WorldWideScience

Sample records for ficus-inidica pereskiopsis porteri

  1. Leaf and stem CO/sub 2/ uptake in the three subfamilies of the Cactaceae. [Pereskia aculeata; Pereskia grandifolia; Maihuenia poeppigii; Carnegiea gigantea; Ferocactus acanthodes; Coryphantha vivipara; Mammillaria dioica; Opuntia ficus-inidica; Pereskiopsis porteri; Quiabentia chacoensis; Austrocylindropuntia subulata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.; Hartsock, T.L.

    1986-04-01

    Net CO/sub 2/ uptake over 24-hour periods was examined for the leaves and for the stems of 11 species of cacti representing all three subfamilies. For Pereskia aculeata, Pereskia grandifolia, and Maihuenia poeppigii (subfamily Pereskioideae), all the net shoot CO/sub 2/ uptake was by the leaves and during the daytime. In contrast, for the leafless species Carnegiea gigantea, Ferocactus acanthodes, Coryphantha vivipara, and Mammillaria dioica (subfamily Cactoideae), all the shoot net CO/sub 2/ uptake was by the stems and at night. Similarly, for leafless Opuntia ficus-indica (subfamily Opuntioideae), all net CO/sub 2/ uptake occurred at night. For leafy members of the Opuntioideae (Pereskiopsis porteri, Quiabentia chacoensis, Austrocylindropuntia subulata), at least 88% of the shoot CO/sub 2/ uptake over 24 hours was by the leaves and some CO/sub 2/ uptake occurred at night. Leaves responded to the instantaneous level of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) during the daytime, as occurs for C/sub 3/ plants, whereas nocturnal CO/sub 2/ uptake by stems of O. ficus-indica and F. acanthodes responded to the total daily PAR, as occurs for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants. Thus, under the well-watered conditions employed, the Pereskioideae behaved as C/sub 3/ plants, the Cactoideae behaved as CAM plants, and the Opuntioideae exhibited characteristics of both pathways.

  2. Helianthus Porteri as a Potential Source for Enhancing the Linoleic Acid Concentration in Sunflower Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confederate Daisy, or Porter's Golden-Eye, Helianthus porteri, formerly known as Viguiera porteri, is an annual sunflower that was recently transferred to the genus Helianthus. It occurs in and around granite outcroppings in the Piedmont regions of North and South Carolina, Alabama, and Georgia. Wil...

  3. Helianthus porteri as a Potential Source for Enhancing Linoleic Acid Concentration in Sunflower Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confederate Daisy, or Porter's Golden-Eye, Helianthus porteri, formerly known as Viguiera porteri, is an annual sunflower that was recently transferred to the genus Helianthus. It occurs in and around granite outcroppings in the Piedmont regions of North and South Carolina, Alabama, and Georgia. Wil...

  4. Biology of Bemisia tuberculata Bondar (Aleyrodidae) and parasitism by Encarsia porteri (Mercet, 1928) (Hymenoptera, Aphelinidae) on cassava plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade Filho, N N; Roel, A R; Penteado-Dias, A M; Costa, R B

    2012-11-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tuberculata has caused serious damage to cassava producing areas in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. However, little is known about the biological characteristics of this species. The objective of this study was therefore, to monitor the development of this species bred on cassava plants under controlled greenhouse conditions, and to determine its most vulnerable stages and its reproductive capacity, as well as measuring the length and width each stage of development. To obtain these data, adult individuals were kept in voile traps on cassava leaves of five different plants, totalling ten leaves. After 24 hours the leaves were removed from the traps thus making each egg-laden leaf an experimental unit. The lowest mortality rate was record in the last nymphal stage ('pupae) compared with the other development stages. The highest mortality occurred in the nymphs at the 2nd and 3rd instars. Each female laid an average of 6.3 eggs in 24 hours. Thirteen days after egg laying, every one of the nymphs was fixed on the leaves of cassava plants. From the egg laying stage up until the adult stage, the process took 26 days. The proportion of females was 73.5%. The average size of the B. tuberculata egg was 163.22 µm in length and 72.39 µm in width and the "pupae" is 915.82 µm in length and 628.71 µm in width. The measurements of males were 797.16 µm in length and 200.81 µm in width and the length females 916.12 µm in length and 338.99 µm in width. The parasitoid Encarsia porteri (Mercet, 1928) (Hymenoptera, Aphelinidae) was found in the insect stock culture.

  5. Leaf and Stem CO2 Uptake in the Three Subfamilies of the Cactaceae 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobel, Park S.; Hartsock, Terry L.

    1986-01-01

    Net CO2 uptake over 24-hour periods was examined for the leaves and for the stems of 11 species of cacti representing all three subfamilies. For Pereskia aculeata, Pereskia grandifolia, and Maihuenia poeppigii (subfamily Pereskioideae), all the net shoot CO2 uptake was by the leaves and during the daytime. In contrast, for the leafless species Carnegiea gigantea, Ferocactus acanthodes, Coryphantha vivipara, and Mammillaria dioica (subfamily Cactoideae), all the shoot net CO2 uptake was by the stems and at night. Similarly, for leafless Opuntia ficus-indica (subfamily Opuntioideae), all net CO2 uptake occurred at night. For leafy members of the Opuntioideae (Pereskiopsis porteri, Quiabentia chacoensis, Austrocylindropuntia subulata), at least 88% of the shoot CO2 uptake over 24 hours was by the leaves and some CO2 uptake occurred at night. Leaves responded to the instantaneous level of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) during the daytime, as occurs for C3 plants, whereas nocturnal CO2 uptake by stems of O. ficus-indica and F. acanthodes responded to the total daily PAR, as occurs for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants. Thus, under the well-watered conditions employed, the Pereskioideae behaved as C3 plants, the Cactoideae behaved as CAM plants, and the Opuntioideae exhibited characteristics of both pathways. PMID:16664741

  6. Leaf and Stem CO(2) Uptake in the Three Subfamilies of the Cactaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobel, P S; Hartsock, T L

    1986-04-01

    Net CO(2) uptake over 24-hour periods was examined for the leaves and for the stems of 11 species of cacti representing all three subfamilies. For Pereskia aculeata, Pereskia grandifolia, and Maihuenia poeppigii (subfamily Pereskioideae), all the net shoot CO(2) uptake was by the leaves and during the daytime. In contrast, for the leafless species Carnegiea gigantea, Ferocactus acanthodes, Coryphantha vivipara, and Mammillaria dioica (subfamily Cactoideae), all the shoot net CO(2) uptake was by the stems and at night. Similarly, for leafless Opuntia ficus-indica (subfamily Opuntioideae), all net CO(2) uptake occurred at night. For leafy members of the Opuntioideae (Pereskiopsis porteri, Quiabentia chacoensis, Austrocylindropuntia subulata), at least 88% of the shoot CO(2) uptake over 24 hours was by the leaves and some CO(2) uptake occurred at night. Leaves responded to the instantaneous level of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) during the daytime, as occurs for C(3) plants, whereas nocturnal CO(2) uptake by stems of O. ficus-indica and F. acanthodes responded to the total daily PAR, as occurs for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants. Thus, under the well-watered conditions employed, the Pereskioideae behaved as C(3) plants, the Cactoideae behaved as CAM plants, and the Opuntioideae exhibited characteristics of both pathways.

  7. Strateegiaguru Porter, klastriguru Porter, sponsorlusguru Porter. Peaaegu, et gurude guru!

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Maailma juhtiva strateegiaguru, Harvard Business Schooli professori Michael Porteri seisukohtadest ja ideedest ettevõtete heategevuse, Interneti kui majandusharu ning klastrite kohta. Lisa: Michael Porter

  8. Strateegiaguru Porter, klastriguru Porter, sponsorlusguru Porter. Peaaegu, et gurude guru!

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Maailma juhtiva strateegiaguru, Harvard Business Schooli professori Michael Porteri seisukohtadest ja ideedest ettevõtete heategevuse, Interneti kui majandusharu ning klastrite kohta. Lisa: Michael Porter

  9. New synonymy and new species in neotropical chloropidae (Diptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis W. Sabrosky

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available An ephydrid, Hyadina porteri Brèthes, 1919, is found to be a senior synonym of Hippelates australis Sabrosky, 1955. New combination: Liohippelates porteri (Brèthes. Two new species, Pseudogaurax souzalopesi from Peru and P. silbergliedi from Panama are described and placed in the synopsis by Sabrosky (1966.

  10. DISPERSAL OF SEEDS AS NEST MATERIAL BY THE CACTUS WREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cactus wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) nests from the southern Chihuahuan Desert contained viable seeds of grasses, forbs, and shrubs. The most common plants used as construction material in these nests were Muhlenbergia porteri, Boerhavia spicata, and the alien grass Era...

  11. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Petitpierre

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Bréthes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864 show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864 has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of H. porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays striking procentric blocks of heterochromatin at pachytene autosomic bivalents using conventional staining. These findings are discussed in relation to previous cytogenetic data and current taxonomy of the subfamily.

  12. Teater

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    28. sept. - 1. okt. toimub rahvusraamatukogus ürituste sari "60 aastat eestlaste põgenemisest kodumaalt". Selle raames etendatakse teatrisaalis H. Sarapuu näidendit "Lahkumine" ; 25. sept. esietendub Endla teatris C. Porteri muusikaline komöödia "Suudle mind, Kate!", lavastaja N. Kuningas

  13. Muusikaliteatri pidu moeka komöödiaga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Novembris kümnendat sünnipäeva tähistav Muusikaliteater toob Tallinna Linnahallis lavale Cole Porteri muusikalise komöödia "Nii on meil moes!" (esietendus 14. nov., lavastaja Andrus Vaarik, ühes peaosas Kristi Roosmaa)

  14. Muusikaliteatri pidu moeka komöödiaga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Novembris kümnendat sünnipäeva tähistav Muusikaliteater toob Tallinna Linnahallis lavale Cole Porteri muusikalise komöödia "Nii on meil moes!" (esietendus 14. nov., lavastaja Andrus Vaarik, ühes peaosas Kristi Roosmaa)

  15. Teater

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    28. sept. - 1. okt. toimub rahvusraamatukogus ürituste sari "60 aastat eestlaste põgenemisest kodumaalt". Selle raames etendatakse teatrisaalis H. Sarapuu näidendit "Lahkumine" ; 25. sept. esietendub Endla teatris C. Porteri muusikaline komöödia "Suudle mind, Kate!", lavastaja N. Kuningas

  16. Acute toxicity and mutagenic activity of Mexican plants used in traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam; Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Angeles-López, Guadalupe E; Navarrete, Andrés; Mata, Rachel

    2007-03-21

    The present work was undertaken to determine safety parameters of selected Mexican medicinal plants chosen on the basis of their frequency of medicinal use and commercial importance. The medicinal herbs included Amphipteryngium adstringens, Hintonia standleyana, Hintonia latiflora, Piper sanctum, Haemathoxylon brasiletto, Iostephane heterophylla, Valeriana procera, Arracacia tolucensis, Brickellia veronicaefolia, Scaphyglottis livida, Exostema caribaeum, Hippocratea excelsa, Ligusticum porteri, Poliomintha longiflora and Gnaphalium sp. In the acute toxicity studies in mice performed according to the Lorke procedure, Exostema caribaeum, Hippocratea excelsa, Ligusticum porteri and Poliomintha longiflora were the most toxic with LD(50) values between 1085 and 2mg/kg. The Ames test revealed that Gnaphalium sp. and Valeriana procera extracts induced mutations of S. typhimurium TA98 with or without the S9 microsomal fraction, and TA100 in the presence of the enzymatic fraction, respectively. The tincture of Valeriana procera, however, was non-mutagenic. Finally, in the Artemia salina lethality test Brickellia veronicaefolia, Arracacia tolucensis, Poliomintha longiflora and Piper sanctum caused significant mortality of the crustacean larvae with LC(50) in the range of 37-227 microg/mL.

  17. Miocene-Pliocene speciation, introgression, and migration of Patis and Ptilagrostis (Poaceae: Stipeae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaschenko, Konstantin; Garcia-Jacas, Nuria; Peterson, Paul M; Soreng, Robert J; Vilatersana, Roser; Susanna, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Genetic interchange between American and Eurasian species is fundamental to our understanding of the biogeographical patterns, and we make a first attempt to reconstruct the evolutionary events in East Asia that lead to the origin and dispersal of two genera, Patis and Ptilagrostis. We conducted a molecular phylogenetic study of 78 species in the tribe Stipeae using four plastid DNA sequences (ndhF, rpl32-trnL, rps16-trnK, and rps16 intron) and two nuclear DNA sequences (ITS and At103). We use single copy nDNA gene At103 for the first time in the grasses to elucidate the evolutionary history among members of the Stipeae. Ampelodesmos, Hesperostipa, Oryzopsis, Pappostipa, Patis, and Stipa are found to be of multiple origins. Our phylograms reveal conflicting positions for Ptilagrostis alpina and Pt. porteri that form a clade with Patis coreana, P. obtusa, and P. racemosa in the combined plastid tree but are aligned with other members of Ptilagrostis in the ITS tree. We hypothesize that Ptilagrostis still retains the nucleotype of an extinct genus which transited the Bering land bridge from American origins in the late Miocene (minimum 7.35-6.37 mya) followed by hybridization and two plastid capture events with a Trikeraia-like taxon (7.96 mya) and para-Patis (between 5.32 and 3.76 mya). Ptilagrostis porteri and Patis racemosa then migrated to continental North America 1.7-2.9 mya and 4.3-5.3 mya, respectively. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Lewis acid catalyzed transformations of Z-ligustilide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Maria Yolanda [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Delgado, Guillermo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-08-01

    Some Lewis acid mediated reactions of Z-ligustilide (1), a bioactive constituent of the medicinal species Ligusticum porteri, were investigated. These reactions provided varying mixtures of Z-butylidenephthalide (7), E-butylidenephthalide (8), n-butyphthalide (13), and novel linear dimeric phthalides (9-12) as the main products. The formation of the dimers occurred in low yields and with regio and situ-selectivity. Initial competitive O- and C- complexation of the Lewis acid with Z-ligustilide promoted the formation of the dimers occurred in low yields and with regio and situ- selectivity. Initial competitive O- and C- complexation of the Lewis acid with Z-ligustilide promoted the formation of carbocations at C(8), C(6) and C(7), which were stabilized by the addition of the C(6')-C(7') olefin of a second unit of the starting material, to provide cations at C(6') and C(7'). Subsequent isomerizations and elimination of the catalyst afforded the dimeric products 9-12. The yields and structure of the products are quite dependent on variations of the reaction conditions and the catalyst employed. [Spanish] Se investigaron algunas reacciones de Z-ligustilidas (1), un constituyente bioactivo de la planta medicinal Ligusticum porteri, catalizadas por acidos de Lewis. Estas reacciones produjeron mezclas variables de Z-butilidenftalida (7), E-butilidenftalida (8), n-butilftalida (13), y ftalidos dimetricos lineales novedosos (9-12) como productos principales. La formacion de los dimeros procedio en rendimientos bajos y con regio- y situ-selectividad. La O- y C- complejacion competitiva inicial del acido de Lewis con Z-lingustilida promueve la formacion de cationes en C(8), C(6) y C(7), los cuales son estabilizados por la adicion de la olefina C(6')-C(7') de una segunda unidad de la materia prima para generar los cationes en C(6')-C(7'). Isomerizaciones subsecuentes y la eliminacion del catalizador conducen a los productos dimericos 9

  19. Experimental study of ghost fishing by gillnets in Laguna Verde Valparaíso, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dante Queirolo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, two experiments were carried out in order to study ghost fishing generated by lost or abandoned gillnets. The first experiment was aimed to identify and quantify the number of captured specimens in intentionally abandoned gillnet between 45 and 86 m depth, which were periodically checked up to 156 days after being abandoned. In this experiment, 912 specimens of 12 taxa were caught, mostly invertebrates such as Cancer porteri (81.6% and Platymera gaudichaudii (9%. After the abandonment, the fish caught were only registered until day 63, while benthic species were captured during all the experiment. The second experiment consisted of checking and registering periodically the loss of height of an abandoned gillnet at 34 m depth in order to determine the reduction of the fishing capacity of the net. After 19 days of abandonment, the functional area of the net was reduced to 40% of the original area, reaching nearly zero after 155 days of abandonment. In order to estimate the potential effect of lost or abandoned gillnets in Chilean hake fisheries (Merluccius gayi gayi, an additional information-collecting process must be carried out, mainly in terms of frequency of gillnets losses.

  20. Mexican antidiabetic herbs: valuable sources of inhibitors of α-glucosidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Rachel; Cristians, Sol; Escandón-Rivera, Sonia; Juárez-Reyes, Krutzkaya; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel

    2013-03-22

    Type II-diabetes mellitus (TII-DM) has been regarded as one of the most important public health problems in all nations in the 21st century. Although allopathic therapies remain the most important for the initial management of TII-DM, herbal remedies have gained wide acceptance for treating this condition. These alternative therapies are particularly valued in countries such as Mexico, rich in medicinal plants strongly attached to the cultural values of the population. Medicinal plants are prized sources of α-glucosidase inhibitors, which delay the liberation of glucose from complex carbohydrates, retarding glucose absorption, and thus controlling the characteristic hyperglycemia of TII-DM. Among the plant species used for treating diabetes in Mexico only 38 have been analyzed for their inhibitory activity of α-glucosidases. Most of these studies, reviewed in the present work, have focused on the evaluation of different types of extracts on the activity of α-glucosidases from diverse sources. Four species have been thoroughly analyzed in order to discover novel α-glucosidase inhibitors, namely, Hintonia latiflora and Hintonia standleyana (Rubiaceae), Ligusticum porteri (Apiaceae), and Brickellia cavanillesii (Asteraceae). Their ethnomedical uses, pharmacological and toxicological studies, chemical composition, and antihyperglycemic principles with α-glucosidase inhibitory activity are summarized.

  1. Arterial stiffness, hypertension, and rational use of nebivolol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Agabiti-Rosei

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Enrico Agabiti-Rosei, Enzo Porteri, Damiano RizzoniClinica Medica, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Brescia, ItalyAbstract: Arterial stiffness plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Some indices of arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, characteristics of central blood pressure waveform may be presently calculated and evaluated in the clinical setting. Age and blood pressure are the two major clinical determinants of increased arterial stiffness, while molecular determinants of arterial stiffness are related to fibrotic components of the extracellular matrix, mainly elastin, collagen and fibronectin. Increased arterial stiffness has been consistently observed in conditions such as hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes. Arterial stiffness evaluated by means of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity yielded prognostic significance beyond and above traditional risk factors. A more favorable effect of calcium channel blockers, diuretics and ACE inhibitors compared with β-blockers on indices of arterial stiffness was observed in several studies. It is conceivable that newer β-blockers with additional vasodilating properties, such as nebivolol, which has favorable effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as on endothelial function and on oxidative stress, may have favorable effects on arterial stiffness, compared with atenolol. In fact, in recent studies, nebivolol was demonstrated to improve artery stiffness to a greater extent than older β-blockers. Because endothelial dysfunction and increased arterial stiffness play an important role in the early atherosclerotic processes and are associated with poor outcomes and increased mortality, independently of blood pressure, the ability of nebivolol to enhance release of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, and consequently improve endothelial function and arterial stiffness, may have significant clinical

  2. Analisis Vegetasi Hutan Rawa Gambut Pascakebakaran di Wilayah Desa Sebangau dan Desa Taruna Jaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reri Yulianti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Kebakaran  merupakan  salah  satu  penyebab  kerusakan  hutan  tropis  di Indonesia. Kerusakan yang berlangsung selama kebakaran hutan bersifat eksplosif artinya terjadi dalam waktu relatif cepat dan areal yang luas. Salah satu tipe dari ekosistem hutan hujan tropis adalah hutan rawa gambut. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah  (1  mengkaji  komposisi  jenis,  (2  mengkaji  keanekaragaman  jenis,  (3 mengkaji  distribusi  jenis,  (4  mengkaji  asosiasi  jenis  (5  mengkaji  persentase ketidaksamaan komunitas vegetasi di hutan rawa gambut bekas kebakaran tahun 1997, 2002, dan 2006.Penelitian ini dilakukan pada bulan Mei sampai Juni 2009 di wilayah Desa Kalampangan Kecamatan Sebangau dan Desa Taruna Jaya Kecamatan Jabiren Raya Kalimantan Tengah. Pengumpulan data dilakukan dengan membuat petak ukur dan kemudian melakukan identifikasi jenis. Titik-titik sampel ditentukan dengan metode random sampling dengan cara undian. Semua jenis dalam petak ukur dicatat nama, diukur   diameter   batang   serta   jumlahnya   dan   dikelompokkan   sesuai   tingkat pertumbuhannya. Hasil   penelitian   adalah   1   Ditemukan   8   jenis   vegetasi   antara   lain Cratoxylon  arborescens,  Combretocarpus  rotundatus,  Timmonius  wallichianum, Acroychia  porteri,  Acacia  auriculiformis,  Xylopia  fusca,  Ilex  macropylla,  dan Diospyros  hermaproditich.  2  Keanekaragaman  pada  hutan  rawa  gambut  bekas kebakaran  sangat  rendah.  3  Jenis  Cratoxylon  arborescens  dan  Combretocarpus rotundatus mempunyai kemampuan regenerasi yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan jenis yang lainnya. Hal ini terlihat dari INP kedua jenis vegetasi yang memiliki nilai INP tertinggi. 4 Asosiasi yang diperlihatkan oleh banyak jenis (tingkat pertumbuhan pohon, tiang, pancang, semai pada hutan rawa gambut bekas kebakaran adalah asosiasi  positif  yang  artinya  seluruh  spesies  lebih

  3. Phthalides: Distribution in Nature, Chemical Reactivity, Synthesis, and Biological Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Alejandra; Del-Ángel, Mayela; Ávila, José Luis; Delgado, Guillermo

    Phthalides are a relatively small group of natural compounds confined to several plant families and some genera of fungi and liverworts. They are divided into two structural groups, the monomeric and dimeric phthalides, and known mainly as bioactive constituents of different plant species used traditionally for medicinal purposes in Asia, Europe, and North America.The first reports on the chemistry of phthalides appeared at the end of the nineteenth century, in which they were identified as the odor constituents of the essential oil of celery (Apium graveolens) by Ciamician and Silber (1897). In the first half of the last century, phthalides were isolated from Cnidium officinale and Ligusticum acutilobum, species widely used in Asian traditional medicine, and from Levisticum officinale, a species used as food and condiment. Throughout the second part of the twentieth century, phthalides have been characterized from several plant families, namely Asteraceae, Leguminosae, Orchidaceae and Rutaceae, among others, but mainly from the Umbelliferae (syn Apiaceae) family, and the major contributors have been the following species used in traditional medicine: Ligusticum chuanxiong (Chinese name: Chuanxiong), Angelica sinensis (Chinese name: Danggui), Cnidium officinale (Japanese name: Senkyu), Angelica acutiloba (Japanese name: Toki), and Ligusticum porteri (Hispanic name: Oshá). Phthalides are also constituents of several genera of fungi, such as Penicillium, Alternaria and Pestalotiopsis, and some liverworts.Different chromatographic, spectrometric, and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been used for the isolation and structural characterization of phthalides in extracts, and for assessing the quality of plant material containing this type of compound. Isotopic labeling has established the biosynthesis of phthalides via linkage of acetate units forming polyketide intermediates.Chemical transformations of monomeric phthalides have included