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Sample records for field alabama usa

  1. Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae in Alabama, USA

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    Dana J. Ehret

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world’s oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon. Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis.

  2. Distribution patterns of invasive alien species in Alabama, USA

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    Xiongwen Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Invasive alien species (IAS cause environmental and economical problems. How to effectively manage all IAS at a large area is a challenge.Hypotheses about IAS (such as the “human activity” hypothesis, the “biotic acceptance” and the “biotic resistance” have been proposedfrom numerous studies. Here the state of Alabama in USA, widely occupied by IAS, is used as a case study for characterizing the emergentpatterns of IAS. The results indicate that most IAS are located in metropolitan areas and in the Black Belt area which is a historical intensiveland use area. There are positive relationships between the richness of IAS and the change of human population, the species richness and thenumber of endangered species, as well as the total road length and farmland area across Alabama. This study partially supports the abovethree hypotheses and provides a general pattern of local IAS. Based on possible processes related with IAS, some implications forstrategically managing local IAS are discussed.

  3. Alabama warm mix asphalt field study : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The Alabama Department of Transportation hosted a warm mix asphalt field demonstration in August 2007. The warm mix asphalt technology demonstrated was Evotherm Dispersed Asphalt Technology. The WMA and hot mix asphalt produced for the demonstration ...

  4. Evaluation of site impacts associated with three silvicultural prescriptions in an upland hardwood stand in northern Alabama, USA

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    Emily A. Carter; Robert B. Rummer; Bryce J. Stokes

    2006-01-01

    Soil disturbance patterns and associated changes in soil physical status were measured in a study that evaluated the implementation of three alternative management prescriptions in an upland hardwood stand in northern Alabama, USA. Management prescriptions applied in this study consisted of a clear-cut, strip cut, and deferment cut that were compared to a non-harvested...

  5. Serosurveillance of Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus in Amphibians and Reptiles from Alabama, USA

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    Graham, Sean P.; Hassan, Hassan K.; Chapman, Taryn; White, Gregory; Guyer, Craig; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is among the most medically important arboviruses in North America, and studies suggest a role for amphibians and reptiles in its transmission cycle. Serum samples collected from 351 amphibians and reptiles (27 species) from Alabama, USA, were tested for the presence of antibodies against EEEV. Frogs, turtles, and lizards showed little or no seropositivity, and snakes had high seropositivity rates. Most seropositive species were preferred or abundant hosts of Culex spp. mosquitoes at Tuskegee National Forest, that target ectothermic hosts. The cottonmouth, the most abundant ectotherm sampled, displayed a high prevalence of seropositivity, indicating its possible role as an amplification and/or over-wintering reservoir for EEEV. PMID:22403333

  6. Serosurveillance of eastern equine encephalitis virus in amphibians and reptiles from Alabama, USA.

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    Graham, Sean P; Hassan, Hassan K; Chapman, Taryn; White, Gregory; Guyer, Craig; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2012-03-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is among the most medically important arboviruses in North America, and studies suggest a role for amphibians and reptiles in its transmission cycle. Serum samples collected from 351 amphibians and reptiles (27 species) from Alabama, USA, were tested for the presence of antibodies against EEEV. Frogs, turtles, and lizards showed little or no seropositivity, and snakes had high seropositivity rates. Most seropositive species were preferred or abundant hosts of Culex spp. mosquitoes at Tuskegee National Forest, that target ectothermic hosts. The cottonmouth, the most abundant ectotherm sampled, displayed a high prevalence of seropositivity, indicating its possible role as an amplification and/or over-wintering reservoir for EEEV.

  7. Habitat use of age 0 Alabama shad in the Pascagoula River drainage, USA

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    P. F. Mickle; J.F. Schaefer; S.B. Adams; B.R. Kreiser

    2010-01-01

    Alabama shad (Alosa alabamae) is an anadromous species that spawns in Gulf of Mexico drainages and is a NOAA Fisheries Species of Concern. Habitat degradation and barriers to migration are considered contributing factors to range contraction that has left just the Pascagoula River drainage population in Mississippi. We studied juvenile life history and autecology in...

  8. Amphibian and reptile responses to thinning and prescribed burning in mixed pine-hardwood forests of northwestern Alabama, USA

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    William B. Sutton; Yong Wang; Callie J. Schweitzer

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the response of amphibians and reptiles to two levels of prescribed burning and three levels of thinning using a field experiment consisting of a before–after, control-impact, and factorial complete block design over a four year period in the William B. Bankhead National Forest located in northwestern Alabama. We captured 2643 individuals representing 47...

  9. Prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in skinless, boneless retail broiler meat from 2005 through 2011 in Alabama, USA

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    Williams Aretha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in 755 skinless, boneless retail broiler meat samples (breast, tenderloins and thighs collected from food stores in Alabama, USA, from 2005 through 2011 was examined. Campylobacter spp. were isolated using enrichment and plate media. Isolates were identified with multiplex PCR assays and typed with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Data were analyzed by nominal variables (brand, plant, product, season, state and store that may affect the prevalence of these bacteria. Results The average prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in retail broiler meat for these years was 41%, with no statistical differences in the prevalence by year (P > 0.05. Seasons did not affect the prevalence of C. jejuni but statistically affected the prevalence of C. coli (P P P C. coli and C. jejuni had an average prevalence of 28% and 66%, respectively. The prevalence of C. coli varied by brand, plant, season, state, store and year, while the prevalence of C. jejuni varied by brand, product, state and store. Tenderloins had a lower prevalence of Campylobacter spp. than breasts and thighs (P P > 0.05 were observed in the prevalence of C. jejuni by season, the lowest prevalence of C. coli was recorded from October through March. A large diversity of PFGE profiles was found for C. jejuni, with some profiles from the same processing plants reappearing throughout the years. Conclusions The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. did not change during the seven years of the study; however, it did change when analyzed by brand, product and state. Seasons did not affect the prevalence of C. jejuni, but they did affect the prevalence of C. coli. Larger PFGE databases are needed to assess the temporal reoccurrence of PFGE profiles to help predict the risk associated with each profile.

  10. A new species of Cretalamna sensu stricto (Lamniformes, Otodontidae) from the Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian) of Alabama, USA

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    Ehret, Dana J.

    2018-01-01

    Decades of collecting from exposures of the Upper Cretaceous Tombigbee Sand Member of the Eutaw Formation and Mooreville Chalk in Alabama, USA has produced large numbers of isolated Cretalamna (sensu stricto) teeth. Many of these teeth had formerly been assigned to the extinct Late Cretaceous shark Cretalamna appendiculata (Agassiz, 1843), a taxon that is now considered largely restricted to the Turonian of Europe. Recent studies have shed light on the diversity of Late Cretaceous Cretalamna (s.s.) taxa, and here we recognize a new species from Alabama, Cretalamna bryanti. The teeth of C. bryanti sp. nov. appear aligned with the members of the Cretalamna borealis species group, but can be distinguished from these other species by a combination of the following: anterior teeth with a more pronounced and triangular lingual root protuberance, broader triangular cusp, and a taller root relative to the height of the crown; anteriorly situated lateroposterior teeth have a distally inclined or hooked main cusp and more than one pair of lateral cusplets; and lateroposterior teeth have a strong distally hooked main cusp and a root that is largely symmetrical in basal view. At present, C. bryanti sp. nov. is stratigraphically confined to the Santonian/Campanian Dicarinella asymetrica Sigal, 1952 and Globotruncanita elevata Brotzen, 1934 Planktonic Foraminiferal Zones within the Tombigbee Sand Member of the Eutaw Formation and Mooreville Chalk, and teeth have been collected from only four counties in central and western Alabama. The recognition of C. bryanti sp. nov. in Alabama adds to our knowledge on the diversity and distribution of Late Cretaceous otodontids in the region. PMID:29333348

  11. A new species of Cretalamna sensu stricto (Lamniformes, Otodontidae from the Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian of Alabama, USA

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    Jun A. Ebersole

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Decades of collecting from exposures of the Upper Cretaceous Tombigbee Sand Member of the Eutaw Formation and Mooreville Chalk in Alabama, USA has produced large numbers of isolated Cretalamna (sensu stricto teeth. Many of these teeth had formerly been assigned to the extinct Late Cretaceous shark Cretalamna appendiculata (Agassiz, 1843, a taxon that is now considered largely restricted to the Turonian of Europe. Recent studies have shed light on the diversity of Late Cretaceous Cretalamna (s.s. taxa, and here we recognize a new species from Alabama, Cretalamna bryanti. The teeth of C. bryanti sp. nov. appear aligned with the members of the Cretalamna borealis species group, but can be distinguished from these other species by a combination of the following: anterior teeth with a more pronounced and triangular lingual root protuberance, broader triangular cusp, and a taller root relative to the height of the crown; anteriorly situated lateroposterior teeth have a distally inclined or hooked main cusp and more than one pair of lateral cusplets; and lateroposterior teeth have a strong distally hooked main cusp and a root that is largely symmetrical in basal view. At present, C. bryanti sp. nov. is stratigraphically confined to the Santonian/Campanian Dicarinella asymetrica Sigal, 1952 and Globotruncanita elevata Brotzen, 1934 Planktonic Foraminiferal Zones within the Tombigbee Sand Member of the Eutaw Formation and Mooreville Chalk, and teeth have been collected from only four counties in central and western Alabama. The recognition of C. bryanti sp. nov. in Alabama adds to our knowledge on the diversity and distribution of Late Cretaceous otodontids in the region.

  12. Habitat relationships of reptiles in pine beetle disturbed forests of Alabama, U.S.A., with guidelines for a modified drift-fence sampling method

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    William B. Sutton; Yong Wang; Callie J. Schweitzer

    2010-01-01

    Understanding vertebrate habitat relationships is important to promote management strategies for the longterm conservation of many species. Using a modified drift fence method, we sampled reptiles and compared habitat variables within the William B. Bankhead National Forest (BNF) in Alabama, U.S.A from April 2005 to June 2006. We captured 226 individual reptiles...

  13. Development of Ecogeomorphological (EGM Stream Design and Assessment Tools for the Piedmont of Alabama, USA

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    Brian Helms

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Regional data needed for effective stream restoration include hydraulic geometry relationships (i.e., regional curves and reference channel morphology parameters. Increasingly ecological conditions are being considered when designing, implementing, and assessing restoration efforts. We provide morphology relationships and associated ecological endpoint curves for reference streams in the Alabama piedmont. Twenty-one reference stream reaches were identified in the Tallapoosa drainage of Alabama, ranging from 0.2 to 242 km2 drainage area. Geomorphic surveys were conducted in each stream to measure riffle cross-sections and longitudinal profiles and related to drainage area to develop regional curves. Fish, crayfish, and benthic macroinvertebrates were collected from each surveyed reach and related to drainage area and geomorphic data to provide associated biological community endpoints. Bankfull channel cross-section area, width, mean depth, and estimated discharge were strongly correlated to watershed drainage area, similar to efforts in other areas of the Piedmont ecoregion. Multiple measures of fish assemblages and crayfish size were strongly predicted by drainage area and geomorphic dimensions. Macroinvertebrates showed no taxonomic and limited functional relationships with drainage area and geomorphic dimension. These tools, which integrate geomorphological and ecological conditions, can result in improved stream evaluations and designs increasing the effectiveness of stream restoration projects.

  14. Economic-environmental modeling of point source pollution in Jefferson County, Alabama, USA.

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    Kebede, Ellene; Schreiner, Dean F; Huluka, Gobena

    2002-05-01

    This paper uses an integrated economic-environmental model to assess the point source pollution from major industries in Jefferson County, Northern Alabama. Industrial expansion generates employment, income, and tax revenue for the public sector; however, it is also often associated with the discharge of chemical pollutants. Jefferson County is one of the largest industrial counties in Alabama that experienced smog warnings and ambient ozone concentration, 1996-1999. Past studies of chemical discharge from industries have used models to assess the pollution impact of individual plants. This study, however, uses an extended Input-Output (I-O) economic model with pollution emission coefficients to assess direct and indirect pollutant emission for several major industries in Jefferson County. The major findings of the study are: (a) the principal emission by the selected industries are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and these contribute to the ambient ozone concentration; (b) the direct and indirect emissions are significantly higher than the direct emission by some industries, indicating that an isolated analysis will underestimate the emission by an industry; (c) while low emission coefficient industries may suggest industry choice they may also emit the most hazardous chemicals. This study is limited by the assumptions made, and the data availability, however it provides a useful analytical tool for direct and cumulative emission estimation and generates insights on the complexity in choice of industries.

  15. Assessing rates of forest change and fragmentation in Alabama, USA, using the vegetation change tracker model

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    Li, Mingshi; Huang, Chengquan; Zhu, Zhiliang; Shi, Hua; Lu, Heng; Peng, Shikui

    2009-01-01

    Forest change is of great concern for land use decision makers and conservation communities. Quantitative and spatial forest change information is critical for addressing many pressing issues, including global climate change, carbon budgets, and sustainability. In this study, our analysis focuses on the differences in geospatial patterns and their changes between federal forests and nonfederal forests in Alabama over the time period 1987–2005, by interpreting 163 Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) scenes using a vegetation change tracker (VCT) model. Our analysis revealed that for the most part of 1990 s and between 2000 and 2005, Alabama lost about 2% of its forest on an annual basis due to disturbances, but much of the losses were balanced by forest regeneration from previous disturbances. The disturbance maps revealed that federal forests were reasonably well protected, with the fragmentation remaining relatively stable over time. In contrast, nonfederal forests, which are predominant in area share (about 95%), were heavily disturbed, clearly demonstrating decreasing levels of fragmentation during the time period 1987–1993 giving way to a subsequent accelerating fragmentation during the time period 1994–2005. Additionally, the identification of the statistical relationships between forest fragmentation status and forest loss rate and forest net change rate in relation to land ownership implied the distinct differences in forest cutting rate and cutting patterns between federal forests and nonfederal forests. The forest spatial change information derived from the model has provided valuable insights regarding regional forest management practices and disturbance regimes, which are closely associated with regional economics and environmental concerns.

  16. Use of remote sensing and ground control in monitoring oil fields in Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Moreaux, P E; Muzikar, R [ed.

    1978-01-01

    Present and future water pollution problems resulting from oil field operations in Alabama are analyzed. An outline of a program of data collection and interpretation necessary to determine and evaluate solutions to these problems is presented. A method of adequate monitoring of the oil and gas fields in Alabama to protect against pollution of its valuable surface and groundwater supplies is described. Samples of brine are continuously collected and analyzed from sources representing all water producing horizons in the oil fields. A network of observation wells has been established in oil fields to periodically determine changes in the chemical quality of groundwaters. Water samples from wells adjacent to all major saltwater evaporation pits have been collected and analyzed for possible changes in chemical quality. Discharge measurements are made on streams adjacent to all oil fields. Periodic aerial photographs are being made of each field. Preliminary administrative reports are regularly prepared on each problem in the oil fields and remedial or disciplinary actions are taken by the Oil and Gas Board.

  17. The Alabama, U.S.A., seismic event and strata collapse of May 7, 1986

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    Long, L.T.; Copeland, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    On May 7, 1986, the residents of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, felt a seismic event of local magnitude 3.6 that occurred at the same time as a rock burst and roof collapse in an active longwall coal mine. Visual inspection of the seismograms reveals a deficiency in energy at frequencies above 20 Hz compared to tectonic earthquakes or surface blasts. The predominance of energy below 5 Hz may explain reports of body wave magnitudes (mb) greater than 4.2. Also, 1.0 Hz surface waves were more strongly excited than body waves and may explain local felt effects more typically associated with greater epicentral distances. All recorded first motions were dilatational. The concentration of stations in the northern hemisphere allows reverse motion on an east-trending near-vertical plane or strike-slip motion on northwest or southeast trending planes. The reverse focal mechanism is preferred, because the area of roof collapse and the area of active longwall mining are located between two east-striking loose vertical fracture zones. The characteristics of the seismic event suggest that it might have been sudden shear failure resulting from accumulated strain energy in overlying strata behind an active longwall. Although an alternate interpretation of the focal mechanism as an implosion or shear failure in the strata above previously mined out areas is also allowed by the first motion data, this alternate intepretation is not supported by geological data. ?? 1989 Birkha??user Verlag.

  18. The areal extent of brown shrimp habitat suitability in Mobile Bay, Alabama, USA: Targeting vegetated habitat restoration

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    Smith, L.M.; Nestlerode, J.A.; Harwell, L.C.; Bourgeois, P.

    2010-01-01

    The availability of wetlands and shallow water habitats significantly influences Gulf of Mexico (GOM) penaeid shrimp fishery productivity. However, the GOM region has the highest rate of wetland loss in the USA. Protection and management of these vital GOM habitats are critical to sustainable shrimp fisheries. Brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) are a major component of GOM fisheries. We present an approach for estimating the areal extent of suitable habitat for post-larval and juvenile brown shrimp in Mobile Bay, Alabama, using an existing habitat suitability index model for the northern GOM calculated from probabilistic survey of water quality and sediment data, land cover data, and submerged aquatic vegetation coverages. This estuarine scale approach is intended to support targeted protection and restoration of these habitats. These analyses indicate that approximately 60% of the area of Mobile Bay is categorized as suitable to near optimal for post-larval and juvenile shrimp and 38% of the area is marginally to minimally suitable. We identify potential units within Mobile Bay for targeted restoration to improve habitat suitability. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  19. Evolution of Holocene fluvio-deltaic systems along the Mississippi-Alabama Shelf, USA

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    Dike, C.; Wallace, D. J.; Miner, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the response of coastal systems to past sea-level rise is paramount to better predicting future scenarios and identifying suitable sand resources for coastal restoration. The Mississippi-Alabama (MS-AL) shelf is an ideal natural laboratory to examine this in detail as there are multiple rivers that discharge into the Mississippi Sound, which is ultimately connected with the Gulf of Mexico. These systems include the Pascagoula, Biloxi, Pearl, and Mobile Rivers, which transport sediment from a combined drainage basin area of 270,000 km2. During the most recent sea-level lowstand, fluvial downcutting produced valley systems that bypassed the exposed shelf producing shelf-edge deltas. During the subsequent transgression, portions of these fluvio-deltaic systems were reworked and generally back-stepped in response to forcing mechanisms (i.e. rate of relative sea-level rise, sediment supply, and accommodation space). The sediment produced from this partial transgressive ravinement likely played a key role in forming the modern barrier islands along the MS-AL chain. While many of the general locations of lowstand valleys and deltas have been previously published, the chronology of valley occupation and infilling, and the detailed response to forcing mechanisms of these paleo-fluvial systems remain largely unclear. Further, the stratigraphic architecture and character of these deposits comprising the lowstand valley fill remains enigmatic due to sparse data coverage. Here we synthesize and analyze prior geophysical data from seven cruises conducted since the mid-1980s. We will present the current knowledge of these fluvial deltaic systems from the shelf slope to modern descendants in the northern Gulf of Mexico, relying on a source-to-sink approach. These shelf deposits not only represent important sand resources to this storm-prone coast, but will also shed light on the nature of the response of these systems to coastal change forcing mechanisms.

  20. Forests of Alabama, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andy Hartsell

    2016-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Alabama based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Alabama Forestry Commission. Estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are updated yearly....

  1. Integrated Modeling and Carbonate Reservoir Analysis, Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation, Fishpond Field, Southwest Alabama

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    Owen, Alexander Emory

    This field case study focuses on Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover hydrocarbon reservoir characterization, modeling and evaluation at Fishpond Field, Escambia County, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain of North America. The field is located in the Conecuh Embayment area, south of the Little Cedar Creek Field in Conecuh County and east of Appleton Field in Escambia County. In the Conecuh Embayment, Smackover microbial buildups commonly developed on Paleozoic basement paleohighs in an inner to middle carbonate ramp setting. The microbial and associated facies identified in Fishpond Field are: (F-1) peloidal wackestone, (F-2) peloidal packstone, (F-3) peloidal grainstone, (F-4) peloidal grainstone/packstone, (F-5) microbially-influenced wackestone, (F-6) microbially-influenced packstone, (F-7) microbial boundstone, (F-8) oolitic grainstone, (F-9) shale, and (F-10) dolomitized wackestone/packstone. The Smackover section consists of an alternation of carbonate facies, including F-1 through F-8. The repetitive vertical trend in facies indicates variations in depositional conditions in the area as a result of changes in water depth, energy conditions, salinity, and/or water chemistry due to temporal variations or changes in relative sea level. Accommodation for sediment accumulation also was produced by a change in base level due to differential movement of basement rocks as a result of faulting and/or subsidence due to burial compaction and extension. These changes in base level contributed to the development of a microbial buildup that ranges between 130-165 ft in thickness. The Fishpond Field carbonate reservoir includes a lower microbial buildup interval, a middle grainstone/packstone interval and an upper microbial buildup interval. The Fishpond Field has sedimentary and petroleum system characteristics similar to the neighboring Appleton and Little Cedar Creek Fields, but also has distinct differences from these Smackover fields. The characteristics of the

  2. Report of Block Field Experience at Jefferson County Department of Health Bureau of Nutrition, Birmingham, Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Chamber of Commerce , "Climate and Geography, Birmingham Area", March, 1984. 2. Department of Economic and Community...Affairs, State of Alabama, "Estimated 1984 Population". *3. Birmingham Area Chamber of Commerce , "An Economic Overview of Birmingham, Alabama", June... Chamber of Commerce , "New Business License List", May, 1985. 6. Birmingham Area Chamber of Commerce , "Birmingham Facts and History", (undated).

  3. The stoneflies (Insecta, Plecoptera) of the Talladega Mountain region, Alabama, USA: distribution, elevation, endemism, and rarity patterns.

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    Grubbs, Scott A; Sheldon, Andrew L

    2018-01-01

    Background The Talladega Mountain region of eastern Alabama is the southernmost outlier of the ancient Appalachian Mountains, including the highest peaks and ranges in the state. Collections of stoneflies (Plecoptera) previously here have been sporadic yet has led to several new species descriptions in modern times (James 1974, James 1976, Stark and Szczytko 1976, Kondratieff and Kirchner 1996, Szczytko and Kondratieff 2015) and expanded our understanding of southeastern US stoneflies. During the period 2003-2012 we conducted an intensive inventory of the stonefly fauna of the Talladega Mountain region. We collected across all months from 192 unique localities, covering a broad range of stream sizes and elevation gradients present in the region. New information A total of 57 confirmed species across eight of the nine Nearctic families were collected as adults (Table 4), including four species described as new during the study period (Table 2). Leuctra crossi James, 1974 was easily the most common species collected. Median elevations per species ranged from 174 m ( Clioperla clio (Newman, 1839)) to 410 m ( Leuctra triloba Claassen, 1923 (Fig. 3). Dot distribution maps were included for all 57 species plus one for undetermined nymphs of Pteronarcys Newman, 1838 (Figs. 4-19). As many as seven species may be endemic to the region but sampling efforts northeastward into Georgia, plus additional focused sampling in Alabama and a comprehensive examination of all available material held in museums and personal collections, are needed for confirmation.

  4. Examining the role of SGD on the nitrogen budget of the fourth largest estuary in the USA, Mobile Bay, Alabama

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    Dimova, N. T.; Montiel, D.; Lu, Y.; Adyasari, D.

    2017-12-01

    The present study aims to help understand further the importance of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to Mobile Bay, Alabama with respect to associated nitrogen (N-) fluxes. Based on a three-year long study we found that on a large scale, when comparing Mobile River discharge to SGD, during the dry season, the SGD flux is only 2.5% of Mobile River discharge, whereas, during the wet season, this contribution is less than 1%. However, when examining the nitrogen budget of MB, we found that during the dry season, SGD delivers about half of the fluxes to the Bay. Furthermore, we found that the distribution of these SGD-derived inputs along the MB shoreline is very heterogeneous. Shallow geophysical electrical resistivity imaging and multiple sediment cores recovered in the examined areas reveal a rich organic sediment layer (up to 80 cm thick at some locations) which is perhaps responsible for the observed enhanced N-fluxes. Ongoing microbial, DOM and stable isotope sediment examination aim to explain the geochemical processes responsible for the disproportionally large SGD-delivered nitrogen fluxes in the identified impacted coastal areas.

  5. Effects of short-term sediment nutrient enrichment and grazer (Neritina reclivata removal on sediment microalgae in a shallow eutrophic estuary (Alabama, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Just Cebrian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The olive snail (Neritina reclivata is ubiquitous in tropical and sub-tropical systems of the Gulf of Mexico, however its impacts on sediment microalgae have been little studied. Many coastal systems around the world are being eutrophied due to human activities, and seemingly they will continue to be eutrophied to a further extent in the future. Exploring the single and combined impacts of further nutrient enrichment and grazing by the olive snail on sediment microalgae in such eutrophic systems is an important question for our understanding and management of these systems. Here we examine the effects of short-term nutrient enrichment and grazing by the olive snail N. reclivata on sediment microalgal biomass and composition in a shallow eutrophic estuary (Weeks Bay, Alabama, USA of the Northern Gulf of Mexico. For this, we performed a series of factorial experiments adding or not nutrients and removing or not the snail, for a total of four treatments in each experiment: ambient grazing, ambient nutrients; ambient grazing, increased nutrients; no grazing, ambient nutrients; and no grazing, increased nutrients. We did not find any significant impact of nutrient addition in any of the eight short-term (i.e. four days experiments carried out. Impacts by the snail were minor; we only found a decrease in biomass due to snail grazing in one of the eight experiments, and no impacts on microalgal (i.e. diatom composition. High ambient nutrient concentrations in the sediment porewater and low snail abundances on the sediment could explain these findings. Our results suggest that ephemeral, short-term nutrient pulses into eutrophic coastal systems of the Northern Gulf of Mexico, such as Weeks Bay (Alabama, USA, should not greatly affect the abundance of sediment microalgae, even though those pulses occur in well-lit areas. The results further suggest the snail N. reclivata is not a major control of sediment microalgal populations in the subtidal

  6. Variations in PCB concentrations between genders of six warmwater fish species in Lake Logan Martin, Alabama, USA.

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    Rypel, Andrew L; Findlay, Robert H; Mitchell, Justin B; Bayne, David R

    2007-08-01

    We collected and analyzed 955 individual fish (six species) for sexual differences in PCB bioaccumulations from a southeastern, USA reservoir. Using 2-way ANCOVAs, we found significant differences in fillet PCB concentrations between sexes for channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and spotted bass (Micropterus punctulatus). Striped bass (Morone saxatilus), black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) did not display differences between sexes in PCB concentrations. We suspect that sexual differences may be due to biological differences in reproduction, relative motility and lipid deposition. For one species (striped bass), sexual differences in PCB concentrations were inconsistent with a study in the Hudson River suggesting that sexual differences in bioaccumulations can change across ecosystems. Two species which did show sexual differences, largemouth bass and channel catfish, are often chosen as representative species (e.g., "piscivore" and "benthivore") in contaminant monitoring in many USA states indicating human consumption and risk management decisions would be improved if an equal number of male and female fish were included in composite PCBs analysis. This could reduce variability in fish PCBs data from which consumption advisories are based.

  7. Volume Tables and Point-Sampling Factors for Shortleaf Pines in Plantation on Abandoned Fields in Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia Highlands

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    Glendon W. Smalley; David R. Bower

    1968-01-01

    The tables and equations published here provide ways to estimate total and merchantable cubic-foot volumes, both inside and outside bark, of shortleaf pines (Pinus echinata Mill.) planted on abandoned fields in the Ridge and Valley, Cumberland Plateau, Eastern Highland Rim, and Western Highland Rim regions of Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia (fig. 1). There already are...

  8. Proposal for adaptive management to conserve biotic integrity in a regulated segment of the Tallapoosa River, Alabama, U.S.A

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    Irwin, Elise R.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2002-01-01

    Conserving river biota will require innovative approaches that foster and utilize scientific understanding of ecosystem responses to alternative river-management scenarios. We describe ecological and societal issues involved in flow management of a section of the Tallapoosa River (Alabama, U.S.A.) in which a species-rich native fauna is adversely affected by flow alteration by an upstream hydropower dam. We hypothesize that depleted Iow flows, flow instability and thermal alteration resulting from pulsed flow releases at the hydropower dam are most responsible for changes in the Tallapoosa River biota. However, existing data are insufficient to prescribe with certainty minimum flow levels or the frequency and duration of stable flow periods that would be necessary or sufficient to protect riverine biotic integrity. Rather than negotiate a specific change in the flow regime, we propose that stakeholders--including management agencies, the power utility, and river advocates--engage in a process of adaptive-flow management. This process would require that stakeholders (1) develop and agree to management objectives; (2) model hypothesized relations between dam operations and management objectives; (3) implement a change in dam operations; and (4) evaluate biological responses and other stakeholder benefits through an externally reviewed monitoring program. Models would be updated with monitoring data and stakeholders would agree to further modify flow regimes as necessary to achieve management objectives. A primary obstacle to adaptive management will be a perceived uncertainty of future costs for the power utility and other stakeholders. However, an adaptive, iterative approach offers the best opportunity for improving flow regimes for native biota while gaining information critical to guiding management decisions in other flow-regulated rivers.

  9. HYDRAULICS, UPPER ALABAMA WATERSHED, ALABAMA RIVER, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  10. Last Deglaciation Events (16.1-11.4 cal-Ka) Recorded in a Speleothem from DeSoto Caverns, Alabama, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, W. J.; Aharon, P.; Hellstrom, J.

    2007-12-01

    Whereas the rapid climate swings that occurred during the last deglaciation have been well documented in the Greenland ice cores, their cause/s continue to be a subject of heated debate. Clearly, more geographically dispersed records are required in order to provide better insight into the history of deglaciation, and by extension into the cause/s of the abrupt climate shifts. Particularly scarce are continental deglaciation records from the southeast North America whose atmospheric conditions were controlled by the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet to the north and the Gulf of Mexico warm waters to the south. In order to remedy the absence of deglaciation records in the Southeast USA in general, and the Gulf Coast in particular, we have initiated a study of a 55-cm long stalagmite (DSSG-2) from the DeSoto Caverns in Childersburg, Alabama (33° 18'N, 86° 17'W). Seven radiocarbon AMS and eighteen U/Th TIMS dates reveal that the continuously layered stalagmite covers the time interval 31 to 11.4 cal-Ka at growth rates varying from 61 μm/decade at the start of deglaciation and up to 2700 μm/decade close to its termination. The combination of unusually high growth rates, pristine aragonite mineralogy and tight sampling (n=602) afforded generation of high fidelity δ13C and δ18O records from about 16.1 to 11.4 cal-Ka whose high resolution is comparable with the contemporaneous Greenland ice core records. The stalagmite δ18O record shows excellent agreement in relative amplitude shifts and timing of abrupt and brief cold reversals (Oldest Dryas, Older Dryas, Inter-Allerød Cold Period) that punctuated the overall trend of deglaciation warming (Bølling/Allerød period). The succeeding Younger Dryas is depicted in the stalagmite by rapid positive shifts in δ18O and δ13C of 1.3‰ and 2.3‰ (V-PDB) relative to the baseline mean value and its start and termination (12.7-11.8 Ka) are concordant within error with the dates reported from GISP2 ice core (12.82-11.60 Ka

  11. TERRAIN, LOWNDES COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, FRANKLIN COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. HYDRAULICS, WALKER COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  14. FLOODPLAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  15. FLOODPLAIN, WALKER COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  16. FLOODPLAIN, MADISON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  17. FLOODPLAIN, MARSHALL COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  18. TERRAIN, TALLAPOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. FLOODPLAIN, GREENE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  20. TERRAIN, CHEROKEE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, RANDOLPH COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, ELMORE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. HYDRAULICS, DALLAS COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  5. HYDRAULICS, TUSCALOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  6. HYDRAULICS, AUTAUGA COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  7. HYDRAULICS, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  8. HYDRAULICS, ELMORE COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  9. TERRAIN, WINSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, CHAMBERS COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, CHILTON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, MARSHALL COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, CHOCTAW COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, MADISON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. FLOODPLAIN, LIMESTONE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  17. TERRAIN, MARENGO COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, CLARKE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DFIRM, BARBOUR COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  20. DFIRM, BULLOCK COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  1. FLOODPLAIN, BIBB COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  2. FLOODPLAIN, SHELBY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  3. FLOODPLAIN, ESCAMBIA COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  4. HYDROLOGY, MADISON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  5. TERRAIN, LAWRENCE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, SHELBY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. BASEMAP, FRANKLIN COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  8. HYDRAULICS, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  9. FLOODPLAIN, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  10. HYDRAULICS, CHAMBERS COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  11. USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    http://www.systime.dk/ungdomsuddannelser/almen-studieforberedelse/usa-en-grundbog-i-politik-og-okonomi.html......http://www.systime.dk/ungdomsuddannelser/almen-studieforberedelse/usa-en-grundbog-i-politik-og-okonomi.html...

  12. An evaluation of cassava, sweet potato and field corn as potential carbohydrate sources for bioethanol production in Alabama and Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziska, Lewis H.; Tomecek, Martha; Sicher, Richard [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Crop Systems and Global Change Lab, 10300 Baltimore Avenue, Building 1, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Runion, G. Brett; Prior, Stephen A.; Torbet, H. Allen [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Soil Dynamics Laboratory, 411 South Donahue Drive, Auburn, AL 36832 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    The recent emphasis on corn production to meet the increasing demand for bioethanol has resulted in trepidation regarding the sustainability of the global food supply. To assess the potential of alternative crops as sources of bioethanol production, we grew sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and cassava (Manihot esculentum) at locations near Auburn, Alabama and Beltsville, Maryland in order to measure root carbohydrate (starch, sucrose, glucose) and root biomass. Averaged for both locations, sweet potato yielded the highest concentration of root carbohydrate (ca 80%), primarily in the form of starch (ca 50%) and sucrose (ca 30%); whereas cassava had root carbohydrate concentrations of (ca 55%), almost entirely as starch. For sweet potato, overall carbohydrate production was 9.4 and 12.7 Mg ha{sup -1} for the Alabama and Maryland sites, respectively. For cassava, carbohydrate production in Maryland was poor, yielding only 2.9 Mg ha{sup -1}. However, in Alabama, carbohydrate production from cassava averaged {proportional_to}10 Mg ha{sup -1}. Relative to carbohydrate production from corn in each location, sweet potato and cassava yielded approximately 1.5 x and 1.6 x as much carbohydrate as corn in Alabama; 2.3 x and 0.5 x for the Maryland site. If economical harvesting and processing techniques could be developed, these data suggest that sweet potato in Maryland, and sweet potato and cassava in Alabama, have greater potential as ethanol sources than existing corn systems, and as such, could be used to replace or offset corn as a source of biofuels. (author)

  13. Persistence of organochlorine chemical residues in fish from the Tombigbee River (Alabama, USA): Continuing risk to wildlife from a former DDT manufacturing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinck, Jo Ellen; Norstrom, Ross J.; Orazio, Carl E.; Schmitt, Christopher J.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticide and total polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations were measured in largemouth bass from the Tombigbee River near a former DDT manufacturing facility at McIntosh, Alabama. Evaluation of mean p,p'- and o,p'-DDT isomer concentrations and o,p'- versus p,p'-isomer proportions in McIntosh bass indicated that DDT is moving off site from the facility and into the Tombigbee River. Concentrations of p,p'-DDT isomers in McIntosh bass remained unchanged from 1974 to 2004 and were four times greater than contemporary concentrations from a national program. Total DDT in McIntosh bass exceeded dietary effect concentrations developed for bald eagle and osprey. Hexachlorobenzene, PCBs, and toxaphene concentrations in bass from McIntosh also exceeded thresholds to protect fish and piscivorous wildlife. Whereas concentrations of DDT and most other organochlorine chemicals in fish have generally declined in the U.S. since their ban, concentrations of DDT in fish from McIntosh remain elevated and represent a threat to wildlife. - DDT persists in the environment near a former manufacturing facility that ceased production over 40 years ago, and concentrations represent a risk to fish and piscivorous birds in the area

  14. Persistence of organochlorine chemical residues in fish from the Tombigbee River (Alabama, USA): Continuing risk to wildlife from a former DDT manufacturing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, J.E.; Norstrom, R.J.; Orazio, C.E.; Schmitt, C.J.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticide and total polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations were measured in largemouth bass from the Tombigbee River near a former DDT manufacturing facility at McIntosh, Alabama. Evaluation of mean p,p???- and o,p???-DDT isomer concentrations and o,p???- versus p,p???-isomer proportions in McIntosh bass indicated that DDT is moving off site from the facility and into the Tombigbee River. Concentrations of p,p???-DDT isomers in McIntosh bass remained unchanged from 1974 to 2004 and were four times greater than contemporary concentrations from a national program. Total DDT in McIntosh bass exceeded dietary effect concentrations developed for bald eagle and osprey. Hexachlorobenzene, PCBs, and toxaphene concentrations in bass from McIntosh also exceeded thresholds to protect fish and piscivorous wildlife. Whereas concentrations of DDT and most other organochlorine chemicals in fish have generally declined in the U.S. since their ban, concentrations of DDT in fish from McIntosh remain elevated and represent a threat to wildlife.

  15. Field investigations of historic covered timber bridges in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Wacker; Travis Hosteng; Brent. Phares

    2012-01-01

    The Federal Highway Administration is sponsoring a comprehensive research program on Historic Covered Timber Bridges in the USA. This national program's main purpose is to develop improved methods to preserve, rehabililate, and restore the timber bridge trusses that were developed during the early 1800s, and in many cases are still in service today. The overall...

  16. Long-term biomonitoring of a produced water discharge from the Cedar Cove degasification field, Alabama. January 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, P.E.; Harris, S.C.; Mettee, M.F.; McGregor, S.W.; Shepard, T.E.

    1991-01-01

    Development of coalbed methane has become a major industry for the state of Alabama. In excess of 1,300 wells were producing methane by the end of July 1990. A byproduct of methane production is produced water containing elevated concentrations of chloride, sodium, iron and bicarbonate. These waters are currently permitted for discharge into streams or as a land application. The purpose of the study was to examine the long-term impacts of produced waters to streams relative to water-quality changes and aquatic biological effects. Distinct water-quality changes in the receiving stream were documented and consisted primarily of increased dissolved solids, changes in the pH regime and changes in the carbonate buffering system. In contrast, no significant or consistent detrimental change in the structure or function of the stream biological community could be detected. Subtle changes in biological community structure and composition were noted and most likely due to effects associated with algal productivity in settling lagoons. These changes, however, were within the boundaries of variation typically observed for the communities. Based on the results of this and earlier studies, it was concluded that the national water-quality criterion for chloride was protective of stream life as examined in the study.

  17. Comparison of geochemical data obtained using four brine sampling methods at the SECARB Phase III Anthropogenic Test CO2 injection site, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Christopher; Thordsen, James J.; Manning, Michael A.; Cook, Paul J.; Trautz, Robert C.; Thomas, Burt; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of formation water and associated gases from the lower Cretaceous Paluxy Formation was determined using four different sampling methods at a characterization well in the Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama, as part of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) Phase III Anthropogenic Test, which is an integrated carbon capture and storage project. In this study, formation water and gas samples were obtained from well D-9-8 #2 at Citronelle using gas lift, electric submersible pump, U-tube, and a downhole vacuum sampler (VS) and subjected to both field and laboratory analyses. Field chemical analyses included electrical conductivity, dissolved sulfide concentration, alkalinity, and pH; laboratory analyses included major, minor and trace elements, dissolved carbon, volatile fatty acids, free and dissolved gas species. The formation water obtained from this well is a Na–Ca–Cl-type brine with a salinity of about 200,000 mg/L total dissolved solids. Differences were evident between sampling methodologies, particularly in pH, Fe and alkalinity. There was little gas in samples, and gas composition results were strongly influenced by sampling methods. The results of the comparison demonstrate the difficulty and importance of preserving volatile analytes in samples, with the VS and U-tube system performing most favorably in this aspect.

  18. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Annual report, March 1996--March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Groshong, R.H.

    1997-08-01

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and produces oil from chalk of the Upper Cretaceous Selma Group and from sandstone of the Eutaw Formation along the southern margin of the Gilbertown fault system. Most of the field has been in primary recovery since establishment, but production has declined to marginally economic levels. This investigation applies advanced geologic concepts designed to aid implementation of improved recovery programs. The Gilbertown fault system is detached at the base of Jurassic salt. The fault system began forming as a half graben and evolved in to a full graben by the Late Cretaceous. Conventional trapping mechanisms are effective in Eutaw sandstone, whereas oil in Selma chalk is trapped in faults and fault-related fractures. Burial modeling establishes that the subsidence history of the Gilbertown area is typical of extensional basins and includes a major component of sediment loading and compaction. Surface mapping and fracture analysis indicate that faults offset strata as young as Miocene and that joints may be related to regional uplift postdating fault movement. Preliminary balanced structural models of the Gilbertown fault system indicate that synsedimentary growth factors need to be incorporated into the basic equations of area balance to model strain and predict fractures in Selma and Eutaw reservoirs.

  19. High Field Magnet R and D in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2003-01-01

    Accelerator magnet technology is currently dominated by the use of NbTi superconductor. New and more demanding applications for superconducting accelerator magnets require the use of alternative materials. Several programs in the US are taking advantage of recent improvements in Nb 3 Sn to develop high field magnets for new applications. Highlights and challenges of the US R and D program are presented along with the status of conductor development. In addition, a new R and D focus, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program, will be discussed

  20. High Field Magnet R and D in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourlay, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Accelerator magnet technology is currently dominated by the use of NbTi superconductor. New and more demanding applications for superconducting accelerator magnets require the use of alternative materials. Several programs in the US are taking advantage of recent improvements in Nb 3 Sn to develop high field magnets for new applications. Highlights and challenges of the US R and D program are presented along with the status of conductor development. In addition, a new R and D focus, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program, will be discussed.

  1. DFIRM Database, COVINGTON COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  2. HYDRAULICS, ST. CLAIR COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  3. FLOODPLAIN, ST. CLAIR COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  4. TERRAIN, ST. CLAIR COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS Hydraulics Submittal, Bullock County, Alabama, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulics data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydraulic procedures for computing flood elevations for a flood insurance...

  6. DCS Hydraulics Submittal, Butler County, Alabama, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulics data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydraulic procedures for computing flood elevations for a flood insurance...

  7. DCS Hydraulics Submittal, Covington County, Alabama, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulics data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydraulic procedures for computing flood elevations for a flood insurance...

  8. 75 FR 60371 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ..., excluding holidays. You may receive one free copy of the amendment by contacting OSM's Birmingham Field... continuing education of certified blaster applicants. D. Alabama Code Sec. 9-16-77(b) Amends existing... public hearing will continue on the specified date until everyone scheduled to speak has been given an...

  9. Alabama Water Use, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Susan S.; Littlepage, Thomas M.; Harper, Michael J.; Tinney, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Water is one of Alabama's most precious natural resources. It is a vital component of human existence and essential to the overall quality of life. Wise stewardship of this valuable resource depends on a continuing assessment of water availability and water use. Population growth in many parts of the State has resulted in increased competition for available water resources. This competition includes offstream uses, such as residential, agricultural, and industrial, and instream uses for maintenance of species habitat and diversity, navigation, power generation, recreation, and water quality. Accurate water-use information is required for sound management decisions within this competitive framework and is necessary for a more comprehensive understanding of the link between water use, water supply, and overall water availability. A study of water use during 2005 was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Office of Water Resources, Water Management Branch (ADECA-OWR), to provide water-use data for local and State water managers. The results of the study about the amount of water used, how it was used, and where it was used in Alabama have been published in 'Estimated use of water in Alabama in 2005' by Hutson and others, 2009, and is accessible on the Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5163 and available upon request as a CD-ROM through USGS and ADECA-OWR.

  10. Proterometra epholkos sp. n. (Digenea: Azygiidae) from Terrapin Creek, Alabama, USA: molecular characterization of life cycle, redescription of Proterometra albacauda, and updated lists of host and geographic locality records for Proterometra spp. in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womble, Matthew R; Orélis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Bullard, Stephen A

    2015-02-01

    Proterometra epholkos sp. n. asexually reproduces in the stream dwelling prosobranch, Elimia cf. modesta (Cerithioidea: Pleuroceridae) and infects the buccal cavity epithelium of spotted bass, Micropterus punctulatus (Perciformes: Centrarchidae) in the Coosa River (Terrapin Creek; N33°51'36.56″, W85°31'28.15″; Cleburne County, Alabama, USA). We characterize cercariae and adults of the new species using morphology and molecular sequence data and redescribe its morphologically similar congener Proterometra albacauda based on the holotype and paratype (USNPC Nos. 61229-30). The new species can be distinguished most easily from P. albacauda by the combination of having cercariae with long mamillae (>100μm) that encircle the tail stem anteriorly, that are restricted to 1 lateral column per body margin at midbody, and that are absent from the medial surface of the tail stem as well as by having adults with a partly extracecal uterus, a transverse metraterm occupying the space between the oral sucker and prostatic sac, and a vitellarium that is longer than the ceca and extends anteriad to the level of or beyond the posterior margin of the oral sucker. Sequence data from the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2; 251bp) did not reject the notion that the cercariae and adults we collected simultaneously from those infected, sympatric, individual snails and fish in Terrapin Creek were conspecific. Also provided herein for species of Proterometra are (i) taxonomic keys for cercariae and adults based on morphological and behavioral characteristics sourced from the published literature, (ii) updated lists of host records (prosobranchs and fishes) and geographic locality records for Proterometra spp., and (iii) synopses and assessments of the morphological features previously used to differentiate them. Proterometra macrostoma (type species), Proterometra melanophora, and Proterometra hodgesiana are species inquirendae; requiring new collections from type

  11. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama -- Year 2. Annual report, March 1997--March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.

    1998-09-01

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and has produced oil from fractured chalk of the Cretaceous Selma Group and glauconitic sandstone of the Eutaw Formation. Nearly all of Gilbertown Field is still in primary recovery, although waterflooding has been attempted locally. The objective of this project is to analyze the geologic structure and burial history of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas in order to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. Indeed, the decline of oil production to marginally economic levels in recent years has made this type of analysis timely and practical. Key technical advancements being sought include understanding the relationship of requisite strain to production in Gilbertown reservoirs, incorporation of synsedimentary growth factors into models of area balance, quantification of the relationship between requisite strain and bed curvature, determination of the timing of hydrocarbon generation, and identification of the avenues and mechanisms of fluid transport.

  12. Guide to Alabama Court Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama Administrative Office of Courts, Montgomery.

    Designed to assist the public in understanding the judicial system and judicial process in Alabama, this handbook (1) presents an overview of Alabama's courts and their jurisdictions, (2) identifies the officers of the courts and the contributions each makes to the judicial process, and (3) narrates in general terms the procedures most common to…

  13. Field validation of food outlet databases: the Latino food environment in North Carolina, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummo, Pasquale E; Albrecht, Sandra S; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining valid, reliable measures of food environments that serve Latino communities is important for understanding barriers to healthy eating in this at-risk population. The primary aim of the study was to examine agreement between retail food outlet data from two commercial databases, Nielsen TDLinx (TDLinx) for food stores and Dun & Bradstreet (D&B) for food stores and restaurants, relative to field observations of food stores and restaurants in thirty-one census tracts in Durham County, NC, USA. We also examined differences by proportion of Hispanic population (Spanish language. One hundred and seventy-four food stores and 337 restaurants in Durham County, NC, USA. We found that overall sensitivity of food store listings in TDLinx was higher (64 %) than listings in D&B (55 %). Twenty-five food stores were characterized by auditors as Latino food stores, with 20 % identified in TDLinx, 52 % in D&B and 56 % in both sources. Overall sensitivity of restaurants (68 %) was higher than sensitivity of Latino restaurants (38 %) listed in D&B. Sensitivity did not differ substantially by Hispanic composition of neighbourhoods. Our findings suggest that while TDLinx and D&B commercial data sources perform well for total food stores, they perform less well in identifying small and independent food outlets, including many Latino food stores and restaurants.

  14. Alabama statewide mobility report, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This Alabama Statewide Mobility Report for 2014 is a new way to analyze interstate mobility performance over an entire year. Over half a billion speed records were acquired, stored, and analyzed for this report. These observations capture recurring c...

  15. Alabama ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and freshwater fish species in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  16. Alabama ESI: REPTILES (Reptile Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for threatened/endangered and rare reptiles in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent the rare...

  17. Alabama ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine and estuarine invertebrate species in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  18. Two distinct clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with the same USA300 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile: a potential pitfall for identification of USA300 community-associated MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Rhod; Goering, Richard; Stegger, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) characterized as USA300 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis identified two distinct clones. One was similar to community-associated USA300 MRSA (ST8-IVa, t008, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive). The second (ST8-IVa, t024...

  19. 76 FR 75508 - United States Navy Restricted Area, SUPSHIP Bath Maine Detachment Mobile at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... Navy Restricted Area, SUPSHIP Bath Maine Detachment Mobile at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile, AL; Restricted Area... facility located in Mobile, Alabama. The Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair, United States... contracts at AUSTAL USA in Mobile, Alabama, on October 9, 2011, replacing Supervisor of Shipbuilding...

  20. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama State Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics for Alabama: School Personnel 2015-16; Student Assessment 2014-15; Alabama State Board of Education members; Financial Data FY2015; Graduation Rates 2013-14/2014-15; Alabama Public Schools 2015-16; Public School Size and Enrollment 2015-16; Graduation Requirements 2015-16; Career and Technical Education…

  1. Pliocene to late Pleistocene magmatism in the Aurora Volcanic Field, Nevada and California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingdon, S.; Cousens, B.; John, D. A.; du Bray, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 3.9- 0.1 Ma Aurora Volcanic Field (AVF) covers 325 km2 east and southeast of the Bodie Hills, north of Mono Lake, California, USA. The AVF is located immediately northwest of the Long Valley magmatic system and adjacent and overlapping the Miocene Bodie Hills Volcanic Field (BHVF). Rock types range from trachybasalt to trachydacite, and high-silica rhyolite. The trachybasalts to trachydacites are weakly to moderately porphyritic (1-30%) with variable phenocryst assemblages that are some combination of plagioclase, hornblende, clinopyroxene, and lesser orthopyroxene, olivine, and/or biotite. Microphenocrysts are dominated by plagioclase, and include opaque oxides, clinopyroxene, and apatite. These rocks are weakly to strongly devitrified. The high-silica rhyolites are sparsely porphyritic with trace to 10% phenocrysts of quartz, sanidine, plagioclase, biotite, (+/- hornblende), accessory opaque oxide minerals, titanite, allanite, (+/-apatite, zircon), and have glassy groundmasses. Rocks in the AVF are less strongly porphyritic than those of BHVF. Plagioclase phenocrysts are often oscillatory zoned and many have sieve texture. Amphiboles have distinct black opaque rims. Xenocrystic quartz and plagioclase are rare. AVF lavas have bimodal SiO2 compositions, ranging from 49 to 78 wt%, with a gap between 65 and 75 wt%. They are high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic in composition, and are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous. They are enriched in rare earth elements (REE), especially light REEs, compared to the Miocene BHVF rocks. Primordial mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns show arc- or subduction-related signatures, with enrichment in Ba and Pb, and depletion in Nb and Ta. Enrichment in K and Sr and depletion in Ti are less pronounced than in the BHVF rocks. There is no correlation between lead isotope ratios and silica (initial 206Pb/204Pb ratios range from 18.974 to 19.151). Neodymium isotope ratios show a moderate negative correlation with silica

  2. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Energy used by Alabama single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  3. Reservoir Changes Derived from Seismic Observations at The Geysers Geothermal Field, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritto, R.; Jarpre, S.

    2012-04-01

    Induced seismicity associated with the exploitation of geothermal fields is used as a tool to characterize and delineate changes associated with injection and production of fluids from the reservoir. At the same time public concern of felt seismicity has led to objections against the operation of geothermal reservoirs in close proximity to population centers. Production at the EGS sites in Basel (Switzerland) was stopped after renewed seismicity caused concern and objection from the public in the city. Operations in other geothermal reservoirs had to be scaled back or interrupted due to an unexpected increase in seismicity (Soultz-sous-forêt, France, Berlín, El Salvador). As a consequence of these concerns and in order to optimize the use of induced seismicity for reservoir engineering purposes, it becomes imperative to understand the relationship between seismic events and stress changes in the reservoir. We will address seismicity trends at The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir, CA USA, to understand the role of historical seismicity associated with past injection of water and/or production of steam. Our analysis makes use of a comprehensive database of earthquakes and associated phase arrivals from 2004 to 2011. A high-precision sub-set of the earthquake data was selected to analyze temporal changes in seismic velocities and Vp/Vs-ratio throughout the whole reservoir. We find relatively low Vp/Vs values in 2004 suggestive of a vapor dominated reservoir. With passing time, however, the observed temporal increase in Vp/Vs, coupled with a decrease in P- and S-wave velocities suggests the presence of fluid-filled fractured rock. Considering the start of a continuous water injection project in 2004, it can be concluded that the fluid saturation of the reservoir has successfully recovered. Preliminary results of 3-D velocity inversions of seismic data appear to corroborate earlier findings that the lowest Vp/Vs estimates are observed in the center of the reservoir

  4. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Final report, March 1996--September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.; Groshong, R.H.; Jin, G.

    1998-12-01

    This project was designed to analyze the structure of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. The Eutaw Formation comprises 7 major flow units and is dominated by low-resistivity, low-contrast play that is difficult to characterize quantitatively. Selma chalk produces strictly from fault-related fractures that were mineralized as warm fluid migrated from deep sources. Resistivity, dipmeter, and fracture identification logs corroborate that deformation is concentrated in the hanging-wall drag zones. New area balancing techniques were developed to characterize growth strata and confirm that strain is concentrated in hanging-wall drag zones. Curvature analysis indicates that the faults contain numerous fault bends that influence fracture distribution. Eutaw oil is produced strictly from footwall uplifts, whereas Selma oil is produced from fault-related fractures. Clay smear and mineralization may be significant trapping mechanisms in the Eutaw Formation. The critical seal for Selma reservoirs, by contrast, is where Tertiary clay in the hanging wall is juxtaposed with poorly fractured Selma chalk in the footwall. Gilbertown Field can be revitalized by infill drilling and recompletion of existing wells. Directional drilling may be a viable technique for recovering untapped oil from Selma chalk. Revitalization is now underway, and the first new production wells since 1985 are being drilled in the western part of the field.

  5. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30

    Executive Summary In the fall of 2010, the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) launched the Multi-State Model for Catalyzing the National Home Energy Retrofit Market Project (Multi-State Project). This residential energy efficiency pilot program was a collaborative effort among the states of Alabama, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, and was funded by competitive State Energy Program (SEP) awards through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project was to catalyze the home energy efficiency retrofit market in select areas within the state of Alabama. To achieve this goal, the project addressed a variety of marketplace elements that did not exist, or were underdeveloped, at the outset of the effort. These included establishing minimum standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency, among others. The anticipated effect of the activities would be increased market demand for retrofits, improved audit to retrofit conversion rates and growth in overall community understanding of energy efficiency. The four-state collaborative was created with the intent of accelerating market transformation by allowing each state to learn from their peers, each of whom possessed different starting points, resources, and strategies for achieving the overall objective. The four partner states engaged the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) to oversee a project steering committee and to manage the project evaluation for all four states. The steering committee, comprised of key program partners, met on a regular basis to provide overall project coordination, guidance, and progress assessment. While there were variances in program design among the states, there were several common elements: use of the Energy Performance Score (EPS) platform; an

  6. Field studies of engineered barriers for closure of low level radioactive waste landfills at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Langhorst, G.J.; Martin, C.E.; Martinez, J.L.; Schofield, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory examined water balance relationships for four different landfill cover designs containing engineered barriers. These field experiments were performed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15, and 25%. Field measurements of seepage, precipitation, interflow, runoff, and soil water content were collected in each of the 16 plots representing four slopes each with four cover designs: Conventional, EPA, Loam Capillary Barrier and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier. A seepage collection system was installed beneath each cover design to evaluate the influence of slope length on seepage using a series of four metal pans filled with medium gravel that were placed end-to-end in the bottom of each field plot. An automated water flow data logging system was used to collect hourly seepage, interflow and runoff data and consisted of 100 100-liter tanks, each of which was equipped with an ultrasonic liquid-level sensor and a motor-operated ball valve used to drain the tank. Soil water content was routinely monitored every six hours at each of 212 locations throughout the 16 plots with time domain reflectrometry (TDR) techniques using an automated and multiplexed measurement system. Field data is presented to show the effects of slope and slope length on the performance of each landfill cover design for the first 15 months of this field experiment

  7. 77 FR 54490 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... revise its program to improve operational efficiency. This document gives the times and locations that... regular business hours at the following location: Alabama Surface Mining Commission, 1811 Second Ave., P.O... for you to read at the locations listed above under ADDRESSES. Alabama 880-X-10C-.62 Revegetation...

  8. The history and perspective of Romania-USA cooperation in the field of technologic transfer of TRIGA reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocaanescu, M.; Ionescu, M.

    1996-01-01

    The cooperation between Romania and the USA in the field of technologic transfer of nuclear research reactor technology began with the steady state 14 MW t TRIGA reactor, installed at INR Pitesti, Romania. It is the first in the range of TRIGA reactors proposed as a materials testing reactor. The first criticality was reached in November 19, 1979 and first operation at 14 MW t level was in February 1980. The paper will present the short history of this cooperation and the perspective for a new cooperation for building a Nuclear Heating Plant using the TRIGA reactor concept for demonstration purpose. The energy crisis is a world-wide problem which affects each country in different ways because the resources and the consumption are unfairly distributed. World-wide research points out that the fossil fuel sources are not to be considered the main energy sources for the long term as they are limited

  9. Final Technical Report. Upgrades to Alabama Power Company Hydroelectric Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crew, James F. [Southern Company Generation, Birmingham, AL (United States). Hydro Services; Johnson, Herbie N. [Southern Company Generation, Birmingham, AL (United States). Hydro Services

    2015-03-31

    From 2010 to 2014, Alabama Power Company (“Alabama Power”) performed upgrades on four units at three of the hydropower developments it operates in east-central Alabama under licenses issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). These three hydropower developments are located on the Coosa River in Coosa, Chilton, and Elmore counties in east-central Alabama.

  10. ECHIDNA LIDAR Campaigns: Forest Canopy Imagery and Field Data, U.S.A., 2007-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains forest canopy scan data from the Echidna Validation Instrument (EVI) and field measurements data from three campaigns conducted in...

  11. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, HOUSTON, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  12. Effects of wildlife of ethyl and methyl parathion applied to California USA rice fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, T.W.; Hill, E.F.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Selected rice fields on the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex were aerially sprayed one time during May or June 1982 with either ethyl (0.11 kg Al/ha) or methyl (0.84 kg AI/ha) parathion for control of tadpole shrimp, Triops longicaudatus. No sick or dead vertebrate wildlife were found or adjacent to the treated rice fields after spraying. Specimens of the following birds and mammals were assayed for brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity to determine exposure to either form of parathion; house mouse, Mus musculus; black-tailed jackrabbit, Lepus californicus; mallard, Anas platyrhynchos; ring-necked pheasant, Phasianus colchicus; American coot, Fulica americana; and red-winged blackbird, Agelaius phoeniceus. Both mice and pheasants from methyl parathion-treated fields had overall mean ChE activities that were significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited compared with controls, and 7, 40, 54 and 57% of individual blackbirds, pheasant, mice, and coots, respectively, had inhibited brain ChE activities (i.e., less than -2 SD of control mean). Although no overall species effect was detected for ethyl parathoid treatment, pheasants (43%), coots (33%), and mice (37%) had significantly inhibited brain ChE activities. Neither of the parathion treatment appeared acutely hazardous to wildlife in or adjacent to rice fields, but sufficient information on potential hazards was obtained to warrant caution in use of these chemicals, especially methyl parathion, in rice fields.

  13. Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis for Salmonella Infection Surveillance, Texas, USA, 2007

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast describes monitoring of the use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for Salmonella surveillance in Houston, Texas. CDC microbiologist Peter Gerner-Smidt discusses the importance of the PulseNet national database in surveillance of food-borne infections.

  14. Vulnerability of field crops to midcentury temperature changes and yield effects in the Southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased temperatures in the Southwestern United States will impact future crop production via multiple pathways. We used four methods to provide an illustrative analysis of midcentury temperature impacts to eight field crops. By midcentury, cropland area thermally suitable for maize cultivation is...

  15. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama): Facilitating Scientific Understanding of the Hydrologic Cycle in Low-Resource Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, L. W.; Lee, M.; Stone, K.

    2008-12-01

    Youth, as future citizens, play an important role in obtaining and maintaining water resources. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama) provides off-campus environmental and water-education activities designed to increase the appreciation, knowledge, conservation, and protection of water resources by middle-school teachers and children from predominantly African-American families in some of Alabama's poorest counties. The project is structured around a variety of indoor and outdoor activities held at two field sites, Auburn University's E. V. Smith Center in Macon County and the Robert G. Wehle Nature Center in Bullock County located in Alabama's "Black Belt" region, a region in which the prosperity of local communities is low. The educational activities provide an engaging laboratory and field experience for children from rural schools that lack scientific facilities and equipment. Both hosting centers have easy access to surface water (ponds, wetlands, streams) and offer facilities for basic hydrologic experiments (e.g., aquifer models, permeameter, water quality). The E.V. Smith site has access to groundwater through pairs of nested wells. Educational activities are designed to help students and teachers visualize groundwater flow and its interaction with surface water in an aquifer tank model; compare the hydrologic properties (porosity and permeability) of different aquifer materials (sands, gravels, and clays); learn about groundwater purging and sampling; and assess water quality and flow direction in the field. Simple exercises demonstrate (1) the balance of recharge and discharge, (2) the effects of flooding, drought and pumping, and (3) movement of contaminants through aquifers. A set of ready-to-teach laboratory exercises and tutorials address goals specified by the State of Alabama science curriculum for grades 6 to 8. The ultimate goal of Project WET Alabama is to help students and teachers from resource-poor schools become knowledgeable

  16. Salmonella enterica pulsed-field gel electrophoresis clusters, Minnesota, USA, 2001-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Joshua M; Hedberg, Craig W; Meyer, Stephanie; Boxrud, David J; Smith, Kirk E

    2010-11-01

    We determined characteristics of Salmonella enterica pulsed-field gel electrophoresis clusters that predict their being solved (i.e., that result in identification of a confirmed outbreak). Clusters were investigated by the Minnesota Department of Health by using a dynamic iterative model. During 2001-2007, a total of 43 (12.5%) of 344 clusters were solved. Clusters of ≥4 isolates were more likely to be solved than clusters of 2 isolates. Clusters in which the first 3 case isolates were received at the Minnesota Department of Health within 7 days were more likely to be solved than were clusters in which the first 3 case isolates were received over a period >14 days. If resources do not permit investigation of all S. enterica pulsed-field gel electrophoresis clusters, investigation of clusters of ≥4 cases and clusters in which the first 3 case isolates were received at a public health laboratory within 7 days may improve outbreak investigations.

  17. Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis for Salmonella Infection Surveillance, Texas, USA, 2007

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-06-14

    This podcast describes monitoring of the use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for Salmonella surveillance in Houston, Texas. CDC microbiologist Peter Gerner-Smidt discusses the importance of the PulseNet national database in surveillance of food-borne infections.  Created: 6/14/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/14/2010.

  18. 77 FR 42653 - United States Navy Restricted Area, SUPSHIP Gulf Coast Detachment Mobile at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Navy Restricted Area, SUPSHIP Gulf Coast Detachment Mobile at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile, AL; Restricted Area... restricted area established around the AUSTAL, USA shipbuilding facility located in Mobile, Alabama. The...) assumed the duties of administering new construction contracts at AUSTAL USA in Mobile, AL, on October 9...

  19. Evaluating permafrost thaw vulnerabilities and hydrologic impacts in boreal Alaska (USA) watersheds using field data and cryohydrogeologic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walvoord, M. A.; Voss, C.; Ebel, B. A.; Minsley, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost environments undergo changes in hydraulic, thermal, chemical, and mechanical subsurface properties upon thaw. These property changes must be considered in addition to alterations in hydrologic, thermal, and topographic boundary conditions when evaluating shifts in the movement and storage of water in arctic and sub-arctic boreal regions. Advances have been made in the last several years with respect to multiscale geophysical characterization of the subsurface and coupled fluid and energy transport modeling of permafrost systems. Ongoing efforts are presented that integrate field data with cryohydrogeologic modeling to better understand and anticipate changes in subsurface water resources, fluxes, and flowpaths caused by climate warming and permafrost thawing. Analyses are based on field data from several sites in interior Alaska (USA) that span a broad north-south transition from continuous to discontinuous permafrost. These data include soil hydraulic and thermal properties and shallow permafrost distribution. The data guide coupled fluid and energy flow simulations that incorporate porewater liquid/ice phase change and the accompanying modifications in hydraulic and thermal subsurface properties. Simulations are designed to assess conditions conducive to active layer thickening and talik development, both of which are expected to affect groundwater storage and flow. Model results provide a framework for identifying factors that control the rates of permafrost thaw and associated hydrologic responses, which in turn influence the fate and transport of carbon.

  20. Plutonium content in field crops yield at South-East of USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriano, D.S.; Korej, D.S.; Dalmen, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    Pu accumulation in crops grown in fields on the territory of Sovannah-River plant and territory of Oak-Ridge national laboratory is described; soil of these sections is characterized by Pu concentrations exceeding the level of global contamination. Pu accumulation in basic cereals (wheat, soy-beans, corn) in Savannah-River, where the main type of contamination is deposition from flows of effluents, with Pu content in basic vegetables in Oak-Ridge where root absorption is the main way of contamination

  1. Non-destructive techniques in the conservation field in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta de Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive evaluation techniques are extensively used in the field of architectural heritage conservation in the United States. This paper outlines the most used techniques, classifying them in visual assessment techniques, and techniques based on wave propagation. Depending on the type of wave, the latter group is subdivided in electromagnetic and acoustic techniques. The final section includes a two nondestructive techniques facilitators: unmanned aerial vehicles and Tablet PC Annotation System.

  2. Alabama ESI: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive human-use data for designated critical habitats, state parks, wildlife refuges, and wildlife management areas in Alabama. Vector...

  3. Field Scale Studies on the Spatial Variability of Soil Quality Indicators in Washington State, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arable lands are needed for sustainable agricultural systems to support an ever-growing human population. Soil quality needs to be defined to assure that new land brought into crop production is sustainable. To evaluate soil quality, a number of soil attributes will need to be measured, evaluated, and integrated into a soil-quality index using the multivariable indicator kriging (MVIK procedure. This study was conducted to determine the spatial variability and correlation of indicator parameters on a field scale with respect to soil quality and suitability for use with MVIK. The variability of the biological parameters decreased in the order of respiration > enzyme assays and qCO2 > microbial biomass C. The distribution frequency of all parameters except respiration were normal although the spatial distribution across the landscape was highly variable. The biological parameters showed little correlation with each other when all data points were considered; however, when grouped in smaller sections, the correlations were more consistent with observed patterns across the field. To accurately assess soil quality, and arable land use, consideration of spatial and temporal variability, soil conditions, and other controlling factors must be taken into account.

  4. Phreatic explosions during basaltic fissure eruptions: Kings Bowl lava field, Snake River Plain, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Scott S.; Kobs Nawotniak, Shannon E.; Sears, Derek W. G.; Borg, Christian; Garry, William Brent; Christiansen, Eric H.; Haberle, Christopher W.; Lim, Darlene S. S.; Heldmann, Jennifer L.

    2018-02-01

    Physical and compositional measurements are made at the 7 km-long ( 2200 years B.P.) Kings Bowl basaltic fissure system and surrounding lava field in order to further understand the interaction of fissure-fed lavas with phreatic explosive events. These assessments are intended to elucidate the cause and potential for hazards associated with phreatic phases that occur during basaltic fissure eruptions. In the present paper we focus on a general understanding of the geological history of the site. We utilize geospatial analysis of lava surfaces, lithologic and geochemical signatures of lava flows and explosively ejected blocks, and surveys via ground observation and remote sensing. Lithologic and geochemical signatures readily distinguish between Kings Bowl and underlying pre-Kings Bowl lava flows, both of which comprise phreatic ejecta from the Kings Bowl fissure. These basalt types, as well as neighboring lava flows from the contemporaneous Wapi lava field and the older Inferno Chasm vent and outflow channel, fall compositionally within the framework of eastern Snake River Plain olivine tholeiites. Total volume of lava in the Kings Bowl field is estimated to be 0.0125 km3, compared to a previous estimate of 0.005 km3. The main (central) lava lake lost a total of 0.0018 km3 of magma by either drain-back into the fissure system or breakout flows from breached levees. Phreatic explosions along the Kings Bowl fissure system occurred after magma supply was cut off, leading to fissure evacuation, and were triggered by magma withdrawal. The fissure system produced multiple phreatic explosions and the main pit is accompanied by others that occur as subordinate pits and linear blast corridors along the fissure. The drop in magma supply and the concomitant influx of groundwater were necessary processes that led to the formation of Kings Bowl and other pits along the fissure. A conceptual model is presented that has relevance to the broader range of low-volume, monogenetic

  5. Lag times of bank filtration at a well field, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, R.A.; Darner, R.A.; Whitteberry, B.L.

    2002-01-01

    Wells placed next to surface-water bodies to induce infiltration have come under scrutiny because of the presence of the potential pathogens in surface water. Removal of pathogens and other contaminants by bank filtration is assumed, but regulatory agencies question the effectiveness of this process. To investigate transport processes of biological constituents, advective groundwater traveltimes to production wells under the influence of surface water need to be established first to determine appropriate water-quality sampling schedules. This paper presents the results of a study of bank filtration at a well field in southwestern Ohio. Field parameters such as water level, specific conductance, and water temperature were measured at least hourly at a streamflow gaging station and at five monitoring wells each at two separate sites, corresponding to two nearby production wells. Water-quality samples also were collected in all wells and the streamflow gaging station. Specific conductance is directly related to concentration of chloride, a chemically conservative constituent. Cross-correlation methods were used to determine the average traveltime from the river to the monitoring wells. Traveltimes based on specific conductance ranged from approximately 20 h to 10 days at one site and 5 days to 3 months at the other site. Calculated groundwater flow velocities ranged from 2.1 ?? 10-3 to 6.0 ?? 10-3 cm/s and 3.5 ?? 10-4 to 7.1 ?? 10-4 cm/s at the two sites. Data collected when a production well is continuously pumping reveal shorter and more consistent traveltimes than when the same well is pumped intermittently. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spectral image analysis of the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Arizona, U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Wescott, T.F.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of economic deposits, the semi-arid environment and the youth of applied remote-sensing technology suit the Hopi Buttes volcanic field as a test site for the application of multispectral image analysis to geologic interpretation and uranium evaluation. All possible enhancements of seasonal images were created in the General Electric interactive multispectral analyzer, model 100, and photographed for study. Contrast and directional edge-enhancement excellently delineated the patterns of megafractures and lineaments which are obscure to ground observation, but may control vent positions. Two sets of orthogonal groups of megafractures are oriented in the cardinal and diagonal directions; they suggest rotation of the stress ellipsoid, or the overlap of stresses from a differently oriented ellipsoid in a neighboring region. A megacircle of vents suggests a deep cylindrical fracture zone and possible incipient cauldron. Other circular areas with unusually abundant travertine maars or volcanic-material-free pipes suggest incipient collapse. Band ratios, density slices and histogram stretches selectively enhanced and differentiated stratigraphic formations, limburgite, tuff, travertine, gypsum-argillized rock and Fe-enriched rock. These were portrayed successfully on thematic map-images. A signature was derived for uraniferous travertine-marl and used to map its distribution. 30 refs.; 24 figs

  7. Constraining volcanic inflation at Three Sisters Volcanic Field in Oregon, USA, through microgravity and deformation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Jeffrey; William-Jones, Glyn; Johnson, Dan; Eggers, Al

    2012-10-01

    Microgravity data were collected between 2002 and 2009 at the Three Sisters Volcanic Complex, Oregon, to investigate the causes of an ongoing deformation event west of South Sister volcano. Three different conceptual models have been proposed as the causal mechanism for the deformation event: (1) hydraulic uplift due to continual injection of magma at depth, (2) pressurization of hydrothermal systems and (3) viscoelastic response to an initial pressurization at depth. The gravitational effect of continual magma injection was modeled to be 20 to 33 μGal at the center of the deformation field with volumes based on previous deformation studies. The gravity time series, however, did not detect a mass increase suggesting that a viscoelactic response of the crust is the most likely cause for the deformation from 2002 to 2009. The crust, deeper than 3 km, in the Three Sisters region was modeled as a Maxwell viscoelastic material and the results suggest a dynamic viscosity between 1018 to 5 × 1019 Pa s. This low crustal viscosity suggests that magma emplacement or stall depth is controlled by density and not the brittle ductile transition zone. Furthermore, these crustal properties and the observed geochemical composition gaps at Three Sisters can be best explained by different melt sources and limited magma mixing rather than fractional crystallization. More generally, low intrusion rates, low crustal viscosity, and multiple melt sources could also explain the whole rock compositional gaps observed at other arc volcanoes.

  8. Diet of juvenile Alabama shad (Alosa alabamae) in two northern Gulf of Mexico drainages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul F. Mickle; Jacob Schaefer; Donald A. Yee; Susan B. Adams

    2013-01-01

    Understanding food-web ecology is valuable to conservation by linking interactions of multiple species together and illustrating the functionality of trophic exchange. Alosa alabamae (Alabama Shad), an anadromous species, reproduces in northern Gulf of Mexico drainages from February through May, and for this study, the Pascagoula and Apalachicola...

  9. Joint actions of the Republic of Tajikistan and USA in the field of weapons of mass destruction nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomov, Dzh.A.; Mirsaidov, I.U.

    2010-01-01

    areas, agricultural sectors and other fields. One of the key issues of ensuring safe use, storage and transportation of radioactive sources and their non-proliferation is establishment of state sources of ionizing radiation database and carrying out its account and control. In this field our republic received and still is receiving appreciable assistance from USA Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Starting from 2003, projects on ensuring intruder alarm and physical protection of sites with high radioactive sources were implemented in the republic. In the framework of this cooperation, the intruder alarms were installed in Republican Waste Disposal Site (RWDS, Faizabad region), Scientific Centre of Oncology under Ministry of Health of the Republic of Tajikistan, Gamma laboratory of Tajik National University. Extensive repairs were carried out in Building N 20 of RWDS, where worked-out radioactive sources are disposed with total activity more than 80 kilo curie and Gamma laboratory building of Tajik National University. Concrete blocks fence was constructed in vulnerable places around RWDS high security zone. In all these sites, the physical protection elements are installed in accordance with international requirements. Those elements includes video-surveillance, 24 hour record of all events in controlled premises and sites in the database, motion detectors for notification of guard personnel about intruder penetration, doors with dual lock, according to two keys use and etc. Especially we would like to emphasize assistance from USA Department of Energy in carrying out orphan sources search. Search of orphan sources in Northern Tajikistan is completed and currently the searches are carried out in Southern Tajikistan. Under this project, two training courses were conducted, necessary equipment for searches realization were provided, “Niva-Shevrolet” vehicle was provided through relevant IAEA regional project with the purpose of orphan

  10. Alabama ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for Alabama and Perdido Key beach mice in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent the rare...

  11. 78 FR 75306 - Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ...] Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, Alabama AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... Television Commission (``AETC''), the licensee of station WBIQ(TV), channel *39, Birmingham, Alabama... freeze on the filing of petitions for rulemaking by television stations seeking channel substitutions in...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethanol Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Transportation Data for Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Private Biodiesel (B20 and above) 2 8 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) 10 23 Electric 84 67 Ethanol Boasts 200-Plus Flex Fuel Vehicles May 24, 2013 Video thumbnail for Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama May 1, 2012 More Case Studies Videos Text Version More Alabama Videos

  14. A State of Emergency in Alabama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Edward Spencer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the Alabama Department of Corrections August 2009 Monthly Statistical Report and Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report, recent articles to explain the serious public safety issue of prison overcrowding within the state of Alabama, lack of funding and correctional staff, and increasing violence among inmates. It is imperative that the stakeholders take a restorative justice approach to offenders who commit nonviolent crimes or otherwise be prepared to release substantial numbers of violent inmates due to federal court intervention, expanding parole, and other types of early release programs. Violent offenders will pose a greater threat to the community. Correctional workers continue to be exposed daily to the risk of injury or death caused by severe prison overcrowding. The state could experience additional financial hardship to rebuild a destroyed correctional facility in an event of a riot. The excessive use of incarceration for nonviolent offenders is one of the most important issues facing the state of Alabama this decade.

  15. F2 screen, inheritance and cross-resistance of field-derived Vip3A resistance in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) collected from Louisiana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Morsello, Shannon; Head, Graham P; Sansone, Chris; Huang, Fangneng; Gilreath, Ryan T; Kerns, David L

    2017-11-28

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is a target pest of the Vip3A protein used in pyramided Bt corn and cotton in the USA. In this study, we provide the first documentation of a resistance allele conferring Vip3A resistance in a field-derived population of S. frugiperda from the USA, and characterize its inheritance and cross-resistance. An F 2 screen with 104 two-parent families generated from a field collection of S. frugiperda in Louisiana, USA, resulted in one family carrying a Vip3A resistance allele. The Vip3A-resistant strain (RR) derived from the two-parent family showed a high level of resistance to Vip3A in both diet and whole-plant bioassays, with a resistance ratio of >632.0-fold relative to a susceptible population (SS) based on diet-overlay bioassays. The inheritance of Vip3A resistance was monogenic, autosomal and recessive. Furthermore, the Vip3A resistance conferred no cross-resistance to Cry1F, Cry2Ab2 or Cry2Ae purified proteins, with resistance ratios of 3.5, 5.0 and 1.1, respectively. These findings provide valuable information for characterizing Vip3A resistance, resistance monitoring, and developing effective resistance management strategies for the sustainable use of the Vip3A technology. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Alabama Kids Count 2002 Data Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being of Alabamas children. The statistical portrait is based on 18 indicators in the areas of child health, education, safety, and security: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention; (6) school…

  17. Alabama Kids Count 2001 Data Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being for Alabama's children. The statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators in the areas of health, education, safety, and security. The indicators are: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention;…

  18. Why do we conduct energy research in Alabama?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the Energy Investigations Program (EIP) at the Geological Survey of Alabama is to research all geological topics related to energy that would affect the state. The state of Alabama has a rich history of coal, oil, and natural gas production. These traditional fuels are still a necessary part of power production, even as other energy sources are being developed. EIP helps assess the remaining reserves of these hydrocarbons, both from areas that have had extensive production as well as new regions that have yet to have viable production. Our research helps people decide how (or even if) they want to develop the resource. Even so, the research in EIP is not all about fossil fuels. We also investigate how carbon dioxide produced from burning these traditional fuels might be captured and then either used or stored permanently. The same types of geology that are good for producing oil and gas are also often good for geologic storage of carbon dioxide permanently. Carbon dioxide can also be used to produce more oil and gas from an older, less productive field, as it can be used to push more of the hydrocarbon out of the rock. This type of research can lead to job development and economic stability or growth within the state.

  19. Feasibility of developing a pilot car training and certification program in Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The State of Alabama does not currently require certification for the pilot car drivers who escort : oversize/overweight vehicles. The Alabama Department of Transportation contracted with The University : Transportation Center for Alabama (UTCA) to i...

  20. Historic Landscape Survey, Maxwell AFB, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    signifies Maxwell AFB’s historic landscapes. 2.1 The pre-military landscape Prehistory in the southeastern United States is generally designated as...the period of Native American occupation before Spanish explorers made contact in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. In Alabama, the prehistory ... prehistory or history is made clear.56 A historic property is determined to be either significant or not significant by applying standardized National

  1. Agribusiness Firms in Alabama: Profiles and Perceptions of Skills and Experiences Needed for Careers in Agribusiness

    OpenAIRE

    Onianwa, Okwudili O.; Wheelock, Gerald; Mojica, Maribel N.; Singh, Surendra P.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the profiles of agribusiness firms and the skills and experiences required for a career in Agribusiness field. Data for this study was generated through a mail survey administered to a total of 300 Agribusiness companies in Alabama. Results are generally consistent with previous studies and show that interpersonal skills, communication skills, ability to use general computer software, and business and economic skills are the most important skills for a successful career in...

  2. Reducing the Effects of Maintenance Dredging on Freshwater Mussels in the Alabama River, Alabama

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    In September 1998, detailed studies of freshwater mussels (Family: Unionidae) were conducted at four mussel beds in the Alabama River, located at River Miles (RM) 20.2-20.4,30.1-30.4, 121.8-122.6, and 124.4-124.9...

  3. Reducing the Effects of Maintenance Dredging on Freshwater Mussels in the Alabama River, Alabama

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    In September 1998, detailed studies of freshwater mussels (Family: Unionidae) were conducted at four mussel beds in the Alabama River, located at River Miles (RM) 20.2-20.4, 30.1-30.4,121.8-122.6, and 124.4-124.9...

  4. Internet Acceptable User Policies in Alabama School Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng; McLean, James E.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current status of and need for acceptable use policies (AUPs) for students' use of the Internet in Alabama school systems. Alabama superintendents were questioned using an electronic survey that could be returned via e-mail on an anonymous Internet site. Primary questions were: (1) What is your level…

  5. A survey of animal-powered logging in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher W. Toms; Mark R. Dubois; John C. Bliss; John H. Wilhoit; Robert B. Rummer

    2001-01-01

    In a state with a very large, highly mechanized timber harvesting industry, animal-powered logging still occupies a niche in Alabama as a small-scale harvesting alternative. This article summarizes the results from a study that examined the extent of animal logging in Alabama. We investigated this topic by asking who is logging with animals, where are they working,...

  6. The Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeper, J. D.; And Others

    The impact of the Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program was evaluated in relation to prenatal care, birth outcome measures, and several child health and home environment outcomes. Begun in 1983, RAPIH targets poor rural blacks in three of west-central Alabama's poorest counties, where economic conditions and infant mortality…

  7. 40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... financial responsibility for hazardous substance underground storage tank systems. (2) Statement of legal... administered by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U.S.C... obtained from the Ground Water Branch, Alabama Department of Environmental Management, 1751 W.L. Dickinson...

  8. 77 FR 61012 - Alabama; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Alabama resulting from Hurricane Isaac... State of Alabama have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Baldwin, Mobile, and... Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to...

  9. Groundwater quality at Alabama Plating and Vincent Spring, Vincent, Alabama, 2007–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Michael W.; Gill, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The former Alabama Plating site in Vincent, Alabama, includes the location where the Alabama Plating Company operated an electroplating facility from 1956 until 1986. The operation of the facility generated waste containing cyanide, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc, and other heavy metals. Contamination resulting from the site operations was identified in groundwater, soil, and sediment. Vincent Spring, used as a public water supply by the city of Vincent, Alabama, is located about ½ mile southwest of the site. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted an investigation at Vincent Spring and the Alabama Plating site, Vincent, Alabama, during 2007–2008 to evaluate the groundwater quality and evaluate the potential effect of contaminated groundwater on the water quality of Vincent Spring. The results of the investigation will provide scientific data and information on the occurrence, fate, and transport of contaminants in the water resources of the area and aid in the evaluation of the vulnerability of the public water supply to contamination. Samples were analyzed to evaluate the water quality at the former plating site, investigate the presence of possible contaminant indicators at Vincent Spring, and determine the usefulness of stable isotopes and geochemical properties in understanding groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the area. Samples collected from 16 monitor wells near the plating site and Vincent Spring were analyzed for major constituents, trace metals, nutrients, and the stable isotopes for hydrogen (2H/H) and oxygen (18O/16O). Groundwater collected from Vincent Spring was characterized as a calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate water type with total dissolved solids concentrations ranging from 110 to 120 milligrams per liter and pH ranging from about 7.5 to 7.9 units. Groundwater chemistry at the monitor wells at the Alabama Plating site was highly variable by location and depth

  10. First report of the cucurbit yellow vine disease caused by Serratia marcescens in watermelon and yellow squash in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms typical of cucurbit yellow vine disease (CYVD) were first observed in a 2 ha watermelon field in Crawford, Russell County, Alabama on 8 June 2010. Watermelon plants, cv. 'Jubilee,' exhibited a yellow or chlorotic appearance and some plants were completely wilted. On 24 June plant samples ...

  11. Architecture and emplacement of flood basalt flow fields: case studies from the Columbia River Basalt Group, NW USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vye-Brown, C.; Self, S.; Barry, T. L.

    2013-03-01

    The physical features and morphologies of collections of lava bodies emplaced during single eruptions (known as flow fields) can be used to understand flood basalt emplacement mechanisms. Characteristics and internal features of lava lobes and whole flow field morphologies result from the forward propagation, radial spread, and cooling of individual lobes and are used as a tool to understand the architecture of extensive flood basalt lavas. The features of three flood basalt flow fields from the Columbia River Basalt Group are presented, including the Palouse Falls flow field, a small (8,890 km2, ˜190 km3) unit by common flood basalt proportions, and visualized in three dimensions. The architecture of the Palouse Falls flow field is compared to the complex Ginkgo and more extensive Sand Hollow flow fields to investigate the degree to which simple emplacement models represent the style, as well as the spatial and temporal developments, of flow fields. Evidence from each flow field supports emplacement by inflation as the predominant mechanism producing thick lobes. Inflation enables existing lobes to transmit lava to form new lobes, thus extending the advance and spread of lava flow fields. Minimum emplacement timescales calculated for each flow field are 19.3 years for Palouse Falls, 8.3 years for Ginkgo, and 16.9 years for Sand Hollow. Simple flow fields can be traced from vent to distal areas and an emplacement sequence visualized, but those with multiple-layered lobes present a degree of complexity that make lava pathways and emplacement sequences more difficult to identify.

  12. Drug shortage management in Alabama hospital pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. Holmes, III

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify effective strategies used by Alabama hospitals to manage drug shortages. Moreover, this study aims to determine if there are any relationships among hospital size, utilization of a standard policy for drug shortage management and perceived usefulness of standard procedures for drug shortages. Methods: A paper survey was mailed to 129 hospital pharmacies in Alabama (per the Alabama Hospital Association directory. The survey consisted of 5 demographic questions, questions involving perception of current medication shortages, sources of information about shorted drugs, and frequency of discussion at P&T committee meetings. Most importantly, the survey contained questions about the use of a standard policy for handling drug shortages, the effectiveness of the policy if one is used, and an open-ended question asking the recipient to describe the policy being used. Results: A response rate of 55% was achieved as 71 surveys were completed and returned. Approximately 70% of the survey respondents described the current drug shortage issue as a top priority in their pharmacy department. The pharmacy distributor served as the primary source of information regarding drug shortages for 45% of the facilities. There is a direct relationship between size of hospital and likelihood of utilization of a standard policy or procedure for drug shortage management among the sample. The smaller facilities of the sample perceived their management strategies as effective more frequently than the larger hospitals. Conclusion: Common components of effective management strategies included extensive communication of shortage details and the ability to locate alternative products. The use of portable technology (e.g., Smart phones and tablets along with mobile applications may emerge as popular means for communicating drug product shortage news and updates within a facility or healthcare system.   Type: Original Research

  13. Drug shortage management in Alabama hospital pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. Holmes III, Pharm.D. Candidate 2013

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify effective strategies used by Alabama hospitals to manage drug shortages. Moreover, this study aims to determine if there are any relationships among hospital size, utilization of a standard policy for drug shortage management and perceived usefulness of standard procedures for drug shortages.Methods: A paper survey was mailed to 129 hospital pharmacies in Alabama (per the Alabama Hospital Association directory. The survey consisted of 5 demographic questions, questions involving perception of current medication shortages, sources of information about shorted drugs, and frequency of discussion at P&T committee meetings. Most importantly, the survey contained questions about the use of a standard policy for handling drug shortages, the effectiveness of the policy if one is used, and an open-ended question asking the recipient to describe the policy being used.Results: A response rate of 55% was achieved as 71 surveys were completed and returned. Approximately 70% of the survey respondents described the current drug shortage issue as a top priority in their pharmacy department. The pharmacy distributor served as the primary source of information regarding drug shortages for 45% of the facilities. There is a direct relationship between size of hospital and likelihood of utilization of a standard policy or procedure for drug shortage management among the sample. The smaller facilities of the sample perceived their management strategies as effective more frequently than the larger hospitals.Conclusion: Common components of effective management strategies included extensive communication of shortage details and the ability to locate alternative products. The use of portable technology (e.g., Smart phones and tablets along with mobile applications may emerge as popular means for communicating drug product shortage news and updates within a facility or healthcare system.

  14. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  15. Flow and nutrient dynamics in a subterranean estuary (Waquoit Bay, MA, USA): Field data and reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Claudette; Slomp, Caroline P.; Charette, Matthew A.; Tuncay, Kagan; Meile, Christof

    2008-07-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) reactive transport model is used to investigate the controls on nutrient ( NO3-, NH4+, PO 4) dynamics in a coastal aquifer. The model couples density-dependent flow to a reaction network which includes oxic degradation of organic matter, denitrification, iron oxide reduction, nitrification, Fe 2+ oxidation and sorption of PO 4 onto iron oxides. Porewater measurements from a well transect at Waquoit Bay, MA, USA indicate the presence of a reducing plume with high Fe 2+, NH4+, DOC (dissolved organic carbon) and PO 4 concentrations overlying a more oxidizing NO3--rich plume. These two plumes travel nearly conservatively until they start to overlap in the intertidal coastal sediments prior to discharge into the bay. In this zone, the aeration of the surface beach sediments drives nitrification and allows the precipitation of iron oxide, which leads to the removal of PO 4 through sorption. Model simulations suggest that removal of NO3- through denitrification is inhibited by the limited overlap between the two freshwater plumes, as well as by the refractory nature of terrestrial DOC. Submarine groundwater discharge is a significant source of NO3- to the bay.

  16. 75 FR 62531 - Alabama Power Company; Project No. 349-150-Alabama Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Alabama Power Company; Project No. 349-150--Alabama Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service List for a... the Martin Dam Hydroelectric Project. The Programmatic Agreement, when executed by the Commission, the...

  17. Host fishes and infection strategies of freshwater mussels in large Mobile Basin streams, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendell R. Haag; Melvin L. Warren

    2003-01-01

    We investigated host fishes, timing and modes of glochidial release, and host-attraction strategies for 7 species of freshwater mussels from the Buttahatchee and Sipsey rivers (Mobile Basin), Alabama and Mississippi, USA. We determined hosts as fish species that produced juvenile mussels from laboratory-induced glochidial infections. We established the following...

  18. Laboratory and field investigations of pestiferous Chironomidae (Diptera) in some man-made wetlands in central Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arshad; Leckel, Robert J; Jahan, Nusrad; Al-Shami, Salman A; Rawi, Che Salmah Md

    2009-03-01

    A 1-year larval and adult population survey of pestiferous chironomids was conducted in 4 man-made wetlands in a resort area of central Florida, USA. Benthic samples were randomly collected from each wetland at least once every month. Geocoordinates, water depth, and physical composition of substrates at each larval sample location were noted. Adult midge populations were sampled weekly around the wetlands by employing 10 New Jersey light traps permanently placed in the area. Chironominae and Tanypodinae midges occurred in the larval and adult samples; a few Orthocladiinae were also taken. Among Chironominae, Chironomini (mostly Polypedilum spp., Cryptochironomus spp., Glyptotendipes paripes, and Goeldichironomus carus) and Tanytarsini (mostly Tanytarsus spp.), and some other Chironomidae were recorded. Tanypodinae were quantitatively not important. Monthly mean number of total adults per trap-night ranged from 23 in February to 211 in October. Annual mean larval density and range of total chironomids in the study wetlands amounted to 1,128/m2, range: 0-12,332/m2. The total larvae were most abundant in May. Tanytarsus spp. and Polypedilum spp. were numerically the most predominant spatially as well as temporally. Mean water depth at the sampled locations was 1.83 m (range: 1-m-deep water. Of all sampled locations, substrates such as sand, mixed substrates, and muck were respectively encountered at 656, 371, and 299 locations. The predominance of sand and mixed substrates was conducive to supporting the numerically dominant Tanytarsus spp. and Polypedilum spp. In laboratory bioassays, Tanytarsus spp., Polypedilum spp., Glyptotendipes paripes, and Goeldichironomus carus were highly susceptible to temephos, as well as to s-methoprene. Bacillus thuringiensis serovar. israelensis was most effective against Tanytarsus spp. and least against Goeldichironomus carus.

  19. Accuracy assessment of the vegetation continuous field tree cover product using 3954 ground plots in the southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. A. White; J. D. Shaw; R. D. Ramsey

    2005-01-01

    An accuracy assessment of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation continuous field (VCF) tree cover product using two independent ground-based tree cover databases was conducted. Ground data included 1176 Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots for Arizona and 2778 Southwest Regional GAP (SWReGAP) plots for Utah and western Colorado....

  20. Comparison of performance of wood extractives as preservatives in field tests against termites and decay in the USA and Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar Hassan; Sohail Ahmed; Mark Mankowski; Grant Kirker

    2017-01-01

    Increasing environmental regulations have limited the use of certain broad spectrum synthetic pesticides as wood preservatives creating a need for more environmentally benign wood preservative systems. Biocidal compounds from natural products have been proposed as alternatives to commercial wood preservatives, but field data from long term performance testing is...

  1. Monogenetic volcanoes fed by interconnected dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, James D.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Although monogenetic volcanic fields pose hazards to major cities worldwide, their shallow magma feeders (networks. Analysis of vent alignments using the pyroclastic massifs and other eruptive centers (e.g., maar-diatremes) shows a NW-SE trend, parallel to that of dikes in the region. We therefore infer that dikes fed many of the eruptions. Dikes are also observed in places transforming to transgressive (ramping) sills. Estimates of the observable volume of dikes (maximum volume of 1.90 × 106 m3) and sills (minimum volume of 8.47 × 105 m3) in this study reveal that sills at Hopi Buttes make up at least 30 % of the shallow intruded volume (∼2.75 × 106 m3 total) within 350 m of the paeosurface. We have also identified saucer-shaped sills, which are not traditionally associated with monogenetic volcanic fields. Our study demonstrates that shallow feeders in monogenetic fields can form geometrically complex networks, particularly those intruding poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. We conclude that the Hopi Buttes eruptions were primarily fed by NW-SE-striking dikes. However, saucer-shaped sills also played an important role in modulating eruptions by transporting magma toward and away from eruptive conduits. Sill development could have been accompanied by surface uplifts on the order of decimeters. We infer that the characteristic feeder systems described here for the Hopi Buttes may underlie monogenetic fields elsewhere, particularly where magma intersects shallow, and often weak, sedimentary rocks. Results from this study support growing evidence of the important role of shallow sills in active monogenetic fields.

  2. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmiston, Jessica L

    2012-09-28

    Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

  3. Utility boiler computer modeling experience in the USA for practical furnace air port and low NOx burner field design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, B.P.; Urich, J.A.; Krippene, B.C. [ESA, Inc. (United States)

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents several examples of where effective furnace and low NOx burner modeling has produced substantial advantages to the low NOx combustion system designer. Using practical boiler furnace air injection port and low NOx burner maths modeling as an integral part of the design process has often made the difference between a successful low NOx combustion system field conversion project and an unsuccessful one.

  4. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on biomass yield and quality in large fields of established switchgrass in southern Iowa, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemus, Roque [Department of Agricultural Sciences, Texas A and M University, Commerce, TX 75429 (United States); Charles Brummer, E. [Center for Applied Genetic Technologies, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Lee Burras, C.; Moore, Kenneth J.; Barker, Michael F. [Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Molstad, Neil E. [USDA-NRCS Hawaii Resource Office, 101 Aupuni Street Suite 229, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a potential biofuel crop in the midwestern United States. The objective of this experiment was to test the effect of nitrogen application on biomass dry matter yield and fiber and mineral concentrations in large field plots in Lucas and Wayne counties in southern Iowa. Two established switchgrass fields with a previous history of limited management were evaluated from 1998 through 2002. Nitrogen was applied in the spring at rates of 0, 56, 112, and 224 kg N ha{sup -1}, and a single biomass harvest was made in autumn. Biomass production averaged across locations and N levels increased by 3.6 mg ha{sup -1} between 1998 and 2002 to 6.5 mg ha{sup -1}. Nitrogen improved yields, with the response declining as N levels increased. The highest yield throughout the experiment was 8.5 mg ha{sup -1} at the Lucas location in 2002. Changes in fiber and mineral concentrations did not follow any trend over years but were likely due to differences in harvest date among years. Nitrogen fertilization had no meaningful effect on the quality of the biofuel produced. This study clearly shows that nitrogen application and proper agronomic management can substantially increase the yield of established switchgrass fields over time without affecting the quality of the feedstock. As this experiment was conducted in large plots using commercial farm machinery, the results should be broadly applicable to real world situations. (author)

  5. Regional Jurassic geologic framework of Alabama coastal waters area and adjacent Federal waters area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    To date, numerous Jurassic hydrocarbon fields and pools have been discovered in the Cotton Valley Group, Haynesville Formation, Smackover Formation and Norphlet Formation in the tri-state area of Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, and in Alabama State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters area. Petroleum traps are basement highs, salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines and extensional faults associated with salt movement. Reservoirs include continental and marine sandstones, limestones and dolostones. Hydrocarbon types are oil, condensate and natural gas. The onshore stratigraphic and structural information can be used to establish a regional geologic framework for the Jurassic for the State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters areas. Evaluation of the geologic information along with the hydrocarbon data from the tri-state area indicates that at least three Jurassic hydrocarbon trends (oil, oil and gas condensate, and deep natural gas) can be identified onshore. These onshore hydrocarbon trends can be projected into the Mobile area in the Central Gulf of Mexico and into the Pensacola, Destin Dome and Apalachicola areas in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Substantial reserves of natural gas are expected to be present in Alabama State waters and the northern portion of the Mobile area. Significant accumulations of oil and gas condensate may be encountered in the Pensacola, Destin Dome, and Apalachicola areas. ?? 1989.

  6. Strontium isotope systematics of mixing groundwater and oil-field brine at Goose Lake in northeastern Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Zell E.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Futa, Kiyoto; Preston, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater, surface water, and soil in the Goose Lake oil field in northeastern Montana have been affected by Cl−-rich oil-field brines during long-term petroleum production. Ongoing multidisciplinary geochemical and geophysical studies have identified the degree and local extent of interaction between brine and groundwater. Fourteen samples representing groundwater, surface water, and brine were collected for Sr isotope analyses to evaluate the usefulness of 87Sr/86Sr in detecting small amounts of brine. Differences in Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr are optimal at this site for the experiment. Strontium concentrations range from 0.13 to 36.9 mg/L, and corresponding 87Sr/86Sr values range from 0.71097 to 0.70828. The local brine has 168 mg/L Sr and a 87Sr/86Sr value of 0.70802. Mixing relationships are evident in the data set and illustrate the sensitivity of Sr in detecting small amounts of brine in groundwater. The location of data points on a Sr isotope-concentration plot is readily explained by an evaporation-mixing model. The model is supported by the variation in concentrations of most of the other solutes.

  7. Magmatism, ash-flow tuffs, and calderas of the ignimbrite flareup in the western Nevada volcanic field, Great Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher D. Henry,; John, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The western Nevada volcanic field is the western third of a belt of calderas through Nevada and western Utah. Twenty-three calderas and their caldera-forming tuffs are reasonably well identified in the western Nevada volcanic field, and the presence of at least another 14 areally extensive, apparently voluminous ash-flow tuffs whose sources are unknown suggests a similar number of undiscovered calderas. Eruption and caldera collapse occurred between at least 34.4 and 23.3 Ma and clustered into five ∼0.5–2.7-Ma-long episodes separated by quiescent periods of ∼1.4 Ma. One eruption and caldera collapse occurred at 19.5 Ma. Intermediate to silicic lavas or shallow intrusions commonly preceded caldera-forming eruptions by 1–6 Ma in any specific area. Caldera-related as well as other magmatism migrated from northeast Nevada to the southwest through time, probably resulting from rollback of the formerly shallow-dipping Farallon slab. Calderas are restricted to the area northeast of what was to become the Walker Lane, although intermediate and effusive magmatism continued to migrate to the southwest across the future Walker Lane.Most ash-flow tuffs in the western Nevada volcanic field are rhyolites, with approximately equal numbers of sparsely porphyritic (≤15% phenocrysts) and abundantly porphyritic (∼20–50% phenocrysts) tuffs. Both sparsely and abundantly porphyritic rhyolites commonly show compositional or petrographic evidence of zoning to trachydacites or dacites. At least four tuffs have volumes greater than 1000 km3, with one possibly as much as ∼3000 km3. However, the volumes of most tuffs are difficult to estimate, because many tuffs primarily filled their source calderas and/or flowed and were deposited in paleovalleys, and thus are irregularly distributed.Channelization and westward flow of most tuffs in paleovalleys allowed them to travel great distances, many as much as ∼250 km (original distance) to what is now the western foothills of the

  8. Alabama ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for dolphins and manatees in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent marine mammal distribution...

  9. Alabama ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for airports, archaeological and historic sites, beaches, boat ramps, state borders, bridges, and marinas for Alabama....

  10. The MAFLA (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) Study, Grain Size Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The MAFLA (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) Study was funded by NOAA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Program. Dr. L.J. Doyle produced grain size analyses in the...

  11. 77 FR 55817 - Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... applicable to Southeastern power sold to existing preference customers in Mississippi, Alabama, Florida... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Virgil Hobbs, Assistant Administrator, Finance and Marketing, Southeastern...: Southeastern believes that each customer should look at their respective situations. Southeastern is not in a...

  12. Data mining and visualization of the Alabama accident database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    The Alabama Department of Public Safety has developed and maintains a centralized database that contain traffic accident data collected from crash report completed by local police officers and state troopers. The Critical Analysis Reporting Environme...

  13. Repair of cracked prestressed concrete girders, I-565, Huntsville, Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Wide cracks were discovered in prestressed concrete bridge girders shortly after their construction in Huntsville, Alabama. Previous investigations of these continuous-for-live-load girders revealed that the cracking resulted from restrained thermal ...

  14. Surface structural damage associated with longwall mining near Tuscaloosa, Alabama: a case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isphording, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    Initially the paper examines the frequency of coal mine subsidence and the influence on surface subsidence of subsurface mining methods, i.e. room and pillar and longwall mining. A case study of the subsidence damage caused to a log house near Tuscaloosa, Alabama (USA), when a longwall panel passed beneath it is presented. The damage resulted in the homeowners suing the mining company for negligence. The article discusses information provided to the plaintiffs attorneys by the author. Aspects covered are: the subsidence and damage to the property; prediction of subsidence; the monitoring of subsidence; and the prevention of subsidence. An out-of-court settlement was agreed by the two parties. 15 refs., 5 figs

  15. Field tracer investigation of unsaturated zone flow paths and mechanisms in agricultural soils of northwestern Mississippi, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, K.S.; Nimmo, J.R.; Rose, C.E.; Coupe, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    In many farmed areas, intensive application of agricultural chemicals and withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation have led to water quality and supply issues. Unsaturated-zone processes, including preferential flow, play a major role in these effects but are not well understood. In the Bogue Phalia basin, an intensely agricultural area in the Delta region of northwestern Mississippi, the fine-textured soils often exhibit surface ponding and runoff after irrigation and rainfall as well as extensive surface cracking during prolonged dry periods. Fields are typically land-formed to promote surface flow into drainage ditches and streams that feed into larger river ecosystems. Downward flow of water below the root zone is considered minimal; regional groundwater models predict only 5% or less of precipitation recharges the heavily used alluvial aquifer. In this study transport mechanisms within and below the root zone of a fallow soybean field were assessed by performing a 2-m ring infiltration test with tracers and subsurface monitoring instruments. Seven months after tracer application, 48 continuous cores were collected for tracer extraction to define the extent of water movement and quantify preferential flow using a mass-balance approach. Vertical water movement was rapid below the pond indicating the importance of vertical preferential flow paths in the shallow unsaturated zone, especially to depths where agricultural disturbance occurs. Lateral flow of water at shallow depths was extensive and spatially non-uniform, reaching up to 10. m from the pond within 2. months. Within 1. month, the wetting front reached a textural boundary at 4-5. m between the fine-textured soil and sandy alluvium, now a potential capillary barrier which, prior to extensive irrigation withdrawals, was below the water table. Within 10. weeks, tracer was detectable at the water table which is presently about 12. m below land surface. Results indicate that 43% of percolation may be through

  16. Landuse legacies of old-field succession and soil structure at the Calhoun Criticl Zone Observatory in SC, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecheisen, Z. S.; Richter, D. D., Jr.; Callaham, M.; Carrera-Martinez, R.; Heine, P.

    2017-12-01

    The pre-colonial Southern Piedmont was an incredibly stable CZ with erosion rates between 0.35-3m/Myr on a 4th order interfluve. With soils and saprolite weathered up to 30m in total depth bedrock with multi-million year residence times under continual forest cover prior to widespread agricultural disturbance. With this biogeomorphic stability came time for soil macroporosity and soil structure to be established and maintained by the activities of soil fauna, plant root growth and death, and tree-fall tip-up events serving to continually mix and aerate the soil. Greatly accelerated surficial agricultural erosion (ca. 1750-1930) has fundamentally altered the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory forest community dynamics aboveground and the soil structure, hydrology, and biogeochemistry belowground. The arrival of the plow to the Southern Piedmont marked the destruction of soil structure, macropore networks, and many of the macroinvertebrate soil engineers. This transformation came via forest clearing, soil tilling, compaction, and wholesale soil erosion, with the region having lost an estimated average of 18cm of soil across the landscape. In the temporal LULC progression from hardwood forests, to cultivated farms, to reforestation, secondary forest soil structure is expected to remain altered compared to the reference hardwood ecosystems. The research presented herein seeks to quantify CZ soil structure regeneration in old-field pine soil profiles' Ksat, aggregation, texture, macro-invertebrates, and direct measurements of topsoil porosity using X-ray computed tomography analysis on 15cm soil cores.

  17. Dune mobility in the St. Anthony Dune Field, Idaho, USA: Effects of meteorological variables and lag time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, R. H.; Gaylord, D. R.; Cooper, C. M.

    2018-05-01

    The St. Anthony Dune Field (SADF) is a 300 km2 expanse of active to stabilized transverse, barchan, barchanoid, and parabolic sand dunes located in a semi-arid climate in southeastern Idaho. The northeastern portion of the SADF, 16 km2, was investigated to examine meteorological influences on dune mobility. Understanding meteorological predictors of sand-dune migration for the SADF informs landscape evolution and impacts assessment of eolian activity on sensitive agricultural lands in the western United States, with implications for semi-arid environments globally. Archival aerial photos from 1954 to 2011 were used to calculate dune migration rates which were subsequently compared to regional meteorological data, including temperature, precipitation and wind speed. Observational analyses based on aerial photo imagery and meteorological data indicate that dune migration is influenced by weather for up to 5-10 years and therefore decadal weather patterns should be taken into account when using dune migration rates as proxies from climate fluctuation. Statistical examination of meteorological variables in this study indicates that 24% of the variation of sand dune migration rates is attributed to temperature, precipitation and wind speed, which is increased to 45% when incorporating lag time.

  18. Predicting Volume and Biomass Change from Multi-Temporal Lidar Sampling and Remeasured Field Inventory Data in Panther Creek Watershed, Oregon, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna P. Poudel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Using lidar for large-scale forest management can improve operational and management decisions. Using multi-temporal lidar sampling and remeasured field inventory data collected from 78 plots in the Panther Creek Watershed, Oregon, USA, we evaluated the performance of different fixed and mixed models in estimating change in aboveground biomass ( ∆ AGB and cubic volume including top and stump ( ∆ CVTS over a five-year period. Actual values of CVTS and AGB were obtained using newly fitted volume and biomass equations or the equations used by the Pacific Northwest unit of the Forest Inventory and Analysis program. Estimates of change based on fixed and mixed-effect linear models were more accurate than change estimates based on differences in LIDAR-based estimates. This may have been due to the compounding of errors in LIDAR-based estimates over the two time periods. Models used to predict volume and biomass at a given time were, however, more precise than the models used to predict change. Models used to estimate ∆ CVTS were not as accurate as the models employed to estimate ∆ AGB . Final models had cross-validation root mean squared errors as low as 40.90% for ∆ AGB and 54.36% for ∆ CVTS .

  19. Gully annealing by aeolian sediment: field and remote-sensing investigation of aeolian-hillslope-fluvial interactions, Colorado River corridor, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Joel B.; Draut, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Processes contributing to development of ephemeral gully channels are of great importance to landscapes worldwide, and particularly in dryland regions where soil loss and land degradation from gully erosion pose long-term land-management problems. Whereas gully formation has been relatively well studied, much less is known of the processes that anneal gullies and impede their growth. This study of gully annealing by aeolian sediment, spanning 95 km along the Colorado River corridor in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA, employed field and remote sensing observations, including digital topographic modelling. Results indicate that aeolian sediment activity can be locally effective at counteracting gully erosion. Gullies are less prevalent in areas where surficial sediment undergoes active aeolian transport, and have a greater tendency to terminate in active aeolian sand. Although not common, examples exist in the record of historical imagery of gullies that underwent infilling by aeolian sediment in past decades and evidently were effectively annealed. We thus provide new evidence for a potentially important interaction of aeolian–hillslope–fluvial processes, which could affect dryland regions substantially in ways not widely recognized. Moreover, because the biologic soil crust plays an important role in determining aeolian sand activity, and so in turn the extent of gully development, this study highlights a critical role of geomorphic–ecologic interactions in determining arid-landscape evolution.

  20. Characterization and 3D reservoir modelling of fluvial sandstones of the Williams Fork Formation, Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, Colorado, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pranter, Matthew J; Vargas, Marielis F; Davis, Thomas L

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the stratigraphic characteristics and distribution of fluvial deposits of the Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation in a portion of Rulison Field and addresses 3D geologic modelling of reservoir sand bodies and their associated connectivity. Fluvial deposits include isolated and stacked point-bar deposits, crevasse splays and overbank (floodplain) mudrock. Within the Williams Fork Formation, the distribution and connectivity of fluvial sandstones significantly impact reservoir productivity and ultimate recovery. The reservoir sandstones are primarily fluvial point-bar deposits interbedded with shales and coals. Because of the lenticular geometry and limited lateral extent of the reservoir sandstones (common apparent widths of ∼500–1000 ft; ∼150–300 m), relatively high well densities (e.g. 10 acre (660 ft; 200 m) spacing) are often required to deplete the reservoir. Heterogeneity of these fluvial deposits includes larger scale stratigraphic variability associated with vertical stacking patterns and structural heterogeneities associated with faults that exhibit lateral and reverse offsets. The discontinuous character of the fluvial sandstones and lack of distinct marker beds in the middle and upper parts of the Williams Fork Formation make correlation between wells tenuous, even at a 10 acre well spacing. Some intervals of thicker and amalgamated sandstones within the middle and upper Williams Fork Formation can be correlated across greater distances. To aid correlation and for 3D reservoir modelling, vertical lithology proportion curves were used to estimate stratigraphic trends and define the stratigraphic zonation within the reservoir interval. Object-based and indicator-based modelling methods have been applied to the same data and results from the models were compared. Results from the 3D modelling indicate that sandstone connectivity increases with net-to-gross ratio and, at lower net-to-gross ratios (<30%), differences exist in

  1. State Emergency Response and Field Observation Activities in California (USA) during the March 11, 2011, Tohoku Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. M.; Wilson, R. I.; Goltz, J.; Fenton, J.; Long, K.; Dengler, L.; Rosinski, A.; California Tsunami Program

    2011-12-01

    This poster will present an overview of successes and challenges observed by the authors during this major tsunami response event. The Tohoku, Japan tsunami was the most costly to affect California since the 1964 Alaskan earthquake and ensuing tsunami. The Tohoku tsunami caused at least $50 million in damage to public facilities in harbors and marinas along the coast of California, and resulted in one fatality. It was generated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake which occurred at 9:46PM PST on Thursday, March 10, 2011 in the sea off northern Japan. The tsunami was recorded at tide gages monitored by the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC), which projected tsunami surges would reach California in approximately 10 hours. At 12:51AM on March 11, 2011, based on forecasted tsunami amplitudes, the WCATWC placed the California coast north of Point Conception (Santa Barbara County) in a Tsunami Warning, and the coast south of Point Conception to the Mexican border in a Tsunami Advisory. The California Emergency Management Agency (CalEMA) activated two Regional Emergency Operation Centers (REOCs) and the State Operation Center (SOC). The California Geological Survey (CGS) deployed a field team which collected data before, during and after the event through an information clearinghouse. Conference calls were conducted hourly between the WCATWC and State Warning Center, as well as with emergency managers in the 20 coastal counties. Coordination focused on local response measures, public information messaging, assistance needs, evacuations, emergency shelters, damage, and recovery issues. In the early morning hours, some communities in low lying areas recommended evacuation for their citizens, and the fishing fleet at Crescent City evacuated to sea. The greatest damage occurred in the harbors of Crescent City and Santa Cruz. As with any emergency, there were lessons learned and important successes in managing this event. Forecasts by the WCATWC were highly accurate

  2. A LATE SANTONIAN FISH-FAUNA FROM THE EUTAW FORMATION OF ALABAMA RECONSTRUCTED FROM OTOLITHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WERNER W. SCHWARZHANS

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The otoliths described here from the Late Santonian of the Eutaw Formation of Alabama, represent one of the earliest association of teleost otoliths known from North America and it is remarkable for its good preservation and species diversity. They were collected by the late C.K. Lamber in 1969 from a road cut on the Hurtsboro-Marvyn highway south of Marvyn in Russell County, eastern Alabama. It contains 18 taxa based on sagittae otoliths, of which 14 are identifiable to the species level, 10 species are new to science and five new genera. The new otolith-based genera are: Allogenartina n. gen. (Stomiiformes family indet., Pseudotrichiurus n. gen. (Aulopiformes family indet., Eutawichthys n. gen. (Beryciformes family indet., Cowetaichthys n. gen. (Polymixiidae and Vox n. gen. (Teleostei family indet.; the new species are: Elops eutawanus n. sp., Genartina cretacea n. sp., Allogenartina muscogeei n. sp., Pseudotrichiurus sagax n. sp., Apateodus? assisi n. sp., Eutawichthys compressus n. sp., Eutawichthys stringeri n. sp., Cowetaichthys alabamae n. sp., Cowetaichthys lamberi n. sp. and Vox thlotlo n. sp. In addition, 8 different morphologies are recognized based on lapilli otoliths, which however cannot be identified to a distinct taxonomic level except for a species of the Ariidae. Two taxa can be related to otoliths recently recorded in situ, pertaining to the genera Osmeroides and Apateodus. The otolith association bears much similarity with those of the Campanian to Maastrichtian of the USA described previously as indicated by the dominance of otoliths of the genera Eutawichthys and Osmeroides. Differences with those faunas are on the species level as well as in the accessory components. The abundance of otoliths of the albuliforms (Osmeroides, putative stomiiforms (Allogenartina, beryciform (Eutawichthys and polymixiids (Cowetaichthys characterizes a rather stable faunal composition through the entire Late Cretaceous of locations studied in

  3. Bringing Global Climate Change Education to Alabama Middle School and High School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.; Mitra, C.; Percival, E.; Thomas, A.; Lucy, T.; Hickman, E.; Cox, J.; Chaudhury, S. R.; Rodger, C.

    2013-12-01

    A NASA-funded Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) Program has been launched in Alabama to improve high school and middle school education in climate change science. The overarching goal is to generate a better informed public that understands the consequences of climate change and can contribute to sound decision making on related issues. Inquiry based NICE modules have been incorporated into the existing course of study for 9-12 grade biology, chemistry, and physics classes. In addition, new modules in three major content areas (earth and space science, physical science, and biological science) have been introduced to selected 6-8 grade science teachers in the summer of 2013. The NICE modules employ five E's of the learning cycle: Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend and Evaluate. Modules learning activities include field data collection, laboratory measurements, and data visualization and interpretation. Teachers are trained in the use of these modules for their classroom through unique partnership with Alabama Science in Motion (ASIM) and the Alabama Math Science Technology Initiative (AMSTI). Certified AMSTI teachers attend summer professional development workshops taught by ASIM and AMSTI specialists to learn to use NICE modules. During the school year, the specialists in turn deliver the needed equipment to conduct NICE classroom exercises and serve as an in-classroom resource for teachers and their students. Scientists are partnered with learning and teaching specialists and lead teachers to implement and test efficacy of instructional materials, models, and NASA data used in classroom. The assessment by professional evaluators after the development of the modules and the training of teachers indicates that the modules are complete, clear, and user-friendly. The overall teacher satisfaction from the teacher training was 4.88/5.00. After completing the module teacher training, the teachers reported a strong agreement that the content developed in the NICE

  4. USA-USSR protocol

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    On 30 November the USA Atomic Energy Commission and the USSR State Committee for the Utilization of Atomic Energy signed, in Washington, a protocol 'on carrying out of joint projects in the field of high energy physics at the accelerators of the National Accelerator Laboratory (Batavia) and the Institute for High Energy Physics (Serpukhov)'. The protocol will be in force for five years and can be extended by mutual agreement.

  5. A natural analogue for near-field behaviour in a high level radioactive waste repository in salt: the Salton Sea geothermal field, California, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elders, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    In the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), in the sediments of the delta of the Colorado River, we are developing a three-dimensional picture of active water/rock reactions at temperatures of 0 C and salinities of 7 to 25 weight percent to produce quantitative data on mineral stabilities and mobilities of naturally-occurring radio-nuclides. The aim is to produce data to validate geochemical computer codes being developed to assess the performance of a Commercial High-Level Waste (CHLW) repository in salt. Among the findings to date are: (1) greenschist facies metamorphism is occurring; (2) brine compositions are fairly similar to those expected in candidate salt repository sites; (3) U and Th concentrations in the rocks are typical for sedimentary rocks; (4) the brines are enriched in Na, Mn, Zn, Sr, Ra Po and strongly depleted in U and Th relative to the rocks; (5) significant radioactive disequilibria exist in brines and solid phases of the SSGF. The disequilibria in the actinide series allow estimation of the rates of brine-rock interaction and understanding of hydrologic processes and radionuclide behaviour. Work is continuing emphasizing the reactions of authigenic clay minerals, epidotes, feldspars, chlorites and sulphates. So far, adapting geochemical codes to the necessary combination of high salinity and high temperature has lagged behind the natural analogue study of the SSGF so that validation is still in progress. In the future our data can be also used in validating performance assessment codes which couple geochemistry and transport processes, and in design of waste packages and back fill compositions. (author)

  6. Geology of the Huntsville quadrangle, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, T.H.; Malmberg, G.T.; West, L.R.

    1961-01-01

    The 7 1/2-minute Huntsville quadrangle is in south-central Madison County, Ala., and includes part of the city of Hunstville. The south, north, east, and west boundaries of the quadrangle are about 3 miles north of the Tennessee River, 15 1/2 miles south of the Tennessee line, 8 miles west of the Jackson County line, and 9 miles east of the Limestone County line. The bedrock geology of the Huntsville quadrangle was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Hunstville and the Geological Survey of Alabama as part of a detailed study of the geology and ground-water resources of Madison County, with special reference to the Huntsville area. G. T. Malmberg began the geologic mapping of the county in July 1953, and completed it in April 1954. T. H. Sanford, Jr., assisted Malmberg in the final phases of the county mapping, which included measuring geologic sections with hand level and steel tape. In November 1958 Sanford, assisted by L. R. West, checked contacts and elevations in the Hunstville quadrangle; made revisions in the contact lines; and wrote the text for this report. The fieldwork for this report was completed in April 1959.

  7. FIELD SURVEY, Androscoggin, MAINE USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Alabama. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Alabama.

  9. 77 FR 59100 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: General and Transportation Conformity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: General and Transportation Conformity & New Source Review... (SMC) Rule. The SIP revision also changes the State's general and transportation conformity regulations... federal general and transportation conformity regulations into the SIP. Alabama's May 2, 2011, SIP...

  10. Assessing Past Fracture Connectivity in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Clumped Isotopes: Proof of Concept in the Blue Mountain Geothermal Field, Nevada USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, K. W.; Sumner, K. K.; Camp, E. R.; Cladouhos, T. T.; Uddenberg, M.; Swyer, M.; Garrison, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface fluid flow is strongly influenced by faults and fractures, yet the transmissivity of faults and fractures changes through time due to deformation and cement precipitation, making flow paths difficult to predict. Here we assess past fracture connectivity in an active hydrothermal system in the Basin and Range, Nevada, USA, using clumped isotope geochemistry and cold cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis of fracture filling cements from the Blue Mountain geothermal field. Calcite cements were sampled from drill cuttings and two cores at varying distances from faults. CL microscopy of some of the cements shows banding parallel to the fracture walls as well as brecciation, indicating that the cements record variations in the composition and source of fluids that moved through the fractures as they opened episodically. CL microscopy, δ13C and δ18O values were used to screen homogeneous samples for clumped isotope analysis. Clumped isotope thermometry of most samples indicates paleofluid temperatures of around 150°C, with several wells peaking at above 200°C. We suggest that the consistency of these temperatures is related to upwelling of fluids in the convective hydrothermal system, and interpret the similarity of the clumped isotope temperatures to modern geothermal fluid temperatures of ~160-180°C as evidence that average reservoir temperatures have changed little since precipitation of the calcite cements. In contrast, two samples, one of which was associated with fault gauge observed in drill logs, record significantly cooler temperatures of 19 and 73°C and anomalous δ13C and δ18Owater values, which point to fault-controlled pathways for downwelling meteoric fluid. Finally, we interpret correspondence of paleofluid temperatures and δ18Owater values constrained by clumped isotope thermometry of calcite from different wells to suggest past connectivity of fractures among wells within the geothermal field. Results show the ability of clumped isotope

  11. 75 FR 27340 - Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR10-21-000] Enterprise..., Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC (Enterprise Alabama) filed a petition for rate approval pursuant to section 284.123(b)(2) of the Commission's regulations. Enterprise Alabama states it is filing to justify...

  12. 75 FR 43964 - Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR10-21-001] Enterprise..., Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC (Enterprise Alabama) pursuant to a July 8, 2010, Letter Order which required Enterprise Alabama to file within 30 days of the issuance of the July 8 order a stand alone...

  13. 77 FR 124 - Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9612-9] Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan... reimbursement of past response costs concerning the Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site located in... Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund...

  14. Alabama Education Report Card for the 2014-2015 School Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama State Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This 2014-2015 "Alabama Education Report Card" includes a wide variety of data and financial information that, when taken together, provides a holistic picture of the world of K-12 education in the state of Alabama and is committed to academic excellence which provides education of the highest quality to all Alabama students, preparing…

  15. Opening the Schoolhouse Doors: Tax Credits and Educational Access in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II.; Erickson, Angela C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, Alabama adopted the Alabama Accountability Act, an education reform measure that includes two new school choice programs that extend a lifeline to Alabama students trapped in failing public schools. One program offers a tax credit to help offset the cost of tuition for families who move their children from public schools designated as…

  16. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that

  17. The Alabama Space and Rocket Center: The Second Decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckbee, Edward O.

    1983-01-01

    The Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, the world's largest rocket and space museum, includes displays illustrating American rocket history, exhibits and demonstrations on rocketry principles and experiences, and simulations of space travel. A new project includes an integrated recreational-educational complex, described in the three…

  18. Laboratory Safety Manual for Alabama Schools. Bulletin 1975. No. 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This document presents the Alabama State Department of Education guidelines for science laboratory safety, equipment, storage, chemical safety, rocket safety, electrical safety, safety with radioisotopes, and safety with biologicals. Also included is a brief bibliography, a teacher's checklist, a listing of laser facts and regulations, and a…

  19. Forest statistics for Southwest-South Alabama counties - 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McWilliams; Patrick E. Miller; John S. Vissage

    1990-01-01

    Tabulated results were derived from data obtained during a recent forest inventory of southeast Alabama (fig. 1). Core tables (1 to 25) are compatible among Forest Inventory and Analysis units in the Eastern U.S. Other tables (26 to 43) supplement the information contained in the core tables. Comparisons are made between results of the 1990 inventory and previous...

  20. Determining soil erosion from roads in coastal plain of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFero Grace; W.J. Elliot

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports soil losses and observed sediment deposition for 16 randomly selected forest road sections in the National Forests of Alabama. Visible sediment deposition zones were tracked along the stormwater flow path to the most remote location as a means of quantifying soil loss from road sections. Volumes of sediment in deposition zones were determined by...

  1. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Alabama. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  2. Parables and Politics: Clergy Attitudes toward Illegal Immigration in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickersham, Mary Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    The passage of a stringent immigration law in Alabama in 2011 makes relevant the juxtaposition of clergy and congregant attitudes and behaviors toward illegal immigrants as related to Biblical teachings that require charity to aliens. In order to examine the relationship between religious attitudes and illegal immigration, approximately 426…

  3. Cardboard Houses with Wings: The Architecture of Alabama's Rural Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botz-Bornstein, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The Rural Studio, an outreach program of Auburn University, designs innovative houses for poor people living in Alabama's Hale County by using "junk" such as car windshields, carpet tiles, baled cardboard, and old license plates. The article theorizes this particular architecture in terms of Critical Regionalism, developed by…

  4. First records of smoky shrew (sorex fumeus) in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary Felix; Lisa J. Gatens; Yong Wang; Callie J. Schweitzer

    2009-01-01

    Conserving biodiversity in the southeastern United States begins with documenting the distribution and natural history of all taxa. Using pitfall traps between March 2005 and January 2006, we collected the fi rst Sorex fumeus (Smoky Shrew) specimens (44) from Alabama on the Cumberland Plateau in the northeastern portion of the state....

  5. Parental perspectives of diabetes management in Alabama public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Jason P; Luthin, David R; Skelley, Jessica W; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Ashraf, Ambika P; Atchison, Joycelyn A

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess parental perceptions of the current state of care for children with diabetes in the Alabama public school system, identify existing disparities, and determine what resources would most improve diabetes management in this setting. There is a significant need for such information because of the paucity of published data on the current state of diabetes care in Alabama public schools. We based our survey on the American Diabetes Association guidelines and collected responses on the Internet via SurveyMonkey and by paper surveys. We distributed surveys to parents of children with diabetes through the Children's Hospital endocrinology clinic, a diabetes camp, and through the Alabama Association of School Nurses e-mail listserv. A majority of children had type 1 diabetes mellitus. Students who could conveniently check their blood glucose levels (BGLs) at school were significantly more likely to participate in all school activities and their parents were significantly more likely to be satisfied with their child's diabetes care at school. Compared with minority students (defined as all races other than white), white students were more likely to be able to conveniently check their BGLs at school. The accommodation and care for children with diabetes is highly variable within much of the Alabama public school system. The ability to conveniently check BGLs at school is key for participation in all school activities and for parental satisfaction with diabetes care at school. Institution of a uniform, statewide diabetes training protocol for school personnel could improve care and parental satisfaction.

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Preschool Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, Suzanne M.; Marks, David J.; Policaro, Katia L.; Halperin, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Preschool Revision (APQ-PR) were explored in a sample of hyperactive-inattentive preschool children (N = 47) and nonimpaired controls (N = 113). A subset of parents completed the questionnaire on 2 occasions, approximately 1 year apart. Factor analysis revealed a 3-factor solution,…

  7. Factors Affecting Conservation Practice Behavior of CRP Participants in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwudili Onianwa; Gerald Wheelock; Shannon Hendrix

    1999-01-01

    This study examines the factors that affect conservation practice choices of CRP farmers in Alabama. From over 9,000 contracts enrolled in the state between 1986 and 1995, 594 were randomly selected for the study. A multiple-regression analysis was employed to analyze the data. Results indicate that education, ratio ofcropland in CRP, farm size, gender, prior crop...

  8. Assessment of Loblolly Pine Decline in Central Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan J. Hess; William J. Otrosina; Emily A. Carter; Jim R. Steinman; John P. Jones; Lori G. Eckhardt; Ann M. Weber; Charles H. Walkinshaw

    2002-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) decline has been prevalent on upland sites of central Alabama since the 1960's. The purpose of this study was to compare Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) standards and protocols with root health evaluations relative to crown, stem, and site measurements. Thirty-nine 1/6 acre plots were established on loblolly decline...

  9. Topobathymetric model of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Brock, John C.; Howard, Daniel M.; Gesch, Dean B.; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2013-01-01

    Topobathymetric Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are a merged rendering of both topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth) that provides a seamless elevation product useful for inundation mapping, as well as for other earth science applications, such as the development of sediment-transport, sea-level rise, and storm-surge models. This 1/9-arc-second (approximately 3 meters) resolution model of Mobile Bay, Alabama was developed using multiple topographic and bathymetric datasets, collected on different dates. The topographic data were obtained primarily from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED) (http://ned.usgs.gov/) at 1/9-arc-second resolution; USGS Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data (2 meters) (http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/400/); and topographic lidar data (2 meters) and Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid Total Survey (CHARTS) lidar data (2 meters) from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) (http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/data/coastallidar/). Bathymetry was derived from digital soundings obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/geodas/geodas.html) and from water-penetrating lidar sources, such as EAARL and CHARTS. Mobile Bay is ecologically important as it is the fourth largest estuary in the United States. The Mobile and Tensaw Rivers drain into the bay at the northern end with the bay emptying into the Gulf of Mexico at the southern end. Dauphin Island (a barrier island) and the Fort Morgan Peninsula form the mouth of Mobile Bay. Mobile Bay is 31 miles (50 kilometers) long by a maximum width of 24 miles (39 kilometers) with a total area of 413 square miles (1,070 square kilometers). The vertical datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). All the topographic datasets were originally referenced to NAVD 88 and no transformations

  10. Alabama Disasters: Leveraging NASA EOS to Explore the Environmental and Economic Impact of the April 27 Tornado Outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdy, Claire; Luvall, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The disastrous tornado outbreak in Alabama on April 27, 2011 greatly impacted the economy of the state. On record, the tornado outbreak was the second deadliest tornado outbreak in U.S. When considering the agricultural and value-added activities such as food and timber processing, farm inputs, manufacturing, transportation, and retail sales, the dollar value of Alabama agribusiness annually exceeds $40 billion (NASS, 2011). This research aims to examine how the timber and agriculture damage affected the state economy of Alabama and will be used to aid in long-term economic recovery. ASTER imagery was used along with ground-truthed NASS (National Agriculture Statistics Service) crop location records to verify the economic impact tornadoes had on the agricultural economy of the state. This swath damage can be calculated by correlating tornado path with NASS statistics on crop yield, precisely showing the fields affected and dollars lost to this disaster. Not only can this be executed manually using ENVI and ArcGIS, but also through the use of Python, a programming language that has the ability to automate the process, creating a product for initial damage assessment.

  11. Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance. Raw data release II. Orientation studies in Alabama. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

    1976-07-01

    Raw data for two orientation studies in the Alabama Valley and Ridge, and Upper Coastal Plain are presented. These studies were conducted in cooperation with the Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

  12. The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA): A Network Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J.; Buechler, D.; Goodman, S. J.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.; Hall, J.

    2005-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is s a 3-D VHF regional lightning detection system that provides on-orbit algorithm validation and instrument performance assessments for the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor, as well as information on storm kinematics and updraft evolution that offers the potential to improve severe storm warning lead time by up t o 50% and decrease te false alarm r a t e ( for non-tornado producing storms). In support of this latter function, the LMA serves as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technology into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather, principally within nearby National Weather Service forecast offices. The LMA, which became operational i n November 2001, consists of VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama and a base station located at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), which is on t h e campus of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The LMA system locates the sources of impulsive VHF radio signals s from lightning by accurately measuring the time that the signals aririve at the different receiving stations. Each station's records the magnitude and time of the peak lightning radiation signal in successive 80 ms intervals within a local unused television channel (channel 5, 76-82 MHz in our case ) . Typically hundreds of sources per flash can be reconstructed, which i n t u r n produces accurate 3-dimensional lightning image maps (nominally network topology and the links have an effective data throughput rate ranging from 600 kbits s -1 t o 1.5 %its s -1. This presentation provides an overview of t h e North Alabama network, the data processing (both real-time and post processing) and network statistics.

  13. Trends in Alabama teen driving death and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Kathy; Irons, Elizabeth; Crew, Marie; Norris, Jesse; Nichols, Michele; King, William D

    2014-09-01

    Motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in teens. Alabama has been in the Top 5 states for MVC fatality rate among teens in the United States for several years. Twelve years of teen MVC deaths and injuries were evaluated. Our hypothesis is that the teen driving motor vehicle-related deaths and injuries have decreased related to legislative and community awareness activities. A retrospective analysis of Alabama teen MVC deaths and injury for the years 2000 to 2011 was conducted. MVC data were obtained from a Fatality Analysis Reporting System data set managed by the Center for Advanced Public Safety at the University of Alabama. A Lowess regression-scattergram analysis was used to identify period specific changes in deaths and injury over time. Statistical analysis was conducted using True Epistat 5.0 software. When the Lowess regression was applied, there was an obvious change in the trend line in 2007. To test that observation, we then compared medians in the pre-2007 and post-2007 periods, which validated our observation. Moreover, it provided a near-even number of observations for comparison. The Spearman rank correlation was used to test for correlation of deaths and injury over time. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate median differences in deaths and injury comparing pre-2007 and post-2007 data. Alabama teen MVC deaths and injury demonstrated a significant negative correlation over the 12-year period (Rs for deaths and injury, -0.87 [p teen driver deaths and injury have decreased during the 12-year study period, most notably after 2006. Factors that may have contributed to this trend may include stricter laws for teen drivers (enacted in 2002 and updated in 2010), less teen driving because of a nationwide economic downturn, delayed licensing in teens, steady improvements in overall seat belt use, and heightened public awareness of risky behaviors in teen driving.

  14. Polychlorinated biphenyls in tree bark near a former manufacturing plant in Anniston, Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanson, Mark H; Johnson, Glenn W

    2007-05-01

    Tree bark samples were collected to identify the relative amounts and congener profiles of atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls dissolved into bark lipids from the gas phase in Anniston, Alabama, USA, where PCBs were manufactured from the 1920s until 1971. The area is heavily contaminated with PCBs: At least 4550 metric tons (mt) of PCB and 14000 mt of PCB distillation residue, known as Montar, remain buried in two landfills near the plant site. A minimum of 20.5 mt of PCBs were emitted to the atmosphere by the plant between 1953 and 1971 based on emissions figures for 1970. Bark results show that total PCB concentrations range over more than three orders of magnitude from 171927 ng/g lipid near the plant/landfill area, dropping exponentially to 35 ng/g lipid at a distance of about 7 km. The exponential trend is highly correlated (r=-0.77) and significant (ptree started growing after 1971 showing that atmospheric PCB concentrations remained high after PCB production ended. All PCB congener profiles show persistent congeners 31+28, 52, 66, 153, 138, and 180. Congener profiles from trees growing near the plant/landfill all have somewhat similar profiles but those growing during PCB production show high molecular mass compounds not usually found in the atmosphere and not found in younger trees, even in the most concentrated sample. We believe that high-temperature Montar disposal released high molecular mass PCBs into the gas phase which were dissolved into older tree bark lipids.

  15. Responses to lost letters about a 2000 General Election amendment to abolish prohibition of interracial marriages in Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, F Stephen; Keeton, Kato B; Clark, L Nicholle

    2002-12-01

    A field study using 621 "lost" letters was conducted in the city of Mobile and in small towns in mostly rural Baldwin County, Alabama. Milgram's lost letter technique was validated against the actual votes cast during the November 7, 2000 General Election. The technique was successful as an unobtrusive measure useful for predicting patterns of voting behavior. Rates of return of lost letters "in favor of and opposed to legalizing interracial marriage" agreed with the actual election returns (chi-square "goodness of fit"). Community size seemed associated with return of lost letters.

  16. Phase 2 - GASB Statement 34 compliance : development of a fixed asset (infrastructure) for the Alabama Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    The Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT) Bureau of Materials and Tests has been working with the University of Alabama's Management Information Systems Department to provide a tool for road maintenance and optimization associated funding. Spe...

  17. Correlation Between Precipitation and Crop Yield for Corn and Cotton Produced in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Carol E.; Perkey, Donald J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, variations in precipitation during the time of corn silking are compared to Alabama corn yields. Also, this study compares precipitation variations during bloom to Alabama cotton yield. The goal is to obtain mathematical correlations between rainfall during the crop's critical period and the crop amount harvested per acre.

  18. Alabama's forest products industry: performance and contribution to the State's economy, 1970 to 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur R. Maki; Con H Schallau; Bennett B. Foster; Clair H. Redmond

    1986-01-01

    Employment and earnings in Alabama's forest products industry, like those of most Southern States, grew significantly between 1970 and 1980. The forest products industry accounted for a larger share of the State's economic base. in 1980 than in 1970. Of the 13 Southern States, only 5 had more forest products industry employment than Alabama. Moreover, during...

  19. 78 FR 25469 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of South Alabama Center for Archaeological Studies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of South Alabama Center for Archaeological Studies... Alabama Center for Archaeological Studies has completed an inventory of human remains and associated...

  20. Illicit Drug Use and the Social Context of HIV/AIDS in Alabama's Black Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Bronwen

    2007-01-01

    Context: The rural Black Belt of Alabama is among the poorest areas of the nation. Poverty, lack of health infrastructure, and health disparities involving HIV/AIDS and other diseases reflect the lower life expectancy of people in the region. The Black Belt region has the highest HIV rates in rural America. Purpose: Using Alabama as a case…

  1. 78 FR 54835 - Air Quality Implementation Plan; Alabama; Attainment Plan for the Troy Area 2008 Lead...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... 4] Air Quality Implementation Plan; Alabama; Attainment Plan for the Troy Area 2008 Lead... Troy 2008 Lead nonattainment area (hereafter referred to as the ``Troy Area'' or ``Area''). The Troy... submittal regarding the attainment plan based on Alabama's attainment demonstration for the Troy Area. The...

  2. 77 FR 34037 - Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System of Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Marketing Division, Southeastern Power Administration, Department of Energy, 1166 Athens Tech Road, Elberton... a public information and comment forum for the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina customers and... before June 5, 2012. The Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina customers, through their representatives, have...

  3. Servant Leadership in Alabama's Regional Public Universities: The President's Role in Fostering Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Jimmy D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the relationship between two variables, "servant leadership" and "job satisfaction," among management, executive staff, and faculty at Alabama's five regional universities: Jacksonville State University, Troy University, the University of Montevallo, the University of North Alabama,…

  4. Activities of the Alabama Consortium on forestry education and research, 1993-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Schelhas

    2002-01-01

    The Alabama Consortium on Forestry Education and Research was established in 1992 to promote communication and collaboration among diverse institutions involved in forestry in the State of Alabama. It was organized to advance forestry education and research in ways that could not be accomplished by individual members alone. This report tells the story of the consortium...

  5. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City... QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.68 Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Mobile (Alabama...

  6. Inferring Shallow Subsurface Density Structure from Surface and Underground Gravity Measurements: Calibrating Models for Relatively Undeformed Volcanic Strata at the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mousumi; Lewis, Megan; Johnson, Alex; George, Nicolas; Rowe, Charlotte; Guardincerri, Elena

    2018-03-01

    Imaging shallow subsurface density structure is an important goal in a variety of applications, from hydrogeology to seismic and volcanic hazard assessment. We assess the effectiveness of surface and subsurface gravity measurements in estimating the density structure of a well-characterized rock volume: the mesa (a small, flat-topped plateau) upon which the town of Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA is located. Our gravity measurements were made on the mesa surface above a horizontal tunnel and underground, within the tunnel. We demonstrate that, in the absence of other geophysical data such as seismic data or muon attenuation, subsurface (tunnel) gravity measurements are critical to accurately recovering geologic structure. Without the tunnel data, our resolution is limited to roughly the surface gravity station spacing, but by including the tunnel data we can resolve structure to a depth of 10 times the surface gravity station spacing. Densities were obtained using both forward modeling and a Bayesian inverse modeling approach, incorporating relevant constraints from geologic observations. We find that Bayesian inversion, with geologically relevant prior, is a superior approach to the forward models in terms of both robustness and efficiency and correctly predicts the orientation and elevation of important geologic features.

  7. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  8. Radiation emergency response in Illinois, Alabama, and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.K.; Chester, R.O.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine state radiation emergency response and to locate any areas of emergency planning in need of improvement. This report briefly presents a summary of laws and defining documents governing radiation emergency response, describes the existing and projected need for such response, and presents the authors' analyses of the evolution of state response plans and their application to radiation incidents. Three states' programs are discussed in detail: Illinois, Alabama, and Texas. These states were selected because they have quite different emergency-response programs. Therefore, these state programs provide a wide variety of approaches to state radiation emergency response

  9. The Gothic shale of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation Greater Aneth Field (Aneth Unit) Southeastern Utah U.S.A.: Seal for Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide Storage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dewers, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chidsey, Thomas C. [Utah Geoglogical Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Carney, Stephanie M. [Utah Geoglogical Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Bereskin, S. R. [Bereskin and Associates, Salt Lake City (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Greater Aneth oil field, Utah’s largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 483 million barrels of oil. Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. Because Greater Aneth is a mature, major oil field in the western U.S., and has a large carbonate reservoir, it was selected to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide storage. The Aneth Unit in the northwestern part of the field has produced over 160 million barrels of the estimated 386 million barrels of original oil in place—a 42% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil made the Aneth Unit ideal to enhance oil recovery by carbon dioxide flooding and demonstrate carbon dioxide storage capacity.

  10. Emendation and new species of Hapalorhynchus Stunkard, 1922 (Digenea: Schistosomatoidea) from musk turtles (Kinosternidae: Sternotherus) in Alabama and Florida rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jackson R; Halanych, Kenneth M; Arias, Cova R; Folt, Brian; Goessling, Jeffrey M; Bullard, Stephen A

    2017-12-01

    Hapalorhynchus Stunkard, 1922 is emended based on morphological study of existing museum specimens (type and voucher specimens) and newly-collected specimens infecting musk turtles (Testudines: Kinosternidae: Sternotherus spp.) from rivers in Alabama and Florida (USA). Hapalorhynchus conecuhensis n. sp. is described from an innominate musk turtle, Sternotherus cf. minor, (type host) from Blue Spring (31°5'27.64″N, 86°30'53.21″W; Pensacola Bay Basin, Alabama) and the loggerhead musk turtle, Sternotherus minor (Agassiz, 1857) from the Wacissa River (30°20'24.73″N, 83°59'27.56″W; Apalachee Bay Basin, Florida). It differs from congeners by lacking a body constriction at level of the ventral sucker, paired anterior caeca, and a transverse ovary as well as by having a small ventral sucker, proportionally short posterior caeca, nearly equally-sized anterior and posterior testes, a small cirrus sac, and a uterus extending dorsal to the ovary and the anterior testis. Specimens of Hapalorhynchus reelfooti Byrd, 1939 infected loggerhead musk turtles, stripe-necked musk turtles (Sternotherus peltifer Smith and Glass, 1947), Eastern musk turtles (Sternotherus odoratus [Latreille in Sonnini and Latreille, 1801]), and S. cf. minor. Those of Hapalorhynchus cf. stunkardi infected S. minor and S. odoratus. Sternothorus minor, S. peltifer, and S. cf. minor plus S. minor and S. odoratus are new host records for H. reelfooti and H. cf. stunkardi, respectively. This is the first report of an infected musk turtle from the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers (Mobile-Tensaw River Basin), Pensacola Bay Basin, or Apalachee Bay Basin. Sequence analysis of the large subunit rDNA (28S) showed a strongly-supported clade for Hapalorhynchus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to Assessing the Functions of Tidal Fringe Wetlands Along the Mississippi and Alabama Gulf Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    philoxeroides Alligatorweed Alabama Class C noxious weed Imperata cylindrica Cogongrass Alabama Class A noxious weed; Mississippi noxious weed Ipomoea...Invasive Species Alternanthera philoxeroides Phragmites australis Cuscuta spp. Imperata cylindrica...weed Cuscuta spp. Dodder Alabama Class A noxious weed Imperata cylindrica Cogongrass Alabama Class A noxious weed; MS noxious weed Ipomoea

  12. 2016 Alabama PV soft cost and workforce development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Southeastern US has the largest potential for growth in the solar industry. However, currently they languish behind the rest of the US. There are several bright spots including the large number of utility scale installations in North Carolina and the recent successes in South Carolina under Act 236. In order to better understand the impacts of state legislation on the growth of the solar industry in the SE US, the Savannah River National Laboratory has undertaken a study to look at the growth in each state in order to develop recommendations to help reduce the cost of solar and to spur the industry. This is the second report in the series. The first focused on developing cost metrics for South Carolina under Act 236. This report focuses on Alabama, the 49th ranked state for solar business, which has very similar population and median income to South Carolina. For this survey, the ten known in-state installers were contacted. Responses were received from seven, representing 70% of the installers, a majority of which provide both residential and commercial installations. Interestingly, none of the respondents serve the utility scale sector. Overall, costs for Alabama are on track with the rest of the country with a reported average cost of $3.29/W-DC for residential systems and $2.44/W-DC for commercial systems. 60% of this cost is attributed to hardware only. Of the remaining costs, installation contributed to the largest percentage of soft costs followed by overhead, marketing and sales, and permitting, respectively. This also closely mirrors results seen in South Carolina. Job growth in the industry is expected to proceed well. An expected 34-42 additional full time equivalent jobs were expected to be added in Alabama within the six month window following the survey period. During the three years following the survey, this number was expected to double with 89-97 additional jobs being added to the market. In both cases, a vast majority of these jobs were for

  13. More than a century of bathymetric observations and present-day shallow sediment characterization in Belfast Bay, Maine, USA: implications for pockmark field longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Laura L.; Kelley, Joseph T.; Belknap, Daniel F.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Andrews, Brian D.; Maynard, Melissa Landon

    2011-08-01

    Mechanisms and timescales responsible for pockmark formation and maintenance remain uncertain, especially in areas lacking extensive thermogenic fluid deposits (e.g., previously glaciated estuaries). This study characterizes seafloor activity in the Belfast Bay, Maine nearshore pockmark field using (1) three swath bathymetry datasets collected between 1999 and 2008, complemented by analyses of shallow box-core samples for radionuclide activity and undrained shear strength, and (2) historical bathymetric data (report and smooth sheets from 1872, 1947, 1948). In addition, because repeat swath bathymetry surveys are an emerging data source, we present a selected literature review of recent studies using such datasets for seafloor change analysis. This study is the first to apply the method to a pockmark field, and characterizes macro-scale (>5 m) evolution of tens of square kilometers of highly irregular seafloor. Presence/absence analysis yielded no change in pockmark frequency or distribution over a 9-year period (1999-2008). In that time pockmarks did not detectably enlarge, truncate, elongate, or combine. Historical data indicate that pockmark chains already existed in the 19th century. Despite the lack of macroscopic changes in the field, near-bed undrained shear-strength values of less than 7 kPa and scattered downcore 137Cs signatures indicate a highly disturbed setting. Integrating these findings with independent geophysical and geochemical observations made in the pockmark field, it can be concluded that (1) large-scale sediment resuspension and dispersion related to pockmark formation and failure do not occur frequently within this field, and (2) pockmarks can persevere in a dynamic estuarine setting that exhibits minimal modern fluid venting. Although pockmarks are conventionally thought to be long-lived features maintained by a combination of fluid venting and minimal sediment accumulation, this suggests that other mechanisms may be equally active in

  14. Enhancing Diversity In The Geosciences; Intensive Field Experience In USA And Mexico For Middle And High School Teachers Serving Large Hispanic Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Bautista, R. M.; Kitts, K. B.; Velazquez Oliman, G.; Perry, E. C.

    2008-12-01

    To encourage Hispanic participation and enrolment in the geosciences and ultimately enhance diversity within the discipline, we recruited ten middle and high school science teachers serving large Hispanic populations (60-97%) for a paid three-week field experience supported by an NSF Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences grant. In 2006, the field experiences focused on volcanic events and the water problems of the Central part of Mexico. In 2008, the field experiences focused on karstic and hydrogeological conditions of the Yucatan Peninsula. In addition to the geological aspects of the fieldwork experience, the trip to Mexico exposed the teachers to a social environment outside of their community where they interacted with a diverse group of scientists from the Universidad National Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Centro de Investigacion Cientifica de Yucatan (CICY) and Centro Nacional de Desastres (CENAPRED). A key part of this project was the encounter between American and Mexican teachers that included a day of presentations, panel discussion and some class-room activities. Direct interaction between the cooperating teachers and the American and Mexican geoscientists provided actual scientific research experiences to educate and to help dispel misconceptions the teachers themselves may have had about who geoscientists really are and what they do. Teachers of the 2006 group produced educational materials from their field experiences and presented these materials at professional conferences. We measured the efficacy of these activities quantitatively via pre- and post-tests assessing confidence levels, preconceptions and biases, NIU staff observations of participants in their home institutions, and evaluations of participants' field books and pedagogical materials. We present these data here and identify specific activities that are both effective and efficient in changing teacher behaviours and attitudes enabling them to better connect with their

  15. USA toetus Eestile

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Ameerika Ühendriikide riigisekretär Condoleezza Rice kinnitas 3. mail 2007 telefonikõnes president Toomas Hendrik Ilvesele USA toetust Eestile ning tõsist muret Venemaa käitumise üle oma naaberriigi suhtes. Ilmunud ka: Meie Kodu 9. mai 2007, lk. 2, pealk.: USA riigisekretär Vabariigi Presidendile: Ühendriigid toetavad Eestit

  16. Glemmer USA Afghanistan nu?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo

    2015-01-01

    Hvis Obamas efterfølger kan skrue den rigtige strategiske fortælling sammen så vil USA ikke forlade Afghanistan med udgangen af 2016.......Hvis Obamas efterfølger kan skrue den rigtige strategiske fortælling sammen så vil USA ikke forlade Afghanistan med udgangen af 2016....

  17. Alabama Black Belt eye care--optometry giving back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanspree, Mary Jean; Allison, Carol; Goldblatt, Stephanie Hardwick; Pevsner, Diane

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the process used to meet the vision needs, as well as other health problems related to eye disease, of individuals in the rural Black Belt region of Alabama. This model includes a multidisciplinary collaborative effort that has developed into a replicable vision care delivery system. This study was a descriptive research study. Vision and health evaluations were made available to residents of rural counties with a specific focus on an area in Alabama known as the "Black Belt." The model for the project was designed with input from the collaborative partners who were responsible for each health and vision station. Participants in the Rural Alabama Diabetes and Glaucoma Initiative (RADGI) study involved 1,765 black women, 619 black men, and 315 others. The study included 2,699 participants in 7 counties. The reported ages of the patients ranged from 5 to 97 years, with a mean age of 44. Of the 2,699 patients, 39% (1,053) were found to have a visual acuity of < or =20/40. Spectacles were prescribed for 56% of the patients who required correction other than reading glasses. There was a 19% (513) referral rate for glaucoma. There was a 2.7% (73) referral rate for diabetic retinopathy. Two hundred sixteen patients presented with cataracts (8%) and were referred to eye care providers for follow-up evaluations. The 9.9% of patients who were known diabetics (267) were referred to either a general physician familiar with the patient history or, if no general physician was reported by the patient, another local physician for evaluation. Because there were no subspecialists in these local communities, the 10% of the patients (270) who were undiagnosed diabetics but showed the risk factor of a hemoglobin A1c greater than 7% were referred to a general physician or local emergency room for follow-up care. One thousand fifty-five patients (35.9%) with a blood pressure of greater than 140/90 mmHg were referred to a physician or to the emergency

  18. El Alabama en la Zona Algodonera de Armero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velasco Llanos Vicente

    1939-10-01

    Full Text Available El gusano cortador de la hoja del algodonero, comúnmente llamado Alabama por todos los plantadores de algodón de la región de Armero, ha merecido y seguirá mereciendo una especial atención, ya que constituye la plaga más importante de cuantas diezman los cultivos de algodón. Si bien es cierto que otros insectos como el gusano rosado colombiano de las cápsulas del algodonero (SacadodespyralisDyar (7; nuevo género y nueva especie, según W m. Schaus, y el pulgón (AphisgossypiiGlov. causan daños de consideración, ninguno de ellos ha mostrado, en esta zona, la enorme voracidad y por lo tanto la fuerza destructora del insecto que tratamos. El Alabama fue la causa de casi todos los fracasos que tuvieron los primeros cultivadores en algunas regiones del interior del país. En ese entonces no había facilidad para su control, como la hay ahora, y era muy común ver un cultivo devastado en pocos días por la plaga en mención, sin que hubiera manera de destruirla. El hecho indiscutible de haberse iniciado el cultivo del algodón en la región de Armero sobre bases técnicas, de haber recibido el apoyo irrestricto y entusiasta de los,gobiernos departamental y nacional, de crear entidades y centros de investigación al servicio de la economía del país, y de poseer vías accesibles a,los mercados de importancia, son las razones inmediatas del éxito rotundo y progresivo de la industria algodonera en esta zona. A pesar de todo esto, el Alabama se presentó desde el primer momento y ha continuado haciendo sus daños de cosecha en cosecha, obligando a,los cultivadores a equiparse con máquinas espolvoreadoras de diversos tipos y a usar los insecticidas aconsejados por la técnica que les dieron resultados positivos; yel insecto, que antes constituía un problema para el cultivo, pasó a ser solo objeto de una inversión en el presupuesto del cultivador.

  19. Apparent field safety of a raccoon poxvirus-vectored plague vaccine in free-ranging prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), Colorado, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W; Rocke, Tonie E; Streich, Sean P; Abbott, Rachel C; Osorio, Jorge E; Miller, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) suffer high rates of mortality from plague. An oral sylvatic plague vaccine using the raccoon poxvirus vector (designated RCN-F1/V307) has been developed for prairie dogs. This vaccine is incorporated into palatable bait along with rhodamine B as a biomarker. We conducted trials in August and September 2012 to demonstrate uptake and apparent safety of the RCN-F1/V307 vaccine in two prairie dog species under field conditions. Free-ranging prairie dogs and other associated small rodents readily consumed vaccine-laden baits during field trials with no apparent adverse effects; most sampled prairie dogs (90%) and associated small rodents (78%) had consumed baits. Visual counts of prairie dogs and their burrows revealed no evidence of prairie dog decline after vaccine exposure. No vaccine-related morbidity, mortality, or gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Poxviruses were not isolated from any animal sampled prior to bait distribution or on sites that received placebo baits. We isolated RCN-F1/V307 from 17 prairie dogs and two deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) captured on sites where vaccine-laden baits were distributed. Based on these findings, studies examining the utility and effectiveness of oral vaccination to prevent plague-induced mortality in prairie dogs and associated species are underway.

  20. Apparent field safety of a raccoon poxvirus-vectored plague vaccine in free-ranging prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Streich, Sean P.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Miller, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) suffer high rates of mortality from plague. An oral sylvatic plague vaccine using the raccoon poxvirus vector (designated RCN-F1/V307) has been developed for prairie dogs. This vaccine is incorporated into palatable bait along with rhodamine B as a biomarker. We conducted trials in August and September 2012 to demonstrate uptake and apparent safety of the RCN-F1/V307 vaccine in two prairie dog species under field conditions. Free-ranging prairie dogs and other associated small rodents readily consumed vaccine-laden baits during field trials with no apparent adverse effects; most sampled prairie dogs (90%) and associated small rodents (78%) had consumed baits. Visual counts of prairie dogs and their burrows revealed no evidence of prairie dog decline after vaccine exposure. No vaccine-related morbidity, mortality, or gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Poxviruses were not isolated from any animal sampled prior to bait distribution or on sites that received placebo baits. We isolated RCN-F1/V307 from 17 prairie dogs and two deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) captured on sites where vaccine-laden baits were distributed. Based on these findings, studies examining the utility and effectiveness of oral vaccination to prevent plague-induced mortality in prairie dogs and associated species are underway.

  1. Sericea lespedeza biomass composition for bioenergy in the southeastern USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosjidis Jorge A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata (Dumont G. Don is used for forage or as a soil conservation plant that has shown potential for the production of ligno-cellulosic biomass in the Southeastern USA. Four genotypes of sericea lespedeza were grown at Tallassee, Alabama. Plant canopy of those genotypes was divided into three 10-cm strata. Year of harvest affected NDF, protein and hemicellulose content of leaves and stems. Cut affected NDF, cellulose and hemicellulose content and protein of leaves. No differences were measured among the four genotypes except for protein content in the stems. Leaves had a much higher protein content than stems which makes them undesirable for biofuel use. Large strata effects on stem composition were measured on all traits except lignin which had the same value across the strata. Values of NDF, ADF, cellulose, and hemicellulose increased from the top of the stem to the base whereas protein content was reduced.

  2. Continuous Measurements of Canopy-level Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence for Inferring Diurnal and Seasonal Dynamics of Photosynthesis in Crop Fields in the Midwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, G.; Guan, K.; Yang, X.; Bernacchi, C.; DeLucia, E. H.; Cai, Y.; Masters, M. D.; Peng, B.

    2016-12-01

    Plants emitted photons of red and far-red light, called chlorophyll fluorescence, after sunlight absorption for photosynthesis. This solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) is generated simultaneously while plants actively photosynthesize. The link between photosynthesis and SIF resulting from the competition for the same excitation energy has long been investigated and applied for inferring the rate of photosynthesis. Recent development of continuous SIF observational technology is furthering the inferring potential as well as our understandings of fluctuations of SIF and photosynthesis with changes in environmental conditions. To better understand this photosynthesis-SIF link at multiple time scales and their relationships with environmental drivers, we deployed two newly developed tower-based SIF systems (FluoSpec) in a corn (Zea mays L., C4 plant) field and a soybean (Glycine max L., C3 plant) field at University of Illinois Energy Farm and conducted continuous near-surface SIF measurements at canopy scale from mid-growing season of 2016. Eddy covariance flux towers were installed in parallel at both sites for canopy-scale gas exchange measurements. Relationship between SIF and flux tower photosynthesis will be analyzed to derive the empirical models for photosynthesis retrieval from SIF signals. Preliminary results indicate that canopy SIF can reflect diurnal and seasonal dynamics of photosynthesis. Mechanistic analysis on SIF fluctuations and responses to environmental variations will be conducted as well for a closer look at mechanism of photosynthetic responses. Corn and soybean SIF and photosynthesis-SIF relationship will be compared to investigate the difference between C4 and C3 plants.

  3. Estimated use of water in Alabama in 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Susan S.; Littlepage, Thomas M.; Harper, Michael J.; Tinney, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Water use in Alabama was about 9,958 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) during 2005. Estimates of withdrawals by source indicate that total surface-water withdrawals were about 9,467 Mgal/d (95 percent of the total withdrawals) and the remaining 491 Mgal/d (5 percent) were from ground water. More surface water than ground water was withdrawn for all categories except aquaculture, mining, and self-supplied residential. During 2005, estimated withdrawals by category and in descending order were: thermoelectric power, 8,274 Mgal/d; public supply, 802 Mgal/d; self-supplied industrial, 550 Mgal/d; irrigation, 161 Mgal/d; aquaculture, 75 Mgal/d; self-supplied residential, 39 Mgal/d; livestock, 28 Mgal/d; and mining, 28 Mgal/d.

  4. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Alabama, elevation data are critical for flood risk management; infrastructure and construction management; wildfire management, planning, and response; natural resources conservation; geologic resource assessment and hazards mitigation; and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data.

  5. Mussel remains from prehistoric salt works, clarke county, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, S.W.; Dumas, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Archaeological research at salt springs in Clarke County, AL (Tombigbee River drainage), documented bivalve mollusk exploitation by late prehistoric American Indians. A total of 582 valves representing 19 species of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) and an estuarine clam (Mactridae) from the Lower Salt Works Site (ca. A.D. 900-1550) and 41 valve fragments representing 6 mussel species from the Stimpson Site (ca. A.D. 1200-1550) were documented. The Lower Salt Works fauna was dominated numerically by Fusconaia ebena and Quadrula asperata, the dominant species reported during recent local surveys. The mussel species represented are known from medium to large streams in sand and gravel habitats and include four federally protected species and other species of conservation concern in Alabama. Results offer comparative data for other archaeological and ecological studies in the region.

  6. Reporting on the Holocaust: the view from Jim Crow Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Dan J

    2011-01-01

    The press in Alabama covered major events taking place in Germany from the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 through the Nuremberg Trials in 1946. Journalists in the state provided extensive coverage, and editors did not hesitate to opine on the persecution of the Jews in Europe. Yet, Alabama’s white-run press failed in the end to explain the events as a singularly Jewish tragedy. The state’s black-run press, for its part, used the news of the mass killings of the Jews to warn against the dangers of conceptions of racial superiority—a primary concern for black southerners living in the Jim Crow South.

  7. Basement control of alkalic flood rhyolite magmatism of the Davis Mountains volcanic field, Trans-Pecos Texas, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Don F.; White, John C.; Ren, Minghua; Barnes, Melanie

    2017-11-01

    Voluminous silicic lava flows, erupted 37.4 Ma from widespread centers within the Davis Mountains Volcanic Field (DMVF), covered approximately 10,000 km2 with an initial volume as great as 1000 km3. Lava flows form three major stratigraphic units: the Star Mountain Rhyolite (minimum 220 km3) of the eastern Davis Mountains and adjacent Barilla Mountains, the Crossen Formation ( 75 km3) of the southern Davis Mountains, and the Bracks Rhyolite ( 75 km3) of the Rim Rock region west of the Davis Mountains proper. Similar extensive rhyolite lava also occurs in slightly younger units (Adobe Canyon Rhyolite, 125 km3, 37.1 Ma), Sheep Pasture Formation ( 125 km3, 36 Ma) and, less voluminously, in the Paisano central volcano ( 36.9 Ma) and younger units in the Davis Mountains. Individual lava flows from these units formed fields as extensive as 55 km and 300-m-thick. Flood rhyolite lavas of the Davis Mountains are marginally peralkaline quartz trachyte to low-silica rhyolite. Phenocrysts include alkali feldspar, clinopyroxene, FeTi oxides, and apatite, and, rarely, fayalite, as well as zircon in less peralkaline units. Many Star Mountain flows may be assigned to one of four geochemical groupings. Temperatures were moderately high, ranging from 911 to 860 °C in quartz trachyte and low silica rhyolite. We suggest that flood rhyolite magma evolved from trachyte magma by filter pressing processes, and trachyte from mafic magma in deeper seated plutons. The Davis Mountains segment of Trans-Pecos Texas overlies Grenville basement and is separated from the older Southern Granite and Rhyolite Province to the north by the Grenville Front, and from the younger Coahuila terrane to the south by the Ouachita Front. We suggest that basement structure strongly influenced the timing and nature of Trans-Pecos magmatism, probably in varying degrees of impeding the ascent of mantle-derived mafic magmas, which were produced by upwelling of asthenospheric mantle above the foundered Farallon slab

  8. Update of bridge design standards in Alabama for AASHTO LRFD seismic design requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT) has been required to update their bridge design to the LRFD Bridge Design Specifications. This transition has resulted in changes to the seismic design standards of bridges in the state. Multiple bridg...

  9. 77 FR 38796 - Alabama Power Company; Holt Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted Service List for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Power Company; Holt Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted Service List for a Programmatic... Hydroelectric Project No. 2203. The programmatic agreement, when executed by the Commission, the Alabama SHPO...

  10. Strandings of Marine Mammals in Alabama from 16 Dec 1978 - 31 Dec 2015 (NCEI Accession 0117461)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains information about marine mammal strandings documented in Alabama waters between 1978 and 2015. Data include identity, size, condition, sex, and...

  11. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Alabama based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Alabama census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  12. Alabama State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    The Alabama State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. This report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Alabama. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Alabama. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Alabama

  13. Citizen Action Can Help the Code Adoption Process for Radon-Resistant New Construction: Decatur, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adopting a code requiring radon-resistant new construction (RRNC) in Decatur, Alabama, took months of effort by four people. Their actions demonstrate the influence that passionate residents can have on reversing a city council’s direction.

  14. The GLOBE Program in Alabama: A Mentoring Approach to State-wide Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. N.

    2003-12-01

    Established in 1997, the GLOBE in Alabama (GIA) partnership has trained more than 1,000 teachers in almost 500 schools - over 25% of the total number of K-12 schools in Alabama. Over those five years, GIA has strived to achieve recognition of GLOBE as the "glue" to Alabama's new education program, the Alabama Math, Science and Technology Initiative (AMSTI). In 2003, GIA trained over 370 AMSTI K-8 teachers at two AMSTI hub sites in north Alabama. As the AMSTI program grows with the addition of future hub sites (eleven are planned), GIA must ready itself to train thousands of AMSTI teachers during the two-week summer professional development institutes that are part of AMSTI. A key component of AMSTI is a mentoring program conducted by math and science specialists - classroom educators loaned to the AMSTI hub sites by the school systems each hub site serves. The AMSTI mentoring program mirrors the GIA mentoring model begun in 1999 that originally funded regional GLOBE master teachers to provide technical assistance, feedback, and coaching for other GLOBE teachers. In schools where GIA mentor teachers were working, nearly a 100% increase in GLOBE student data reporting was noted. The GIA mentors now work within the hub site framework to ensure implementation of GLOBE as an integrated part of AMSTI. With the continued support of the State of Alabama, GIA will establish a network of mentors who work with the AMSTI hub site specialists in providing support for all AMSTI teachers. GIA is administered by the National Space Science and Technology Center, a partnership between NASA and the State of Alabama's seven research universities. Operational funding for GIA has been provided by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's Earth System Science Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium, The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, the Alabama State Department of Education, and Legacy. GIA has been able to build on these

  15. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface irrigation, such as flood or furrow, is the predominant form of irrigation in California for agronomic crops. Compared to other irrigation methods, however, it is inefficient in terms of water use; large quantities of water, instead of being used for crop production, are lost to excess deep percolation and tail runoff. In surface-irrigated fields, irrigators commonly cut off the inflow of water when the water advance reaches a familiar or convenient location downfield, but this experience-based strategy has not been very successful in reducing the tail runoff water. Our study compared conventional cutoff practices to a retroactively applied model-based cutoff method in four commercially producing alfalfa fields in Northern California, and evaluated the model using a simple sensor system for practical application in typical alfalfa fields. These field tests illustrated that the model can be used to reduce tail runoff in typical surface-irrigated fields, and using it with a wireless sensor system saves time and labor as well as water.

  16. The Role of Underemployment in Employee’s Overall Job Satisfaction: The Alabama Case.

    OpenAIRE

    Addy, Samuel N.; Nzaku, Kilungu; Ijaz, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Job satisfaction is an important measure of utility that employees derive from their jobs and is related to various features of the job such as pay, security, intrinsic values of work, working conditions, career growth opportunities, working hours, and the like. This paper analyzes the relationship between underemployment and overall job satisfaction among other personal and job characteristics of the workforce in Alabama using survey data from Alabama workforce development regions. A logisti...

  17. Cultural Resources Investigations at Redstone Arsenal, Madison County, Alabama. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    units pro- hably based upon changes in projectile point themes. Although Walthall is probably right in predicting that the Lauder - dale phase is...investigations. According to him, During the WPA-TVA salvage program, time and money allowed investigation of only shell mounds, burial mounds, and other large...1813, becoming the first school in Alabama to be subsidized with public money . Alabama’s first bank, the Planters and 3 Mechanics Bank of Huntsville

  18. The history of neurosurgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Paul M; Markert, James M; Diethelm, Arnold G; Hadley, Mark N

    2014-10-01

    : The Division of Neurosurgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham was formally founded in 1954 under the leadership of James Garber Galbraith. The following 60 years would see neurosurgery at the forefront of the development of a nationally recognized medical center in the heart of Birmingham, Alabama. The Department of Neurosurgery now employs 14 faculty members, performs more than 4500 neurosurgical procedures annually, is active in clinical and laboratory research, and boasts a contemporary, comprehensive residency training program.

  19. USA kunstidessant Venemaale

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    USA kunstnike näitus "Kolm sajandit ameerika kunsti" Moskvas Pushkini muuseumis. Eksponeeritakse Mark Rothko, Jean-Michel Basguiat', Roy Lichtensteini, Robert Rauschenbergi, Georgia O'Keefe'i, Willem de Kooningi töid

  20. USA Hire Testing Platform

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The USA Hire Testing Platform delivers tests used in hiring for positions in the Federal Government. To safeguard the integrity of the hiring processes and ensure...

  1. Fiscal 1997 technological survey report. Engineer exchange project - coal mine technological field (Advanced coal producing country survey - U.S.A. survey); 1997 nendo gijutsusha koryu jigyo (tanko gijutsu bun'ya) senshin santankoku chosa. Beikoku chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    While the introduction and adaptation of the Longwall excavation technology were carried forward for coal producing countries in the Pacific region, U.S.A. information was collected by making tours of coal mines in the West and Washington/Colorado/Utah States, with the intention of ascertaining technological trend so as to carry out efficient technological transfer, and for the purpose of replenishing the contents and contributing to the smooth implementation of the engineer exchange project in 'coal mine technological field'. The coal reserves are 400 billion tons, with 840 million tons produced and with 80 million tons exported; not less than 56% of the U.S. domestic electricity rests on coal. Production by open-pit mining is the majority while the output by underground mining is 38%; the Longwall method has increased as a digging method, taking 18% of all digging output. The productivity is 4.24 ton/person per day and ranks as the world highest. The coal mining technological trend in the U.S. can be summarized as follows. The coal mining output in the West is increasing, with the number of mines decreasing, so that the output per mine is increasing. With the output ratio by open-pit mining increasing, the digging method in the mine is being changed to the Longwall. (NEDO)

  2. Monitoring, field experiments, and geochemical modeling of Fe(II) oxidation kinetics in a stream dominated by net-alkaline coal-mine drainage, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta,, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Watershed-scale monitoring, field aeration experiments, and geochemical equilibrium and kinetic modeling were conducted to evaluate interdependent changes in pH, dissolved CO2, O2, and Fe(II) concentrations that typically take place downstream of net-alkaline, circumneutral coal-mine drainage (CMD) outfalls and during aerobic treatment of such CMD. The kinetic modeling approach, using PHREEQC, accurately simulates observed variations in pH, Fe(II) oxidation, alkalinity consumption, and associated dissolved gas concentrations during transport downstream of the CMD outfalls (natural attenuation) and during 6-h batch aeration tests on the CMD using bubble diffusers (enhanced attenuation). The batch aeration experiments demonstrated that aeration promoted CO2 outgassing, thereby increasing pH and the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was accurately estimated by the abiotic homogeneous oxidation rate law −d[Fe(II)]/dt = k1·[O2]·[H+]−2·[Fe(II)] that indicates an increase in pH by 1 unit at pH 5–8 and at constant dissolved O2 (DO) concentration results in a 100-fold increase in the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. Adjusting for sample temperature, a narrow range of values for the apparent homogeneous Fe(II) oxidation rate constant (k1′) of 0.5–1.7 times the reference value of k1 = 3 × 10−12 mol/L/min (for pH 5–8 and 20 °C), reported by Stumm and Morgan (1996), was indicated by the calibrated models for the 5-km stream reach below the CMD outfalls and the aerated CMD. The rates of CO2 outgassing and O2ingassing in the model were estimated with first-order asymptotic functions, whereby the driving force is the gradient of the dissolved gas concentration relative to equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere. Although the progressive increase in DO concentration to saturation could be accurately modeled as a kinetic function for the conditions evaluated, the simulation of DO as an instantaneous equilibrium process did not affect the

  3. Field Comparisons of the Elwha Bedload Sampler and an Acoustic Gravel-transport Sensor: Middle Fork of the Piedra River, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, J.; Ryan, S. E.

    2001-12-01

    Ten simultaneous bedload measurements were made with an Elhwa sampler and an acoustic-gravel-transport sensor (GTS) on the Middle Fork of the Piedra River in southwestern Colorado near the end of the spring freshet in water year 2001. The purpose was to compare bedload samples with acoustic measurements acquired under field conditions. Upstream of the measurement site, the river drains 86 km2 of andesite, ash flows, tuffs, and breccias in the San Juan Mountains, contributing a relatively high sediment load to the river system. The channel transitions from step-pools at high elevations to a plane bed with a slope of 0.018 in the study reach. Channel width, mean depth and bank-full velocity at the site are: 13.6 m, 0.52, and 1.5 m s-1. The D50 of the riverbed surface is 0.08 m which is 6 to 40 times larger than the D50s of the bedload samples. D16 and D84 of the bed = 0.02 and 0.21 m respectively. Water discharges from 7.3 to 9.3 m3 s-1 transported about 0.01 kg of gravel m-1 s-1 in the channel. Transport of coarse gravel (8-64 mm) ranged from 0.00063 to 0.024 kg m-1 s-1. The Elwha sampler is a portable, pressure-differential trap with a 0.2 m wide by 0.1 m high opening. The acoustic sensor is a 0.025-m wide by 0.1 m high strip of PVDF piezoelectric film connected to a signal processor and bonded to an aluminum pressure plate. When the plate is struck by stones, the GTS produces signal peaks with areas that are accurate measures of stone momentum. The GTS was calibrated with steels balls dropped on the pressure plate in still water to develop a curve of ball momentum as a function of peak areas. Based on these calibrations, the standard error of the GTS momentum estimates is 0.0017 kg m s-1. Five transects with 30 verticals, each occupied for 60 s, were completed with the sampler and GTS separated by < 1 m. Five additional verticals were occupied for about 1800 s each with the instruments separated by < 0.5 m. The trapped material was sieved and weighed and the water

  4. Gasoline prices and traffic crashes in Alabama, 1999-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Guangqing; McClure, Timothy E; Brown, David B

    2012-09-01

    The price of gasoline has been found to be negatively associated with traffic crashes in a limited number of studies. However, most of the studies have focused either on fatal crashes only or on all crashes but measured over a very short time period. In this study, we examine gasoline price effects on all traffic crashes by demographic groups in the state of Alabama from 1999 to 2009. Using negative binomial regression techniques to examine monthly data from 1999 to 2009 in the state of Alabama, we estimate the effects of changes in gasoline price on changes in automobile crashes. We also examine how these effects differ by age group (16-20, 21-25, 26-30, 31-64, and 65+), gender (male and female), and race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic). The results show that gasoline prices have both short-term and long-term effects on reducing total traffic crashes and crashes of each age, gender, and race/ethnicity group (except Hispanic due to data limitations). The short-term and long-term effects are not statistically different for each individual demographic group. Gasoline prices have a stronger effect in reducing crashes involving drivers aged 16 to 20 than crashes involving drivers aged 31 to 64 and 65+ in the short term; the effects, however, are not statistically different across other demographic groups. Although gasoline price increases are not favored, our findings show that gasoline price increases (or decreases) are associated with reductions (or increases) in the incidence of traffic crashes. If gasoline prices had remained at the 1999 level of $1.41 from 1999 to 2009, applying the estimated elasticities would result in a predicted increase in total crashes of 169,492 (or 11.3%) from the actual number of crashes. If decision makers wish to reduce traffic crashes, increasing gasoline taxes is a possible option-however, doing so would increase travel costs and lead to equity concerns. These findings may help to shape transportation

  5. Ground-water resources data for Baldwin County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James L.; Moreland, Richard S.; Clark, Amy E.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data for 237 wells were collected, and water-levels in 223 wells in Baldwin and Escambia Counties were measured. Long-term water water-level data, available for many wells, indicate that ground-water levels in most of Baldwin County show no significant trends for the period of record. However, ground-water levels have declined in the general vicinity of Spanish Fort and Daphne, and ground-water levels in the Gulf Shores and Orange Beach areas are less than 5 feet above sea level in places. The quality of ground water generally is good, but problems with iron, sulfur, turbidity, and color occur. The water from most private wells in Baldwin County is used without treatment or filtration. Alabama public- health law requires that water from public-supply wells be chlorinated. Beyond that, the most common treatment of ground water by public-water suppliers in Baldwin County consists of pH adjustment, iron removal, and aeration. The transmissivity of the Miocene-Pliocene aquifer was determined at 10 locations in Baldwin County. Estimates of transmissivity ranged from 700 to 5,400 feet squared per day. In general, aquifer transmissivity was greatest in the southeastern part of the county, and least in the western part of the county near Mobile Bay. A storage coefficient of 1.5 x 10-3 was determined for the Miocene-Pliocene aquifer near Loxley.

  6. Mortality from a tornado outbreak, Alabama, April 27, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Cindy H; Schnall, Amy H; Mertzlufft, Caitlin E; Noe, Rebecca S; Wolkin, Amy F; Spears, Jeanne; Casey-Lockyer, Mary; Vagi, Sara J

    2013-08-01

    We describe the demographics of the decedents from the tornado outbreak in Alabama on April 27, 2011; examine the circumstances of death surrounding these fatalities; and identify measures to prevent future tornado-related fatalities. We collected information about the decedents from death certificates, disaster-related mortality surveillance, and interview data collected by American Red Cross volunteers from the decedent's families. We describe demographic characteristics, circumstances and causes of death, and sheltering behaviors before death. Of the 247 fatalities, females and older adults were at highest risk for tornado-related deaths. Most deaths were directly related to the tornadoes, on scene, and trauma-related. The majority of the deceased were indoors in single-family homes. Word of mouth was the most common warning mechanism. This tornado event was the third deadliest in recent US history. Our findings support the need for local community shelters, enhanced messaging to inform the public of shelter locations, and encouragement of word-of-mouth warnings and personal and family preparedness planning, with a special focus on assisting vulnerable individuals in taking shelter.

  7. Prevalence of encysted Toxoplasma gondii in raptors from Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, D S; Smith, P C; Hoerr, F J; Blagburn, B L

    1993-12-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of encysted Toxoplasma gondii in wild birds. We examined the hearts and breast muscles from 101 raptors for encysted T. gondii. All of the raptors had been submitted for necropsy to the State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Auburn, Alabama. Tissues were digested in acid-pepsin solution and inoculated into groups of 3-5 laboratory mice. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from 27 of 101 (26.7%) raptors: 8 of 12 (66.7%) red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus), 13 of 27 (41.1%) red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), 1 of 4 (25%) Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperi), 1 of 5 (20%) great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), 4 of 15 (26.7%) barred owls (Strix varia), and 1 of 3 (33.3%) kestrels (Falco sparverius). Toxoplasma gondii was not isolated from 3 broad-winged hawks (Buteo platypterus), 3 sharp-shinned hawks (Accipiter striatus), 6 barn owls (Tyto alba), 9 screech owls (Asio otus), a Mississippi kite (Ictinia misisippiensis), 2 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), 4 ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), 4 turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), or 2 black vultures (Coragyps atratus). No significant difference (P > 0.05) in prevalence was detected based on sex using chi-square analysis. Chi-square analysis of the data demonstrated that adult raptors had encysted stages of T. gondii significantly (P < 0.05) more often than did immature raptors.

  8. Det sorte USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndal, Jørn

    Bogen gennemgår det sorte USAs historie fra 1776 til 2016, idet grundtemaet er spændingsforholdet mellem USAs grundlæggelsesidealer og den racemæssige praksis, et spændingsforhold som Gunnar Myrdal kaldte "det amerikanske dilemma." Bogen, der er opbygget som politisk, social og racemæssig histori......, er opdelt i 13 kapitler og består af fire dele: Første del: Slaveriet; anden del: Jim Crow; tredje del. King-årene; fjerde del: Frem mod Obama....

  9. USA National Phenology Network observational data documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemartin, Alyssa H.; Denny, Ellen G.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Marsh, R. Lee; Posthumus, Erin E.; Crimmins, Theresa M.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2018-04-25

    The goals of the USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN, www.usanpn.org) are to advance science, inform decisions, and communicate and connect with the public regarding phenology and species’ responses to environmental variation and climate change. The USA-NPN seeks to advance the science of phenology and facilitate ecosystem stewardship by providing phenological information freely and openly. To accomplish these goals, the USA-NPN National Coordinating Office (NCO) delivers observational data on plant and animal phenology in several formats, including minimally processed status and intensity datasets and derived phenometrics for individual plants, sites, and regions. This document describes the suite of observational data products delivered by the USA National Phenology Network, covering the period 2009–present for the United States and accessible via the Phenology Observation Portal (http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F78S4N1V) and via an Application Programming Interface. The data described here have been used in diverse research and management applications, including over 30 publications in fields such as remote sensing, plant evolution, and resource management.

  10. Baltimaade kunsti turnee USAs

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    5. nov.-st USA Lõuna-Carolina osariigis Wellington B. Grey galeriis ja Jenkins Fine Art Center's 13 eesti, läti ja leedu kunstniku näitus, mis hakkab kolme aasta jooksul ringlema Ameerikas. Eksponeeritud fotokunst, video, installatsioon, joonistused. Kuraator Peeter Linnap ja Mari Laanemets peavad ettekande näituse avamisega samal ajal toimuval Fotohariduse Ühingu konverentsil

  11. 77 FR 62449 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama; Disapproval of 110(a)(2)(E)(ii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... in their comment that EPA approve a conflict of interest protocol submitted for inclusion in the SIP... that with the inclusion of this protocol in the SIP, EPA would be able to approve Alabama's 1997 annual... the State Implementation Plan (SIP) submissions, submitted by the State of Alabama, through the...

  12. 76 FR 9320 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Alabama Shad as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... (41 to 48) on the lower limb of the anterior gill arch. Alabama shad differ from other members of... degrees Celsius. Males appear to enter the river at earlier dates and lower water temperatures than... built on the Alabama and lower Tombigbee rivers in the 1960s. Five adults have been captured in the...

  13. Community food environment measures in the Alabama Black Belt: Implications for cancer risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Gyawu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In-store measures were utilized to evaluate the availability of healthy food choices and nutrition/health promotion messages for cancer risk reduction in the selected Alabama Black Belt counties/cities. Sixty one retail food outlets (RFOs were audited in 12 Alabama Black Belt cities. Store types included convenience stores (49.2%, restaurants (19.7%, fast food restaurants (16.4%, small supermarkets (8.2%, and large supermarket and farmers' markets (3.3 %, respectively. Although there were low numbers of farmers' markets/street stands and large supermarkets, these had significantly (p < 0.0001 higher health scores than the other store types. A few health promotion messages were highly visible or obscurely positioned in some RFOs. The Alabama Black Belt food environment had limited opportunities for healthy food choices.

  14. Guantanamo rikub USA seadusi / Krister Paris

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paris, Krister, 1977-

    2003-01-01

    Kaks USA tsiviilkohut leiavad oma otsuses, et USA valitsus rikub USA-s ja Guantanamo sõjaväebaasis kinnipeetavate nn. vaenlasvõitlejate õigusi. Inimõigusorganisatsioonid avaldavad heameelt kohtute otsuste üle

  15. Over 100 years of environmental change recorded by foraminifers and sediments in Mobile Bay, Alabama, Gulf of Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Lisa E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2012-12-01

    The marine microfauna of Mobile Bay has been profoundly influenced by the development and expansion of the primary shipping channel over the last ˜100 years. Foraminifers and sediments from seven box cores with excess lead-210 chronology document that channel dredging and spoil disposal have altered circulation, reduced estuarine mixing, changed sedimentation patterns, and caused a faunal turnover within the bay. Beginning in the late 1800s, changes in estuarine mixing allowed for greater low-pH freshwater influence in the bay, and ultimately began environmental changes that resulted in the loss of calcareous foraminifers. By the early 1900s, box cores throughout Mobile Bay record a ˜100-year trend of increasing calcareous test dissolution that continues to the present. Since the completion of the current shipping channel in the 1950s, restricted tidal flushing and increased terrestrial organic matter, documented by carbon-to-nitrogen ratios, stimulated an increase in agglutinated foraminiferal densities. However, in deeper areas of the bay, hypoxic water has negatively impacted the marine microfauna. Comparisons of the present-day foraminiferal assemblage with foraminifers collected in the early 1970s indicate that the continued biologic loss of calcareous foraminifers in the bay has allowed the introduction of a new agglutinated foraminiferal species into the bay.

  16. Effects of Desiccation Practices of Cultured Atlantic Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) on Vibrio spp. in Portersville Bay, Alabama, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodeska, Stephanie M; Jones, Jessica L; Arias, Covadonga R; Walton, William C

    2017-08-01

    The expansion of off-bottom aquaculture to the Gulf of Mexico has raised public health concerns for human health officials. High temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico are associated with high levels of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus. Routine desiccation practices associated with off-bottom aquaculture expose oysters to ambient air, allowing Vibrio spp. to proliferate in the closed oyster. Currently, there is limited research on the length of time needed for Vibrio spp. levels in desiccated oysters to return to background levels, defined as the levels found in oysters that remain continually submersed and not exposed to ambient air. This study determined the time needed to return V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae levels to background levels in oysters exposed to the following desiccation practices: 3-h freshwater dip followed by 24-h ambient air exposure, 27-h ambient air exposure, and control. All oysters were submerged at least 2 weeks prior to the beginning of each trial, with the control samples remaining submerged for the duration of each trial. Vibrio spp. levels were enumerated from samples collected on days 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 10, and 14 after resubmersion using a three-tube most-probable-number enrichment followed by BAX PCR. V. cholerae levels were frequently (92%) below the limit of detection at all times, so they were not statistically analyzed. V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus levels in the 27-h ambient air exposure and the 3-h freshwater dip followed by 24-h ambient air exposure samples were significantly elevated compared with background samples. In most cases, the Vibrio spp. levels in oysters in both desiccation treatments remained elevated compared with background levels until 2 or 3 days post-resubmersion. However, there was one trial in which the Vibrio spp. levels did not return to background levels until day 7. The results of this study provide scientific support that oyster farmers should be required to implement a minimum 7-day resubmersion regimen. This length of time allowed the Vibrio spp. levels to become not significantly different across all treatments.

  17. Community food environment measures in the Alabama Black Belt: Implications for cancer risk reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawu, Rebecca; Quansah, Joseph E.; Fall, Souleymane; Gichuhi, Peter N.; Bovell-Benjamin, Adelia C.

    2015-01-01

    In-store measures were utilized to evaluate the availability of healthy food choices and nutrition/health promotion messages for cancer risk reduction in the selected Alabama Black Belt counties/cities. Sixty one retail food outlets (RFOs) were audited in 12 Alabama Black Belt cities. Store types included convenience stores (49.2%), restaurants (19.7%), fast food restaurants (16.4%), small supermarkets (8.2%), and large supermarket and farmers' markets (3.3 %), respectively. Although there were low numbers of farmers' markets/street stands and large supermarkets, these had significantly (p food environment had limited opportunities for healthy food choices. PMID:26844138

  18. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for Jackson, Calhoun, and Gadsden Counties in Florida, and Houston County in Alabama, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2015-09-18

    A detailed inventory of irrigated crop acreage is not available at the level of resolution needed to accurately estimate water use or to project future water demands in many Florida counties. This report provides a detailed digital map and summary of irrigated areas for 2014 within Jackson, Calhoun, and Gadsden Counties in Florida, and Houston County in Alabama. The irrigated areas were delineated using land-use data and orthoimagery that were then field verified between June and November 2014. Selected attribute data were collected for the irrigated areas, including crop type, primary water source, and type of irrigation system. Results of the 2014 study indicate that an estimated 31,608 acres were irrigated in Jackson County during 2014. This estimate includes 25,733 acres of field crops, 1,534 acres of ornamentals and grasses (including pasture), and 420 acres of orchards. Specific irrigated crops include cotton (11,759 acres), peanuts (9,909 acres), field corn (2,444 acres), and 3,235 acres of various vegetable (row) crops. The vegetable acreage includes 1,714 acres of which 857 acres were planted with both a spring and fall crop on the same field (double cropped). Overall, groundwater was used to irrigate 98.6 percent of the total irrigated acreage in Jackson County during 2014, whereas surface water and wastewater were used to irrigate the remaining 1.4 percent.

  19. The True Story of Oral Communication Education in Alabama: A Case of Academic Discrimination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Written communication and oral communication are inextricably linked as essential life skills and as desirable educational outcomes. However, there is a clear disconnect between what Alabama colleges expect of their graduates and what they are providing them in terms of oral communication education. The steps taken to develop the general studies…

  20. 75 FR 23264 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following rules: Arsenic Rule, Lead and... motion, this determination shall become final and effective on June 2, 2010. Any request for a public... the Regional Administrator's determination and a brief statement of the information that the...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL ATTITUDES OF ALABAMA COASTAL RESIDENTS: PUBLIC OPINION POLLS AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given these conclusions at the national level, it follows that the continued health and vitality of the Alabama coastal zone is associated with the current environmental knowledge of Mobile and Baldwin county residents. In this research, we collected information from coa...

  2. 75 FR 65467 - Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Enterprise Intrastate L.P; Notice of Baseline Filings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR11-4-000; Docket No. PR11-5-000; Not Consolidated] Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Enterprise Intrastate L.P; Notice of Baseline Filings October 18, 2010. Take notice that on October 15, 2010, the applicants listed above...

  3. Organizational characteristics associated with cultural and linguistic service provision within Alabama hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jullet A; Whitman, Marilyn V

    2008-01-01

    Like several states in the Southeast, Alabama is in the nascent stages of an increase in the population of foreign-born individuals for whom English is a second language. These individuals are also culturally different from the traditional southern population. Given the impact of culture and language on a person's service utilization, the introduction of new cultures may pose significant challenges for Alabama's health care providers if they are not prepared. The purpose of this project is to examine the organizational characteristics associated with the provision of culturally and linguistically appropriate services by Alabama hospitals. The data for the project come from a survey of all medical/surgical hospitals (N = 101). Fifty-nine surveys were returned, giving us a 58% response rate. The data were analyzed using correlations, analysis of variance, and logistic regression. Approximately 47% of the sample hospitals reported having a staff interpreter. Furthermore, hospitals that had staff interpreters did seem to be more aware of their community, which was reflected in their mission statements. In addition, directors who viewed their role as fulfilling the strategic plan accepted the task of providing staff interpreters. Thus, several hospitals in Alabama seemed to be ready to meet the cultural and language needs of their markets.

  4. Nutritional Status of New Orleans, Mississippi and Alabama Head Start Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jack L.

    Three purposes guided compilation of this final report on the nutritional status of New Orleans, Mississippi, and Alabama Head Start children: (1) to evaluate the causes of anemia through detailed studies of urban New Orleans preschool children and their mothers, (2) to study the effect of dietary supplementation of school feeding programs upon…

  5. Something for Everyone: The Marketing and Promotion of Alabama Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Recruiters and marketers within the Alabama Community College System are tasked with increasing enrollment at their institutions. The methods of accomplishing this goal include traditional strategies as well as new and emerging ones. Unlike personnel at other institutions of higher learning, however, community college recruiters and marketers have…

  6. Reach Out and Touch Someone: West Alabama Designs a New Emergency Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Mercy Hardie

    1980-01-01

    Quality on-the-scene emergency care for a rural area is provided by West Alabama's Emergency Medical Services. The success of this delivery system is attributed to a radio/telephone communications system that provides quick, direct contact between paramedics at the scene and medical doctors miles away. (DS)

  7. Status of the cerulean warbler (Dendroica cerulea) in Northern Alabama, 1999-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    John P. Carpenter; Eric C. Soehren; Adrian A. Lesak; Yong Wang; Callie J. Schweitzer

    2005-01-01

    The cerulean warbler (Dendroica cerulea) is a Neotropic-Nearctic migratory passerine that breeds in eastern North America and winters in northwestern South America (Dunn and Garrett 1997, Hamel 2000a, 2000b). The northern two-thirds of Alabama historically represented the southernmost extension of the Cerulean Warbler's breeding range, where...

  8. Cooperative Education: Entrepreneurial Development by Colleges and Universities. A Case Study of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Frank

    The entrepreneurial development and experiential education environments of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama, are described. The college-owned industries of the dairy, farm, garment and linen service, bakery, food manufacturing, convenience store, and snack bar are discussed in terms of markets and marketing, permissions and protections,…

  9. Great Expectations: A Guide to Alabama's High School Graduation Exam. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama Department of Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    State leaders, parents, and business people want to be sure that students truly learn what they are being taught in school. Today, basic skills are not sufficient to guarantee that children will find good jobs and become productive citizens. As a result, the Alabama State Legislature passed its Education Accountability Law in 1995. The new…

  10. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  11. Sediment and Runoff Losses following Harvesting/Site Prep Operations on a Piedmont Soil in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnny M. III Grace; Emily A. Carter

    2001-01-01

    Impacts of soil erosion on water quality from forest harvesting and site preparation have received increased concern in recent years. The study presented here was performed in Lee County, Alabama to investigate the impact of harvesting and site preparation on a 20-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation on sediment and runoff yield....

  12. Diet Quality Is Low among Female Food Pantry Clients in Eastern Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Patricia; Zizza, Claire; Jacoby, Jocelynn; Tayie, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examine diet quality, food security, and obesity among female food pantry clients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A food pantry in Lee County, Alabama. Participants: Fifty-five female food pantry clients between 19 and 50 years of age. Main Outcome Measure(s): Diet quality using United States (US) Department of Agriculture…

  13. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alabama's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  14. Growth reductions in naturally regenerated southern pine stands in Alabama and Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.A. Ruark; C.E. Thomas; W.A. Bechtold; D.M. May

    1991-01-01

    Data from Forest Inventory and analysis (FIA) units of the USDA Forest Service were used to compare average annual stand-level basal area accretion onto survivor pines in naturally regenerated pine stands throughout Alabama and Georgia. Growth rates measured between 1972-82 were compared to growth rates during the previous 10-year survey cycle in each state. Separate...

  15. Alabama Education Report Card, 2012-2013: A Year in Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama State Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in January of 2012, the Alabama State Board of Education embarked on a bold and transformation plan for K-12 public education known as PLAN 2020. Foundational to this plan was a new definition of a successful and prepared high school graduate informed by community colleges, institutions of higher education, and business and industry,…

  16. Urban and community forests of the South Central East region: Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Eric J. Greenfield

    2010-01-01

    This report details how land cover and urbanization vary within the states of Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Tennessee by community (incorporated and census designated places), county subdivision, and county. Specifically this report provides critical urban and community forestry information for each state including human population characteristics and trends,...

  17. Legal and Ethical Implications of Working with Minors in Alabama: Consent and Confidentiality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Michael A.; Cobia, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, there has been little guidance in the professional literature with respect to counseling minors outside of the school setting. Although most authors suggest referring to state statutes for legal limits of counseling practice, little research exists describing these requirements in Alabama. The purpose of this literature and…

  18. The Freedom Quilting Bee Cooperative of Alabama: An Art Education Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jeri Pamela

    Using an institution description taxonomy, this study surveyed the Freedom Quilting Bee Cooperative (FQB) of Alabama, comprised of Negro women who make and sell folk quilts. The history of the FQB and the area served was traced from slavery through the Depression, the New Deal, World War II, and postwar years up to Martin Luther King's movement.…

  19. Factors that Facilitated an Alabama School Assistance Team's Success in a Low-Performing School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Virginia; Kochan, Frances

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the perceived factors that enabled an Alabama School Assistance Team (ASAT) to be effective in helping improve a low performing school. A case study was conducted with the ASATs and the Local Education Agency (LEA) site they served. Data were collected from interviews, documents and observations. The perceptions explored in…

  20. Evaluating a Chat Reference Service at the University of South Alabama's Baugh Biomedical Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanton, Clista C.; Staggs, Geneva B.; Williams, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    The University of South Alabama's Baugh Biomedical Library recently initiated a chat reference service targeted at distance education students in the biomedical sciences. After one year of service, the library conducted an evaluation of the chat reference to assess the success of this mode of reference service. Both traditional reference and…

  1. Feasibility Report and Environmental Impact Statement for Navigation Improvements at Bayou La Batre, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-12

    and plant corn. When coastal Alabama was opened to British and American settlers; fishing, livestock and, later, resort hotels became the important...bay (Magnolia virginiana), swamp bay ( Persea palustris), water oak (Quercus nigra), and sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua). Bald cypress (Taxodium

  2. Development of State Plan for Career Education in Alabama. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This state plan for career education in Alabama describes the first-year objectives and operational procedures of the State Advisory Council for Career Education. Activities of the following six task forces are reported: (1) needs assessment for grades K-12, (2) postsecondary needs assessment, (3) noneducational (business and industry) needs…

  3. Alabama DOE/EPSCoR traineeship program. Final report, September 28, 1991--September 28, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruitt, K.M.; April, G.C.

    1995-12-01

    This report covers programmatic accomplishments of the Alabama DOE/EPSCoR Traineeship Program for the period September 28, 1991 to September 29, 1995. The Alabama DOE/EPSCoR Traineeship Program is an integral part of this state`s efforts to address barriers that inhibit the full development and substantial growth of energy-related research at the six major research institutions and at Alabama`s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). To overcome these barriers it was determined that the following actions were needed: Area 1: Strengthening the Research Faculty Base Area 2: Increasing the Number of Outstanding Graduate Students Area 3: Improving the Research Environment Area 4: Developing the Human Resources Base Area 5. Improving the Energy-related Infrastructure, Collaborations and Communications. Although the DOE/EPSCoR Traineeship Grant complements each of the areas listed above, its primary emphasis is the enhancement of opportunities for graduate students. The extent to which this program has met this challenge during the three year funding period constitutes the substance of this report.

  4. Combined and synergistic effects of climate change and urbanization on water quality in the Wolf Bay watershed, southern Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruoyu; Kalin, Latif

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated potential changes in flow, total suspended solid (TSS) and nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorous) loadings under future climate change, land use/cover (LULC) change and combined change scenarios in the Wolf Bay watershed, southern Alabama, USA. Four Global Circulation Models (GCMs) under three Special Report Emission Scenarios (SRES) of greenhouse gas were used to assess the future climate change (2016-2040). Three projected LULC maps (2030) were employed to reflect different extents of urbanization in future. The individual, combined and synergistic impacts of LULC and climate change on water quantity/quality were analyzed by the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Under the "climate change only" scenario, monthly distribution and projected variation of TSS are expected to follow a pattern similar to streamflow. Nutrients are influenced both by flow and management practices. The variation of Total Nitrogen (TN) and Total Phosphorous (TP) generally follow the flow trend as well. No evident difference in the N:P ratio was projected. Under the "LULC change only" scenario, TN was projected to decrease, mainly due to the shrinkage of croplands. TP will increase in fall and winter. The N:P ratio shows a strong decreasing potential. Under the "combined change" scenario, LULC and climate change effect were considered simultaneously. Results indicate that if future loadings are expected to increase/decrease under any individual scenario, then the combined change will intensify that trend. Conversely, if their effects are in opposite directions, an offsetting effect occurs. Science-based management practices are needed to reduce nutrient loadings to the Bay. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Recent developments: USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The development of a National Energy Stategy (NES) for the USA is discussed. On July 26, 1989 President Bush directed of the Secretary of Energy to submit to the President a NES based on the following guidelines: to develop a NES through the year 2030 that could be implemented as son as possible, rather than waiting until the next energy crisis; to formulate the program so that it will create public consensus; build upon market reliance, rather than coercion; and to take a can do approach, capitalizing on US scientific knowledge and common abuse

  6. Archive of digital Chirp subbottom profile data collected during USGS cruises 09CCT03 and 09CCT04, Mississippi and Alabama Gulf Islands, June and July 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2011-01-01

    In June and July of 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys to investigate the geologic controls on island framework from Cat Island, Mississippi, to Dauphin Island, Alabama, as part of a broader USGS study on Coastal Change and Transport (CCT). The surveys were funded through the Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project as part of the Holocene Evolution of the Mississippi-Alabama Region Subtask (http://ngom.er.usgs.gov/task2_2/index.php). This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital Chirp seismic profile data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Single-beam and Swath bathymetry data were also collected during these cruises and will be published as a separate archive. Gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report.

  7. Tšarterkool USA-s / Johannes Kiersch

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kiersch, Johannes

    2001-01-01

    24.-27. mainì 01 toimub Tallinnas EFFE 2001 (European Forum of Freedom in Education) konverents "Haridus tänases kodanikuühiskonnas." Konverentsil esineb ka Witteni Waldorf-pedagoogika Instituudi õppejõud Johannes Kiersch. Lähemalt tema artiklist USA-s populaarsust võitvate tsharterkoolide kohta, mis on riigi- ja erakooli vahevorm

  8. 76 FR 25330 - Georgia Power Company; Project No. 485-063-Georgia and Alabama, Bartletts Ferry Hydroelectric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Georgia Power Company; Project No. 485-063--Georgia and Alabama, Bartletts Ferry Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service... Ferry Hydroelectric Project. The Programmatic Agreement, when executed by the Commission, the Georgia...

  9. Hurricane Katrina Aerial Photography: High-Resolution Imagery of the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama After Landfall

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama after Hurricane Katrina made landfall. The regions photographed range from...

  10. A Comprehensive Inventory of Alabama Coastal Zone Wetland Habitats (Swamps, Marshes, Submersed Grassbeds) from 1980 to 1982 (NCEI Accession 0161311)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitized maps of Mobile Bay and other coastal areas of Alabama, showing habitat types and species compositions of the vegetation in three broad categories of...

  11. Physical, chemical, and biological data collected in Weeks Bay, Alabama (June 1990 - May 2000) (NODC Accession 0116469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: This dataset contains ten years of physical, chemical, and biological data collected during shipboard surveys in Weeks Bay, Alabama, between June 1990 and...

  12. GASB Statement 34 compliance : development of a fixed asset (infrastructure) MIS, Phase 1 for the Alabama Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-02

    This project defined the scope, goals, and high-level requirements for the Alabama Department of Transportation's Asset Management System, so that it will comply with the General Accounting Standards Board policy 34. The system will provide a network...

  13. TTÜ ja TÜ osalevad USA armee miljoniprojektides

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2016-01-01

    TTÜ ja TÜ liitusid USA-s tegutseva meditsiinitehnoloogia ettevõtete konsortsiumiga. Nii jõuavad juhtivate Eesti kõrgkoolide teadmised USA armeesse, kes konsortsiumi kaudu innovaatilisi tooteid ja teenuseid sisse ostab

  14. Euroopa teadis USA salavanglaist / Tõnis Erilaid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Erilaid, Tõnis, 1943-

    2005-01-01

    USA endise välisministri Colin Powelli sõnul pole see tema sõpradele Euroopas uudiseks, et USA on viinud vange riikidesse, kus tema seadused ei kehti. USA praeguse välisministri Condoleezza Rice'i sõnul on USA vange üle kuulanud väljaspool USA-d. USA Today kirjeldab Stare Kiejkuty küla Poolas, kus arvatavasti on olnud salavangla

  15. The Evolution of the Coastal Economy: The Role of Working Waterfronts in the Alabama Gulf Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoqi Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the evolution of the coastal economy in Alabama and examines the driving forces of the sustainable economy in a historical context. The input-output model was applied to assess the direct and secondary effects of output and employment in the coastal region. Results suggest that state industries are heavily dependent on waterfront-related activities in this area, which have fueled much of their rapid development in the past few decades. Tourism, ship building and repairing and transportation are the three dominating sources contributing to the coastal economy. There are a few general problems of working waterfronts in the coastal Alabama area, but there are also some unique problems (e.g., Hurricane Katrina, Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Policies for future sustainable development are proposed.

  16. Geology of the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 10 x 20 NTMS Quadrangles, Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, C.W.; Beg, M.A.

    1979-04-01

    This document is a facsimile edition (with accompanying maps) of geologic reports on the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangles prepared for SRL by the Geological Survey of Alabama. The purpose of these reports is to provide background geologic information to aid in the interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance data. Each report includes descriptions of economic mineral localities as well as a mineral locality map and a geologic map

  17. Geology of the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 10 x 20 NTMS quadrangles, Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, C.W.; Beg, M.A.

    1979-04-01

    This document is a facsimile edition (with accompanying maps) of geologic reports on the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangles prepared for SRL by the Geological Survey of Alabama. Purpose of these reports is to provide background geologic information to aid in the interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance data. Each report includes descriptions of economic mineral localities as well as a mineral locality map and a geologic map

  18. AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project and its Relationship to a Concentration in STEM Discipline at Alabama A&M University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwoye, J.

    2017-12-01

    The American Meteorological Society (AMS) reported that our nation faces a serious challenge in attracting young people to science and science-related careers (including teaching). This is particularly true for members of groups underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and is especially acute in the small number of minority college students majoring in the geosciences. The purpose of this paper is to report on how the author engages Alabama A&M University (AAMU) students in STEM transportation science. Specifically, the objective is to develop a conceptual framework of engaging minority students in transportation concentration in the department of community and regional planning. The students were involved in writing a research paper on direct and indirect climate change impacts on transportation and also involved in classroom discussions during a wk14 module on overview of transportation suitability: climate change and environment. The paper concludes with minority needs to gain access to STEM and participation of minority students in field and site analysis.

  19. Future USA development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephen, J.D.; Biancheria, A.; Leibnitz, D.; O'Reilly, B.D.; Liu, Y.Y.; Labar, M.P.; Gneiting, B.C.

    1979-01-01

    The planning for further development in the USA at this time is a mixture of expectation and guessing. Modeling development is certain to continue, but the target reactor is uncertain. The next plant may or may not use the FFTR driver fuel design. The planning, therefore, emphasizes fundamentals and flexibility. There are many options to be modeled. The FFTF driver fuel performance in FFTF must be evaluated; both the reference and improved designs. A decision to use the FFTR driver design in the large plant will demand predictions on the effects of axial blankets, constant power (rather than decreasing) throughout life, and power changes, behavior beyond breach and design basis transients in large plants. A decision favoring a lower doubling time oxide design adds the effects of higher strength/lower swelling alloys, increased pin diameter, reduced cladding thickness/diameter, increased smeared density, gap versus pellet density, and reduced pin pitch/diameter. A helium bonded carbide design adds concern about increased potential for fuel-cladding-assembly mechanical interactions. And blanket pin performance predictions, either in a homogeneous or a heterogeneous core, add an increasing power history and enhanced assembly interactions. It is possible that the decision will be to choose a first core and retain all options for later cores. The modeling objective, for whatever options are chosen, is to predict the effect of normal and off-normal design conditions on performance limits (i.e., fuel temperature, pin deformation, pin lifetime). Several significant uncertainties in the mechanisms associated with the performance limits remain and will be addressed. These include gap closure, gap conductance and fuel properties at higher burnup, fuel-fission product reactions, retained gas, breach mechanisms, assembly interactions and behavior beyond breach, plus establishing appropriate criteria. The LIFE system, with its elements of 1D and 2D fundamental modeling

  20. Barrier island habitat map and vegetation survey—Dauphin Island, Alabama, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Borchert, Sinéad M.; Day, Richard H.; Feher, Laura C.; Osland, Michael J.; Wang, Lei; Wang, Hongqing

    2017-08-04

    Barrier islands are dynamic environments due to their position at the land-sea interface. Storms, waves, tides, currents, and relative sea-level rise are powerful forces that shape barrier island geomorphology and habitats (for example, beach, dune, marsh, and forest). Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the Deep Water Horizon oil spill in 2010 are two major events that have affected habitats and natural resources on Dauphin Island, Alabama. The latter event prompted a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the State of Alabama funded by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to investigate viable, sustainable restoration options that protect and restore the natural resources of Dauphin Island, Alabama.In order to understand the feasibility and sustainability of various restoration scenarios, it is important to understand current conditions on Dauphin Island. To further this understanding, a detailed 19-class habitat map for Dauphin Island was produced from 1-foot aerial infrared photography collected on December 4, 2015, and lidar data collected in January 2015. We also conducted a ground survey of habitat types, vegetation community structure, and elevations in November and December 2015. These products provide baseline data regarding the ecological and general geomorphological attributes of the area, which can be compared with observations from other dates for tracking changes over time.

  1. Pepeljajev eesti näitlejatega USA-s

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Sasha Pepeljajevi tantsulavastust "Uksed" etendati USA rahvusvahelisel teatrifestivalil "Arts & Ideas". Vene-Eesti trupi Apparatus lavastus on pühendatud Daniil Harmsi 100. sünniaastapäevale ning põhineb tema töödel

  2. Nordkorea kan endelig ramme USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo

    2017-01-01

    Nordkoreas evne til at nå USA baner vej for en forhandlet løsning, fordi præsident Trump ikke har andre alternativer. Krig vil koste over en million døde, og Kina er imod effektive sanktioner. Det nødvendige pres for at få USA til forhandlingsbordet er nu på plads.......Nordkoreas evne til at nå USA baner vej for en forhandlet løsning, fordi præsident Trump ikke har andre alternativer. Krig vil koste over en million døde, og Kina er imod effektive sanktioner. Det nødvendige pres for at få USA til forhandlingsbordet er nu på plads....

  3. FrogwatchUSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droege, S.

    2002-01-01

    full text: Frogs and toads are perhaps the most approachable and available of all our wildlife. In many, if not most places, they are abundant. In wetter parts of the East, almost anyone outside on a warm rainy night in spring will hear their dream-like calls, bellows, trills and snores. Even in the deserts of the Southwest, a nocturnal trip after a summer monsoon will yield toads moving across the roads toward a cacophonous orgy of mating and calling in the roadside ditches and desert pools. Birds share with frogs and toads this same sense of presence in our daily lives. But the difference is that birds are like the attractive neighbor who just never gives you the time of day, while frogs are more like the troglodyte who appears regularly to chat, philosophize, and have a beer. Uninvited, frogs appear in our water gardens, toads are on our stoops in the morning, we catch them when we are kids, raise their babies in the aquarium, and feel sorry when we find we have run them over with the lawnmower. When concerns about declining populations of amphibians reached the mass media, the Secretaries' office became involved. In addition to using traditional research mechanisms to investigate the problem, the Secretary also wanted to involve the public directly. The combination of high public appeal and the relative ease with which frog calls can be learned made a large-scale monitoring program for frogs and toads possible. What emerged was a program called Frogwatch USA, modeled after a successful Canadian program with a similar name. A web site was created (www.frogwatch.org) that presented potential frogwatchers with directions and a way to register their site online as well as enter their data. Observers chose where to count frogs depending on what they felt was important. For some it was their backyard, others chose vulnerable wetlands in their neighborhoods, or spots on local refuges and parks. Initially funded at $8,000 a year and then after two years increased to

  4. USA pelgab Hiina tehnoloogialuuret / Tõnis Arnover

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Arnover, Tõnis, 1952-

    2005-01-01

    Hiina Ameerika-vastasest majandusluurest. USA luureameti andmetel on USA-s loodud üle kolme tuhande Hiina firma, kelle ülesandeks on tööstusliku või sõjalise tehnoloogia hankimine. Vt. samas: Hiina firmad ostavad üha suuremaid USA ettevõtteid

  5. Analysis of Alabama Airborne Gravity at Three Altitudes: Expected Accuracy and Spatial Resolution from a Future Tibetan Airborne Gravity Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hsun Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ airborne gravity data at altitudes of 11, 6.3, and 1.7 km over a smooth area of Alabama are used to assess gravity accuracy and errors in upward and downward continuations. Analysis of the Alabama free-air anomaly gravity data at crossover points at the three altitudes suggests 1 - 2 mgal accuracy for the dataset. Gravity data at each altitude are then expanded into local 3D Fourier series, to prepare for continuation. This Fourier representation results in continuation errors at few-mgal level in Alabama, even in the extreme case of downward continuation from 11 km to sea level. The result in Alabama inspires an airborne gravity survey over the rough, inaccessible terrain of Tibet. Similar investigations as in Alabama are made in Tibet using EGM08-derived airborne gravity data at flight altitudes of 10, 5, and 0 km. Bouguer anomalies at the 10-km altitude preserve the major tectonic features of Tibet. Downward continuation errors increase with terrain roughness, but the survey can enhance local tectonic features. This study highlights the value of a future Tibetan airborne gravity survey and points out the expected gravity accuracy and spatial resolution from this survey.

  6. Abundance of Soil-Borne Entomopathogenic Fungi in Organic and Conventional Fields in the Midwestern USA with an Emphasis on the Effect of Herbicides and Fungicides on Fungal Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Eric H; Jaronski, Stefan T; Hodgson, Erin W; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are widespread in agricultural fields and help suppress crop pests. These natural enemies may be hindered by certain agronomic practices associated with conventional agriculture including the use of pesticides. We tested whether the abundance of EPF differed between organic and conventional fields, and whether specific cropping practices and soil properties were correlated with their abundance. In one year of the survey, soil from organic fields and accompanying margins had significantly more EPF than conventional fields and accompanying margins. Regression analysis revealed that the percentage of silt and the application of organic fertilizer were positively correlated with EPF abundance; but nitrogen concentration, tillage, conventional fields, and margins of conventional fields were negatively correlated with EPF abundance. A greenhouse experiment in which fungicides and herbicides were applied to the soil surface showed no significant effect on EPF. Though organic fields were perceived to be more suitable environments for EPF, abiotic factors and cropping practices such as tillage may have greater impacts on the abundance of EPF. Also, fungicides and herbicides may not be as toxic to soil-borne EPF as originally thought.

  7. Abundance of Soil-Borne Entomopathogenic Fungi in Organic and Conventional Fields in the Midwestern USA with an Emphasis on the Effect of Herbicides and Fungicides on Fungal Persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H Clifton

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic fungi (EPF are widespread in agricultural fields and help suppress crop pests. These natural enemies may be hindered by certain agronomic practices associated with conventional agriculture including the use of pesticides. We tested whether the abundance of EPF differed between organic and conventional fields, and whether specific cropping practices and soil properties were correlated with their abundance. In one year of the survey, soil from organic fields and accompanying margins had significantly more EPF than conventional fields and accompanying margins. Regression analysis revealed that the percentage of silt and the application of organic fertilizer were positively correlated with EPF abundance; but nitrogen concentration, tillage, conventional fields, and margins of conventional fields were negatively correlated with EPF abundance. A greenhouse experiment in which fungicides and herbicides were applied to the soil surface showed no significant effect on EPF. Though organic fields were perceived to be more suitable environments for EPF, abiotic factors and cropping practices such as tillage may have greater impacts on the abundance of EPF. Also, fungicides and herbicides may not be as toxic to soil-borne EPF as originally thought.

  8. Evaluation of Skills Needed in College Education by Colleges of Agriculture Alumni from 1862 and 1890 Land Grant Universities in Alabama and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekeri, Andrew A.; Baba, Pauline A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine college skills Alumni from 1862 and 1890 Land-Grant universities in Alabama and Tennessee rated as essential to acquire in their college education. The data are from a survey of colleges of agriculture alumni who graduated from six land-grant universities in Alabama and Tennessee. IBM SPSS Statistical…

  9. The Anthropology of Science Education Reform: An Alabama Model for Building an Integrated Stakeholder Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, R. L.; Cox, G. N.

    2004-12-01

    Anthropologists are concerned with every aspect of the culture they are investigating. One of the five main branches of anthropology, socio-cultural anthropology, concerns itself with studying the relationship between behavior and culture. This paper explores the concept that changing the behavior of our culture - its beliefs and values - towards science is at the heart of science education reform. There are five institutions that socio-cultural anthropologists use to study the social organization of cultures: the educational system is only one of them. Its function - across all cultures - is to serve as a mechanism for implementing change in cultural beliefs and values. As leaders of science education reform, the Alabama model contends that we must stop the struggle with our purpose and get on with the business of leading culture change through an integrated stakeholder systems approach. This model stresses the need for the interaction of agencies other than education - including government, industry, the media and our health communities to operate in an integrated and systemic fashion to address the issues of living among a technically literate society. Twenty-five years of science education reform needs being voiced and programs being developed has not produced the desired results from within the educational system. This is too limited a focus to affect any real cultural change. It is when we acknowledge that students spend only an average of 12 percent of their life time in schools, that we can begin to ask ourselves what are our students learning the other 88 percent of their time - from their peers, their parents and the media - and what should we be doing to address this cultural crisis in these other arenas in addition to the educational system? The Alabama Math, Science and Technology Education Coalition (AMSTEC) is a non-profit 501c(3) organization operating in the state of Alabama to provide leadership in improving mathematics, science, and technology

  10. Orlando, FL, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This color infrared photo of the Orlando, FL area (28.5N,81.5W) shows the extensive citrus tree orchards as neat bright red field patterns. The extensive road and highway network in the central Florida region is clearly visible. Also, the recent urban growth caused by the opening of the Disney World amusement complex just southwest of Orlando is clearly evident. This view spans the width of the state from Tampa Bay to the Atlantic coast.

  11. Delineation of marsh types from Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, to Perdido Bay, Alabama, in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Michael G. Brasher,; Jenneke M. Visser,; Michael K. Mitchell,; Bart M. Ballard,; Mark W. Parr,; Barry C. Wilson,

    2015-07-23

    Coastal zone managers and researchers often require detailed information regarding emergent marsh vegetation types (that is, fresh, intermediate, brackish, and saline) for modeling habitat capacities and needs of marsh dependent taxa (such as waterfowl and alligator). Detailed information on the extent and distribution of emergent marsh vegetation types throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico coast has been historically unavailable. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the Gulf Coast Joint Venture, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., and the Texas A&M University-Kingsville, produced a classification of emergent marsh vegetation types from Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, to Perdido Bay, Alabama.

  12. Proposed Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina system power marketing policy and subsequent contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an Environmental Assessment (Assessment) (DOE/EA-0935) evaluating the Power Marketing Policy and Subsequent Contracts between Southeastern and its customers. The Assessment evaluates two alternatives and the no action alternative. The proposed action is to market the power and energy available in the Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina System during the next ten years, with new power sales contracts of ten-year durations, to the customers set forth in Appendix A of the Assessment. In addition to the proposed alternative, the Assessment evaluates the alternative of extending existing contracts under the current marketing policy

  13. Analysis of Summer Thunderstorms in Central Alabama Using the NASA Land Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Robert; Case, Jonathan; Molthan, Andrew; Jedloved, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Forecasters have difficulty predicting "random" afternoon thunderstorms during the summer months. Differences in soil characteristics could be a contributing factor for storms. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) may assist forecasters in predicting summer convection by identifying boundaries in land characteristics. This project identified case dates during the summer of 2009 by analyzing synoptic weather maps, radar, and satellite data to look for weak atmospheric forcing and disorganized convective development. Boundaries in land characteristics that may have lead to convective initiation in central Alabama were then identified using LIS.

  14. Benthic foraminiferal census data from Mobile Bay, Alabama--counts of surface samples and box cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richwine, Kathryn A.; Osterman, Lisa E.

    2012-01-01

    A study was undertaken in order to understand recent environmental change in Mobile Bay, Alabama. For this study a series of surface sediment and box core samples was collected. The surface benthic foraminiferal data provide the modern baseline conditions of the bay and can be used as a reference for changing paleoenvironmental parameters recorded in the box cores. The 14 sampling locations were chosen in the bay to cover the wide diversity of fluvial and marine-influenced environments on both sides of the shipping channel.

  15. Short history of PACS. Part I: USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.K.

    2011-01-01

    This historical review covers the PACS development in the USA during the past 28 years from 1982 to 2010. General historical remarks of PACS and international scene in three stages from infancy, puberty to adolescence are presented. Early PACS development was mostly financed by the federal government including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. PACS evolution went through several stages. The earliest stages included the definition of large-scale PACS, establishment of the DICOM and other standards, the development of some early key PACS related technologies, and PACS implementation strategies. The later stages were in the concept of enterprise PACS, IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) workflow profiles, and ePR with image distribution. The current most excited accomplishment is in the development of the new field in medical imaging informatics. This review goes through these stages and events in the USA during these 28 years, whenever an event involved participants from other countries, the contributors are cited.

  16. Short history of PACS. Part I: USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H K

    2011-05-01

    This historical review covers the PACS development in the USA during the past 28 years from 1982 to 2010. General historical remarks of PACS and international scene in three stages from infancy, puberty to adolescence are presented. Early PACS development was mostly financed by the federal government including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. PACS evolution went through several stages. The earliest stages included the definition of large-scale PACS, establishment of the DICOM and other standards, the development of some early key PACS related technologies, and PACS implementation strategies. The later stages were in the concept of enterprise PACS, IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) workflow profiles, and ePR with image distribution. The current most excited accomplishment is in the development of the new field in medical imaging informatics. This review goes through these stages and events in the USA during these 28 years, whenever an event involved participants from other countries, the contributors are cited. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Short history of PACS. Part I: USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.K., E-mail: hkhuang@aol.com [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California (United States); Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2011-05-15

    This historical review covers the PACS development in the USA during the past 28 years from 1982 to 2010. General historical remarks of PACS and international scene in three stages from infancy, puberty to adolescence are presented. Early PACS development was mostly financed by the federal government including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. PACS evolution went through several stages. The earliest stages included the definition of large-scale PACS, establishment of the DICOM and other standards, the development of some early key PACS related technologies, and PACS implementation strategies. The later stages were in the concept of enterprise PACS, IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) workflow profiles, and ePR with image distribution. The current most excited accomplishment is in the development of the new field in medical imaging informatics. This review goes through these stages and events in the USA during these 28 years, whenever an event involved participants from other countries, the contributors are cited.

  18. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L. [National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  19. The Regional Autopsy Center: The University of Alabama at Birmingham Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Daniel Stephen; Reilly, Stephanie

    2017-09-01

    Rates of autopsied deaths have decreased significantly for the last several decades. It may not be practical for some institutions to maintain the facilities and staffing required to perform autopsies. In recent years, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has established contracts to perform autopsies for several regional institutions including the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences (ADFS), the United States Veterans Affairs, the local prison system, local community hospitals, and with families for private autopsy services. Contracts and autopsy data from 2004 to 2015 were obtained and reviewed. Since 2004, the number of UAB hospital autopsies trended slightly downward. On average, UAB hospital cases comprised most yearly cases, and the ADFS was the second largest contributor of cases. Income generated from outside autopsies performed from 2006 to 2015 totaled just more than 2 million dollars, and most of the income was generated from referred ADFS cases. This study provides evidence that a centralized institution (regional autopsy center [RAC]) can provide regional autopsy service in a practical, feasible, and economically viable manner, and a RAC can benefit both the referring institutions as well as the RAC itself.

  20. The physical characteristics of the sediments on and surrounding Dauphin Island, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Alisha M.; Marot, Marci E.; Smith, Christopher G.; Wheaton, Cathryn J.

    2017-06-20

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center collected 303 surface sediment samples from Dauphin Island, Alabama, and the surrounding water bodies in August 2015. These sediments were processed to determine physical characteristics such as organic content, bulk density, and grain-size. The environments where the sediments were collected include high and low salt marshes, washover deposits, dunes, beaches, sheltered bays, and open water. Sampling by the USGS was part of a larger study to assess the feasibility and sustainability of proposed restoration efforts for Dauphin Island, Alabama, and assess the island’s resilience to rising sea level and storm events. The data presented in this publication can be used by modelers to attempt validation of hindcast models and create predictive forecast models for both baseline conditions and storms. This study was funded by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, via the Gulf Environmental Benefit Fund.This report serves as an archive for sedimentological data derived from surface sediments. Downloadable data are available as Excel spreadsheets, JPEG files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata.

  1. Single-beam bathymetry data collected in 2015 from Grand Bay, Alabama-Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Stalk, Chelsea A.; Smith, Christopher G.; Locker, Stanley D.; Fredericks, Jake J.; McCloskey, Terrence A.; Wheaton, Cathryn J.

    2017-12-01

    As part of the Sea-level and Storm Impacts on Estuarine Environments and Shorelines (SSIEES) project, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a single-beam bathymetry survey within the estuarine, open-bay, and tidal creek environments of Grand Bay, Alabama-Mississippi, from May to June 2015. The goal of the SSIEES project is to assess the physical controls of sediment and material exchange between wetlands and estuarine environments along the northern Gulf of Mexico, specifically Grand Bay, Alabama-Mississippi; Vermilion Bay, Louisiana; and, along the east coast, within Chincoteague Bay, Virginia-Maryland. The data described in this report provide baseline bathymetric information for future research investigating wetland-marsh evolution, sediment transport, erosion, recent and long-term geomorphic change, and can also support the modeling of changes in response to restoration and storm impacts. The survey area encompasses more than 40 square kilometers of Grand Bay’s waters.

  2. The sedimentological characteristics and geochronology of the marshes of Dauphin Island, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Alisha M.; Smith, Christopher G.; Marot, Marci E.

    2018-03-22

    In August 2015, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center collected 11 push cores from the marshes of Dauphin Island and Little Dauphin Island, Alabama. Sample site environments included high marshes, low salt marshes, and salt flats, and varied in distance from the shoreline. The sampling efforts were part of a larger study to assess the feasibility and sustainability of proposed restoration efforts for Dauphin Island, Alabama, and to identify trends in shoreline erosion and accretion. The data presented in this publication can provide a basis for assessing organic and inorganic sediment accumulation rates and temporal changes in accumulation rates over multiple decades at multiple locations across the island. This study was funded by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, via the Gulf Environmental Benefit Fund. This report serves as an archive for the sedimentological and geochemical data derived from the marsh cores. Downloadable data are available and include Microsoft Excel spreadsheets (.xlsx), comma-separated values (.csv) text files, JPEG files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata in a U.S. Geological Survey data release.

  3. DØ Collaboration at FNAL, USA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. DØ Collaboration at FNAL, USA. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 62 Issue 3 March 2004 pp 561-563 Experimental Particle Physics. Search for narrow-width t t ¯ resonances in p p ¯ collisons at ( s ) = 1.8 TeV · Supriya Jain DØ Collaboration at FNAL, ...

  4. Dyslexia Laws in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youman, Martha; Mather, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the various states of the USA, the appropriate identification of dyslexia and the timely provision of interventions are characterized by variability and inconsistency. Several states have recognized the existence of this disorder and the well-established need for services. These states have taken proactive steps to implement laws and…

  5. USA panustab keskkonda / Jeffrey Goldstein

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Goldstein, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    USA uus energiapoliitika kava näeb ette bensiini tarbimise vähendamist järgneva 10 aasta jooksul 20%, mis omakorda vähendab ameeriklaste autodest eralduva süsihappegaasi heitmete kasvu ning vähendab sõltuvust naftast

  6. USA asekaitseminister seisab Eesti eest

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Eestis visiidil viibiv USA asekaitseminister poliitika alal Michele Flournoy ütles, et pooldab koostöökohtade otsimist Moskvaga, kuid on kindlal seisukohal, et Venemaa ei tohi end siin piirkonnas kehtestada. Flournoy tunnustas Eesti panust Afganistani ning samuti liitlassuhetesse laiemalt

  7. Avian metapneumovirus in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the United States of America (USA), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) causes an upper respiratory tract infection in turkeys; no outbreaks have been reported in commercial chicken flocks. Typical clinical signs of the disease in turkey poults include coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, tracheal rale...

  8. Germination and field survival of white-topped pitcher plant seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristina Connor; Hilliard Gibbs

    2012-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine longevity of white-topped pitcher plant (Sarracenia leucophylla, Raf.) seeds in the field and in cold storage. Thirty seed pods were harvested in August 2009 from plants located in Alabama 38 miles from the Gulf Coast. Of the 10,000+ seeds extracted from the pods, some were buried outside in screen-wire bags and...

  9. Role of herbicide treatments and application times in cogongrass eradication under open field infestation scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Cogongrass eradication project was conducted from spring 2008 through fall 2011 on natural, open-field Cogongrass infestations at two locations near Tilman's Corner and Bayou La Batre in southwestern Alabama. Treatments consisted of glyphosate alone (4 lb/acre), imazapyr alone (0.75 lb/acre) and ...

  10. Eesti ja USA sõlmisid kokkuleppe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2017-01-01

    Kaitseminister Margus Tsahkna ja Ameerika Ühendriikide suursaadik Eestis James Melville allkirjastasid Eesti ja USA kaitsekoostöö kokkuleppe, mis hakkab reguleerima Eestis viibivate USA relvajõudude liikmete, nende pereliikmete ja lepinglaste õiguslikku staatust

  11. Range expansion of invasive shrubs: implication for crown fire risk in forestlands of the southern USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan; Wonkka, Carissa L; Grant, William E; Rogers, William E

    2016-01-01

    Non-native plant invasions and changing management activities have dramatically altered the structure and composition of forests worldwide. Invasive shrubs and fire suppression have led to increased densification and biomass accumulation in forest ecosystems of the southeastern USA. Notably, Chinese and European privets are rapid growing, shade-tolerant shrubs which number among the most aggressive invasive species in these forests. Privet encroachment has caused losses of native diversity, alteration of ecosystem processes and changes in community structure. The latter has become manifest through decreases in fine herbaceous fuels concurrent with increases in coarse woody fuels in forest understoreys. These alterations in fuel structure will potentially lead to less frequent, but more severe forest fires, which threaten important forest resources during extreme weather conditions. Drawing on extensive data sets compiled by the US Forest Service, we integrated statistical forecasting and analytical techniques within a spatially explicit, agent-based, simulation framework to predict potential range expansion of Chinese and European privet (Ligustrum sinenseandL. vulgare) and the associated increase in crown fire risk over the next two decades in forestlands of Mississippi and Alabama. Our results indicate that probability of invasion is positively associated with elevation, adjacency (within 300 m) to water bodies, mean daily maximum temperature, site productivity and private land ownership, and is negatively associated with slope, stand age, artificial regeneration, distance to the nearest road and fire disturbance. Our projections suggest the total area invaded will increase from 1.36 to ≈31.39% of all forestlands in Mississippi and Alabama (≈7 million hectares) and the annual frequency of crown fires in these forestlands will approximately double within the next two decades. Such time series projections of annual range expansions and crown fire frequency

  12. USA suursaadikuga Tallinna lahel / Katrin Kruss

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kruss, Katrin

    2007-01-01

    USA suursaadik Stanley Davis Phillips oma haridusteest, perekonnast, armastusest mere vastu, panusest isa Earl Phillipsi mööbliäri laiendamisse, golfiharrastusest, suursaadikute ettevalmistusest USA-s, suursaadiku residentsist Pirital ning uue saatkonnahoone otsingutest Tallinnas. Lisa: Stanley Davis Phillips

  13. USA andis Gruusiale vastakaid signaale / Neeme Raud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raud, Neeme, 1969-

    2008-01-01

    USA välisministri Condoleezza Riceþi saabumisest Thbilisisse, et avaldada Gruusiale toetust. USA poolt antud soovitustest Gruusia president Mihhail Saakashvilile mitte jõudu kasutada ega alluda Venemaa provokatsioonidele ning hoiatustest sõjalise konflikti tagajärgede eest. USA analüütikute arvamusi

  14. 77 FR 23619 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: Removal of State Low-Reid Vapor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... submitted the final version of the SIP revision on March 2, 2012. The revision modifies Alabama's SIP to move Chapter 335-3-20 ``Control of Fuels,'' which includes the regulation that governs the State's 7.0...) of the CAA. The low-RVP fuel program required that all gasoline sold during the control period (June...

  15. The Production of Professional School Counselors in Alabama: Graduation Rates of CACREP and Non-CACREP Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Susan R.; Snow, Brent M.; Chibbaro, Julie S.

    2009-01-01

    Today's professional school counselors have many roles and tasks within the schools. As more children depend on the services of school counselors, well-trained counselors are needed to meet the demands. Data presented in this paper provide support for the production of professional school counselors in Alabama and the immediate southeastern area…

  16. Response of avian bark foragers and cavity nesters to regeneration treatments in the oak-hickory forest of Northern Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang Yong; Callie Jo Schweitzer; Adrian A. Lesak

    2006-01-01

    We examined bark-foraging and cavity-nesting birds’ use of upland hardwood habitat altered through a shelterwood regeneration experiment on the mid-Cumberland Plateau of northern Alabama. The five regeneration treatments were 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent basal area retention. The 75 percent retention treatment was accomplished by stem-injecting herbicide into mostly...

  17. Low-flow frequency and flow-duration characteristics of selected streams in Alabama through March 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Toby D.; Lee, Kathyrn G.

    2017-08-28

    Low-flow statistics are needed by water-resource engineers, planners, and managers to protect and manage the water resources of Alabama. The accuracy of these statistics is influenced by such factors as length of record and specific hydrologic conditions measured in those records. As such, it is generally recommended that flow statistics be updated about every 10 years to provide improved and representative low-flow characteristics. The previous investigation of low-flow characteristics for Alabama included data through September 1990. Since that time, Alabama has experienced several historic droughts highlighting the need to update the low-flow characteristics at U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations. Consequently, this investigation was undertaken in cooperation with a number of State and local agencies to update low-flow frequency and flow-duration statistics at 210 continuous-record streamgaging stations in Alabama and 67 stations from basins that are shared with surrounding States. The flow characteristics were computed on the basis of available data through March 2014.

  18. An analysis of factors affecting participation behavior of limited resource farmers in agricultural cost-share programs in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwudili Onianwa; Gerald Wheelock; Buddhi Gyawali; Jianbang Gan; Mark Dubois; John Schelhas

    2004-01-01

    This study examines factors that affect the participation behavior of limited resource farmers in agricultural cost-share programs in Alabama. The data were generated from a survey administered to a sample of limited resource farm operators. A binary logit model was employed to analyze the data. Results indicate that college education, age, gross sales, ratio of owned...

  19. Dietary patterns and diet quality among diverse older adults: The University of Alabama at Birmingham study of aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: To characterize dietary patterns among a diverse sample of older adults (= 65 years). Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Five counties in west central Alabama. Participants: Community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries (N=416; 76.8 ± 5.2 years, 56% female, 39% African American) in the Univer...

  20. An Exploration of the Associations among Hearing Loss, Physical Health, and Visual Memory in Adults from West Central Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay-McCutcheon, Marcia J.; Hyams, Adriana; Yang, Xin; Parton, Jason; Panasiuk, Brianna; Ondocsin, Sarah; James, Mary Margaret; Scogin, Forrest

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this preliminary study was to explore the associations among hearing loss, physical health, and visual memory in adults living in rural areas, urban clusters, and an urban city in west Central Alabama. Method: Two hundred ninety-seven adults (182 women, 115 men) from rural areas, urban clusters, and an urban city of west…

  1. Comparing Children's Fears in Alabama: An Investigation Using Post-9/11 and Post-Invasion of Iraq Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Joy J.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the fears of children and adolescents in Alabama in the aftermath of 9/11 and after the initial invasion of Iraq in 2003. The American Fear Survey Schedule for Children (FSSC-AM; Burnham, 1995, 2005) was utilized to measure the fears of youth in Grades 2-12. (Contains 4 tables.)

  2. 76 FR 35508 - Alabama Southern Railroad, L.L.C.-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-Norfolk Southern Railway...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Railroad, L.L.C.--Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption--Norfolk Southern Railway Company Norfolk Southern... grant nonexclusive overhead temporary trackage rights to Alabama Southern Railroad, L.L.C. (ABS) over a... http://www.stb.dot.gov . Decided: June 13, 2011. By the Board. Rachel D. Campbell, Director, Office of...

  3. Use of Color in Child Care Environments: Application of Color for Wayfinding and Space Definition in Alabama Child Care Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Marilyn A.

    2003-01-01

    Compared the use of color in physical design features associated with the exterior and interior designs of 101 child care centers in Alabama. Found that color was evidenced on the exterior of the centers at just over half of the sample. The interior environments had warm colors and bright accents in the setting; however, the majority of centers…

  4. Using Lidar and color infrared imagery to successfully measure stand characteristics on the William B. Bankhead National Forest, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey Stephens; Luben Dimov; Callie Schweitzer; Wubishet Tadesse

    2008-01-01

    Light detection and ranging (Lidar) and color infrared imagery (CIR) were used to quantify forest structure and to distinguish deciduous from coniferous trees for selected stands on the William B. Bankhead National Forest in Alabama. Lidar bare ground and vegetation point clouds were used to determine tree heights and tree locations. Lidar accuracy was assessed by...

  5. 77 FR 13055 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: Removal of State Low-Reid Vapor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ... emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), lead and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) from RVP requirements. As a result, there... Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: Removal of State Low-Reid Vapor Pressure Requirement for the... sulfur and low-RVP requirements for the Birmingham Area pursuant to 211(c)(4)(C)(i). In a final...

  6. Sõda, mille USA on juba kaotanud / Mart Helme

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Helme, Mart, 1949-

    2003-01-01

    USA pole suutnud Iraagi-vastase sõja vajalikkust põhjendada, arvavad paljud USA poliitikavaatlejad. Rängaks diplomaatiliseks eksimuseks peetakse USA kaitseministri Donald Rumsfeldi avaldust, et USA ei vaja kellegi abi sõjas

  7. Surface discharge of raw wastewater among unsewered homes in central Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M.; Das, P.; Blackwell, A.; Aytekin, E.; Hu, Y.; White, K.; Jones, R.; Lu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Discussions of future water and wastewater challenges in the US typically focus on crumbling infrastructure. However, another major challenge has been almost entirely neglected. A growing body of evidence indicates that household discharge of untreated wastewater to the surface (through so-called "straight pipes") is widespread in poor rural communities of Appalachia and the southeastern US. The US Census included water and wastewater questions until 1990. However, the census questions do not appear to differentiate clearly between legal onsite treatment and discharge of raw wastewater to the ground (EPA, 1999; US Census, 2015). Although straight pipes are illegal, many reports from the southern US and Appalachia indicate that the practice is still common in poor rural areas (e.g., EPA Region 4, 2002; du Albuquerque, 2011). A representative, county-scale report on straight pipes in Madison County, NC (Baldwin, 2000) found that 5.6% of unsewered rural households directly discharged raw wastewater and a 2005 study of Bibb County, AL, reported 15% straight pipe among households not connected to sewer (White and Jones, 2006). We focused on two Alabama counties (Hale and Wilcox) with high rates of rural poverty (26.6% and 39.2% of households in poverty, respectively) and soils unsuited for conventional septic systems. We used two main methods (1) site-by-site inspections of a random sample of unsewered rural homes and (2) water sample collection and analysis from impacted streams. We found high rates of straight pipe use and substantial impacts on water quality in local streams. For example, in Wilcox Co., 60% of unsewered households had a visible straight pipe; conservatively, these homes discharge 500,000 gallons of raw sewage to the ground in Wilcox Co. each day. Water sampling upstream and downstream of an unsewered town with many straight pipes indicated major impacts on surface water quality. Additionally, the literature reveals possible health impacts from onsite

  8. Large Differences in Global and Regional Total Soil Carbon Stock Estimates Based on SoilGrids, HWSD, and NCSCD: Intercomparison and Evaluation Based on Field Data From USA, England, Wales, and France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tifafi, Marwa; Guenet, Bertrand; Hatté, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Soils are the major component of the terrestrial ecosystem and the largest organic carbon reservoir on Earth. However, they are a nonrenewable natural resource and especially reactive to human disturbance and climate change. Despite its importance, soil carbon dynamics is an important source of uncertainty for future climate predictions and there is a growing need for more precise information to better understand the mechanisms controlling soil carbon dynamics and better constrain Earth system models. The aim of our work is to compare soil organic carbon stocks given by different global and regional databases that already exist. We calculated global and regional soil carbon stocks at 1 m depth given by three existing databases (SoilGrids, the Harmonized World Soil Database, and the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database). We observed that total stocks predicted by each product differ greatly: it is estimated to be around 3,400 Pg by SoilGrids and is about 2,500 Pg according to Harmonized World Soil Database. This difference is marked in particular for boreal regions where differences can be related to high disparities in soil organic carbon concentration. Differences in other regions are more limited and may be related to differences in bulk density estimates. Finally, evaluation of the three data sets versus ground truth data shows that (i) there is a significant difference in spatial patterns between ground truth data and compared data sets and that (ii) data sets underestimate by more than 40% the soil organic carbon stock compared to field data.

  9. An Outbreak of Syphilis in Alabama Prisons: Correctional Health Policy and Communicable Disease Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Mitchell I.; Xu, Fujie; Patel, Priti; O'Cain, Michael; Schillinger, Julia A.; St. Louis, Michael E.; Finelli, Lyn

    2001-01-01

    Objectives. After syphilis outbreaks were reported at 3 Alabama State men's prisons in early 1999, we conducted an investigation to evaluate risk factors for syphilis infection and describe patterns of syphilis transmission. Methods. We reviewed medical, patient interview, and prison transfer records and documented sexual networks. Presumptive source cases were identified. Odds of exposure to unscreened jail populations and transfer from other prisons were calculated for case patients at 1 prison. Results. Thirty-nine case patients with early syphilis were identified from 3 prisons. Recent jail exposure (odds ratio [OR] = 8.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.3, 158.7, P = .14) and prison transfer (OR = 32.0, 95% CI = 1.6, 1668.1, P prisons included mixing of prisoners with unscreened jail populations, transfer of infected inmates between prisons, and multiple concurrent sexual partnerships. Reducing sexual transmission of disease in correctional settings is a public health priority and will require innovative prevention strategies. PMID:11499107

  10. Prevention of child injuries during tornadoes: cases from the 2011 tornado outbreak in Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christine M; Baker, Mark D; Monroe, Kathy W

    2012-12-01

    Tornadoes and violent weather pose a hazard to children, yet little is known about the use of personal protective devices during storms. An outbreak of tornadoes on April 27, 2011, resulted in the deaths of 23 children in Alabama. Records from 60 patients seen in a pediatric emergency department for tornado-related injuries were reviewed to identify the use of injury prevention devices. Three children directly exposed to a violent tornado (Enhanced Fujita Scale 4) were using safety equipment, specifically, a helmet and infant car seats. These 3 children sustained only minor injuries. Personal protective devices may have played a role in preventing child injuries from tornadoes. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the medical literature on helmet and infant car seat use as child protective devices during tornadoes.

  11. Determining Provider Needs for Respite Training, Results of an Alabama Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F. Geiger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Alabama Lifespan Respite Resource Network™ enhances respite services for family caregivers. University evaluators conducted a statewide assessment of respite providers using multiple formats. The purpose was to determine met and unmet needs for respite training among providers serving family caregivers of individuals with disabilities and chronic illnesses. A total of 317 respite providers attempted and 191 completed survey items, revealing respite experience, disabilities and chronic illnesses, areas of difficulty, prior training and confidence, training needs and preferences. Results will be used by a state Network to match content and delivery of training to providers’ needs. Respite providers have important roles to play, sharing information about respite services and providers, advocating for caregiver eligibility to receive services, and participating in training paid and volunteer providers.

  12. Greater use of wood residue fuels through improved financial planning: a case study in Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billings, C.D.; Ziemke, M.C. (Alabama Univ., Huntsville, AL (United States). Coll. of Administrative Science); Stanford, R. (Alabama Dept. of Economic and Community Affairs, Montgomery, AL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    As the world reacts to environmental concerns relating to fossil energy usage, emphasis is again placed on greater use of renewable fuels such as wood residues. Realistically, however, decisions to utilize such fuels are based on economic factors, rather than desires to improve US energy independence and/or protect the environment. Because Alabama has a large forest products industry, state authorities have long sought to assist potential users of wood residue fuels to better use biomass fuels instead of the usual alternative: natural gas. State agency experience in promoting commercial and industrial use of wood residue fuels has shown that inadequate financial planning has often resulted in rejection of viable projects or acceptance of non-optimum projects. This paper discusses the reasons for this situation and suggests remedies for its improvement. (author)

  13. Freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in the headwaters of Chipola River, Houston County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, J.T.; McGregor, S.W.; Tarpley, T.A.; Buntin, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Big and Cowarts creeks lie in extreme southeastern Alabama and form the headwaters of Chipola River. Qualitative and quantitative sampling for freshwater mussels in these reaches during 2006 and 2007 revealed an intact fauna, relative to historical reports. A cumulative total of 17 species, including federally protected Elliptio chipolaensis (Chipola Slabshell), Lampsilis subangulata (Shinyrayed Pocketbook), Medionidus penicillatus (Gulf Moccasinshell), and Pleurobema pyriforme (Oval Pigtoe), was encountered. A total of 3382 mussels (density 5.84 per m2) was estimated for one 65-m reach of Big Creek and 9627 mussels (density 8.09 per m2) were estimated to occur in one 170-m reach of Cowarts Creek. Tributaries had depauperate faunas, apparently due to substrate instability.

  14. Analysis of seafloor change around Dauphin Island, Alabama, 1987–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocks, James G.; DeWitt, Nancy T.; Stalk, Chelsea A.

    2017-09-26

    Dauphin Island is a 26-km-long barrier island located southwest of Mobile Bay, Alabama, in the north-central Gulf of Mexico. The island contains sandy beaches, dunes, maritime forests, freshwater ponds and intertidal wetlands, providing habitat for many endangered and threatened species. Dauphin Island also provides protection for and maintains estuarine conditions within Mississippi Sound, supporting oyster habitat and seagrasses. Wetland marshes along the Alabama mainland are protected by the island from wave-induced erosion during storms approaching from the Gulf of Mexico. Over the years, the island has been eroded by storms, most recently by Hurricane Ivan (2004) and Hurricane Katrina (2005) (Ivan/Katrina), which breached the island along its narrowest extent and caused damage to infrastructure. Along with storms producing significant episodic change, long-term beach erosion has exposed numerous pine tree stumps in the shoreface. The stumps are remnants of past maritime forests and reflect the consistent landward retreat of the island.Island change has prompted the State of Alabama to evaluate restoration alternatives to increase island resilience and sustainability by protecting and preserving the natural habitat, and by understanding the processes that influence shoreline change. Under a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, restoration alternatives are being developed that will allow the State to make decisions on engineering and ecological restoration designs based on scientific analysis of likely outcomes and tradeoffs between impacts to stakeholder interests. Science-based assessment of the coastal zone requires accurate and up-to-date baseline data to provide a valid image of present conditions and to support modeling of coastal processes. Bathymetric elevation measurements are essential to this requirement. In August 2015, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Geological Survey conducted single beam and multibeam bathymetric

  15. Experiences Accessing Abortion Care in Alabama among Women Traveling for Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kari; deMartelly, Victoria; Grossman, Daniel; Turan, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    In Alabama, more than one-half of reproductive-aged women live in counties without an abortion provider. State regulations require in-person counseling (or confirmed receipt of materials sent by certified mail) followed by a 48-hour waiting period. We explored the impact of this service and policy environment on experiences accessing abortion care for women traveling long distances to clinics. We conducted in-depth interviews with 25 women who traveled more than 30 miles to an Alabama clinic providing abortion care between July and September 2014. Women were interviewed by telephone at least 1 day after their consultation, procedure, or follow-up visit. We used content analysis methods to code and analyze interview transcripts. Almost all women found a clinic by searching online or talking to others in their social networks who had abortions. These strategies did not always direct women to the closest clinic, and some described searches that yielded inaccurate information. The majority of women did not believe an in-person consultation visit was necessary and found it to be burdensome because of the extra travel required and long waits at the clinic. Two-thirds of the women were unable to schedule their abortion 48 hours later owing to work schedules or because appointments were offered only once a week, and four women were delayed until their second trimester even though they sought services earlier in pregnancy. It is often difficult for women in communities without an abortion provider to find and access timely abortion care. Efforts are needed to make abortion more accessible and prevent further restrictions on services. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Competing risks and the development of adaptive management plans for water resources: Field reconnaissance investigation of risks to fishes and other aquatic biota exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (edcs) in lake mead, Nevada USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, G.; Little, E.E.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis and characterization of competing risks for water resources rely on a wide spectrum of tools to evaluate hazards and risks associated with their management. For example, waters of the lower Colorado River stored in reservoirs such as Lake Mead present a wide range of competing risks related to water quantity and water quality. These risks are often interdependent and complicated by competing uses of source waters for sustaining biological resources and for supporting a range of agricultural, municipal, recreational, and industrial uses. USGS is currently conducting a series of interdisciplinary case-studies on water quality of Lake Mead and its source waters. In this case-study we examine selected constituents potentially entering the Lake Mead system, particularly endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Worldwide, a number of environmental EDCs have been identified that affect reproduction, development, and adaptive behaviors in a wide range of organisms. Many EDCs are minimally affected by current treatment technologies and occur in treated sewage effluents. Several EDCs have been detected in Lake Mead, and several substances have been identified that are of concern because of potential impacts to the aquatic biota, including the sport fishery of Lake Mead and endangered razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus) that occur in the Colorado River system. For example, altered biomarkers relevant to reproduction and thyroid function in fishes have been observed and may be predictive of impaired metabolism and development. Few studies, however, have addressed whether such EDC-induced responses observed in the field have an ecologically significant effect on the reproductive success of fishes. To identify potential linkages between EDCs and species of management concern, the risk analysis and characterization in this reconnaissance study focused on effects (and attendant uncertainties) that might be expressed by exposed populations. In addition, risk reduction

  17. Policy and innovation: Nanoenergy technology in the USA and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Na; Guan, JianCheng

    2016-01-01

    The USA is a leading country while China is an up-and-coming one in nanotechnology. We carried out a cross-country comparative study on policy and innovation of the two countries in subset nanoenergy field. They both created favorable policy environments for nanotechnology involving applications of nanotechnology in the energy sector. However, Chinese policy deployments for nanotechnology lack coordinated arrangements and effective assessment mechanisms. China performs better than the USA in technological quantity, but weaker in technological influence. The USA expresses an industry-oriented model in nanoenergy technological research and development, but China exhibits a university-and-institute-oriented model. Interorganizational collaboration relationships in the two countries are both still very rare and have huge development space. They both have a long way to go in converting their technological achievements into commercial products, especially China. Finally, we provide the policy implications of this study. In particular, the Chinese government should strengthen its efforts in policies by changing the national S&T evaluation system to set up the basic idea that quality is better than quantity in order to raise the original innovation motivations of innovators. - Highlights: •We compare development status of nanoenergy technologies between China and the USA. •We mainly focus on their policies, innovation performance and pattern in nanoenergy. •Differences are observed in nanoenergy technologies developed in these two countries. •We propose their endeavor directions in nanoenergy based on this study.

  18. Meteorological, biological, and hydrographic data collected from a nearshore moored buoy near Dauphin Island, Alabama from 24 Feb 2003 to 31 Dec 2013 (NODC Accession 0114998)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the the Alabama Department of Conservation, State Land Division,...

  19. Meteorological, biological, and hydrographic data collected from Meaher State Park, Alabama from 08/21/2003 - 12/31/2013 (NODC Accession 0117375)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation, State Land Division, Coastal...

  20. Meteorological, biological, and hydrographic data collected from Cedar Point Fishing Pier, Cedar Point, Alabama from 04/04/2008 - 12/31/2013 (NODC Accession 0117373)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide...

  1. Meteorological, biological, and hydrographic data collected from a nearshore moored buoy near Bon Secour, Alabama from 02/19/2010 - 12/31/2013 (NODC Accession 0117372)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with Weeks Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, the Alabama...

  2. Historical Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) Distributions from Coastal Alabama, Gulf of Mexico from 1940-01-01 to 1966-10-21 (NCEI Accession 0162477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historic black and white aerial photographs of coastal Alabama (Mobile Bay and adjacent waters) from 1940, 1955, and 1966 were digitized and georeferenced using Blue...

  3. Meteorological, biological and hydrographic data collected from Perdido Pass, Alabama from 11/7/2011 - 12/31/2013 (NODC Accession 0117377)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Baldwin County to provide...

  4. Water use in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Alabama, Florida, and Georgia, 2010, and water-use trends, 1985-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2016-02-25

    The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River Basin encompasses about 20,230 square miles in parts of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. Increasing population growth and agricultural production from the 1970s to 2010 has prompted increases in water-resources development and substantially increased water demand in the basin. Since the 1980s, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are parties to litigation concerning water management in the ACF River Basin.

  5. Ground-Water Resources of the Lower Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin in Parts of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia-Subarea 4 of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa River Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Counties, Ga . Evaluation of ground- water-development potential in the virtually untapped Intermediate system has questionable reliability due to the...Alabama, Florida, and Georgia into 4 districts: Fall Line Hills, Dougherty Plain, Tifton Upland, and Gulf Coastal Lowlands. Physiographic descriptions...approximately with the boundary between the Tifton Uplands and the Dough- erty Plain districts and the Gulf Coastal Lowlands district occupies the

  6. USA otsib Iraanist aktiivselt tuumainfot / Neeme Raud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raud, Neeme, 1969-

    2005-01-01

    Iraan avaldas protesti USA luurelendude üle Iraani kohal. USA endine kaitseminister James Baker peab Iraani ja Põhja-Koreaga nende tuumaprogrammide hävitamiseks sõja alustamist suurimaks veaks. Kuigi Bushi meeskond rõhutab vajadust lahendada küsimus rahumeelselt, toovad Dick Cheney' ja Condoleezza Rice'i avaldused mitme USA kommentaatori arvates meelde Iraagi sõja eelse taktika

  7. Eesti on USA uus lemmik / Argo Ideon

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ideon, Argo, 1966-

    2007-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilvese visiidist Washingtoni, kohtumistest USA presidendi George W. Bushi, asepresident Dick Cheney, asevälisminister John Negroponte, kaitseminister Robert M. Gates'i, USA Kongressi esindajatekoja spiikri Nancy Pelosi ja kongresmenidega. Eestil õnnestus korraldada USA pealinnas kohtumised, mille järjekorras ootab hulk palju suuremaid riike. Vabariigi President töövisiidil Ameerika Ühendriikides 25.-26.06.2007

  8. The energy situation in the Usa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This analyses discusses the energy supplying security, the natural gas demand increase and its consequences, the climatic change in the long-dated, the long dated perspectives of the Usa energy policy, the law on the energy and the consequences for the nuclear activity, the financial incentives in favor of the construction of new nuclear power plants in the Usa and the good nuclear energy industry situation in the Usa. (A.L.B.)

  9. USA NCAP - a glance at harmonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, R.M.; Park, B.T.; Beuse, N.M.; Lowrie, J.C. [National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Swanson, J.L.; Rockwell, T.E. [ACE Systems Technologies, Inc. (United States)

    2001-07-01

    This paper is separated roughly into four parts. First, the authors discuss the frontal tests of the USA New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) and then consider similarities and differences in the two different types of frontal tests worldwide. Second, the focus is placed on the side crash of the USA NCAP and comparisons are made between the results of the two different types of lateral tests worldwide. Third, the paper explains the Congressional requirements to establish a child safety rating system (in the USA) by model year 2003 and looks at the approach taken by NCAPs worldwide. Finally, the growth in requests for consumer information (in the USA) is measured. (orig.)

  10. Superfund at work: Hazardous waste cleanup efforts nationwide, fall 1992. (CIBA-GEIGY Corporation, McIntosh, Alabama)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    On March 31, 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reached an agreement with Ciba-Geigy Corporation in McIntosh, Alabama to clean up soil and ground water contaminated by DDT, herbicides, and chemicals. The agreement is one of the largest private party settlements in Superfund history, valued at approximately $120 million. EPA activities at the site included: conducting preliminary contamination investigations jointly with the Alabama Environmental Health Administration, beginning in 1979; designing a multi-phased cleanup that is responsive to the complex nature of the contamination and reduces potential risk to the local population and environment; and awarding a grant to a community group to help them participate in cleanup decisions. Ciba-Geigy, like EPA, has made consistent efforts to build and maintain good relations with the community. These efforts demonstrate the increasing trend toward cooperation between industries, local communities, and EPA at Superfund sites

  11. Reducing Tick-Borne Disease in Alabama: Linking Health Risk Perception with Spatial Analysis Using the NASA Earth Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, S.; Renneboog, N.; Firsing, S.; Capilouto, E.; Harden, J.; Hyden, R.; Tipre, M.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD) accounts for most vector-borne disease reports in the U.S., and although its existence in Alabama remains controversial, other tick-borne illnesses (TBI) such as Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness (STARI) pose a health concern in the state. Phase One of the Marshall Space Flight Center-UAB DEVELOP study of TBI identified the presence of the chain of infection for LD (Ixodes scapularis ticks carrying Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria) and STARI (Amblyomma americanum ticks and an as-yet-unconfirmed agent) in Alabama. Both LD and STARI are associated with the development of erythema migrans rashes around an infected tick bite, and while treatable with oral antibiotics, a review of educational resources available to state residents revealed low levels of prevention information. To improve prevention, recognition, and treatment of TBI in Alabama, Phase Two builds a health communication campaign based on vector habitat mapping and risk perception assessment. NASA Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) satellite imagery identified likely tick habitats using remotely sensed measurements of vegetation vigor (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and soil moisture. Likely tick habitats, identified as those containing both high vegetation density and soil moisture, included Oak Mountain State Park, Bankhead National Forest, and Talladega National Forest. To target a high-risk group -- outdoor recreation program participants at Alabama universities -- the study developed a behavior survey instrument based on existing studies of LD risk factors and theoretical constructs from the Social Ecological Model and Health Belief Model. The survey instrument was amended to include geographic variables in the assessment of TBI knowledge, attitudes, and prevention behaviors, and the vector habitat model will be expanded to incorporate additional environmental variables and in situ data. Remotely sensed environmental data combined with

  12. Program in Functional Genomics of Autoimmunity and Immunology of yhe University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan M Kaplan

    2012-10-12

    This grant will be used to augment the equipment infrastructure and core support at the University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama particularly in the areas of genomics/informatics, molecular analysis and cell separation. In addition, we will promote collaborative research interactions through scientific workshops and exchange of scientists, as well as joint exploration of the role of immune receptors as targets in autoimmunity and host defense, innate and adaptive immune responses, and mucosal immunity in host defense.

  13. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Stephen J; Ebersole, Jun A; Dickinson, William C; Ciampaglio, Charles N

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole.

  14. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2 in Colbert County, Alabama, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Jacquemin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P. leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL. Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole.

  15. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen J. Jacquemin; Jun A. Ebersole; William C. Dickinson; Charles N. Ciampaglio

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (?10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) lead...

  16. Green electricity - experiences from USA; Groen el - erfarenheter fraan USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graens, N

    1995-10-01

    Environmental concern has opened a market for electric power produced from renewable energy sources in USA. A number of American electric utilities have responded to the interest from the public and offered green electricity at a price somewhat above the normal rates. Most of these programs, that have existed for a few years, have succeeded quite well, giving the utilities better relations to their customers and experiences from marketing new products. The customers have been satisfied and shown enthusiasm for the new product. The present report reviews the attitudes to and drive behind green electricity from/relative to utilities, customers, environmental organizations and authorities. The programs and experiences of the utilities are described, and the prospects for green power on a deregulated market are discussed. Speculations about market responses to green power in Sweden are also made. 37 refs, 13 figs

  17. Area Health Education Center (AHEC) programs for rural and underrepresented minority students in the Alabama Black Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashruta; Knox, Regina J; Logan, Alicia; Summerville, Katie

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluated the implementation West Central Alabama Area Health Education Center programs for high school students in grades 9-12 through participant-reported evaluations and feedback during the  September 1st, 2013 to August 31st, 2014 fiscal year. The programs targeted racial/ethnic minorities and/or rural individuals interested in pursuing a career as a healthcare provider in medically underserved counties of Alabama. Students participated in enrichment activities related to prospective health careers that included: successful college preparedness, knowledge about health careers, and the types of primary care health professions that are needed in underserved Alabama communities. The curriculum studied 593 (ACT preparation: n  = 172, AHEC 101: n  = 56, FAFSA: n  = 109, Health Career Exploration: n  = 159, College Career Readiness: n  = 67, Dixie Scholars NERD: n  = 30) baseline measures for the programs to evaluate effectiveness when rated by participants both quantitatively and qualitatively. Interactive activities with video incorporation, hands-on experiences, and group discussions paired with student motivation and interest in specific health career-related activities provided the highest program ratings. It is important to use a variety of successful program strategies when forming healthcare workforce development interventions. Student evaluations can help adapt methods for future program implementation to ultimately achieve strategies for health professional recruitment, training, and retention in areas that lack access to quality healthcare.

  18. Race, class loyalty and the structure of capitalism: Coal miners in Alabama and the Transvaal, 1918-1922

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, P. [Rand Afrikaans University, Auckland Park (South Africa). Dept. of Sociology

    2004-03-15

    Focusing on two major coal-industry strikes, one in Alabama (1920-1921) and one in the Transvaal (1922), this article seeks to understand why the former was biracial and the latter only involved white employees. The contrast is interesting because of its wider significance within the US and South Africa, and because of resemblances between the two cases. In Alabama, blacks and whites undertook similar work and there were cultural commonalities as well as divides, but in the Transvaal the economic and social gulf was so great that, for practical purposes, there were two working classes. In Alabama, most black miners and most white miners were free and settled, and came from similar rural areas. In the Transvaal, whilst blacks were coerced and migrated between subsistence societies and the collieries, whites were free and settled, and mostly had proletarian backgrounds. In South Africa, the regular supply of 'cheap' black labour - upon which the economy depended - was maintained by institutions created or supported by the state. It is argued, finally, that whilst the possibility of interracialism was rooted in the outcome of the Civil War, the institutionalisation of a dual working class was a product of imperialist victory in the South African War.

  19. Spatial Analysis of Environmental Factors Related to Lyme Disease in Alabama by Means of NASA Earth Observation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renneboog, Nathan; Capilouto, Emily G.; Firsing, Stephen L., III; Levy, Kyle; McAllister, Marilyn; Roa, Kathryn; Setia,Shveta; Xie, Lili; Burnett, Donna; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the epidemiology of Lyme Disease that accounts for more than 95% or vector borne diseases in the United States. The history, symptoms and the life cycle of the tick, the transmitting agent of Lyme Disease, a map that shows the cases reported to the CDC between1990 and 2006 and the number of cases in Alabama by year from 1986 to 2007. A NASA project is described, the goals of which are to (1) Demonstrate the presence of the chain of infection of Lyme disease in Alabama (2) Identify areas with environmental factors that support tick population using NASA Earth Observation Systems data in selected areas of Alabama and (3) Increase community awareness of Lyme disease and recommend primary and secondary prevention strategies. The remote sensing methods included: Analyzed Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and DigitalGlobe Quickbird satellite imagery from summer months and Performed image analyses in ER Mapper 7.1. Views from the ASTER and Quickbird land cover are shown, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) algorithm was applied to all ASTER and Quickbird imagery. The use of the images to obtain the level of soil moisture is reviewed, and this analysis was used along with the NDVI, was used to identify the areas that support the tick population.

  20. 77 FR 6587 - Startek USA, Inc. Alexandria, LA; Startek USA, Inc., Collinsville, VA; Amended Certification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-75,089; TA-W-75,089A] Startek USA, Inc. Alexandria, LA; Startek USA, Inc., Collinsville, VA; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility... for Worker Adjustment Assistance on January 26, 2011, applicable to workers of StarTek USA, Inc...

  1. Ground-water quality beneath an urban residential and commercial area, Montgomery, Alabama, 1999-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James L.

    2002-01-01

    The Black Warrior River aquifer, which is composed of the Coker, Gordo, and Eutaw Formations, supplies more than 50 percent of the ground water used for public water supply in the Mobile River Basin. The city of Montgomery, Alabama, is partially built upon a recharge area for the Black Warrior River aquifer, and is one of many major population centers that depend on the Black Warrior River aquifer for public water supply. To represent the baseline ground-water quality in the Black Warrior River aquifer, water samples were collected from 30 wells located in a low-density residential or rural setting; 9 wells were completed in the Coker Formation, 9 wells in the Gordo Formation, and 12 wells in the Eutaw Formation. To describe the ground-water quality beneath Montgomery, Alabama, water samples also were collected from 30 wells located in residential and commercial areas of Montgomery, Alabama; 16 wells were completed in the Eutaw Formation, 8 wells in alluvial deposits, and 6 wells in terrace deposits. The alluvial and terrace deposits directly overlie the Eutaw Formation with little or no hydraulic separation. Ground-water samples collected from both the rural and urban wells were analyzed for physical properties, major ions, nutrients, metals, volatile organic compounds, and pesticides. Samples from the urban wells also were analyzed for bacteria, chlorofluorocarbons, dissolved gases, and sulfur hexafluoride. Ground-water quality beneath the urban area was compared to baseline water quality in the Black Warrior River aquifer.Compared to the rural wells, ground-water samples from urban wells contained greater concentrations or more frequent detections of chloride and nitrate, and the trace metals aluminium, chromium, cobalt, copper, nickel, and zinc. Pesticides and volatile organic compounds were detected more frequently and in greater concentrations in ground-water samples collected from urban wells than in ground-water samples from rural wells.The Spearman rho

  2. Knowledge and management of sports concussions among coaches and certified athletic trainers in Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftel, Kimberly G; Yust, Elizabeth M; Nichols, Michele H; King, William D; Davis, Drew

    2014-07-01

    To identify modifiable barriers in resources, knowledge, and management that may improve the care of young athletes with concussions in the state of Alabama. An electronic survey was distributed to 2668 middle and high school coaches of contact sports in Alabama, and a paper survey was completed by 79 certified athletic trainers (ATCs) in 2010. Questions focused on their resource availability, knowledge of concussions based on the 2008 Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport: the 3rd International Conference on Concussion in Sport (commonly known as the Zurich consensus statement), and management of concussions. A total of 402 (16% response rate) coaches and 55 ATCs (70% response rate) responded to the survey. This study highlights that ATC coverage often is limited to the high school level, football, and competitions. Both coaches and ATCs primarily use physicians to make return-to-play decisions, although coaches (43.7%) usually refer to primary care physicians, whereas ATCs (43.6%) refer to orthopedic or sports medicine physicians. The study also revealed that coaches and ATCs desire education and could expand concussion awareness by providing education to parents and athletes. No overall difference was seen in the knowledge and management of concussions between coaches and ATCs; however, ATCs were more likely to identify symptoms that are positive for concussions (P = 0.04). Both groups had difficulty recognizing subtle symptoms such as trouble sleeping, personality changes, and dizziness; they also were unaware that strenuous mental activities could delay concussion recovery, although ATCs scored significantly better than coaches (P < 0.001). Neither coaches nor ATCs consistently use standardized measures such as the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (7.5% vs 56.4%) or neuropsychological testing (5.3% vs 14.5%). This study describes coaches' and ATCs' varying knowledge and management techniques and highlights areas in which targeted interventions and

  3. USA tankid jõudsid Tapale

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2017-01-01

    Tapale saabus poolsada USA sõjamasinat, nende seas neli tanki Abrams M1A2 ja 15 jalaväe lahingumasinat Bradley. Tehnikat hakkab kasutama USA maaväe 4. jalaväediviisi 68. soomusrügemendi esimese pataljoni C-kompanii

  4. USA allveelaev uputas kalalaeva / Heiki Suurkask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Suurkask, Heiki, 1972-

    2001-01-01

    Hawaii lähistel õppustel kiiret pinnaletõusu harjutanud USA allveelaev USS Greeneville põrkas kokku Jaapani õppelaevaga Ehime Maru, õnnetuse tagajärjel hukkus tõenäoliselt 9 jaapanlast. Skeem: Õnnetused USA allveelaevadega

  5. Poola ootab USA maaväelasi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2014-01-01

    Poola kaitseministri Tomasz Siemoniaki sõnul saadab USA Poolasse maavägesid, et laeindada NATO kohalolekut ajal, mil pingeline olukord Ukrainas kestab, kirjutas Washington Post. Siemoniak ütles lehele, et sõjalised planeerijad juba töötavad vastava kava üksikasjade kallal. Ta lisas, et tõenäoliselt saadetakse USA sõdureid ka Baltimaadesse

  6. Krossil on probleeme USA viisaga? / Raimo Poom

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Poom, Raimo

    2011-01-01

    Eesti Päevaleht esitas USA Eesti-saatkonnale järelepärimise seoses sellega, et Eerik-Niiles Krossi USA-viisa on tühistatud. Saatkonna pressi- ja kultuuriatašee James Landi vastusest. Eerik-Niiles Krossi kommentaare

  7. Bulgaaria valitsus tahab USA raketikilpi / Mihkel Niglas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Niglas, Mihkel

    2007-01-01

    Bulgaarias küsiti USA presidendilt George W. Bushilt, miks Poolasse ja Tšehhi kavandatav raketikilp ei hakka katma Bulgaariat. USA paigutab septembris Bulgaaria sõjabaasi üle 3000 sõduri. George W. Bush toetab Bulgaaria nõudmist Liibüale vabastada Bulgaaria meditsiiniõed

  8. Etteheide: USA okupeerib Haitit / Kaivo Kopli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kopli, Kaivo

    2010-01-01

    Prantsusmaa ja Brasiilia on esitanud protesti, sest USA sõjalennukitele on antud eelisõigus Haiti pealinna Port-au-Prince'i lennujaama kasutamisel. Paljude kommentaatorite hinnangul on Prantsusmaa püüdnud haarata prominentset rolli Haiti abistamisel, kuid USA on tegutsenud kiiremini ja jõulisemalt. Kaart

  9. USA raport hoiatab tuumaterroristide eest / Karin Volmer

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Volmer, Karin

    2007-01-01

    USA-s tegutseva tuumaterrori vastase organisatsiooni Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) raport kinnitab maailma edusamme tuumamaterjali turvalisuses, kuid on ka palju ohuallikaid. Analüütikud kahtlevad Venemaa ja Pakistani armee usaldusväärsuses tuumamaterjali hoidmisel. Lisa: Tuumaterrori raport

  10. USA's litterære superstjerne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Thomas Ærvold

    2010-01-01

    Jonathan Franzen er den mest omtalte forfatter i USA lige nu og ombejlet af alle fra Time Magazine til Oprah Winfrey. Hvad er det, han kan, manden bag ”Freedom”?......Jonathan Franzen er den mest omtalte forfatter i USA lige nu og ombejlet af alle fra Time Magazine til Oprah Winfrey. Hvad er det, han kan, manden bag ”Freedom”?...

  11. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2003-01-01

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and

  12. Ideaalne torm USA majanduses / Ken Goldstein ; interv. Neeme Raud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Goldstein, Ken

    2008-01-01

    USA majandusuuringute organisatsiooni The Conference Board analüütik USA majanduse olukorrast, mõjust maailmamajandusele, arenguvõimalustest ning uue presidendi vajalikest sammudest majanduses. Lisa: Enamuse arvates on USA valel teel

  13. Design and construction of solidification and dewatering facility at Alabama Power Company's Farley Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, P.

    1988-01-01

    The approximate total cost of the structure and supporting piping systems is estimated to be 4.1 million dollars. Total dose savings per year could be as high as 70 man Rem for resin processing alone. The ability to store refueling equipment, process contaminated oils, load and unload trucks and containers regardless of weather conditions and support repair work on equipment greatly enhances the cost effectiveness of the project. It will take at least one year of operation of the facility to accurately assess the true cost savings to Alabama Power Company. The morale factor for the Waste and Decon Group has escalated measurably due to the dose reduction to our personnel. Plant and company management are well pleased due to the possibility of a spill or release to the environment has been eliminated which was on intangible cost. Facility construction has been completed as of this date and resin transfer anticipated within the next few days. Some of the problems encountered in planning and constructing this solidification and dewatering facility are presented. A safety evaluation for the facility is included in the appendix

  14. Analysis of Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data for classification of forest stands in Baldwin County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    A computer-implemented classification has been derived from Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data acquired over Baldwin County, Alabama on January 15, 1983. One set of spectral signatures was developed from the data by utilizing a 3x3 pixel sliding window approach. An analysis of the classification produced from this technique identified forested areas. Additional information regarding only the forested areas. Additional information regarding only the forested areas was extracted by employing a pixel-by-pixel signature development program which derived spectral statistics only for pixels within the forested land covers. The spectral statistics from both approaches were integrated and the data classified. This classification was evaluated by comparing the spectral classes produced from the data against corresponding ground verification polygons. This iterative data analysis technique resulted in an overall classification accuracy of 88.4 percent correct for slash pine, young pine, loblolly pine, natural pine, and mixed hardwood-pine. An accuracy assessment matrix has been produced for the classification.

  15. Closeout Report: Experimental High Energy Physics Group at the University of South Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Charles M; Godang, Romulus

    2013-06-25

    The High Energy Physics group at the University of South Alabama has been supported by this research grant (DE-FG02-96ER40970) since 1996. One researcher, Dr. Merrill Jenkins, has been supported on this grant during this time worked on fixed target experiments at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, west of Chicago, Illinois. These experiments have been E-705, E-771, E-871 (HyperCP) and E-921 (CKM) before it was canceled for budgetary reasons. After the cancellation of CKM, Dr. Jenkins joined the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment as an associate member via the High Energy Physics Group at the Florida State University. A second, recently tenured faculty member, Dr. Romulus Godang joined the group in 2009 and has been supported by this grant since then. Dr. Godang is working on the BaBaR experiment at SLAC and has joined the Belle-II experiment located in Japan at KEK. According to the instructions sent to us by our grant monitor, we are to concentrate on the activities over the last three years in this closeout report.

  16. Annual report for the High Energy Physics Program at The University of Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baksay, L.; Busenitz, J.K.

    1993-10-01

    The High Energy Physics group at University of Alabama is a member of the L3 collaboration studying e + e - collisions near the Z degree pole at the LEP accelerator at CERN. About 2 million Z degree events have been accumulated and the experiment has been prolific in publishing results on the Z resonance parameters, the Z couplings to all leptons and quarks with mass less than half the Z mass, searches for new particles and interactions, and studies of strong interactions and/or weak charged current decays of quarks and leptons abundantly produced in Z decays. They are contributing to data analysis as well as to detector hardware. In particular, they are involved in a major hardware upgrade for the experiment, namely the design, construction and commissioning of a Silicon Microvertex Detector (SMD) which has successfully been installed for operation during the present grant period. A report is presented on their recent L3 activities and their plans for the next grant period of twelve months (April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995). Their main interests in data analysis are in the study of single photon final states and the physics made more accessible by the SMD, such as heavy flavor physics. Their hardware efforts continue to be concentrated on the high precision capacitive and optical alignment monitoring systems for the SMD and also includes gas monitoring for the muon system. They are also planning to participate in the coming upgrade of the L3 detector

  17. [High Energy Physics Program at the University of Alabama. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baksay, L.; Busenitz, J.K.

    1993-10-01

    The High Energy Physics group at University of Alabama is a member of the L3 collaboration studying e+e- collisions near the Z degree pole at the LEP accelerator at CERN. About 2 million Z degree events have been accumulated and the experiment has been prolific in publishing results on the Z resonance parameters, the Z couplings to all leptons and quarks with mass less than half the Z mass, searches for new particles and interactions, and studies of strong interactions and/or weak charged current decays of the quarks and leptons abundantly produced in Z decays. The group is contributing to data analysis as well as to detector hardware. In particular, the authors are involved in a major hardware upgrade for the experiment, namely the design, construction and commissioning of a Silicon Microvertex Detector (SMD) which has successfully been installed for operation during the present grant period. The authors present here a report on their recent L3 activities and their plans for the next grant period of twelve months (April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995). Their main interests in data analysis are in the study of single photon final states and the physics made more accessible by the SMD, such as heavy flavor physics. Their hardware efforts continue to be concentrated on the high precision capacitive and optical alignment monitoring systems for the SMD and also includes gas monitoring for the muon system. They are also planning to participate in the coming upgrade of the L3 detector

  18. Chester (Mississippian) ostracodes from Bangor Formation of Black Warrior basin, northern Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devery, H.; Dewey, C.

    1986-05-01

    A previously unreported ostracode fauna is described from the Bangor Limestone in Franklin, Lawrence, and Colbert Counties, Alabama. The Bangor formation is a Chesterian (Mississippian) platformal carbonate sequence. The predominant carbonates are bioclastic and oolitic grainstones to wackestones with less abundant micritic claystones. Intercalated fine clastics are common in the upper and lower parts of the sequence. This study focuses on the bioclastic limestones with interbedded shales of the lower Bangor. The megafaunal associations include crinoid and blastoid pelmatozoans, orthotetid, and spiriferid brachiopids, and both fenestrate and nonfenestrate bryozoans. Solitary rugose corals and trilobites may be locally abundant. Gastropods and bivalves form a consistent but accessory part of the fauna, which indicates a shallow, nearshore shelf environment. A diverse ostracode fauna of variable abundance has been collected from the shaly units and friable limestones. The ostracode fauna indicates shallow, open-marine conditions and is dominated by bairdiaceans, including Bairdia spp. Rectobairdia and Bairdiacypris. Several species of Cavellina, healdia, and Seminolites are also abundant. Palaeocopids present include Coryellina, Kirkbya, and Polytylites. Kloedenellaceans include Beyrichiopsis, Glyptopleura, Glypotpleurina, and .Hypotetragona. Paraparchitaceans are notably more scarce, but specimens of Shishaella have been found. Some sample have a high valve to carapace ratio, suggesting postmortem transport. Although diversity is high, numerical abundances can be low. Initial studies suggest the ostracodes have a Mid-Continent affinity, which may indicate that the Appalachians were acting as a barrier to migration of European forms.

  19. Statistically significant faunal differences among Middle Ordovician age, Chickamauga Group bryozoan bioherms, central Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Middle Ordovician age Chickamauga Group carbonates crop out along the Birmingham and Murphrees Valley anticlines in central Alabama. The macrofossil contents on exposed surfaces of seven bioherms have been counted to determine their various paleontologic characteristics. Twelve groups of organisms are present in these bioherms. Dominant organisms include bryozoans, algae, brachiopods, sponges, pelmatozoans, stromatoporoids and corals. Minor accessory fauna include predators, scavengers and grazers such as gastropods, ostracods, trilobites, cephalopods and pelecypods. Vertical and horizontal niche zonation has been detected for some of the bioherm dwelling fauna. No one bioherm of those studied exhibits all 12 groups of organisms; rather, individual bioherms display various subsets of the total diversity. Statistical treatment (G-test) of the diversity data indicates a lack of statistical homogeneity of the bioherms, both within and between localities. Between-locality population heterogeneity can be ascribed to differences in biologic responses to such gross environmental factors as water depth and clarity, and energy levels. At any one locality, gross aspects of the paleoenvironments are assumed to have been more uniform. Significant differences among bioherms at any one locality may have resulted from patchy distribution of species populations, differential preservation and other factors.

  20. Aerial radiological survey of the Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant and surrounding area, Dothan, Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, T.C.; Shipman, G.R.

    1982-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed during the period 8 to 19 December 1979 over a 2000 square kilometer area centered on the two unit Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant near Dothan, Alabama. Radiological data were collected by flying north-south lines spaced 900 meters apart at an altitude of 150 meters above ground level. Processed data showed that all gamma rays detected within the survey area were those expected from naturally occurring radionuclides. Count rates obtained from the aerial platform were converted to exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground and are presented in the form of a radiation contour map. The observed exposure rates were between 4 and 12 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), with most of the area ranging between 4 and 10 μR/h. These values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 4.0 μR/h but do not include any contribution from airborne radionuclides, i.e., radon. Exposure rates obtained from ground measurements taken within the survey area were in close agreement with the aerial data. The data were also in close agreement with those obtained from a similar survey conducted during March 1977. Comparison of the results from both surveys indicated that no detectable change in the radiological characteristics of the survey area has occurred due to the operation of unit number 1 during the intervening period. The same equipment and procedures were utilized for both surveys

  1. Northern Alabama colonies of the endangered grey bat Myotis grisescens: Organochlorine contamination and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.R.; Bagley, F.M.; Johnson, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    From 1976 to 1986, dead and dying grey bats Myotis grisescens and grey bat guano were collected from caves along the Tennessee River in northern Alabama to determine the possible role of organochlorine chemicals.sbd.in particular wastes from a former DDT manufacturing plant near Huntsville.sbd.in the mortalities. Concentrations of chemical residues in brains were less than known lethal levels: certain observations and analyses did indicate the possibility of past organochlorine-induced bat deaths. Levels of contaminants in bats declined slowly during the 10-year sampling period, but heavy residue burdens persist. The high ratio of DDD to DDE in residue from the former DDT plant made them identifiable as far as 140 km downriver. Grey bats concentrated chemical rsidues to higher levels and demonstrated the presence of these residues over much greater distances than did red-winged blackbirds Agelaius phoeniceus. Grey bats may be the most sensitive indicator available for monitoring the contamination from this former DDT manufacturing site.

  2. Estimate of Alabama argillacea (Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae development with nonlinear models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Medeiros

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate which nonlinear model [Davidson (1942, 1944, Stinner et al. (1974, Sharpe & DeMichele (1977, and Lactin et al. (1995] best describes the relationship between developmental rates of the different instars and stages of Alabama argillacea (Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, and temperature. A. argillacea larvae were fed with cotton leaves (Gossypium hirsutum L., race latifolium Hutch., cultivar CNPA 7H at constant temperatures of 20, 23, 25, 28, 30, 33, and 35ºC; relative humidity of 60 ± 10%; and photoperiod of 14:10 L:D. Low R² values obtained with Davidson (0.0001 to 0.1179 and Stinner et al. (0.0099 to 0.8296 models indicated a poor fit of their data for A. argillacea. However, high R² values of Sharpe & DeMichele (0.9677 to 0.9997 and Lactin et al. (0.9684 to 0.9997 models indicated a better fit for estimating A. argillacea development.

  3. Characterization of Dredged Oyster Shell Deposits at Mobile Bay, Alabama Using Geophysical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C. Nwokebuihe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for disposing materials dredged from ship channels is a common problem in bays and lagoons. This study is aimed at investigating the suitability of scour features produced by dredging oyster shell deposits in Mobile Bay, Alabama, to dispose excavated channel material. A study area approximately 740 by 280 m lying about 5 km east of Gaillard Island was surveyed using underwater electrical resistivity tomography (UWERT and continuous electrical resistivity profiling (CERP tools. The geophysical survey was conducted with the intent to map scour features created by oyster shell dredging activities in the bay between 1947 and 1982. The geoelectrical surveys show that oyster beds are characterized by high resistivity values greater than 1.1 ohm.m while infilled dredge cuts show lower resistivity, generally from 0.6 to 1.1 ohm.m. The difference in resistivity mainly reflects the lithology and the consolidation of the shallow sediments: consolidated silty clay and sandy sediments rich in oyster shell deposits (with less clay content overlying unconsolidated clayey materials infilling the scours. Results show that most of the infilled dredge cuts are mostly distributed in the north-south direction. Considering that the scours are generally up to 6 m deep across the survey location, it is estimated that about 0.8 million cubic meters of oyster shells and overlying strata were dredged from the survey location.

  4. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Alabama. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  5. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Three. Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Alabama governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  6. Diachronous ranges of benthonic Foraminifera in the Eocene of Alabama and South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willard, G.D.; Fallaw, W.C.; Snipes, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    Seventeen species of benthonic Foraminifera reported by Bandy (1949) from the Eocene of Little Stave Creek in Clarke County, Alabama were identified from the middle eocene Santee Limestone and the upper Eocene Dry Branch Formation in Aiken and Barnwell counties, South Carolina. Of the 17 species, seven occurred in South Carolina stratigraphically above or below the ranges listed by Bandy. Bandy made a detailed study of Foraminifera from the Claibornian and Jacksonian Tallahatta, Lisbon, Gosport, Moodys Branch, and Yazoo formations exposed on Little Stave Creek and plotted the stratigraphic ranges within the section of numerous species. The authors' samples came from well cores at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Of 13 species from the middle Eocene Santee and also reported by Bandy, four are stratigraphically below the lowest occurrence listed by Bandy, and one is stratigraphically above the highest occurrence. Of four species from the upper Eocene Dry Branch Formation and also listed by Bandy, two are stratigraphically above his highest occurrence. Dockery and Nystrom (1992) and Campbell (1993) have described diachroneity among mollusks in the Eocene of South Carolina. Caution should be used in relying on a small number of species in correlating Eocene deposits in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains

  7. Examing the Validity of the Adapted Alabama Parenting Questionnaire Parent Global Report Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguin, Eugene; Nochajski, Thomas; Dewit, David; Safyer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to comprehensively examine the validity of an adapted version of the parent global report form of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ) with respect to its factor structure, relationships with demographic and response style covariates, and differential item functioning (DIF). The APQ was adapted by omitting the Corporal Punishment and the other discipline items. The sample consisted of 674 Canadian and United States families having a 9–12 year old child and at least one parent-figure who had received treatment within the past five years for alcohol problems or met criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence. The primary parent in each family completed the APQ. The four factor CFA model of the four published scales used and the three factor CFA model of those scales from prior research were rejected. Exploratory structural equation modeling was then used. The final three factor model combined the author-defined Involvement and Positive Parenting scales and retained the original Poor Monitoring/Supervision and Inconsistent Discipline scales. However, there were substantial numbers of moderate magnitude cross-loadings and large magnitude residual covariances. Differential item functioning (DIF) was observed for a number of APQ items. Controlling for DIF, response style and demographic variables were related significantly to the factors. PMID:26348028

  8. Examining the validity of the adapted Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Parent Global Report Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguin, Eugene; Nochajski, Thomas H; De Wit, David J; Safyer, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to comprehensively examine the validity of an adapted version of the parent global report form of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ) with respect to its factor structure, relationships with demographic and response style covariates, and differential item functioning (DIF). The APQ was adapted by omitting the corporal punishment and the other discipline items. The sample consisted of 674 Canadian and United States families having a 9- to 12-year-old child and at least 1 parent figure who had received treatment within the past 5 years for alcohol problems or met criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence. The primary parent in each family completed the APQ. The 4-factor CFA model of the 4 published scales used and the 3-factor CFA model of those scales from prior research were rejected. Exploratory structural equation modeling was then used. The final 3-factor model combined the author-defined Involvement and Positive Parenting scales and retained the original Poor Monitoring/Supervision and Inconsistent Discipline scales. However, there were substantial numbers of moderate magnitude cross-loadings and large magnitude residual covariances. Differential item functioning (DIF) was observed for a number of APQ items. Controlling for DIF, response style and demographic variables were related significantly to the factors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Estimates of the Lightning NOx Profile in the Vicinity of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William J.; Peterson, Harold S.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Blazar, Arastoo

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to August 2006 North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) data to estimate the (unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical source profile of lightning nitrogen oxides, NOx = NO + NO2. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (Trademark) (NLDN) is also employed. This is part of a larger effort aimed at building a more realistic lightning NOx emissions inventory for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Overall, special attention is given to several important lightning variables including: the frequency and geographical distribution of lightning in the vicinity of the NALMA network, lightning type (ground or cloud flash), lightning channel length, channel altitude, channel peak current, and the number of strokes per flash. Laboratory spark chamber results from the literature are used to convert 1-meter channel segments (that are located at a particular known altitude; i.e., air density) to NOx concentration. The resulting lightning NOx source profiles are discussed.

  10. Nuclear chemistry and Radiochemistry in the USA; Kern- und Radiochemie in den USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Div.; Stoyer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry are very young sciences which developed at an extremely brisk pace within a very short period of time after the discovery of nuclear fission in 1938, and caused profound societal changes. In the United States, nuclear chemistry developed very differently from Germany, where nuclear research initially had been banned after the Second World War. The prime mover in the development in the United States was the Manhattan Project, the construction of the atomic bomb. The counteract the impending shortage of qualified personnel, important institutions have begun to establish training and support programs in the field. The National Laboratories in the United States introduced a National Security Internship Program, while the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tries to promote cooperation, and thus the training of personnel, by launching programs of its own. Yet, a greater shortage of qualified personnel is becoming apparent. The situation of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry in the United States can be summarized in the finding that research at the National Laboratories is very wide ranging. It receives sufficient funds from the DOE. However, the National Laboratories show a very high proportion of elderly personnel, a problem which will have to be corrected in the years to come. This may be helped by the Summer Schools financed by the DOE, though a summer school of six weeks cannot replace a sound training in nuclear chemistry of the kind still to be found in Germany. (orig.) [German] Kern- und Radiochemie sind sehr junge Wissenschaften, die sich nach der Entdeckung der Kernspaltung 1938 innerhalb kuerzester Zeit extrem rasant entwickelt und tiefe gesellschaftliche Veraenderungen bewirkt haben. In den USA hat sich die Kernchemie sehr unterschiedlich im Vergleich zu Deutschland entwickelt, wo die Kernforschung nach dem 2. Weltkrieg vorerst verboten war. Massgeblich in den USA war dabei das Manhatten-Projekt zum Bau von Nuklearwaffen

  11. Citronelle Dome: A giant opportunity for multizone carbon storage and enhanced oil recovery in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, R.A.; Pashin, J.C.; Walsh, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Citronelle Dome is a giant, salt-cored anticline in the eastern Mississippi Interior Salt Basin of southern Alabama that is located near several large-scale, stationary, carbon-emitting sources in the greater Mobile area. The dome forms an elliptical, four-way structural closure containing opportunities for CO2-enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) and large-capacity saline reservoir CO2 sequestration. The Citronelle oil field, located on the crest of the dome, has produced more than 169 million bbl of 42-46?? API gravity oil from sandstone bodies in the Lower Cretaceous Rodessa Formation. The top seal for the oil accumulation is a thick succession of shale and anhydrite, and the reservoir is underfilled such that oil-water contacts are typically elevated 30-60 m (100-200 ft) above the structural spill point. Approximately 31-34% of the original oil in place has been recovered by primary and secondary methods, and CO2-EOR has the potential to increase reserves by up to 20%. Structural contour maps of the dome demonstrate that the area of structural closure increases upward in section. Sandstone units providing prospective carbon sinks include the Massive and Pilot sands of the lower Tuscaloosa Group, as well as several sandstone units in the upper Tuscaloosa Group and the Eutaw Formation. Many of these sandstone units are characterized by high porosity and permeability with low heterogeneity. The Tuscaloosa-Eutaw interval is capped by up to 610 m (2000 ft) of chalk and marine shale that are proven reservoir seals in nearby oil fields. Therefore, the Citronelle Dome can be considered a major geologic sink where CO2 can be safely stored while realizing the economic benefits associated with CO2-EOR. Copyright ?? 2008. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  12. THEORETICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL CONCEPTS OF PHILOLOGICAL EDUCATION IN THE USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Bidyuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and methodical foundations of higher philological education in the USA have been considered. Modern trends in the development of philology as a scientific field and a direction of professional training in the USA have been found out. Sociocultural peculiarities of philological education in the USA have been revealed. The essence of transformation processes in the philologists’ training at present time has been considered. They are: diversity and flexibility of educational programs; close relationship of higher education and linguistic communities; «major-minor» specialization; using of innovative forms and methods; reducing stress and increasing classroom time for independent students’ work; providing free access to education; improving elective education system; academic students’ mobility; implementing of «expert systems» into the quality of educational outcomes; creating conditions for ethnic minorities education. The transformation of the philological education system at conceptual, legal and normative, organizational and pedagogical, content-based, institutional and sociocultural levels has been analyzed. It has been found out that the content of the training provides for the integration of social and humanitarian, linguistic, literature-based, translational components of learning outcomes directed at forming a competent philologist-researcher, philologist-translator/interpreter, philologist-literary scholar, thus a highly moral, cultured personality. Key competencies of a philologist (linguistic, literature-based, translational, cross-cultural, information, research have been singled out and characterized. Special attention has been paid to the problem of providing quality philological education; in particular, the criteria and their indicators have been singled out. Perspectives for further researches on the problem of philological education in the USA have been outlined.

  13. Atomic power development in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggin, E.

    1976-01-01

    Many problems concerning the atomic power development in USA are investigated and discussed. (Introduction of fast breeder reactors is not considered in this paper). The first problem is the raising of capital for plant construction. The second problem is the supply of uranium. Estimated amount of yellow cake and its price are presented and compared with estimated demands. It is concluded that 3.5x10 6 tons of yellow coke is sufficient for generating 7x10 8 KW of electric power up to about 2000. The third problem is the enrichment service. Balance of supply and demand is discussed together with the projected extension of existing plants and the construction of new plants. The completion of nuclear fuel cycle is discussed as the fourth problem. According to the author's opinion, technological problems of reprocessing, storing, waste disposal, and the utilization of mixed oxide fuel are not difficult to solve. Definite judgement of NRC and ERDA is strongly required. The last problem discussed in this paper is the public acceptance. The movements of anti-nuclear groups and the opinion of general public are analyzed and the role of AIF in presenting paper informations is discussed. (Aoki, K.)

  14. Obchodní politika USA

    OpenAIRE

    Vaculíková, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Práce se zabývá nástroji a cíli obchodní politiky USA - aktivitami, které liberalizují celosvětový obchod. V první části je popsáno postavení Spojených států amerických v mnohostranném obchodním systému a vývoj zahraničního obchodu v posledních letech. Druhá kapitola je zaměřena na autonomní a smluvní nástroje obchodní politiky ovlivňující import, export a domácí výrobu. O obchodních dohodách uzavřených na mnohostranné, regionální a dvoustranné úrovni pojednává třetí kapitola....

  15. Licensing reform in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The licensing process for nuclear power plants in the USA is currently in two distinct stages: the issuance of a construction permit followed later by the issuance of an operation license. The ''two-step'' process has come under heavy criticism from the U.S. nuclear industry on the grounds that it causes uncertainty and delays and therefore inhibits new commitments to nuclear power plants. In 1989 the NRC published new regulations for the licensing of nuclear power plants which provide for the issuance of early site permits, safety certifications of standard designs, and combined construction permits and operating licences. The new rule was challenged by intervenors representing antinuclear groups who filed a legal challenge seeking to have the rule set aside on the grounds that it violates the Atomic Energy Act which they allege makes two-step licensing mandatory. In November 1990 the US Court of Appeals upheld the NRC's authority to issue combined licenses. An appeal for a rehearing has been filed. The paper analyses the events and the possible consequences of an adverse court decision. It reviews the options open to the NRC and industry if the court decision is upheld. The possibility of congressional action to amend the Atomic Energy Act is discussed. (author)

  16. by shale gas producers in USA and Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Galimska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is analysis and comparison of the standards used for preparation of financial statementsby enterprises looking for and extracting shale gas in Poland and in the USA. The author reviewsthe different accounting regulations underlying financial reporting of companies operating in this field.Nowadays, globalization and constant development of financial markets cause intensified expectations ofshareholders regarding the attributes of financial statements. The author points out the high level of specializationand comprehensiveness of American regulations. In contrast, international accounting standardsaddress only the initial phase of the process of alternative hydrocarbons extraction, which results ina lack of financial reports’ consistency and decline of investors’ interest.

  17. Targeted initiatives. Support for nuclear engineering education in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutteridge, John

    2001-01-01

    Recruitment and education of a new generation of nuclear engineers stands to benefit in the USA from a range of programmes involving governmental bodies, universities, and industry groups. They are part of efforts to attract more students to consider and prepare for careers in the nuclear industry, and to provide financial support for nuclear research and education. Career prospects in the nuclear field are brightening. The demand for nuclear engineers and nuclear trained personnel is on the rise as the new century opens. During the past year several studies were completed in an attempt to ascertain the problems in nuclear engineering education and define initiatives to address these problems

  18. A Review of Land-Cover Mapping Activities in Coastal Alabama and Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.

    2010-01-01

    -based land-use classifications. Aerial photography is typically selected for smaller landscapes (watershed-basin scale), for greater definition of the land-use categories, and for increased spatial resolution. Disadvantages of using photography include time-consuming digitization, high costs for imagery collection, and lack of seasonal data. Recently, the availability of high-resolution satellite imagery has generated a new category of LULC data product. These new datasets have similar strengths to the aerial-photo-based LULC in that they possess the potential for refined definition of land-use categories and increased spatial resolution but also have the benefit of satellite-based classifications, such as repeatability for change analysis. LULC classification based on high-resolution satellite imagery is still in the early stages of development but merits greater attention because environmental-monitoring and landscape-modeling programs rely heavily on LULC data. This publication summarizes land-use and land-cover mapping activities for Alabama and Mississippi coastal areas within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project boundaries. Existing LULC datasets will be described, as well as imagery data sources and ancillary data that may provide ground-truth or satellite training data for a forthcoming land-cover classification. Finally, potential areas for a high-resolution land-cover classification in the Alabama-Mississippi region will be identified.

  19. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

    2007-12-01

    This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOE’s high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies – steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

  20. Urbanization effects on stream habitat characteristics in Boston, Massachusetts; Birmingham, Alabama; and Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, T.M.; Giddings, E.M.P.; Zappia, H.; Coles, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Relations between stream habitat and urban land-use intensity were examined in 90 stream reaches located in or near the metropolitan areas of Salt Lake City, Utah (SLC); Birmingham, Alabama (BIR); and Boston, Massachusetts (BOS). Urban intensity was based on a multi-metric index (urban intensity index or UII) that included measures of land cover, socioeconomic organization, and urban infrastructure. Twenty-eight physical variables describing channel morphology, hydraulic properties, and streambed conditions were examined. None of the habitat variables was significantly correlated with urbanization intensity in all three study areas. Urbanization effects on stream habitat were less apparent for streams in SLC and BIR, owing to the strong influence of basin slope (SLC) and drought conditions (BIR) on local flow regimes. Streamflow in the BOS study area was not unduly influenced by similar conditions of climate and physiography, and habitat conditions in these streams were more responsive to urbanization. Urbanization in BOS contributed to higher discharge, channel deepening, and increased loading of fine-grained particles to stream channels. The modifying influence of basin slope and climate on hydrology of streams in SLC and BIR limited our ability to effectively compare habitat responses among different urban settings and identify common responses that might be of interest to restoration or water management programs. Successful application of land-use models such as the UII to compare urbanization effects on stream habitat in different environmental settings must account for inherent differences in natural and anthropogenic factors affecting stream hydrology and geomorphology. The challenge to future management of urban development is to further quantify these differences by building upon existing models, and ultimately develop a broader understanding of urbanization effects on aquatic ecosystems. ?? 2005 by the American Fisheries Society.

  1. The unionid (Bivalvia) fauna of the Sipsey River in northwestern Alabama, an aquatic hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, W. Henry; Williams, James D.; McGregor, Stuart W.; Pierson, J. Malcom; Lydeard, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Recent surveys for unionid bivalves were conducted in the mainstem of the Sipsey River and headwater tributaries (Tombigbee River drainage) during the summer and autumn of 1996-1999. A total of 35 species and 22 genera were found. Museum records from the upper Sipsey, based largely on the efforts of H. H. Smith during 1910-11, raised the total number of recorded unionids in the Sipsey to 42. Smith documented 25 species in the river; however, most of his collections were made in the mid- to upper-Sipsey, which has lower diversity. The three most common recently observed species in descending order of abundance were Quadrula asperata (I. Lea, 1861), Pleurobema decisum (I. Lea, 1831), and Tritogonia verrucosa (Rafinesque, 1820). Federally listed species observed recently include Lampsilis perovalis (Conrad, 1834) (threatened), Medionidus acutissimus (I. Lea, 1831) (threatened), P. decisum (endangered), P. perovatum (Conrad, 1834) (endangered), and Potamilus inflatus (I. Lea, 1831) (threatened). Species not observed recently but recorded in prior surveys include Anodontoides radiatus (Conrad, 1834), Arcidens confragosus (Say, 1829), Plectomerus dombeyanus (Valenciennes, 1827), Q. metanevra (Rafinesque, 1820), Q. stapes (I. Lea, 1831) (federally endangered), P. taitianum (I. Lea, 1834) (federally endangered), and Toxolasma parvus (Barnes, 1823). Many, species are known recently or historically by only five or fewer recorded specimens including: A. radiatus, Elliptio arctata (Conrad, 1834), Ligumia recta (Lamarck, 1819), P. taitianum, P. inflatus, Q. aspera (Lea, 1831), Q. metanevra, Q. stapes, T. parvus, Truncilla donaciformis (I. Lea, 1828), Uniomerus tetralasmus (Say, 1831), Utterbackia imbecillis (Say, 1829), A. confragosus, and P. dombeyanus. Unlike the mussel fauna of most Alabama streams, that of the Sipsey River is still relatively intact in terms of species richness despite impacts from mining, silvicultural, and agricultural activities. A concerted effort

  2. Associations between perceptions of drinking water service delivery and measured drinking water quality in rural Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedgworth, Jessica C; Brown, Joe; Johnson, Pauline; Olson, Julie B; Elliott, Mark; Forehand, Rick; Stauber, Christine E

    2014-07-18

    Although small, rural water supplies may present elevated microbial risks to consumers in some settings, characterizing exposures through representative point-of-consumption sampling is logistically challenging. In order to evaluate the usefulness of consumer self-reported data in predicting measured water quality and risk factors for contamination, we compared matched consumer interview data with point-of-survey, household water quality and pressure data for 910 households served by 14 small water systems in rural Alabama. Participating households completed one survey that included detailed feedback on two key areas of water service conditions: delivery conditions (intermittent service and low water pressure) and general aesthetic characteristics (taste, odor and color), providing five condition values. Microbial water samples were taken at the point-of-use (from kitchen faucets) and as-delivered from the distribution network (from outside flame-sterilized taps, if available), where pressure was also measured. Water samples were analyzed for free and total chlorine, pH, turbidity, and presence of total coliforms and Escherichia coli. Of the 910 households surveyed, 35% of participants reported experiencing low water pressure, 15% reported intermittent service, and almost 20% reported aesthetic problems (taste, odor or color). Consumer-reported low pressure was associated with lower gauge-measured pressure at taps. While total coliforms (TC) were detected in 17% of outside tap samples and 12% of samples from kitchen faucets, no reported water service conditions or aesthetic characteristics were associated with presence of TC. We conclude that consumer-reported data were of limited utility in predicting potential microbial risks associated with small water supplies in this setting, although consumer feedback on low pressure-a risk factor for contamination-may be relatively reliable and therefore useful in future monitoring efforts.

  3. Associations between Perceptions of Drinking Water Service Delivery and Measured Drinking Water Quality in Rural Alabama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica C. Wedgworth

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Although small, rural water supplies may present elevated microbial risks to consumers in some settings, characterizing exposures through representative point-of-consumption sampling is logistically challenging. In order to evaluate the usefulness of consumer self-reported data in predicting measured water quality and risk factors for contamination, we compared matched consumer interview data with point-of-survey, household water quality and pressure data for 910 households served by 14 small water systems in rural Alabama. Participating households completed one survey that included detailed feedback on two key areas of water service conditions: delivery conditions (intermittent service and low water pressure and general aesthetic characteristics (taste, odor and color, providing five condition values. Microbial water samples were taken at the point-of-use (from kitchen faucets and as-delivered from the distribution network (from outside flame-sterilized taps, if available, where pressure was also measured. Water samples were analyzed for free and total chlorine, pH, turbidity, and presence of total coliforms and Escherichia coli. Of the 910 households surveyed, 35% of participants reported experiencing low water pressure, 15% reported intermittent service, and almost 20% reported aesthetic problems (taste, odor or color. Consumer-reported low pressure was associated with lower gauge-measured pressure at taps. While total coliforms (TC were detected in 17% of outside tap samples and 12% of samples from kitchen faucets, no reported water service conditions or aesthetic characteristics were associated with presence of TC. We conclude that consumer-reported data were of limited utility in predicting potential microbial risks associated with small water supplies in this setting, although consumer feedback on low pressure—a risk factor for contamination—may be relatively reliable and therefore useful in future monitoring efforts.

  4. Associations between Perceptions of Drinking Water Service Delivery and Measured Drinking Water Quality in Rural Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedgworth, Jessica C.; Brown, Joe; Johnson, Pauline; Olson, Julie B.; Elliott, Mark; Forehand, Rick; Stauber, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Although small, rural water supplies may present elevated microbial risks to consumers in some settings, characterizing exposures through representative point-of-consumption sampling is logistically challenging. In order to evaluate the usefulness of consumer self-reported data in predicting measured water quality and risk factors for contamination, we compared matched consumer interview data with point-of-survey, household water quality and pressure data for 910 households served by 14 small water systems in rural Alabama. Participating households completed one survey that included detailed feedback on two key areas of water service conditions: delivery conditions (intermittent service and low water pressure) and general aesthetic characteristics (taste, odor and color), providing five condition values. Microbial water samples were taken at the point-of-use (from kitchen faucets) and as-delivered from the distribution network (from outside flame-sterilized taps, if available), where pressure was also measured. Water samples were analyzed for free and total chlorine, pH, turbidity, and presence of total coliforms and Escherichia coli. Of the 910 households surveyed, 35% of participants reported experiencing low water pressure, 15% reported intermittent service, and almost 20% reported aesthetic problems (taste, odor or color). Consumer-reported low pressure was associated with lower gauge-measured pressure at taps. While total coliforms (TC) were detected in 17% of outside tap samples and 12% of samples from kitchen faucets, no reported water service conditions or aesthetic characteristics were associated with presence of TC. We conclude that consumer-reported data were of limited utility in predicting potential microbial risks associated with small water supplies in this setting, although consumer feedback on low pressure—a risk factor for contamination—may be relatively reliable and therefore useful in future monitoring efforts. PMID:25046635

  5. Historical bathymetry and bathymetric change in the Mississippi-Alabama coastal region, 1847-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buster, Noreen A.; Morton, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Land loss and seafloor change around the Mississippi and Alabama (MS-AL) barrier islands are of great concern to the public and to local, state, and federal agencies. The islands provide wildlife protected areas and recreational land, and they serve as a natural first line of defense for the mainland against storm activity (index map on poster). Principal physical conditions that drive morphological seafloor and coastal change in this area include decreased sediment supply, sea-level rise, storms, and human activities (Otvos, 1970; Byrnes and others, 1991; Morton and others, 2004; Morton, 2008). Seafloor responses to the same processes can also affect the entire coastal zone. Sediment eroded from the barrier islands is entrained in the littoral system, where it is redistributed by alongshore currents. Wave and current activity is partially controlled by the profile of the seafloor, and this interdependency along with natural and anthropogenic influences has significant effects on nearshore environments. When a coastal system is altered by human activity such as dredging, as is the case of the MS-AL coastal region, the natural state and processes are altered, and alongshore sediment transport can be disrupted. As a result of deeply dredged channels, adjacent island migration is blocked, nearshore environments downdrift in the littoral system become sediment starved, and sedimentation around the channels is modified. Sediment deposition and erosion are reflected through seafloor evolution. In a rapidly changing coastal environment, understanding historically where and why changes are occurring is essential. To better assess the comprehensive dynamics of the MS-AL coastal zone, a 160-year evaluation of the bathymetry and bathymetric change of the region was conducted.

  6. Endise USA vastuluuraja naasmine / Priit Pullerits

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pullerits, Priit, 1965-

    2008-01-01

    USA poliitikateaduste professorist Christopher L. Kukest, kes käesoleval õppeaastal töötab Fulbright Scholar programmi stipendiaadina Tartu Ülikoolis. Lisa: CV. Kommenteerib Tartu Ülikooli riigiteaduste instituudi doktorant Mihkel Solvak

  7. Skandaal USAs : Obamat kujutati islamiterroristina / Aadu Hiietamm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hiietamm, Aadu, 1954-

    2008-01-01

    The New Yorkeri esiküljel ilmus karikatuur, kus USA demokraatide presidendikandidaati Barack Obamat ja tema abikaasat Michelle'i kujutati islamiterroristidena, karikaturisti väitel joonistas ta selle Obama laimajate naeruvääristamiseks

  8. Ilves kritiseeris USA juhtidega Venemaad / Dagne Hanschmidt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hanschmidt, Dagne

    2008-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Postimees : na russkom jazõke 21. apr. lk. 4. President Toomas Hendrik Ilves kohtus töövisiidil Ameerika Ühendriikidesse USA asepresidendi Dick Cheney ja riigisekretär Condoleezza Rice'iga. Arutusel olid Euroopa Liidu suhted Venemaaga, Venemaa käitumine Gruusiaga, NATO viimase tippkohtumise tulemused. USA välisminister C. Rice avaldas Eesti presidendile tänu Eesti silmapaistva panuse eest Afganistanis. Kohtumisi kommenteerivad Riigikogu Euroopa Liidu asjade komisjoni esimees Marko Mihkelson ja Riigikogu väliskomisjoni esimees Sven Mikser. Vt. samas: Euroliit andis USA viisavabadusele rohelise tee. Euroopa Liidu sise- ja justiitsministrite kohtumisel kiideti heaks otsused, mis võimaldavad Eestil liituda USA viisavabadusprogrammiga. Vabariigi President töövisiidil Ameerika Ühendriikides 17.-23.04.2008

  9. LHV soovib USA-s kohtuvälist kokkulepet / Toivo Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tänavsuu, Toivo

    2005-01-01

    Kohtuväline kokkulepe LHV ja USA väärtpaberituru järelevalveasutuse SEC vahel tähendaks külmutatud väärtpaberikontode avamist, ent tõenäoliselt ka seda, et LHV peab maksma trahvi. Kohtuistungil USA-s esindavad LHV töötajaid Kristjan Lepikut ja Oliver Peeki advokaadid. Lisa: Teisedki on "sundpuhkusel"

  10. Change Detection Analysis in Urban and Suburban Areas Using Landsat Thematic Mapper data: Case of Huntsville, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Dana; Fahsi, A.; Steinfeld S.; Coleman, T.

    1998-01-01

    Two Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, from July 1984 and July 1992, were used to identify land use/cover changes in the urban and suburban fringe of the city of Huntsville, Alabama. Image difference was the technique used to quantify the change between the two dates. The eight-year period showed a 16% change, mainly from agricultural lands to urban areas generated by the settlement of industrial, commercial, and residential areas. Visual analysis of the change map (i.e., difference image) supported this phenomenon by showing that most changes were occurring in the vicinity of the major roads and highways across the city.

  11. USA võtab hoogu maha / Tarvo Vaarmets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaarmets, Tarvo

    2010-01-01

    Pärast riiklike soodustuste lõppu koduostjatele on USA-s vähenenud kinnisvara soetamine, jaemüüjate käive langes juunis võrreldes maiga 0,5%. USA keskpanga presidendi Ben Bernanke hinnangul on USA majandus ebatavaliselt ebamäärane

  12. Quo vadis, USA dollar? : finantsturgude viimastest arengutest / Robert Liljequist

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Liljequist, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Swedbank AB Soome strateegiajuht vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad USA majandust alanud aastal, dollari n.-ö turvalise valuuta staatuse kaotamise ohtu, võlakirjade ostmise vähendamist ja selle mõju USA dollarile, Euroopa Keskpanga poliitika mõju euro ja USA dollari suhtele. Swebanki prognoos USA dollari kohta

  13. USA tahab Iraagilt täispuutumatust / Kaivo Kopli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kopli, Kaivo

    2008-01-01

    USA ja Iraagi läbirääkimised USA vägede staatuse üle venivad, USA soovib oma sõduritele täielikku immuniteeti. Iraak olevat nõus nende USA üksuste immuniteediga, kes on sõjalistes rajatistes või missioonil, milles on varem kokku lepitud

  14. Lahingustress ajab USA sõdurid jooma / Neeme Raud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raud, Neeme, 1969-

    2007-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Postimees : na russkom jazõke, 15. märts 2007, lk. 10. USA kaitseministeeriumi siseuurimuse kohaselt kasvas alkoholi kuritarvitamine tegevteenistuses olevate USA sõjaväelaste seas aastatel 2002-2005 enam kui 30%. Alkoholi ja uimastite tarvitamisest Iraagis ja Afganistanis teenivate USA sõdurite hulgas. Vt. samas: USA relvajõududes puhkes uus homoskandaal

  15. USA suursaadik : hirmud on alistanud lootuse / Toomas Sildam

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sildam, Toomas, 1961-

    2004-01-01

    Eestist lahkuv USA suursaadik Joseph de Thomas andis USA iseseisvuspäeva kõnes hinnangu Eesti toetusele Iraagis ja USA Iraagi-poliitikale. Parlamendiliige Eiki Berg USA suursaadiku kõnest. Vt. ka: Suursaadiku sõnum lk. 10

  16. Physical protection of plutonium in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaseda, Noboru

    1974-01-01

    The present situation of nuclear substance protection in USA is introduced for reference sake. The protection regulation has been revised since 1973 as follows: the protection plan once approved by AEC shall not be modified without the prior approval by AEC; AEC shall inspect the execution of the approved protection plan by measuring and testing nuclear substances and related equipments, and by checking the records of retention, use and transportation of nuclear substances; in the event of finding some imperfection, those concerned with the facilities shall improve the imperfection, and shall report the results to AEC: in the event of danger of theft or obstruction, report shall be made to AEC, and AEC shall contact with FBI, custom bureau, coast guard or CIA according to the matter. The requisites of AEC are briefly described. For atomic power plants, AEC has not prescribed requirements, but regulates by tentative system. In transportation, the protection requirements of AEC are applied to the cases of 2 kg or more Pu and 5 kg or more U-235 in 20% or more enriched U, and the regulations for road, rail, sea and air transport are prescribed separately. AEC has published a regulation guide concerning ten fields, e.g. power reactor, research reactor, fuel processing facility and environment. Although AEC has strengthened the protection system, several documents have been published and aroused argument, which forced AEC to examine them. Two documents are introduced. One is ''Profiles - the curve of binding energy'' published in the ''New Yorker'' in 1973, and the other is ''Nuclear theft: risks and safeguards'', published in 1974. AEC staff evaluation report, GESMO report and others are outlined. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Field Evaluation of Advances in Energy-Efficiency Practices for Manufactured Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Dentz, J. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, E. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Barker, G. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Rath, P. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Dadia, D. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Through field-testing and analysis, this project evaluated whole-building approaches and estimated the relative contributions of select technologies toward reducing energy use related to space conditioning in new manufactured homes. Three lab houses of varying designs were built and tested side-by-side under controlled conditions in Russellville, Alabama. The tests provided a valuable indicator of how changes in the construction of manufactured homes can contribute to significant reductions in energy use.

  18. Introduction to in situ leaching technique and facility at Smith Ranch uranium project in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lechang; Wang Delin; Sun Xianrong; Gao Shangxiong

    2005-01-01

    The history of in situ leaching of uranium in USA is reviewed. Some techniques and parameters of alkaline in situ leach at Smith Ranch uranium project are introduced, including well field, sorption, elution, precipitation, filter and drying, automatic control, radiation protection, safety and environmental protection. (authors)

  19. Termite and fungal resistance of in situ polymerized tributyltin acrylate and acetylated Indonesian and USA wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Yusuf Sudo Hadi; Dodi Nandika; Sulaeman Yusuf; Yuliati Indrayani

    2000-01-01

    Wood [Indonesian pine (IP), Indonesian Jabon (IJ) and USA southern yellow pine (USP)] was either in situ polymerized with tributyltin acrylate (TBTA) or acetylated and then exposed to termite and fungal degradation both in laboratory tests and field exposure. The TBTA woods had an average weight percent gain (WPG) of 11% for IP, 12% for IJ, and 10% for USP. The...

  20. Enhanced Gravitational Drainage of Crude Oil Through Alabama Beach Sand Caused by the Dispersant Corexit 9500A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffy, D. A.; Nichols, A.; Hobbs, K.

    2017-12-01

    Oil spill material released by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon accident contaminated a majority of the 60 miles of Alabama coastline. In response to the oil spill, BP sprayed a dispersant, Corexit 9500A, as an initial remediation effort. An unforeseen impact of the saltwater-dispersant mixture includes the mobilization of oil-spilled material into the underlying beach sand. This study investigated the effect of the dispersant to promote gravitational drainage by measuring the physical characteristics of the sand, saltwater, crude oil, and the dispersant solution. The saltwater-dispersant mixture promoted the downward movement of oil mass 20 times greater extent than just saltwater. These tests are meant to simulate spill material on the beach being exposed to a low-energy, 1-meter mixed tide occurring along the Alabama coastline. A separate test simulated oilwet sand exposed to saltwater and a saltwater-dispersant mixture. The oil-wet sand impeded the vertical movement of saltwater, but allowed a saltwater-dispersant solution to mobilize the oil to migrate downward. The mobilization of oil in this three phase system of saltwater, oil, and air is controlled by: the pressure-saturation profile of the sand; interfacial tension with saltwater; and its surface tension with air.

  1. Voices from inside the elementary classroom: Three teachers' perspectives on the Alabama Reading Initiative and elementary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Brenda Hainley

    The influences of mandates, particularly the Alabama Reading Initiative (ARI) as the response to No Child Left Behind (2002), on elementary science education in Alabama were investigated. Teachers' voices provided insights to the status of science education in kindergarten, second grade, and third grade, and all three case participants reported negative influences of ARI on science education in their classrooms. The multiple case study, framed by critical theory and critical pedagogy, indicated that these teachers sometimes accepted marginalized roles in determining curriculum and pedagogy yet at other times made the decisions to empower themselves and negotiate or discard mandates in favor of meeting their children's learning needs or their own professional needs as they perceived them to be. Whether the case participants reached a threshold of resisting mandates or not, they struggled with the view of the political hierarchy that continues to force them into the status of being a technician rather than being a teaching professional. NCLB currently mandates standardized science testing, beginning in the spring of 2008. Historically, standardized testing reduces learning to low-level recall and teaching to rigid, uncreative, uncritical strategies. All of this intersects with science education reform and a national call for more attention to be given to science, technology, and mathematics learning. Research should track the continued influences of intersecting mandates on science education at every level.

  2. Thermal maturity patterns in Pennsylvanian coal-bearing rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania: Chapter F.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Hower, James C.; Grady, William C.; Levine, Jeffrey R.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal maturation patterns of Pennsylvanian strata in the Appalachian basin and part of the Black Warrior basin were determined by compiling previously published and unpublished percent-vitrinite-reflectance (%R0) measurements and preparing isograd maps on the basis of the measurements. The isograd values range from 0.6 %R0 in Ohio and the western side of the Eastern Kentucky coal field to 5.5 %R0 in the Southern field in the Pennsylvania Anthracite region, Schuylkill County, Pa. The vitrinite-reflectance values correspond to the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) coal-rank classes of high-volatile C bituminous to meta-anthracite, respectively. In general, the isograds show that thermal maturity patterns of Pennsylvanian coals within the Appalachian basin generally decrease from east to west. In the Black Warrior basin of Alabama, the isograds show a circular pattern with the highest values (greater than 1.6 %R0) centered in Jefferson County, Ala. Most of the observed patterns can be explained by variations in the depth of burial, variations in geothermal gradient, or a combination of both; however, there are at least four areas of higher ranking coal in the Appalachian basin that are difficult to explain by these two processes alone: (1) a set of west- to northwest-trending salients centered in Somerset, Cambria, and Fayette Counties, Pa.; (2) an elliptically shaped, northeast-trending area centered in southern West Virginia and western Virginia; (3) the Pennsylvania Anthracite region in eastern Pennsylvania; and (4) the eastern part of the Black Warrior coal field in Alabama. The areas of high-ranking coal in southwestern Pennsylvania, the Black Warrior coal field, and the Pennsylvania Anthracite region are interpreted here to represent areas of higher paleo-heat flow related to syntectonic movement of hot fluids towards the foreland associated with Alleghanian deformation. In addition to the higher heat flow from these fluids, the Pennsylvania

  3. Outcomes Associated With Early Preventive Dental Care Among Medicaid-Enrolled Children in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrisey, Michael A.; Sen, Bisakha

    2017-01-01

    Importance There is a recommendation for children to have a dental home by 6 months of age, but there is limited evidence supporting the effectiveness of early preventive dental care or whether primary care providers (PCPs) can deliver it. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of preventive dental care in reducing caries-related treatment visits among Medicaid enrollees. Design, Setting, and Participants High-dimensional propensity scores were used to address selection bias for a retrospective cohort study of children continuously enrolled in coverage from the Alabama Medicaid Agency from birth between 2008 and 2012, adjusting for demographics, access to care, and general health service use. Exposures Children receiving preventive dental care prior to age 2 years from PCPs or dentists vs no preventive dental care. Main Outcome and Measures Two-part models estimated caries-related treatment and expenditures. Results Among 19 658 eligible children, 25.8% (n = 3658) received early preventive dental care, of whom 44% were black, 37.6% were white, and 16.3% were Hispanic. Compared with matched children without early preventive dental care, children with dentist-delivered preventive dental care more frequently had a subsequent caries-related treatment (20.6% vs 11.3%, P dental expenditures ($168 vs $87 per year, P dental care was associated with an increase in the expected number of caries-related treatment visits by 0.14 per child per year (95% CI, 0.11-0.16) and caries-related treatment expenditures by $40.77 per child per year (95% CI, $30.48-$51.07). Primary care provider–delivered preventive dental care did not significantly affect caries-related treatment use or expenditures. Conclusions and Relevance Children with early preventive care visits from dentists were more likely to have subsequent dental care, including caries-related treatment, and greater expenditures than children without preventive dental care. There was no association with subsequent

  4. EAARL Coastal Topography-Mississippi and Alabama Barrier Islands, Post-Hurricane Gustav, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C.W.; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Klipp, E.S.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Fredericks, Xan; Segura, Martha

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Mississippi and Alabama barrier islands, acquired post-Hurricane Gustav (September 2008 hurricane) on September 8, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the

  5. Transmissivity of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Bellino, Jason C.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2012-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system (FAS) covers an area of approximately 100,000 square miles in Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, Alabama, and Mississippi. Groundwater wells for water supply were first drilled in the late 1800s and by the year 2000, the FAS was the primary source of drinking water for about 10 million people. One of the methods for assessing groundwater availability is the development of regional or subregional groundwater flow models of the aquifer system that can be used to develop water budgets spatially and temporally, as well as evaluate the groundwater resource change over time. Understanding the distribution of transmissivity within the FAS is critical to the development of groundwater flow models. The map presented herein differs from previously published maps of the FAS in that it is based on interpolation of 1,487 values of transmissivity. The transmissivity values in the dataset range from 8 to 9,000,000 feet squared per day (ft2/d) with the majority of the values ranging from 10,000 to 100,000 ft2/d. The wide range in transmissivity (6 orders of magnitude) is typical of carbonate rock aquifers, which are characterized by a wide range in karstification. Commonly, the range in transmissivity is greatest in areas where groundwater flow creates conduits in facies that dissolve more readily or areas of high porosity units that have interconnected vugs, with diameters greater than 0.1 foot. These are also areas where transmissivity is largest. Additionally, first magnitude springsheds and springs are shown because in these springshed areas, the estimates of transmissivity from interpolation may underestimate the actual range in transmissivity. Also shown is an area within the Gulf Trough in Georgia where high yielding wells are unlikely to be developed in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The interpolated transmissivity ranges shown on this map reflect the geologic structure and karstified areas. Transmissivity is large in the areas where the

  6. Two apparent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variants in normal XY males: G6PD Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prchal, J T; Hall, K; Csepreghy, M; Lilly, M; Berkow, R; Scott, C W

    1988-03-01

    A six-year-old black boy who had transient hemolysis after a viral infection was found to have mildly decreased red cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity (1.25 IU/g hemoglobin). Two G6PD bands, both slightly faster than normal G6PD B, were seen on electrophoresis in both the propositus as well as in his maternal grandfather. This is an unexpected finding, since the G6PD gene is located on the long arm of the X chromosome that is subject to X-chromosome inactivation, and available evidence indicates that it is present as a single functional copy in the human genome. The obvious possibility of duplication of the X chromosome was eliminated by cytogenetic analysis with G-banding. G6PD duplication is unlikely, since peripheral blood granulocytes, platelets, and lymphocytes; cultured skin and bone marrow fibroblasts; and Epstein-Barr virus-stimulated lymphocytes yielded only a single electrophoretic band with mobility identical to the slower band seen in crude red blood cell hemolysate. Study of partially purified red blood cell hemolysate G6PD also yielded a single band with identical mobility. Kinetic studies of the enzyme in the propositus and in three generations of his family identified a unique, previously unpublished G6PD mutant that is herein designated G6PD Alabama. Red blood cells were separated by density gradient into a reticulocyte-enriched, an intermediate, and a dense, older portion. Two distinct enzyme bands were identified on electrophoresis of hemolysate from the reticulocyte-enriched portion, but not from the other two portions. It is postulated that two transcriptional products of the mutant G6PD gene exist; one with a short half-life and detectable only in young red blood cells, and another with a longer half-life present in all cells. The existence of two distinct mutant genes in the genome or a unique post-translational form of the mutant G6PD detected only in reticulocytes cannot be excluded.

  7. Analysis of professors' perceptions towards institutional redevelopment of brownfield sites in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Berkley Nathaniel, Jr.

    This study was conducted to analyze professors' perceptions on the institutional redevelopment of brownfield sites into usable greenspaces. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (2016) refers to brownfields as sites, (either facility or land) under public law § 107-118 (H.R. 2869), which are contaminated with a substance that is classified as a hazard or a pollutant. Usable greenspaces, however, are open spaces or any open piece of land that is undeveloped, has no buildings or other built structures, and is accessible to the public (EPA, 2015). Open green spaces provide recreational areas for residents and help to enhance the beauty and environmental quality of neighborhoods (EPA, 2015). In addition, in a study conducted by Dadvand et al. (2015), exposure to green space has been associated with better physical and mental health among elementary school children, and this exposure, according to Dadvand et al., could also influence cognitive development. Because of the institutional context provided in these articles and other research studies, a sequential mixed-methods study was conducted that investigated the perceptions of professors towards the redevelopment of brownfields near their campuses. This study provided demographics of forty-two college and university professors employed at two institutions in the state of Alabama, a southeastern region of the United States. Survey questions were structured to analyze qualitative data. The secondary method of analysis utilized descriptive statistics to measure the most important indicators that influences professors' perceptions. The collection of quantitative data was adapted from an instrument designed by Wernstedt, Crooks, & Hersh (2003). Findings from the study showed that professors are knowledgeable and aware of the sociological and economic challenges in low income communities where brownfields are geographically located. Pseudonyms are used for the three universities which were contacted. Findings also

  8. Quebec-USA electricity export contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labbe, J.-F.

    1993-06-01

    Electricity exports from Hydro-Quebec to utilities in the USA significantly affects the economy and environment of Quebec. These exports may be arranged under interconnection agreements to sell excess capacity and production during off-peak periods or under firm sales contracts. Hydro-Quebec exports could also replace power plants that would otherwise be needed in the USA. The economic environment for Hydro-Quebec exports to the USA is reviewed along with the regulatory environment applicable to international trade (General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, Canada-USA Free Trade Agreement, North American Free Trade Agreement), Quebec (Canadian federal and provincial law), and the USA (federal and state law). A jurisdictional analysis of power export contracts is then presented, citing examples of contracts already signed by Hydro-Quebec with utilities in New York and New England. Contract law and contract provisions are discussed, including common clauses and particular clauses. Suggestions are made for new clauses that would improve the electricity trade. 215 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  9. The Moundville Expeditions of Clarence Bloomfield Moors, edited and with an Introduction by Vernon James Knight Jr. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Givens

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The University of Alabama Press has done a valuable service to the Americanist archaeological community by reprinting certain parts of Clarence B. Moore's Moundville's work. As part of their series "Classics in Southeastern Archaeology", this volume provides the historian of Americanist archaeology yet another glimpse into the Moore's classic work at Moundville.

  10. Perceptions of Participating K-12 Educational Leaders' Experiences and Decisions Regarding the Crisis Caused by the April 27, 2011 Tornadoes in Rural Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, William E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    April 27, 2011, will be remembered by many as a catastrophic day and event in Alabama, and specifically by K-12 educational leaders. Natural disasters like tornadoes have a significant impact on leaders, on their decision making and, obviously, on the survival of many of their victims. The possibility and threat of a major crisis caused by natural…

  11. Overstory tree status following thinning and burning treatments in mixed pine-hardwood stands on the William B. Bankhead National Forest, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callie Jo Schweitzer; Yong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Prescribed burning and thinning are intermediate stand treatments whose consequences when applied in mixed pine-hardwood stands are unknown. The William B. Bankhead National Forest in northcentral Alabama has undertaken these two options to move unmanaged, 20- to 50-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations towards upland hardwood-dominated...

  12. The prevalence of food insecurity and associated factors among households with children in Head Start programs in Houston, Texas and Birmingham, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study measured food security and hunger of households enrolled in Head Start in Houston, Texas, and Birmingham, Alabama and assessed factors that could affect food security. Interviewers collected data from primary caregivers on demographic characteristics, dietary intake, and the six-item US f...

  13. Spatial analysis of the change in land cover and human well-being in the black-belt counties of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddhi R. Gyawali; Rory F. Fraser; Yong Wang; Wubishet Tadesse; James Bukenya; John Schelhas

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies at the county level have found an increase in forest cover, urbanization, and water structures in the Black Belt counties of Alabama and have documented the connection between such increase and socioeconomic development in the region. However, such findings have limited inferences as the studies did not address the variations in demographic,...

  14. Effect of culture and density on aboveground biomass allocation of 12 years old loblolly pine trees in the upper coastal plain and piedmont of Georgia and Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh Subedi; Dr. Michael Kane; Dr. Dehai Zhao; Dr. Bruce Borders; Dr. Dale Greene

    2012-01-01

    We destructively sampled a total of 192 12-year-old loblolly pine trees from four installations established by the Plantation Management Research Cooperative (PMRC) to analyze the effects of planting density and cultural intensity on tree level biomass allocation in the Piedmont and Upper Coastal Plain of Georgia and Alabama. Each installation had 12 plots, each plot...

  15. A Study of Superintendents' Power and Leadership Styles as Perceived by Local Teacher Association Representatives and Secondary School Principals in Alabama Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounders, Barbara; And Others

    The situational leadership model identifies four leadership styles--telling, selling, participating, and delegating. This paper discusses the initial findings of a study that examined the role of superintendents in Alabama. The study sought to determine if secondary school principals and local teacher-association representatives differed in their…

  16. Engineering and Environmental Study of DDT Contamination of Huntsville Spring Branch, Indian Creek, and Ajacent Lands and Waters, Wheeler Reservoir, Alabama. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-04

    27. Endangered, Threatened and Special Concern Plants Possibly Occurring on Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge ALABAMA FEDERAL SPECIES FAMILY STATUS1...SSC NL Oxalis grandis Oxalidaceae SSC NL Actaea pachypoda Ranunculaceae SSC NL Anemone caroliniana Ranunculaceae SSC NL Veronica anoacalis - agutc...River Valley base camps and seasonally dispersing into small groups of nuclear families to exploit the uplands. Later, during the Woodland period, the

  17. Cruise and Data Report of USA-PRC Joint Air-Sea Interaction Studies in the Western Pacific Ocean (NODC Accession 8700374)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The USA-PRC Joint Program on Air-Sea Interaction Studies in the Tropical Western Pacific is a component of the Protocol on Cooperation in the Field of Marine and...

  18. Nineteenth Workshop Athens, GA, USA

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, S P; Schöttler, H B; Computer Simulation Studies in Condensed-Matter Physics XIX

    2008-01-01

    This volume represents a "status report" emanating from presentations made during the 19th Annual Workshop on Computer Simulations Studies in Condensed Matter Physics at the Center for Simulational Physics at the University of Georgia in February, 2006. It provides a broad overview of the most recent advances in the field, spanning the range from equilibrium and non-equilibrium behavior in statistical physics to biological and soft condensed matter systems. Results on nanomagents and materials are included as are several descriptions of advances in methodology.

  19. Hvad SKER der med drikkevandet i USA?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsay, Loren Mark

    2017-01-01

    Forskellige lande har forskellige traditioner indenfor drikkevandsbehandling. Denne beretning fra ”Water Quality Technology Conference” i USA er set med en særlig vinkel, da forfatteren er amerikansk statsborger, men har arbejdet i den danske vandbranche i mere end 25 år.......Forskellige lande har forskellige traditioner indenfor drikkevandsbehandling. Denne beretning fra ”Water Quality Technology Conference” i USA er set med en særlig vinkel, da forfatteren er amerikansk statsborger, men har arbejdet i den danske vandbranche i mere end 25 år....

  20. Allele frequencies of hemojuvelin gene (HJV I222N and G320V missense mutations in white and African American subjects from the general Alabama population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohannon Sean B

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for coding region mutations of the hemojuvelin gene (HJV in whites is a cause of early age-of-onset iron overload (juvenile hemochromatosis, and of hemochromatosis phenotypes in some young or middle-aged adults. HJV coding region mutations have also been identified recently in African American primary iron overload and control subjects. Primary iron overload unexplained by typical hemochromatosis-associated HFE genotypes is common in white and black adults in Alabama, and HJV I222N and G320V were detected in a white Alabama juvenile hemochromatosis index patient. Thus, we estimated the frequency of the HJV missense mutations I222N and G320V in adult whites and African Americans from Alabama general population convenience samples. Methods We evaluated the genomic DNA of 241 Alabama white and 124 African American adults who reported no history of hemochromatosis or iron overload to detect HJV missense mutations I222N and G320V using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. Analysis for HJV I222N was performed in 240 whites and 124 African Americans. Analysis for HJV G320V was performed in 241 whites and 118 African Americans. Results One of 240 white control subjects was heterozygous for HJV I222N; she was also heterozygous for HFE C282Y, but had normal serum iron measures and bone marrow iron stores. HJV I222N was not detected in 124 African American subjects. HJV G320V was not detected in 241 white or 118 African American subjects. Conclusions HJV I222N and G320V are probably uncommon causes or modifiers of primary iron overload in adult whites and African Americans in Alabama. Double heterozygosity for HJV I222N and HFE C282Y may not promote increased iron absorption.

  1. "Riia ring, "luurepost ja tööjaotus USA esindustest Baltikumis 1920. aastatel / Eero Medijainen""

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Medijainen, Eero, 1959-

    2012-01-01

    Diplomaatilisest taustast. USA esinduste rajamisest Baltikumi. Olukorrast USA saatkonnas 1922. aastal. USA sõjalisest vaatlejast "Balti provintsides" 1919-1922. Luurekeskusest ja Sergius Riisist. "Vene sektsiooni" formaliseeerumisest.

  2. Estimation of sediment inflows to Lake Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 2009-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.G.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Tuscaloosa, evaluated the concentrations, loads, and yields of suspended sediment in the tributaries to Lake Tuscaloosa in west-central Alabama, from October 1, 2008, to January 31, 2012. The collection and analysis of these data will facilitate the comparison with historical data, serve as a baseline for future sediment-collection efforts, and help to identify areas of concern. Lake Tuscaloosa, at the reservoir dam, receives runoff from a drainage area of 423 square miles (mi2). Basinwide in 2006, forested land was the primary land cover (68 percent). Comparison of historical imagery with the National Land Cover Database (2001 and 2006) indicated that the greatest temporal land-use change was timber harvest. The land cover in 2006 was indicative of this change, with shrub/scrub land (12 percent) being the secondary land use in the basin. Agricultural land use (10 percent) was represented predominantly by hay and pasture or grasslands. Urban land use was minimal, accounting for 4 percent of the entire basin. The remaining 6 percent of the basin has a land use of open water or wetlands. Storm and monthly suspended-sediment samples were collected from seven tributaries to Lake Tuscaloosa: North River, Turkey Creek, Binion Creek, Pole Bridge Creek, Tierce Creek, Carroll Creek, and Brush Creek. Suspended-sediment concentrations and streamflow measurements were statistically analyzed to estimate annual suspended-sediment loads and yields from each of these contributing watersheds. Estimated annual suspended-sediment yields in 2009 were 360, 540, and 840 tons per square mile (tons/mi2) at the North River, Turkey Creek, and Carroll Creek streamflow-gaging stations, respectively. Estimated annual suspended-sediment yields in 2010 were 120 and 86 tons/mi2 at the Binion Creek and Pole Bridge Creek streamflow-gaging stations, respectively. Estimated annual suspended-sediment yields in 2011 were 190 and 300 tons/mi2

  3. Nutrient Mass Balance for the Mobile River Basin in Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, D. A.; Harvill, J. S.; McMahon, G.

    2001-12-01

    The source and fate of nutrients in the Mobile River drainage basin are important water-quality concerns in Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Land cover in the basin is 74 percent forested, 16 percent agricultural, 2.5 percent developed, and 4 percent wetland. A nutrient mass balance calculated for 18 watersheds in the Mobile River Basin indicates that agricultural non-point nitrogen and phosphorus sources and urban non-point nitrogen sources are the most important factors associated with nutrients in the streams. Nitrogen and phosphorus inputs from atmospheric deposition, crop fertilizer, biological nitrogen fixation, animal waste, and point sources were estimated for each of the 18 drainage basins. Total basin nitrogen inputs ranged from 27 to 93 percent from atmospheric deposition (56 percent mean), 4 to 45 percent from crop fertilizer (25 percent mean), animal waste (8 percent mean), and 0.2 to 11 percent from point sources (3 percent mean). Total basin phosphorus inputs ranged from 10 to 39 percent from atmospheric deposition (26 percent mean), 7 to 51 percent from crop fertilizer (28 percent mean), 20 to 64 percent from animal waste (41 percent mean), and 0.2 to 11 percent from point sources (3 percent mean). Nutrient outputs for the watersheds were estimated by calculating instream loads and estimating nutrient uptake, or withdrawal, by crops. The difference between the total basin inputs and outputs represents nutrients that are retained or processed within the basin while moving from the point of use to the stream, or in the stream. Nitrogen output, as a percentage of the total basin nitrogen inputs, ranged from 19 to 79 percent for instream loads (35 percent mean) and from 0.01 to 32 percent for crop harvest (10 percent mean). From 53 to 87 percent (75 percent mean) of nitrogen inputs were retained within the 18 basins. Phosphorus output ranged from 9 to 29 percent for instream loads (18 percent mean) and from 0.01 to 23 percent for crop harvest (7

  4. Water quality of the Mississippian carbonate aquifer in parts of middle Tennessee and northern Alabama, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, James A.; Shelton, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Water-quality data for nitrate, fecal-indicator bacteria, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds collected in parts of Middle Tennessee and northern Alabama indicate that the Mississippian carbonate aquifer in these areas is susceptible to contamination from point and nonpoint sources. Thirty randomly located wells (predominantly domestic), two springs, and two additional public-supply wells were sampled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. These wells and springs were sampled to characterize the occurrence and distribution of the above constituents in this karst aquifer of Mississippian age and to determine the principal environmental factors related to their occurrence.Nitrate and fecal indicator bacteria were frequently detected at the sampled sites. Nitrate exceeded the drinking-water maximum contaminant level of 10 milligrams per liter in two samples; the median concentration for all samples was about 1.5 milligrams per liter. Correlation of nitrate concentrations to the amount of cropland near a site and to pesticide detections indicates that fertilizer application is the predominant source of nitrogen to the aquifer. Fecal-indicator bacteria were present in samples from about 40 percent of the sites. The presence of fecal-indicator bacteria is weakly correlated to the depth to ground water but is not correlated to a specific land use near the sites.Pesticides and pesticide breakdown products (metabolites) were detected at 74 percent of the sites sampled. Concentrations generally were less than 1 microgram per liter and no pesticide detections exceeded drinking-water maximum contaminant levels. The maximum total pesticide concentration measured was about 4 micrograms per liter. Intensity of pesticide use, proximity of sites to areas of pesticide application, and soil hydrologic group were the primary factors affecting the occurrence of pesticides.Volatile organic compounds were

  5. BIRTH, GROWTH AND CHALLENGES OF "KINESMETRICS" IN THE USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimo Zhu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The term "Kinesmetrics" was coined by Weimo Zhu in 1999 when he created a new doctoral program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, USA, with a focus to "develop and apply measurement theory, statistics and mathematical analysis to the field of Kinesiology." Since then, a number of Ph.D. scholars in Kinesmetrics have been trained at UIUC, which also regularly hosts visiting scholars from all over the world. In fall 2008, a new Kinesmetrics program was established at Middle Tennessee State University by Minsoo Kang, a UIUC Kinesmetrics Ph.D. graduate, and the International Forum of Kinesiometrics was held at the University of Primorska in Koper, Slovenia, in 2009. Meanwhile, Kinesmetrics scholars/programs in the USA are experiencing many challenges, e.g., reduced faculty positions, limited funding resources, a variety of data characteristics and measurement issues due to the interdisciplinary nature of Kinesiology, etc. After a brief review of the historical background and foundation of Kinesmetrics, this paper focused on the current challenges faced by Kinesmetrics, as a subdiscipline within Kinesiology, and how these challenges can best be addressed. Future directions of Kinesmetrics were also outlined.

  6. Professional Training of Economists in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitska, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the peculiarities of American professional undergraduate and graduate training in economics. The analysis of documents, scientific and educational literature demonstrates the diversity of the US training courses and combinations of disciplines in economics. It has been defined that leading position of the USA in the world…

  7. Cultural-Based Development in the USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tubadji, A.; Osoba, B.J.; Nijkamp, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the link between culture and regional development in USA counties by explicitly including an arts variable in an attitudes-driven culture-based development (CBD) production function. The main aims of the research are (1) to revisit the standard CBD model in order to examine

  8. Angiostrongylus cantonensis Meningitis and Myelitis, Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hammoud, Roukaya; Nayes, Stacy L; Murphy, James R; Heresi, Gloria P; Butler, Ian J; Pérez, Norma

    2017-06-01

    Infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis roundworms is endemic in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. A. cantonensis meningitis and myelitis occurred in summer 2013 in a child with no history of travel outside of Texas, USA. Angiostrongyliasis is an emerging neurotropic helminthic disease in Texas and warrants increased awareness among healthcare providers.

  9. USA abandons K1 - or does it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The controversy over the USA's Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee (FRPCC) policy to distribute potassium iodide to emergency workers and institutionalised individuals in the event of a nuclear reactor accident but not to recommend the predistribution or stockpiling of potassium iodide for the general public is discussed. (U.K.)

  10. Gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5 m cell size) of Penguin Bank, Hawaii, USA. The netCDF grid and ArcGIS ASCII file include multibeam bathymetry from the Simrad EM3002d, and...

  11. Babesia microti infection, eastern Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Marcela E Perez; Ender, Peter T; Smith, Erin M; Jahre, Jeffrey A

    2013-07-01

    Infection with Babesia microti has not been well-described in eastern Pennsylvania, USA, despite the vector of this organism being prevalent. We report 3 cases of babesiosis in eastern Pennsylvania in persons without recent travel outside the region or history of blood transfusions, suggesting emergence of this infection.

  12. Fosfomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrowais, Hind; McElheny, Christi L; Spychala, Caressa N; Sastry, Sangeeta; Guo, Qinglan; Butt, Adeel A; Doi, Yohei

    2015-11-01

    Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described.

  13. Euroopa ja USA: liidus tulevikuks / Barack Obama

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Obama, Barack, 1961-

    2010-01-01

    Ameerika Ühendriikide president kirjutab 19.-20. novembril Lissabonis toimuvast NATO tippkohtumisest, USA ja Euroopa vastastikusest vajalikkusest ning NATO-sisesest koostööst. Barack Obama leiab, et NATO ja Venemaa võiksid taaskäivitada oma suhted

  14. Analysis of data acquired by Shuttle Imaging Radar SIR-A and Landsat Thematic Mapper over Baldwin County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.-T.

    1985-01-01

    Seasonally compatible data collected by SIR-A and by Landsat 4 TM over the lower coastal plain in Alabama were coregistered, forming a SIR-A/TM multichannel data set with 30 m x 30 m pixel size. Spectral signature plots and histogram analysis of the data were used to observe data characteristics. Radar returns from pine forest classes correlated highly with the tree ages, suggesting the potential utility of microwave remote sensing for forest biomass estimation. As compared with the TM-only data set, the use of SIR-A/TM data set improved classification accuracy of the seven land cover types studied. In addition, the SIR-A/TM classified data support previous finding by Engheta and Elachi (1982) that microwave data appear to be correlated with differing bottomland hardwood forest vegetation as associated with varying water regimens (i.e., wet versus dry).

  15. Rethinking the memorial in a Black Belt landscape: Planning, memory and identity of African-Americans in Alabama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Giliberti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many old sites are well preserved, many sites of historical and cultural value in the United States are disappearing due to their abandonment. In some cases, the condition of these sites makes restorers’ work very difficult. In other cases, in order to recover blighted local economies, administrations and cultural institutions are adopting strategic spatial plans to attract tourists or accommodate historical theme parks. However, recent scholarly interest in the interaction of history and collective memory has highlighted these sites. Even if the memory of some historical sites is fading quickly, this memory is receiving greater attention than in the past in order to enhance local identity and strengthen the sense of community. This article examines a number of plans and strategies adopted to give shape to the memorial landscape in Alabama, thereby documenting and exploring some key relations between city planning and the commemoration of African-American history.

  16. Interprofessional academic health center leadership development: the case of the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Healthcare Leadership Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Grant T; Duncan, W Jack; Knowles, Kathy L; Nelson, Kathleen; Rogers, David A; Kennedy, Karen N

    2014-05-01

    The study describes the genesis of the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Healthcare Leadership Academy (HLA), highlights the HLA's outcomes, discloses how the HLA has changed, and delineates future directions for academic health center (AHC) interprofessional leadership training. While interprofessional training is recognized as an important component of the professional education for health professionals, AHCs have not focused on interprofessional leadership training to prepare future AHC leaders. As professional bureaucracies, AHCs require leadership distributed across different professions; these leaders not only should be technical experts, but also skilled at interprofessional teamwork and collaborative governance. The HLA is examined using the case method, which is supplemented with a descriptive analysis of program evaluation data and outcomes. The HLA has created a networked community of AHC leaders; the HLA's interprofessional team projects foster innovative problem solving. Interprofessional leadership training expands individuals' networks and has multiple organizational benefits. © 2014.

  17. Topographic lidar survey of the Alabama, Mississippi, and Southeast Louisiana Barrier Islands, from September 5 to October 11, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Kristy K.; Doran, Kara S.; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2014-01-01

    This Data Series Report contains lidar elevation data collected from September 5 to October 11, 2012, for the barrier islands of Alabama, Mississippi and southeast Louisiana, including the coast near Port Fourchon. Most of the data were collected September 5–10, 2012, with a reflight conducted on October 11, 2012, to increase point density in some areas. Point cloud data—data points described in three dimensions—in lidar data exchange format (LAS), and bare earth digital elevation models (DEMs) in ERDAS Imagine raster format (IMG), are available as downloadable files. The point cloud data were processed to extract bare earth data; therefore, the point cloud data are organized into four classes: 1-unclassified, 2-ground, 7-noise and 9-water. Aero-Metric, Inc., was contracted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to collect and process these data.

  18. Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-9: Longitudinal Measurement Invariance Across Parents and Youth During the Transition to High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Thomas J; Fleming, Charles B; Mason, W Alex; Haggerty, Kevin P

    2017-07-01

    The Alabama Parenting Questionnaire nine-item short form (APQ-9) is an often used assessment of parenting in research and applied settings. It uses parent and youth ratings for three scales: Positive Parenting, Inconsistent Discipline, and Poor Supervision. The purpose of this study is to examine the longitudinal invariance of the APQ-9 for both parents and youth, and the multigroup invariance between parents and youth during the transition from middle school to high school. Parent and youth longitudinal configural, metric, and scalar invariance for the APQ-9 were supported when tested separately. However, the multigroup invariance tests indicated that scalar invariance was not achieved between parent and youth ratings. Essentially, parent and youth mean scores for Positive Parenting, Inconsistent Discipline, and Poor Supervision can be independently compared across the transition from middle school to high school. However, comparing parent and youth scores across the APQ-9 scales may not be meaningful.

  19. A procedure used for a ground truth study of a land use map of North Alabama generated from LANDSAT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, S. W., Jr.; Sharma, G. C.; Bagwell, C.

    1977-01-01

    A land use map of a five county area in North Alabama was generated from LANDSAT data using a supervised classification algorithm. There was good overall agreement between the land use designated and known conditions, but there were also obvious discrepancies. In ground checking the map, two types of errors were encountered - shift and misclassification - and a method was developed to eliminate or greatly reduce the errors. Randomly selected study areas containing 2,525 pixels were analyzed. Overall, 76.3 percent of the pixels were correctly classified. A contingency coefficient of correlation was calculated to be 0.7 which is significant at the alpha = 0.01 level. The land use maps generated by computers from LANDSAT data are useful for overall land use by regional agencies. However, care must be used when making detailed analysis of small areas. The procedure used for conducting the ground truth study together with data from representative study areas is presented.

  20. Leadership lessons in global nursing and health from the Nightingale Letter Collection at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Doreen C; Davey, Kimberly S; Fordham, Pamela N

    2014-03-01

    This article analyzes the components of Florence Nightingale's visionary leadership for global health and nursing within the historical context of Great Britain's colonization of India. The descriptive study used the qualitative approach of narrative analysis to analyze selected letters in the Nightingale Letter Collection at the University of Alabama at Birmingham that Nightingale wrote to or about Dr. Thomas Gillham Hewlett, a physician and health officer in Bombay, India. The authors sought to increase understanding of Nightingale's visionary leadership for global nursing and health through a study of the form and content of the letters analyzed as temporally contextualized data, focusing on how the narratives are composed and what is conveyed. Several recurring themes central to Nightingale's leadership on global nursing and health emerge throughout these letters, including health and sanitation reform, collaborative partnerships, data-driven policy development, and advocacy for public health. These themes are illustrated through her letters to and testimony about Dr. Thomas Gillham Hewlett in her vivid descriptions of health education and promotion, data-driven policy documents, public health and sanitation advice, and collaboration with citizens, medicine, policy makers, and governments to improve the health and welfare of the people of India. The focus on leadership in nursing as a global construct highlights the lessons learned from University of Alabama at Birmingham's Nightingale Letter Collection that has relevance for the future of nursing and health care, particularly Nightingale's collaboration with policy leaders, her analysis of data to set policy agendas, and public health reform centered on improving the health and well-being of underserved populations.