction in parameters. With its well separated fields and extended time domain of 1960 to mid-2002, the model is able to detect the known sequence of geomagnetic jerks within this frame and gives evidence for an event of interest around 1997. Because all sources...... are coestimated in a comprehensive approach, intriguing north-south features typically filtered out with other methods are being discovered in the lithospheric representation of the model, such as the S Atlantic spreading ridge and Andean subduction zone lineations. In addition, this lithospheric field exhibits...

  17. Creating physically-based three-dimensional microstructures: Bridging phase-field and crystal plasticity models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Owen, Steven J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Abdeljawad, Fadi F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanks, Byron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In order to better incorporate microstructures in continuum scale models, we use a novel finite element (FE) meshing technique to generate three-dimensional polycrystalline aggregates from a phase field grain growth model of grain microstructures. The proposed meshing technique creates hexahedral FE meshes that capture smooth interfaces between adjacent grains. Three dimensional realizations of grain microstructures from the phase field model are used in crystal plasticity-finite element (CP-FE) simulations of polycrystalline a -iron. We show that the interface conformal meshes significantly reduce artificial stress localizations in voxelated meshes that exhibit the so-called "wedding cake" interfaces. This framework provides a direct link between two mesoscale models - phase field and crystal plasticity - and for the first time allows mechanics simulations of polycrystalline materials using three-dimensional hexahedral finite element meshes with realistic topological features.

  18. Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes: New Zealand hydrothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

    1993-12-01

    Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions

  19. Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes usign New Zealand hydrothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-06-01

    Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions

  20. A metal-semiconductor composite model for the linear magnetoresistance in high magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jie; Zhang Duanming; Yang Fengxia; Li Zhihua; Deng Zongwei; Pan Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A model for the linear magnetoresistance (MR) in high magnetic field is proposed by considering silver-rich Ag 2+δ Se and Ag 2+δ Te materials as two-phase (silver metal phase and semiconductor phase) composites. The model takes the MR as a function of magnetic field, temperature and the conductivity of the two phases without magnetic field. The model predictions are in good agreement with the available experimental data. It is inferred from the model that there is a critical volume fraction of silver metal phase, at which the MR reaches a maximum value. The values of the critical volume fraction of the silver metal phase are about 0.2 and 0.05 for the Ag 2+δ Te thin film and Ag 2+δ Se bulk, respectively. We interpret the occurrence of the critical volume fraction as a result of the percolation between silver particles in the material