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Sample records for fibroin 3d scaffolds

  1. Fabrication of micro/nanoporous collagen/dECM/silk-fibroin biocomposite scaffolds using a low temperature 3D printing process for bone tissue regeneration.

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    Lee, Hyeongjin; Yang, Gi Hoon; Kim, Minseong; Lee, JaeYoon; Huh, JunTae; Kim, GeunHyung

    2018-03-01

    Biomaterials must be biocompatible, biodegradable, and mechanically stable to be used for tissue engineering applications. Among various biomaterials, a natural-based biopolymer, collagen, has been widely applied in tissue engineering because of its outstanding biocompatibility. However, due to its low mechanical properties, collagen has been a challenge to build a desired/complex 3D porous structure with appropriate mechanical strength. To overcome this problem, in this study, we used a low temperature printing process to create a 3D porous scaffold consisting of collagen, decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) to induce high cellular activities, and silk-fibroin (SF) to attain the proper mechanical strength. To show the feasibility of the scaffold, pre-osteoblast (MC3T3-E1) cells were grown on the fabricated scaffold. Various in vitro cellular activities (cell-viability, MTT assay, and osteogenic activity) for pure collagen, collagen/dECM, and collagen/SF/dECM scaffolds were compared. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 3D freeform printing of silk fibroin.

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    Rodriguez, Maria J; Dixon, Thomas A; Cohen, Eliad; Huang, Wenwen; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2018-03-14

    Freeform fabrication has emerged as a key direction in printing biologically-relevant materials and structures. With this emerging technology, complex structures with microscale resolution can be created in arbitrary geometries and without the limitations found in traditional bottom-up or top-down additive manufacturing methods. Recent advances in freeform printing have used the physical properties of microparticle-based granular gels as a medium for the submerged extrusion of bioinks. However, most of these techniques require post-processing or crosslinking for the removal of the printed structures [1,2]. In this communication, we introduce a novel method for the one-step gelation of silk fibroin within a suspension of synthetic nanoclay (Laponite) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). Silk fibroin has been used as a biopolymer for bioprinting in several contexts, but chemical or enzymatic additives or bulking agents are needed to stabilize 3D structures. Our method requires no post-processing of printed structures and allows for in situ physical crosslinking of pure aqueous silk fibroin into arbitrary geometries produced through freeform 3D printing. 3D bioprinting has emerged as a technology that can produce biologically relevant structures in defined geometries with microscale resolution. Techniques for fabrication of free-standing structures by printing into granular gel media has been demonstrated previously, however, these methods require crosslinking agents and post-processing steps on printed structures. Our method utilizes one-step gelation of silk fibroin within a suspension of synthetic nanoclay (Laponite), with no need for additional crosslinking compounds or post processing of the material. This new method allows for in situ physical crosslinking of pure aqueous silk fibroin into defined geometries produced through freeform 3D printing. Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Preparation and characteristics of non-woven silk fibroin/nano-hydroxyapatite scaffolds].

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    Zhao, Yong; Li, Gang; Chen, Jing; Chen, Zhi-Qing

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to design and fabricate a three dimensional (3D) porous structure of silk fibroin/apatite used as a potential scaffold in bone tissue engineering. With the combining use of non-woven silk fibroin net and biomimetic method, porous non-woven silk fibroin/nano-hydroxyapatite net (NSF/nHAP) was prepared and characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The porosity and swelling ratio of the 3D scaffold were also measured. Besides, the osteoblasts from the cranium of new born SD rat were cultured on the pre-fabricated scaffold to evaluate the biological reaction of the scaffold. The nano-sized hydroxyapatite crystals were needle-like with the length of 100-300 nm and the diameter of 20-60 nm. The scaffold fabricated in the present study exhibited the porous microstructure with open porosity around 70%-78%. Its average pore size was about (163.4 +/- 42.6) microm. The swelling ratio and water uptaking were 4.56% and 81.93%, respectively, which revealed that the 3D porous scaffold had an excellent hydrophilicity. The rod-shaped apatite crystals could rapidly form on the surface of fibroin fibers throughout the network by immersing the net into calcium and phosphate solutions alternatively. A 3D porous NSF/nHAP scaffold can be fabricated by biomimetic mineralization and none-woven silk fibroin method. The novel NSF/nHAP scaffold has an excellent cytocompatibility for the growth of osteoblasts. Porous NSF/nHAP scaffold may be a hopeful biomaterial used in bone tissue engineering.

  4. Silk fibroin porous scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Chao; Yang, Qiang; Zhu, Meifeng; Du, Lilong; Zhang, Jiamin; Ma, Xinlong; Xu, Baoshan; Wang, Lianyong

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are structurally complex tissue that hold the vertebrae together and provide mobility to spine. The nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration often results in degenerative IVD disease that is one of the most common causes of back and neck pain. Tissue engineered nucleus pulposus offers an alternative approach to regain the function of the degenerative IVD. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of porous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds fabricated by paraffin-sphere-leaching methods with freeze-drying in the application of nucleus pulposus regeneration. The prepared scaffold possessed high porosity of 92.38 ± 5.12% and pore size of 165.00 ± 8.25 μm as well as high pore interconnectivity and appropriate mechanical properties. Rabbit NP cells were seeded and cultured on the SF scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy, histology, biochemical assays and mechanical tests revealed that the porous scaffolds could provide an appropriate microstructure and environment to support adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of NP cells in vitro as well as the generation of extracellular matrix. The NP cell–scaffold construction could be preliminarily formed after subcutaneously implanted in a nude mice model. In conclusion, The SF porous scaffold offers a potential candidate for tissue engineered NP tissue. - Highlights: • Paraffin microsphere-leaching method is used to fabricate silk fibroin scaffold. • The scaffold has appropriate mechanical property, porosity and pore size • The scaffold supports growth and infiltration of nucleus pulposus cells. • Nucleus pulposus cells can secrete extracellular matrix in the scaffolds. • The scaffold is a potential candidate for tissue engineered nucleus pulposus

  5. Silk fibroin porous scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering

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    Zeng, Chao; Yang, Qiang [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhu, Meifeng [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Du, Lilong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhang, Jiamin [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ma, Xinlong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Xu, Baoshan, E-mail: xubaoshan99@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Wang, Lianyong, E-mail: wly@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are structurally complex tissue that hold the vertebrae together and provide mobility to spine. The nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration often results in degenerative IVD disease that is one of the most common causes of back and neck pain. Tissue engineered nucleus pulposus offers an alternative approach to regain the function of the degenerative IVD. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of porous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds fabricated by paraffin-sphere-leaching methods with freeze-drying in the application of nucleus pulposus regeneration. The prepared scaffold possessed high porosity of 92.38 ± 5.12% and pore size of 165.00 ± 8.25 μm as well as high pore interconnectivity and appropriate mechanical properties. Rabbit NP cells were seeded and cultured on the SF scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy, histology, biochemical assays and mechanical tests revealed that the porous scaffolds could provide an appropriate microstructure and environment to support adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of NP cells in vitro as well as the generation of extracellular matrix. The NP cell–scaffold construction could be preliminarily formed after subcutaneously implanted in a nude mice model. In conclusion, The SF porous scaffold offers a potential candidate for tissue engineered NP tissue. - Highlights: • Paraffin microsphere-leaching method is used to fabricate silk fibroin scaffold. • The scaffold has appropriate mechanical property, porosity and pore size • The scaffold supports growth and infiltration of nucleus pulposus cells. • Nucleus pulposus cells can secrete extracellular matrix in the scaffolds. • The scaffold is a potential candidate for tissue engineered nucleus pulposus.

  6. Bioengineered silk scaffolds in 3D tissue modeling with focus on mammary tissues.

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    Maghdouri-White, Yas; Bowlin, Gary L; Lemmon, Christopher A; Dréau, Didier

    2016-02-01

    In vitro generation of three-dimensional (3D) biological tissues and organ-like structures is a promising strategy to study and closely model complex aspects of the molecular, cellular, and physiological interactions of tissue. In particular, in vitro 3D tissue modeling holds promises to further our understanding of breast development. Indeed, biologically relevant 3D structures that combine mammary cells and engineered matrices have improved our knowledge of mammary tissue growth, organization, and differentiation. Several polymeric biomaterials have been used as scaffolds to engineer 3D mammary tissues. Among those, silk fibroin-based biomaterials have many biologically relevant properties and have been successfully used in multiple medical applications. Here, we review the recent advances in engineered scaffolds with an emphasis on breast-like tissue generation and the benefits of modified silk-based scaffolds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydroxyapatite reinforced inherent RGD containing silk fibroin composite scaffolds: Promising platform for bone tissue engineering.

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    Behera, Sibaram; Naskar, Deboki; Sapru, Sunaina; Bhattacharjee, Promita; Dey, Tuli; Ghosh, Ananta K; Mandal, Mahitosh; Kundu, Subhas C

    2017-07-01

    Replacement and repair of ectopic bone defects and traumatized bone tissues are done using porous scaffolds and composites. The prerequisites for such scaffolds include high mechanical strength, osseoconductivity and cytocompatibility. The present work is designed to address such requirements by fabricating a reinforced cytocompatible scaffold. Biocompatible silk protein fibroin collected from tropical non-mulberry tasar silkworm (Antheraea mylitta) is used to fabricate fibroin-hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocomposite particles using chemical precipitation method. In situ reinforcement of fibroin-HAp nanocomposite and external deposition of HAp particles on fibroin scaffold is carried out for comparative evaluations of bio-physical and biochemical characteristics. HAp deposited fibroin scaffolds provide greater mechanical strength and cytocompatibility, when compared with fibroin-HAp nanoparticles reinforced fibroin scaffolds. Minimal immune responses of both types of composite scaffolds are observed using osteoblast-macrophage co-culture model. Nanocomposite reinforced fibroin scaffold can be tailored further to accommodate different requirements depending on bone type or bone regeneration period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cartilage Tissue Engineering with Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Fabricated by Indirect Additive Manufacturing Technology

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    Chih-Hao Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced tissue engineering (TE technology based on additive manufacturing (AM can fabricate scaffolds with a three-dimensional (3D environment suitable for cartilage regeneration. Specifically, AM technology may allow the incorporation of complex architectural features. The present study involves the fabrication of 3D TE scaffolds by an indirect AM approach using silk fibroin (SF. From scanning electron microscopic observations, the presence of micro-pores and interconnected channels within the scaffold could be verified, resulting in a TE scaffold with both micro- and macro-structural features. The intrinsic properties, such as the chemical structure and thermal characteristics of SF, were preserved after the indirect AM manufacturing process. In vitro cell culture within the SF scaffold using porcine articular chondrocytes showed a steady increase in cell numbers up to Day 14. The specific production (per cell basis of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix component (collagen Type II was enhanced with culture time up to 12 weeks, indicating the re-differentiation of chondrocytes within the scaffold. Subcutaneous implantation of the scaffold-chondrocyte constructs in nude mice also confirmed the formation of ectopic cartilage by histological examination and immunostaining.

  9. Cartilage Tissue Engineering with Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Fabricated by Indirect Additive Manufacturing Technology.

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    Chen, Chih-Hao; Liu, Jolene Mei-Jun; Chua, Chee-Kai; Chou, Siaw-Meng; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2014-03-13

    Advanced tissue engineering (TE) technology based on additive manufacturing (AM) can fabricate scaffolds with a three-dimensional (3D) environment suitable for cartilage regeneration. Specifically, AM technology may allow the incorporation of complex architectural features. The present study involves the fabrication of 3D TE scaffolds by an indirect AM approach using silk fibroin (SF). From scanning electron microscopic observations, the presence of micro-pores and interconnected channels within the scaffold could be verified, resulting in a TE scaffold with both micro- and macro-structural features. The intrinsic properties, such as the chemical structure and thermal characteristics of SF, were preserved after the indirect AM manufacturing process. In vitro cell culture within the SF scaffold using porcine articular chondrocytes showed a steady increase in cell numbers up to Day 14. The specific production (per cell basis) of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix component (collagen Type II) was enhanced with culture time up to 12 weeks, indicating the re-differentiation of chondrocytes within the scaffold. Subcutaneous implantation of the scaffold-chondrocyte constructs in nude mice also confirmed the formation of ectopic cartilage by histological examination and immunostaining.

  10. Anisotropic silk fibroin/gelatin scaffolds from unidirectional freezing

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    Asuncion, Maria Christine Tankeh, E-mail: christine.asuncion@u.nus.edu [National University of Singapore, Department of Biomedical Engineering (Singapore); Goh, James Cho-Hong [National University of Singapore, Department of Biomedical Engineering (Singapore); National University of Singapore, Department of Orthopedic Surgery (Singapore); Toh, Siew-Lok [National University of Singapore, Department of Biomedical Engineering (Singapore); National University of Singapore, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Singapore)

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have underlined the importance of matching scaffold properties to the biological milieu. Tissue, and thus scaffold, anisotropy is one such property that is important yet sometimes overlooked. Methods that have been used to achieve anisotropic scaffolds present challenges such as complicated fabrication steps, harsh processing conditions and toxic chemicals involved. In this study, unidirectional freezing was employed to fabricate anisotropic silk fibroin/gelatin scaffolds in a simple and mild manner. Morphological, mechanical, chemical and cellular compatibility properties were investigated, as well as the effect of the addition of gelatin to certain properties of the scaffold. It was shown that scaffold properties were suitable for cell proliferation and that mesenchymal stem cells were able to align themselves along the directed fibers. The fabricated scaffolds present a platform that can be used for anisotropic tissue engineering applications such as cardiac patches. - Highlights: • Silk/gelatin scaffolds with unidirectional alignment were fabricated using a simple and scalable process • Presence of gelatin in silk resulted to lesser shrinkage, better water retention and improved cell proliferation. • Mesenchymal stem cells were shown to align themselves according to the fiber alignment.

  11. Artificial crawler model for texture analysis on silk fibroin scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Bruno Brandoli; Gonçalves, Wesley Nunes; Bruno, Odemir Martinez

    2014-01-01

    Texture plays an important role in computer vision tasks. Several methods of texture analysis are available. However, these methods are not capable of extracting rich detail in images. This paper presents a novel approach to image texture classification based on the artificial crawler model. Here, we propose a new rule of movement that moves artificial crawler agents not only toward higher intensities but also toward lower ones. This strategy is able of capturing more detail because the agents explore the peaks as well as the valleys. Thus, compared with the state-of-the-art method, this approach shows an increased discriminatory power. Experiments on the most well known benchmark demonstrate the superior performance of our approach. We also tested our approach on silk fibroin scaffold analysis, and results indicate that our method is consistent and can be applied in real-world situations. (paper)

  12. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere for cartilage repair

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    Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Qiu; Cheng, Niangmei [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Tao, Xiaojun [Department of Pharmacy, School of Medicine, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, 410013, Hunan (China); Zhang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaomin [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang, Qiqing, E-mail: zhangqiq@126.com [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials of Tianjin, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300192 (China)

    2016-04-01

    For cartilage repair, ideal scaffolds should mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibiting excellent characteristics, such as biocompatibility, suitable porosity, and good cell affinity. This study aimed to prepare a collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microsphere that can be applied in repairing cartilage. To obtain optimum conditions for manufacturing a composite scaffold, a scaffold composed of different collagen-to-silk fibroin ratios was evaluated by determining porosity, water absorption, loss rate in hot water, and cell proliferation. Results suggested that the optimal ratio of collagen and silk fibroin composite scaffold was 7:3. The microstructure and morphological characteristics of the obtained scaffold were also examined through scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of in vitro fluorescence staining of bone marrow stromal cells revealed that collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold enhanced cell proliferation without eliciting side effects. The prepared composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere was implanted in fully thick articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold with PLGA microspheres could enhance articular cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Therefore, this composite will be a promising material for cartilage repair and regeneration. - Highlights: • Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere proposed for cartilage repair was created. • In vivo, scaffold could enhance cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired and surrounding cartilage. • In vitro, scaffold exhibits excellent characteristics, such as, improved porosity water absorption and good cell affinity.

  13. The Relationship between Secondary Structure and Biodegradation Behavior of Silk Fibroin Scaffolds

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    Yongpei Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silk fibroin has a unique and useful combination of properties, including good biocompatibility and excellent mechanical performance. These features provided early clues to the utility of regenerated silk fibroin as a scaffold/matrix for tissue engineering. The silk fibroin scaffolds used for tissue engineering should degrade at a rate that matches the tissue growth rate. The relationship between secondary structure and biodegradation behavior of silk fibroin scaffolds was investigated in this study. Scaffolds with different secondary structure were prepared by controlling the freezing temperature and by treatment with carbodiimide or ethanol. The quantitative proportions of each secondary structure were obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and each sample was then degraded in vitro with collagenase IA for 18 days. The results show that a high content of β-sheet structure leads to a low degradation rate. The random coil region in the silk fibroin material is degraded, whereas the crystal region remains stable and the amount of β-sheet structure increases during incubation. The results demonstrate that it is possible to control the degradation rate of a silk fibroin scaffold by controlling the content of β-sheet structure.

  14. Human amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffold in the repair of spinal cord injury

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    Ting-gang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and functional reconstruction after central nervous system injury is a major medical and social challenge. An increasing number of researchers are attempting to use neural stem cells combined with artificial scaffold materials, such as fibroin, for nerve repair. However, such approaches are challenged by ethical and practical issues. Amniotic tissue, a clinical waste product, is abundant, and amniotic epithelial cells are pluripotent, have low immunogenicity, and are not the subject of ethical debate. We hypothesized that amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffolds would be conducive to the repair of spinal cord injury. To test this, we isolated and cultured amniotic epithelial cells, and constructed complexes of these cells and silk fibroin scaffolds. Implantation of the cell-scaffold complex into a rat model of spinal cord injury resulted in a smaller glial scar in the damaged cord tissue than in model rats that received a blank scaffold, or amniotic epithelial cells alone. In addition to a milder local immunological reaction, the rats showed less inflammatory cell infiltration at the transplant site, milder host-versus-graft reaction, and a marked improvement in motor function. These findings confirm that the transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffold can promote the repair of spinal cord injury. Silk fibroin scaffold can provide a good nerve regeneration microenvironment for amniotic epithelial cells.

  15. [Digital modeling for the individual mandibular 3D mesh scaffold based on 3D printing technology].

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    Yan, Rongzeng; Luo, Danmei; Qin, Xiaoyu; Li, Runxin; Rong, Qiguo; Hu, Min

    2016-05-01

    To investigate an ideal modeling method of designing 3D mesh scaffold substitutes based on tissue engineering to restore mandibular bone defects. By analyzing the theoretical model from titanium scaffolds fabricated by 3D printing, the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methodology were verified. Based on the CT scanned data of a subject, the Mimics 15.0 and Geomagic studio 12.0 reverse engineering software were adopted to generate surface model of mandibular bone and the defect area was separated from the 3D model of bone. Then prosthesis was designed via mirror algorithm, in which outer shape was used as the external shape of scaffold. Unigraphics software NX 8.5 was applied on Boolean calculation of subtraction between prosthesis and regular microstructure structure and ANSYS 14.0 software was used to design the inner construction of 3D mesh scaffolds. The topological structure and the geometrical parameters of 3D mesh titanium scaffolds were adjusted according to the aim of optimized structure and maximal strength with minimal weight. The 3D mesh scaffolds solid model through two kinds of computer-aided methods was input into 3D printing equipment to fabricate titanium scaffolds. Individual scaffolds were designed successfully by two modeling methods. The finite element optimization made 10% decrease of the stress peak and volume decrease of 43%, and the porosity increased to 76.32%. This modeling method was validated by 3D printing titanium scaffold to be feasible and effective. 3D printing technology combined with finite element topology optimization to obtain the ideal mandibular 3D mesh scaffold is feasible and effective.

  16. Apple derived cellulose scaffolds for 3D mammalian cell culture.

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    Daniel J Modulevsky

    Full Text Available There are numerous approaches for producing natural and synthetic 3D scaffolds that support the proliferation of mammalian cells. 3D scaffolds better represent the natural cellular microenvironment and have many potential applications in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that 3D cellulose scaffolds produced by decellularizing apple hypanthium tissue can be employed for in vitro 3D culture of NIH3T3 fibroblasts, mouse C2C12 muscle myoblasts and human HeLa epithelial cells. We show that these cells can adhere, invade and proliferate in the cellulose scaffolds. In addition, biochemical functionalization or chemical cross-linking can be employed to control the surface biochemistry and/or mechanical properties of the scaffold. The cells retain high viability even after 12 continuous weeks of culture and can achieve cell densities comparable with other natural and synthetic scaffold materials. Apple derived cellulose scaffolds are easily produced, inexpensive and originate from a renewable source. Taken together, these results demonstrate that naturally derived cellulose scaffolds offer a complementary approach to existing techniques for the in vitro culture of mammalian cells in a 3D environment.

  17. Mechanical property and biological performance of electrospun silk fibroin-polycaprolactone scaffolds with aligned fibers.

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    Yuan, Han; Shi, Hongfei; Qiu, Xushen; Chen, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical strength, biocompatibility, and sterilizability of silk fibroin allow it to be a possible candidate as a natural bone regenerate material. To improve mechanical character and reinforce the cell movement induction, silk fibroin (SF)-polycaprolactone (PCL) alloy was fabricated by electrospinning techniques with a rotating collector to form aligned fibrous scaffolds and random-oriented scaffolds. The scanning electron microscope image of the scaffold and the mechanical properties of the scaffold were investigated by tensile mechanical tests, which were compared to random-oriented scaffolds. Furthermore, mesenchymal stem cells were planted on these scaffolds to investigate the biocompatibility, elongation, and cell movement in situ. Scanning electron microscopy shows that 91% fibers on the aligned fibroin scaffold were distributed between the dominant direction ±10°. With an ideal support for stem cell proliferation in vitro, the aligned fibrous scaffold induces cell elongation at a length of 236.46 ± 82 μm and distribution along the dominant fiber direction with a cell alignment angle at 6.57° ± 4.45°. Compared with random-oriented scaffolds made by artificial materials, aligned SF-PCL scaffolds could provide a moderate mesenchymal stem cell engraftment interface and speed up early stage cell movement toward the bone defect.

  18. Influence of scaffold design on 3D printed cell constructs.

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    Souness, Auryn; Zamboni, Fernanda; Walker, Gavin M; Collins, Maurice N

    2018-02-01

    Additive manufacturing is currently receiving significant attention in the field of tissue engineering and biomaterial science. The development of precise, affordable 3D printing technologies has provided a new platform for novel research to be undertaken in 3D scaffold design and fabrication. In the past, a number of 3D scaffold designs have been fabricated to investigate the potential of a 3D printed scaffold as a construct which could support cellular life. These studies have shown promising results; however, few studies have utilized a low-cost desktop 3D printing technology as a potential rapid manufacturing route for different scaffold designs. Here six scaffold designs were manufactured using a Fused deposition modeling, a "bottom-up" solid freeform fabrication approach, to determine optimal scaffold architecture for three-dimensional cell growth. The scaffolds, produced from PLA, are coated using pullulan and hyaluronic acid to assess the coating influence on cell proliferation and metabolic rate. Scaffolds are characterized both pre- and postprocessing using water uptake analysis, mechanical testing, and morphological evaluation to study the inter-relationships between the printing process, scaffold design, and scaffold properties. It was found that there were key differences between each scaffold design in terms of porosity, diffusivity, swellability, and compressive strength. An optimal design was chosen based on these physical measurements which were then weighted in accordance to design importance based on literature and utilizing a design matrix technique. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 533-545, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Partially nanofibrous architecture of 3D tissue engineering scaffolds.

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    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X

    2009-11-01

    An ideal tissue-engineering scaffold should provide suitable pores and appropriate pore surface to induce desired cellular activities and to guide 3D tissue regeneration. In the present work, we have developed macroporous polymer scaffolds with varying pore wall architectures from smooth (solid), microporous, partially nanofibrous, to entirely nanofibrous ones. All scaffolds are designed to have well-controlled interconnected macropores, resulting from leaching sugar sphere template. We examine the effects of material composition, solvent, and phase separation temperature on the pore surface architecture of 3D scaffolds. In particular, phase separation of PLLA/PDLLA or PLLA/PLGA blends leads to partially nanofibrous scaffolds, in which PLLA forms nanofibers and PDLLA or PLGA forms the smooth (solid) surfaces on macropore walls, respectively. Specific surface areas are measured for scaffolds with similar macroporosity but different macropore wall architectures. It is found that the pore wall architecture predominates the total surface area of the scaffolds. The surface area of a partially nanofibrous scaffold increases linearly with the PLLA content in the polymer blend. The amounts of adsorbed proteins from serum increase with the surface area of the scaffolds. These macroporous scaffolds with adjustable pore wall surface architectures may provide a platform for investigating the cellular responses to pore surface architecture, and provide us with a powerful tool to develop superior scaffolds for various tissue-engineering applications.

  20. Design and 3D Printing of Scaffolds and Tissues

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    Jia An

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of three-dimensional (3D-printing processes have been applied to tissue engineering. This paper presents a state-of-the-art study of 3D-printing technologies for tissue-engineering applications, with particular focus on the development of a computer-aided scaffold design system; the direct 3D printing of functionally graded scaffolds; the modeling of selective laser sintering (SLS and fused deposition modeling (FDM processes; the indirect additive manufacturing of scaffolds, with both micro and macro features; the development of a bioreactor; and 3D/4D bioprinting. Technological limitations will be discussed so as to highlight the possibility of future improvements for new 3D-printing methodologies for tissue engineering.

  1. Precisely printable and biocompatible silk fibroin bioink for digital light processing 3D printing.

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    Kim, Soon Hee; Yeon, Yeung Kyu; Lee, Jung Min; Chao, Janet Ren; Lee, Young Jin; Seo, Ye Been; Sultan, Md Tipu; Lee, Ok Joo; Lee, Ji Seung; Yoon, Sung-Il; Hong, In-Sun; Khang, Gilson; Lee, Sang Jin; Yoo, James J; Park, Chan Hum

    2018-04-24

    Although three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting technology has gained much attention in the field of tissue engineering, there are still several significant engineering challenges to overcome, including lack of bioink with biocompatibility and printability. Here, we show a bioink created from silk fibroin (SF) for digital light processing (DLP) 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering applications. The SF-based bioink (Sil-MA) was produced by a methacrylation process using glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) during the fabrication of SF solution. The mechanical and rheological properties of Sil-MA hydrogel proved to be outstanding in experimental testing and can be modulated by varying the Sil-MA contents. This Sil-MA bioink allowed us to build highly complex organ structures, including the heart, vessel, brain, trachea and ear with excellent structural stability and reliable biocompatibility. Sil-MA bioink is well-suited for use in DLP printing process and could be applied to tissue and organ engineering depending on the specific biological requirements.

  2. Bio-inspired mineralization of hydroxyapatite in 3D silk fibroin hydrogel for bone tissue engineering.

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    Jin, Yashi; Kundu, Banani; Cai, Yurong; Kundu, Subhas C; Yao, Juming

    2015-10-01

    To fabricate hard tissue implants with bone-like structure using a biomimetic mineralization method is drawing much more attentions in bone tissue engineering. The present work focuses in designing 3D silk fibroin hydrogel to modulate the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals via a simple ion diffusion method. The study indicates that Ca(2+) incorporation within the hydrogel provides the nucleation sites for hydroxyapatite crystals and subsequently regulates their oriented growth. The mineralization process is regulated in a Ca(2+) concentration- and minerlization time-dependent way. Further, the compressive strength of the mineralized hydrogels is directly proportional with the mineral content in hydrogel. The orchestrated organic/inorganic composite supports well the viability and proliferation of human osteoblast cells; improved cyto-compatibility with increased mineral content. Together, the present investigation reports a simple and biomimetic process to fabricate 3D bone-like biomaterial with desired efficacy to repair bone defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Soft chitosan microbeads scaffold for 3D functional neuronal networks.

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    Tedesco, Maria Teresa; Di Lisa, Donatella; Massobrio, Paolo; Colistra, Nicolò; Pesce, Mattia; Catelani, Tiziano; Dellacasa, Elena; Raiteri, Roberto; Martinoia, Sergio; Pastorino, Laura

    2018-02-01

    The availability of 3D biomimetic in vitro neuronal networks of mammalian neurons represents a pivotal step for the development of brain-on-a-chip experimental models to study neuronal (dys)functions and particularly neuronal connectivity. The use of hydrogel-based scaffolds for 3D cell cultures has been extensively studied in the last years. However, limited work on biomimetic 3D neuronal cultures has been carried out to date. In this respect, here we investigated the use of a widely popular polysaccharide, chitosan (CHI), for the fabrication of a microbead based 3D scaffold to be coupled to primary neuronal cells. CHI microbeads were characterized by optical and atomic force microscopies. The cell/scaffold interaction was deeply characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by immunocytochemistry using confocal microscopy. Finally, a preliminary electrophysiological characterization by micro-electrode arrays was carried out. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Facile fabrication of the porous three-dimensional regenerated silk fibroin scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Zhengbing; Wen, Jianchuan [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yao, Jinrong, E-mail: yaoyaojr@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ni, Yusu [Otology and Skull Base Surgery Department, Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shao, Zhengzhong [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2013-08-01

    In the present work, we report a new facile method to fabricate porous three-dimensional regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) scaffolds through n-butanol- and freezing-induced conformation transition and phase separation. The effects of RSF concentration, freezing temperature and n-butanol addition on the microstructure, the secondary structures of silk fibroin and apparent mechanical properties of the RSF scaffolds were investigated by SEM, {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR spectra and mechanical testing, respectively. By adjusting the RSF concentration and n-butanol addition, the pore size of the scaffold could be controlled in the range from of 10 μm to 350 μm with 84%–98% of porosity. The tensile strength of the wet scaffold reached the maximum of 755.2 ± 33.6 kPa when the concentration of RSF solution was increased to 15% w/w. Moreover, post-treatment with ethanol further induced conformation transition of RSF from random coil or helix to β-sheet. The porous scaffolds prepared by this facile and energy-saving method with good biocompatibility will have great potential for application in tissue engineering. Highlights: • A new facile and energy-saving method to fabricate porous silk fibroin scaffolds; • Freeze-drying step (a typical high energy consuming process) is unnecessary; • Morphology and mechanical properties of scaffolds were easily controlled; • Ethanol post-treatment can be used to tune the degradation behavior.

  5. 3D Printing of Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Anh-Vu; Khorsand, Behnoush; Geary, Sean M.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2015-01-01

    The current need for organ and tissue replacement, repair and regeneration for patients is continually growing such that supply is not meeting the high demand primarily due to a paucity of donors as well as biocompatibility issues that lead to immune rejection of the transplant. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, scientists working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have investigated the use of scaffolds as an alternative to transplantation. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) by providing structural support as well as promoting attachment, proliferation, and differentiation with the ultimate goal of yielding functional tissues or organs. Initial attempts at developing scaffolds were problematic and subsequently inspired a growing interest in 3D printing as a mode for generating scaffolds. Utilizing three-dimensional printing (3DP) technologies, ECM-like scaffolds can be produced with a high degree of complexity and precision, where fine details can be included at a micron level. In this review, we discuss the criteria for printing viable and functional scaffolds, scaffolding materials, and 3DP technologies used to print scaffolds for tissue engineering. A hybrid approach, employing both natural and synthetic materials, as well as multiple printing processes may be the key to yielding an ECM-like scaffold with high mechanical strength, porosity, interconnectivity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and high processability. Creating such biofunctional scaffolds could potentially help to meet the demand by patients for tissues and organs without having to wait or rely on donors for transplantation. PMID:26097108

  6. Hybrid 3D-2D printing for bone scaffolds fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, V. A.; Prinz, V. Ya

    2017-02-01

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields.

  7. Modified silk fibroin scaffolds with collagen/decellularized pulp for bone tissue engineering in cleft palate: Morphological structures and biofunctionalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangkert, Supaporn [Biological Materials for Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla90110 (Thailand); Meesane, Jirut, E-mail: jirutmeesane999@yahoo.co.uk [Biological Materials for Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla90110 (Thailand); Kamonmattayakul, Suttatip [Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Preventive Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla90110 (Thailand); Chai, Wen Lin [Faculty of Dentistry, Department of General Dental Practice and Oral and Maxillofacial Imaging, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-01-01

    Cleft palate is a congenital malformation that generates a maxillofacial bone defect around the mouth area. The creation of performance scaffolds for bone tissue engineering in cleft palate is an issue that was proposed in this research. Because of its good biocompatibility, high stability, and non-toxicity, silk fibroin was selected as the scaffold of choice in this research. Silk fibroin scaffolds were prepared by freeze-drying before immerging in a solution of collagen, decellularized pulp, and collagen/decellularized pulp. Then, the immersed scaffolds were freeze-dried. Structural organization in solution was observed by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The molecular organization of the solutions and crystal structure of the scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The weight increase of the modified scaffolds and the pore size were determined. The morphology was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Mechanical properties were tested. Biofunctionalities were considered by seeding osteoblasts in silk fibroin scaffolds before analysis of the cell proliferation, viability, total protein assay, and histological analysis. The results demonstrated that dendrite structure of the fibrils occurred in those solutions. Molecular organization of the components in solution arranged themselves into an irregular structure. The fibrils were deposited in the pores of the modified silk fibroin scaffolds. The modified scaffolds showed a beta-sheet structure. The morphological structure affected the mechanical properties of the silk fibroin scaffolds with and without modification. Following assessment of the biofunctionalities, the modified silk fibroin scaffolds could induce cell proliferation, viability, and total protein particularly in modified silk fibroin with collagen/decellularized pulp. Furthermore, the histological analysis indicated that the cells could adhere in modified silk fibroin

  8. 3D Printing of Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Anh-Vu; Khorsand, Behnoush; Geary, Sean M; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-08-26

    The current need for organ and tissue replacement, repair, and regeneration for patients is continually growing such that supply is not meeting demand primarily due to a paucity of donors as well as biocompatibility issues leading to immune rejection of the transplant. In order to overcome these drawbacks, scientists have investigated the use of scaffolds as an alternative to transplantation. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) by providing structural support as well as promoting attachment, proliferation, and differentiation with the ultimate goal of yielding functional tissues or organs. Initial attempts at developing scaffolds were problematic and subsequently inspired an interest in 3D printing as a mode for generating scaffolds. Utilizing three-dimensional printing (3DP) technologies, ECM-like scaffolds can be produced with a high degree of complexity, where fine details can be included at a micrometer level. In this Review, the criteria for printing viable and functional scaffolds, scaffolding materials, and 3DP technologies used to print scaffolds for tissue engineering are discussed. Creating biofunctional scaffolds could potentially help to meet the demand by patients for tissues and organs without having to wait or rely on donors for transplantation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli.

  10. Hybrid 3D-2D printing of bone scaffolds Hybrid 3D-2D printing methods for bone scaffolds fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, V Ya; Seleznev, Vladimir

    2016-12-13

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields. Copyright 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Fabrication of 3D porous SF/β-TCP hybrid scaffolds for bone tissue reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jung; Min, Kyung Dan; Lee, Min Chae; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Lee, Jung Min; Park, Ye Ri; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Ju Yeon; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-07-01

    Bio-ceramic is a biomaterial actively studied in the field of bone tissue engineering. But, only certain ceramic materials can resolve the corrosion problem and possess the biological affinity of conventional metal biomaterials. Therefore, the recent development of composites of hybrid composites and polymers has been widely studied. In this study, we aimed to select the best scaffold of silk fibroin and β-TCP hybrid for bone tissue engineering. We fabricated three groups of scaffold such as SF (silk fibroin scaffold), GS (silk fibroin/small granule size of β-TCP scaffold) and GM (silk fibroin/medium granule size of β-TCP scaffold), and we compared the characteristics of each group. During characterization of the scaffold, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for structural analysis. We compared the physiological properties of the scaffold regarding the swelling ratio, water uptake and porosity. To evaluate the mechanical properties, we examined the compressive strength of the scaffold. During in vitro testing, we evaluated cell attachment and cell proliferation (CCK-8). Finally, we confirmed in vivo new bone regeneration from the implanted scaffolds using histological staining and micro-CT. From these evaluations, the fabricated scaffold demonstrated high porosity with good inter-pore connectivity, showed good biocompatibility and high compressive strength and modulus. In particular, the present study indicates that the GM scaffold using β-TCP accelerates new bone regeneration of implanted scaffolds. Accordingly, our scaffold is expected to act a useful application in the field of bone tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1779-1787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Fabrication of Nanostructured Poly-ε-caprolactone 3D Scaffolds for 3D Cell Culture Technology

    KAUST Repository

    Schipani, Rossana

    2015-04-21

    Tissue engineering is receiving tremendous attention due to the necessity to overcome the limitations related to injured or diseased tissues or organs. It is the perfect combination of cells and biomimetic-engineered materials. With the appropriate biochemical factors, it is possible to develop new effective bio-devices that are capable to improve or replace biological functions. Latest developments in microfabrication methods, employing mostly synthetic biomaterials, allow the production of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds that are able to direct cell-to-cell interactions and specific cellular functions in order to drive tissue regeneration or cell transplantation. The presented work offers a rapid and efficient method of 3D scaffolds fabrication by using optical lithography and micro-molding techniques. Bioresorbable polymer poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) was the material used thanks to its high biocompatibility and ability to naturally degrade in tissues. 3D PCL substrates show a particular combination in the designed length scale: cylindrical shaped pillars with 10μm diameter, 10μm height, arranged in a hexagonal lattice with spacing of 20μm were obtained. The sidewalls of the pillars were nanostructured by attributing a 3D architecture to the scaffold. The suitability of these devices as cell culture technology supports was evaluated by plating NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human Neural Stem Cells (hNSC) on them. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis was carried out in order to examine the micro- and nano-patterns on the surface of the supports. In addition, after seeding of cells, SEM and immunofluorescence characterization of the fabricated systems were performed to check adhesion, growth and proliferation. It was observed that cells grow and develop healthy on the bio-polymeric devices by giving rise to well-interconnected networks. 3D PCL nano-patterned pillared scaffold therefore may have considerable potential as effective tool for

  13. 3D printing of novel osteochondral scaffolds with graded microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Margaret A.; Castro, Nathan J.; Plesniak, Michael W.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondral tissue has a complex graded structure where biological, physiological, and mechanical properties vary significantly over the full thickness spanning from the subchondral bone region beneath the joint surface to the hyaline cartilage region at the joint surface. This presents a significant challenge for tissue-engineered structures addressing osteochondral defects. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D bioprinters present a unique solution to this problem. The objective of this study is to use FDM-based 3D bioprinting and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for improved bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, growth, and osteochondral differentiation. FDM printing parameters can be tuned through computer aided design and computer numerical control software to manipulate scaffold geometries in ways that are beneficial to mechanical performance without hindering cellular behavior. Additionally, the ability to fine-tune 3D printed scaffolds increases further through our investment casting procedure which facilitates the inclusion of nanoparticles with biochemical factors to further elicit desired hMSC differentiation. For this study, FDM was used to print investment-casting molds innovatively designed with varied pore distribution over the full thickness of the scaffold. The mechanical and biological impacts of the varied pore distributions were compared and evaluated to determine the benefits of this physical manipulation. The results indicate that both mechanical properties and cell performance improve in the graded pore structures when compared to homogeneously distributed porous and non-porous structures. Differentiation results indicated successful osteogenic and chondrogenic manipulation in engineered scaffolds.

  14. Precipitation of hydroxyapatite on electrospun polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugavel, Suganya; Reddy, Venugopal Jayarama; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Lakshmi, B S; Dev, Vr Giri

    2014-07-01

    Advances in electrospun nanofibres with bioactive materials have enhanced the scope of fabricating biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering. The present research focuses on fabrication of polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffolds by electrospinning followed by hydroxyapatite deposition by calcium-phosphate dipping method for bone tissue engineering. Morphology, composition, hydrophilicity and mechanical properties of polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin-hydroxyapatite nanofibrous scaffolds along with controls polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffolds were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle and tensile tests, respectively. Adipose-derived stem cells cultured on polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin-hydroxyapatite nanofibrous scaffolds displayed highest cell proliferation, increased osteogenic markers expression (alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin), osteogenic differentiation and increased mineralization in comparison with polycaprolactone control. The obtained results indicate that polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin-hydroxyapatite nanofibrous scaffolds have appropriate physico-chemical and biological properties to be used as biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. A simple semi-quantitative approach studying the in vivo degradation of regenerated silk fibroin scaffolds with different pore sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongwei; Chen, Zhongchun; Wen, Jianchuan; Jia, Minghui; Shao, Zhengzhong; Zhao, Xia

    2017-10-01

    The biocompatibility and in vivo degradation rate of biomaterials represent critical control points in the long-term success of scaffolds for tissue restoration. In this study, new three-dimensional (3D) regenerated silk fibroin scaffolds (RSFs) were prepared by the freezing-defrosting procedure, and then were implanted beneath the dorsal skin of rats. This study aims to develop a kinetic semi-quantitative approach to assess in vivo degradation rate and biocompatibility of this kind of RSFs with different pore sizes for the first time, and to evaluate the relationship between the biodegradation and tissue responses by measuring the thickness of residual scaffolds, fibrous capsules and infiltrated tissues through integrated techniques of histology, optical imaging and image analysis. Our results showed that scaffolds with both pore sizes (74.35±10.84μm and 139.23±44.93μm, respectively) were well tolerated by host animals and pore size was found to be the rate limiting factor to the biodegradation in the subcutaneous implantation model. In addition, the biodegradation of RSFs was inflammation-mediated to a certain degree and fibroblasts may play a critical role in this process. Overall, such semi-quantitative approach was demonstrated to be a simple and effective method to assess the in vivo degradation rate, and the prepared RSFs were presented to have promising potential in tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 3D Tissue Scaffold Printing On Custom Artificial Bone Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül ALDEMİR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of defect-matching scaffolds is the most critical step in custom artificial bone applications. Three dimensional printing (3DP is one of the best techniques particularly for custom designs on artificial bone applications because of the high controllability and design independency. Our long-term aim is to implant an artificial custom bone that is cultured with patient's own mesenchymal stem cells after determining defect architecture on patient's bone by using CT-scan and printing that defect-matching 3D scaffold with appropriate nontoxic materials. In this study, preliminary results of strength and cytotoxicity measurements of 3D printed scaffolds with modified calcium sulfate compositepowder (MCSCP were presented. CAD designs were created and MCSCP were printed by a 3D printer (3DS, Visijet, PXL Core. Some samples were covered with salt solution in order to harden the samples. MCSCP and salt coated MCSCP were the two experimental groups in this study. Cytotoxicity and mechanical experiments were performed after surface examination withscanning electron microscope (SEM and light microscope. Tension tests were performed for MCSCP and salt coated MCSCP samples. The 3D scaffolds were sterilized with ethylene oxide gas sterilizer, ventilated and conditioned with DMEM (10% FBS. L929 mouse fibroblast cells were cultured on scaffolds (3 repetitive and cell viability was determined using MTT analysis. According to the mechanical results, the MCSCP group stands until average 71,305 N, while salt coated MCSCP group stands until 21,328N. Although the strength difference between two groups is statistically significant (p=0.001, Mann-Whitney U, elastic modulus is not (MCSCP=1,186Pa, salt coated MCSCP=1,169Pa, p=0.445. Cell viability (MTT analysis results on day 1, 3, and 5 demonstrated thatscaffolds hadno toxic effect to the L929 mouse fibroblast cells. Consequently, 3D printed samples with MCSCP could potentially be a strong alternative

  17. Improved resolution of 3D printed scaffolds by shrinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Helena N; Wu, Benjamin M

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP) uses inkjet printheads to selectively deposit liquid binder to adjoin powder particles in a layer-by-layer fashion to create a computer-modeled 3D object. Two general approaches for 3DP have been described for biomedical applications (direct and indirect 3DP). The two approaches offer competing advantages, and both are limited by print resolution. This study describes a materials processing strategy to enhance 3DP resolution by controlled shrinking net-shape scaffolds. Briefly, porogen preforms are printed and infused with the desired monomer or polymer solution. After solidification or polymerization, the porogen is leached and the polymer is allowed to shrink by controlled drying. Heat treatment is performed to retain the dimensions against swelling forces. The main objective of this study is to determine the effects of polymer content and post-processing on dimension, microstructure, and thermomechanical properties of the scaffold. For polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA), reducing polymer content corresponded with greater shrinkage with maximum shrinkage of ∼80 vol% at 20% vol% PEG-DA. The secondary heat treatment retains the microarchitecture and new dimensions of the scaffolds, even when the heat-treated scaffolds are immersed into water. To demonstrate shrinkage predictability, 3D components with interlocking positive and negative features were printed, processed, and fitted. This material processing strategy provides an alternative method to enhance the resolution of 3D scaffolds, for a wide range of polymers, without optimizing the binder-powder interaction physics to print each material combination. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahini A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aref Shahini,1 Mostafa Yazdimamaghani,2 Kenneth J Walker,2 Margaret A Eastman,3 Hamed Hatami-Marbini,4 Brenda J Smith,5 John L Ricci,6 Sundar V Madihally,2 Daryoosh Vashaee,1 Lobat Tayebi2,7 1School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, 2School of Chemical Engineering, 3Department of Chemistry, 4School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 6Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY; 7School of Material Science and Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK, USA Abstract: Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene poly(4-styrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS, in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent

  19. Evaluation of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells and 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Jian-Feng; Li, Shuo; Guo, Chang-An; Zhang, Feng; Yan, Zuo-Qin; Xu, Du-Liang; Mo, Xiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells and scaffolds play a very important role in tissue engineering. Here, we isolated synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) from synovial membrane tissue and characterized stem-cell properties. Gelatin nanoparticles (NP) were prepared using a two-step desolvation method and then pre-mixed into different host matrix (silk fibroin (SF), gelatin (Gel), or SF–Gel mixture) to generate various 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds (NP/SF, NP/SF–Gel, NP/Gel-1, and NP/Gel-2). The microstructure was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Biocompatibility assessment was performed through CCK-8 assay by coculturing with SMSCs at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days. According to the results, SMSCs are similar to other MSCs in their surface epitope expression, which are negative for CD45 and positive for CD44, CD90, and CD105. After incubation in lineage-specific medium, SMSCs could differentiate into chondrocytes, osteocytes and adipocytes. 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds exhibited a good biocompatibility in the process of coculturing with SMSCs and had no negative effect on cell behavior. The study provides a strategy to obtain SMSCs and fabricate 3D printed nanocomposite scaffolds, the combination of which could be used for practical applications in tissue engineering. (paper)

  20. 3D printing facilitated scaffold-free tissue unit fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan J; Mei, Ying; Trusk, Thomas C; Visconti, Richard P; Yost, Michael J; Drake, Christopher J; Argraves, William Scott; Markwald, Roger R; Kindy, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing microdroplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit microdroplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell–cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation. (paper)

  1. Coaxial electrospun aligned tussah silk fibroin nanostructured fiber scaffolds embedded with hydroxyapatite-tussah silk fibroin nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Weili; He, Jianxin; Sang, Feng; Ding, Bin; Chen, Li; Cui, Shizhong; Li, Kejing; Han, Qiming; Tan, Weilin

    2016-01-01

    The bone is a composite of inorganic and organic materials and possesses a complex hierarchical architecture consisting of mineralized fibrils formed by collagen molecules and coated with oriented hydroxyapatite. To regenerate bone tissue, it is necessary to provide a scaffold that mimics the architecture of the extracellular matrix in native bone. Here, we describe one such scaffold, a nanostructured composite with a core made of a composite of hydroxyapatite and tussah silk fibroin. The core is encased in a shell of tussah silk fibroin. The composite fibers were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning using green water solvent and were characterized using different techniques. In comparison to nanofibers of pure tussah silk, composite notably improved mechanical properties, with 90-fold and 2-fold higher initial modulus and breaking stress, respectively, obtained. Osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were cultivated on the composite to assess its suitability as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. We found that the fiber scaffold supported cell adhesion and proliferation and functionally promoted alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition relevant for biomineralization. In addition, the composite were more biocompatible than pure tussah silk fibroin or cover slip. Thus, the nanostructured composite has excellent biomimetic and mechanical properties and is a potential biocompatible scaffold for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimization of the silk scaffold sericin removal process for retention of silk fibroin protein structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, Thomas K H; Toh, Siew-Lok; Goh, James C H, E-mail: dosgohj@nus.edu.s, E-mail: dostkh@nus.edu.s, E-mail: bietohsl@nus.edu.s [Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-06-01

    In the process of removing sericin (degumming) from a raw silk scaffold, the fibroin structural integrity is often challenged, leading to mechanical depreciation. This study aims to identify the factors and conditions contributing to fibroin degradation during alkaline degumming and to perform an optimization study of the parameters involved to achieve preservation of fibroin structure and properties. The methodology involves degumming knitted silk scaffolds for various durations (5-90 min) and temperatures (60-100 {sup 0}C). Mechanical agitation and use of the refreshed solution during degumming are included to investigate how these factors contribute to degumming efficiency and fibroin preservation. Characterizations of silk fibroin morphology, mechanical properties and protein components are determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), single fiber tensile tests and gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), respectively. Sericin removal is ascertained via SEM imaging and a protein fractionation method involving SDS-PAGE. The results show that fibroin fibrillation, leading to reduced mechanical integrity, is mainly caused by prolonged degumming duration. Through a series of optimization, knitted scaffolds are observed to be optimally degummed and experience negligible mechanical and structural degradation when subjected to alkaline degumming with mechanical agitation for 30 min at 100 {sup 0}C.

  3. Osteoinductive silk fibroin/titanium dioxide/hydroxyapatite hybrid scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jung Min; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the fabrication that incorporation of titanium isopropoxide (TiO2) and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles into the silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds. In this process, we prepared TiO2 nanoparticles using sol-gel synthesis and the porous structure was developed by salt-leaching process. Homogeneous distribution of TiO2 and HA nanoparticles were confirmed by images of VP-FE-SEM and those equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. Structural characteristics of the porous SF/TiO2/HA hybrid scaffold were also determined using FTIR analysis and X-ray diffractometer. In this study, the porous SF/TiO2/HA hybrid scaffold showed similar porosity, enhanced mechanical property, but decreased water binding abilities, compared with the porous SF scaffold. For evaluation of the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic gene expression were employed. Our results revealed that the porous SF/TiO2/HA hybrid scaffold had improved osteoinductivity compared with the porous SF scaffold. These results suggest that the osteogenic property as well as mechanical property of the porous SF/TiO2/HA hybrid scaffold could be better than the porous SF scaffold. Therefore, the porous SF/TiO2/HA hybrid scaffold may be a good promising biomaterial for bone tissue engineering application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Coaxial electrospun aligned tussah silk fibroin nanostructured fiber scaffolds embedded with hydroxyapatite–tussah silk fibroin nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Weili; He, Jianxin; Sang, Feng; Ding, Bin; Chen, Li; Cui, Shizhong; Li, Kejing; Han, Qiming; Tan, Weilin

    2016-01-01

    The bone is a composite of inorganic and organic materials and possesses a complex hierarchical architecture consisting of mineralized fibrils formed by collagen molecules and coated with oriented hydroxyapatite. To regenerate bone tissue, it is necessary to provide a scaffold that mimics the architecture of the extracellular matrix in native bone. Here, we describe one such scaffold, a nanostructured composite with a core made of a composite of hydroxyapatite and tussah silk fibroin. The core is encased in a shell of tussah silk fibroin. The composite fibers were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning using green water solvent and were characterized using different techniques. In comparison to nanofibers of pure tussah silk, composite notably improved mechanical properties, with 90-fold and 2-fold higher initial modulus and breaking stress, respectively, obtained. Osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were cultivated on the composite to assess its suitability as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. We found that the fiber scaffold supported cell adhesion and proliferation and functionally promoted alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition relevant for biomineralization. In addition, the composite were more biocompatible than pure tussah silk fibroin or cover slip. Thus, the nanostructured composite has excellent biomimetic and mechanical properties and is a potential biocompatible scaffold for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A designing scaffold strategy to imitate the mineralized collagen bundles in natural bone was presented. • Aligned nanostructured composite fibers were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning using green water solvent. • Mechanical properties of aligned TSF nanofiber had been significantly improved by embedding with composite nanoparticles. • Composite scaffolds effectively supported proliferation of MG-63 cells and promoted biomineralization.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of curcumin-loaded silk fibroin/P(LLA-CL) nanofibrous scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yuan; Zhan, Jian-Chao; Zhang, Kui-Hua; Mo, Xiu-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Curcumin exhibited excellent properties including antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, and anticoagulant activities. In this study, curcumin was incorporated into silk fibroin (SF)/poly(L-lactic acid- co-e-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) nanofibrous scaffolds via electrospinning, and changes brought about by raising the curcumin content were observed: SEM images showed that the average nanofibrous diameter decreased at the beginning and then increased, and the nanofibers became uniform; FTIR showed that the conformation of SF transforming from random coil form to β-sheet structure had not been induced, while SF conformation converted to β-sheet after being treated with 75% ethanol vapor; XRD results confirmed that the crystal structure of (P(LLA-CL)) had been destroyed; The mechanical test illustrated that nanofibrous scaffolds still maintained good mechanical properties. Further, curcumin-loaded nanofibrous scaffolds were evaluated for drug release, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities in vitro. The results showed that curcumin presented a sustained release behavior from nanofibrous scaffolds and maintained its free radical scavenging ability, and such scaffolds could effectively inhibit S. aureus growth (> 95%). Thus, curcumin-loaded SF/P(LLA-CL) nanofibrous scaffolds might be potential candidates for wound dressing and tissue engineering scaffolds.

  6. In vitro and in vivo research on using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Qian [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China); Chen Denglong [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China); Yang Zhiming [Division of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Li Min, E-mail: mli@fjnu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China)

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold was investigated in vitro and in vivo, respectively, utilizing tenocytes and animal model. The animal model used here was an adult New Zealand White rabbit with a 15-mm gap defect in both sides of the Achilles tendon. The Achilles tendon defects in one side of hind legs were repaired using the braided A. pernyi silk fibroin scaffold in experimental group (n = 24), while the other side left untreated as negative group (n = 24). The recovery of the defect tendons were evaluated postoperatively at the 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 16th week using macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical, scanning electron micrograph and biomechanical test techniques. In vitro results examined by scanning electron micrograph showed that A. pernyi silk fibroin promote the adhesion and propagation of the tenocytes. In vivo, at 16 weeks after implantation, morphological results showed that neo-tendons were formed, and bundles of collagen fibers in the neo-tendons were uniform and well oriented. Immunohistochemical results showed that collagen type in the regenerated tendons was predominantly type I. The maximum load of regenerated tendon at 16 weeks reached 55.46% of the normal tendon values. Preliminary, we concluded that A. pernyi silk fibroin promoted the recovery of Achilles tendon defect of rabbit and the application of A. pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold is feasible.

  7. In vitro and in vivo research on using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Qian; Chen Denglong; Yang Zhiming; Li Min

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold was investigated in vitro and in vivo, respectively, utilizing tenocytes and animal model. The animal model used here was an adult New Zealand White rabbit with a 15-mm gap defect in both sides of the Achilles tendon. The Achilles tendon defects in one side of hind legs were repaired using the braided A. pernyi silk fibroin scaffold in experimental group (n = 24), while the other side left untreated as negative group (n = 24). The recovery of the defect tendons were evaluated postoperatively at the 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 16th week using macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical, scanning electron micrograph and biomechanical test techniques. In vitro results examined by scanning electron micrograph showed that A. pernyi silk fibroin promote the adhesion and propagation of the tenocytes. In vivo, at 16 weeks after implantation, morphological results showed that neo-tendons were formed, and bundles of collagen fibers in the neo-tendons were uniform and well oriented. Immunohistochemical results showed that collagen type in the regenerated tendons was predominantly type I. The maximum load of regenerated tendon at 16 weeks reached 55.46% of the normal tendon values. Preliminary, we concluded that A. pernyi silk fibroin promoted the recovery of Achilles tendon defect of rabbit and the application of A. pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold is feasible.

  8. Incorporation of zinc oxide nanoparticles into chitosan-collagen 3D porous scaffolds: Effect on morphology, mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of 3D porous scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Saleem; Zainol, Ismail; Idrus, Ruszymah Hj

    2017-11-01

    The zinc oxide nanoparticles (particles size <50nm) incorporated into chitosan-collagen 3D porous scaffolds and investigated the effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles incorporation on microstructure, mechanical properties, biodegradation and cytocompatibility of 3D porous scaffolds. The 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0% and 4.0% zinc oxide nanoparticles chitosan-collagen 3D porous scaffolds were fabricated via freeze-drying technique. The zinc oxide nanoparticles incorporation effects consisting in chitosan-collagen 3D porous scaffolds were investigated by mechanical and swelling tests, and effect on the morphology of scaffolds examined microscopically. The biodegradation and cytocompatibility tests were used to investigate the effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles incorporation on the ability of scaffolds to use for tissue engineering application. The mean pore size and swelling ratio of scaffolds were decreased upon incorporation of zinc oxide nanoparticles however, the porosity, tensile modulus and biodegradation rate were increased upon incorporation of zinc oxide nanoparticles. In vitro culture of human fibroblasts and keratinocytes showed that the zinc oxide nanoparticles facilitated cell adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of chitosan-collagen 3D porous scaffolds. It was found that the zinc oxide nanoparticles incorporation enhanced porosity, tensile modulus and cytocompatibility of chitosan-collagen 3D porous scaffolds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Marine Spongin: Naturally Prefabricated 3D Scaffold-Based Biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesionowski, Teofil; Norman, Małgorzata; Żółtowska-Aksamitowska, Sonia; Petrenko, Iaroslav; Ehrlich, Hermann

    2018-01-01

    The biosynthesis, chemistry, structural features and functionality of spongin as a halogenated scleroprotein of keratosan demosponges are still paradigms. This review has the principal goal of providing thorough and comprehensive coverage of spongin as a naturally prefabricated 3D biomaterial with multifaceted applications. The history of spongin’s discovery and use in the form of commercial sponges, including their marine farming strategies, have been analyzed and are discussed here. Physicochemical and material properties of spongin-based scaffolds are also presented. The review also focuses on prospects and trends in applications of spongin for technology, materials science and biomedicine. Special attention is paid to applications in tissue engineering, adsorption of dyes and extreme biomimetics. PMID:29522478

  10. Fabrication and characterization of drug-loaded nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 scaffolds modified with carbon nanotubes and silk fibroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Meng-Zhu; Huang-Fu, Ming-Yi; Liu, Hui-Na; Wang, Xia-Rong; Sheng, Xiaoxia; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (nHA/PA66) porous scaffolds were fabricated by a phase inversion method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and silk fibroin (SF) were used to modify the surface of the nHA/PA66 scaffolds by freeze-drying and cross-linking. Dexamethasone was absorbed to the CNTs to promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). The cell viability of BMSCs was investigated by changing the concentration of the CNT dispersion, and the most biocompatible scaffold was selected. In addition, the morphology and mechanical property of the scaffolds were investigated. The results showed that the nHA/PA66 scaffolds modified with CNTs and SF met the requirements of bone tissue engineering scaffolds. The dexamethasone-loaded CNT/SF-nHA/PA66 composite scaffold promoted the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and the drug-loaded scaffolds are expected to function as effective bone tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:27920525

  11. Impedance Spectroscopic Characterisation of Porosity in 3D Cell Culture Scaffolds with Different Channel Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canali, Chiara; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Heiskanen, Arto

    2015-01-01

    We present the application of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a method for discriminating between different polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffolds for three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. The validity of EIS characterisation for scaffolds having different degree of porosity...

  12. Rapid prototyping for tissue-engineered bone scaffold by 3D printing and biocompatibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui-Yu; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Mi, Xue; Hu, Yang; Gu, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold (calcined goat spongy bone-biphasic ceramic composite/PVA gel) by 3D printing was performed, and the biocompatibility of the fabricated bone scaffold was studied. Pre-designed STL file was imported into the GXYZ303010-XYLE 3D printing system, and the tissue-engineered bone scaffold was fabricated by 3D printing using gel extrusion. Rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in vitro and then inoculated to the sterilized bone scaffold obtained by 3D printing. The growth of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold was observed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effect of the tissue-engineered bone scaffold on the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs using MTT assay. Universal testing machine was adopted to test the tensile strength of the bone scaffold. The leachate of the bone scaffold was prepared and injected into the New Zealand rabbits. Cytotoxicity test, acute toxicity test, pyrogenic test and intracutaneous stimulation test were performed to assess the biocompatibility of the bone scaffold. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing had uniform pore size with the porosity of about 68.3%. The pores were well interconnected, and the bone scaffold showed excellent mechanical property. Rabbit BMSCs grew and proliferated on the surface of the bone scaffold after adherence. MTT assay indicated that the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold did not differ significantly from that of the cells in the control. In vivo experiments proved that the bone scaffold fabricated by 3D printing had no acute toxicity, pyrogenic reaction or stimulation. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing allows the rabbit BMSCs to adhere, grow and proliferate and exhibits excellent biomechanical property and high biocompatibility. 3D printing has a good application prospect in the prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold.

  13. Electrospun silk fibroin/poly(lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous scaffolds for bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi; Lin, Ming; Xie, Qing; Sun, Hao; Huang, Yazhuo; Zhang, DanDan; Yu, Zhang; Bi, Xiaoping; Chen, Junzhao; Wang, Jing; Shi, Wodong; Gu, Ping; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue engineering has become a promising therapeutic approach for bone regeneration. Nanofibrous scaffolds have attracted great interest mainly due to their structural similarity to natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Poly(lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) has been successfully used in bone regeneration, but PLCL polymers are inert and lack natural cell recognition sites, and the surface of PLCL scaffold is hydrophobic. Silk fibroin (SF) is a kind of natural polymer with inherent bioactivity, and supports mesenchymal stem cell attachment, osteogenesis, and ECM deposition. Therefore, we fabricated hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds by adding different weight ratios of SF to PLCL in order to find a scaffold with improved properties for bone regeneration. Methods Hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated by blending different weight ratios of SF with PLCL. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) were seeded on SF/PLCL nanofibrous scaffolds of various ratios for a systematic evaluation of cell adhesion, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and osteogenic differentiation; the efficacy of the composite of hADSCs and scaffolds in repairing critical-sized calvarial defects in rats was investigated. Results The SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold exhibited favorable tensile strength, surface roughness, and hydrophilicity, which facilitated cell adhesion and proliferation. Moreover, the SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold promoted the osteogenic differentiation of hADSCs by elevating the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes such as BSP, Ocn, Col1A1, and OPN and enhanced ECM mineralization. In vivo assays showed that SF/PLCL (50/50) scaffold improved the repair of the critical-sized calvarial defect in rats, resulting in increased bone volume, higher trabecular number, enhanced bone mineral density, and increased new bone areas, compared with the pure PLCL scaffold. Conclusion The SF/PLCL (50/50) nanofibrous scaffold facilitated hADSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in

  14. Mimicked cartilage scaffolds of silk fibroin/hyaluronic acid with stem cells for osteoarthritis surgery: Morphological, mechanical, and physical clues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaipaew, Jirayut; Wangkulangkul, Piyanun; Meesane, Jirut; Raungrut, Pritsana; Puttawibul, Puttisak

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a critical disease that comes from degeneration of cartilage tissue. In severe cases surgery is generally required. Tissue engineering using scaffolds with stem cell transplantation is an attractive approach and a challenge for orthopedic surgery. For sample preparation, silk fibroin (SF)/hyaluronic acid (HA) scaffolds in different ratios of SF/HA (w/w) (i.e., 100:0, 90:10, 80:20, and 70:30) were formed by freeze-drying. The morphological, mechanical, and physical clues were considered in this research. The morphological structure of the scaffolds was observed by scanning electron microscope. The mechanical and physical properties of the scaffolds were analyzed by compressive and swelling ratio testing, respectively. For the cell experiments, scaffolds were seeded and cultured with human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs). The cultured scaffolds were tested for cell viability, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression. The SF with HA scaffolds showed regular porous structures. Those scaffolds had a soft and elastic characteristic with a high swelling ratio and water uptake. The SF/HA scaffolds showed a spheroid structure of the cells in the porous structure particularly in the SF80 and SF70 scaffolds. Cells could express Col2a, Agg, and Sox9 which are markers for chondrogenesis. It could be deduced that SF/HA scaffolds showed significant clues for suitability in cartilage tissue engineering and in surgery for osteoarthritis. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/Hyaluronic acid was fabricated into mimicked scaffolds. • Mimicked scaffolds were incorporated with stem cells for chondrogenesis. • Mimicked scaffolds showed the clues for chondrogenic regulation. • Mimicked scaffolds had suitable performance for cartilage tissue engineering • Mimicked scaffolds showed promise for osteoarthritis surgery.

  15. Mimicked cartilage scaffolds of silk fibroin/hyaluronic acid with stem cells for osteoarthritis surgery: Morphological, mechanical, and physical clues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaipaew, Jirayut [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, 15 Karnjanavanich Road, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand 90110 (Thailand); Wangkulangkul, Piyanun [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, 15 Karnjanavanich Road, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand 90110 (Thailand); Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, 15 Karnjanavanich Road, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand 90110 (Thailand); Meesane, Jirut, E-mail: jirutmeesane999@yahoo.co.uk [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, 15 Karnjanavanich Road, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand 90110 (Thailand); Raungrut, Pritsana [Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, 15 Karnjanavanich Road, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand 90110 (Thailand); Puttawibul, Puttisak [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, 15 Karnjanavanich Road, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand 90110 (Thailand); Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, 15 Karnjanavanich Road, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand 90110 (Thailand)

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is a critical disease that comes from degeneration of cartilage tissue. In severe cases surgery is generally required. Tissue engineering using scaffolds with stem cell transplantation is an attractive approach and a challenge for orthopedic surgery. For sample preparation, silk fibroin (SF)/hyaluronic acid (HA) scaffolds in different ratios of SF/HA (w/w) (i.e., 100:0, 90:10, 80:20, and 70:30) were formed by freeze-drying. The morphological, mechanical, and physical clues were considered in this research. The morphological structure of the scaffolds was observed by scanning electron microscope. The mechanical and physical properties of the scaffolds were analyzed by compressive and swelling ratio testing, respectively. For the cell experiments, scaffolds were seeded and cultured with human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs). The cultured scaffolds were tested for cell viability, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression. The SF with HA scaffolds showed regular porous structures. Those scaffolds had a soft and elastic characteristic with a high swelling ratio and water uptake. The SF/HA scaffolds showed a spheroid structure of the cells in the porous structure particularly in the SF80 and SF70 scaffolds. Cells could express Col2a, Agg, and Sox9 which are markers for chondrogenesis. It could be deduced that SF/HA scaffolds showed significant clues for suitability in cartilage tissue engineering and in surgery for osteoarthritis. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/Hyaluronic acid was fabricated into mimicked scaffolds. • Mimicked scaffolds were incorporated with stem cells for chondrogenesis. • Mimicked scaffolds showed the clues for chondrogenic regulation. • Mimicked scaffolds had suitable performance for cartilage tissue engineering • Mimicked scaffolds showed promise for osteoarthritis surgery.

  16. Preparation and characterization of Antheraea assama silk fibroin based novel non-woven scaffold for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasoju, Naresh; Bhonde, Ramesh R; Bora, Utpal

    2009-10-01

    The quest for novel materials as scaffolds with suitable micro-architecture for supporting tissue neogenesis in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) is continuing. In this paper we report an Antheraea assama silk-based non-woven fibroin scaffold for applications in TERM. The novel three-dimensional scaffold is highly interconnected and porous, with a pore size of 150 microm, porosity of 90% and water uptake capacity of 85%. FTIR revealed a typical beta-sheet structure of fibroin. The scaffold has thermal and mechanical properties superior to those of Bombyx mori, as revealed by DSC, TGA and tensile tests. The scaffold exhibited satisfactory blood compatibility, as determined by thrombogenicity, haemolysis, platelet/leukocyte count, platelet adhesion and protein adsorption studies. The scaffold was found to be cytocompatible with human cell lines A549, KB, HepG2 and HeLa for a period of up to 4 weeks. SEM analysis revealed excellent attachment, spreading and migration of cells in the scaffold. MTT assay was performed to estimate the viability and growth of cells in the matrix. Quantification of collagen in cell-scaffold constructs was done by picro-Sirius red assay. Ex ovo chorioallantoic membrane assay and nitric oxide estimations in spent culture medium showed the scaffold's ability to promote angiogenesis. Finally, the biodegradability of the scaffold was determined by the weight loss observed upon treatment with trypsin over a period of 4 weeks. The results reveal that the fibroin from A. assama is a promising candidate as a biocompatible, biomimetic and biodegradable biomaterial of natural origin for applications in TERM. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effect of fetal bovine serum on mineralization in silk fibroin scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetsch, Jolanda R; Paulsen, Samantha J; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2015-02-01

    Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is a common media supplement used in tissue engineering (TE) cultures. The chemical composition of FBS is known to be highly variable between different brands, types or batches and can have a significant impact on cell function. This study investigated the influence of four different FBS types in osteogenic or control medium on mineralization of acellular and cell-seeded silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds. In bone TE, mineralized tissue is considered as the final product of a successful cell culture. Calcium assays and micro-computed tomography scans revealed spontaneous mineralization on SF scaffolds with certain FBS types, even without cells present. In contrast, cell-mediated mineralization was found under osteogenic conditions only. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis demonstrated a similar ion composition of the mineralization present in scaffolds, whether cell-mediated or spontaneous. These results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. This study shows clear evidence for the influence of FBS type on mineralization on SF scaffolds. The suitability of FBS medium supplementation in TE studies is highly questionable with regard to reproducibility of studies and comparability of obtained results. For future TE studies, alternatives to conventional FBS such as defined FBS or serum-free media should be considered, as suggested decades ago. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A graded graphene oxide-hydroxyapatite/silk fibroin biomimetic scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Chu, Yanyan; He, Jianxin; Shao, Weili; Zhou, Yuman; Qi, Kun; Wang, Lidan; Cui, Shizhong

    2017-11-01

    To better mimic natural bone, a graphene oxide-hydroxyapatite/silk fibroin (cGO-HA/SF) scaffold was fabricated by biomineralizing carboxylated GO sheets, blending with SF, and freeze-drying. The material has increasing porosity and decreasing density from outside to inside. Analysis of GO mineralization in simulated body fluid indicated that carboxylation and Chitosan may synergistically regulate HA growth along the c-axis of weakly crystalline, rod-like GO-HA particles. Compared with HA/SF gradient composites, a cGO-HA gradient scaffold with cGO:HA mass ratio 1:4 has 5-fold and 2.5-fold higher compressive strength and compressive modulus, respectively. Additionally, the cGO-HA/SF composite stimulated mouse mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase secretion, and mineral deposition more strongly than HA/SF and pure HA scaffolds. Hence, the material may prove to be an excellent and versatile scaffold for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The biocompatibility of silk fibroin and acellular collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering in the ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yi; Redmond, Sharon L; Teh, Bing M; Atlas, Marcus D; Marano, Robert J; Dilley, Rodney J; Papadimitriou, John M; Yan, Sheng; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Minghao

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have shown the suitability of silk fibroin scaffold (SFS) and porcine-derived acellular collagen I/III scaffold (ACS) as onlay graft materials for tympanic membrane perforation repair. The aims of this study were to further characterize and evaluate the in vivo biocompatibility of SFS and ACS compared with commonly used materials such as Gelfoam and paper in a rat model. The scaffolds were implanted in subcutaneous (SC) tissue and middle ear (ME) cavity followed by histological and otoscopic evaluation for up to 26 weeks. Our results revealed that SFS and ACS were well tolerated and compatible in rat SC and ME tissues throughout the study. The tissue response adjacent to the implants evaluated by histology and otoscopy showed SFS and ACS to have a milder tissue response with minimal inflammation compared to that of paper. Gelfoam gave similar results to SFS and ACS after SC implantation, but it was found to be associated with pronounced fibrosis and osteoneogenesis after ME implantation. It is concluded that SFS and ACS both were biocompatible and could serve as potential alternative scaffolds for tissue engineering in the ear. (paper)

  20. Preparation of Porous Scaffolds from Silk Fibroin Extracted from the Silk Gland of Bombyx mori (B. mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangjun Zhu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to use a simple and ecofriendly method to prepare porous silk scaffolds, aqueous silk fibroin solution (ASF was extracted from silk gland of 7-day-old fifth instar larvae of Bombyx mori (B. mori. SDS-page analysis indicated that the obtained fibroin had a molecular weight higher than 200 kDa. The fabrication of porous scaffolds from ASF was achieved by using the freeze-drying method. The pore of porous scaffolds is homogenous and tends to become smaller with an increase in the concentration of ASF. Conversely, the porosity is decreased. The porous scaffolds show impressive compressive strength which can be as high as 6.9 ± 0.4 MPa. Furthermore, ASF has high cell adhesion and growth activity. It also exhibits high ALP activity. This implies that porous scaffolds prepared from ASF have biocompatibility. Therefore, the porous scaffolds prepared in this study have potential application in tissue engineering due to the impressive compressive strength and biocompatibility.

  1. Different post-processing conditions for 3D bioprinted α-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, Liciane Sabadin; Schabbach, Rodrigo; Loureiro Dos Santos, Luis Alberto

    2017-09-15

    The development of 3D printing hardware, software and materials has enabled the production of bone substitute scaffolds for tissue engineering. Calcium phosphates cements, such as those based on α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP), have recognized properties of osteoinductivity, osteoconductivity and resorbability and can be used to 3D print scaffolds to support and induce tissue formation and be replaced by natural bone. At present, however, the mechanical properties found for 3D printed bone scaffolds are only satisfactory for non-load bearing applications. This study varied the post-processing conditions of the 3D powder printing process of α-TCP cement scaffolds by either immersing the parts into binder, Ringer's solution or phosphoric acid, or by sintering in temperatures ranging from 800 to 1500 °C. The porosity, composition (phase changes), morphology, shrinkage and compressive strength were evaluated. The mechanical strength of the post-processed 3D printed scaffolds increased compared to the green parts and was in the range of the trabecular bone. Although the mechanical properties achieved are still low, the high porosity presented by the scaffolds can potentially result in greater bone ingrowth. The phases present in the scaffolds after the post-processing treatments were calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite, brushite, monetite, and unreacted α-TCP. Due to their chemical composition, the 3D printed scaffolds are expected to be resorbable, osteoinductive, and osteoconductive.

  2. Human dental pulp stem cells and gingival fibroblasts seeded into silk fibroin scaffolds have the same ability in attracting vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eWoloszyk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neovascularization is one of the most important processes during tissue repair and regeneration. Current healing approaches based on the use of biomaterials combined with stem cells in critical-size bone defects fail due to the insufficient implant vascularization and integration into the host tissues. Therefore, here we studied the attraction, ingrowth, and distribution of blood vessels from the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane into implanted silk fibroin scaffolds seeded with either human dental pulp stem cells or human gingival fibroblasts. Perfusion capacity was evaluated by non-invasive in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging while the number and density of blood vessels were measured by histomorphometry. Our results demonstrate that human dental pulp stem cells and gingival fibroblasts possess equal abilities in attracting vessels within silk fibroin scaffolds. Additionally, the prolonged in vitro pre-incubation period of these two cell populations favors the homogeneous distribution of vessels within silk fibroin scaffolds, which further improves implant survival and guarantees successful healing and regeneration.

  3. Automated quality characterization of 3D printed bone scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Liang Bill Tseng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of design is an important step in obtaining tissue engineering scaffolds with appropriate shapes and inner microstructures. Different shapes and sizes of scaffolds are modeled using UGS NX 6.0 software with variable pore sizes. The quality issue we are concerned is the scaffold porosity, which is mainly caused by the fabrication inaccuracies. Bone scaffolds are usually characterized using a scanning electron microscope, but this study presents a new automated inspection and classification technique. Due to many numbers and size variations for the pores, the manual inspection of the fabricated scaffolds tends to be error-prone and costly. Manual inspection also raises the chance of contamination. Thus, non-contact, precise inspection is preferred. In this study, the critical dimensions are automatically measured by the vision camera. The measured data are analyzed to classify the quality characteristics. The automated inspection and classification techniques developed in this study are expected to improve the quality of the fabricated scaffolds and reduce the overall cost of manufacturing.

  4. Mimicked cartilage scaffolds of silk fibroin/hyaluronic acid with stem cells for osteoarthritis surgery: Morphological, mechanical, and physical clues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipaew, Jirayut; Wangkulangkul, Piyanun; Meesane, Jirut; Raungrut, Pritsana; Puttawibul, Puttisak

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is a critical disease that comes from degeneration of cartilage tissue. In severe cases surgery is generally required. Tissue engineering using scaffolds with stem cell transplantation is an attractive approach and a challenge for orthopedic surgery. For sample preparation, silk fibroin (SF)/hyaluronic acid (HA) scaffolds in different ratios of SF/HA (w/w) (i.e., 100:0, 90:10, 80:20, and 70:30) were formed by freeze-drying. The morphological, mechanical, and physical clues were considered in this research. The morphological structure of the scaffolds was observed by scanning electron microscope. The mechanical and physical properties of the scaffolds were analyzed by compressive and swelling ratio testing, respectively. For the cell experiments, scaffolds were seeded and cultured with human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs). The cultured scaffolds were tested for cell viability, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression. The SF with HA scaffolds showed regular porous structures. Those scaffolds had a soft and elastic characteristic with a high swelling ratio and water uptake. The SF/HA scaffolds showed a spheroid structure of the cells in the porous structure particularly in the SF80 and SF70 scaffolds. Cells could express Col2a, Agg, and Sox9 which are markers for chondrogenesis. It could be deduced that SF/HA scaffolds showed significant clues for suitability in cartilage tissue engineering and in surgery for osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioactive polymeric–ceramic hybrid 3D scaffold for application in bone tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, A.L.; Gaspar, V.M.; Serra, I.R.; Diogo, G.S.; Fradique, R.; Silva, A.P.; Correia, I.J.

    2013-01-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects remains a challenging scenario from a therapeutic point of view. In fact, the currently available bone substitutes are often limited by poor tissue integration and severe host inflammatory responses, which eventually lead to surgical removal. In an attempt to address these issues, herein we evaluated the importance of alginate incorporation in the production of improved and tunable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds to be used as temporary templates for bone regeneration. Different bioceramic combinations were tested in order to investigate optimal scaffold architectures. Additionally, 3D β-TCP/HA vacuum-coated with alginate, presented improved compressive strength, fracture toughness and Young's modulus, to values similar to those of native bone. The hybrid 3D polymeric–bioceramic scaffolds also supported osteoblast adhesion, maturation and proliferation, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that a 3D scaffold produced with this combination of biomaterials is described. Altogether, our results emphasize that this hybrid scaffold presents promising characteristics for its future application in bone regeneration. - Graphical abstract: B-TCP:HA–alginate hybrid 3D porous scaffolds for application in bone regeneration. - Highlights: • The produced hybrid 3D scaffolds are prone to be applied in bone tissue engineering. • Alginate coated 3D scaffolds present high mechanical and biological properties. • In vitro assays for evaluation of human osteoblast cell attachment in the presence of the scaffolds • The hybrid 3D scaffolds present suitable mechanical and biological properties for use in bone regenerative medicine

  6. Ornamenting 3D printed scaffolds with cell-laid extracellular matrix for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Song, Tae-Ha; Rijal, Girdhari; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    3D printing technique is the most sophisticated technique to produce scaffolds with tailorable physical properties. But, these scaffolds often suffer from limited biological functionality as they are typically made from synthetic materials. Cell-laid mineralized ECM was shown to be potential for improving the cellular responses and drive osteogenesis of stem cells. Here, we intend to improve the biological functionality of 3D-printed synthetic scaffolds by ornamenting them with cell-laid mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) that mimics a bony microenvironment. We developed bone graft substitutes by using 3D printed scaffolds made from a composite of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and mineralized ECM laid by human nasal inferior turbinate tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs). A rotary flask bioreactor was used to culture hTMSCs on the scaffolds to foster formation of mineralized ECM. A freeze/thaw cycle in hypotonic buffer was used to efficiently decellularize (97% DNA reduction) the ECM-ornamented scaffolds while preserving its main organic and inorganic components. The ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds supported osteoblastic differentiation of newly-seeded hTMSCs by upregulating four typical osteoblastic genes (4-fold higher RUNX2; 3-fold higher ALP; 4-fold higher osteocalcin; and 4-fold higher osteopontin) and increasing calcium deposition compared to bare 3D printed scaffolds. In vivo, in ectopic and orthotopic models in rats, ECM-ornamented scaffolds induced greater bone formation than that of bare scaffolds. These results suggest a valuable method to produce ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds as off-the-shelf bone graft substitutes that combine tunable physical properties with physiological presentation of biological signals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Strong and biocompatible three-dimensional porous silk fibroin/graphene oxide scaffold prepared by phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Dong; Ma, Qian; Wang, Ke; Ma, Pi-Bo

    2018-05-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) is blended with graphene oxide (GO) to prepare the strong and biocompatible three dimensional porous SF/GO blended scaffold via phase separation. GO could be well dispersed in SF solution and GO could also be well distributed in the SF scaffold. Furthermore, the introduction of GO can lead to structural change in the bended scaffold. Higher concentration of GO resulted in more compact structure and smaller pore size of the composite scaffolds without decreasing their porosity. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry results also reveal that SF and GO are homogeneous blended together. Analysis of chemical structures of the scaffold shows that addition of GO do not affect the crystalline structure of SF and it is evenly blended with SF. The blended scaffold has significantly higher breaking strength than the pure SF scaffold. In vitro study indicates that both pure SF scaffold and SF/GO composite scaffold support growth and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoprogenitor cells. However, the addition of GO contribute to the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoprogenitor. The testing results show that the blended scaffold is an appropriate candidate for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrospun silk fibroin scaffolds coated with reduced graphene promote neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells under electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador; Pagán, Ana; Martínez, Jose G; Bernabeu-Esclapez, Antonia; Otero, Toribio F; Meseguer-Olmo, Luis; Paredes, Juan I; Cenis, Jose L

    2017-10-01

    Novel approaches to neural research require biocompatible materials capable to act as electrode structures or scaffolds for tissue engineering in order to stimulate or restore the functionality of damaged tissues. This work offers promising results that indicate the potential use of electrospun silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds coated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in this sense. The coated material becomes conductor and electroactive. A complete characterisation of SF/rGO scaffolds is provided in terms of electrochemistry, mechanical behaviour and chemical conformation of fibroin. The excellent biocompatibility of this novel material is proved with cultures of PC-12 cells. The coating with rGO improved the adhesion of cells in comparison with cells growing onto the surface of pure SF scaffolds. Also, the use of SF/rGO scaffolds combined with electrical stimulation promoted the differentiation into neural phenotypes reaching comparable or even superior levels to those obtained by means of the traditional treatment with neural growth factor (NGF). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An approach to architecture 3D scaffold with interconnective microchannel networks inducing angiogenesis for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiaoxia; Wang, Yuanliang; Qian, Zhiyong; Hu, Chenbo

    2011-11-01

    The angiogenesis of 3D scaffold is one of the major current limitations in clinical practice tissue engineering. The new strategy of construction 3D scaffold with microchannel circulation network may improve angiogenesis. In this study, 3D poly(D: ,L: -lactic acid) scaffolds with controllable microchannel structures were fabricated using sacrificial sugar structures. Melt drawing sugar-fiber network produced by a modified filament spiral winding method was used to form the microchannel with adjustable diameters and porosity. This fabrication process was rapid, inexpensive, and highly scalable. The porosity, microchannel diameter, interconnectivity and surface topographies of the scaffold were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by compression tests. The mean porosity values of the scaffolds were in the 65-78% and the scaffold exhibited microchannel structure with diameter in the 100-200 μm range. The results showed that the scaffolds exhibited an adequate porosity, interconnective microchannel network, and mechanical properties. The cell culture studies with endothelial cells (ECs) demonstrated that the scaffold allowed cells to proliferate and penetrate into the volume of the entire scaffold. Overall, these findings suggest that the fabrication process offers significant advantages and flexibility in generating a variety of non-cytotoxic tissue engineering scaffolds with controllable distributions of porosity and physical properties that could provide the necessary physical cues for ECs and further improve angiogenesis for tissue engineering.

  10. 3D Printed Silicone–Hydrogel Scaffold with Enhanced Physicochemical Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Alm, Martin; Hemmingsen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    is currently a huge challenge. The goal of this work was to fabricate a tissue engineering scaffold from clinically approved materials with the capability of delivering biomolecules and direct cell fate. We have used a simple 3D printing approach, that combines polymer casting with supercritical fluid...... technology to produce 3D interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) scaffold of silicone-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (pHEMA-co-PEGMEA). The pHEMA-co-PEGMEA IPN materials were employed to support growth of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), resulting in high...... cell viability and metabolic activity over a 3 weeks period. In addition, the IPN scaffolds support 3D tissue formation inside the porous scaffold with well spread cell morphology on the surface of the scaffold. As a proof of concept, sustained doxycycline (DOX) release from pHEMA-co-PEGMEA IPN...

  11. 3D fibre deposition and stereolithography techniques for the design of multifunctional nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Roberto; D'Amora, Ugo; Russo, Teresa; Ronca, Alfredo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds based on poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) were fabricated by 3D fibre deposition modelling (FDM) and stereolithography techniques. In addition, hybrid coaxial and bilayer magnetic scaffolds were produced by combining such techniques. The aim of the current research was to analyse some structural and functional features of 3D magnetic scaffolds obtained by the 3D fibre deposition technique and by stereolithography as well as features of multimaterial scaffolds in the form of coaxial and bilayer structures obtained by the proper integration of such methods. The compressive mechanical behaviour of these scaffolds was investigated in a wet environment at 37 °C, and the morphological features were analysed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray micro-computed tomography. The capability of a magnetic scaffold to absorb magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in water solution was also assessed. confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the in vitro biological behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on 3D structures. Results showed that a wide range of mechanical properties, covering those spanning hard and soft tissues, can be obtained by 3D FDM and stereolithography techniques. 3D virtual reconstruction and SEM showed the precision with which the scaffolds were fabricated, and a good-quality interface between poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) based scaffolds was observed for bilayer and coaxial scaffolds. Magnetised scaffolds are capable of absorbing water solution of MNPs, and a preliminary information on cell adhesion and spreading of hMSCs was obtained without the application of an external magnetic field.

  12. Fabrication of electrospun silk fibroin scaffolds coated with graphene oxide and reduced graphene for applications in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador; Martínez, Jose G; Bernabeu-Esclapez, Antonia; Lozano-Pérez, A Abel; Meseguer-Olmo, Luis; Otero, Toribio F; Cenis, Jose L

    2016-04-01

    Silk fibroin and graphene are both promising biomaterials described in the bibliography. Hybrid scaffolds combining their properties could be attractive for tissue engineering applications. In this work, a new methodology to produce electrospun fibroin scaffolds coated with graphene materials is provided. The mechanical, electrical and electrochemical properties of the materials attained were characterised. The fibre diameters were measured (from 3.9 to 5.2 μm). The samples coated with reduced grapheme were electronic conductors and electroactive in liquid electrolytes, showing maximum oxidation and reduction (around−0.4 V peak). The chronoamperometric responses showed a reduction shoulder, pointing to the entrance of balancing cations from the solution by nucleation–relaxation: the reaction induced structural changes in the graphene. In order to check the biocompatibility of the materials, they were seeded with L929 fibroblasts. The excellent biocompatibility of silk fibroin meshes was maintained after coating with graphene, being the proliferation results equal in all the treatments 7 days after the seeding (Tukey, p N 0.05).The conductive and electroactive properties of meshes coated with reduced graphene allow the potential application of local electric fields or local ionic currents to cell cultures, biological interfaces or animal models without host response.

  13. Development of Novel 3-D Printed Scaffolds With Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Jun; Zhu, Wei; Heyburn, Lanier; Nowicki, Margaret; Harris, Brent; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-02-01

    A traumatic injury of peripheral nerves is serious clinical problem that may lead to major loss of nerve function, affecting quality of patient's life. Currently, nerve autograft is widely used to reconstruct the nerve gap. However, such surgical procedure suffers from many disadvantages including donor site morbidity and limited availability. In order to address these issues, neural tissue engineering has focused on the development of synthetic nerve scaffolds to support bridging a larger gap and improving nerve generation. For this purpose, we fabricated a novel 3-D biomimetic scaffold, which has tunable porous structure and embedded core-shell nanoparticles with sustained neurogenic factor delivery system, using stereolithography based 3-D printing and coaxial electrospraying techniques. Our results showed that scaffolds with larger porosity significantly improve PC-12 neural cell adhesion compared to ones with smaller porosity. Furthermore, scaffolds embedded with bovine serum albumin containing nanoparticles showed an enhancement in cell proliferation relative to bared control scaffolds. More importantly, confocal microscopy images illustrated that the scaffold with nerve growth factor nanoparticles greatly increased the length of neurites and directed neurite extension of PC-12 cells along the fiber. In addition, the 3-D printed nanocomposite scaffolds also improved the average neurite length of primary cortical neurons. The results in this study demonstrate the potential of this 3-D printed scaffold in improving neural cell function and nerve growth.

  14. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricci, C.; Mota, C.M.; Moscato, S.; D' Alessandro, D.; Ugel, S.; Sartoris, S.; Bronte, V.; Boggi, U.; Campani, D.; Funel, N.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, S.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl

  15. 3D printed scaffolds with gradient porosity based on a cellulose nanocrystal hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Sahar; Mathew, Aji P

    2018-03-01

    3-Dimensional (3D) printing provides a unique methodology for the customization of biomedical scaffolds with respect to size, shape, pore structure and pore orientation useful for tissue repair and regeneration. 3D printing was used to fabricate fully bio-based porous scaffolds of a double crosslinked interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) from a hydrogel ink of sodium alginate and gelatin (SA/G) reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). CNCs provided favorable rheological properties required for 3D printing. The 3D printed scaffolds were crosslinked sequentially via covalent and ionic reactions resulting in dimensionally stable hydrogel scaffolds with pore sizes of 80-2125 μm and nanoscaled pore wall roughness (visible from scanning electron microscopy) favorable for cell interaction. The 2D wide angle X-ray scattering studies showed that the nanocrystals orient preferably in the printing direction; the degree of orientation varied between 61-76%. The 3D printing pathways were optimised successfully to achieve 3-dimensional scaffolds (Z axis up to 20 mm) with uniform as well as gradient pore structures. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D printing in developing bio-based scaffolds with controlled pore sizes, gradient pore structures and alignment of nanocrystals for optimal tissue regeneration.

  16. Optimized composition of nanocomposite scaffolds formed from silk fibroin and nano-TiO2for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, N; Madaah Hosseini, H R; Samadikuchaksaraei, A

    2017-10-01

    Natural silk fibroin (SF) polymer has biomedical and mechanical properties as a biomaterial for bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Freeze-dried porous nanocomposite scaffolds were prepared from silk fibroin and titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles as a bioactive reinforcing agent by a phase separation method. In order to fabricate SF/TiO 2 scaffolds, 5, 10, 15 and 20wt% of the TiO 2 were added to the SF. The phase structure, functional groups and morphology of the scaffolds were evaluated using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques, respectively. Porosity of the scaffolds was measured by Archimedes' Principle. In addition, mechanical properties of prepared scaffolds were evaluated by measuring the compressive strength and compressive modulus. The bioactivity property of these scaffolds was examined for 7, 14, 21 and 28days immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37°C and the in vitro degradation was studied by incubation in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C and pH7.4 for up to 30days. Moreover, the scaffolds' biocompatibility was evaluated by seeding and culture of SaOS-2 osteoblast-like cells and assessment of their proliferation with MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. Results showed that the prepared scaffolds had directional porosity and the reduction of porosity in composite scaffolds with higher contents of TiO 2 nanoparticles resulted to an improvement of the mechanical strength. The macroporous structures with open interconnected and directional pores were successfully obtained without applying any porogen or inorganic solvent. The bioactivity of these scaffolds was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showing surface crystallization of the apatite layer proportional to the duration of immersion in the SBF and the degradation rate of scaffolds were increased by increasing the TiO 2 content. The osteoblast-like cells showed a high

  17. Bio-hybrid silk fibroin/calcium phosphate/PLGA nanocomposite scaffold to control the delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farokhi, Mehdi, E-mail: mehdi13294@yahoo.com [Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh, E-mail: fatemeh.motaghi@gmail.com [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University (TMU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ai, Jafar, E-mail: jafar_ai@tums.ac.ir [Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadjati, Jamshid; Azami, Mahmoud [Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of bio-hybrid silk fibroin/Calcium phosphate/PLGA nanocomposite scaffold as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) delivery system. The scaffold was fabricated using freeze-drying and electrospinning. Here, we highlight the structural changes of the scaffold using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The uniform dispersion of calcium phosohate (CaP) powder within silk fibroin (SF) solution was also confirmed using Zeta potential analysis. Moreover, good biocompatibility of osteoblast cells next to the scaffold was approved by cell adhesion, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase production. The release profile of VEGF during 28 days has established the efficacy of the scaffold as a sustained delivery system. The bioactivity of the released VEGF was maintained about 83%. The histology analysis has shown that the new bone tissue formation happened in the defected site after 10 weeks of implantation. Generally, our data showed that the fabricated scaffold could be considered as an effective scaffold for bone tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/calcium phosphate/PLGA scaffold was successfully fabricated using freeze-drying and electrospinning. • The scaffold could control the release of VEGF during 28 days. • The bioactivity of electrospun VEGF was above 80%. • VEGF loaded scaffold could induce bone regeneration after 10 weeks in rabbit.

  18. A new electrospun graphene-silk fibroin composite scaffolds for guiding Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yahong; Gong, Jiahuan; Niu, Changmei; Wei, Ziwei; Shi, Jiaqi; Li, Guohui; Yang, Yumin; Wang, Hongbo

    2017-12-01

    Graphene (Gr) has been made of various forms used for repairing peripheral nerve injury with favorable electroactivity, however, graphene-based scaffolds in peripheral nerve regeneration are still rarely reported due to the difficulty of realizing uniform dispersion of graphene and electroactive materials at nanoscale as well as lacking biocompatibility. In this paper, graphene-silk fibroin (SF) composite nanofiber membranes with different mass ratios were prepared via electrospinning. Microscopic observation revealed that electrospun Gr/SF membranes had a nanofibrous structure. Electrochemical analysis provided electroactivity characterization of the Gr/SF membranes. The physiochemical results showed that the physiochemical properties of electrospun Gr/SF membranes could be changed by varying Gr concentration. Swelling ratio and contact angle measurements confirmed that electrospun Gr/SF membranes possessed large absorption capacity and hydrophilic surface, and the mechanical property was improved with increasing Gr concentration. Additionally, in-vitro cytotoxicity with L929 revealed that all the electrospun Gr/SF membranes are biocompatible. Moreover, the morphology and quantity showed that the membranes supported the survival and growth of the cultured Schwann cells. Collectively, all of the results suggest that the electrospun Gr/SF membranes combine the excellent electrically conductivity and mechanical strength of the graphene with biocompatibility property of silk to mimic the natural neural cell micro-environment for nerve development.

  19. Nanofibrous silk fibroin/reduced graphene oxide scaffolds for tissue engineering and cell culture applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalvuran, Hande; Elçin, Ayşe Eser; Elçin, Yaşar Murat

    2018-03-16

    Graphene and silk fibroin (SF) have been extensively investigated in the literature. Hybrid scaffolds of SF and graphene combine the properties of both of the materials and provide promising applications for tissue engineering purposes. In this study, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) (0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% (w/v)) was incorporated into SF and fabricated into composite nanofibers through electrospinning. The fibers were characterized and analyzed by SEM, XRD, FTIR, TGA, circular dichroism analysis, contact angle measurements and tensile tests. Here, we document that the presence of RGO increases intermolecular forces between RGO and SF molecular chains in the SF matrix, which results in an increased silk II content. Upon the incorporation of RGO, thermal stability and mechanical properties of the fibers significantly improved. Furthermore, in-vitro findings showed that composite nanofibers supported cell viability and were hemocompatible. Finally, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were induced osteogenically on electrospun SF/RGO mats for 30days, which showed that the substrate supported osteogenic differentiation. In this study, a feasible method is proposed to generate biocompatible and versatile SF/RGO-composite nanofibers that can influence biomedical applications. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Application of Synthetic Polymeric Scaffolds in Breast Cancer 3D Tissue Cultures and Animal Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girdhari Rijal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of three-dimensional (3D porous scaffolds from synthetic polymers is a challenge to most laboratories conducting biomedical research. Here, we present a handy and cost-effective method to fabricate polymeric hydrogel and porous scaffolds using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA or polycaprolactone (PCL. Breast cancer cells grown on 3D polymeric scaffolds exhibited distinct survival, morphology, and proliferation compared to those on 2D polymeric surfaces. Mammary epithelial cells cultured on PLGA- or PCL-coated slides expressed extracellular matrix (ECM proteins and their receptors. Estrogen receptor- (ER- positive T47D breast cancer cells are less sensitive to 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-HT treatment when cultured on the 3D porous scaffolds than in 2D cultures. Finally, cancer cell-laden polymeric scaffolds support consistent tumor formation in animals and biomarker expression as seen in human native tumors. Our data suggest that the porous synthetic polymer scaffolds satisfy the basic requirements for 3D tissue cultures both in vitro and in vivo. The scaffolding technology has appealing potentials to be applied in anticancer drug screening for a better control of the progression of human cancers.

  1. 3D Powder Printed Bioglass and β-Tricalcium Phosphate Bone Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Seidenstuecker

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of both bioglass (BG and β tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP for bone replacement applications has been studied extensively due to the materials’ high biocompatibility and ability to resorb when implanted in the body. 3D printing has been explored as a fast and versatile technique for the fabrication of porous bone scaffolds. This project investigates the effects of using different combinations of a composite BG and β-TCP powder for 3D printing of porous bone scaffolds. Porous 3D powder printed bone scaffolds of BG, β-TCP, 50/50 BG/β-TCP and 70/30 BG/β-TCP compositions were subject to a variety of characterization and biocompatibility tests. The porosity characteristics, surface roughness, mechanical strength, viability for cell proliferation, material cytotoxicity and in vitro bioactivity were assessed. The results show that the scaffolds can support osteoblast-like MG-63 cells growth both on the surface of and within the scaffold material and do not show alarming cytotoxicity; the porosity and surface characteristics of the scaffolds are appropriate. Of the two tested composite materials, the 70/30 BG/β-TCP scaffold proved to be superior in terms of biocompatibility and mechanical strength. The mechanical strength of the scaffolds makes them unsuitable for load bearing applications. However, they can be useful for other applications such as bone fillers.

  2. 3D printing nano conductive multi-walled carbon nanotube scaffolds for nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Jun; Zhu, Wei; Nowicki, Margaret; Lee, Grace; Nyoung Heo, Dong; Kim, Junghoon; Zuo, Yi Y.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been introduced to modify the surface properties of scaffolds, thus enhancing the interaction between the neural cells and biomaterials. In addition to superior electrical conductivity, CNTs can provide nanoscale structures similar to those present in the natural neural environment. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the proliferative capability and differential potential of neural stem cells (NSCs) seeded on a CNT incorporated scaffold. Approach. Amine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were incorporated with a PEGDA polymer to provide enhanced electrical properties as well as nanofeatures on the surface of the scaffold. A stereolithography 3D printer was employed to fabricate a well-dispersed MWCNT-hydrogel composite neural scaffold with a tunable porous structure. 3D printing allows easy fabrication of complex 3D scaffolds with extremely intricate microarchitectures and controlled porosity. Main results. Our results showed that MWCNT-incorporated scaffolds promoted neural stem cell proliferation and early neuronal differentiation when compared to those scaffolds without the MWCNTs. Furthermore, biphasic pulse stimulation with 500 µA current promoted neuronal maturity quantified through protein expression analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Significance. Results of this study demonstrated that an electroconductive MWCNT scaffold, coupled with electrical stimulation, may have a synergistic effect on promoting neurite outgrowth for therapeutic application in nerve regeneration.

  3. 3D Powder Printed Bioglass and β-Tricalcium Phosphate Bone Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenstuecker, Michael; Kerr, Laura; Bernstein, Anke; Mayr, Hermann O; Suedkamp, Norbert P; Gadow, Rainer; Krieg, Peter; Hernandez Latorre, Sergio; Thomann, Ralf; Syrowatka, Frank; Esslinger, Steffen

    2017-12-22

    The use of both bioglass (BG) and β tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) for bone replacement applications has been studied extensively due to the materials' high biocompatibility and ability to resorb when implanted in the body. 3D printing has been explored as a fast and versatile technique for the fabrication of porous bone scaffolds. This project investigates the effects of using different combinations of a composite BG and β-TCP powder for 3D printing of porous bone scaffolds. Porous 3D powder printed bone scaffolds of BG, β-TCP, 50/50 BG/β-TCP and 70/30 BG/β-TCP compositions were subject to a variety of characterization and biocompatibility tests. The porosity characteristics, surface roughness, mechanical strength, viability for cell proliferation, material cytotoxicity and in vitro bioactivity were assessed. The results show that the scaffolds can support osteoblast-like MG-63 cells growth both on the surface of and within the scaffold material and do not show alarming cytotoxicity; the porosity and surface characteristics of the scaffolds are appropriate. Of the two tested composite materials, the 70/30 BG/β-TCP scaffold proved to be superior in terms of biocompatibility and mechanical strength. The mechanical strength of the scaffolds makes them unsuitable for load bearing applications. However, they can be useful for other applications such as bone fillers.

  4. Conducting Polymer Scaffolds for Hosting and Monitoring 3D Cell Culture

    KAUST Repository

    Inal, Sahika

    2017-05-03

    This work reports the design of a live-cell monitoring platform based on a macroporous scaffold of a conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate). The conducting polymer scaffolds support 3D cell cultures due to their biocompatibility and tissue-like elasticity, which can be manipulated by inclusion of biopolymers such as collagen. Integration of a media perfusion tube inside the scaffold enables homogenous cell spreading and fluid transport throughout the scaffold, ensuring long term cell viability. This also allows for co-culture of multiple cell types inside the scaffold. The inclusion of cells within the porous architecture affects the impedance of the electrically conducting polymer network and, thus, is utilized as an in situ tool to monitor cell growth. Therefore, while being an integral part of the 3D tissue, the conducting polymer is an active component, enhancing the tissue function, and forming the basis for a bioelectronic device with integrated sensing capability.

  5. Design of 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering testing a tough polylactide-based graft copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorati, R.; Colonna, C.; Tomasi, C.; Genta, I.; Bruni, G.; Conti, B.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate a tough polymer to develop 3D scaffolds and 2D films for tissue engineering applications, in particular to repair urethral strictures or defects. The polymer tested was a graft copolymer of polylactic acid (PLA) synthesized with the rationale to improve the toughness of the related PLA homopolymer. The LMP-3055 graft copolymer (in bulk) demonstrated to have negligible cytotoxicity (bioavailability > 85%, MTT test). Moreover, the LMP-3055 sterilized through gamma rays resulted to be cytocompatible and non-toxic, and it has a positive effect on cell biofunctionality, promoting the cell growth. 3D scaffolds and 2D film were prepared using different LMP-3055 polymer concentrations (7.5, 10, 12.5 and 15%, w/v), and the effect of polymer concentration on pore size, porosity and interconnectivity of the 3D scaffolds and 2D film was investigated. 3D scaffolds got better results for fulfilling structural and biofunctional requirements: porosity, pore size and interconnectivity, cell attachment and proliferation. 3D scaffolds obtained with 10 and 12.5% polymer solutions (3D-2 and 3D-3, respectively) were identified as the most suitable construct for the cell attachment and proliferation presenting pore size ranged between 100 and 400 μm, high porosity (77–78%) and well interconnected pores. In vitro cell studies demonstrated that all the selected scaffolds were able to support the cell proliferation, the cell attachment and growth resulting to their dependency on the polymer concentration and structural features. The degradation test revealed that the degradation of polymer matrix (ΔMw) and water uptake of 3D scaffolds exceed those of 2D film and raw polymer (used as control reference), while the mass loss of samples (3D scaffold and 2D film) resulted to be controlled, they showed good stability and capacity to maintain the physical integrity during the incubation time. - Highlights: • Tough PLA graft copolymer was proposed

  6. Design of 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering testing a tough polylactide-based graft copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorati, R., E-mail: rossella.dorati@unipv.it [Department of Drug Sciences, University of Pavia, V.le Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Center for Tissue Engineering (CIT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Colonna, C. [Department of Drug Sciences, University of Pavia, V.le Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Center for Tissue Engineering (CIT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Tomasi, C. [C.S.G.I., Department of Chemistry, Division of Physical Chemistry, University of Pavia, V.le Taramelli 16 I, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Genta, I. [Department of Drug Sciences, University of Pavia, V.le Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Center for Tissue Engineering (CIT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bruni, G. [C.S.G.I., Department of Chemistry, Division of Physical Chemistry, University of Pavia, V.le Taramelli 16 I, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Conti, B. [Department of Drug Sciences, University of Pavia, V.le Taramelli 12, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Center for Tissue Engineering (CIT), University of Pavia, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate a tough polymer to develop 3D scaffolds and 2D films for tissue engineering applications, in particular to repair urethral strictures or defects. The polymer tested was a graft copolymer of polylactic acid (PLA) synthesized with the rationale to improve the toughness of the related PLA homopolymer. The LMP-3055 graft copolymer (in bulk) demonstrated to have negligible cytotoxicity (bioavailability > 85%, MTT test). Moreover, the LMP-3055 sterilized through gamma rays resulted to be cytocompatible and non-toxic, and it has a positive effect on cell biofunctionality, promoting the cell growth. 3D scaffolds and 2D film were prepared using different LMP-3055 polymer concentrations (7.5, 10, 12.5 and 15%, w/v), and the effect of polymer concentration on pore size, porosity and interconnectivity of the 3D scaffolds and 2D film was investigated. 3D scaffolds got better results for fulfilling structural and biofunctional requirements: porosity, pore size and interconnectivity, cell attachment and proliferation. 3D scaffolds obtained with 10 and 12.5% polymer solutions (3D-2 and 3D-3, respectively) were identified as the most suitable construct for the cell attachment and proliferation presenting pore size ranged between 100 and 400 μm, high porosity (77–78%) and well interconnected pores. In vitro cell studies demonstrated that all the selected scaffolds were able to support the cell proliferation, the cell attachment and growth resulting to their dependency on the polymer concentration and structural features. The degradation test revealed that the degradation of polymer matrix (ΔMw) and water uptake of 3D scaffolds exceed those of 2D film and raw polymer (used as control reference), while the mass loss of samples (3D scaffold and 2D film) resulted to be controlled, they showed good stability and capacity to maintain the physical integrity during the incubation time. - Highlights: • Tough PLA graft copolymer was proposed

  7. Fabrication of a customized bone scaffold using a homemade medical 3D printer for comminuted fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Shin, Han-Back; Kim, Moo-Sub; Choe, Bo-Young; Kim, Sunmi; Suh, Tae Suk; Lee, Keum Sil; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to show a 3D printed reconstruction model of a bone destroyed by a comminuted fracture. After a thoracic limb of a cow with a comminuted fracture was scanned by using computed tomography, a scaffold was designed by using a 3D modeling tool for its reconstruction and fabricated by using a homemade medical 3D printer. The homemade medical 3D printer was designed for medical use. In order to reconstruct the geometry of the destroyed bone, we use the geometry of a similar section (reference geometry) of normal bone in the 3D modeling process. The missing part between the destroyed ridge and the reference geometry was filled with an effective space by using a manual interpolation. Inexpensive materials and free software were used to construct the medical 3D printer system. The fabrication of the scaffold progressed according to the design of reconstructed bone by using this medical 3D printer. The material of the scaffold was biodegradable material, and could be transplanted into the human body. The fabricated scaffold was correctly inserted into the fractured bone in place of the destroyed portion, with good agreement. According to physical stress test results, the performance of printing resolution was 0.1 mm. The average geometrical error of the scaffold was below 0.3 mm. The reconstructed bone by using the fabricated scaffold was able to support the weight of the human body. No process used to obtain the result was complex or required many resources. The methods and results in this study show several possible clinical applications in fields such as orthopedics or oncology without a need to purchase high-price instruments for 3D printing.

  8. Biocompatibility and antibacterial effect of silver doped 3D-glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagna, Cristina; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Miola, Marta; Verné, Enrica; Canuto, Rosa Angela; Saracino, Silvia; Muzio, Giuliana; Fucale, Giacomo; Maina, Giovanni

    2011-02-01

    A 3D-glass-ceramic scaffold for bone tissue engineering with an interconnected macroporous network of pores was doped with silver ions in order to confer antibacterial properties. For this purpose, silver ions were selectively added to the scaffold surfaces through ion-exchange using an aqueous silver nitrate solution. The silver-doped scaffolds were characterized by means of leaching, in vitro antibacterial, and citotoxicity tests. In particular, the silver effect was examined through a broth dilution test in order to evaluate the proliferation of bacteria by counting the colonies forming units. Moreover, cytotoxicity tests were carried out to understand the effect of silver-containing scaffolds on cell adhesion, proliferation, and vitality. For all tests a comparison between silver-doped scaffold and silver-doped scaffold dry sterilized was performed.

  9. Thermo-responsive non-woven scaffolds for "smart" 3D cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, Claire L; Chetty, Avashnee; Moolman, Francis Sean; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Hoppe, Heinrich; Mancama, Dalu T

    2012-08-01

    The thermo-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) has received widespread attention for its in vitro application in the non-invasive, non-destructive release of adherent cells on two dimensional surfaces. In this study, 3D non-woven scaffolds fabricated from poly(propylene) (PP), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and nylon that had been grafted with PNIPAAm were tested for their ability to support the proliferation and subsequent thermal release of HC04 and HepG2 hepatocytes. Hepatocyte viability and proliferation were estimated using the Alamar Blue assay and Hoechst 33258 total DNA quantification. The assays revealed that the pure and grafted non-woven scaffolds maintained the hepatocytes within the matrix and promoted 3D proliferation comparable to that of the commercially available Algimatrix™ alginate scaffold. Albumin production and selected cytochrome P450 genes expression was found to be superior in cells growing on pure and grafted non-woven PP scaffolds as compared to cells grown as a 2D monolayer. Two scaffolds, namely, PP-g-PNIPAAm-A and PP-g-PNIPAAm-B were identified as having far superior thermal release capabilities; releasing the majority of the cells from the matrices within 2 h. This is the first report for the development of 3D non-woven, thermo-responsive scaffolds able to release cells from the matrix without the use of any enzymatic assistance or scaffold degradation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Gel de plaquetas: arcabouço 3D para cultura celular Platelet gel: 3D scaffold for cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Moroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O reparo tissular é o objetivo final da cirurgia. A cultura celular requer arcabouço mecânico que dê suporte ao crescimento celular e difusão dos nutrientes. O uso do plasma rico em plaquetas (PRP como um arcabouço 3D possui diversas vantagens: é material biológico, de fácil absorção pós-transplante, rico em fatores de crescimento, em especial PDGF- ββ e TGF-β que estimula síntese de matriz extracelular na cartilagem. OBJETIVO: Desenvolver arcabouço 3D à base de PRP. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Duas formas foram idealizadas: Sphere e Carpet. Condições estéreis foram utilizadas. O gel de plaquetas permaneceu em cultura celular, observado diariamente em microscópio invertido. RESULTADOS: Ambos arcabouços obtiveram sucesso, com aspectos positivos e negativos. DISCUSSÃO: A forma Sphere não aderiu ao plástico. Observou-se retração do gel e investigação ao microscópio dificultada devido às áreas opacas no campo visual. A forma Carpet não aderiu ao plástico e apresentou-se translúcida. O tempo de estudo foi de 20 dias. CONCLUSÕES: A produção de um arcabouço 3D PRP foi um sucesso, e trata-se de uma alternativa que necessita ser mais utilizado e investigado para que se consolide em uma rota eficiente e confiável na tecnologia de engenharia tissular, particularmente em cultura de tecido cartilaginoso.INTRODUCTION: Tissue repair has been the ultimate goal of surgery. Cell culture requires a mechanical scaffold that supports cell growth and nutrient diffusion. Using platelet-rich plasma (PRP as a 3D scaffold presents various advantages: it is a biological material, easily absorbed after transplantation, rich in growth factors, in particular, PDGF-ββ and TGF-β that stimulate extracellular matrix synthesis in cartilage culture. OBJECTIVE: To develop a PRP 3D scaffold. Material and METHODS: Two forms were idealized: Sphere and Carpet. Sterile conditions were used. The platelet gel remained in culture

  11. Scaffold-free trachea regeneration by tissue engineering with bio-3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Machino, Ryusuke; Takeoka, Yosuke; Elgalad, Abdelmotagaly; Gunge, Kiyofumi; Takagi, Katsunori; Taura, Yasuaki; Hatachi, Go; Matsuo, Naoto; Yamasaki, Naoya; Nakayama, Koichi; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2018-01-15

    Currently, most of the artificial airway organs still require scaffolds; however, such scaffolds exhibit several limitations. Alternatively, the use of an autologous artificial trachea without foreign materials and immunosuppressants may solve these issues and constitute a preferred tool. The rationale of this study was to develop a new scaffold-free approach for an artificial trachea using bio-3D printing technology. Here, we assessed the circumferential tracheal replacement using scaffold-free trachea-like grafts generated from isolated cells in an inbred animal model. Chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from F344 rats. Rat lung microvessel endothelial cells were purchased. Our bio-3D printer generates spheroids consisting of several types of cells to create 3D structures. The bio-3D-printed artificial trachea from spheroids was matured in a bioreactor and transplanted into F344 rats as a tracheal graft under general anaesthesia. The mechanical strength of the artificial trachea was measured, and histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed. Tracheal transplantation was performed in 9 rats, which were followed up postoperatively for 23 days. The average tensile strength of artificial tracheas before transplantation was 526.3 ± 125.7 mN. The bio-3D-printed scaffold-free artificial trachea had sufficient strength to transplant into the trachea with silicone stents that were used to prevent collapse of the artificial trachea and to support the graft until sufficient blood supply was obtained. Chondrogenesis and vasculogenesis were observed histologically. The scaffold-free isogenic artificial tracheas produced by a bio-3D printer could be utilized as tracheal grafts in rats. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. 3D-Printing Composite Polycaprolactone-Decellularized Bone Matrix Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindone, Alexandra N; Nyberg, Ethan; Grayson, Warren L

    2017-05-11

    Millions of patients worldwide require bone grafts for treatment of large, critically sized bone defects from conditions such as trauma, cancer, and congenital defects. Tissue engineered (TE) bone grafts have the potential to provide a more effective treatment than current bone grafts since they would restore fully functional bone tissue in large defects. Most bone TE approaches involve a combination of stem cells with porous, biodegradable scaffolds that provide mechanical support and degrade gradually as bone tissue is regenerated by stem cells. 3D-printing is a key technique in bone TE that can be used to fabricate functionalized scaffolds with patient-specific geometry. Using 3D-printing, composite polycaprolactone (PCL) and decellularized bone matrix (DCB) scaffolds can be produced to have the desired mechanical properties, geometry, and osteoinductivity needed for a TE bone graft. This book chapter will describe the protocols for fabricating and characterizing 3D-printed PCL:DCB scaffolds. Moreover, procedures for culturing adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) in these scaffolds in vitro will be described to demonstrate the osteoinductivity of the scaffolds.

  13. A simple method for deriving functional MSCs and applied for osteogenesis in 3D scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Lijin; Luo, Yonglun; Chen, Muwan

    2013-01-01

    polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds or PCL scaffolds functionalized with natural polymer hyaluronan and ceramic TCP (PHT) both in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that these iPS-MSCs are functionally compatible with the two 3D scaffolds tested and formed typically calcified structure in the scaffolds. Overall......We describe a simple method for bone engineering using biodegradable scaffolds with mesenchymal stem cells derived from human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPS-MSCs). The hiPS-MSCs expressed mesenchymal markers (CD90, CD73, and CD105), possessed multipotency characterized by tri......-lineages differentiation: osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic, and lost pluripotency - as seen with the loss of markers OCT3/4 and TRA-1-81 - and tumorigenicity. However, these iPS-MSCs are still positive for marker NANOG. We further explored the osteogenic potential of the hiPS-MSCs in synthetic polymer...

  14. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feifei; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haiping; Zhang, Fuhua; Zheng, Lulu; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-03-01

    The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES) process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  15. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Yan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  16. Extrusion-based 3D printing of poly(propylene fumarate) scaffolds with hydroxyapatite gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Placone, Jesse K; Smith, Brandon T; Fisher, John P; Mikos, Antonios G

    2017-04-01

    The primary focus of this work is to present the current challenges of printing scaffolds with concentration gradients of nanoparticles with an aim to improve the processing of these scaffolds. Furthermore, we address how print fidelity is related to material composition and emphasize the importance of considering this relationship when developing complex scaffolds for bone implants. The ability to create complex tissues is becoming increasingly relevant in the tissue engineering community. For bone tissue engineering applications, this work demonstrates the ability to use extrusion-based printing techniques to control the spatial deposition of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles in a 3D composite scaffold. In doing so, we combined the benefits of synthetic, degradable polymers, such as poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), with osteoconductive HA nanoparticles that provide robust compressive mechanical properties. Furthermore, the final 3D printed scaffolds consisted of well-defined layers with interconnected pores, two critical features for a successful bone implant. To demonstrate a controlled gradient of HA, thermogravimetric analysis was carried out to quantify HA on a per-layer basis. Moreover, we non-destructively evaluated the tendency of HA particles to aggregate within PPF using micro-computed tomography (μCT). This work provides insight for proper fabrication and characterization of composite scaffolds containing particle gradients and has broad applicability for future efforts in fabricating complex scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  17. Extrusion-based 3D printing of poly(propylene fumarate) scaffolds with hydroxyapatite gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Jordan E.; Placone, Jesse K.; Smith, Brandon T.; Fisher, John P.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2017-01-01

    The primary focus of this work is to present the current challenges of printing scaffolds with concentration gradients of nanoparticles with an aim to improve the processing of these scaffolds. Furthermore, we address how print fidelity is related to material composition and emphasize the importance of considering this relationship when developing complex scaffolds for bone implants. The ability to create complex tissues is becoming increasingly relevant in the tissue engineering community. For bone tissue engineering applications, this work demonstrates the ability to use extrusion-based printing techniques to control the spatial deposition of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles in a 3D composite scaffold. In doing so, we combined the benefits of synthetic, degradable polymers, such as poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), with osteoconductive HA nanoparticles that provide robust compressive mechanical properties. Furthermore, the final 3D printed scaffolds consisted of well-defined layers with interconnected pores, two critical features for a successful bone implant. To demonstrate a controlled gradient of HA, thermogravimetric analysis was carried out to quantify HA on a per-layer basis. Moreover, we non-destructively evaluated the tendency of HA particles to aggregate within PPF using micro-computed tomography (µCT). This work provides insight for proper fabrication and characterization of composite scaffolds containing particle gradients and has broad applicability for future efforts in fabricating complex scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:28125380

  18. Fabrication and Evaluation of Electrospun, 3D-Bioplotted, and Combination of Electrospun/3D-Bioplotted Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana F. Mellor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun scaffolds provide a dense framework of nanofibers with pore sizes and fiber diameters that closely resemble the architecture of native extracellular matrix. However, it generates limited three-dimensional structures of relevant physiological thicknesses. 3D printing allows digitally controlled fabrication of three-dimensional single/multimaterial constructs with precisely ordered fiber and pore architecture in a single build. However, this approach generally lacks the ability to achieve submicron resolution features to mimic native tissue. The goal of this study was to fabricate and evaluate 3D printed, electrospun, and combination of 3D printed/electrospun scaffolds to mimic the native architecture of heterogeneous tissue. We assessed their ability to support viability and proliferation of human adipose derived stem cells (hASC. Cells had increased proliferation and high viability over 21 days on all scaffolds. We further tested implantation of stacked-electrospun scaffold versus combined electrospun/3D scaffold on a cadaveric pig knee model and found that stacked-electrospun scaffold easily delaminated during implantation while the combined scaffold was easier to implant. Our approach combining these two commonly used scaffold fabrication technologies allows for the creation of a scaffold with more close resemblance to heterogeneous tissue architecture, holding great potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications of osteochondral tissue and other heterogeneous tissues.

  19. 3D-printed gelatin scaffolds of differing pore geometry modulate hepatocyte function and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Phillip L; Green, Richard M; Shah, Ramille N

    2018-03-15

    Three dimensional (3D) printing is highly amenable to the fabrication of tissue-engineered organs of a repetitive microstructure such as the liver. The creation of uniform and geometrically repetitive tissue scaffolds can also allow for the control over cellular aggregation and nutrient diffusion. However, the effect of differing geometries, while controlling for pore size, has yet to be investigated in the context of hepatocyte function. In this study, we show the ability to precisely control pore geometry of 3D-printed gelatin scaffolds. An undifferentiated hepatocyte cell line (HUH7) demonstrated high viability and proliferation when seeded on 3D-printed scaffolds of two different geometries. However, hepatocyte specific functions (albumin secretion, CYP activity, and bile transport) increases in more interconnected 3D-printed gelatin cultures compared to a less interconnected geometry and to 2D controls. Additionally, we also illustrate the disparity between gene expression and protein function in simple 2D culture modes, and that recreation of a physiologically mimetic 3D environment is necessary to induce both expression and function of cultured hepatocytes. Three dimensional (3D) printing provides tissue engineers the ability spatially pattern cells and materials in precise geometries, however the biological effects of scaffold geometry on soft tissues such as the liver have not been rigorously investigated. In this manuscript, we describe a method to 3D print gelatin into well-defined repetitive geometries that show clear differences in biological effects on seeded hepatocytes. We show that a relatively simple and widely used biomaterial, such as gelatin, can significantly modulate biological processes when fabricated into specific 3D geometries. Furthermore, this study expands upon past research into hepatocyte aggregation by demonstrating how it can be manipulated to enhance protein function, and how function and expression may not precisely correlate in

  20. Impact of Particle Size of Ceramic Granule Blends on Mechanical Strength and Porosity of 3D Printed Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Spath, Sebastian; Drescher, Philipp; Seitz, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is a promising method for the fabrication of scaffolds in the field of bone tissue engineering. To date, the mechanical strength of 3D printed ceramic scaffolds is not sufficient for a variety of applications in the reconstructive surgery. Mechanical strength is directly in relation with the porosity of the 3D printed scaffolds. The porosity is directly influenced by particle size and particle-size distribution of the raw material. To investigate this impact, a hydroxyapatite gran...

  1. Immobilized Lentivirus Vector on Chondroitin Sulfate-Hyaluronate Acid-Silk Fibroin Hybrid Scaffold for Tissue-Engineered Ligament-Bone Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Liguo; Li, Hongguo; Qu, Ling; Zhu, Rui; Fan, Xiangli; Xue, Yingsen; Xie, Zhenghong; Fan, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    The lack of a fibrocartilage layer between graft and bone remains the leading cause of graft failure after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The objective of this study was to develop a gene-modified silk cable-reinforced chondroitin sulfate-hyaluronate acid-silk fibroin (CHS) hybrid scaffold for reconstructing the fibrocartilage layer. The scaffold was fabricated by lyophilizing the CHS mixture with braided silk cables. The scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) showed that micr...

  2. Fabrication and characterization of electrospun laminin-functionalized silk fibroin/poly(ethylene oxide) nanofibrous scaffolds for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Mina; Firouzi, Masoumeh; Hassannejad, Zahra; Haririan, Ismaeil; Zahedi, Payam

    2017-08-14

    The peripheral nerve regeneration is still one of the major clinical problems, which has received a great deal of attention. In this study, the electrospun silk fibroin (SF)/poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated and functionalized their surfaces with laminin (LN) without chemical linkers for potential use in the peripheral nerve tissue engineering. The morphology, surface chemistry, thermal behavior and wettability of the scaffolds were examined to evaluate their performance by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and water contact angle (WCA) measurements, respectively. The proliferation and viability of Schwann cells onto the surfaces of SF/PEO nanofibrous scaffolds were investigated using SEM and thiazolyl blue (MTT) assay. The results showed an improvement of SF conformation and surface hydrophilicity of SF/PEO nanofibers after methanol and O 2 plasma treatments. The immunostaining observation indicated a continuous coating of LN on the scaffolds. Improving the surface hydrophilicity and LN functionalization significantly increased the cell proliferation and this was more prominent after 5 days of culture time. In conclusion, the obtained results revealed that the electrospun LN-functionalized SF/PEO nanofibrous scaffold could be a promising candidate for peripheral nerve tissue regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. In vitro degradation of a 3D porous Pennisetum purpureum/PLA biocomposite scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revati, R; Majid, M S Abdul; Ridzuan, M J M; Basaruddin, K S; Rahman Y, M N; Cheng, E M; Gibson, A G

    2017-10-01

    The in vitro degradation and mechanical properties of a 3D porous Pennisetum purpureum (PP)/polylactic acid (PLA)-based scaffold were investigated. In this study, composite scaffolds with PP to PLA ratios of 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% were immersed in a PBS solution at 37°C for 40 days. Compression tests were conducted to evaluate the compressive strength and modulus of the scaffolds, according to ASTM F451-95. The compression strength of the scaffolds was found to increase from 1.94 to 9.32MPa, while the compressive modulus increased from 1.73 to 5.25MPa as the fillers' content increased from 0wt% to 30wt%. Moreover, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction were employed to observe and analyse the microstructure and fibre-matrix interface. Interestingly, the degradation rate was reduced for the PLA/PP 20 scaffold, though insignificantly, this could be attributed to the improved mechanical properties and stronger fibre-matrix interface. Microstructure changes after degradation were observed using FESEM. The FESEM results indicated that a strong fibre-matrix interface was formed in the PLA/PP 20 scaffold, which reflected the addition of P. purpureum into PLA decreasing the degradation rate compared to in pure PLA scaffolds. The results suggest that the P. purpureum/PLA scaffold degradation rate can be altered and controlled to meet requirements imposed by a given tissue engineering application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanical, thermal and morphological characterisation of 3D porous Pennisetum purpureum/PLA biocomposites scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revati, R; Abdul Majid, M S; Ridzuan, M J M; Normahira, M; Mohd Nasir, N F; Rahman Y, M N; Gibson, A G

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical, thermal, and morphological properties of a 3D porous Pennisetum purpureum (PP)/polylactic acid (PLA) based scaffold were investigated. In this study, a scaffold containing P. purpureum and PLA was produced using the solvent casting and particulate leaching method. P. purpureum fibre, also locally known as Napier grass, is composed of 46% cellulose, 34% hemicellulose, and 20% lignin. PLA composites with various P. purpureum contents (10%, 20%, and 30%) were prepared and subsequently characterised. The morphologies, structures and thermal behaviours of the prepared composite scaffolds were characterised using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The morphology was studied using FESEM; the scaffold possessed 70-200μm-sized pores with a high level of interconnectivity. The moisture content and mechanical properties of the developed porous scaffolds were further characterised. The P. purpureum/PLA scaffold had a greater porosity factor (99%) and compression modulus (5.25MPa) than those of the pure PLA scaffold (1.73MPa). From the results, it can be concluded that the properties of the highly porous P. purpureum/PLA scaffold developed in this study can be controlled and optimised. This can be used to facilitate the construction of implantable tissue-engineered cartilage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) surface nanomodified 3D printed polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Favi, Pelagie; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Golshan, Negar H; Ziemer, Katherine S; Keidar, Michael; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a new fabrication method for tissue engineering which can precisely control scaffold architecture at the micron-scale. However, scaffolds not only need 3D biocompatible structures that mimic the micron structure of natural tissues, they also require mimicking of the nano-scale extracellular matrix properties of the tissue they intend to replace. In order to achieve this, the objective of the present in vitro study was to use cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as a quick and inexpensive way to modify the nano-scale roughness and chemical composition of a 3D printed scaffold surface. Water contact angles of a normal 3D printed poly-lactic-acid (PLA) scaffold dramatically dropped after CAP treatment from 70±2° to 24±2°. In addition, the nano-scale surface roughness (Rq) of the untreated 3D PLA scaffolds drastically increased (up to 250%) after 1, 3, and 5min of CAP treatment from 1.20nm to 10.50nm, 22.90nm, and 27.60nm, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the ratio of oxygen to carbon significantly increased after CAP treatment, which indicated that the CAP treatment of PLA not only changed nano-scale roughness but also chemistry. Both changes in hydrophilicity and nano-scale roughness demonstrated a very efficient plasma treatment, which in turn significantly promoted both osteoblast (bone forming cells) and mesenchymal stem cell attachment and proliferation. These promising results suggest that CAP surface modification may have potential applications for enhancing 3D printed PLA bone tissue engineering materials (and all 3D printed materials) in a quick and an inexpensive manner and, thus, should be further studied. Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a new fabrication method for tissue engineering which can precisely control scaffold architecture at the micron-scale. Although their success is related to their ability to exactly mimic the structure of natural tissues and control mechanical

  6. 3D printing for the design and fabrication of polymer-based gradient scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracaglia, Laura G; Smith, Brandon T; Watson, Emma; Arumugasaamy, Navein; Mikos, Antonios G; Fisher, John P

    2017-07-01

    To accurately mimic the native tissue environment, tissue engineered scaffolds often need to have a highly controlled and varied display of three-dimensional (3D) architecture and geometrical cues. Additive manufacturing in tissue engineering has made possible the development of complex scaffolds that mimic the native tissue architectures. As such, architectural details that were previously unattainable or irreproducible can now be incorporated in an ordered and organized approach, further advancing the structural and chemical cues delivered to cells interacting with the scaffold. This control over the environment has given engineers the ability to unlock cellular machinery that is highly dependent upon the intricate heterogeneous environment of native tissue. Recent research into the incorporation of physical and chemical gradients within scaffolds indicates that integrating these features improves the function of a tissue engineered construct. This review covers recent advances on techniques to incorporate gradients into polymer scaffolds through additive manufacturing and evaluate the success of these techniques. As covered here, to best replicate different tissue types, one must be cognizant of the vastly different types of manufacturing techniques available to create these gradient scaffolds. We review the various types of additive manufacturing techniques that can be leveraged to fabricate scaffolds with heterogeneous properties and discuss methods to successfully characterize them. Additive manufacturing techniques have given tissue engineers the ability to precisely recapitulate the native architecture present within tissue. In addition, these techniques can be leveraged to create scaffolds with both physical and chemical gradients. This work offers insight into several techniques that can be used to generate graded scaffolds, depending on the desired gradient. Furthermore, it outlines methods to determine if the designed gradient was achieved. This review

  7. Chondrogenesis of infrapatellar fat pad derived adipose stem cells in 3D printed chitosan scaffold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ye

    Full Text Available Infrapatellar fat pad adipose stem cells (IPFP-ASCs have been shown to harbor chondrogenic potential. When combined with 3D polymeric structures, the stem cells provide a source of stem cells to engineer 3D tissues for cartilage repair. In this study, we have shown human IPFP-ASCs seeded onto 3D printed chitosan scaffolds can undergo chondrogenesis using TGFβ3 and BMP6. By week 4, a pearlescent, cartilage-like matrix had formed that penetrated the top layers of the chitosan scaffold forming a 'cap' on the scaffold. Chondrocytic morphology showed typical cells encased in extracellular matrix which stained positively with toluidine blue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positive staining for collagen type II and cartilage proteoglycans, as well as collagen type I. Real time PCR analysis showed up-regulation of collagen type II, aggrecan and SOX9 genes when IPFP-ASCs were stimulated by TGFβ3 and BMP6. Thus, IPFP-ASCs can successfully undergo chondrogenesis using TGFβ3 and BMP6 and the cartilage-like tissue that forms on the surface of 3D-printed chitosan scaffold may prove useful as an osteochondral graft.

  8. Engineering multi-layered skeletal muscle tissue by using 3D microgrooved collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwu; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-12-01

    Preparation of three-dimensional (3D) micropatterned porous scaffolds remains a great challenge for engineering of highly organized tissues such as skeletal muscle tissue and cardiac tissue. Two-dimensional (2D) micropatterned surfaces with periodic features (several nanometers to less than 100 μm) are commonly used to guide the alignment of muscle myoblasts and myotubes and lead to formation of pre-patterned cell sheets. However, cell sheets from 2D patterned surfaces have limited thickness, and harvesting the cell sheets for implantation is inconvenient and can lead to less alignment of myotubes. 3D micropatterned scaffolds can promote cell alignment and muscle tissue formation. In this study, we developed a novel type of 3D porous collagen scaffolds with concave microgrooves that mimic muscle basement membrane to engineer skeletal muscle tissue. Highly aligned and multi-layered muscle bundle tissues were engineered by controlling the size of microgrooves and cell seeding concentration. Myoblasts in the engineered muscle tissue were well-aligned and had high expression of myosin heavy chain and synthesis of muscle extracellular matrix. The microgrooved collagen scaffolds could be used to engineer organized multi-layered muscle tissue for implantation to repair/restore the function of diseased tissues or be used to investigate the cell-cell interaction in 3D microscale topography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fabrication of computationally designed scaffolds by low temperature 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Miguel; Dias, Marta; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Fernandes, Paulo; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Rodrigues, Jorge; Vorndran, Elke

    2013-09-01

    The development of artificial bone substitutes that mimic the properties of bone and simultaneously promote the desired tissue regeneration is a current issue in bone tissue engineering research. An approach to create scaffolds with such characteristics is based on the combination of novel design and additive manufacturing processes. The objective of this work is to characterize the microstructural and the mechanical properties of scaffolds developed by coupling both topology optimization and a low temperature 3D printing process. The scaffold design was obtained using a topology optimization approach to maximize the permeability with constraints on the mechanical properties. This procedure was studied to be suitable for the fabrication of a cage prototype for tibial tuberosity advancement application, which is one of the most recent and promising techniques to treat cruciate ligament rupture in dogs. The microstructural and mechanical properties of the scaffolds manufactured by reacting α/β-tricalcium phosphate with diluted phosphoric acid were then assessed experimentally and the scaffolds strength reliability was determined. The results demonstrate that the low temperature 3D printing process is a reliable option to create synthetic scaffolds with tailored properties, and when coupled with topology optimization design it can be a powerful tool for the fabrication of patient-specific bone implants.

  10. Tailorable Surface Morphology of 3D Scaffolds by Combining Additive Manufacturing with Thermally Induced Phase Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Luca, Andrea; de Wijn, Joost R; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2017-08-01

    The functionalization of biomaterials substrates used for cell culture is gearing towards an increasing control over cell activity. Although a number of biomaterials have been successfully modified by different strategies to display tailored physical and chemical surface properties, it is still challenging to step from 2D substrates to 3D scaffolds with instructive surface properties for cell culture and tissue regeneration. In this study, additive manufacturing and thermally induced phase separation are combined to create 3D scaffolds with tunable surface morphology from polymer gels. Surface features vary depending on the gel concentration, the exchanging temperature, and the nonsolvent used. When preosteoblasts (MC-3T3 cells) are cultured on these scaffolds, a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity is measured for submicron surface topography, suggesting a potential role on early cell differentiation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Evaluation of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Coated with Freeze-Dried Platelet-Rich Plasma for Bone Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Junda; Chen, Meilin; Wei, Xiaoying; Hao, Yishan; Wang, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing is one of the most promising techniques for the manufacturing of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. However, a pure scaffold is limited by its biological properties. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been shown to have the potential to improve the osteogenic effect. In this study, we improved the biological properties of scaffolds by coating 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with freeze-dried and traditionally prepared PRP, and we evaluated these scaffold...

  12. Effect of pore architecture on oxygen diffusion in 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Geunseon; Park, Jeong Hun; Kang, Taeyun; Lee, Jin Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to maximize oxygen diffusion within a three-dimensional scaffold in order to improve cell viability and proliferation. To evaluate the effect of pore architecture on oxygen diffusion, we designed a regular channel shape with uniform diameter, referred to as cylinder shaped, and a new channel shape with a channel diameter gradient, referred to as cone shaped. A numerical analysis predicted higher oxygen concentration in the cone-shaped channels than in the cylinder-shaped channels, throughout the scaffold. To confirm these numerical results, we examined cell proliferation and viability in 2D constructs and 3D scaffolds. Cell culture experiments revealed that cell proliferation and viability were superior in the constructs and scaffolds with cone-shaped channels.

  13. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Asa’ad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on “3D-printed” ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration.

  14. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa'ad, Farah; Giannì, Aldo Bruno; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on “3D-printed” ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration. PMID:27366149

  15. Fabrication of a Highly Aligned Neural Scaffold via a Table Top Stereolithography 3D Printing and Electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Jun; Nowicki, Margaret; Harris, Brent; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a rapidly emerging technique in the field of tissue engineering to fabricate extremely intricate and complex biomimetic scaffolds in the range of micrometers. Such customized 3D printed constructs can be used for the regeneration of complex tissues such as cartilage, vessels, and nerves. However, the 3D printing techniques often offer limited control over the resolution and compromised mechanical properties due to short selection of printable inks. To address these limitations, we combined stereolithography and electrospinning techniques to fabricate a novel 3D biomimetic neural scaffold with a tunable porous structure and embedded aligned fibers. By employing two different types of biofabrication methods, we successfully utilized both synthetic and natural materials with varying chemical composition as bioink to enhance biocompatibilities and mechanical properties of the scaffold. The resulting microfibers composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer and PCL mixed with gelatin were embedded in 3D printed hydrogel scaffold. Our results showed that 3D printed scaffolds with electrospun fibers significantly improve neural stem cell adhesion when compared to those without the fibers. Furthermore, 3D scaffolds embedded with aligned fibers showed an enhancement in cell proliferation relative to bare control scaffolds. More importantly, confocal microscopy images illustrated that the scaffold with PCL/gelatin fibers greatly increased the average neurite length and directed neurite extension of primary cortical neurons along the fiber. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to create unique 3D neural tissue constructs by combining 3D bioprinting and electrospinning techniques.

  16. 3D printing of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds intended for use in bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sophie C; Thornby, John A; Gibbons, Gregory J; Williams, Mark A; Mallick, Kajal K

    2015-02-01

    A systematic characterisation of bone tissue scaffolds fabricated via 3D printing from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVOH) composite powders is presented. Flowability of HA:PVOH precursor materials was observed to affect mechanical stability, microstructure and porosity of 3D printed scaffolds. Anisotropic behaviour of constructs and part failure at the boundaries of interlayer bonds was highlighted by compressive strength testing. A trade-off between the ability to facilitate removal of PVOH thermal degradation products during sintering and the compressive strength of green parts was revealed. The ultimate compressive strength of 55% porous green scaffolds printed along the Y-axis and dried in a vacuum oven for 6h was 0.88 ± 0.02 MPa. Critically, the pores of 3D printed constructs could be user designed, ensuring bulk interconnectivity, and the imperfect packing of powder particles created an inherent surface roughness and non-designed porosity within the scaffold. These features are considered promising since they are known to facilitate osteoconduction and osteointegration in-vivo. Characterisation techniques utilised in this study include two funnel flow tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), compressive strength testing and computed tomography (CT). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzana, Jason A; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M; Kelly, James P; Graeve, Olivia A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2014-04-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1-2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Design, construction and mechanical testing of digital 3D anatomical data-based PCL-HA bone tissue engineering scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qingqiang; Wei, Bo; Guo, Yang; Jin, Chengzhe; Du, Xiaotao; Yan, Chao; Yan, Junwei; Hu, Wenhao; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Yijin; Wang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the techniques of design and construction of CT 3D reconstructional data-based polycaprolactone (PCL)-hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold. Femoral and lumbar spinal specimens of eight male New Zealand white rabbits were performed CT and laser scanning data-based 3D printing scaffold processing using PCL-HA powder. Each group was performed eight scaffolds. The CAD-based 3D printed porous cylindrical stents were 16 piece × 3 groups, including the orthogonal scaffold, the Pozi-hole scaffold and the triangular hole scaffold. The gross forms, fiber scaffold diameters and porosities of the scaffolds were measured, and the mechanical testing was performed towards eight pieces of the three kinds of cylindrical scaffolds, respectively. The loading force, deformation, maximum-affordable pressure and deformation value were recorded. The pore-connection rate of each scaffold was 100 % within each group, there was no significant difference in the gross parameters and micro-structural parameters of each scaffold when compared with the design values (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the loading force, deformation and deformation value under the maximum-affordable pressure of the three different cylinder scaffolds when the load was above 320 N. The combination of CT and CAD reverse technology could accomplish the design and manufacturing of complex bone tissue engineering scaffolds, with no significant difference in the impacts of the microstructures towards the physical properties of different porous scaffolds under large load.

  19. Composite PLA/PEG/nHA/Dexamethasone Scaffold Prepared by 3D Printing for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zigui; Qi, Yanxin; Li, Linlong; Zhang, Peibiao; Chen, Xuesi; Huang, Yubin

    2018-04-24

    3D printing has become an essential part of bone tissue engineering and attracts great attention for the fabrication of bioactive scaffolds. Combining this rapid manufacturing technique with chemical precipitation, biodegradable 3D scaffold composed of polymer matrix (polylactic acid and polyethylene glycol), ceramics (nano hydroxyapatite), and drugs (dexamethasone (Dex)) is prepared. Results of water contact angle, differential scanning calorimeter, and mechanical tests confirm that incorporation of Dex leads to significantly improved wettability, higher crystallinity degree, and tunable degradation rates. In vitro experiment with mouse MC3T3-E1 cells implies that Dex released from scaffolds is not beneficial for early cell proliferation, but it improves late alkaline phosphatase secretion and mineralization significantly. Anti-inflammation assay of murine RAW 264.7 cells proves that Dex released from all the scaffolds successfully suppresses lipopolysaccharide induced interleukin-6 and inducible nitric oxide synthase secretion by M1 macrophages. Further in vivo experiment on rat calvarial defects indicates that scaffolds containing Dex promote osteoinduction and osteogenic response and would be promising candidates for clinical applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Antimicrobial 3D Porous Scaffolds Prepared by Additive Manufacturing and Breath Figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Alfredo, Nelson; Dorronsoro, Ane; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Rodríguez-Hernández, Juan

    2017-10-25

    We describe herein a novel strategy for the fabrication of efficient 3D printed antibacterial scaffolds. For this purpose, both the surface topography as well as the chemical composition of 3D scaffolds fabricated by additive manufacturing were modified. The scaffolds were fabricated by fused deposition modeling (FDM) using high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) filaments. The surface of the objects was then topographically modified providing materials with porous surfaces by means of the Breath Figures approach. The strategy involves the immersion of the scaffold in a polymer solution during a precise period of time. This approach permitted the modification of the pore size varying the immersion time as well as the solution concentration. Moreover, by using polymer blend solutions of polystyrene and polystyrene-b-poly(acrylic acid) (PS 23 -b-PAA 18 ) and a quaternized polystyrene-b-poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PS 42 -b-PDMAEMAQ 17 ), the scaffolds were simultaneously chemically modified. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. Finally, the biological response toward bacteria was explored. Porous surfaces prepared using quaternized PDMAEMA as well as those prepared using PAA confer antimicrobial activity to the films, i.e., were able to kill on contact Staphylococcus aureus employed as model bacteria.

  1. In Vitro Biological Evaluation of 3-D Hydroxyapatite/Collagen (50/50 wt. (% Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Moura Campos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite-collagen (HA/Col composites are potential scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this work, three-dimensional (3-D HA/Col (50/50 wt. (% scaffolds were synthesized using a self-assembly method and cross-linked with a 0.125% glutaraldehyde solution. Scaffolds were evaluated in vitro by cytotoxicity testing using MC3T3 cells; proliferation and differentiation were studied using STRO-1A human stromal cells for up to 21 days. Morphological and histological examinations showed a fibrous structure with a good distribution and homogeneous HA particles distribution. By thermogravimetric analysis, a ratio of 1.2 between inorganic and organic phase was found. The scaffolds presented no cytotoxicity when evaluated using three different parameters of cell survival and integrity: 2,3-bis[2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl] -2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT, Neutral Red (NR and Crystal Violet Dye Elution (CVDE. STRO-1A cells were found to adhere, proliferate and differentiate on the 3-D scaffold, but limited cell penetration was observed.

  2. Dynamic mechanical properties of 3D fiber-deposited PEOT/PBT scaffolds: An experimental and numerical analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moroni, Lorenzo; Poort, G.; van Keulen, F.; de Wijn, J.R.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical properties of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds can be appropriately modulated through novel fabrication techniques like 3D fiber deposition (3DF), by varying scaffold's pore size and shape. Dynamic stiffness, in particular, can be considered as an important property to optimize the

  3. The potential of encapsulating "raw materials" in 3D osteochondral gradient scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Neethu; Gupta, Vineet; Sridharan, Banupriya; Sutherland, Amanda; Detamore, Michael S

    2014-04-01

    Scaffolds with continuous gradients in material composition and bioactive signals enable a smooth transition of properties at the interface. Components like chondroitin sulfate (CS) and bioactive glass (BG) in 3D scaffolds may serve as "raw materials" for synthesis of new extracellular matrix (ECM), and may have the potential to completely or partially replace expensive growth factors. We hypothesized that scaffolds with gradients of ECM components would enable superior performance of engineered constructs. Raw material encapsulation altered the appearance, structure, porosity, and degradation of the scaffolds. They allowed the scaffolds to better retain their 3D structure during culture and provided a buffering effect to the cells in culture. Following seeding of rat mesenchymal stem cells, there were several instances where glycosaminoglycan (GAG), collagen, or calcium contents were higher with the scaffolds containing raw materials (CS or BG) than with those containing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 or bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. It was also noteworthy that a combination of both CS and TGF-β3 increased the secretion of collagen type II. Moreover, cells seeded in scaffolds containing opposing gradients of CS/TGF-β3 and BG/BMP-2 produced clear regional variations in the secretion of tissue-specific ECM. The study demonstrated raw materials have the potential to create a favorable microenvironment for cells; they can significantly enhance the synthesis of certain extracellular matrix (ECM) components when compared to expensive growth factors; either alone or in combination with growth factors they can enhance the secretion of tissue specific matrix proteins. Raw materials are promising candidates that can be used to either replace or be used in combination with growth factors. Success with raw materials in lieu of growth factors could have profound implications in terms of lower cost and faster regulatory approval for more rapid translation of

  4. Designing of PLA scaffolds for bone tissue replacement fabricated by ordinary commercial 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Aleš; Filová, Eva; Novák, Martin; Kronek, Jakub; Chlup, Hynek; Buzgo, Matěj; Blahnová, Veronika; Lukášová, Věra; Bartoš, Martin; Nečas, Alois; Hošek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of Tissue engineering is a regeneration or replacement of tissues or organs damaged by disease, injury, or congenital anomalies. At present, Tissue engineering repairs damaged tissues and organs with artificial supporting structures called scaffolds. These are used for attachment and subsequent growth of appropriate cells. During the cell growth gradual biodegradation of the scaffold occurs and the final product is a new tissue with the desired shape and properties. In recent years, research workplaces are focused on developing scaffold by bio-fabrication techniques to achieve fast, precise and cheap automatic manufacturing of these structures. Most promising techniques seem to be Rapid prototyping due to its high level of precision and controlling. However, this technique is still to solve various issues before it is easily used for scaffold fabrication. In this article we tested printing of clinically applicable scaffolds with use of commercially available devices and materials. Research presented in this article is in general focused on "scaffolding" on a field of bone tissue replacement. Commercially available 3D printer and Polylactic acid were used to create originally designed and possibly suitable scaffold structures for bone tissue engineering. We tested printing of scaffolds with different geometrical structures. Based on the osteosarcoma cells proliferation experiment and mechanical testing of designed scaffold samples, it will be stated that it is likely not necessary to keep the recommended porosity of the scaffold for bone tissue replacement at about 90%, and it will also be clarified why this fact eliminates mechanical properties issue. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the size of an individual pore could be double the size of the recommended range between 0.2-0.35 mm without affecting the cell proliferation. Rapid prototyping technique based on Fused deposition modelling was used for the fabrication of designed scaffold

  5. Impact of Particle Size of Ceramic Granule Blends on Mechanical Strength and Porosity of 3D Printed Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Spath

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a promising method for the fabrication of scaffolds in the field of bone tissue engineering. To date, the mechanical strength of 3D printed ceramic scaffolds is not sufficient for a variety of applications in the reconstructive surgery. Mechanical strength is directly in relation with the porosity of the 3D printed scaffolds. The porosity is directly influenced by particle size and particle-size distribution of the raw material. To investigate this impact, a hydroxyapatite granule blend with a wide particle size distribution was fractioned by sieving. The specific fractions and bimodal mixtures of the sieved granule blend were used to 3D print specimens. It has been shown that an optimized arrangement of fractions with large and small particles can provide 3D printed specimens with good mechanical strength due to a higher packing density. An increase of mechanical strength can possibly expand the application area of 3D printed hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

  6. Impact of Particle Size of Ceramic Granule Blends on Mechanical Strength and Porosity of 3D Printed Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, Sebastian; Drescher, Philipp; Seitz, Hermann

    2015-07-24

    3D printing is a promising method for the fabrication of scaffolds in the field of bone tissue engineering. To date, the mechanical strength of 3D printed ceramic scaffolds is not sufficient for a variety of applications in the reconstructive surgery. Mechanical strength is directly in relation with the porosity of the 3D printed scaffolds. The porosity is directly influenced by particle size and particle-size distribution of the raw material. To investigate this impact, a hydroxyapatite granule blend with a wide particle size distribution was fractioned by sieving. The specific fractions and bimodal mixtures of the sieved granule blend were used to 3D print specimens. It has been shown that an optimized arrangement of fractions with large and small particles can provide 3D printed specimens with good mechanical strength due to a higher packing density. An increase of mechanical strength can possibly expand the application area of 3D printed hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

  7. Production of new 3D scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration by rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradique, R; Correia, T R; Miguel, S P; de Sá, K D; Figueira, D R; Mendonça, A G; Correia, I J

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of bone disorders, whether due to trauma or pathology, has been trending upward with the aging of the worldwide population. The currently available treatments for bone injuries are rather limited, involving mainly bone grafts and implants. A particularly promising approach for bone regeneration uses rapid prototyping (RP) technologies to produce 3D scaffolds with highly controlled structure and orientation, based on computer-aided design models or medical data. Herein, tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/alginate scaffolds were produced using RP and subsequently their physicochemical, mechanical and biological properties were characterized. The results showed that 60/40 of TCP and alginate formulation was able to match the compression and present a similar Young modulus to that of trabecular bone while presenting an adequate biocompatibility. Moreover, the biomineralization ability, roughness and macro and microporosity of scaffolds allowed cell anchoring and proliferation at their surface, as well as cell migration to its interior, processes that are fundamental for osteointegration and bone regeneration.

  8. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Chang

    Full Text Available Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w. Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity.

  9. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Fwu-Hsing; Chen, Mark Hung-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity.

  10. 3D printed porous polycaprolactone/oyster shell powder (PCL/OSP) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenfeng; Zhang, Shuangying; Lan, Yuewei; Huang, Chen; Wang, Chao; Lai, Xuexu; Chen, Hanwei; Ao, Ningjian

    2018-04-01

    In this work, oyster shell powder (OSP) was used as the bio-filler and combined with polycaprolactone (PCL) through melt blending methodology. The PCL and PCL/OSP scaffolds were prepared using additive manufacturing process. All the 3D printed scaffolds hold a highly porosity and interconnected pore structures. OSP particles are dispersed in the polymer matrix, which helped to improve the degree of crystallinity and mineralization ability of the scaffolds. There was no significant cytotoxicity of the prepared scaffolds towards MG-63 cells, and all the scaffolds showed a well ALP activity. Therefore, PCL/OSP scaffolds had a high potential to be employed in the bone tissue engineering.

  11. Fabrication of 3D porous silk scaffolds by particulate (salt/sucrose) leaching for bone tissue reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Ok Joo; Lee, Min Chae; Moon, Bo Mi; Ju, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jung min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Chan Hum

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibroin is a biomaterial being actively studied in the field of bone tissue engineering. In this study, we aimed to select the best strategy for bone reconstruction on scaffolds by changing various conditions. We compared the characteristics of each scaffold via structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), the swelling ratio, water uptake, porosity, compressive strength, cell infiltration and cell viability (CCK-8). The scaffolds had high porosity with good inter pore connectivity and showed high compressive strength and modulus. In addition, to confirm bone reconstruction, animal studies were conducted in which samples were implanted in rat calvaria and investigated by micro-CT scans. In conclusion, the presented study indicates that using sucrose produces scaffolds showing better pore interconnectivity and cell infiltration than scaffolds made by using a salt process. In addition, in vivo experiments showed that hydroxyapatite accelerates bone reconstruction on implanted scaffolds. Accordingly, our scaffold will be expected to have a useful application in bone reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Highly Concentrated Alginate-Gellan Gum Composites for 3D Plotting of Complex Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Rahul Akkineni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In tissue engineering, additive manufacturing (AM technologies have brought considerable progress as they allow the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D structures with defined architecture. 3D plotting is a versatile, extrusion-based AM technology suitable for processing a wide range of biomaterials including hydrogels. In this study, composites of highly concentrated alginate and gellan gum were prepared in order to combine the excellent printing properties of alginate with the favorable gelling characteristics of gellan gum. Mixtures of 16.7 wt % alginate and 2 or 3 wt % gellan gum were found applicable for 3D plotting. Characterization of the resulting composite scaffolds revealed an increased stiffness in the wet state (15%–20% higher Young’s modulus and significantly lower volume swelling in cell culture medium compared to pure alginate scaffolds (~10% vs. ~23%. Cytocompatibility experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC revealed that cell attachment was improved—the seeding efficiency was ~2.5–3.5 times higher on the composites than on pure alginate. Additionally, the composites were shown to support hMSC proliferation and early osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, print fidelity of highly concentrated alginate-gellan gum composites was comparable to those of pure alginate; after plotting and crosslinking, the scaffolds possessed improved qualities regarding shape fidelity, mechanical strength, and initial cell attachment making them attractive for tissue engineering applications.

  13. Measurement of cell motility on proton beam micromachined 3D scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, F.; Sun, F.; Kan, J.A. van; Shao, P.G.; Zheng, Z.; Ge, R.W.; Watt, F.

    2005-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a rapidly developing and highly interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of cell biology, engineering and material science. In natural tissues, the cells are arranged in a three-dimensional (3D) matrix which provides the appropriate functional, nutritional and spatial conditions. In scaffold guided tissue engineering 3D scaffolds provide the critical function of acting as extracellular matrices onto which cells can attach, grow, and form new tissue. The main focus of this paper is to understand cell behavior on micro-grooved and ridged substrates and to study the effects of geometrical constraints on cell motility and cell function. In this study, we found that BAE (Bovine Aortic Endothelial) cells naturally align with and are guided along 3D ridges and grooves machined into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates. Average cell speed on micro-grooves and ridges ranged from 0.015 μm/s (for 12 μm wide and 10 μm deep ridges) to 0.025 μm/s (for 20 μm wide and 10 μm deep ridges). This compares with the cell motility rate on a flat PMMA surface where the average cell speed is around 0.012 μm/s. In this work we used scaffolds which were directly written with a focused proton beam, typically 1 MeV protons with a beam spot size of 1 x 1 μm 2

  14. Carboxy-Methyl-Cellulose (CMC) hydrogel-filled 3-D scaffold: Preliminary study through a 3-D antiproliferative activity of Centella asiatica extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizad, Syazwan; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2015-09-01

    This study focuses on the effects of using the water extract from Centella asiatica on the mortality of human lung cancer cells (A549) with the use of novel 3-D scaffolds infused with CMC hydrogel. A biodegradable polymer, poly (hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) was used in this study as 3-D scaffolds, with some modifications made by introducing the gel structure on its pore, which provides a great biomimetic microenvironment for cells to grow apart from increasing the interaction between the cells and cell-bioactive extracts. The CMC showed a good hydrophilic characteristic with mean contact angle of 24.30 ± 22.03°. To ensure the CMC gel had good attachments with the scaffolds, a surface treatment was made before the CMC gel was infused into the scaffolds. The results showed that these modified scaffolds contained 42.41 ± 0.14% w/w of CMC gel, which indicated that the gel had already filled up the entire pore of 3-D scaffolds. Besides, the infused hydrogel scaffolds took only 24 hours to be saturated when absorbing the water. The viability of cancer cells by MTS assay after being treated with Centella asiatica showed that the scaffolds infused with CMC hydrogel had the cell viability of 46.89 ± 1.20% followed by porous 3-D model with 57.30 ± 1.60% of cell viability, and the 2-D model with 67.10 ± 1.10% of cell viability. The inhibitory activity in cell viability between 2-D and 3-D models did not differ significantly (p>0.05) due to the limitation of time in incubating the extract with the cell in the 3-D model microenvironment. In conclusion, with the application of 3-D scaffolds infused with CMC hydrogel, the extracts of Centella asiatica has been proven to have the ability to kill cancer cells and have a great potential to become one of the alternative methods in treating cancer patients.

  15. Influence of crosslinking on the mechanical behavior of 3D printed alginate scaffolds: Experimental and numerical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghieh, Saman; Karamooz-Ravari, Mohammad Reza; Sarker, M D; Karki, Eva; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2018-04-01

    Tissue scaffolds fabricated by three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting are attracting considerable attention for tissue engineering applications. Because the mechanical properties of hydrogel scaffolds should match the damaged tissue, changing various parameters during 3D bioprinting has been studied to manipulate the mechanical behavior of the resulting scaffolds. Crosslinking scaffolds using a cation solution (such as CaCl 2 ) is also important for regulating the mechanical properties, but has not been well documented in the literature. Here, the effect of varied crosslinking agent volume and crosslinking time on the mechanical behavior of 3D bioplotted alginate scaffolds was evaluated using both experimental and numerical methods. Compression tests were used to measure the elastic modulus of each scaffold, then a finite element model was developed and a power model used to predict scaffold mechanical behavior. Results showed that crosslinking time and volume of crosslinker both play a decisive role in modulating the mechanical properties of 3D bioplotted scaffolds. Because mechanical properties of scaffolds can affect cell response, the findings of this study can be implemented to modulate the elastic modulus of scaffolds according to the intended application. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fabrication and evaluation of 3D β-TCP scaffold by novel direct-write assembly method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Min Woo; Kim, Jong Young [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Various scaffold fabrication methods have been explored to enhance the cell interaction effects and mechanical properties of scaffolds in bone regeneration. Rapid prototyping (RP) for tissue engineering is a useful technology that may provide a potential scaffolding structure to regenerate, restore, and repair a damaged bone tissue or organ, that is, RP is a promising tissue engineering technique through a 3D scaffold fabrication by using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system. In this study, 3D β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds were fabricated by a novel direct-write assembly method. The mechanical property of β-TCP scaffolds was analyzed by stress-strain curves by using a compression testing machine. Furthermore, an in vitro CCK-8 assay of osteosarcoma MG-63 cells showed the significant cell attachment and proliferation in the β-TCP scaffold.

  17. Digital micromirror device (DMD)-based 3D printing of poly(propylene fumarate) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Eric J; Busso, Mallory; Luo, Xinyi; Dolder, Courtney; Wang, Martha O; Fisher, John P; Dean, David

    2016-04-01

    Our recent investigations into the 3D printing of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), a linear polyester, using a DMD-based system brought us to a resin that used titanium dioxide (TiO2) as an ultraviolet (UV) filter for controlling cure depth. However, this material hindered the 3D printing process due to undesirable lateral or "dark" curing (i.e., in areas not exposed to light from the DMD chip). Well known from its use in sunscreen, another UV filter, oxybenzone, has previously been used in conjunction with TiO2. In this study we hypothesize that combining these two UV filters will result in a synergistic effect that controls cure depth and avoids dark cure. A resin mixture (i.e., polymer, initiator, UV filters) was identified that worked well. The resin was then further characterized through mechanical testing, cure testing, and cytotoxicity testing to investigate its use as a material for bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Results show that the final resin eliminated dark cure as shown through image analysis. Mechanically the new scaffolds proved to be far weaker than those printed from previous resins, with compressive strengths of 7.8 ± 0.5 MPa vs. 36.5 ± 1.6 MPa, respectively. The new scaffolds showed a 90% reduction in elastic modulus and a 74% increase in max strain. These properties may be useful in tissue engineering applications where resorption is required. Initial cytotoxicity evaluation was negative. As hypothesized, the use of TiO2 and oxybenzone showed synergistic effects in the 3D printing of PPF tissue engineering scaffolds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A biomimetic multilayer nanofiber fabric fabricated by electrospinning and textile technology from polylactic acid and Tussah silk fibroin as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Weili; He, Jianxin; Han, Qiming; Sang, Feng; Wang, Qian; Chen, Li; Cui, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    To engineer bone tissue, a scaffold with good biological properties should be provided to approximate the hierarchical structure of collagen fibrils in natural bone. In this study, we fabricated a novel scaffold consisting of multilayer nanofiber fabrics (MLNFFs) by weaving nanofiber yarns of polylactic acid (PLA) and Tussah silk fibroin (TSF). The yarns were fabricated by electrospinning, and we found that spinnability, as well as the mechanical properties of the resulting scaffold, was determined by the ratio between polylactic acid and Tussah silk fibroin. In particular, a 9:1 mixture can be spun continuously into nanofiber yarns with narrow diameter distribution and good mechanical properties. Accordingly, woven scaffolds based on this mixture had excellent mechanical properties, with Young's modulus 417.65 MPa and tensile strength 180.36 MPa. For nonwoven scaffolds fabricated from the same materials, the Young's modulus and tensile strength were 2- and 4-fold lower, respectively. Woven scaffolds also supported adhesion and proliferation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells, and promoted biomineralization via alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition. Finally, the scaffolds significantly enhanced the formation of new bone in damaged femoral condyle in rabbits. Thus, the scaffolds are potentially suitable for bone tissue engineering because of biomimetic architecture, excellent mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility. - Highlights: • A novel strategy to mimic the hierarchical collagen fibril in bone is proposed by electrospinning and conventional textile technology. • The tensile strength of the woven scaffold was nearly 4-fold larger than that of nonwoven mats. • The nanofiber woven scaffolds show excellent cytocompatibility and accelerate osteoblast differentiation. • The composite scaffold significantly enhanced formation of new bone in damaged condyles in rabbit femur.

  19. A biomimetic multilayer nanofiber fabric fabricated by electrospinning and textile technology from polylactic acid and Tussah silk fibroin as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Weili [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education, Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Henan provincial key laboratory of functional textile materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); He, Jianxin, E-mail: hejianxin771117@163.com [Henan provincial key laboratory of functional textile materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Han, Qiming [Henan provincial key laboratory of functional textile materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Sang, Feng [Department of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Treatment and Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhengzhou 450000 (China); Wang, Qian [Henan provincial key laboratory of functional textile materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Chen, Li [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education, Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Cui, Shizhong [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites, Ministry of Education, Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Henan provincial key laboratory of functional textile materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Textile and Garment Industry, Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); and others

    2016-10-01

    To engineer bone tissue, a scaffold with good biological properties should be provided to approximate the hierarchical structure of collagen fibrils in natural bone. In this study, we fabricated a novel scaffold consisting of multilayer nanofiber fabrics (MLNFFs) by weaving nanofiber yarns of polylactic acid (PLA) and Tussah silk fibroin (TSF). The yarns were fabricated by electrospinning, and we found that spinnability, as well as the mechanical properties of the resulting scaffold, was determined by the ratio between polylactic acid and Tussah silk fibroin. In particular, a 9:1 mixture can be spun continuously into nanofiber yarns with narrow diameter distribution and good mechanical properties. Accordingly, woven scaffolds based on this mixture had excellent mechanical properties, with Young's modulus 417.65 MPa and tensile strength 180.36 MPa. For nonwoven scaffolds fabricated from the same materials, the Young's modulus and tensile strength were 2- and 4-fold lower, respectively. Woven scaffolds also supported adhesion and proliferation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells, and promoted biomineralization via alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition. Finally, the scaffolds significantly enhanced the formation of new bone in damaged femoral condyle in rabbits. Thus, the scaffolds are potentially suitable for bone tissue engineering because of biomimetic architecture, excellent mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility. - Highlights: • A novel strategy to mimic the hierarchical collagen fibril in bone is proposed by electrospinning and conventional textile technology. • The tensile strength of the woven scaffold was nearly 4-fold larger than that of nonwoven mats. • The nanofiber woven scaffolds show excellent cytocompatibility and accelerate osteoblast differentiation. • The composite scaffold significantly enhanced formation of new bone in damaged condyles in rabbit femur.

  20. Additive manufactured polymeric 3D scaffolds with tailored surface topography influence mesenchymal stromal cells activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Sara C; Mota, Carlos; Longoni, Alessia; Barrias, Cristina C; Granja, Pedro L; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-05-24

    Additive manufactured three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with tailored surface topography constitute a clear advantage in tissue regeneration strategies to steer cell behavior. 3D fibrous scaffolds of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) block copolymer presenting different fiber surface features were successfully fabricated by additive manufacturing combined with wet-spinning, in a single step, without any post-processing. The optimization of the processing parameters, mainly driven by different solvent/non-solvent combinations, led to four distinct scaffold types, with average surface roughness values ranging from 0.071 ± 0.012 μm to 1.950 ± 0.553 μm, average pore sizes in the x- and y-axis between 351.1 ± 33.6 μm and 396.1 ± 32.3 μm, in the z-axis between 36.5 ± 5.3 μm and 70.7 ± 8.8 μm, average fiber diameters between 69.4 ± 6.1 μm and 99.0 ± 9.4 μm, and porosity values ranging from 60.2 ± 0.8% to 71.7 ± 2.6%. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured on these scaffolds adhered, proliferated, and produced endogenous extracellular matrix. The effect of surface roughness and topography on hMSCs differentiation was more evident for cells seeded at lower density, where the percentage of cells in direct contact with the surface was higher compared to more densely seeded scaffolds. Under osteogenic conditions, lower surface roughness values (0.227 ± 0.035 μm) had a synergistic effect on hMSCs behavior, while chondrogenesis was favored on rougher surfaces (1.950 ± 0.553 μm).

  1. Direct 3D powder printing of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds for substitution of complex bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Miguel; Moseke, Claus; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Pires, Inês; Teßmar, Jörg; Vorndran, Elke

    2014-03-01

    The 3D printing technique based on cement powders is an excellent method for the fabrication of individual and complex bone substitutes even in the case of large defects. The outstanding bone remodeling capacity of biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) containing hydroxyapatite (HA) as well as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) in varying ratios makes the adaption of powder systems resulting in BCP materials to this fabrication technique a desirable aim. This study presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel powder system for the 3D printing process, intended for the production of complexly shaped BCP scaffolds by a hydraulic setting reaction of calcium carbonate and TCP with phosphoric acid. The HA/TCP ratio in the specimens could be tailored by the calcium/phosphate ratio of the starting powder. The scaffolds could be fabricated with a dimensional accuracy of >96.5% and a minimal macro pore size of 300 µm. Independent of the phase composition the printed specimens showed a microporosity of approximately 68%, while the compressive strength strongly depended on the chemical composition and increased with rising TCP content in the scaffolds to a maximum of 1.81 MPa. Post-treatment of the scaffolds with a polylactic-co-glycolic acid-solution enhanced the mechanical properties by a factor of 8. In vitro studies showed that all BCP scaffolds were cytocompatible and enhanced the cell viability as well as the cell proliferation, as compared with pure TCP. Cell proliferation is even better on BCP when compared to HA and cell viability is in a similar range on these materials.

  2. Materials and scaffolds in medical 3D printing and bioprinting in the context of bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Martin; Bauer, Heide-Katharina; Goetze, Elisabeth; Gielisch, Matthias; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Moncal, Kazim K; Rizk, Elias; Seitz, Hermann; Gelinsky, Michael; Schröder, Heinz C; Wang, Xiaohong H; Müller, Werner E G; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    The structural and functional repair of lost bone is still one of the biggest challenges in regenerative medicine. In many cases, autologous bone is used for the reconstruction of bone tissue; however, the availability of autologous material is limited, which always means additional stress to the patient. Due to this, more and more frequently various biocompatible materials are being used instead for bone augmentation. In this context, in order to ensure the structural function of the bone, scaffolds are implanted and fixed into the bone defect, depending on the medical indication. Nevertheless, for the surgeon, every individual clinical condition in which standardized scaffolds have to be aligned is challenging, and in many cases the alignment is not possible without limitations. Therefore, in the last decades, 3D printing (3DP) or additive manufacturing (AM) of scaffolds has become one of the most innovative approaches in surgery to individualize and improve the treatment of patients. Numerous biocompatible materials are available for 3DP, and various printing techniques can be applied, depending on the process conditions of these materials. Besides these conventional printing techniques, another promising approach in the context of medical AM is 3D bioprinting, a technique which makes it possible to print human cells embedded in special carrier substances to generate functional tissues. Even the direct printing into bone defects or lesions becomes possible. 3DP is already improving the treatment of patients, and has the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine in future.

  3. Photolithography and micromolding techniques for the realization of 3D polycaprolactone scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    KAUST Repository

    Limongi, Tania

    2015-06-01

    Material science, cell biology, and engineering are all part of the research field of tissue engineering. It is the application of knowledge, methods and instrumentations of engineering and life science to the development of biocompatible solutions for repair and/or replace tissues and damaged organs. Last generation microfabrication technologies utilizing natural and synthetic biomaterials allow the realization of scaffolds resembling tissue-like structures as skin, brain, bones, muscles, cartilage and blood vessels. In this work we describe an effective and simple micromolding fabrication process allowing the realization of 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold for human neural stem cells (hNSC) culture. Scanning Electron Microscopy has been used to investigate the micro and nano features characterizing the surface of the device. Immunofluorescence analysis showed how, after seeding cells onto the substrate, healthy astrocytes grew up in a well-organized 3D network. Thus, we proposed this effective fabrication method for the production of nanopatterned PCL pillared scaffold providing a biomimetic environment for the growth of hNSC, a promising and efficient means for future applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  4. 2D µ-Particle Image Velocimetry and Computational Fluid Dynamics Study Within a 3D Porous Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Marin, A; Grossi, T; Bianchi, E; Dubini, G; Lacroix, D

    2017-05-01

    Transport properties of 3D scaffolds under fluid flow are critical for tissue development. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can resolve 3D flows and nutrient concentrations in bioreactors at the scaffold-pore scale with high resolution. However, CFD models can be formulated based on assumptions and simplifications. μ-Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements should be performed to improve the reliability and predictive power of such models. Nevertheless, measuring fluid flow velocities within 3D scaffolds is challenging. The aim of this study was to develop a μPIV approach to allow the extraction of velocity fields from a 3D additive manufacturing scaffold using a conventional 2D μPIV system. The μ-computed tomography scaffold geometry was included in a CFD model where perfusion conditions were simulated. Good agreement was found between velocity profiles from measurements and computational results. Maximum velocities were found at the centre of the pore using both techniques with a difference of 12% which was expected according to the accuracy of the μPIV system. However, significant differences in terms of velocity magnitude were found near scaffold substrate due to scaffold brightness which affected the μPIV measurements. As a result, the limitations of the μPIV system only permits a partial validation of the CFD model. Nevertheless, the combination of both techniques allowed a detailed description of velocity maps within a 3D scaffold which is crucial to determine the optimal cell and nutrient transport properties.

  5. Preparation and characterization of cockle shell aragonite nanocomposite porous 3D scaffolds for bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saffanah Khuder Mahmood

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The demands for applicable tissue-engineered scaffolds that can be used to repair load-bearing segmental bone defects (SBDs is vital and in increasing demand. In this study, seven different combinations of 3 dimensional (3D novel nanocomposite porous structured scaffolds were fabricated to rebuild SBDs using an extraordinary blend of cockle shells (CaCo3 nanoparticles (CCN, gelatin, dextran and dextrin to structure an ideal bone scaffold with adequate degradation rate using the Freeze Drying Method (FDM and labeled as 5211, 5400, 6211, 6300, 7101, 7200 and 8100. The micron sized cockle shells powder obtained (75 µm was made into nanoparticles using mechano-chemical, top-down method of nanoparticles synthesis with the presence of the surfactant BS-12 (dodecyl dimethyl bataine. The phase purity and crystallographic structures, the chemical functionality and the thermal characterization of the scaffolds’ powder were recognized using X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrophotometer and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC respectively. Characterizations of the scaffolds were assessed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Degradation Manner, Water Absorption Test, Swelling Test, Mechanical Test and Porosity Test. Top-down method produced cockle shell nanoparticles having averagely range 37.8±3–55.2±9 nm in size, which were determined using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM. A mainly aragonite form of calcium carbonate was identified in both XRD and FTIR for all scaffolds, while the melting (Tm and transition (Tg temperatures were identified using DSC with the range of Tm 62.4–75.5 °C and of Tg 230.6–232.5 °C. The newly prepared scaffolds were with the following characteristics: (i good biocompatibility and biodegradability, (ii appropriate surface chemistry and (iii highly porous, with interconnected pore network. Engineering analyses showed that scaffold 5211 possessed 3D interconnected homogenous

  6. Collagenous matrix supported by a 3D-printed scaffold for osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimipour, Farahnaz; Dashtimoghadam, Erfan; Rasoulianboroujeni, Morteza; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Khoshroo, Kimia; Tahriri, Mohammadreza; Yadegari, Amir; Gonzalez, Jose A; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Lobner, Douglas C; Jafarzadeh Kashi, Tahereh S; Tayebi, Lobat

    2018-02-01

    A systematic characterization of hybrid scaffolds, fabricated based on combinatorial additive manufacturing technique and freeze-drying method, is presented as a new platform for osteoblastic differentiation of dental pulp cells (DPCs). The scaffolds were consisted of a collagenous matrix embedded in a 3D-printed beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) as the mineral phase. The developed construct design was intended to achieve mechanical robustness owing to 3D-printed β-TCP scaffold, and biologically active 3D cell culture matrix pertaining to the Collagen extracellular matrix. The β-TCP precursor formulations were investigated for their flow-ability at various temperatures, which optimized for fabrication of 3D printed scaffolds with interconnected porosity. The hybrid constructs were characterized by 3D laser scanning microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and compressive strength testing. The in vitro characterization of scaffolds revealed that the hybrid β-TCP/Collagen constructs offer superior DPCs proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity compared to the 3D-printed β-TCP scaffold over three weeks. Moreover, it was found that the incorporation of TCP into the Collagen matrix improves the ALP activity. The presented results converge to suggest the developed 3D-printed β-TCP/Collagen hybrid constructs as a new platform for osteoblastic differentiation of DPCs for craniomaxillofacial bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. A microfluidic chip containing multiple 3D nanofibrous scaffolds for culturing human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, Lior; Shapira, Assaf; Amir, Roey J.; Dvir, Tal

    2018-04-01

    In microfluidics-based lab-on-a-chip systems, which are used for investigating the effect of drugs and growth factors on cells, the latter are usually cultured within the device’s channels in two-dimensional, and not in their optimal three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment. Herein, we address this shortfall by designing a microfluidic system, comprised of two layers. The upper layer of the system consists of multiple channels generating a gradient of soluble factors. The lower layer is comprised of multiple wells, each deposited with 3D, nanofibrous scaffold. We first used a mathematical model to characterize the fluid flow within the system. We then show that induced pluripotent stem cells can be seeded within the 3D scaffolds and be exposed to a well-mixed gradient of soluble factors. We believe that utilizing such system may enable in the future to identify new differentiation factors, investigate drug toxicity, and eventually allow to perform analyses on patient-specific tissues, in order to fit the appropriate combination and concentration of drugs.

  8. 3-D loaded scaffolds obtained by supercritical CO2 assisted process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardea, S; Reverchon, E

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a supercritical CO 2 (SC-CO 2 ) drying process for the formation of 3-D PVDF-HFP loaded scaffolds was tested. Experiments at pressures ranging between 150 and 250 bar and at temperatures ranging between 35 and 55°C were performed. The PVDF-HFP- acetone-ethanol solution at 15% w/w polymer was selected as the base case. The drug (amoxicillin) concentration was varied from 20 to 30% w/w with respect to PVDF-HFP. SC- CO 2 drying process was confirmed to be a valid alternative to generate loaded structures; indeed, scaffolds characterized by nanometric networks (with mean pore diameter of about 300 nm) with a homogeneous drug distribution were obtained. Drug controlled release experiments were also performed and a quasi-zero order release kinetic was observed

  9. 3D silicon doped hydroxyapatite scaffolds decorated with Elastin-like Recombinamers for bone regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Mercedes; García, Ana; Girotti, Alessandra; Alonso, Matilde; Rodríguez-Cabello, Jose Carlos; González-Vázquez, Arlyng; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth; Buján, Julia; García-Honduvilla, Natalio; Vallet-Regí, María

    2016-11-01

    The current study reports on the manufacturing by rapid prototyping technique of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds based on silicon substituted hydroxyapatite with Elastin-like Recombinamers (ELRs) functionalized surfaces. Silicon doped hydroxyapatite (Si-HA), with Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 5.7 (SiO 4 ) 0.3 (OH) 1.7 h 0.3 nominal formula, was surface functionalized with two different types of polymers designed by genetic engineering: ELR-RGD that contain cell attachment specific sequences and ELR-SN A 15/RGD with both hydroxyapatite and cells domains that interact with the inorganic phase and with the cells, respectively. These hybrid materials were subjected to in vitro assays in order to clarify if the ELRs coating improved the well-known biocompatible and bone regeneration properties of calcium phosphates materials. The in vitro tests showed that there was a total and homogeneous colonization of the 3D scaffolds by Bone marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (BMSCs). In addition, the BMSCs were viable and able to proliferate and differentiate into osteoblasts. Bone tissue engineering is an area of increasing interest because its main applications are directly related to the rising life expectancy of the population, which promotes higher rates of several bone pathologies, so innovative strategies are needed for bone tissue regeneration therapies. Here we use the rapid prototyping technology to allow moulding ceramic 3D scaffolds and we use different bio-polymers for the functionalization of their surfaces in order to enhance the biological response. Combining the ceramic material (silicon doped hydroxyapatite, Si-HA) and the Elastin like Recombinamers (ELRs) polymers with the presence of the integrin-mediate adhesion domain alone or in combination with SNA15 peptide that possess high affinity for hydroxyapatite, provided an improved Bone marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (BMSCs) differentiation into osteoblastic linkage. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier

  10. 3D Nanostructured materials: TiO2 nanoparticles incorporated gellan gum scaffold for photocatalyst and biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasmizam Razali, Mohd; Arifah Ismail, Nur; Zulkafli, Mohd Farhan Azly Mohd; Anuar Mat Amin, Khairul

    2018-03-01

    A unique three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured gellan gum (GG) is fabricated by incorporating TiO2 nanoparticles (GG + TiO2NPs) scaffold by freeze-drying. The fabricated GG + TiO2NPs were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study their physiochemical properties. FTIR was used to investigate the intermolecular interactions in the scaffolds. The crystal structure was determined by bulk analysis using XRD and SEM for microstructure observation of scaffold surfaces. The performance of synthesized GG + TiO2NPs scaffold 3D nanostructured materials was evaluated as a photocatalyst for methyl orange (MO) degradation and for biomedical applications. The results showed that the scaffold possessed good photocatalytic activity for removal of methyl orange with 88.24% degradation after 3 h of UV irradiation. The scaffold also induces the cell growth, thus offering a good candidate for biomedical applications.

  11. Evaluation of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Coated with Freeze-Dried Platelet-Rich Plasma for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junda Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional printing is one of the most promising techniques for the manufacturing of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. However, a pure scaffold is limited by its biological properties. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP has been shown to have the potential to improve the osteogenic effect. In this study, we improved the biological properties of scaffolds by coating 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL scaffolds with freeze-dried and traditionally prepared PRP, and we evaluated these scaffolds through in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, we evaluated the interaction between dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs and the scaffolds by measuring cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, and osteogenic differentiation. The results showed that freeze-dried PRP significantly enhanced ALP activity and the mRNA expression levels of osteogenic genes (ALP, RUNX2 (runt-related gene-2, OCN (osteocalcin, OPN (osteopontin of DPSCs (p < 0.05. In vivo, 5 mm calvarial defects were created, and the PRP-PCL scaffolds were implanted. The data showed that compared with traditional PRP-PCL scaffolds or bare PCL scaffolds, the freeze-dried PRP-PCL scaffolds induced significantly greater bone formation (p < 0.05. All these data suggest that coating 3D-printed PCL scaffolds with freeze-dried PRP can promote greater osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs and induce more bone formation, which may have great potential in future clinical applications.

  12. µ-Particle tracking velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics study of cell seeding within a 3D porous scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, A Campos; Grossi, T; Bianchi, E; Dubini, G; Lacroix, D

    2017-11-01

    Cell seeding of 3D scaffolds is a critical step in tissue engineering since the final tissue properties are related to the initial cell distribution and density within the scaffold unit. Perfusion systems can transport cells to the scaffold however; the fact that cells flow inside the scaffold pores does not guarantee cell deposition onto the scaffold substrate and cell attachment. The aim of this study was to investigate how fluid flow conditions modulate cell motion and deposition during perfusion. For such a purpose, a multiphase-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed in conjunction with particle tracking velocimetry experiments (PTV) which for the first time were applied to observe cell seeding inside a 3D scaffold. CFD and PTV results showed the strong effect of gravity for lower flow rates leading to cell sedimentation and poor transport of cells to the scaffold. Higher flow rates help overcome the effect of gravity so more cells travelling inside the scaffold were found. Nonetheless, fluid flow drags cells along the fluid streamlines without intercepting the scaffold substrate. As a consequence, if cells do not deposit into the scaffold substrate, cell adhesion cannot occur. Therefore, cell-scaffold interception should be promoted and the present computational model which predicts the effect of gravity and fluid drag on cells trajectories could serve to optimise bioreactors and enhance cell seeding efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomineralized poly (l-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-tussah silk fibroin nanofiber fabric with hierarchical architecture as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanfei; Shao, Weili; Qian, Wang; He, Jianxin; Zhou, Yuman; Qi, Kun; Wang, Lidan; Cui, Shizhong; Wang, Rui

    2018-03-01

    In bone tissue engineering, the fabrication of a scaffold with a hierarchical architecture, excellent mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility remains a challenge. Here, a solution of polylactic acid (PLA) and Tussah silk fibroin (TSF) was electrospun into nanofiber yarns and woven into multilayer fabrics. Then, composite scaffolds were obtained by mineralization in simulated body fluid (SBF) using the multilayer fabrics as a template. The structure and related properties of the composite scaffolds were characterized using different techniques. PLA/TSF (mass ratio, 9:1) nanofiber yarns with uniform diameters of 72±9μm were obtained by conjugated electrospinning; the presence of 10wt% TSF accelerated the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite on the surface of the composite scaffolds in SBF. Furthermore, the compressive mechanical properties of the PLA/TSF multilayer nanofiber fabrics were improved after mineralization; the compressive modulus and stress of the mineralized composite scaffolds were 32.8 and 3.0 times higher than that of the composite scaffolds without mineralization, respectively. Interestingly, these values were higher than those of scaffolds containing random nanofibers. Biological assay results showed that the mineralization and multilayer fabric structure of the composite nanofiber scaffolds significantly increased cell adhesion and proliferation and enhanced the mesenchymal stem cell differentiation toward osteoblasts. Our results indicated that the mineralized nanofiber scaffolds with multilayer fabrics possessed excellent cytocompatibility and good osteogenic activity, making them versatile biocompatible scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of thermoresponsive non-woven 3D scaffold for smart cell culture

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahlangu, T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available D scaffold which is based on a polypropylene (PP), non-woven fabric (NWF), grafted with poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) for use in non-invasive 3D cell culture [1]. PNIPAAm is a thermo-responsive polymer with a lower critical solution... are the characteristic bands of the broad amide II (N-H) stretch, amide I (C=O) stretching vibration and amide II deformation respectively. The gNWF spectra resembles that of PNIPAAm; therefore confirming that grafting has taken place. Figure 3: SEM images of a) p...

  15. Fabrication of scalable and structured tissue engineering scaffolds using water dissolvable sacrificial 3D printed moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Larsen, Layla Bashir; Trifol Guzman, Jon

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges in producing large scale engineered tissue is the lack of ability to create large highly perfused scaffolds in which cells can grow at a high cell density and viability. Here, we explore 3D printed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a sacrificial mould in a polymer casting...... process. The PVA mould network defines the channels and is dissolved after curing the polymer casted around it. The printing parameters determined the PVA filament density in the sacrificial structure and this density resulted in different stiffness of the corresponding elastomer replica. It was possible...

  16. Expansion of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Perfused 3D Ceramic Scaffolds Enhances In Vivo Bone Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Allison I; Duhr, Ralph; Di Maggio, Nunzia; Mehrkens, Arne; Jakob, Marcel; Wendt, David

    2017-12-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC), when expanded directly within 3D ceramic scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors, more reproducibly form bone when implanted in vivo as compared to conventional expansion on 2D polystyrene dishes/flasks. Since the bioreactor-based expansion on 3D ceramic scaffolds encompasses multiple aspects that are inherently different from expansion on 2D polystyrene, we aimed to decouple the effects of specific parameters among these two model systems. We assessed the effects of the: 1) 3D scaffold vs. 2D surface; 2) ceramic vs. polystyrene materials; and 3) BMSC niche established within the ceramic pores during in vitro culture, on subsequent in vivo bone formation. While BMSC expanded on 3D polystyrene scaffolds in the bioreactor could maintain their in vivo osteogenic potential, results were similar as BMSC expanded in monolayer on 2D polystyrene, suggesting little influence of the scaffold 3D environment. Bone formation was most reproducible when BMSC are expanded on 3D ceramic, highlighting the influence of the ceramic substrate. The presence of a pre-formed niche within the scaffold pores had negligible effects on the in vivo bone formation. The results of this study allow a greater understanding of the parameters required for perfusion bioreactor-based manufacturing of osteogenic grafts for clinical applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Investigation of silk fibroin nanoparticle-decorated poly(L-lactic acid composite scaffolds for osteoblast growth and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen BQ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biao-Qi Chen,1 Ranjith Kumar Kankala,1,2 Ai-Zheng Chen,1,2 Ding-Zhu Yang,1 Xiao-Xia Cheng,1 Ni-Na Jiang,1,2 Kai Zhu,3,4 Shi-Bin Wang1,2 1Institute of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, 2Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Biochemical Technology, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, Fujian, 3Department of Cardiac Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 4Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Attempts to reflect the physiology of organs is quite an intricacy during the tissue engineering process. An ideal scaffold and its surface topography can address and manipulate the cell behavior during the regeneration of targeted tissue, affecting the cell growth and differentiation significantly. Herein, silk fibroin (SF nanoparticles were incorporated into poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA to prepare composite scaffolds via phase-inversion technique using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2. The SF nanoparticle core increased the surface roughness and hydrophilicity of the PLLA scaffolds, leading to a high affinity for albumin attachment. The in vitro cytotoxicity test of SF/PLLA scaffolds in L929 mouse fibroblast cells indicated good biocompatibility. Then, the in vitro interplay between mouse preosteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1 and various topological structures and biochemical cues were evaluated. The cell adhesion, proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and their relationship with the structures as well as SF content were explored. The SF/PLLA weight ratio (2:8 significantly affected the MC3T3-E1 cells by improving the expression of key players in the regulation of bone formation, ie, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, osteocalcin (OC and collagen 1 (COL-1. These results suggest not only the importance of surface topography and biochemical cues but also the potential of applying SF/PLLA composite scaffolds as biomaterials in bone tissue engineering. Keywords: super critical fluids, surface topography, bone

  18. Polymer structure-property requirements for stereolithographic 3D printing of soft tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondschein, Ryan J; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Williams, Christopher B; Verbridge, Scott S; Long, Timothy E

    2017-09-01

    This review highlights the synthesis, properties, and advanced applications of synthetic and natural polymers 3D printed using stereolithography for soft tissue engineering applications. Soft tissue scaffolds are of great interest due to the number of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and connective tissue injuries and replacements humans face each year. Accurately replacing or repairing these tissues is challenging due to the variation in size, shape, and strength of different types of soft tissue. With advancing processing techniques such as stereolithography, control of scaffold resolution down to the μm scale is achievable along with the ability to customize each fabricated scaffold to match the targeted replacement tissue. Matching the advanced manufacturing technique to polymer properties as well as maintaining the proper chemical, biological, and mechanical properties for tissue replacement is extremely challenging. This review discusses the design of polymers with tailored structure, architecture, and functionality for stereolithography, while maintaining chemical, biological, and mechanical properties to mimic a broad range of soft tissue types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of porosity on cell ingrowth into accurately defined, laser-made, polylactide-based 3D scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilevicius, Paulius; Georgiadi, Leoni [Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), N Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Pateman, Christopher J.; Claeyssens, Frederik [Kroto Research Institute, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ (United Kingdom); Chatzinikolaidou, Maria, E-mail: mchatzin@materials.uoc.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), N Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, 71303 Heraklion (Greece); Farsari, Maria, E-mail: mfarsari@iesl.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), N Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • We studied the porosity of laser-made 3D scaffolds on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells. • We made polylactide 3D scaffolds with pores 25–110 μm. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to demonstrate the accuracy required for the investigation of the role of solid scaffolds’ porosity in cell proliferation. We therefore present a qualitative investigation into the effect of porosity on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cell ingrowth of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds fabricated by direct femtosecond laser writing. The material we used is a purpose made photosensitive pre-polymer based on polylactide. We designed and fabricated complex, geometry-controlled 3D scaffolds with pore sizes ranging from 25 to 110 μm, representing porosities 70%, 82%, 86%, and 90%. The 70% porosity scaffolds did not support cell growth initially and in the long term. For the other porosities, we found a strong adhesion of the pre-osteoblastic cells from the first hours after seeding and a remarkable proliferation increase after 3 weeks and up to 8 weeks. The 86% porosity scaffolds exhibited a higher efficiency compared to 82% and 90%. In addition, bulk material degradation studies showed that the employed, highly-acrylated polylactide is degradable. These findings support the potential use of the proposed material and the scaffold fabrication technique in bone tissue engineering.

  20. Enhanced osteogenic activity of poly(ester urea) scaffolds using facile post-3D printing peptide functionalization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Xu, Yanyi; Yu, Jiayi; Becker, Matthew L

    2017-10-01

    Additive manufacturing has the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine, but the harsh thermal or photochemical conditions during the 3D printing process limit the inclusion of drugs, growth factors and other biologics within the resulting scaffolds. Functionalization strategies that enable specific placement of bioactive species on the surface of 3D printed structures following the printing process afford a promising approach to sidestep the harsh conditions and incorporate these valuable bioactive molecules with precise control over concentration. Herein, resorbable polymer scaffolds were prepared from propargyl functionalized L-phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s (PEUs). Osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) or bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) peptides were immobilized on PEU scaffolds through surface available propargyl groups via copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) post 3D printing. The presence of either OGP or BMP-2 significantly enhanced hMSCs osteogenic differentiation compared to unfunctionalized scaffolds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced bone formation in electrospun poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)–tussah silk fibroin ultrafine nanofiber scaffolds incorporated with graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Weili; He, Jianxin; Sang, Feng; Wang, Qian; Chen, Li; Cui, Shizhong; Ding, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To engineer bone tissue, it is necessary to provide a biocompatible, mechanically robust scaffold. In this study, we fabricated an ultrafine nanofiber scaffold by electrospinning a blend of poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid), tussah silk fibroin, and graphene oxide (GO) and characterized its morphology, biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and biological activity. The data indicate that incorporation of 10 wt.% tussah silk and 1 wt.% graphene oxide into poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanofibers significantly decreased the fiber diameter from 280 to 130 nm. Furthermore, tussah silk and graphene oxide boosted the Young's modulus and tensile strength by nearly 4-fold and 3-fold, respectively, and significantly enhanced adhesion, proliferation in mouse mesenchymal stem cells and functionally promoted biomineralization-relevant alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and mineral deposition. The results indicate that composite nanofibers could be excellent and versatile scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • GO-doped PLGA–tussah silk fibroin ultrafine nanofibers with diameter of about 130 nm were fabricated by electrospinning. • Incorporation of 10 wt.% tussah silk to the PLGA nanofibers accelerates osteoblast differentiation and formation of new bone. • Mechanical properties of composite nanofiber mats had been significantly improved after embedding with GO nanosheets. • Nanostructured composite scaffolds effectively accelerate mesenchymal stem cells differentiation and formation of new bone.

  2. Enhanced bone formation in electrospun poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)–tussah silk fibroin ultrafine nanofiber scaffolds incorporated with graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Weili [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites (Ministry of Education), Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Henan Provincial Key Laboratory of Functional Textile Materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); He, Jianxin, E-mail: hejianxin771117@163.com [Henan Provincial Key Laboratory of Functional Textile Materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Sang, Feng [Department of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Treatment and Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhengzhou 450000 (China); Wang, Qian [Henan Provincial Key Laboratory of Functional Textile Materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Chen, Li [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites (Ministry of Education), Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Cui, Shizhong [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composites (Ministry of Education), Institute of Textile Composites, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Henan Provincial Key Laboratory of Functional Textile Materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Ding, Bin [Henan Provincial Key Laboratory of Functional Textile Materials, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201600 (China)

    2016-05-01

    To engineer bone tissue, it is necessary to provide a biocompatible, mechanically robust scaffold. In this study, we fabricated an ultrafine nanofiber scaffold by electrospinning a blend of poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid), tussah silk fibroin, and graphene oxide (GO) and characterized its morphology, biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and biological activity. The data indicate that incorporation of 10 wt.% tussah silk and 1 wt.% graphene oxide into poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanofibers significantly decreased the fiber diameter from 280 to 130 nm. Furthermore, tussah silk and graphene oxide boosted the Young's modulus and tensile strength by nearly 4-fold and 3-fold, respectively, and significantly enhanced adhesion, proliferation in mouse mesenchymal stem cells and functionally promoted biomineralization-relevant alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and mineral deposition. The results indicate that composite nanofibers could be excellent and versatile scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • GO-doped PLGA–tussah silk fibroin ultrafine nanofibers with diameter of about 130 nm were fabricated by electrospinning. • Incorporation of 10 wt.% tussah silk to the PLGA nanofibers accelerates osteoblast differentiation and formation of new bone. • Mechanical properties of composite nanofiber mats had been significantly improved after embedding with GO nanosheets. • Nanostructured composite scaffolds effectively accelerate mesenchymal stem cells differentiation and formation of new bone.

  3. Fabrication and durable antibacterial properties of 3D porous wet electrospun RCSC/PCL nanofibrous scaffold with silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei; Lin, Han; Wang, -->Yilong; Yang, Guang; Zhao, He; Sun, Dahui

    2017-08-01

    Electrospunnanofibers are used as three-dimensional (3D) scaffold materials that can alter cell attachment and cell proliferation, change the antibacterial properties of materials, and can be used as wound dressings. But the fabrication of porous 3D scaffold structure and the antibacterial properties enhancing are challenges remained to improve. With the states here, a Ranachensinensis skin collagen (RCSC)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL)AgNP-loaded3D nanofiber scaffold is fabricated as a wound dressing material by using an improved wet electrospinning method (blending). The nanoscale of the AgNPs is proved. The 3D porous morphologies of the materials with different AgNP loadings, are determined with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the presence and uniformity distribution of AgNPs is confirmed by Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The silver-ion release rates, antibacterial properties, and cytotoxicities of dressing materials with different AgNP contents are evaluated using ICP-AES, the zone inhibition method, and MTT testing. These results showed that the improved wet electrospun is an effective way to fabricate AgNP loaded 3D scaffold materials with porous structure and nearly 90% porosity and the presence of AgNPs in dressing materials strengthen the antibacterial properties. The RCSC/PCL 3D scaffold materials containing 2.0%AgNP would be promising for dressing materials application nearly without cytotoxicities.

  4. Bioprinting 3D microfibrous scaffolds for engineering endothelialized myocardium and heart-on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Arneri, Andrea; Bersini, Simone; Shin, Su-Ryon; Zhu, Kai; Goli-Malekabadi, Zahra; Aleman, Julio; Colosi, Cristina; Busignani, Fabio; Dell'Erba, Valeria; Bishop, Colin; Shupe, Thomas; Demarchi, Danilo; Moretti, Matteo; Rasponi, Marco; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Atala, Anthony; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Engineering cardiac tissues and organ models remains a great challenge due to the hierarchical structure of the native myocardium. The need of integrating blood vessels brings additional complexity, limiting the available approaches that are suitable to produce integrated cardiovascular organoids. In this work we propose a novel hybrid strategy based on 3D bioprinting, to fabricate endothelialized myocardium. Enabled by the use of our composite bioink, endothelial cells directly bioprinted within microfibrous hydrogel scaffolds gradually migrated towards the peripheries of the microfibers to form a layer of confluent endothelium. Together with controlled anisotropy, this 3D endothelial bed was then seeded with cardiomyocytes to generate aligned myocardium capable of spontaneous and synchronous contraction. We further embedded the organoids into a specially designed microfluidic perfusion bioreactor to complete the endothelialized-myocardium-on-a-chip platform for cardiovascular toxicity evaluation. Finally, we demonstrated that such a technique could be translated to human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells to construct endothelialized human myocardium. We believe that our method for generation of endothelialized organoids fabricated through an innovative 3D bioprinting technology may find widespread applications in regenerative medicine, drug screening, and potentially disease modeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Surface modification of strontium-doped porous bioactive ceramic scaffolds via poly(DOPA) coating and immobilizing silk fibroin for excellent angiogenic and osteogenic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Gu, Zhipeng; Jiang, Bo; Li, Li; Yu, Xixun

    2016-04-01

    For bioceramic scaffolds employed in clinical applications, excellent bioactivity and tenacity were of great importance. Modifying inorganic SCPP scaffolds with biological macromolecules could obviously improve its bioactivity and eliminate its palpable brittleness. However, it was hard to execute directly due to extremely bad interfacial compatibility between them. In this research, dopamine (DOPA) was introduced onto strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) scaffolds, subsequently the preliminary material was successfully further modified by silk fibroin (SF). SCPP/D/SF possessed suitable biomechanical properties, ability to stimulate angiogenic factor secretion and excellent biocompatibility. Biomechanical examination demonstrated that SCPP/D/SF scaffolds yielded better compressive strength because of improved interfacial compatibility. MTT assay and CLSM observation showed that SCPP/D/SF scaffolds had good cytocompatibility and presented better inducing-cell-migration potential than pure SCPP scaffolds. Meanwhile, its ability to stimulate angiogenic factor secretion was measured through the ELISA assay and immunohistological analysis in vitro and in vivo respectively. The results revealed, superior to SCPP, SCPP/D/SF could effectively promote VEGF and bFGF expression, possibly leading to enhancing angiogenesis and osteogenesis. In a word, SCPP/D/SF could serve as a potential bone tissue engineering scaffold for comparable biomechanical properties and excellent bioactivity. It provided a novel idea for modification of inorganic materials to prepare promising bone tissue engineering scaffolds with the ability to accelerate bone regeneration and vascularization.

  6. Improving PEEK bioactivity for craniofacial reconstruction using a 3D printed scaffold embedded with mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskies, Michael; Jordan, Jack O; Fang, Dongdong; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Hier, Michael P; Mlynarek, Alex; Tamimi, Faleh; Tran, Simon D

    2016-07-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a bioinert thermoplastic that has been investigated for its potential use in craniofacial reconstruction; however, its use in clinical practice is limited by a poor integration with adjacent bone upon implantation. To improve the bone-implant interface, two strategies have been employed: to modify its surface or to impregnate PEEK with bioactive materials. This study attempts to combine and improve upon the two approaches by modifying the internal structure into a trabecular network and to impregnate PEEK with mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, we compare the newly designed PEEK scaffolds' interactions with both bone-derived (BMSC) and adipose (ADSC) stem cells. Customized PEEK scaffolds were designed to incorporate a trabecular microstructure using a computer-aided design program and then printed via selective laser sintering (SLS), a 3D-printing process with exceptional accuracy. The scaffold structure was evaluated using microCT. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate scaffold morphology with and without mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adipose and bone marrow mesenchymal cells were isolated from rats and cultured on scaffolds. Cell proliferation and differentiation were assessed using alamarBlue and alkaline phosphatase assays, respectively. Cell morphology after one week of co-culturing cells with PEEK scaffolds was evaluated using SEM. SLS 3D printing fabricated scaffolds with a porosity of 36.38% ± 6.66 and density of 1.309 g/cm(2). Cell morphology resembled viable fibroblasts attaching to the surface and micropores of the scaffold. PEEK scaffolds maintained the viability of both ADSCs and BMSCs; however, ADSCs demonstrated higher osteodifferentiation than BMSCs (p PEEK scaffolds that maintain the viability of adipose and bone marrow-derived MSCs and induce the osteodifferentiation of the adipose-derived MSCs. The combination of 3D printed PEEK scaffolds with MSCs could overcome some of the limitations

  7. Enhanced bone formation in electrospun poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-tussah silk fibroin ultrafine nanofiber scaffolds incorporated with graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Weili; He, Jianxin; Sang, Feng; Wang, Qian; Chen, Li; Cui, Shizhong; Ding, Bin

    2016-05-01

    To engineer bone tissue, it is necessary to provide a biocompatible, mechanically robust scaffold. In this study, we fabricated an ultrafine nanofiber scaffold by electrospinning a blend of poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid), tussah silk fibroin, and graphene oxide (GO) and characterized its morphology, biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and biological activity. The data indicate that incorporation of 10 wt.% tussah silk and 1 wt.% graphene oxide into poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanofibers significantly decreased the fiber diameter from 280 to 130 nm. Furthermore, tussah silk and graphene oxide boosted the Young's modulus and tensile strength by nearly 4-fold and 3-fold, respectively, and significantly enhanced adhesion, proliferation in mouse mesenchymal stem cells and functionally promoted biomineralization-relevant alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and mineral deposition. The results indicate that composite nanofibers could be excellent and versatile scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An engineered 3D human airway mucosa model based on an SIS scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Maria; Gross, Roy; Walles, Heike; Gangnus, Rainer; Schütze, Karin; Walles, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    To investigate interrelations of human obligate airway pathogens, such as Bordetella pertussis, and their hosts test systems with high in vitro/in vivo correlation are of urgent need. Using a tissue engineering approach, we generated a 3D test system of the airway mucosa with human tracheobronchial epithelial cells (hTEC) and fibroblasts seeded on a clinically implemented biological scaffold. To investigate if hTEC display tumour-specific characteristics we analysed Raman spectra of hTEC and the adenocarcinoma cell line Calu-3. To establish optimal conditions for infection studies, we treated human native airway mucosa segments with B. pertussis. Samples were processed for morphologic analysis. Whereas our test system consisting of differentiated epithelial cells and migrating fibroblasts shows high in vitro/in vivo correlation, hTEC seeded on the scaffold as monocultures did not resemble the in vivo situation. Differences in Raman spectra of hTEC and Calu-3 were identified in distinct wave number ranges between 720 and 1662 cm(-1) indicating that hTEC do not display tumour-specific characteristics. Infection of native tissue with B. pertussis led to cytoplasmic vacuoles, damaged mitochondria and destroyed epithelial cells. Our test system is suitable for infection studies with human obligate airway pathogens by mimicking the physiological microenvironment of the human airway mucosa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a porous 3D graphene-PDMS scaffold for improved osseointegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfeng; Liu, Xiao; Crook, Jeremy M; Wallace, Gordon G

    2017-11-01

    Osseointegration in orthopedic surgery plays an important role for bone implantation success. Traditional treatment of implant surface aimed at improved osseointegration has limited capability for its poor performance in supporting cell growth and proliferation. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used silicon-based organic polymer material with properties that are useful in cosmetics, domestic applications and mechanical engineering. In addition, the biocompatibility of PDMS, in part due to the high solubility of oxygen, makes it an ideal material for cell-based implants. Notwithstanding its potential, a property that can inhibit PDMS bioactivity is the high hydrophobicity, limiting its use to date in tissue engineering. Here, we describe an efficient approach to produce porous, durable and cytocompatible PDMS-based 3D structures, coated with reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The RGO/PDMS scaffold has good mechanical strength and with pore sizes ranging from 10 to 600μm. Importantly, the scaffold is able to support growth and differentiation of human adipose stem cells (ADSCs) to an osteogenic cell lineage, indicative of its potential as a transition structure of an osseointegrated implant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Immobilized Lentivirus Vector on Chondroitin Sulfate-Hyaluronate Acid-Silk Fibroin Hybrid Scaffold for Tissue-Engineered Ligament-Bone Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of a fibrocartilage layer between graft and bone remains the leading cause of graft failure after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. The objective of this study was to develop a gene-modified silk cable-reinforced chondroitin sulfate-hyaluronate acid-silk fibroin (CHS hybrid scaffold for reconstructing the fibrocartilage layer. The scaffold was fabricated by lyophilizing the CHS mixture with braided silk cables. The scanning electronic microscopy (SEM showed that microporous CHS sponges were formed around silk cables. Each end of scaffold was modified with lentiviral-mediated transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3 gene. The cells on scaffold were transfected by bonded lentivirus. In vitro culture demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on scaffolds proliferated vigorously and produced abundant collagen. The transcription levels of cartilage-specific genes also increased with culture time. After 2 weeks, the MSCs were distributed uniformly throughout scaffold. Deposited collagen was also found to increase. The chondral differentiation of MSCs was verified by expressions of collagen II and TGF-β3 genes in mRNA and protein level. Histology also confirmed the production of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM components. The results demonstrated that gene-modified silk cable-reinforced CHS scaffold was capable of supporting cell proliferation and differentiation to reconstruct the cartilage layer of interface.

  11. 3D printed tablets with internal scaffold structure using ethyl cellulose to achieve sustained ibuprofen release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Wang, Huihui; Li, Haichao; Ou, Zhimin; Yang, Gensheng

    2018-03-30

    The object of this study is to prepare and evaluate tablets with predesigned internal scaffold structure using 3D printing to achieve sustained drug release. Model drug (ibuprofen) and sustained release material (ethyl cellulose), together with other excipients, were firstly mixed and extruded into filaments by hot melt extrusion. Then these obtained filaments were printed into tablets by fused deposition modeling. The tablets printability and drug release behavior were influenced by drug content, release modifiers, printing parameters and modeling. An optimized and completed drug release within 24h was achieved by adding certain amount of release modifiers and by adjusting the fill pattern, fill density and shell thickness of models. Drug release profiles and tablet integrity by scanning electron microscope indicated that drug released from these printed tablets through a diffusion-erosion mechanism. All results demonstrated that 3D printing is a highly adjustable and digitally controllable technology that can be applied to produce release-tailored medications. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Fabrication and durable antibacterial properties of 3D porous wet electrospun RCSC/PCL nanofibrous scaffold with silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Mei; Lin, Han [Alan G. MacDiarmid Laboratory, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang, Yilong [College of Quartermaster Technology, Jilin University, Changchun, 130062 (China); Yang, Guang [Norman Bethune First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Zhao, He [Alan G. MacDiarmid Laboratory, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Sun, Dahui, E-mail: sundahui1971@sina.com [Norman Bethune First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Ranachensinensis skin collagen (RCSC) was used with molecular weight 105∼250KDa. • Wet electrospinning was successfully improved and was used to produce 3D porous structure materials with about 90% porosity. • AgNPs was loaded in AgNPs dispersion liquid. - Abstract: Electrospunnanofibers are used as three-dimensional (3D) scaffold materials that can alter cell attachment and cell proliferation, change the antibacterial properties of materials, and can be used as wound dressings. But the fabrication of porous 3D scaffold structure and the antibacterial properties enhancing are challenges remained to improve. With the states here, a Ranachensinensis skin collagen (RCSC)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)AgNP-loaded3D nanofiber scaffold is fabricated as a wound dressing material by using an improved wet electrospinning method (blending). The nanoscale of the AgNPs is proved. The 3D porous morphologies of the materials with different AgNP loadings, are determined with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the presence and uniformity distribution of AgNPs is confirmed by Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The silver-ion release rates, antibacterial properties, and cytotoxicities of dressing materials with different AgNP contents are evaluated using ICP-AES, the zone inhibition method, and MTT testing. These results showed that the improved wet electrospun is an effective way to fabricate AgNP loaded 3D scaffold materials with porous structure and nearly 90% porosity and the presence of AgNPs in dressing materials strengthen the antibacterial properties. The RCSC/PCL 3D scaffold materials containing 2.0%AgNP would be promising for dressing materials application nearly without cytotoxicities.

  13. Collagen-chitosan 3-D nano-scaffolds effects on macrophage phagocytosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Aziz; Mohsenifar, Afshin; Rahmani-Cherati, Tavoos

    2016-07-01

    Macrophages are effector cells in the innate and adaptive immune systems and in situ exist within three-dimensional (3-D) microenvironments. As there has been an increase in interest in the use of 3-D scaffolds to mimic natural microenvironments in vitro, this study examined the impact on cultured mice peritoneal macrophages using standard 2-D plates as compared to 3-D collagen-chitosan scaffolds. Here, 2-D and 3-D cultured macrophages were evaluated for responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), dexamethasone (Dex), BSA (bovine serum albumin), safranal (herbal component isolated from safranal [Saf]) and Alyssum homolocarpum mucilage (A. muc: mixed herbal components). After treatments, cultured macrophages were evaluated for viability, phagocytic activity and release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β pro-inflammatory cytokines. Comparison of 2-D vs 3-D cultures showed that use of either system - with or without any exogenous agent - had no effect on cell viability. In the case of cell function, macrophages cultured on scaffolds had increases in phagocytic activity relative to that by cells on 2-D plates. In general, the test herbal components Saf and A. muc. had more impact than any of the other exogenous agents on nanoparticle uptake. With respect to production of TNFα and IL-1β, compared to the 2-D cells, scaffold cells tended to have significantly different levels of production of each cytokine, with the effect varying (higher or lower) depending on the test agent used. However, unlike with particle uptake, here, while Saf and A. muc. led to significantly greater levels of cytokine formation by the 3-D culture cells vs that by the 2-D plate cells, there was no net effect (stimulatory) vs control cultures. These results illustrated that collagen-chitosan scaffolds could provide a suitable 3-D microenvironment for macrophage phagocytosis and could also impact on the formation of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  14. Fabrication and evaluation of 3D printed BCP scaffolds reinforced with ZrO2for bone tissue applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Min-Woo; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Moriarty, Rebecca A; Kamalitdinov, Timur; Fisher, John P; Kim, Jong Young

    2018-04-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a promising 3D printing and manufacturing step to create well interconnected porous scaffold designs from the computer-aided design (CAD) models for the next generation of bone scaffolds. The purpose of this study was to fabricate and evaluate a new biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffold reinforced with zirconia (ZrO 2 ) by a FDM system for bone tissue engineering. The 3D slurry foams with blending agents were successfully fabricated by a FDM system. Blending materials were then removed after the sintering process at high temperature to obtain a targeted BCP/ZrO 2 scaffold with the desired pore characteristics, porosity, and dimension. Morphology of the sintered scaffold was investigated with SEM/EDS mapping. A cell proliferation test was carried out and evaluated with osteosarcoma MG-63 cells. Mechanical testing and cell proliferation evaluation demonstrated that 90% BCP and 10% ZrO 2 scaffold had a significant effect on the mechanical properties maintaining a structure compared that of only 100% BCP with no ZrO 2 . Additionally, differentiation studies of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on BCP/ZrO 2 scaffolds in static and dynamic culture conditions showed increased expression of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) when cultured on BCP/ZrO 2 scaffolds under dynamic conditions compared to on BCP control scaffolds. The manufacturing of BCP/ZrO 2 scaffolds through this innovative technique of a FDM may provide applications for various types of tissue regeneration, including bone and cartilage. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Pore architecture and cell viability on freeze dried 3D recombinant human collagen-peptide (RHC)–chitosan scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Aimei; Deng, Aipeng [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yang, Yang [Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Gao, Lihu; Zhong, Zhaocai [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yang, Shulin, E-mail: yshulin@njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Pore architecture of 3D scaffolds used in tissue engineering plays a critical role in the maintenance of cell survival, proliferation and further promotion of tissue regeneration. We investigated the pore size and structure, porosity, swelling as well as cell viability of a series of recombinant human collagen-peptide–chitosan (RHCC) scaffolds fabricated by lyophilization. In this paper, freezing regime containing a final temperature of freezing (T{sub f}) and cooling rates was applied to obtain scaffolds with pore size ranging from 100 μm to 120 μm. Other protocols of RHC/chitosan suspension concentration and ratio modification were studied to produce more homogenous and appropriate structural scaffolds. The mean pore size decreased along with the decline of T{sub f} at a slow cooling rate of 0.7 °C/min; a more rapid cooling rate under 5 °C/min resulted to a smaller pore size and more homogenous microstructure. High concentration could reduce pore size and lead to thick well of scaffold, while improved the ratio of RHC, lamellar and fiber structure coexisted with cellular pores. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded on these manufactured scaffolds, the cell viability represented a negative correlation to the pore size. This study provides an alternative method to fabricate 3D RHC–chitosan scaffolds with appropriate pores for potential tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabrication of recombinant human collagen-chitosan scaffolds by freezing drying • Influence of freeze drying protocols on lyophilized scaffolds • Pore size, microstructure, porosity, swelling and cell viability were compared. • The optimized porous scaffold is suitable for cell (HUVEC) seeding.

  16. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter [Danish Polymer Centre, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Søltofts Plads, Building 229, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Wolff, Anders, E-mail: anders.wolff@nanotech.dtu.dk [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Ørsteds Plads, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  17. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  18. The fabrication of double layer tubular vascular tissue engineering scaffold via coaxial electrospinning and its 3D cell coculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin; Cao, Jie; Chen, Lamei; Geng, Xue; Zhang, Ai-Ying; Guo, Lian-Rui; Gu, Yong-Quan; Feng, Zeng-Guo

    2015-12-01

    A continuous electrospinning technique was applied to fabricate double layer tubular tissue engineering vascular graft (TEVG) scaffold. The luminal layer was made from poly(ɛ-caprolac-tone)(PCL) ultrafine fibers via common single axial electrospinning followed by the outer layer of core-shell structured nanofibers via coaxial electrospinning. For preparing the outer layernano-fibers, the PCL was electrospun into the shell and both bovine serum albumin (BSA) and tetrapeptide val-gal-pro-gly (VAPG) were encapsulated into the core. The core-shell structure in the outer layer fibers was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The in vitro release tests exhibited the sustainable release behavior of BSA and VAPG so that they provided a better cell growth environment in the interior of tubular scaffold wall. The in vitro culture of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) demonstrated their potential to penetrate into the scaffold wall for the 3D cell culture. Subsequently, 3D cell coculture was conducted. First, SMCs were seeded on the luminal surface of the scaffold and cultured for 5 days, and then endothelial cells (ECs) were also seeded on the luminal surface and cocultured with SMCs for another 2 days. After stained with antibodies, 3D cell distribution on the scaffold was revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) where ECs were mainly located on the luminal surface whereas SMCs penetrated into the surface and distributed inside the scaffold wall. This double layer tubular scaffold with 3D cell distribution showed the promise to develop it into a novel TEVG for clinical trials in the near future. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Development of bioartificial myocardium by electrostimulation of 3D collagen scaffolds seeded with stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Carpentier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrostimulation (ES can be defined as a safe physical method to induce stem cell differentiation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of ES on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs seeded in collagen scaffolds in terms of proliferation and differentiation into cardiomyocytes. BMSCs were isolated from Wistar rats and seeded into 3D collagen type 1 templates measuring 25 x 25 x 6 mm. Bipolar in vitro ES was performed during 21 days. Electrical impedance and cell proliferation were measured. Expression of cardiac markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Viscoelasticity of collagen matrix was evaluated. Electrical impedance assessments showed a low resistance of 234±41 Ohms which indicates good electrical conductivity of collagen matrix. Cell proliferation at 570 nm as significantly increased in ES groups after seven day (ES 0.129±0.03 vs non-stimulated control matrix 0.06±0.01, P=0.002 and after 21 days, (ES 0.22±0.04 vs control 0.13±0.01, P=0.01. Immunocytochemistry of BMSCs after 21 days ES showed positive staining of cardiac markers, troponin I, connexin 43, sarcomeric alpha-actinin, slow myosin, fast myosin and desmin. Staining for BMSCs marker CD29 after 21 days was negative. Electrostimulation of cell-seeded collagen matrix changed stem cell morphology and bio- chemical characteristics, increasing the expression of cardiac markers. Thus, MSC-derived differentiated cells by electrostimulation grafted in biological scaffolds might result in a convenient tissue engineering source for myocardial diseases.

  20. Effect of in vitro enzymatic degradation on 3D printed poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds: morphological, chemical and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joana; Gloria, Antonio; Cometa, Stefania; Coelho, Jorge F J; Domingos, Marco

    2017-07-27

    In recent years, the tissue engineering (TE) field has significantly benefited from advanced techniques such as additive manufacturing (AM), for the design of customized 3D scaffolds with the aim of guided tissue repair. Among the wide range of materials available to biomanufacture 3D scaffolds, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) clearly arises as the synthetic polymer with the greatest potential, due to its unique properties - namely, biocompatibility, biodegradability, thermal and chemical stability and processability. This study aimed for the first time to investigate the effect of pore geometry on the in vitro enzymatic chain cleavage mechanism of PCL scaffolds manufactured by the AM extrusion process. Methods: Morphological properties of 3D printed PCL scaffolds before and after degradation were evaluated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was employed to determine possible variations in the crystallinity of the scaffolds during the degradation period. The molecular weight was assessed using Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) while the mechanical properties were investigated under static compression conditions. Morphological results suggested a uniform reduction of filament diameter, while increasing the scaffolds' porosity. DSC analysis revealed and increment in the crystallinity degree while the molecular weight, evaluated through SEC, remained almost constant during the incubation period (25 days). Mechanical analysis highlighted a decrease in the compressive modulus and maximum stress over time, probably related to the significant weight loss of the scaffolds. All of these results suggest that PCL scaffolds undergo enzymatic degradation through a surface erosion mechanism, which leads to significant variations in mechanical, physical and chemical properties, but which has little influence on pore geometry.

  1. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  2. Triblock copolymers based on ε-caprolactone and trimethylene carbonate for the 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güney, Aysun; Malda, Jos; Dhert, Wouter J.A.; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Biodegradable PCL-b-PTMC-b-PCL triblock copolymers based on trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and ε-caprolactone (CL) were prepared and used in the 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds. Triblock copolymers of various molecular weights containing equal amounts of TMC and CL were

  3. Triblock copolymers based on ε-caprolactone and trimethylene carbonate for the 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güney, Aysun; Malda, Jos; Dhert, Wouter J A; Grijpma, Dirk W

    BACKGROUND: Biodegradable PCL-b-PTMC-b-PCL triblock copolymers based on trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and ε-caprolactone (CL) were prepared and used in the 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds. Triblock copolymers of various molecular weights containing equal amounts of TMC and CL were

  4. Triblock copolymers based on epsilon-caprolactone and trimethylene carbonate for the 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guney, Aysun; Malda, Jos; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    Background: Biodegradable PCL-b-PTMC-b-PCL triblock copolymers based on trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and epsilon-caprolactone (CL) were prepared and used in the 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds. Triblock copolymers of various molecular weights containing equal amounts of TMC and CL were

  5. Thermo-Responsive non-woven scaffolds for ‘‘smart’’ 3D cell culture

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rossouw, CL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available viability and proliferation were estimated using the Alamar Blue assay and Hoechst 33258 total DNA quantification. The assays revealed that the pure and grafted non-woven scaffolds maintained the hepatocytes within the matrix and promoted 3D proliferation...

  6. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Kuldeep, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto

    2016-01-01

    pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing...... to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random...... parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone)were used for fabrication.However,we showthat this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control...

  7. A 3D Electroactive Polypyrrole-Collagen Fibrous Scaffold for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam W. Leong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fibers that can provide topographical, biochemical and electrical cues would be attractive for directing the differentiation of stem cells into electro-responsive cells such as neuronal or muscular cells. Here we report on the fabrication of polypyrrole-incorporated collagen-based fibers via interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC. The mean ultimate tensile strength of the fibers is 304.0 ± 61.0 MPa and the Young’s Modulus is 10.4 ± 4.3 GPa. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are cultured on the fibers in a proliferating medium and stimulated with an external electrical pulse generator for 5 and 10 days. The effects of polypyrrole in the fiber system can be observed, with hMSCs adopting a neuronal-like morphology at day 10, and through the upregulation of neural markers, such as noggin, MAP2, neurofilament, β tubulin III and nestin. This study demonstrates the potential of this fiber system as an attractive 3D scaffold for tissue engineering, where collagen is present on the fiber surface for cellular adhesion, and polypyrrole is encapsulated within the fiber for enhanced electrical communication in cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions.

  8. Poly(dopamine) coating of 3D printed poly(lactic acid) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Chia-Tze [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Wen; Yeh, Chia-Hung [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Fang, Hsin-Yuan [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Thoracic Surgery, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, College of Medicine, College of Public Health, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-01

    3D printing is a versatile technique to generate large quantities of a wide variety of shapes and sizes of polymer. The aim of this study is to develop functionalized 3D printed poly(lactic acid) (PLA) scaffolds and use a mussel-inspired surface coating to regulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). We prepared PLA 3D scaffolds coated with polydopamine (PDA). The chemical composition and surface properties of PDA/PLA were characterized by XPS. PDA/PLA modulated hADSCs' responses in several ways. Firstly, adhesion and proliferation, and cell cycle of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly enhanced relative to those on PLA. In addition, the collagen I secreted from cells was increased and promoted cell attachment and cell cycle progression were depended on the PDA content. In osteogenesis assay, the ALP activity and osteocalcin of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly higher than seen in those cultured on pure PLA scaffolds. Moreover, hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA showed up-regulation of the ang-1 and vWF proteins associated with angiogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that the bio-inspired coating synthetic PLA polymer can be used as a simple technique to render the surfaces of synthetic scaffolds active, thus enabling them to direct the specific responses of hADSCs. - Highlights: • A simple method of 3D printed poly(lactic acid) scaffold coated with PDA • Promoted proliferation of hADSCs on PDA/PLA scaffolds • Increased collagen I, cell cycle, and cell adhesion with a high PDA content • Up-regulation of angiogenic and osteogenic of hADSCs • A promising method for bioinspired surface modification on PLA using PDA.

  9. Poly(dopamine) coating of 3D printed poly(lactic acid) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Lin, Chi-Chang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Yeh, Chia-Hung; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is a versatile technique to generate large quantities of a wide variety of shapes and sizes of polymer. The aim of this study is to develop functionalized 3D printed poly(lactic acid) (PLA) scaffolds and use a mussel-inspired surface coating to regulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). We prepared PLA 3D scaffolds coated with polydopamine (PDA). The chemical composition and surface properties of PDA/PLA were characterized by XPS. PDA/PLA modulated hADSCs' responses in several ways. Firstly, adhesion and proliferation, and cell cycle of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly enhanced relative to those on PLA. In addition, the collagen I secreted from cells was increased and promoted cell attachment and cell cycle progression were depended on the PDA content. In osteogenesis assay, the ALP activity and osteocalcin of hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA were significantly higher than seen in those cultured on pure PLA scaffolds. Moreover, hADSCs cultured on PDA/PLA showed up-regulation of the ang-1 and vWF proteins associated with angiogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that the bio-inspired coating synthetic PLA polymer can be used as a simple technique to render the surfaces of synthetic scaffolds active, thus enabling them to direct the specific responses of hADSCs. - Highlights: • A simple method of 3D printed poly(lactic acid) scaffold coated with PDA • Promoted proliferation of hADSCs on PDA/PLA scaffolds • Increased collagen I, cell cycle, and cell adhesion with a high PDA content • Up-regulation of angiogenic and osteogenic of hADSCs • A promising method for bioinspired surface modification on PLA using PDA

  10. A novel approach for fabricating highly tunable and fluffy bioinspired 3D poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fiber scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sunanda; Kuddannaya, Shreyas; Das, Tanya; Lee, Heng Yeong; Lim, Jacob; Hu, Xiao 'Matthew'; Chee Yoon, Yue; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-06-01

    The excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability and chemo-thermal stability of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) have been harnessed in diverse practical applications. These properties have motivated the fabrication of high performance PVA based nanofibers with adequate control over the micro and nano-architectures and surface chemical interactions. However, the high water solubility and hydrophilicity of the PVA polymer limits the application of the electrospun PVA nanofibers in aqueous environments owing to instantaneous dissolution. In this work, we report a novel yet facile concept for fabricating extremely light, fluffy, insoluble and stable three dimensional (3D) PVA fibrous scaffolds with/without coating for multifunctional purposes. While the solubility, morphology, fiber density and mechanical properties of nanofibers could be tuned by optimizing the cross-linking conditions, the surface chemical reactivity could be readily enhanced by coating with a polydopamine (pDA) bioinspired polymer without compromising the stability and innate properties of the native PVA fiber. The 3D pDA-PVA scaffolds exhibited super dye adsorption and constructive synergistic cell-material interactions by promoting healthy adhesion and viability of the human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) within 3D micro-niches. We foresee the application of tunable PVA 3D as a highly adsorbent material and a scaffold material for tissue regeneration and drug delivery with close consideration of realistic in vivo parameters.

  11. 3D bioprinting of BMSC-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds with CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mingchun; Chen, Bing; Meng, Qingyuan; Liu, Sumei; Zheng, Xiongfei; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Heran; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Nuo; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-12-18

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting combines biomaterials, cells and functional components into complex living tissues. Herein, we assembled function-control modules into cell-laden scaffolds using 3D bioprinting. A customized 3D printer was able to tune the microstructure of printed bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-laden methacrylamide gelatin scaffolds at the micrometer scale. For example, the pore size was adjusted to 282 ± 32 μm and 363 ± 60 μm. To match the requirements of the printing nozzle, collagen microfibers with a length of 22 ± 13 μm were prepared with a high-speed crusher. Collagen microfibers bound bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) with a collagen binding domain (CBD) as differentiation-control module, from which BMP2 was able to be controllably released. The differentiation behaviors of BMSCs in the printed scaffolds were compared in three microenvironments: samples without CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers in the growth medium, samples without microfibers in the osteogenic medium and samples with microfibers in the growth medium. The results indicated that BMSCs showed high cell viability (>90%) during printing; CBD-BMP2-collagen microfibers induced BMSC differentiation into osteocytes within 14 days more efficiently than the osteogenic medium. Our studies suggest that these function-control modules are attractive biomaterials and have potential applications in 3D bioprinting.

  12. Development of a novel alginate-polyvinyl alcohol-hydroxyapatite hydrogel for 3D bioprinting bone tissue engineered scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtsen, Stephanie T; Quinnell, Sean P; Wei, Mei

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional printed biomaterials used as personalized tissue substitutes have the ability to promote and enhance regeneration in areas of defected tissue. The challenge with 3D printing for bone tissue engineering remains the selection of a material with optimal rheological properties for printing in addition to biocompatibility and capacity for uniform cell incorporation. Hydrogel biomaterials may provide sufficient printability to allow cell encapsulation and bioprinting of scaffolds with uniform cell distribution. In this study, a novel alginate-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-hydroxyapatite (HA) hydrogel formulation with optimal rheological properties for 3D bioprinting of mouse calvaria 3T3-E1 (MC3T3) cells into scaffolds of high shape fidelity has been developed. A systematic investigation was conducted to determine the effect of varying concentrations of alginate, phosphate, calcium, and the PVA-HA suspension in the formulation on the resulting viscosity and thus printability of the hydrogel. HA, the main mineral component in natural bone, was incorporated into the hydrogel formulation to create a favorable bone-forming environment due to its excellent osteoconductivity. Degradation studies in α-MEM cell culture media showed that the 3D printed alginate-PVA-HA scaffolds remained in-tact for 14 days. MC3T3 cells were well distributed and encapsulated throughout the optimal hydrogel formulation and expressed high viability through the completion of the 3D printing process. Thus, the development of this novel, osteoconductive, biodegradable, alginate-PVA-HA formulation and its ability to 3D bioprint tissue engineered scaffolds make it a promising candidate for treating personalized bone defects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1457-1468, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The effect of interface microstructure on interfacial shear strength for osteochondral scaffolds based on biomimetic design and 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Interface integration between chondral phase and osseous phase is crucial in engineered osteochondral scaffolds. However, the integration was poorly understood and commonly failed to meet the need of osteochondral scaffolds. In this paper, a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold with enhanced interfacial integration was developed. The chondral phase was a PEG hydrogel. The osseous phase was a β-TCP ceramic scaffold. The PEG hydrogel was directly cured on the ceramic interface layer by layer to fabricate osteochondral scaffolds by 3D printing technology. Meanwhile, a series of interface structure were designed with different interface pore area percentages (0/10/20/30/40/50/60%), and interfacial shear test was applied for interface structure optimization (n=6 samples/group). The interfacial shear strength of 30% pore area group was nearly three folds improved compared with that of 0% pore area percentage group, and more than fifty folds improved compared with that of traditional integration (5.91±0.59 kPa). In conclusion, the biomimetic PEG/β-TCP scaffolds with interface structure enhanced integration show promising potential application for osteochondral tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-assembled composite matrix in a hierarchical 3D scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, M; Le, D Q S; Baatrup, Anette

    2011-01-01

    It is of high clinical relevance in bone tissue engineering that scaffolds promote a high seeding efficiency of cells capable of osteogenic differentiation, such as human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). We evaluated the effects of a novel polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold on h...

  15. Ceramic scaffolds produced by computer-assisted 3D printing and sintering: characterization and biocompatibility investigations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warnke, P.H.; Seitz, H.; Warnke, F.; Becker, S.T.; Sivananthan, S.; Sherry, E.; Liu, Q.; Wiltfang, J.; Douglas, T.E.L.

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) are two very common ceramic materials for bone replacement. However, in general HAP and TCP scaffolds are not tailored to the exact dimensions of the defect site and are mainly used as granules or beads. Some scaffolds are available as ordinary

  16. Sulfophenyl-Functionalized Reduced Graphene Oxide Networks on Electrospun 3D Scaffold for Ultrasensitive NO2 Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasensitive room temperature real-time NO2 sensors are highly desirable due to potential threats on environmental security and personal respiratory. Traditional NO2 gas sensors with highly operated temperatures (200–600 °C and limited reversibility are mainly constructed from semiconducting oxide-deposited ceramic tubes or inter-finger probes. Herein, we report the functionalized graphene network film sensors assembled on an electrospun three-dimensional (3D nanonetwork skeleton for ultrasensitive NO2 sensing. The functional 3D scaffold was prepared by electrospinning interconnected polyacrylonitrile (PAN nanofibers onto a nylon window screen to provide a 3D nanonetwork skeleton. Then, the sulfophenyl-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (SFRGO was assembled on the electrospun 3D nanonetwork skeleton to form SFRGO network films. The assembled functionalized graphene network film sensors exhibit excellent NO2 sensing performance (10 ppb to 20 ppm at room temperature, reliable reversibility, good selectivity, and better sensing cycle stability. These improvements can be ascribed to the functionalization of graphene with electron-withdrawing sulfophenyl groups, the high surface-to-volume ratio, and the effective sensing channels from SFRGO wrapping onto the interconnected 3D scaffold. The SFRGO network-sensing film has the advantages of simple preparation, low cost, good processability, and ultrasensitive NO2 sensing, all advantages that can be utilized for potential integration into smart windows and wearable electronic devices for real-time household gas sensors.

  17. Sulfophenyl-Functionalized Reduced Graphene Oxide Networks on Electrospun 3D Scaffold for Ultrasensitive NO₂ Gas Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Guo, Yunlong; Shen, Nannan; Xiao, Anshan; Li, Mingjun; Zhu, Liang; Wan, Pengbo; Sun, Xiaoming

    2017-12-19

    Ultrasensitive room temperature real-time NO₂ sensors are highly desirable due to potential threats on environmental security and personal respiratory. Traditional NO₂ gas sensors with highly operated temperatures (200-600 °C) and limited reversibility are mainly constructed from semiconducting oxide-deposited ceramic tubes or inter-finger probes. Herein, we report the functionalized graphene network film sensors assembled on an electrospun three-dimensional (3D) nanonetwork skeleton for ultrasensitive NO₂ sensing. The functional 3D scaffold was prepared by electrospinning interconnected polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers onto a nylon window screen to provide a 3D nanonetwork skeleton. Then, the sulfophenyl-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (SFRGO) was assembled on the electrospun 3D nanonetwork skeleton to form SFRGO network films. The assembled functionalized graphene network film sensors exhibit excellent NO₂ sensing performance (10 ppb to 20 ppm) at room temperature, reliable reversibility, good selectivity, and better sensing cycle stability. These improvements can be ascribed to the functionalization of graphene with electron-withdrawing sulfophenyl groups, the high surface-to-volume ratio, and the effective sensing channels from SFRGO wrapping onto the interconnected 3D scaffold. The SFRGO network-sensing film has the advantages of simple preparation, low cost, good processability, and ultrasensitive NO₂ sensing, all advantages that can be utilized for potential integration into smart windows and wearable electronic devices for real-time household gas sensors.

  18. In vitro analog of human bone marrow from 3D scaffolds with biomimetic inverted colloidal crystal geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Joan E; Cortiella, Joaquin; Lee, Jungwoo; Niles, Jean A; Cuddihy, Meghan; Wang, Shaopeng; Bielitzki, Joseph; Cantu, Andrea; Mlcak, Ron; Valdivia, Esther; Yancy, Ryan; McClure, Matthew L; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2009-02-01

    In vitro replicas of bone marrow can potentially provide a continuous source of blood cells for transplantation and serve as a laboratory model to examine human immune system dysfunctions and drug toxicology. Here we report the development of an in vitro artificial bone marrow based on a 3D scaffold with inverted colloidal crystal (ICC) geometry mimicking the structural topology of actual bone marrow matrix. To facilitate adhesion of cells, scaffolds were coated with a layer of transparent nanocomposite. After seeding with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), ICC scaffolds were capable of supporting expansion of CD34+ HSCs with B-lymphocyte differentiation. Three-dimensional organization was shown to be critical for production of B cells and antigen-specific antibodies. Functionality of bone marrow constructs was confirmed by implantation of matrices containing human CD34+ cells onto the backs of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with subsequent generation of human immune cells.

  19. A novel layer-structured scaffold with large pore sizes suitable for 3D cell culture prepared by near-field electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng-Li; Li, Da-Wei; He, Jin; Liu, Yang-Yang; Ahmad, Fiaz; Liu, Ya-Li; Deng, Xudong; Ye, Ya-Jing; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2018-05-01

    Electrospinning is a powerful method for preparing porous materials that can be applied as biomedical materials for implantation or tissue engineering or as scaffolds for 3D cell culture experiments. However, this technique is limited in practical applications because the pore size of 3D scaffolds directly prepared by conventional electrospinning is usually less than several tens of micrometres, which may not be suitable for 3D cell culture and tissue growth. To allow for satisfactory 3D cell culture and tissue engineering, the pore size of the scaffold should be controllable according to the requirement of the specific cells to be cultured. Here, we show that layer-structured scaffolds with pore sizes larger than 100μm can be obtained by stacking meshes prepared by direct-writing using the near-field electrospinning (NFES) technique. In the study, we prepared composite scaffolds made of polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) via the above-mentioned method and tested the effectiveness of the novel scaffold in cell culture using mouse pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1). The pore size and the degradability of the PCL/HAp scaffolds were characterized. The results showed that the average pore size of the scaffolds was 167μm, which was controllable based on the required application; the degradation rate was controllable depending on the ratio of PCL to HAp. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds in vitro was studied, and it was found that the scaffolds showed no toxicity and that the cells could effectively attach, proliferate, and differentiate in the 3D skeleton of the scaffolds. Our studies showed that a simple modification of the preparation procedure can lead to a new way to fabricate novel layer-structured 3D scaffolds with controllable structures and pore sizes suitable for practical applications in implantation, tissue engineering and 3D cell culture. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Mesoporous Bioactive Glass Functionalized 3D Ti-6Al-4V Scaffolds with Improved Surface Bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaotong; Leeflang, Sander; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang; Zhou, Jie; Huan, Zhiguang

    2017-10-27

    Porous Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds fabricated by means of selective laser melting (SLM), having controllable geometrical features and preferable mechanical properties, have been developed as a class of biomaterials that hold promising potential for bone repair. However, the inherent bio-inertness of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy as the matrix of the scaffolds results in a lack in the ability to stimulate bone ingrowth and regeneration. The aim of the present study was to develop a bioactive coating on the struts of SLM Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds in order to add the desired surface osteogenesis ability. Mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs) coating was applied on the strut surfaces of the SLM Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds through spin coating, followed by a heat treatment. It was found that the coating could maintain the characteristic mesoporous structure and chemical composition of MBG, and establish good interfacial adhesion to the Ti-6Al-4V substrate. The compressive strength and pore interconnectivity of the scaffolds were not affected by the coating. Moreover, the results obtained from in vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated that the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) on the MBG-coated Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds were improved as compared with those on the conventional bioactive glass (BG)-coated Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds and bare-metal Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds. Our results demonstrated that the MBG coating by using the spinning coating method could be an effective approach to achieving enhanced surface biofunctionalization for SLM Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds.

  1. Mesoporous Bioactive Glass Functionalized 3D Ti-6Al-4V Scaffolds with Improved Surface Bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong Ye

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Porous Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds fabricated by means of selective laser melting (SLM, having controllable geometrical features and preferable mechanical properties, have been developed as a class of biomaterials that hold promising potential for bone repair. However, the inherent bio-inertness of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy as the matrix of the scaffolds results in a lack in the ability to stimulate bone ingrowth and regeneration. The aim of the present study was to develop a bioactive coating on the struts of SLM Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds in order to add the desired surface osteogenesis ability. Mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs coating was applied on the strut surfaces of the SLM Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds through spin coating, followed by a heat treatment. It was found that the coating could maintain the characteristic mesoporous structure and chemical composition of MBG, and establish good interfacial adhesion to the Ti-6Al-4V substrate. The compressive strength and pore interconnectivity of the scaffolds were not affected by the coating. Moreover, the results obtained from in vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated that the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs on the MBG-coated Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds were improved as compared with those on the conventional bioactive glass (BG-coated Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds and bare-metal Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds. Our results demonstrated that the MBG coating by using the spinning coating method could be an effective approach to achieving enhanced surface biofunctionalization for SLM Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds.

  2. Urethral reconstruction with a 3D porous bacterial cellulose scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jian-Wen; Lv, Xiang-Guo; Song, Lu-Jie; Feng, Chao; Xie, Min-Kai; Li, Chao; Li, Hong-Bin; Wang, Ji-Hong; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Xu, Yue-Min; Li, Zhe; Chen, Shi-Yan; Wang, Hua-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of urethral reconstruction with a three-dimensional (3D) porous bacterial cellulose (BC) scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model. A novel 3D porous BC scaffold was prepared by gelatin sponge interfering in the BC fermentation process. Rabbit lingual keratinocytes were isolated, expanded, and seeded onto 3D porous BC. BC alone (group 1, N  =  10), 3D porous BC alone (group 2, N  =  10), and 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes (group 3, N  =  10) were used to repair rabbit ventral urethral defects (2.0   ×   0.8 cm). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that BC consisted of a compact laminate while 3D porous BC was composed of a porous sheet buttressed by a dense outer layer. The average pore diameter and porosity of the 3D porous BC were 4.23   ±   1.14 μm and 67.00   ±   6.80%, respectively. At 3 months postoperatively, macroscopic examinations and retrograde urethrograms of urethras revealed that all urethras maintained wide calibers in group 3. Strictures were found in all rabbits in groups 1 and 2. Histologically, at 1 month postoperatively, intact epithelium occurred in group 3, and discontinued epithelium was found in groups 1 and 2. However, groups 2 and 3 exhibited similar epithelial regeneration, which was superior to that of group 1 at 3 months (p  <  0.05). Comparisons of smooth muscle content and endothelia density among the three groups revealed a significant increase at each time point (p  <  0.05). Our results demonstrated that 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes enhanced urethral tissue regeneration. 3D porous BC could potentially be used as an optimized scaffold for urethral reconstruction. (paper)

  3. Development and characterization of novel porous 3D alginate-cockle shell powder nanobiocomposite bone scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharatham, B Hemabarathy; Abu Bakar, Md Zuki; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Yusof, Loqman Mohamed; Hamid, Muhajir

    2014-01-01

    A novel porous three-dimensional bone scaffold was developed using a natural polymer (alginate/Alg) in combination with a naturally obtained biomineral (nano cockle shell powder/nCP) through lyophilization techniques. The scaffold was developed in varying composition mixture of Alg-nCP and characterized using various evaluation techniques as well as preliminary in vitro studies on MG63 human osteoblast cells. Morphological observations using SEM revealed variations in structures with the use of different Alg-nCP composition ratios. All the developed scaffolds showed a porous structure with pore sizes ideal for facilitating new bone growth; however, not all combination mixtures showed subsequent favorable characteristics to be used for biological applications. Scaffolds produced using the combination mixture of 40% Alg and 60% nCP produced significantly promising results in terms of mechanical strength, degradation rate, and increased cell proliferation rates making it potentially the optimum composition mixture of Alg-nCP with future application prospects.

  4. Osteoinduction by Foamed and 3D-Printed Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds: Effect of Nanostructure and Pore Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Albert; Diez-Escudero, Anna; Maazouz, Yassine; Rappe, Katrin; Espanol, Montserrat; Montufar, Edgar B; Bonany, Mar; Sadowska, Joanna M; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Öhman-Mägi, Caroline; Persson, Cecilia; Manzanares, Maria-Cristina; Franch, Jordi; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2017-12-06

    Some biomaterials are osteoinductive, that is, they are able to trigger the osteogenic process by inducing the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to the osteogenic lineage. Although the underlying mechanism is still unclear, microporosity and specific surface area (SSA) have been identified as critical factors in material-associated osteoinduction. However, only sintered ceramics, which have a limited range of porosities and SSA, have been analyzed so far. In this work, we were able to extend these ranges to the nanoscale, through the foaming and 3D-printing of biomimetic calcium phosphates, thereby obtaining scaffolds with controlled micro- and nanoporosity and with tailored macropore architectures. Calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) scaffolds were evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks in an ectopic-implantation canine model and compared with two sintered ceramics, biphasic calcium phosphate and β-tricalcium phosphate. Only foams with spherical, concave macropores and not 3D-printed scaffolds with convex, prismatic macropores induced significant ectopic bone formation. Among them, biomimetic nanostructured CDHA produced the highest incidence of ectopic bone and accelerated bone formation when compared with conventional microstructured sintered calcium phosphates with the same macropore architecture. Moreover, they exhibited different bone formation patterns; in CDHA foams, the new ectopic bone progressively replaced the scaffold, whereas in sintered biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds, bone was deposited on the surface of the material, progressively filling the pore space. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the high reactivity of nanostructured biomimetic CDHA combined with a spherical, concave macroporosity allows the pushing of the osteoinduction potential beyond the limits of microstructured calcium phosphate ceramics.

  5. Balancing mechanical strength with bioactivity in chitosan-calcium phosphate 3D microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: air- vs. freeze-drying processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D T; McCanless, J D; Mecwan, M M; Noblett, A P; Haggard, W O; Smith, R A; Bumgardner, J D

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential benefit of 3D composite scaffolds composed of chitosan and calcium phosphate for bone tissue engineering. Additionally, incorporation of mechanically weak lyophilized microspheres within those air-dried (AD) was considered for enhanced bioactivity. AD microsphere, alone, and air- and freeze-dried microsphere (FDAD) 3D scaffolds were evaluated in vitro using a 28-day osteogenic culture model with the Saos-2 cell line. Mechanical testing, quantitative microscopy, and lysozyme-driven enzymatic degradation of the scaffolds were also studied. FDAD scaffold showed a higher concentration (p mechanical strength was sacrificed through introduction of the less stiff, porous FD spheres.

  6. Controlling the extrudate swell in melt extrusion additive manufacturing of 3D scaffolds: a designed experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Azizeh-Mitra; Smucker, Byran; Naber, Alex; Wyrick, Cara; Shaw, Charles; Bennett, Katelyn; Szekely, Sarah; Focke, Carlie; Wood, Katherine A

    2018-02-01

    Tissue engineering using three-dimensional porous scaffolds has shown promise for the restoration of normal function in injured and diseased tissues and organs. Rigorous control over scaffold architecture in melt extrusion additive manufacturing is highly restricted mainly due to pronounced variations in the deposited strand diameter upon any variations in process conditions and polymer viscoelasticity. We have designed an I-optimal, split-plot experiment to study the extrudate swell in melt extrusion additive manufacturing and to control the scaffold architecture. The designed experiment was used to generate data to relate three responses (swell, density, and modulus) to a set of controllable factors (plotting needle diameter, temperature, pressure, and the dispensing speed). The fitted regression relationships were used to optimize the three responses simultaneously. The swell response was constrained to be close to 1 while maximizing the modulus and minimizing the density. Constraining the extrudate swell to 1 generates design-driven scaffolds, with strand diameters equal to the plotting needle diameter, and allows a greater control over scaffold pore size. Hence, the modulus of the scaffolds can be fully controlled by adjusting the in-plane distance between the deposited strands. To the extent of the model's validity, we can eliminate the effect of extrudate swell in designing these scaffolds, while targeting a range of porosity and modulus appropriate for bone tissue engineering. The result of this optimization was a predicted modulus of 14 MPa and a predicted density of 0.29 g/cm 3 (porosity ≈ 75%) using polycaprolactone as scaffold material. These predicted responses corresponded to factor levels of 0.6 μm for the plotting needle diameter, plotting pressure of 2.5 bar, melt temperature of 113.5 °C, and dispensing speed of 2 mm/s. The validation scaffold enabled us to quantify the percentage difference for the predictions, which was 9.5% for the

  7. 3D polylactide-based scaffolds for studying human hepatocarcinoma processes in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaffaro, Roberto; Lo Re, Giada; Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Ghersi, Giulio

    2012-08-01

    We evaluated the combination of leaching techniques and melt blending of polymers and particles for the preparation of highly interconnected three-dimensional polymeric porous scaffolds for in vitro studies of human hepatocarcinoma processes. More specifically, sodium chloride and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used as water-soluble porogens to form porous and solvent-free poly(L,D-lactide) (PLA)-based scaffolds. Several characterization techniques, including porosimetry, image analysis and thermogravimetry, were combined to improve the reliability of measurements and mapping of the size, distribution and microarchitecture of pores. We also investigated the effect of processing, in PLA-based blends, on the simultaneous bulk/surface modifications and pore architectures in the scaffolds, and assessed the effects on human hepatocarcinoma viability and cell adhesion. The influence of PEG molecular weight on the scaffold morphology and cell viability and adhesion were also investigated. Morphological studies indicated that it was possible to obtain scaffolds with well-interconnected pores of assorted sizes. The analysis confirmed that SK-Hep1 cells adhered well to the polymeric support and emitted surface protrusions necessary to grow and differentiate three-dimensional systems. PEGs with higher molecular weight showed the best results in terms of cell adhesion and viability.

  8. 3D polylactide-based scaffolds for studying human hepatocarcinoma processes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Scaffaro, Giada Lo Re, Salvatrice Rigogliuso and Giulio Ghersi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the combination of leaching techniques and melt blending of polymers and particles for the preparation of highly interconnected three-dimensional polymeric porous scaffolds for in vitro studies of human hepatocarcinoma processes. More specifically, sodium chloride and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG were used as water-soluble porogens to form porous and solvent-free poly(L,D-lactide (PLA-based scaffolds. Several characterization techniques, including porosimetry, image analysis and thermogravimetry, were combined to improve the reliability of measurements and mapping of the size, distribution and microarchitecture of pores. We also investigated the effect of processing, in PLA-based blends, on the simultaneous bulk/surface modifications and pore architectures in the scaffolds, and assessed the effects on human hepatocarcinoma viability and cell adhesion. The influence of PEG molecular weight on the scaffold morphology and cell viability and adhesion were also investigated. Morphological studies indicated that it was possible to obtain scaffolds with well-interconnected pores of assorted sizes. The analysis confirmed that SK-Hep1 cells adhered well to the polymeric support and emitted surface protrusions necessary to grow and differentiate three-dimensional systems. PEGs with higher molecular weight showed the best results in terms of cell adhesion and viability.

  9. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs in 3D Collagen Scaffolds: developing pharmacologically monitored neuroimplants for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kourgiantaki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury, a traumatic disease characterised by a massive degeneration of neural tissue, was recently targeted for neuroregenerative interventions. Our approach is the development of pharmacologically pulsed neuroimplants using 3D collagen scaffolds hosting NSCs. We aim to monitor the properties of NSCs ex vivo and in vivo, using synthetic small molecules with neuroprotective and neurogenic properties. Synthetic, highly lipophilic CNS bioavailable small molecules, synthesized by our group (microneurotrophins, bind to neurotrophins receptors (Gravanis et al, Science Signaling, 2012, Calogeropoulou et al., J Med Chem., 2009. BNN27 can specifically interact with TrkA and p75NTR receptors activating specific signalling pathways controlling neuronal cell survival and neurogenesis (Charalampopoulos et al, PNAS, 2004, Lazaridis et al., PLoS Biol., 2011. We are seeding embryonic and adult mouse NSC on collagen 3D scaffolds of different composition (collagen, chondroitin-6-sulphate and gelatin and construction (size of pores and stiffness, testing cell behaviour (survival, proliferation or differentiation in basal conditions or pulsed with neurotrophins and/or microneurotrophins. Using the knock in sox2-egfp mice strain and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS analysis, we obtain NSCs cultures with a sox2-positive population more than 90% pure. We evaluate specific markers of proliferation (ki67 and/or differentiation (GFAP for glial cells, Tuj1 for mature neurons and O4 for oligodendrocytes: we are currently testing the possible effect of BNN27 on proliferation of cortical NSCs in 2D cultures (increased numbers of ki67 positive cells up to 12%. The composition and the structure of 3D scaffolds seem to play a significant functional role: scaffolds with a combined composition such as 50% collagen/50% gelatin and 92% collagen/8% chondroitin-6-sulphate support NSC survival since they sustain sox2 expression and propagate neurosphere formation

  10. The Use of Silk as a Scaffold for Mature, Sustainable Unilocular Adipose 3D Tissue Engineered Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Wang, Rebecca Y; Reagan, Michaela R; Chen, Ying; Borowsky, Francis E; Zieba, Adam; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter; Ghobrial, Irene M; Kaplan, David L

    2016-07-01

    There is a critical need for monitoring physiologically relevant, sustainable, human adipose tissues in vitro to gain new insights into metabolic diseases. To support long-term culture, a 3D silk scaffold assisted culture system is developed that maintains mature unilocular adipocytes ex vivo in coculture with preadipocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells obtained from small volumes of liquefied adipose samples. Without the silk scaffold, adipose tissue explants cannot be sustained in long-term culture (3 months) due to their fragility. Adjustments to media components are used to tune lipid metabolism and proliferation, in addition to responsiveness to an inflammatory stimulus. Interestingly, patient specific responses to TNFα stimulation are observed, providing a proof-of-concept translational technique for patient specific disease modeling in the future. In summary, this novel 3D scaffold assisted approach is required for establishing physiologically relevant, sustainable, human adipose tissue systems from small volumes of lipoaspirate, making this methodology of great value to studies of metabolism, adipokine-driven diseases, and other diseases where the roles of adipocytes are only now becoming uncovered. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. [Gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting promotes cell adhesion and proliferation of human dental pulp cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai-Yue; Ma, Dan-Dan; Wu, Bu-Ling

    2017-05-20

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) and compare the cell adhesion and proliferation of the cells seeded in the biomaterial using two different methods. HDPCs isolated by tissue block culture and enzyme digestion were cultured and passaged. Gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds were printed using a bioplotter, and the cytotoxicity of the aqueous extracts of the scaffold material was tested in the third passage of HDPCs using cell counting kit-8. Scanning electron microscopy and trypan blue were used to assess the adhesion and proliferation of the cells seeded in the scaffold material at a low or high concentration. The aqueous extract of the scaffolds at different concentrations showed no obvious cytotoxicity and promoted the proliferation of HDPCs. The scaffolds had a good biocompatibility and HDPCs seeded in the scaffold showed good cell growth. Cell seeding at a high concentration in the scaffold better promoted the adhesion of HDPCs and resulted in a greater cell number on the scaffold surface compared with low-concentration cell seeding after a 5-day culture (Palginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting has a good biocompatibility and promotes the proliferation of HDPCs, and can be used as a scaffold material for tooth regeneration. Cell seeding at a high concentration can better promote cell adhesion to the scaffold material.

  12. Effect of heat bed temperature of 3D bioprinter to hardness and compressive strength of scaffold bovine hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triyono, Joko; Pratama, Aditya; Sukanto, Heru; Nugroho, Yohanes; Wijayanta, Agung Tri

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of heat bed temperature of 3D bioprinter toward compressive strength and hardness bovine bone hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone filler applications. BHA-glycerin mixed with a ratio of 1:1, and keep it for 24 hours. After the homogenization process acquired, bio-Ink with shaped slurry will be used as a material for a 3D printer. The printing process with a temperature variation have performed by setting up heat bed temperature. After printing process was completed, the 3D scaffold was detained on the heat bed for 10 minutes before being picked up. The test results in this study had the lowest hardness value of 9.82±0.62 VHN and the highest number of 24.32±0.99 VHN. The compressive strength testing had the lowest value of 1.62±0.16 MPa with the highest number of 5.67±0.39 MPa. Pore observation using a scanning electron microscope. The result shows that the size of the pores were not much different, that was ±100-200 µm. This observation also indicated that the pore form was square pores.

  13. Experimental Study on 3D Chi - Hap Scaffolds for Thyroid Cartilage Repairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Nannan; Shi, Tingchun; Fan, Yuan; Hu, Binbin

    2018-01-01

    Due to the limitation of self-repairing capability for cartilage injury, the construction of tissue engineering in vitro has been an ideal treatment to repair tissue injury. In this paper, hydroxyapatite (Hap) and chitosan (Chi) were selected to fabricate the scaffold through low temperature deposition manufacturing (LDM) technique. The scaffold was characterized with interconnected structure and high porosity, as well as lower toxicity to cells (TDC-5-EGPE). Animal experiment was performed, Twelve white New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, the side of the thyroid cartilage was removed, Chi-HAP composite scaffold was implanted into the cartilage defect as the experimental group A. Group B was treated for thyroid cartilage defects without any treatment. After 10 weeks, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and S-O staining were carried out on the injured tissues. The result showed that newborn chondrocytes were found in repaired areas for group A, and there are no new cells found for group B. Therefore, Chi-HAP composite scaffolds formed by LDM possess biological activity for repairing injury cartilage.

  14. Large 3D direct laser written scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Anika; Rüth, Marieke; Lemke, Horst-Dieter; Walther, Thomas; Hellmann, Ralf

    2018-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of three-dimensional direct laser written scaffolds for tissue engineering and the seeding of primary fibroblasts on these structures. Scaffolds are realized by two-photon absorption induced polymerization in the inorganic-organic hybrid polymer OrmoComp using a 515 nm femtosecond laser. A nonstop single-line single-pass writing process is implemented in order to produce periodic reproducible large scaled structures with a dimension in the range of several millimeters and reduce process time to less than one hour. This method allows us to determine optimized process parameters for writing stable structures while achieving pore sizes ranging from 5 μm to 90 μm and a scanning speed of up to 5 mm/s. After a multi-stage post-treatment, normal human dermal fibroblasts are applied to the scaffolds to test if these macroscopic structures with large surface and numerous small gaps between the pores provide nontoxic conditions. Furthermore, we study the cell behavior in this environment and observe both cell growth on as well as ingrowth on the three-dimensional structures. In particular, fibroblasts adhere and grow also on the vertical walls of the scaffolds.

  15. Mesoporous bioactive glass functionalized 3D Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds with improved surface bioactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Xiaotong; Leeflang, M.A.; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang; Zhou, J.; Huan, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Porous Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds fabricated by means of selective laser melting (SLM),
    having controllable geometrical features and preferable mechanical properties, have been developed as a class of biomaterials that hold promising potential for bone repair. However, the inherent bio-inertness of the

  16. Development and Characterization of Novel Porous 3D Alginate-Cockle Shell Powder Nanobiocomposite Bone Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hemabarathy Bharatham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel porous three-dimensional bone scaffold was developed using a natural polymer (alginate/Alg in combination with a naturally obtained biomineral (nano cockle shell powder/nCP through lyophilization techniques. The scaffold was developed in varying composition mixture of Alg-nCP and characterized using various evaluation techniques as well as preliminary in vitro studies on MG63 human osteoblast cells. Morphological observations using SEM revealed variations in structures with the use of different Alg-nCP composition ratios. All the developed scaffolds showed a porous structure with pore sizes ideal for facilitating new bone growth; however, not all combination mixtures showed subsequent favorable characteristics to be used for biological applications. Scaffolds produced using the combination mixture of 40% Alg and 60% nCP produced significantly promising results in terms of mechanical strength, degradation rate, and increased cell proliferation rates making it potentially the optimum composition mixture of Alg-nCP with future application prospects.

  17. Development of nanocellulose scaffolds with tunable structures to support 3D cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Cheng, Fang; Grénman, Henrik; Spoljaric, Steven; Seppälä, Jukka; E Eriksson, John; Willför, Stefan; Xu, Chunlin

    2016-09-05

    Swollen three-dimensional nanocellulose films and their resultant aerogels were prepared as scaffolds towards tissue engineering application. The nanocellulose hydrogels with various swelling degree (up to 500 times) and the resultant aerogels with desired porosity (porosity up to 99.7% and specific surface area up to 308m(2)/g) were prepared by tuning the nanocellulose charge density, the swelling media conditions, and the material processing approach. Representative cell-based assays were applied to assess the material biocompatibility and efficacy of the human extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimicking nanocellulose scaffolds. The effects of charge density and porosity of the scaffolds on the biological tests were investigated for the first time. The results reveal that the nanocellulose scaffolds could promote the survival and proliferation of tumor cells, and enhance the transfection of exogenous DNA into the cells. These results suggest the usefulness of the nanocellulose-based matrices in supporting crucial cellular processes during cell growth and proliferation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic Macroporous Hydrogels as a Novel Approach for Perfused Stem Cell Culture in 3D Scaffolds via Contactless Motion Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödling, Lisa; Volz, Esther Magano; Raic, Annamarija; Brändle, Katharina; Franzreb, Matthias; Lee-Thedieck, Cornelia

    2018-01-19

    There is an urgent need for 3D cell culture systems that avoid the oversimplifications and artifacts of conventional culture in 2D. However, 3D culture within the cavities of porous biomaterials or large 3D structures harboring high cell numbers is limited by the needs to nurture cells and to remove growth-limiting metabolites. To overcome the diffusion-limited transport of such soluble factors in 3D culture, mixing can be improved by pumping, stirring or shaking, but this in turn can lead to other problems. Using pumps typically requires custom-made accessories that are not compatible with conventional cell culture disposables, thus interfering with cell production processes. Stirring or shaking allows little control over movement of scaffolds in media. To overcome these limitations, magnetic, macroporous hydrogels that can be moved or positioned within media in conventional cell culture tubes in a contactless manner are presented. The cytocompatibility of the developed biomaterial and the applied magnetic fields are verified for human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The potential of this technique for perfusing 3D cultures is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle study that shows that controlled contactless movement of cell-laden magnetic hydrogels in culture media can mimic the natural influence of differently perfused environments on HSPCs. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. 3D-Printed Bioactive Ca3SiO5Bone Cement Scaffolds with Nano Surface Structure for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Wang, Xiaoya; Ma, Bing; Zhu, Haibo; Huan, Zhiguang; Ma, Nan; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2017-02-22

    Silicate bioactive materials have been widely studied for bone regeneration because of their eminent physicochemical properties and outstanding osteogenic bioactivity, and different methods have been developed to prepare porous silicate bioactive ceramics scaffolds for bone-tissue engineering applications. Among all of these methods, the 3D-printing technique is obviously the most efficient way to control the porous structure. However, 3D-printed bioceramic porous scaffolds need high-temperature sintering, which will cause volume shrinkage and reduce the controllability of the pore structure accuracy. Unlike silicate bioceramic, bioactive silicate cements such as tricalcium silicate (Ca 3 SiO 5 and C 3 S) can be self-set in water to obtain high mechanical strength under mild conditions. Another advantage of using C 3 S to prepare 3D scaffolds is the possibility of simultaneous drug loading. Herein, we, for the first time, demonstrated successful preparation of uniform 3D-printed C 3 S bone cement scaffolds with controllable 3D structure at room temperature. The scaffolds were loaded with two model drugs and showed a loading location controllable drug-release profile. In addition, we developed a surface modification process to create controllable nanotopography on the surface of pore wall of the scaffolds, which showed activity to enhance rat bone-marrow stem cells (rBMSCs) attachment, spreading, and ALP activities. The in vivo experiments revealed that the 3D-printed C 3 S bone cement scaffolds with nanoneedle-structured surfaces significantly improved bone regeneration, as compared to pure C 3 S bone cement scaffolds, suggesting that 3D-printed C 3 S bone cement scaffolds with controllable nanotopography surface are bioactive implantable biomaterials for bone repair.

  20. Osteoinduction and survival of osteoblasts and bone-marrow stromal cells in 3D biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds under static and dynamic culture conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rath, Subha N; Strobel, Leonie A; Arkudas, Andreas; Beier, Justus P; Maier, Anne-Kathrin; Greil, Peter; Horch, Raymund E; Kneser, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In many tissue engineering approaches, the basic difference between in vitro and in vivo conditions for cells within three-dimensional (3D) constructs is the nutrition flow dynamics. To achieve comparable results in vitro, bioreactors are advised for improved cell survival, as they are able to provide a controlled flow through the scaffold. We hypothesize that a bioreactor would enhance long-term differentiation conditions of osteogenic cells in 3D scaffolds. To achieve this either primary ra...

  1. In vitro study of 3D PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP composite scaffolds with etched oxygen plasma surface modification in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Hee-Sang [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, 309 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sang-Chul [Department of Environmental Engineering, Sunchon National University, 255 Jungang-ro, Sunchon 57922 (Korea, Republic of); Kook, Min-Suk [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Hoon, E-mail: kim5055@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, 309 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju 61452 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • PLGA and PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP scaffolds were successfully fabricated by 3D printing. • Oxygen plasma etching increases the wettability and surface roughness. • Bioceramics and oxygen plasma etching and could be used to improve the cell affinity. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds have many advantageous properties for bone tissue engineering application, due to its controllable properties such as pore size, structural shape and interconnectivity. In this study, effects on oxygen plasma surface modification and adding of nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HAp) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on the 3D PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP scaffolds for improving preosteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) adhesion, proliferation and differentiation were investigated. The 3D PLGA/n-HAp/β-TCP scaffolds were fabricated by 3D Bio-Extruder equipment. The 3D scaffolds were prepared with 0°/90° architecture and pore size of approximately 300 μm. In addition 3D scaffolds surface were etched by oxygen plasma to enhance the hydrophilic property and surface roughness. After oxygen plasma treatment, the surface chemistry and morphology were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. And also hydrophilic property was measured by contact angle. The MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and differentiation were investigated by MTT assay and ALP activity. In present work, the 3D PLGA/HAp/beta-TCP composite scaffold with suitable structure for the growth of osteoblast cells was successfully fabricated by 3D rapid prototyping technique. The surface hydrophilicity and roughness of 3D scaffold increased by oxygen plasma treatment had a positive effect on cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cell was significantly enhanced by adding of n-HAp and β-TCP on 3D PLGA scaffold. As a result, combination of bioceramics and oxygen plasma treatment showed a synergistic effect on

  2. In Vivo Evaluation of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone Scaffold Implantation Combined with β-TCP Powder for Alveolar Bone Augmentation in a Beagle Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su A. Park

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient bone volume is one of the major challenges encountered by dentists after dental implant placement. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a customized three-dimensional polycaprolactone (3D PCL scaffold implant fabricated with a 3D bio-printing system to facilitate rapid alveolar bone regeneration. Saddle-type bone defects were surgically created on the healed site after extracting premolars from the mandibles of four beagle dogs. The defects were radiologically examined using computed tomography for designing a customized 3D PCL scaffold block to fit the defect site. After fabricating 3D PCL scaffolds using rapid prototyping, the scaffolds were implanted into the alveolar bone defects along with β-tricalcium phosphate powder. In vivo analysis showed that the PCL blocks maintained the physical space and bone conductivity around the defects. In addition, no inflammatory infiltrates were observed around the scaffolds. However, new bone formation occurred adjacent to the scaffolds, rather than directly in contact with them. More new bone was observed around PCL blocks with 400/1200 lattices than around blocks with 400/400 lattices, but the difference was not significant. These results indicated the potential of 3D-printed porous PCL scaffolds to promote alveolar bone regeneration for defect healing in dentistry.

  3. Designing of PLA scaffolds for bone tissue replacement fabricated by ordinary commercial 3D printer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregor, A.; Filová, Eva; Novák, M.; Kronek, J.; Chlup, H.; Buzgo, M.; Blahnová, Veronika; Lukášová, Věra; Bartoš, M.; Nečas, A.; Hošek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, oct (2017), s. 31 ISSN 1754-1611 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309; GA ČR GA16-14758S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : tissue engineering * bio-fabrication * scaffold Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics OBOR OECD: Bioproducts (products that are manufactured using biological material as feedstock) biomaterials, bioplastics, biofuels, bioderived bulk and fine chemicals, bio-derived novel materials Impact factor: 3.660, year: 2016

  4. Uncertainty quantification and validation of 3D lattice scaffolds for computer-aided biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorguluarslan, Recep M; Choi, Seung-Kyum; Saldana, Christopher J

    2017-07-01

    A methodology is proposed for uncertainty quantification and validation to accurately predict the mechanical response of lattice structures used in the design of scaffolds. Effective structural properties of the scaffolds are characterized using a developed multi-level stochastic upscaling process that propagates the quantified uncertainties at strut level to the lattice structure level. To obtain realistic simulation models for the stochastic upscaling process and minimize the experimental cost, high-resolution finite element models of individual struts were reconstructed from the micro-CT scan images of lattice structures which are fabricated by selective laser melting. The upscaling method facilitates the process of determining homogenized strut properties to reduce the computational cost of the detailed simulation model for the scaffold. Bayesian Information Criterion is utilized to quantify the uncertainties with parametric distributions based on the statistical data obtained from the reconstructed strut models. A systematic validation approach that can minimize the experimental cost is also developed to assess the predictive capability of the stochastic upscaling method used at the strut level and lattice structure level. In comparison with physical compression test results, the proposed methodology of linking the uncertainty quantification with the multi-level stochastic upscaling method enabled an accurate prediction of the elastic behavior of the lattice structure with minimal experimental cost by accounting for the uncertainties induced by the additive manufacturing process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ECM Inspired Coating of Embroidered 3D Scaffolds Enhances Calvaria Bone Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentsch, C.; Rentsch, B.; Heinemann, S.; Bernhardt, R.; Bischoff, B.; Förster, Y.; Scharnweber, D.; Rammelt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Resorbable polymeric implants and surface coatings are an emerging technology to treat bone defects and increase bone formation. This approach is of special interest in anatomical regions like the calvaria since adults lose the capacity to heal large calvarial defects. The present study assesses the potential of extracellular matrix inspired, embroidered polycaprolactone-co-lactide (PCL) scaffolds for the treatment of 13 mm full thickness calvarial bone defects in rabbits. Moreover the influence of a collagen/chondroitin sulfate (coll I/cs) coating of PCL scaffolds was evaluated. Defect areas filled with autologous bone and empty defects served as reference. The healing process was monitored over 6 months by combining a novel ultrasonographic method, radiographic imaging, biomechanical testing, and histology. The PCL coll I/cs treated group reached 68% new bone volume compared to the autologous group (100%) and the biomechanical stability of the defect area was similar to that of the gold standard. Histological investigations revealed a significantly more homogenous bone distribution over the whole defect area in the PCL coll I/cs group compared to the noncoated group. The bioactive, coll I/cs coated, highly porous, 3-dimensional PCL scaffold acted as a guide rail for new skull bone formation along and into the implant. PMID:25013767

  6. Compensation of spherical aberration influences for two-photon polymerization patterning of large 3D scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichel, T.; Hecht, B.; Houbertz, R.; Sextl, G.

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon polymerization using femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 515 nm is used for three-dimensional patterning of photosensitive, biocompatible inorganic-organic hybrid polymers (ORMOCER®s). In order to fabricate millimeter-sized biomedical scaffold structures with interconnected pores, medium numerical aperture air objectives with long working distances are applied which allow voxel lengths of several micrometers and thus the solidification of large scaffolds in an adequate time. It is demonstrated that during processing the refraction of the focused laser beam at the air/material interface leads to strong spherical aberration which decreases the peak intensity of the focal point spread function along with shifting and severely extending the focal region in the direction of the beam propagation. These effects clearly decrease the structure integrity, homogeneity and the structure details and therefore are minimized by applying a positioning and laser power adaptation throughout the fabrication process. The results will be discussed with respect to the resulting structural homogeneity and its application as biomedical scaffold.

  7. Histological evaluation of osteogenesis of 3D-printed poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffolds in a rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge Zigang; Tian Xianfeng; Heng, Boon Chin; Fan, Victor; Yeo Jinfei; Cao Tong, E-mail: omscaot@nus.edu.s [Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, National University of Singapore, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)

    2009-04-15

    Utilizing a suitable combination of lactide and glycolide in a copolymer would optimize the degradation rate of a scaffold upon implantation in situ. Moreover, 3D printing technology enables customizing the shape of the scaffold to biometric data from CT and MRI scans. A previous in vitro study has shown that novel 3D-printed poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffolds had good biocompatibility and mechanical properties comparable with human cancellous bone, while they could support proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts. Based on the previous study, this study evaluated PLGA scaffolds for bone regeneration within a rabbit model. The scaffolds were implanted at two sites on the same animal, within the periosteum and within bi-cortical bone defects on the iliac crest. Subsequently, the efficacy of bone regeneration within the implanted scaffolds was evaluated at 4, 12 and 24 weeks post-surgery through histological analysis. In both the intra-periosteum and iliac bone defect models, the implanted scaffolds facilitated new bone tissue formation and maturation over the time course of 24 weeks, even though there was initially observed to be little tissue ingrowth within the scaffolds at 4 weeks post-surgery. Hence, the 3D-printed porous PLGA scaffolds investigated in this study displayed good biocompatibility and are osteoconductive in both the intra-periosteum and iliac bone defect models. (communication)

  8. Histological evaluation of osteogenesis of 3D-printed poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffolds in a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Zigang; Tian Xianfeng; Heng, Boon Chin; Fan, Victor; Yeo Jinfei; Cao Tong

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing a suitable combination of lactide and glycolide in a copolymer would optimize the degradation rate of a scaffold upon implantation in situ. Moreover, 3D printing technology enables customizing the shape of the scaffold to biometric data from CT and MRI scans. A previous in vitro study has shown that novel 3D-printed poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffolds had good biocompatibility and mechanical properties comparable with human cancellous bone, while they could support proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts. Based on the previous study, this study evaluated PLGA scaffolds for bone regeneration within a rabbit model. The scaffolds were implanted at two sites on the same animal, within the periosteum and within bi-cortical bone defects on the iliac crest. Subsequently, the efficacy of bone regeneration within the implanted scaffolds was evaluated at 4, 12 and 24 weeks post-surgery through histological analysis. In both the intra-periosteum and iliac bone defect models, the implanted scaffolds facilitated new bone tissue formation and maturation over the time course of 24 weeks, even though there was initially observed to be little tissue ingrowth within the scaffolds at 4 weeks post-surgery. Hence, the 3D-printed porous PLGA scaffolds investigated in this study displayed good biocompatibility and are osteoconductive in both the intra-periosteum and iliac bone defect models. (communication)

  9. Smart 3D cell culture using a thermoresponsive PP nonwoven scaffold

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chetty, A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available -ray diffraction, and gravimetric graft yield will be discussed. Additionally, the authors will show proof-of-concept for non-invasive cell harvesting of human hepatocyte cell-lines in the 3D thermoresponsive bioreactor. It is envisaged that the CSIR cell culturing...

  10. Transplantation of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite scaffold improves bone repair in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Wang, Jun; Huang, Jian; Huang, Fang; Fu, Jianhong; Yang, Xinjing; Miao, Zongning

    2014-11-01

    The main requirements for successful tissue engineering of the bone are non-immunogenic cells with osteogenic potential and a porous biodegradable scaffold. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of a silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (SF/HA) porous material as a delivery vehicle for human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs) in a rabbit radius defect model. In this study, we randomly assigned 16 healthy adult New Zealand rabbits into two groups, subjected to transplantation with either SF/HA and PMSCs (experimental group) or SF/HA alone (control group). To evaluate fracture healing, we assessed the extent of graft absorption, the quantity of newly formed bone, and re-canalization of the cavitas medullaris using radiographic and histological tools. We performed flow cytometric analysis to characterize PMSCs, and found that while they express CD90, CD105 and CD73, they stain negative for HLA-DR and the hematopoietic cell surface markers CD34 and CD45. When PMSCs were exposed to osteogenic induction medium, they secreted calcium crystals that were identified by von Kossa staining. Furthermore, when seeded on the surface of SF/HA scaffold, they actively secreted extracellular matrix components. Here, we show, through radiographic and histological analyses, that fracture healing in the experimental group is significantly improved over the control group. This strongly suggests that transplantation of human PMSCs grown in an SF/HA scaffold into injured radius segmental bone in rabbits, can markedly enhance tissue repair. Our finding provides evidence supporting the utility of human placenta as a potential source of stem cells for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Validation of an in vitro 3D bone culture model with perfused and mechanically stressed ceramic scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bouet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An engineered three dimensional (3D in vitro cell culture system was designed with the goal of inducing and controlling in vitro osteogenesis in a reproducible manner under conditions more similar to the in vivo bone microenvironment than traditional two-dimensional (2D models. This bioreactor allows efficient mechanical loading and perfusion of an original cubic calcium phosphate bioceramic of highly controlled composition and structure. This bioceramic comprises an internal portion containing homogeneously interconnected macropores surrounded by a dense layer, which minimises fluid flow bypass around the scaffold. This dense and flat layer permits the application of a homogeneous loading on the bioceramic while also enhancing its mechanical strength. Numerical modelling of constraints shows that the system provides direct mechanical stimulation of cells within the scaffold. Experimental results establish that under perfusion at a steady flow of 2 µL/min, corresponding to 3 ≤ Medium velocity ≤ 23 µm/s, mouse calvarial cells grow and differentiate as osteoblasts in a reproducible manner, and lay down a mineralised matrix. Moreover, cells respond to mechanical loading by increasing C-fos expression, which demonstrates the effective mechanical stimulation of the culture within the scaffold. In summary, we provide a “proof-of-concept” for osteoblastic cell culture in a controlled 3D culture system under perfusion and mechanical loading. This model will be a tool to analyse bone cell functions in vivo, and will provide a bench testing system for the clinical assessment of bioactive bone-targeting molecules under load.

  12. Triblock copolymers based on ε-caprolactone and trimethylene carbonate for the 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güney, Aysun; Malda, Jos; Dhert, Wouter J A; Grijpma, Dirk W

    2017-05-09

    Biodegradable PCL-b-PTMC-b-PCL triblock copolymers based on trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and ε-caprolactone (CL) were prepared and used in the 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds. Triblock copolymers of various molecular weights containing equal amounts of TMC and CL were prepared. These block copolymers combine the low glass transition temperature of amorphous PTMC (approximately -20°C) and the semi-crystallinity of PCL (glass transition approximately -60°C and melting temperature approximately 60°C). PCL-b-PTMC-b-PCL triblock copolymers were synthesized by sequential ring opening polymerization (ROP) of TMC and ε-CL. From these materials, films were prepared by solvent casting and porous structures were prepared by extrusion-based 3D printing. Films prepared from a polymer with a relatively high molecular weight of 62 kg/mol had a melting temperature of 58°C and showed tough and resilient behavior, with values of the elastic modulus, tensile strength and elongation at break of approximately 120 MPa, 16 MPa and 620%, respectively. Porous structures were prepared by 3D printing. Ethylene carbonate was used as a crystalizable and water-extractable solvent to prepare structures with microporous strands. Solutions, containing 25 wt% of the triblock copolymer, were extruded at 50°C then cooled at different temperatures. Slow cooling at room temperature resulted in pores with widths of 18 ± 6 μm and lengths of 221 ± 77 μm, rapid cooling with dry ice resulted in pores with widths of 13 ± 3 μm and lengths of 58 ± 12 μm. These PCL-b-PTMC-b-PCL triblock copolymers processed into porous structures at relatively low temperatures may find wide application as designed degradable tissue engineering scaffolds. In this preliminary study we prepared biodegradable triblock copolymers based on 1,3-trimethylene carbonate and ε-caprolactone and assessed their physical characteristics. Furthermore, we evaluated their potential as melt-processable thermoplastic

  13. Development of thermoresponsive poly(propylene-g-N-isopropylacrylamide) non-woven 3D scaffold for smart cell culture using oxyfluorination-assisted graft polymerisation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chetty, AS

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Growing cells on 3D scaffolds is far superior to the conventional 2D monolayer culture method. In this study, a novel 3D thermoresponsive poly(propylene-g-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PP-g-PNIPAAm) nonwoven fabric (gNWF) was developed for cell culture...

  14. Fabrication of Three Dimensional Tissue Engineering Polydimethylsiloxane ( PDMS) Microporous Scaffolds Integrated in a Bioreactor Using a 3D Printed Water Dissolvable Sacrificial Mould

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Mantis, Ioannis; Chetan, Aradhya Mallikarjunaiah

    2015-01-01

    We present a new scalable and general approach for manufacturing structured pores/channels in 3D polymer based scaffolds. The method involves 3D printing of a sacrificial polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) mould whose geometrical features are designed according to the required vascular channel network...

  15. 3D hydrogel scaffold doped with 2D graphene materials for biosensors and bioelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun Seok; Kwon, Oh Seok; Kim, Jae-Hong; Conde, João; Artzi, Natalie

    2017-03-15

    Hydrogels consisting of three-dimensional (3D) polymeric networks have found a wide range of applications in biotechnology due to their large water capacity, high biocompatibility, and facile functional versatility. The hydrogels with stimulus-responsive swelling properties have been particularly instrumental to realizing signal transduction in biosensors and bioelectronics. Graphenes are two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials with unprecedented physical, optical, and electronic properties and have also found many applications in biosensors and bioelectronics. These two classes of materials present complementary strengths and limitations which, when effectively coupled, can result in significant synergism in their electrical, mechanical, and biocompatible properties. This report reviews recent advances made with hydrogel and graphene materials for the development of high-performance bioelectronics devices. The report focuses on the interesting intersection of these materials wherein 2D graphenes are hybridized with 3D hydrogels to develop the next generation biosensors and bioelectronics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 3D Printing of Scaffold for Cells Delivery: Advances in Skin Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury or damage to tissue and organs is a major health problem, resulting in about half of the world’s annual healthcare expenditure every year. Advances in the fields of stem cells (SCs and biomaterials processing have provided a tremendous leap for researchers to manipulate the dynamics between these two, and obtain a skin substitute that can completely heal the wounded areas. Although wound healing needs a coordinated interplay between cells, extracellular proteins and growth factors, the most important players in this process are the endogenous SCs, which activate the repair cascade by recruiting cells from different sites. Extra cellular matrix (ECM proteins are activated by these SCs, which in turn aid in cellular migrations and finally secretion of growth factors that can seal and heal the wounds. The interaction between ECM proteins and SCs helps the skin to sustain the rigors of everyday activity, and in an attempt to attain this level of functionality in artificial three-dimensional (3D constructs, tissue engineered biomaterials are fabricated using more advanced techniques such as bioprinting and laser assisted printing of the organs. This review provides a concise summary of the most recent advances that have been made in the area of polymer bio-fabrication using 3D bio printing used for encapsulating stem cells for skin regeneration. The focus of this review is to describe, in detail, the role of 3D architecture and arrangement of cells within this system that can heal wounds and aid in skin regeneration.

  17. Structure, Properties, and In Vitro Behavior of Heat-Treated Calcium Sulfate Scaffolds Fabricated by 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Shafiei, Seyedeh Sara; Mohammadi, Sepideh; Hafezi, Masoud; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2016-01-01

    The ability of inkjet-based 3D printing (3DP) to fabricate biocompatible ceramics has made it one of the most favorable techniques to generate bone tissue engineering (BTE) scaffolds. Calcium sulfates exhibit various beneficial characteristics, and they can be used as a promising biomaterial in BTE. However, low mechanical performance caused by the brittle character of ceramic materials is the main weakness of 3DP calcium sulfate scaffolds. Moreover, the presence of certain organic matters in the starting powder and binder solution causes products to have high toxicity levels. A post-processing treatment is usually employed to improve the physical, chemical, and biological behaviors of the printed scaffolds. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the structural, mechanical, and physical characteristics of 3DP calcium sulfate prototypes were investigated. Different microscopy and spectroscopy methods were employed to characterize the printed prototypes. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the specimens was also evaluated before and after heat treatment. Results showed that the as-printed scaffolds and specimens heat treated at 300°C exhibited severe toxicity in vitro but had almost adequate strength. By contrast, the specimens heat treated in the 500°C-1000°C temperature range, although non-toxic, had insufficient mechanical strength, which was mainly attributed to the exit of the organic binder before 500°C and the absence of sufficient densification below 1000°C. The sintering process was accelerated at temperatures higher than 1000°C, resulting in higher compressive strength and less cytotoxicity. An anhydrous form of calcium sulfate was the only crystalline phase existing in the samples heated at 500°C-1150°C. The formation of calcium oxide caused by partial decomposition of calcium sulfate was observed in the specimens heat treated at temperatures higher than 1200°C. Although considerable improvements in cell viability of heat-treated scaffolds were

  18. Structure, Properties, and In Vitro Behavior of Heat-Treated Calcium Sulfate Scaffolds Fabricated by 3D Printing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Asadi-Eydivand

    Full Text Available The ability of inkjet-based 3D printing (3DP to fabricate biocompatible ceramics has made it one of the most favorable techniques to generate bone tissue engineering (BTE scaffolds. Calcium sulfates exhibit various beneficial characteristics, and they can be used as a promising biomaterial in BTE. However, low mechanical performance caused by the brittle character of ceramic materials is the main weakness of 3DP calcium sulfate scaffolds. Moreover, the presence of certain organic matters in the starting powder and binder solution causes products to have high toxicity levels. A post-processing treatment is usually employed to improve the physical, chemical, and biological behaviors of the printed scaffolds. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the structural, mechanical, and physical characteristics of 3DP calcium sulfate prototypes were investigated. Different microscopy and spectroscopy methods were employed to characterize the printed prototypes. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the specimens was also evaluated before and after heat treatment. Results showed that the as-printed scaffolds and specimens heat treated at 300°C exhibited severe toxicity in vitro but had almost adequate strength. By contrast, the specimens heat treated in the 500°C-1000°C temperature range, although non-toxic, had insufficient mechanical strength, which was mainly attributed to the exit of the organic binder before 500°C and the absence of sufficient densification below 1000°C. The sintering process was accelerated at temperatures higher than 1000°C, resulting in higher compressive strength and less cytotoxicity. An anhydrous form of calcium sulfate was the only crystalline phase existing in the samples heated at 500°C-1150°C. The formation of calcium oxide caused by partial decomposition of calcium sulfate was observed in the specimens heat treated at temperatures higher than 1200°C. Although considerable improvements in cell viability of heat

  19. Construction of a 3D rGO-collagen hybrid scaffold for enhancement of the neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhou; Mou, Xiaoning; Liu, Hong; Wang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold because the surface of the scaffold can determine the fate of stem cells. A conductive surface is required for a scaffold to direct stem cells toward neural differentiation. However, most conductive polymers are toxic and not amenable to biological degradation, which restricts the design of neural tissue engineering scaffolds. In this study, we used a bioactive three-dimensional (3D) porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM), which is mainly composed of type I collagen, as a basic material and successfully assembled a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets on the surface of the PADM channels to obtain a porous 3D, biodegradable, conductive and biocompatible PADM-rGO hybrid neural tissue engineering scaffold. Compared with the PADM scaffold, assembling the rGO into the scaffold did not induce a significant change in the microstructure but endowed the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold with good conductivity. A comparison of the neural differentiation of rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was performed by culturing the MSCs on PADM and PADM-rGO scaffolds in neuronal culture medium, followed by the determination of gene expression and immunofluorescence staining. The results of both the gene expression and protein level assessments suggest that the rGO-assembled PADM scaffold may promote the differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells with higher protein and gene expression levels after 7 days under neural differentiation conditions. This study demonstrated that the PADM-rGO hybrid scaffold is a promising scaffold for neural tissue engineering; this scaffold can not only support the growth of MSCs at a high proliferation rate but also enhance the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells.The cell-material interface is one of the most important considerations in designing a high-performance tissue engineering scaffold

  20. Evaluation of PBS Treatment and PEI Coating Effects on Surface Morphology and Cellular Response of 3D-Printed Alginate Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza García, María A; Izadifar, Mohammad; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2017-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technology for the fabrication of scaffolds to repair/replace damaged tissue/organs in tissue engineering. This paper presents our study on 3D printed alginate scaffolds treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) coating and their impacts on the surface morphology and cellular response of the printed scaffolds. In our study, sterile alginate was prepared by means of the freeze-drying method and then, used to prepare the hydrogel for 3D printing into calcium chloride, forming 3D scaffolds. Scaffolds were treated with PBS for a time period of two days and seven days, respectively, and PEI coating; then they were seeded with Schwann cells (RSC96) for the examination of cellular response (proliferation and differentiation). In addition, swelling and stiffness (Young's modulus) of the treated scaffolds was evaluated, while their surface morphology was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images revealed significant changes in scaffold surface morphology due to degradation caused by the PBS treatment over time. Our cell proliferation assessment over seven days showed that a two-day PBS treatment could be more effective than seven-day PBS treatment for improving cell attachment and elongation. While PEI coating of alginate scaffolds seemed to contribute to cell growth, Schwann cells stayed round on the surface of alginate over the period of cell culture. In conclusion, PBS-treatment may offer the potential to induce surface physical cues due to degradation of alginate, which could improve cell attachment post cell-seeding of 3D-printed alginate scaffolds.

  1. 3D-Printed Atsttrin-Incorporated Alginate/Hydroxyapatite Scaffold Promotes Bone Defect Regeneration with TNF/TNFR Signaling Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan; Xia, Qingqing; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Xiaolei; Wen, Feiqiu; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shufang; Heng, Boon Chin; He, Yong; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2015-08-05

    High expression levels of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α within bone defects can decelerate and impair bone regeneration. However, there are few available bone scaffolds with anti-inflammatory function. The progranulin (PGRN)-derived engineered protein, Atsttrin, is known to exert antagonistic effects on the TNF-α function. Hence, this study investigates whether 3D-printed Atsttrin-incorporated alginate(Alg)/hydroxyapatite(nHAp) scaffolds can facilitate bone healing through affecting the TNF/TNFR signaling. A 3D bioprinting system is used to fabricate Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp composite scaffolds, and the Atsttrin release from this scaffold is characterized, followed by evaluation of its efficacy on bone regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. The 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold exhibits a precisely defined structure, can sustain Atsttrin release for at least 5 days, has negligible cytotoxicity, and supports cell adhesion. Atsttrin can also attenuate the suppressive effects of TNF-α on BMP-2-induced osteoblastic differentiation in vitro. The 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold significantly reduces the number of TNF-α positive cells within wound sites, 7 days after post-calvarial defect surgery. Additionally, histological staining and X-ray scanning results also show that the 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold enhances the regeneration of mice calvarial bone defects. These findings thus demonstrate that the precise structure and anti-inflammatory properties of 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffolds may promote bone defect repair. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. High-resolution direct 3D printed PLGA scaffolds: print and shrink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, Helena N; Wu, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    Direct three-dimensional printing (3DP) produces the final part composed of the powder and binder used in fabrication. An advantage of direct 3DP is control over both the microarchitecture and macroarchitecture. Prints which use porogen incorporated in the powder result in high pore interconnectivity, uniform porosity, and defined pore size after leaching. The main limitations of direct 3DP for synthetic polymers are the use of organic solvents which can dissolve polymers used in most printheads and limited resolution due to unavoidable spreading of the binder droplet after contact with the powder. This study describes a materials processing strategy to eliminate the use of organic solvent during the printing process and to improve 3DP resolution by shrinking with a non-solvent plasticizer. Briefly, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) powder was prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation to form polymer microparticles. The printing powder was composed of polymer microparticles dry mixed with sucrose particles. After printing with a water-based liquid binder, the polymer microparticles were fused together to form a network by solvent vapor in an enclosed vessel. The sucrose is removed by leaching and the resulting scaffold is placed in a solution of methanol. The methanol acts as a non-solvent plasticizer and allows for polymer chain rearrangement and efficient packing of polymer chains. The resulting volumetric shrinkage is ∼80% at 90% methanol. A complex shape (honey-comb) was designed, printed, and shrunken to demonstrate isotropic shrinking with the ability to reach a final resolution of ∼400 μm. The effect of type of alcohol (i.e. methanol or ethanol), concentration of alcohol, and temperature on volumetric shrinking was studied. This study presents a novel materials processing strategy to overcome the main limitations of direct 3DP to produce high resolution PLGA scaffolds. (paper)

  3. High-resolution direct 3D printed PLGA scaffolds: print and shrink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Helena N; Wu, Benjamin M

    2014-12-17

    Direct three-dimensional printing (3DP) produces the final part composed of the powder and binder used in fabrication. An advantage of direct 3DP is control over both the microarchitecture and macroarchitecture. Prints which use porogen incorporated in the powder result in high pore interconnectivity, uniform porosity, and defined pore size after leaching. The main limitations of direct 3DP for synthetic polymers are the use of organic solvents which can dissolve polymers used in most printheads and limited resolution due to unavoidable spreading of the binder droplet after contact with the powder. This study describes a materials processing strategy to eliminate the use of organic solvent during the printing process and to improve 3DP resolution by shrinking with a non-solvent plasticizer. Briefly, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) powder was prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation to form polymer microparticles. The printing powder was composed of polymer microparticles dry mixed with sucrose particles. After printing with a water-based liquid binder, the polymer microparticles were fused together to form a network by solvent vapor in an enclosed vessel. The sucrose is removed by leaching and the resulting scaffold is placed in a solution of methanol. The methanol acts as a non-solvent plasticizer and allows for polymer chain rearrangement and efficient packing of polymer chains. The resulting volumetric shrinkage is ∼80% at 90% methanol. A complex shape (honey-comb) was designed, printed, and shrunken to demonstrate isotropic shrinking with the ability to reach a final resolution of ∼400 μm. The effect of type of alcohol (i.e. methanol or ethanol), concentration of alcohol, and temperature on volumetric shrinking was studied. This study presents a novel materials processing strategy to overcome the main limitations of direct 3DP to produce high resolution PLGA scaffolds.

  4. Mechanical, Permeability, and Degradation Properties of 3D Designed Poly(1,8 Octanediol-co-Citrate)(POC) Scaffolds for Soft Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Claire G.; Hollister, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citric acid) (POC) is a synthetic biodegradable elastomer that can be processed into 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering. We investigated the effect of designed porosity on the mechanical properties, permeability and degradation profiles of the POC scaffolds. For mechanical properties, scaffold compressive data was fit to a 1D nonlinear elastic model and solid tensile data was fit to a Neohookean incompressible nonlinear elastic model. Chondrocytes were seeded on scaffolds to assess the biocompatibility of POC. Increased porosity was associated with increased degradation rate, increased permeability, and decreased mechanical stiffness which also became less nonlinear. Scaffold characterization in this paper will provide design guidance for POC scaffolds to meet the mechanical and biological parameters needed for engineering soft tissues such as cartilage. PMID:20091910

  5. Production and in vitro characterization of 3D porous scaffolds made of magnesium carbonate apatite (MCA)/anionic collagen using a biomimetic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sader, Marcia S., E-mail: msader@metalmat.ufrj.br [Prog. Engenharia Metalúrgica e Materiais, COPPE/UFRJ, RJ (Brazil); Martins, Virginia C.A. [Depto. de Química e Física Molecular, IQSC/USP, SP (Brazil); Gomez, Santiago [Dept. Anatomía Patológica, Universidad de Cádiz, Cadiz (Spain); LeGeros, Racquel Z. [Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, NY (United States); Soares, Gloria A. [Prog. Engenharia Metalúrgica e Materiais, COPPE/UFRJ, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    3D porous scaffolds are relevant biomaterials to bone engineering as they can be used as templates to tissue reconstruction. The aim of the present study was to produce and characterize in vitro 3D magnesium-carbonate apatite/collagen (MCA/col) scaffolds. They were prepared by using biomimetic approach, followed by cross-linking with 0.25% glutaraldehyde solution (GA) and liofilization. Results obtained with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the type-B carbonate substitution, while by X-ray diffraction (XRD), a crystallite size of ∼ 10 nm was obtained. Optical and electron microscopy showed that the cylindrical samples exhibited an open-porous morphology, with apatite nanocrystals precipitated on collagen fibrils. The cross-linked 3D scaffolds showed integrity when immersed in culture medium up to 14 days. Also, the immersion of such samples into an acid buffer solution, to mimic the osteoclastic resorption environment, promotes the release of important ions for bone repair, such as calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. Bone cells (SaOs2) adhered, and proliferated on the 3D composite scaffolds, showing that synthesis and the cross-linking processes did not induce cytotoxicity. Highlights: • 3D scaffolds of Mg-carbonate–apatite and anionic-collagen were produced. • The biomimetic approach and the cross-linking with 0.25% GA solution were employed. • The scaffolds showed open-porous structure and apatite crystals on collagen fibrils. • The cross-linked scaffolds exhibited integrity when immersed in culture medium. • SaOs2 cells adhered and proliferated on the cross-linked scaffolds confirming no cytotoxicity.

  6. Production and in vitro characterization of 3D porous scaffolds made of magnesium carbonate apatite (MCA)/anionic collagen using a biomimetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sader, Marcia S.; Martins, Virginia C.A.; Gomez, Santiago; LeGeros, Racquel Z.; Soares, Gloria A.

    2013-01-01

    3D porous scaffolds are relevant biomaterials to bone engineering as they can be used as templates to tissue reconstruction. The aim of the present study was to produce and characterize in vitro 3D magnesium-carbonate apatite/collagen (MCA/col) scaffolds. They were prepared by using biomimetic approach, followed by cross-linking with 0.25% glutaraldehyde solution (GA) and liofilization. Results obtained with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the type-B carbonate substitution, while by X-ray diffraction (XRD), a crystallite size of ∼ 10 nm was obtained. Optical and electron microscopy showed that the cylindrical samples exhibited an open-porous morphology, with apatite nanocrystals precipitated on collagen fibrils. The cross-linked 3D scaffolds showed integrity when immersed in culture medium up to 14 days. Also, the immersion of such samples into an acid buffer solution, to mimic the osteoclastic resorption environment, promotes the release of important ions for bone repair, such as calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. Bone cells (SaOs2) adhered, and proliferated on the 3D composite scaffolds, showing that synthesis and the cross-linking processes did not induce cytotoxicity. Highlights: • 3D scaffolds of Mg-carbonate–apatite and anionic-collagen were produced. • The biomimetic approach and the cross-linking with 0.25% GA solution were employed. • The scaffolds showed open-porous structure and apatite crystals on collagen fibrils. • The cross-linked scaffolds exhibited integrity when immersed in culture medium. • SaOs2 cells adhered and proliferated on the cross-linked scaffolds confirming no cytotoxicity

  7. Evaluation of bone marrow stem cell response to PLA scaffolds manufactured by 3D printing and coated with polydopamine and type I collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Bruna Nunes; Aprile, Paola; Mendonça, Roberta H; Kelly, Daniel J; Thiré, Rossana Mara da Silva Moreira

    2018-02-26

    The majority of synthetic polymers used in 3 D printing are not designed to promote specific cellular interactions and hence possess limited bioactivity. Most of the strategies proposed to overcome this limitation demand multiple and expensive processing steps. This study aimed to evaluate the surface modification of 3D-printed poly(lactic acid) (PLA) scaffolds with polydopamine (PDA) coating as an alternative strategy to enhance their bioactivity and to facilitate the immobilization of type I collagen (COL I) onto the implant surface. Physical and chemical properties of PLA scaffolds coated with PDA, COL I or both were evaluated. The response of porcine bone marrow stem cells (MSCs) to the coatings was also investigated. The PDA layer improved COL immobilization onto the surface of the PLA scaffolds by 92%. The combination of PDA and COL functionalizations provided the best conditions for early-stage (PLA and PDA plus COL-coated scaffolds by day 21, cells seeded onto PDA plus COL scaffolds produced substantially higher amounts of alkaline phosphatase. These results indicate that the osteoinductivity of 3D-printed PLA scaffolds can be enhanced by PDA and type I collagen coatings. This surface modification of polymeric scaffolds represents a promising strategy for bone tissue engineering. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Fabrication and mechanical characterization of 3D electrospun scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, L D; Young, R T; Andric, T; Freeman, J W

    2010-01-01

    Electrospinning is a polymer processing technique that produces fibrous structures comparable to the extracellular matrix of many tissues. Electrospinning, however, has been severely limited in its tissue engineering capabilities because this technique has produced few three-dimensional structures. Sintering of electrospun materials provides a method to fabricate unique architectures and allow much larger structures to be made. Electrospun mats were sintered into strips and cylinders, and their tensile and compressive mechanical properties were measured. In addition, electrospun materials with salt pores (salt embedded within the material and then leached out) were fabricated to improve porosity of the electrospun materials for tissue engineering scaffolds. Sintered electrospun poly(d,l-lactide) and poly(l-lactide) (PDLA/PLLA) materials have higher tensile mechanical properties (modulus: 72.3 MPa, yield: 960 kPa) compared to unsintered PLLA (modulus: 40.36 MPa, yield: 675.5 kPa). Electrospun PDLA/PLLA cylinders with and without salt-leached pores had compressive moduli of 6.69 and 26.86 MPa, respectively, and compressive yields of 1.36 and 0.56 MPa, respectively. Sintering of electrospun materials is a novel technique that improves electrospinning application in tissue engineering by increasing the size and types of electrospun structures that can be fabricated.

  9. Antibacterial chitosan/silk sericin 3D porous scaffolds as a wound dressing material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahaliloglu, Zeynep; Kilicay, Ebru; Denkbas, Emir Baki

    2017-09-01

    Antimicrobial mixed dressings have traditionally been used to minimize bacterial infection of burns and other wounds. This study presents the advancement of biocompatible chitosan/silk sericin (CHT/SS) scaffolds combined with lauric acid (LA) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) for the successful wound dressing applications. Antibacterial assay results showed that the diameters of the inhibition zone increased from 2 ± 0.4 to 7 ± 0.1 mm for Escherichia coli, as well as from 2.5 ± 0.2 to 6 ± 0.4 mm for Staphylococcus aureus while CHTS/SS/100nZnO compared to CHT/SS/0.01LA. The results not only showed excellent inhibition against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial growth but also revealed improved proliferation and extended viability for HaCaT cells.

  10. Scaffolds fabricated by 3D two-photon photopolymerization for live cell studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplicky, T.; Cunderlikova, B.; Mateasik, A.; Vincze, A.; Chorvat, D.; Marcek Chorvatova, A.

    2016-12-01

    Design and fabrication of appropriate biocompatible microstructures that ensure fixation and control of experimental conditions for live cell and bacteria observations is an important prerequisite for number of real time experiments. Our approach is to design engineered microfabricated 3D structures for growth of cells in culture without significant modification of their metabolic state. Presented approach is aimed at evaluation of the potential applicability of biocompatible constructs in the biomedical field and thus live cell monitoring in controlled conditions. Design and evaluation of properties of materials and structures with mesoscopic arrangement and their interaction with biological objects is a prerequisite for establishment of physiologically relevant in vitro models of pathologies as well as for development of a new generation of nano / micro / bio-sensors.

  11. Low temperature fabrication of magnesium phosphate cement scaffolds by 3D powder printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klammert, Uwe; Vorndran, Elke; Reuther, Tobias; Müller, Frank A; Zorn, Katharina; Gbureck, Uwe

    2010-11-01

    Synthetic bone replacement materials are of great interest because they offer certain advantages compared with organic bone grafts. Biodegradability and preoperative manufacturing of patient specific implants are further desirable features in various clinical situations. Both can be realised by 3D powder printing. In this study, we introduce powder-printed magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) structures, accompanied by a neutral setting reaction by printing farringtonite (Mg(3)(PO(4))(2)) powder with ammonium phosphate solution as binder. Suitable powders were obtained after sintering at 1100°C for 5 h following 20-40 min dry grinding in a ball mill. Depending on the post-treatment of the samples, compressive strengths were found to be in the range 2-7 MPa. Cytocompatibility was demonstrated in vitro using the human osteoblastic cell line MG63.

  12. Deformation and fatigue of tough 3D printed elastomer scaffolds processed by fused deposition modeling and continuous liquid interface production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew T; Safranski, David L; Wood, Catherine; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2017-11-01

    Polyurethane (PU) based elastomers continue to gain popularity in a variety of biomedical applications as compliant implant materials. In parallel, advancements in additive manufacturing continue to provide new opportunities for biomedical applications by enabling the creation of more complex architectures for tissue scaffolding and patient specific implants. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of printed architecture on the monotonic and cyclic mechanical behavior of elastomeric PUs and to compare the structure-property relationship across two different printing approaches. We examined the tensile fatigue of notched specimens, 3D crosshatch scaffolds, and two 3D spherical pore architectures in a physically crosslinked polycarbonate urethane (PCU) printed via fused deposition modeling (FDM) as well as a photo-cured, chemically-crosslinked, elastomeric PU printed via continuous liquid interface production (CLIP). Both elastomers were relatively tolerant of 3D geometrical features as compared to stiffer synthetic implant materials such as PEEK and titanium. PCU and crosslinked PU samples with 3D porous structures demonstrated a reduced tensile failure stress as expected without a significant effect on tensile failure strain. PCU crosshatch samples demonstrated similar performance in strain-based tensile fatigue as solid controls; however, when plotted against stress amplitude and adjusted by porosity, it was clear that the architecture had an impact on performance. Square shaped notches or pores in crosslinked PU appeared to have a modest effect on strain-based tensile fatigue while circular shaped notches and pores had little impact relative to smooth samples. When plotted against stress amplitude, any differences in fatigue performance were small or not statistically significant for crosslinked PU samples. Despite the slight difference in local architecture and tolerances, crosslinked PU solid samples were found to perform on par with PCU solid

  13. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused 3D Porous Polymer Scaffold for Liver Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    A huge shortage of liver organs for transplantation has motivated the research field of tissue engineering to develop bioartificial liver tissue and even a whole liver. The goal of NanoBio4Trans is to create a vascularized bioartificial liver tissue, initially as a liver-support system. Due...... to limitations of primary hepatocytes regarding availability and maintenance of functionality, stem cells and especially human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPS cells) are an attractive cell source for liver tissue engineering. The aim of this part of NanoBio4Trans is to optimize culture and hepatic...... differentiation of hIPS-derived definitive endoderm (DE) cells in a 3D porous polymer scaffold built-in a perfusable bioreactor. The use of a microfluidic bioreactor array enables the culture of 16 independent tissues in one experimental run and thereby an optimization study to be performed....

  14. UV Cross-Linkable Graphene/Poly(trimethylene Carbonate) Composites for 3D Printing of Electrically Conductive Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyar, Sepidar; Bjorninen, Miina; Haimi, Suvi; Miettinen, Susanna; Gilmore, Kerry; Grijpma, Dirk; Wallace, Gordon

    2016-11-23

    Conductive, flexible graphene/poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) composites were prepared. Addition of just 3 wt % graphene to PTMC oligomers functionalized with methacrylate end-groups followed by UV cross-linking resulted in more than 100% improvement in tensile strength and enhanced electrical conductivity by orders of magnitude without altering the processability of the host material. The addition of graphene also enhanced mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment and proliferation. When electrical stimulation via the composite material was applied, MSC viability was not compromised, and osteogenic markers were upregulated. Using additive fabrication techniques, the material was processed into multilayer 3D scaffolds which supported MSC attachment. These conducting composites with excellent processability and compatibility with MSCs are promising biomaterials to be used as versatile platforms for biomedical applications.

  15. Influence of the mechanical environment on the engineering of mineralised tissues using human dental pulp stem cells and silk fibroin scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszyk, Anna; Holsten Dircksen, Sabrina; Bostanci, Nagihan; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2014-01-01

    Teeth constitute a promising source of stem cells that can be used for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine purposes. Bone loss in the craniofacial complex due to pathological conditions and severe injuries could be treated with new materials combined with human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) that have the same embryonic origin as craniofacial bones. Optimising combinations of scaffolds, cells, growth factors and culture conditions still remains a great challenge. In the present study, we evaluate the mineralisation potential of hDPSCs seeded on porous silk fibroin scaffolds in a mechanically dynamic environment provided by spinner flask bioreactors. Cell-seeded scaffolds were cultured in either standard or osteogenic media in both static and dynamic conditions for 47 days. Histological analysis and micro-computed tomography of the samples showed low levels of mineralisation when samples were cultured in static conditions (0.16±0.1 BV/TV%), while their culture in a dynamic environment with osteogenic medium and weekly µCT scans (4.9±1.6 BV/TV%) significantly increased the formation of homogeneously mineralised structures, which was also confirmed by the elevated calcium levels (4.5±1.0 vs. 8.8±1.7 mg/mL). Molecular analysis of the samples showed that the expression of tooth correlated genes such as Dentin Sialophosphoprotein and Nestin were downregulated by a factor of 6.7 and 7.4, respectively, in hDPSCs when cultured in presence of osteogenic medium. This finding indicates that hDPSCs are able to adopt a non-dental identity by changing the culture conditions only. Also an increased expression of Osteocalcin (1.4x) and Collagen type I (1.7x) was found after culture under mechanically dynamic conditions in control medium. In conclusion, the combination of hDPSCs and silk scaffolds cultured under mechanical loading in spinner flask bioreactors could offer a novel and promising approach for bone tissue engineering where appropriate and rapid bone

  16. Influence of the mechanical environment on the engineering of mineralised tissues using human dental pulp stem cells and silk fibroin scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Woloszyk

    Full Text Available Teeth constitute a promising source of stem cells that can be used for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine purposes. Bone loss in the craniofacial complex due to pathological conditions and severe injuries could be treated with new materials combined with human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs that have the same embryonic origin as craniofacial bones. Optimising combinations of scaffolds, cells, growth factors and culture conditions still remains a great challenge. In the present study, we evaluate the mineralisation potential of hDPSCs seeded on porous silk fibroin scaffolds in a mechanically dynamic environment provided by spinner flask bioreactors. Cell-seeded scaffolds were cultured in either standard or osteogenic media in both static and dynamic conditions for 47 days. Histological analysis and micro-computed tomography of the samples showed low levels of mineralisation when samples were cultured in static conditions (0.16±0.1 BV/TV%, while their culture in a dynamic environment with osteogenic medium and weekly µCT scans (4.9±1.6 BV/TV% significantly increased the formation of homogeneously mineralised structures, which was also confirmed by the elevated calcium levels (4.5±1.0 vs. 8.8±1.7 mg/mL. Molecular analysis of the samples showed that the expression of tooth correlated genes such as Dentin Sialophosphoprotein and Nestin were downregulated by a factor of 6.7 and 7.4, respectively, in hDPSCs when cultured in presence of osteogenic medium. This finding indicates that hDPSCs are able to adopt a non-dental identity by changing the culture conditions only. Also an increased expression of Osteocalcin (1.4x and Collagen type I (1.7x was found after culture under mechanically dynamic conditions in control medium. In conclusion, the combination of hDPSCs and silk scaffolds cultured under mechanical loading in spinner flask bioreactors could offer a novel and promising approach for bone tissue engineering where appropriate and

  17. The effect of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds on the chondrogenesis of induced pluripotent stem cells and their application in restoration of cartilage defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; Nie, Huarong; Xu, Zhengliang; Niu, Xin; Guo, Shangchun; Yin, Junhui; Guo, Fei; Li, Gang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) rendered the reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells to primary stem cells with pluripotency possible and provided potential for the regeneration and restoration of cartilage defect. Chondrogenic differentiation of iPSCs is crucial for their application in cartilage tissue engineering. In this study we investigated the effect of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds on the chondrogenesis of iPSCs and articular cartilage defect restoration. Super-hydrophilic and durable mechanic polycaprolactone (PCL)/gelatin scaffolds were fabricated using two separate electrospinning processes. The morphological structure and mechanical properties of the scaffolds were characterized. The chondrogenesis of the iPSCs in vitro and the restoration of the cartilage defect was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), histological observation, RT-qPCR, and western blot analysis. iPSCs on the scaffolds expressed higher levels of chondrogenic markers than the control group. In an animal model, cartilage defects implanted with the scaffold-cell complex exhibited an enhanced gross appearance and histological improvements, higher cartilage-specific gene expression and protein levels, as well as subchondral bone regeneration. Therefore, we showed scaffolds with a 3D nanofibrous structure enhanced the chondrogenesis of iPSCs and that iPSC-containing scaffolds improved the restoration of cartilage defects to a greater degree than did scaffolds alone in vivo.

  18. The effect of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds on the chondrogenesis of induced pluripotent stem cells and their application in restoration of cartilage defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Liu

    Full Text Available The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs rendered the reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells to primary stem cells with pluripotency possible and provided potential for the regeneration and restoration of cartilage defect. Chondrogenic differentiation of iPSCs is crucial for their application in cartilage tissue engineering. In this study we investigated the effect of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds on the chondrogenesis of iPSCs and articular cartilage defect restoration. Super-hydrophilic and durable mechanic polycaprolactone (PCL/gelatin scaffolds were fabricated using two separate electrospinning processes. The morphological structure and mechanical properties of the scaffolds were characterized. The chondrogenesis of the iPSCs in vitro and the restoration of the cartilage defect was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8, histological observation, RT-qPCR, and western blot analysis. iPSCs on the scaffolds expressed higher levels of chondrogenic markers than the control group. In an animal model, cartilage defects implanted with the scaffold-cell complex exhibited an enhanced gross appearance and histological improvements, higher cartilage-specific gene expression and protein levels, as well as subchondral bone regeneration. Therefore, we showed scaffolds with a 3D nanofibrous structure enhanced the chondrogenesis of iPSCs and that iPSC-containing scaffolds improved the restoration of cartilage defects to a greater degree than did scaffolds alone in vivo.

  19. Novel Compound-Forming Technology Using Bioprinting and Electrospinning for Patterning a 3D Scaffold Construct with Multiscale Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanshao Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges for tissue engineering is to efficiently provide oxygen and nutrients to cells on a three-dimensional (3D engineered scaffold structure. Thus, achieving sufficient vascularization of the structure is a critical problem in tissue engineering. This facilitates the need to develop novel methods to enhance vascularization. Use of patterned hydrogel structures with multiscale channels can be used to achieve the required vascularization. Patterned structures need to be biocompatible and biodegradable. In this study, gelatin was used as the main part of a hydrogel to prepare a biological structure with 3D multiscale channels using bioprinting combined with selection of suitable materials and electrostatic spinning. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were then used to confirm efficacy of the structure, inferred from cell viability on different engineered construct designs. HUVECs were seeded on the surface of channels and cultured in vitro. HUVECs showed high viability and diffusion within the construct. This method can be used as a practical platform for the fabrication of engineered construct for vascularization.

  20. Association of electrospinning with electrospraying: a strategy to produce 3D scaffolds with incorporated stem cells for use in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braghirolli, Daikelly Iglesias; Zamboni, Fernanda; Acasigua, Gerson AX; Pranke, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    In tissue engineering, a uniform cell occupation of scaffolds is crucial to ensure the success of tissue regeneration. However, this point remains an unsolved problem in 3D scaffolds. In this study, a direct method to integrate cells into fiber scaffolds was investigated by combining the methods of electrospinning of fibers and bioelectrospraying of cells. With the associating of these methods, the cells were incorporated into the 3D scaffolds while the fibers were being produced. The scaffolds containing cells (SCCs) were produced using 20% poly(lactide-co-glycolide) solution for electrospinning and mesenchymal stem cells from deciduous teeth as a suspension for bioelectrospraying. After their production, the SCCs were cultivated for 15 days at 37°C with an atmosphere of 5% CO2. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test demonstrated that the cells remained viable and were able to grow between the fibers. Scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of a high number of cells in the structure of the scaffolds and confocal images demonstrated that the cells were able to adapt and spread between the fibers. Histological analysis of the SCCs after 1 day of cultivation showed that the cells were uniformly distributed throughout the thickness of the scaffolds. Some physicochemical properties of the scaffolds were also investigated. SCCs exhibited good mechanical properties, compatible with their handling and further implantation. The results obtained in the present study suggest that the association of electrospinning and bioelectrospraying provides an interesting tool for forming 3D cell-integrated scaffolds, making it a viable alternative for use in tissue engineering. PMID:26316747

  1. Bone regeneration in 3D printing bioactive ceramic scaffolds with improved tissue/material interface pore architecture in thin-wall bone defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huifeng; Ke, Xiurong; Liu, An; Sun, Miao; He, Yong; Yang, Xianyan; Fu, Jianzhong; Liu, Yanming; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Guojing; Xu, Sanzhong; Gou, Zhongru

    2017-04-12

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing bioactive ceramics have demonstrated alternative approaches to bone tissue repair, but an optimized materials system for improving the recruitment of host osteogenic cells into the bone defect and enhancing targeted repair of the thin-wall craniomaxillofacial defects remains elusive. Herein we systematically evaluated the role of side-wall pore architecture in the direct-ink-writing bioceramic scaffolds on mechanical properties and osteogenic capacity in rabbit calvarial defects. The pure calcium silicate (CSi) and dilute Mg-doped CSi (CSi-Mg6) scaffolds with different layer thickness and macropore sizes were prepared by varying the layer deposition mode from single-layer printing (SLP) to double-layer printing (DLP) and then by undergoing one-, or two-step sintering. It was found that the dilute Mg doping and/or two-step sintering schedule was especially beneficial for improving the compressive strength (∼25-104 MPa) and flexural strength (∼6-18 MPa) of the Ca-silicate scaffolds. The histological analysis for the calvarial bone specimens in vivo revealed that the SLP scaffolds had a high osteoconduction at the early stage (4 weeks) but the DLP scaffolds displayed a higher osteogenic capacity for a long time stage (8-12 weeks). Although the DLP CSi scaffolds displayed somewhat higher osteogenic capacity at 8 and 12 weeks, the DLP CSi-Mg6 scaffolds with excellent fracture resistance also showed appreciable new bone tissue ingrowth. These findings demonstrate that the side-wall pore architecture in 3D printed bioceramic scaffolds is required to optimize for bone repair in calvarial bone defects, and especially the Mg doping wollastontie is promising for 3D printing thin-wall porous scaffolds for craniomaxillofacial bone defect treatment.

  2. 3D printed scaffolds of calcium silicate-doped β-TCP synergize with co-cultured endothelial and stromal cells to promote vascularization and bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuan; Jiang, Chuan; Li, Cuidi; Li, Tao; Peng, Mingzheng; Wang, Jinwu; Dai, Kerong

    2017-07-17

    Synthetic bone scaffolds have potential application in repairing large bone defects, however, inefficient vascularization after implantation remains the major issue of graft failure. Herein, porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds with calcium silicate (CS) were 3D printed, and pre-seeded with co-cultured human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) to construct tissue engineering scaffolds with accelerated vascularization and better bone formation. Results showed that in vitro β-TCP scaffolds doped with 5% CS (5%CS/β-TCP) were biocompatible, and stimulated angiogenesis and osteogenesis. The results also showed that 5%CS/β-TCP scaffolds not only stimulated co-cultured cells angiogenesis on Matrigel, but also stimulated co-cultured cells to form microcapillary-like structures on scaffolds, and promoted migration of BMSCs by stimulating co-cultured cells to secrete PDGF-BB and CXCL12 into the surrounding environment. Moreover, 5%CS/β-TCP scaffolds enhanced vascularization and osteoinduction in comparison with β-TCP, and synergized with co-cultured cells to further increase early vessel formation, which was accompanied by earlier and better ectopic bone formation when implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. Thus, our findings suggest that porous 5%CS/β-TCP scaffolds seeded with co-cultured cells provide new strategy for accelerating tissue engineering scaffolds vascularization and osteogenesis, and show potential as treatment for large bone defects.

  3. Efficacy Study of Carrageenan as an Alternative Infused Material (Filler in Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate Porous 3D Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Syamimi Che Johari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric porous 3D scaffold plays an important role in culturing mammalian cells as ex vivo model. However, the scaffold used is ineffective due to its structural and cell acceptability weaknesses. Therefore, this research attempts to overcome the weaknesses by using carrageenan from red seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii as an alternative infused material (filler of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV porous 3D scaffold. The 3D scaffold was conventionally fabricated using the solvent-casting particulate-leaching (SCPL method. Carrageenan was later infused into 3D porous scaffolds under vacuum pressure and freeze-drying process. Five carrageenan concentrations were prepared and its physicochemical properties such as pH and viscosity were carried out on each concentration to determine the best solutions to produce a new composite 3D structure. The preliminary result shows that carrageenan concentrations of 2, 4, and 6% (w/v were considered the best solutions for the infusion process due to its stable rheology properties. The pH and viscosity profiles of three selected carrageenan solutions were exhibited in the range of 9.00–9.20 and 0.047–1.144 Pa·s, respectively. Moreover, the incorporated carrageenan gel fraction was in the range of 4.30% to 14.95% (w/w which was determined by gravimetric analysis and dye staining method (visual assessment. The well-infused carrageenan 3D scaffold was further characterized based on its internal morphology and degradability study. The vertical cross-sections of the scaffolds revealed homogeneous accumulation of dried gelatinous carrageenan which was covered throughout its pores wall. The degradation rate (K of the carrageenan infused 3D scaffold was between 0.01±1.66 (mg/day and 0.03±3.23 (mg/day. The higher the carrageenan concentration used, the faster the degradation rate occurring (p2 weeks. In conclusion, the usage of carrageenan as a composite material exhibits its great potential to be

  4. Fabrication of Three Dimensional Tissue Engineering Polydimethylsiloxane ( PDMS) Microporous Scaffolds Integrated in a Bioreactor Using a 3D Printed Water Dissolvable Sacrificial Mould

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Mantis, Ioannis; Chetan, Aradhya Mallikarjunaiah

    2015-01-01

    We present a new scalable and general approach for manufacturing structured pores/channels in 3D polymer based scaffolds. The method involves 3D printing of a sacrificial polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) mould whose geometrical features are designed according to the required vascular channel network....... Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer is cast around the PVA mould, cross-linked and then the mould is dissolved, leaving behind a structured porous PDMS scaffold. The fabrication method described here is demonstrated with silicone elastomer but various other natural and synthetic polymers are compatible...

  5. Unsupervised 3D ring template searching as an ideas generator for scaffold hopping: use of the LAMDA, RigFit, and field-based similarity search (FBSS) methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Martin; Loeprecht, Björn; Wendt, Bernd; Heritage, Trevor; Richmond, Nicola J; Willett, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Crystal structures taken from the Cambridge Structural Database were used to build a ring scaffold database containing 19 050 3D structures, with each such scaffold then being used to generate a centroid connecting path (CCP) representation. The CCP is a novel object that connects ring centroids, ring linker atoms, and other important points on the connection path between ring centroids. Unsupervised searching in the scaffold and CCP data sets was carried out using the atom-based LAMDA and RigFit search methods and the field-based similarity search method. The performance of these methods was tested with three different ring scaffold queries. These searches demonstrated that unsupervised 3D scaffold searching methods can find not only the types of ring systems that might be retrieved in carefully defined pharmacophore searches (supervised approach) but also additional, structurally diverse ring systems that could form the starting point for lead discovery programs or other scaffold-hopping applications. Not only are the methods effective but some are sufficiently rapid to permit scaffold searching in large chemical databases on a routine basis.

  6. A casting based process to fabricate 3D alginate scaffolds and to investigate the influence of heat transfer on pore architecture during fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, W.M.; Guo, Y.B.

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of 3-dimensional (3D) tissue scaffolds is a competitive approach to engineered tissues. An ideal tissue scaffold must be highly porous, biocompatible, biodegradable, easily processed and cost-effective, and have adequate mechanical properties. A casting based process has been developed in this study to fabricate 3D alginate tissue scaffolds. The alginate/calcium gluconate hydrogel was quenched in a glass mold and freeze dried to form a highly porous tissue scaffold whose tiny pores retain the shape of the ice crystals during quenching. Knowing that the water in the alginate hydrogel would form ice crystals if frozen and that different cooling conditions may dramatically influence the pore architecture, the speed and direction of the heat transfer in freeze drying hydrogel were examined with regard to pore size and orientation. The pore architecture at the different locations of the fabricated scaffolds was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The fabricated scaffolds consist of pores that are highly interconnected, with a diameter about 200 μm (average diameter of a capillary) to permit blood vessel penetration. It also has been found that the pore size, orientation, and uniformity are significantly affected by the condition of heat transfer during freeze drying. Tailoring the pore architecture of the scaffolds is feasible by controlling heat transfer. This study provides an insight on pore architecture formation and control by altered process parameters

  7. In Vivo Evaluation of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone Scaffold Implantation Combined with β-TCP Powder for Alveolar Bone Augmentation in a Beagle Defect Model

    OpenAIRE

    Su A. Park; Hyo-Jung Lee; Keun-Suh Kim; Sang Jin Lee; Jung-Tae Lee; Sung-Yeol Kim; Na-Hee Chang; Shin-Young Park

    2018-01-01

    Insufficient bone volume is one of the major challenges encountered by dentists after dental implant placement. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a customized three-dimensional polycaprolactone (3D PCL) scaffold implant fabricated with a 3D bio-printing system to facilitate rapid alveolar bone regeneration. Saddle-type bone defects were surgically created on the healed site after extracting premolars from the mandibles of four beagle dogs. The defects were radiologically examined u...

  8. Comparison of 3D-Printed Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Scaffolds Functionalized with Tricalcium Phosphate, Hydroxyapatite, Bio-Oss, or Decellularized Bone Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Ethan; Rindone, Alexandra; Dorafshar, Amir; Grayson, Warren L

    2017-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-printing facilitates rapid, custom manufacturing of bone scaffolds with a wide range of material choices. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential for 3D-printing bioactive (i.e., osteo-inductive) scaffolds for use in bone regeneration applications. In this study, we 3D-printed porous poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds using a fused deposition modeling (FDM) process and functionalized them with mineral additives that have been widely used commercially and clinically: tricalcium phosphate (TCP), hydroxyapatite (HA), Bio-Oss (BO), or decellularized bone matrix (DCB). We assessed the "print quality" of the composite scaffolds and found that the print quality of PCL-TCP, PCL-BO, and PCL-DCB measured ∼0.7 and was statistically lower than PCL and PCL-HA scaffolds (∼0.8). We found that the incorporation of mineral particles did not significantly decrease the compressive modulus of the graft, which was on the order of 260 MPa for solid blocks and ranged from 32 to 83 MPa for porous scaffolds. Raman spectroscopy revealed the surfaces of the scaffolds maintained the chemical profile of their dopants following the printing process. We evaluated the osteo-inductive properties of each scaffold composite by culturing adipose-derived stromal/stem cells in vitro and assessing their differentiation into osteoblasts. The calcium content (normalized to DNA) increased significantly in PCL-TCP (p  0.05). Collagen 1 expression was 10-fold greater than PCL in PCL-BO and PCL-DCB (p < 0.05) and osteocalcin expression was 10-fold greater in PCL-BO and PCL-DCB (p < 0.05) as measured by quantitative-real time-polymerase chain reaction. This study suggests that PCL-BO and PCL-DCB hybrid material may be advantageous for bone healing applications over PCL-HA or PCL-TCP blends.

  9. Strategic Design and Fabrication of Biomimetic 3D Scaffolds: Unique Architectures of Extracellular Matrices for Enhanced Adipogenesis and Soft Tissue Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Sasikala, Arathyram Ramachandra Kurup; Thomas, Shalom Sara; Nejad, Amin Ghavami; Cha, Youn Soo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2018-04-09

    The higher rate of soft tissue impairment due to lumpectomy or other trauma greatly requires the restoration of the irreversibly lost subcutaneous adipose tissues. The nanofibers fabricated by conventional electrospinning provide only a superficial porous structure due to its sheet like 2D structure and thereby hinder the cell infiltration and differentiation throughout the scaffolds. Thus we developed a novel electrospun 3D membrane using the zwitterionic poly (carboxybetaine-co-methyl methacrylate) co-polymer (CMMA) through electrostatic repulsion based electrospinning for soft tissue engineering. The inherent charges in the CMMA will aid the nanofiber to directly transform into a semiconductor and thereby transfer the immense static electricity from the grounded collector and will impart greater fluffiness to the scaffolds. The results suggest that the fabricated 3D nanofiber (CMMA 3NF) scaffolds possess nanofibers with larger inter connected pores and less dense structure compared to the conventional 2D scaffolds. The CMMA 3NF exhibits significant cues of soft tissue engineering such as enhanced biocompatibility as well as the faster regeneration of cells. Moreover the fabricated 3D scaffolds greatly assist the cells to develop into its stereoscopic topographies with an enhanced adipogenic property.

  10. Pyrolysed 3D-Carbon Scaffolds Induce Spontaneous Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells and Facilitate Real-Time Dopamine Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amato, Letizia; Heiskanen, Arto; Caviglia, Claudia; Shah, Fozia; Zor, Kinga; Skolimowski, Maciej; Madou, Marc; Gammelgaard, Lauge; Hansen, Rasmus; Seiz, Emma G.; Ramos, Milagros; Ramos Moreno, Tania; Martinez-Serrano, Alberto; Keller, Stephan S.; Emneus, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Structurally patterned pyrolysed three-dimensional carbon scaffolds (p3D-carbon) are fabricated and applied for differentiation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) developed for cell replacement therapy and sensing of released dopamine. In the absence of differentiation factors (DF) the pyrolysed

  11. 3D additive-manufactured nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds: Effect of the application mode of a time-dependent magnetic field on hMSCs behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo D'Amora

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of the application mode of a time-dependent magnetic field on the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs seeded on 3D additive-manufactured poly(ɛ-caprolactone/iron-doped hydroxyapatite (PCL/FeHA nanocomposite scaffolds.

  12. Design and Fabrication of Complex Scaffolds for Bone Defect Healing: Combined 3D Plotting of a Calcium Phosphate Cement and a Growth Factor-Loaded Hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlfeld, Tilman; Akkineni, Ashwini Rahul; Förster, Yvonne; Köhler, Tino; Knaack, Sven; Gelinsky, Michael; Lode, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing enables the fabrication of scaffolds with defined architecture. Versatile printing technologies such as extrusion-based 3D plotting allow in addition the incorporation of biological components increasing the capability to restore functional tissues. We have recently described the fabrication of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds by 3D plotting of an oil-based CPC paste under mild conditions. In the present study, we have developed a strategy for growth factor loading based on multichannel plotting: a biphasic scaffold design was realised combining CPC with VEGF-laden, highly concentrated hydrogel strands. As hydrogel component, alginate and an alginate-gellan gum blend were evaluated; the blend exhibited a more favourable VEGF release profile and was chosen for biphasic scaffold fabrication. After plotting, two-step post-processing was performed for both, hydrogel crosslinking and CPC setting, which was shown to be compatible with both materials. Finally, a scaffold was designed and fabricated which can be applied for testing in a rat critical size femur defect. Optimization of CPC plotting enabled the fabrication of highly resolved structures with strand diameters of only 200 µm. Micro-computed tomography revealed a precise strand arrangement and an interconnected pore space within the biphasic scaffold even in swollen state of the hydrogel strands.

  13. Liquid Crystal Elastomers—A Path to Biocompatible and Biodegradable 3D-LCE Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The development of appropriate materials that can make breakthroughs in tissue engineering has long been pursued by the scientific community. Several types of material have been long tested and re-designed for this purpose. At the same time, liquid crystals (LCs) have captivated the scientific community since their discovery in 1888 and soon after were thought to be, in combination with polymers, artificial muscles. Within the past decade liquid crystal elastomers (LCE) have been attracting increasing interest for their use as smart advanced materials for biological applications. Here, we examine how LCEs can potentially be used as dynamic substrates for culturing cells, moving away from the classical two-dimensional cell-culture nature. We also briefly discuss the integration of a few technologies for the preparation of more sophisticated LCE-composite scaffolds for more dynamic biomaterials. The anisotropic properties of LCEs can be used not only to promote cell attachment and the proliferation of cells, but also to promote cell alignment under LCE-stimulated deformation. 3D LCEs are ideal materials for new insights to simulate and study the development of tissues and the complex interplay between cells. PMID:29510523

  14. 3D scaffolds from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/poly(methyl methacrylate) composites via atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tebikachew, Behabtu; Magina, Sandra [CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Mata, Diogo; Oliveira, Filipe J.; Silva, Rui F. [CICECO, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Barros-Timmons, Ana, E-mail: anabarros@ua.pt [CICECO, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) synthesized by Thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (TCVD) were modified using an Ar:O{sub 2} (97:3) plasma to generate oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface for subsequent modification. X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman analyses confirmed the grafting of those functional groups onto the surface of the nanotubes as well as the removal of amorphous carbon produced and deposited on the VACNT forests during the CVD process. The plasma treated VACNT forests were further modified with 2-bromo-2-methylpropionyl bromide, an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator, to grow poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chains from the forests via ATRP. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of the ensuing VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed the coating of the nanotube forests with the PMMA polymer. 3D scaffolds of polymeric composites with honeycomb like structure were then obtained. Compressive tests have shown that the VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength than the pristine forest. - Highlights: • Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) were synthesized and plasma modified. • X-ray photo-emission and Raman spectroscopies confirmed the VACNTs modification. • Poly(methyl methacrylate) chains were grown via ATRP from the VACNTs. • STEM of the VACNT/PMMA composites confirmed that PMMA surrounds the nanotubes. • VACNT/PMMA composite has higher compressive strength compared to the pristine forest.

  15. Microstructure and compression properties of 3D powder printed Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds with designed porosity: Experimental and computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barui, Srimanta; Chatterjee, Subhomoy; Mandal, Sourav; Kumar, Alok; Basu, Bikramjit

    2017-01-01

    The osseointegration of metallic implants depends on an effective balance among designed porosity to facilitate angiogenesis, tissue in-growth and bone-mimicking elastic modulus with good strength properties. While addressing such twin requirements, the present study demonstrates a low temperature additive manufacturing based processing strategy to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds with designed porosity using inkjet-based 3D powder printing (3DPP). A novel starch-based aqueous binder was prepared and the physico-chemical parameters such as pH, viscosity, and surface tension were optimized for drop-on-demand (DOD) based thermal inkjet printing. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of sintered scaffolds revealed a 57% total porosity in homogeneously porous scaffold and 45% in the gradient porous scaffold with 99% interconnectivity among the micropores. Under uniaxial compression testing, the strength of homogeneously porous and gradient porous scaffolds were ~47MPa and ~90MPa, respectively. The progressive failure in homogeneously porous scaffold was recorded. In parallel to experimental measurements, finite element (FE) analyses have been performed to study the stress distribution globally and also locally around the designed pores. Consistent with FE analyses, a higher elastic modulus was recorded with gradient porous scaffolds (~3GPa) than the homogenously porous scaffolds (~2GPa). While comparing with the existing literature reports, the present work, for the first time, establishes 'direct powder printing methodology' of Ti-6Al-4V porous scaffolds with biomedically relevant microstructural and mechanical properties. Also, a new FE analysis approach, based on the critical understanding of the porous architecture using micro-CT results, is presented to realistically predict the compression response of porous scaffolds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The efficacy of a scaffold-free Bio 3D conduit developed from human fibroblasts on peripheral nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Yurie

    Full Text Available Although autologous nerve grafting is the gold standard treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, several alternative methods have been developed, including nerve conduits that use supportive cells. However, the seeding efficacy and viability of supportive cells injected in nerve grafts remain unclear. Here, we focused on a novel completely biological, tissue-engineered, scaffold-free conduit.We developed six scaffold-free conduits from human normal dermal fibroblasts using a Bio 3D Printer. Twelve adult male rats with immune deficiency underwent mid-thigh-level transection of the right sciatic nerve. The resulting 5-mm nerve gap was bridged using 8-mm Bio 3D conduits (Bio 3D group, n = 6 and silicone tube (silicone group, n = 6. Several assessments were conducted to examine nerve regeneration eight weeks post-surgery.Kinematic analysis revealed that the toe angle to the metatarsal bone at the final segment of the swing phase was significantly higher in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (-35.78 ± 10.68 versus -62.48 ± 6.15, respectively; p < 0.01. Electrophysiological studies revealed significantly higher compound muscle action potential in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (53.60 ± 26.36% versus 2.93 ± 1.84%; p < 0.01. Histological and morphological studies revealed neural cell expression in all regions of the regenerated nerves and the presence of many well-myelinated axons in the Bio 3D group. The wet muscle weight of the tibialis anterior muscle was significantly higher in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (0.544 ± 0.063 versus 0.396 ± 0.031, respectively; p < 0.01.We confirmed that scaffold-free Bio 3D conduits composed entirely of fibroblast cells promote nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve model.

  17. Collagen/heparin sulfate scaffolds fabricated by a 3D bioprinter improved mechanical properties and neurological function after spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Zhao, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Ren-Kun; Lu, Gang; Zhao, Chang-Yu; Fu, Feng; Sun, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Sai; Tu, Yue; Li, Xiao-Hong

    2017-05-01

    Effective treatments promoting axonal regeneration and functional recovery for spinal cord injury (SCI) are still in the early stages of development. Most approaches have been focused on providing supportive substrates for guiding neurons and overcoming the physical and chemical barriers to healing that arise after SCI. Although collagen has become a promising natural substrate with good compatibility, its low mechanical properties restrict its potential applications. The mechanical properties mainly rely on the composition and pore structure of scaffolds. For the composition of a scaffold, we used heparin sulfate to react with collagen by crosslinking. For the structure, we adopted a three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to fabricate a scaffold with a uniform pore distributions. We observed that the internal structure of the scaffold printed with a 3D bioprinter was regular and porous. We also found that both the compression modulus and strengths of the scaffold were significantly enhanced by the collagen/heparin sulfate composition compared to a collagen scaffold. Meanwhile, the collagen/heparin sulfate scaffold presented good biocompatibility when it was co-cultured with neural stem cells in vitro. We also demonstrated that heparin sulfate modification significantly improved bFGF immobilization and absorption to the collagen by examining the release kinetics of bFGF from scaffolds. Two months after implantating the scaffold into transection lesions in T10 of the spinal cord in rats, the collagen/heparin sulfate group demonstrated significant recovery of locomotor function and according to electrophysiological examinations. Parallel to functional recovery, collagen/heparin sulfate treatment further ameliorated the pathological process and markedly increased the number of neurofilament (NF) positive cells compared to collagen treatment alone. These data suggested that a collagen/heparin sulfate scaffold fabricated by a 3D bioprinter could enhance the

  18. 3D non-woven polyvinylidene fluoride scaffolds: fibre cross section and texturizing patterns have impact on growth of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Anne; Ross, Robin; Abagnale, Giulio; Joussen, Sylvia; Schuster, Philipp; Arshi, Annahit; Pallua, Norbert; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Gries, Thomas; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Several applications in tissue engineering require transplantation of cells embedded in appropriate biomaterial scaffolds. Such structures may consist of 3D non-woven fibrous materials whereas little is known about the impact of mesh size, pore architecture and fibre morphology on cellular behavior. In this study, we have developed polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) non-woven scaffolds with round, trilobal, or snowflake fibre cross section and different fibre crimp patterns (10, 16, or 28 needles per inch). Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue were seeded in parallel on these scaffolds and their growth was compared. Initial cell adhesion during the seeding procedure was higher on non-wovens with round fibres than on those with snowflake or trilobal cross sections. All PVDF non-woven fabrics facilitated cell growth over a time course of 15 days. Interestingly, proliferation was significantly higher on non-wovens with round or trilobal fibres as compared to those with snowflake profile. Furthermore, proliferation increased in a wider, less dense network. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the MSCs aligned along the fibres and formed cellular layers spanning over the pores. 3D PVDF non-woven scaffolds support growth of MSCs, however fibre morphology and mesh size are relevant: proliferation is enhanced by round fibre cross sections and in rather wide-meshed scaffolds.

  19. Investigation of neuronal pathfinding and construction of artificial neuronal networks on 3D-arranged porous fibrillar scaffolds with controlled geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongyoon; Kim, Seong-Min; Lee, Seyeong; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2017-08-10

    Herein, we investigated the neurite pathfinding on electrospun microfibers with various fiber densities, diameters, and microbead islands, and demonstrated the development of 3D connected artificial neuronal network within a nanofiber-microbead-based porous scaffold. The primary culture of rat hippocampal embryonic neurons was deposited on geometry-controlled polystyrene (PS) fiber scaffolds while growth cone morphology, neurite outgrowth patterns, and focal adhesion protein expression were cautiously examined by microscopic imaging of immunostained and live neuronal cells derived from actin-GFP transgenic mice. It was demonstrated that the neurite outgrowth was guided by the overall microfiber orientation, but the increase in fiber density induced the neurite path alteration, thus, the reduction in neurite linearity. Indeed, we experimentally confirmed that growth cone could migrate to a neighboring, but, spatially disconnected microfiber by spontaneous filopodium extrusion, which is possibly responsible for the observed neurite steering. Furthermore, thinner microfiber scaffolds showed more pronounced expression of focal adhesion proteins than thicker ones, suggesting that the neuron-microfiber interaction can be delicately modulated by the underlying microfiber geometry. Finally, 3D connected functional neuronal networks were successfully constructed using PS nanofiber-microbead scaffolds where enhanced porosity and vertical fiber orientation permitted cell body inclusion within the scaffold and substantial neurite outgrowth in a vertical direction, respectively.

  20. 3D non-woven polyvinylidene fluoride scaffolds: fibre cross section and texturizing patterns have impact on growth of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Schellenberg

    Full Text Available Several applications in tissue engineering require transplantation of cells embedded in appropriate biomaterial scaffolds. Such structures may consist of 3D non-woven fibrous materials whereas little is known about the impact of mesh size, pore architecture and fibre morphology on cellular behavior. In this study, we have developed polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF non-woven scaffolds with round, trilobal, or snowflake fibre cross section and different fibre crimp patterns (10, 16, or 28 needles per inch. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs from adipose tissue were seeded in parallel on these scaffolds and their growth was compared. Initial cell adhesion during the seeding procedure was higher on non-wovens with round fibres than on those with snowflake or trilobal cross sections. All PVDF non-woven fabrics facilitated cell growth over a time course of 15 days. Interestingly, proliferation was significantly higher on non-wovens with round or trilobal fibres as compared to those with snowflake profile. Furthermore, proliferation increased in a wider, less dense network. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed that the MSCs aligned along the fibres and formed cellular layers spanning over the pores. 3D PVDF non-woven scaffolds support growth of MSCs, however fibre morphology and mesh size are relevant: proliferation is enhanced by round fibre cross sections and in rather wide-meshed scaffolds.

  1. A synergistic approach to the design, fabrication and evaluation of 3D printed micro and nano featured scaffolds for vascularized bone tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Benjamin; Bulusu, Kartik; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-02-01

    3D bioprinting has begun to show great promise in advancing the development of functional tissue/organ replacements. However, to realize the true potential of 3D bioprinted tissues for clinical use requires the fabrication of an interconnected and effective vascular network. Solving this challenge is critical, as human tissue relies on an adequate network of blood vessels to transport oxygen, nutrients, other chemicals, biological factors and waste, in and out of the tissue. Here, we have successfully designed and printed a series of novel 3D bone scaffolds with both bone formation supporting structures and highly interconnected 3D microvascular mimicking channels, for efficient and enhanced osteogenic bone regeneration as well as vascular cell growth. Using a chemical functionalization process, we have conjugated our samples with nano hydroxyapatite (nHA), for the creation of novel micro and nano featured devices for vascularized bone growth. We evaluated our scaffolds with mechanical testing, hydrodynamic measurements and in vitro human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion (4 h), proliferation (1, 3 and 5 d) and osteogenic differentiation (1, 2 and 3 weeks). These tests confirmed bone-like physical properties and vascular-like flow profiles, as well as demonstrated enhanced hMSC adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Additional in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells also demonstrated improved vascular cell growth, migration and organization on micro-nano featured scaffolds.

  2. Development of gelatin/carboxymethyl chitosan/nano-hydroxyapatite composite 3D macroporous scaffold for bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Somnath; Agarwal, Tarun; Das, Joyjyoti; Maiti, Tapas Kumar

    2018-06-01

    The present study delineates a relatively simpler approach for fabrication of a macroporous three-dimensional scaffold for bone tissue engineering. The novelty of the work is to obtain a scaffold with macroporosity (interconnected networks) through a combined approach of high stirring induced foaming of the gelatin/carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC)/nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp) matrix followed by freeze drying. The fabricated macroporous (SGC) scaffold had a greater pore size, higher porosity, higher water retention capacity, slow and sustained enzymatic degradation rate along with higher compressive strength compared to that of non-macroporous (NGC, prepared by conventional freeze drying methodology) scaffold. The biological studies revealed the increased percentage of viability, proliferation, and differentiation as well as higher mineralization of differentiated human Wharton's jelly MSC microtissue (wjhMSC-MT) on SGC as compared to NGC scaffold. RT-PCR also showed enhanced expression level of collagen type I, osteocalcin and Runx2 when seeded on SGC. μCT and histological analysis further revealed a penetration of cellular spheroid to a greater depth in SGC scaffold than NGC scaffold. Furthermore, the effect of cryopreservation on microtissue survival on the three-dimensional construct revealed significant higher viability upon revival in macroporous SGC scaffolds. These results together suggest that high stirring based macroporous scaffolds could have a potential application in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions in novel 3D cartilage scaffolds with hydrogen treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Benjamin; Castro, Nathan J.; Li, Jian; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-09-01

    Cartilage tissue is a nanostructured tissue which is notoriously hard to regenerate due to its extremely poor inherent regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Current treatment methods are highly invasive and may have many complications. Thus, the goal of this work is to use nanomaterials and nano/microfabrication methods to create novel biologically inspired tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds to facilitate human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis. To this end we utilized electrospinning to design and fabricate a series of novel 3D biomimetic nanostructured scaffolds based on hydrogen (H2) treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and biocompatible poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) polymers. Specifically, a series of electrospun fibrous PLLA scaffolds with controlled fiber dimension were fabricated in this study. In vitro MSC studies showed that stem cells prefer to attach in the scaffolds with smaller fiber diameter. More importantly, the MWCNT embedded scaffolds showed a drastic increase in mechanical strength and a compressive Young’s modulus matching to natural cartilage. Furthermore, our MSC differentiation results demonstrated that incorporation of the H2 treated carbon nanotubes and poly-L-lysine coating can induce more chondrogenic differentiations of MSCs than controls. After two weeks of culture, PLLA scaffolds with H2 treated MWCNTs and poly-L-lysine can achieve the highest glycosaminoglycan synthesis, making them promising for further exploration for cartilage regeneration.

  4. A Gelatin-sulfonated Silk Composite Scaffold based on 3D Printing Technology Enhances Skin Regeneration by Stimulating Epidermal Growth and Dermal Neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Si; Zhang, Xianzhu; Lu, Ping; Wu, Yan; Wang, Quan; Sun, Heng; Heng, Boon Chin; Bunpetch, Varitsara; Zhang, Shufang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2017-06-27

    One of the key problems hindering skin repair is the deficiency of dermal vascularization and difficulty of epidermis regeneration, which makes it challenging to fabricate scaffolds that can biologically fulfill the requirements for skin regeneration. To overcome this problem, three-dimensional printing was used to fabricate a gelatin-sulfonated silk composite scaffold that was incorporated with basic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) through binding with a sulfonic acid group (SO 3 ) (3DG-SF-SO 3 -FGF). The efficacy and mechanism by which the 3DG-SF-SO 3 -FGF scaffolds promote skin regeneration were investigated both within in vitro cell culture and in vivo with a full-thickness skin defect model. The histological results showed that the gelatin-sulfonated silk composite scaffolds promoted granulation, and that incorporation of FGF-2 significantly enhanced the regeneration of skin-like tissues after implantation in rat skin defects for 14 and 28 days. Further investigations demonstrated that 3DG-SF-SO 3 -FGF scaffolds might stimulate dermal vascularization. These findings thus suggest that incorporation of FGF-2 into the 3D printed scaffolds is a viable strategy for enhancing skin regeneration.

  5. Pyrolysed 3D-Carbon Scaffolds Induce Spontaneous Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells and Facilitate Real-Time Dopamine Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amato, Letizia; Heiskanen, Arto; Caviglia, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    -dimensional (2D) and 3D environment. Due to conductive properties and 3D environment, the p3D-carbon serves as a neurotransmitter trap, enabling electrochemical detection of a signifi cantly larger dopamine fraction released by the hNSC derived neurons than on conventional 2D electrodes. This is the first study......Structurally patterned pyrolysed three-dimensional carbon scaffolds (p3Dcarbon) are fabricated and applied for differentiation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) developed for cell replacement therapy and sensing of released dopamine. In the absence of differentiation factors (DF) the pyrolysed...... carbon material induces spontaneous hNSC differentiation into mature dopamine-producing neurons and the 3D-topography promotes neurite elongation. In the presence and absence of DF, ≈73–82% of the hNSCs obtain dopaminergic properties on pyrolysed carbon, a to-date unseen efficiency in both two...

  6. Binary phase solid-state photopolymerization of acrylates: design, characterization and biomineralization of 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitlo, Inamullah; Ali, Safdar; Akram, Muhammad Yasir; Shehzad, Farooq Khurum; Nie, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Porous polymer scaffolds designed by the cryogel method are attractive materials for a range of tissue engineering applications. However, the use of toxic crosslinker for retaining the pore structure limits their clinical applications. In this research, acrylates (HEA/PEGDA, HEMA/PEGDA and PEGDA) were used in the low-temperature solid-state photopolymerization to produce porous scaffolds with good structural retention. The morphology, pore diameter, mineral deposition and water absorption of the scaffold were characterized by SEM and water absorption test respectively. Elemental analysis and cytotoxicity of the biomineralized scaffold were revealed by using XRD and MTT assay test. The PEGDA-derived scaffold showed good water absorption ability and a higher degree of porosity with larger pore size compared to others. XRD patterns and IR results confirmed the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals from an alternative socking process. The overall cell proliferation was excellent, where PEGDA-derived scaffold had the highest and the most uniform cell growth, while HEMA/PEGDA scaffold showed the least. These results suggest that the cell proliferation and adhesion are directly proportional to the pore size, the shape and the porosity of scaffolds.

  7. Osteoinduction and survival of osteoblasts and bone-marrow stromal cells in 3D biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds under static and dynamic culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Subha N; Strobel, Leonie A; Arkudas, Andreas; Beier, Justus P; Maier, Anne-Kathrin; Greil, Peter; Horch, Raymund E; Kneser, Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    In many tissue engineering approaches, the basic difference between in vitro and in vivo conditions for cells within three-dimensional (3D) constructs is the nutrition flow dynamics. To achieve comparable results in vitro, bioreactors are advised for improved cell survival, as they are able to provide a controlled flow through the scaffold. We hypothesize that a bioreactor would enhance long-term differentiation conditions of osteogenic cells in 3D scaffolds. To achieve this either primary rat osteoblasts or bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) were implanted on uniform-sized biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds produced by a 3D printing method. Three types of culture conditions were applied: static culture without osteoinduction (Group A); static culture with osteoinduction (Group B); dynamic culture with osteoinduction (Group C). After 3 and 6 weeks, the scaffolds were analysed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), dsDNA amount, SEM, fluorescent labelled live-dead assay, and real-time RT-PCR in addition to weekly alamarBlue assays. With osteoinduction, increased ALP values and calcium deposition are observed; however, under static conditions, a significant decrease in the cell number on the biomaterial is observed. Interestingly, the bioreactor system not only reversed the decreased cell numbers but also increased their differentiation potential. We conclude from this study that a continuous flow bioreactor not only preserves the number of osteogenic cells but also keeps their differentiation ability in balance providing a suitable cell-seeded scaffold product for applications in regenerative medicine. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. High loading of graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotubes into PDLLA: A route towards the design of osteoconductive, bactericidal and non-immunogenic 3D porous scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanin, Hudson [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NANOBIO), Institute of Research and Development - IP& D, University of Vale do Paraiba, Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Laboratory of Energy Storage & Supply - ES& S, Institute of Research and Development - IP& D, University of Vale do Paraiba, Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, CEP: 12.244-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rodrigues, Bruno Vinícius Manzolli [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NANOBIO), Institute of Research and Development - IP& D, University of Vale do Paraiba, Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ribeiro Neto, Wilson Alves; Bretas, Rosario Elida Suman [Department of Materials Engineering, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luis, km 235 – SP-310, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Da-Silva, Newton Soares [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Tissue, Institute of Research and Development - IP& D, University of Vale do Paraiba, Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, CEP: 12244-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Marciano, Fernanda Roberta [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NANOBIO), Institute of Research and Development - IP& D, University of Vale do Paraiba, Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira Lobo, Anderson, E-mail: aolobo@pq.cnpq.br [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NANOBIO), Institute of Research and Development - IP& D, University of Vale do Paraiba, Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    We have prepared a novel 3D porous biomaterial combining poly (DL-lactic acid) (PDLLA) and graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotubes oxides (MWCNTO-GO) composite. PDLLA as control and a high loading of PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO (50/50 w/w) bioscaffolds were prepared and functionalized. MWCNTs were exfoliated to form MWCNTO-GO by oxygen plasma etching. The later was also applied to enhance the scaffolds wettability, attaching oxygen-containing groups on their surfaces. This approach produced a porous architecture observed by scanning electron microscopy and semi-quantified by electrochemical analysis. The later also indicated a notable increase on the conductivity of PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO scaffold compared to MWCNTO-GO free PDLLA (about 5 orders of magnitudes at low frequencies). Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the MWCNTO-GO acted protecting the PDLLA matrix, enhancing its thermal stability. The PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO scaffolds had significant cellular adhesion, did not present cytotoxicity effect, besides reduced bactericidal proliferation and produced mineralized tissues in SBF media. The metallic MWCNTO-GO powder held together by PDLLA polymer opens a whole new branch of applications, including bioelectroanalyses, drug delivery systems and tissue engineering. - Highlights: • We produced a novel 3D porous material from PDLLA, graphene oxide and MWCNT oxide. • MWCNTO-GO loading (50/50 w/w) increased notably the conductivity of PDLLA scaffold. • MWCNTO-GO acted protecting the PDLLA matrix, enhancing its thermal stability. • PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO scaffolds did not present cytotoxicity effect. • PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO scaffolds presented bioactivity properties.

  9. Gas anti-solvent precipitation assisted salt leaching for generation of micro- and nano-porous wall in bio-polymeric 3D scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaibani, Marina; Elvassore, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.elvassore@unipd.it

    2012-08-01

    The mass transport through biocompatible and biodegradable polymeric 3D porous scaffolds may be depleted by non-porous impermeable internal walls. As consequence the concentration of metabolites and growth factors within the scaffold may be heterogeneous leading to different cell fate depending on spatial cell location, and in some cases it may compromise cell survival. In this work, we fabricated polymeric scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale porosity by developing a new technique that couples two conventional scaffold production methods: solvent casting-salt leaching and gas antisolvent precipitation. 10-15 w/w solutions of a hyaluronic benzyl esters (HYAFF11) and poly-(lactic acid) (PLA) were used to fill packed beds of 0.177-0.425 mm NaCl crystals. The polymer precipitation in micro and nano-porous structures between the salt crystals was induced by high-pressure gas, then its flushing extracted the residual solvent. The salt was removed by water-wash. Morphological analysis by scanning electron microscopy showed a uniform porosity ({approx} 70%) and a high interconnectivity between porous. The polymeric walls were porous themselves counting for 30% of the total porosity. This wall porosity did not lead to a remarkable change in compressive modulus, deformation, and rupture pressure. Scaffold biocompatibility was tested with murine muscle cell line C2C12 for 4 and 7 days. Viability analysis and histology showed that micro- and nano-porous scaffolds are biocompatible and suitable for 3D cell culture promoting cell adhesion on the polymeric wall and allowing their proliferation in layers. Micro- and nano-scale porosities enhance cell migration and growth in the inner part of the scaffold. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gas anti-solvent precipitation and salt leaching for scaffold fabrication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyaluronic benzyl esters (HYAFF11) and poly-(lactic acid) (PLA) sponges. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gas anti-solvent precipitation

  10. Characterization of mechanical and biological properties of 3-D scaffolds reinforced with zinc oxide for bone tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Feng

    Full Text Available A scaffold for bone tissue engineering should have highly interconnected porous structure, appropriate mechanical and biological properties. In this work, we fabricated well-interconnected porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP scaffolds via selective laser sintering (SLS. We found that the mechanical and biological properties of the scaffolds were improved by doping of zinc oxide (ZnO. Our data showed that the fracture toughness increased from 1.09 to 1.40 MPam(1/2, and the compressive strength increased from 3.01 to 17.89 MPa when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. It is hypothesized that the increase of ZnO would lead to a reduction in grain size and an increase in density of the strut. However, the fracture toughness and compressive strength decreased with further increasing of ZnO content, which may be due to the sharp increase in grain size. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was investigated by analyzing the adhesion and the morphology of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells cultured on the surfaces of the scaffolds. The scaffolds exhibited better and better ability to support cell attachment and proliferation when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. Moreover, a bone like apatite layer formed on the surfaces of the scaffolds after incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF, indicating an ability of osteoinduction and osteoconduction. In summary, interconnected porous β-TCP scaffolds doped with ZnO were successfully fabricated and revealed good mechanical and biological properties, which may be used for bone repair and replacement potentially.

  11. Increasing the strength and bioactivity of collagen scaffolds using customizable arrays of 3D-printed polymer fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdzen, Laura C; Rodgers, Ryan; Banks, Jessica M; Bailey, Ryan C; Harley, Brendan A C

    2016-03-01

    Tendon is a highly aligned connective tissue which transmits force from muscle to bone. Each year, people in the US sustain more than 32 million tendon injuries. To mitigate poor functional outcomes due to scar formation, current surgical techniques rely heavily on autografts. Biomaterial platforms and tissue engineering methods offer an alternative approach to address these injuries. Scaffolds incorporating aligned structural features can promote expansion of adult tenocytes and mesenchymal stem cells capable of tenogenic differentiation. However, appropriate balance between scaffold bioactivity and mechanical strength of these constructs remains challenging. The high porosity required to facilitate cell infiltration, nutrient and oxygen biotransport within three-dimensional constructs typically results in insufficient biomechanical strength. Here we describe the use of three-dimensional printing techniques to create customizable arrays of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) fibers that can be incorporated into a collagen scaffold under development for tendon repair. Notably, mechanical performance of scaffold-fiber composites (elastic modulus, peak stress, strain at peak stress, and toughness) can be selectively manipulated by varying fiber-reinforcement geometry without affecting the native bioactivity of the collagen scaffold. Further, we report an approach to functionalize ABS fibers with activity-inducing growth factors via sequential oxygen plasma and carbodiimide crosslinking treatments. Together, we report an adaptable approach to control both mechanical strength and presence of biomolecular cues in a manner orthogonal to the architecture of the collagen scaffold itself. Tendon injuries account for more than 32 million injuries each year in the US alone. Current techniques use allografts to mitigate poor functional outcomes, but are not ideal platforms to induce functional regeneration following injury. Tissue engineering approaches using biomaterial

  12. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Kai; Li, Ruixin; Jiang, Wenxue; Sun, Yufu; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young’s modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/collagen was fabricated using 3D printing. • Physical characterization and Cell compatibility were compared. • 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance.

  13. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Kai [Tianjin First Center Hospital, No. 24 Fukang Road, Tianjin, TJ 300192 (China); Li, Ruixin [Institute of Medical Equipment, Academy of Military and Medical Sciences, No. 106, Wandong Street, Hedong District, Tianjin 300000 (China); Jiang, Wenxue, E-mail: jiangortholivea@sina.cn [Tianjin First Center Hospital, No. 24 Fukang Road, Tianjin, TJ 300192 (China); Sun, Yufu [Tianjin First Center Hospital, No. 24 Fukang Road, Tianjin, TJ 300192 (China); Li, Hui [Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, No. 154 Anshan Road, Tianjin, TJ 300052 (China)

    2016-09-02

    In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young’s modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/collagen was fabricated using 3D printing. • Physical characterization and Cell compatibility were compared. • 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance.

  14. Robust formulation for the design of tissue engineering scaffolds: A comprehensive study on structural anisotropy, viscoelasticity and degradation of 3D scaffolds fabricated with customized desktop robot based rapid prototyping (DRBRP) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, M Enamul

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates the scaffolds' structural anisotropy (i.e. the effect of loading direction), viscoelasticity (i.e. the effect of cross head speed or strain rate), and the influence of simulated physiological environment (PBS solution at 37°C) on the mechanical properties. Besides, the in vitro degradation study has also been performed that evaluates the effect of variation in material and lay-down pattern on the scaffolds' degradation kinetics in terms of mass loss, and change in morphological and mechanical properties. Porous three dimensional (3D) scaffolds of polycarprolactone (PCL) and polycarprolactone-polyethylene glycol (PCL-PEG) were developed by laying down the microfilaments directionally layer-by-layer using an in-house built computer-controlled extrusion and deposition process, called desktop robot based rapid prototyping (DRBRP) system. The loading direction, strain rate and physiological environment directly influenced the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. In vitro degradation study demonstrated that both PCL and PCL-PEG scaffolds realized homogeneous hydrolytic degradation via surface erosion resulting in a consistent and predictable mass loss. The linear mass loss caused uniform and linear increase in porosity that accordingly led to the decrease in mechanical properties. The synthetic polymer had the potential to modulate hydrophilicity and/or degradability and consequently, the biomechanical properties of the scaffolds by varying the polymer constituents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 3D biomimetic artificial bone scaffolds with dual-cytokines spatiotemporal delivery for large weight-bearing bone defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaogang; Zhu, Lingjun; Huang, Xiaodong; Tang, Dezhi; He, Dannong; Shi, Jiangang; Xu, Guohua

    2017-08-10

    It is a great challenge to prepare "functional artificial bone" for the repair of large segmental defect, especially in weight-bearing bones. In this study, bioactive HA/PCL composite scaffolds that possess anatomical structure as autogenous bone were fabricated by CT-guided fused deposition modeling technique. The scaffolds can provide mechanical support and possess osteoconduction property. Then the VEGF-165/BMP-2 loaded hydrogel was filled into biomimetic artificial bone spatially to introduce osteoinduction and angioinduction ability via sustained release of these cytokines. It has been revealed that the cytokine-loaded hydrogel possessed good biodegradability and could release the VEGF-165/BMP-2 sustainedly and steadily. The synergistic effect of these two cytokines showed significant stimulation on the osteogenic gene expresssion of osteoblast in vitro and ectopic ossification in vivo. The scaffolds were then implanted into the rabbit tibial defect sites (1.2 cm) for bone regeneration for 12 weeks, indicating the best repair of defect in vivo, which was superior to the pure hydrogel/scaffolds or one-cytokine loaded hydrogel/scaffolds and close to autogenous bone graft. The strategy to construct an "anatomy-structure-function" trinity system as functional artificial bone shows great potential in replacing autogenous bone graft and applying in large bone defect repair clinically in future.

  16. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  17. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  18. Preparation and characterization of photocured poly (ε-caprolactone) diacrylate/poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate/chitosan for photopolymerization-type 3D printing tissue engineering scaffold application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yih-Lin; Chen, Freeman

    2017-12-01

    Because of its biocompatible, biodegradable and antimicrobial properties, chitosan is an attractive biomaterial for use in tissue engineering scaffolds. This work builds on previous research by incorporating 95% DD chitosan into a visible-light curable resin which is compatible with a digital light processing (DLP™) projection additive manufacturing (3D printing) system. Different concentrations of chitosan were added to a poly (ε-caprolactone)-diacrylate/poly (ethylene glycol)-diacrylate baseline resin and the samples were extensively characterized. Thermal and mechanical analysis conformed to established scaffold requirements. L929 cells were cultured on the photo-crosslinked films and MTT assays were performed at 1, 3, and 5days to assess cytocompatibility of the resins. Data and SEM images verified a correlation between the concentration of chitosan in the photocurable resin and the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of cell cultures. Finally, the processability of the resins with the dynamic masking DLP system was demonstrated by constructing multi-layer scaffolds with actual measurements that were consistent with the CAD models. These findings encourage the use of chitosan as an additive in visible-light curable resins to improve desired properties in tissue engineering scaffolds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 3D nanocomposite chitosan/bioactive glass scaffolds obtained using two different routes: an evaluation of the porous structure and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke M. F. Lemos

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous synthetic substrates are developed through tissue engineering technologies to grow new tissue, restoring the function of tissue or an organ. For bone regeneration, these scaffolds must support the dynamic load exerted on this tissue, achieved primarily by increasing their compression strength, as established in the literature. The aim of this paper was to incorporate an inorganic composite bioactive glass (60%SiO2 - 36%CaO - 4%P2O5 as a reinforcing agent in mechanical 3D scaffolds that must remain porous. Two strategies were adopted: a co-precipitation method to obtain a nanoparticulate dispersion of bioactive glass (BGNP and a sol-gel method to combine a bioactive glass solution (BG with a previously prepared chitosan polymer solution. Moreover, a lyophilization process was also used, generating highly porous scaffolds. Various aspects of the scaffold were evaluated, including the morphology, orientation and size of the pores, and mechanical strength, as obtained using the two synthetic methods. The data for compressive strength revealed increased strength after the incorporation of bioactive glass, which was more pronounced when utilizing the nanoscale bioactive glass.

  20. A comparison of the influence of material on in vitro cartilage tissue engineering with PCL, PGS, and POC 3D scaffold architecture seeded with chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Claire G; Hollister, Scott J

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this study was to determine material effects on cartilage regeneration for scaffolds with the same controlled architecture. The 3D polycaprolactone (PCL), poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS), and poly (1,8 octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) scaffolds of the same design were physically characterized and tissue regeneration in terms of cell phenotype, cellular proliferation and differentiation, and matrix production were compared to find which material would be most optimal for cartilage regeneration in vitro. POC provided the best support for cartilage regeneration in terms of tissue ingrowth, matrix production, and relative mRNA expressions for chondrocyte differentiation (Col2/Col1). PGS was seen as the least favorable material for cartilage based on its relatively high de-differentiation (Col1), hypertrophic mRNA expression (Col10) and high matrix degradation (MMP13, MMP3) results. PCL still provided microenvironments suitable for cells to be active yet it seemed to cause de-differentiation (Col1) of chondrocytes inside the scaffold while many cells migrated out, growing cartilage outside the scaffold. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cationic osteogenic peptide P15-CSP coatings promote 3-D osteogenesis in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) scaffolds of distinct pore size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Ghavidel Mehr, Nima; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Favis, Basil D; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2017-08-01

    P15-CSP is a biomimetic cationic fusion peptide that stimulates osteogenesis and inhibits bacterial biofilm formation when coated on 2-D surfaces. This study tested the hypothesis that P15-CSP coatings enhance 3-D osteogenesis in a porous but otherwise hydrophobic poly-(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold. Scaffolds of 84 µm and 141 µm average pore size were coated or not with Layer-by-Layer polyelectrolytes followed by P15-CSP, seeded with adult primary human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cultured 10 days in proliferation medium, then 21 days in osteogenic medium. Atomic analyses showed that P15-CSP was successfully captured by LbL. After 2 days of culture, MSCs adhered and spread more on P15-CSP coated pores than PCL-only. At day 10, all constructs contained nonmineralized tissue. At day 31, all constructs became enveloped in a "skin" of tissue that, like 2-D cultures, underwent sporadic mineralization in areas of high cell density that extended into some 141 µm edge pores. By quantitative histomorphometry, 2.5-fold more tissue and biomineral accumulated in edge pores versus inner pores. P15-CSP specifically promoted tissue-scaffold integration, fourfold higher overall biomineralization, and more mineral deposits in the outer 84 µm and inner 141 µm pores than PCL-only (p pore surfaces with 3-D topography. Biomineralization deeper than 150 µm from the scaffold edge was optimally attained with the larger 141 µm peptide-coated pores. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2171-2181, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Scaffold-Free Tubular Tissues Created by a Bio-3D Printer Undergo Remodeling and Endothelialization when Implanted in Rat Aortae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Itoh

    Full Text Available Small caliber vascular prostheses are not clinically available because synthetic vascular prostheses lack endothelial cells which modulate platelet activation, leukocyte adhesion, thrombosis, and the regulation of vasomotor tone by the production of vasoactive substances. We developed a novel method to create scaffold-free tubular tissue from multicellular spheroids (MCS using a "Bio-3D printer"-based system. This system enables the creation of pre-designed three-dimensional structures using a computer controlled robotics system. With this system, we created a tubular structure and studied its biological features.Using a "Bio-3D printer," we made scaffold-free tubular tissues (inner diameter of 1.5 mm from a total of 500 MCSs (2.5× 104 cells per one MCS composed of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (40%, human aortic smooth muscle cells (10%, and normal human dermal fibroblasts (50%. The tubular tissues were cultured in a perfusion system and implanted into the abdominal aortas of F344 nude rats. We assessed the flow by ultrasonography and performed histological examinations on the second (n = 5 and fifth (n = 5 day after implantation. All grafts were patent and remodeling of the tubular tissues (enlargement of the lumen area and thinning of the wall was observed. A layer of endothelial cells was confirmed five days after implantation.The scaffold-free tubular tissues made of MCS using a Bio-3D printer underwent remodeling and endothelialization. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanism of endothelialization and its function, as well as the long-term results.

  3. Scaffold-Free Tubular Tissues Created by a Bio-3D Printer Undergo Remodeling and Endothelialization when Implanted in Rat Aortae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Manabu; Nakayama, Koichi; Noguchi, Ryo; Kamohara, Keiji; Furukawa, Kojirou; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Toda, Shuji; Oyama, Jun-Ichi; Node, Koichi; Morita, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Small caliber vascular prostheses are not clinically available because synthetic vascular prostheses lack endothelial cells which modulate platelet activation, leukocyte adhesion, thrombosis, and the regulation of vasomotor tone by the production of vasoactive substances. We developed a novel method to create scaffold-free tubular tissue from multicellular spheroids (MCS) using a "Bio-3D printer"-based system. This system enables the creation of pre-designed three-dimensional structures using a computer controlled robotics system. With this system, we created a tubular structure and studied its biological features. Using a "Bio-3D printer," we made scaffold-free tubular tissues (inner diameter of 1.5 mm) from a total of 500 MCSs (2.5× 104 cells per one MCS) composed of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (40%), human aortic smooth muscle cells (10%), and normal human dermal fibroblasts (50%). The tubular tissues were cultured in a perfusion system and implanted into the abdominal aortas of F344 nude rats. We assessed the flow by ultrasonography and performed histological examinations on the second (n = 5) and fifth (n = 5) day after implantation. All grafts were patent and remodeling of the tubular tissues (enlargement of the lumen area and thinning of the wall) was observed. A layer of endothelial cells was confirmed five days after implantation. The scaffold-free tubular tissues made of MCS using a Bio-3D printer underwent remodeling and endothelialization. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanism of endothelialization and its function, as well as the long-term results.

  4. Efficacy of rhBMP-2 Loaded PCL/β-TCP/bdECM Scaffold Fabricated by 3D Printing Technology on Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Bin Bae

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of 3D printed polycaprolactone (PCL/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP scaffold containing bone demineralized and decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM and human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 on bone regeneration. Scaffolds were divided into PCL/β-TCP, PCL/β-TCP/bdECM, and PCL/β-TCP/bdECM/BMP groups. In vitro release kinetics of rhBMP-2 were determined with respect to cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. These three reconstructive materials were implanted into 8 mm diameter calvarial bone defect in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were sacrificed four weeks after implantation for micro-CT, histologic, and histomorphometric analyses. The findings obtained were used to calculate new bone volumes (mm3 and new bone areas (%. Excellent cell bioactivity was observed in the PCL/β-TCP/bdECM and PCL/β-TCP/bdECM/BMP groups, and new bone volume and area were significantly higher in the PCL/β-TCP/bdECM/BMP group than in the other groups (p<.05. Within the limitations of this study, bdECM printed PCL/β-TCP scaffolds can reproduce microenvironment for cells and promote adhering and proliferating the cells onto scaffolds. Furthermore, in the rat calvarial defect model, the scaffold which printed rhBMP-2 loaded bdECM stably carries rhBMP-2 and enhances bone regeneration confirming the possibility of bdECM as rhBMP-2 carrier.

  5. High-efficiency pyrene-based blue light emitting diodes: Aggregation suppression using a calixarene 3D-scaffold

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Khaileok

    2012-01-01

    An efficient blue light emitting diode based on solution processable pyrene-1,3-alt-calix[4]arene is demonstrated, providing a record current efficiency of 10.5 cd A -1 in a simple non-doped OLED configuration. Complete suppression of pyrene aggregation in the solid state is achieved by controlling chromophore dispersion using the 1,3-alt-calix[4]arene scaffold. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. SiO2 and ZnO Dopants in 3D Printed TCP Scaffolds Enhances Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Gary; Bose, Susmita

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds with three dimensionally (3D) interconnected pores play an important role in mechanical interlocking and biological fixation in bone implant applications. CaPs alone, however, are only osteoconductive (ability to guide bone growth). Much attention has been given to the incorporation of biologics and pharmacologics to add osteoinductive (ability to cause new bone growth) properties to CaP materials. Because biologics and pharmacologics are generally delicate compounds and also subject to increased regulatory scrutiny, there is a need to investigate alternative methods to introduce osteoinductivity to CaP materials. In this study silica (SiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been incorporated in to 3D printed β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds to investigate their potential to trigger osteoinduction in vivo. Silicon and zinc are trace elements that are common to bone and have also been shown to have many beneficial properties from increased bone regeneration to angiogenesis. Implants were placed in bicortical femur defects introduced to a murine model for up to 16 weeks. Addition of dopants into TCP increased the capacity for new early bone formation by modulating collagen I production and osteocalcin production. Neovascularization was found to be up to three times more than the pure TCP control group. The findings from this study indicate that the combination of SiO2 and ZnO dopants in TCP may be a viable alternative to introduce osteoinductive properties to CaPs. PMID:23871941

  7. 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamic simulations for prediction of new Hsp90 inhibitors based on isoxazole scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Maryam; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Amanlou, Massoud

    2018-05-01

    Heat shock protein 90(Hsp90), as a molecular chaperone, play a crucial role in folding and proper function of many proteins. Hsp90 inhibitors containing isoxazole scaffold are currently being used in the treatment of cancer as tumor suppressers. Here in the present studies, new compounds based on isoxazole scaffold were predicted using a combination of molecular modeling techniques including three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR), molecular docking and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were also done. The steric and electrostatic contour map of CoMFA and CoMSIA were created. Hydrophobic, hydrogen bond donor and acceptor of CoMSIA model also were generated, and new compounds were predicted by CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps. To investigate the binding modes of the predicted compounds in the active site of Hsp90, a molecular docking simulation was carried out. MD simulations were also conducted to evaluate the obtained results on the best predicted compound and the best reported Hsp90 inhibitors in the 3D-QSAR model. Findings indicate that the predicted ligands were stable in the active site of Hsp90.

  8. Development, Characterization and Cell Cultural Response of 3D Biocompatible Micro-Patterned Poly-ε-Caprolactone Scaffolds Designed and Fabricated Integrating Lithography and Micromolding Fabrication Techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Limongi, Tania

    2014-12-12

    Scaffold design and fabrication are very important subjects for biomaterial, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine research playing a unique role in tissue regeneration and repair. Among synthetic biomaterials Poly-ε- Caprolactone (PCL) is very attractive bioresorbable polyester due to its high permeability, biodegradability and capacity to be blended with other biopolymers. Thanks to its ability to naturally degrade in tissues, PCL has a great potential as a new material for implantable biomedical micro devices. This work focuses on the establishment of a micro fabrication process, by integrating lithography and micromolding fabrication techniques, for the realization of 3D microstructure PCL devices. Scaffold surface exhibits a combination in the patterned length scale; cylindrical pillars of 10 μm height and 10 μm diameter are arranged in a hexagonal lattice with periodicity of 30 μm and their sidewalls are nano-sculptured, with a regular pattern of grooves leading to a spatial modulation in the z direction. In order to demonstrate that these biocompatible pillared PCL substrates are suitable for a proper cell growth, NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts were seeded on them and cells key adhesion parameters were evaluated. Scanning Electron Microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis were carried out to check cell survival, proliferation and adhesion; cells growing on the PCL substrates appeared healthy and formed a well-developed network in close contact with the micro and nano features of the pillared surface. Those 3D scaffolds could be a promising solution for a wide range of applications within tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  9. Delivery of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor by 3D Biocompatible Polymeric Scaffolds for Neural Tissue Engineering and Neuronal Regeneration

    KAUST Repository

    Limongi, Tania

    2018-04-04

    Biopolymers are increasingly employed for neuroscience applications as scaffolds to drive and promote neural regrowth, thanks to their ability to mediate the upload and subsequent release of active molecules and drugs. Synthetic degradable polymers are characterized by different responses ranging from tunable distension or shrinkage to total dissolution, depending on the function they are designed for. In this paper we present a biocompatible microfabricated poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffold for primary neuron growth and maturation that has been optimized for the in vitro controlled release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We demonstrate that the designed morphology confers to these devices an enhanced drug delivery capability with respect to monolithic unstructured supports. After incubation with BDNF, micropillared PCL devices progressively release the neurotrophin over 21 days in vitro. Moreover, the bioactivity of released BDNF is confirmed using primary neuronal cultures, where it mediates a consistent activation of BDNF signaling cascades, increased synaptic density, and neuronal survival. These results provide the proof-of-principle on the fabrication process of micropatterned PCL devices, which represent a promising therapeutic option to enhance neuronal regeneration after lesion and for neural tissue engineering and prosthetics.

  10. Sulfophenyl-Functionalized Reduced Graphene Oxide Networks on Electrospun 3D Scaffold for Ultrasensitive NO2 Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Bin; Guo, Yunlong; Shen, Nannan; Xiao, Anshan; Li, Mingjun; Zhu, Liang; Wan, Pengbo; Sun, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasensitive room temperature real-time NO2 sensors are highly desirable due to potential threats on environmental security and personal respiratory. Traditional NO2 gas sensors with highly operated temperatures (200–600 °C) and limited reversibility are mainly constructed from semiconducting oxide-deposited ceramic tubes or inter-finger probes. Herein, we report the functionalized graphene network film sensors assembled on an electrospun three-dimensional (3D) nanonetwork skeleton for ultr...

  11. p38 MAPK mediated in compressive stress-induced chondrogenesis of rat bone marrow MSCs in 3D alginate scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhao, Zhihe; Yang, Jingyuan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yurong

    2009-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known to have the capability to form bone and cartilage, and chondrogenesis derived from MSCs is reported to be affected by mechanical stimuli. This research was aimed to study the effects of cyclic compressive stress on the chondrogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs) which were encapsulated in alginate scaffolds and cultured with or without chondrogenic medium, and to investigate the role of p38 MAPK phospho-relay cascade in this process. The results show that the gene expression of chondrocyte-specific markers of Col2alpha1, aggrecan, Sox9, Runx2, and Ihh was upregulated by dynamic compressive stress introduced at the 8th day of chondrogenic differentiation in vitro. The p38 MAPK was activated by chondrogenic cytokines in a slow and lagged way, but activated by cyclic compressive stimulation in a rapid and transient manner. And inhibition of p38 activity with SB203580 suppressed gene expression of chondrocyte-specific genes stimulated by chondrogenic medium and (or) cyclic compressive stress. These findings suggest that p38 MAPK signal acts as an essential mediator in the mechano-biochemical transduction and subsequent transcriptional regulation in the process of chondrogenesis.

  12. Validation of TZD Scaffold as Potential ARIs: Pharmacophore Modeling, Atom-based 3D QSAR and Docking Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Lalita; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kaur, Ramandeep; Kumar, Vipin; Kumar, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic disorders associated with diabetic patients are a serious concern. Aldose reductase (ALR2) has been identified as first rate-limiting enzyme in the polyol pathway which catalyzes the reduction of glucose to sorbitol. It represents one of the validated targets to develop potential new chemical entities for the prevention and subsequent progression of microvascular diabetic complications. In order to further understand the intricate structural prerequisites of molecules to act as ALR2 inhibitors, ligand-based pharmacophore model, atombased 3D-QSAR and structure based drug design studies have been performed on a series of 2,4- thiazolidinedione derivatives with ALR2 inhibitory activity. In the present study, a validated six point pharmacophore model (AAADNR) with three hydrogen bond acceptor (A), one hydrogen bond donor (D), one negative ionic group (N) and one aromatic ring (R) was developed using PHASE module of Schrodinger suite with acceptable PLS statistics (survival score = 3.871, cross-validated correlation coefficient Q2 = 0.6902, correlation coefficient of multiple determination r2 = 0.9019, Pearson-R coefficient = 0.8354 and F distribution = 196.2). In silico predictive studies (pharmacophore modeling, atom-based 3D QSAR and docking combined with drug receptor binding free energetics and pharmacokinetic drug profile) highlighted some of the important structural features of thiazolidinedione analogs required for potential ALR2 inhibitory activity. The result of these studies may account to design a legitimate template for rational drug design of novel, potent and promising ALR2 inhibitors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Magnesium Catalyzed Polymerization of End Functionalized Poly(propylene maleate) and Poly(propylene fumarate) for 3D Printing of Bioactive Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James A; Luong, Derek; Kleinfehn, Alex P; Sallam, Sahar; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Becker, Matthew L

    2018-01-10

    The ring-opening copolymerization of maleic anhydride and propylene oxide, using a functionalized primary alcohol initiator and magnesium 2,6-di-tert-butyl phenoxide as a catalyst, was investigated in order to produce high end-group fidelity poly(propylene maleate). Subsequent isomerization of the material into 3D printable poly(propylene fumarate) was utilized to produce thin films and scaffolds possessing groups that can be modified with bioactive groups postpolymerization and postprinting. The surface concentration of these modifiable groups was determined to be 30.0 ± 3.3 pmol·cm -2 , and copper-mediated azide-alkyne cycloaddition was used to attach a small molecule dye and cell adhesive GRGDS peptides to the surface as a model system. The films were then studied for cytotoxicity and found to have high cell viability before and after surface modification.

  14. 3D-Printed Poly(ε-caprolactone) Scaffold Augmented With Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Total Meniscal Substitution: A 12- and 24-Week Animal Study in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng-Zheng; Wang, Shao-Jie; Zhang, Ji-Ying; Jiang, Wen-Bo; Huang, Ai-Bing; Qi, Yan-Song; Ding, Jian-Xun; Chen, Xue-Si; Jiang, Dong; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2017-06-01

    Total meniscectomy leads to knee osteoarthritis in the long term. The poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold is a promising material for meniscal tissue regeneration, but cell-free scaffolds result in relatively poor tissue regeneration and lead to joint degeneration. A novel, 3-dimensional (3D)-printed PCL scaffold augmented with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) would offer benefits in meniscal regeneration and cartilage protection. Controlled laboratory study. PCL meniscal scaffolds were 3D printed and seeded with bone marrow-derived MSCs. Seventy-two New Zealand White rabbits were included and were divided into 4 groups: cell-seeded scaffold, cell-free scaffold, sham operation, and total meniscectomy alone. The regeneration of the implanted tissue and the degeneration of articular cartilage were assessed by gross and microscopic (histological and scanning electron microscope) analysis at 12 and 24 weeks postoperatively. The mechanical properties of implants were also evaluated (tensile and compressive testing). Compared with the cell-free group, the cell-seeded scaffold showed notably better gross appearance, with a shiny white color and a smooth surface. Fibrochondrocytes with extracellular collagen type I, II, and III and proteoglycans were found in both seeded and cell-free scaffold implants at 12 and 24 weeks, while the results were significantly better for the cell-seeded group at week 24. Furthermore, the cell-seeded group presented notably lower cartilage degeneration in both femur and tibia compared with the cell-free or meniscectomy group. Both the tensile and compressive properties of the implants in the cell-seeded group were significantly increased compared with those of the cell-free group. Seeding MSCs in the PCL scaffold increased its fibrocartilaginous tissue regeneration and mechanical strength, providing a functional replacement to protect articular cartilage from damage after total meniscectomy. The study suggests the potential of the novel 3D PCL

  15. Human Rett-derived neuronal progenitor cells in 3D graphene scaffold as an in vitro platform to study the effect of electrical stimulation on neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Mattiassi, Sabrina; Loeblein, Manuela; Chin, Eunice; Ma, DongLiang; Coquet, Philippe; Viasnoff, Virgile; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Goh, Eyleen L; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2018-03-21

    Studies of electrical stimulation therapies for the treatment of neurological disorders, such as deep brain stimulation, have almost exclusively been performed using animal-models. However, because animal-models can only approximate human brain disorders, these studies should be supplemented with an in vitro human cell-culture based model to substantiate the results of animal-based studies and further investigate therapeutic benefit in humans. This study presents a novel approach to analyze the effect of electrical stimulation on the neurogenesis of patient-induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) derived neural progenitor cell (NPC) lines, in vitro using a 3D graphene scaffold system. The iPSC-derived hNPCs used to demonstrate the system were collected from patients with Rett syndrome, a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder. The graphene scaffold readily supported both the wild-type and Rett NPCs. Electrical stimulation parameters were optimized to accommodate both wild-type and Rett cells. Increased cell maturation and improvements in cell morphology of the Rett cells was observed after electrical stimulation. The results of the pilot study of electrical stimulation to enhance Rett NPCs neurogenesis were promising and support further investigation of the therapy. Overall, this system provides a valuable tool to study electrical stimulation as a potential therapy for neurological disorders using patient-specific cells.

  16. Human Periodontal Ligament- and Gingiva-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Nerve Regeneration When Encapsulated in Alginate/Hyaluronic Acid 3D Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sahar; Diniz, Ivana M; Chen, Chider; Sarrion, Patricia; Tamayol, Ali; Wu, Benjamin M; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2017-12-01

    Repair or regeneration of damaged nerves is still a challenging clinical task in reconstructive surgeries and regenerative medicine. Here, it is demonstrated that periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) isolated from adult human periodontal and gingival tissues assume neuronal phenotype in vitro and in vivo via a subcutaneous transplantation model in nude mice. PDLSCs and GMSCs are encapsulated in a 3D scaffold based on alginate and hyaluronic acid hydrogels capable of sustained release of human nerve growth factor (NGF). The elasticity of the hydrogels affects the proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated MSCs within scaffolds. Moreover, it is observed that PDLSCs and GMSCs are stained positive for βIII-tubulin, while exhibiting high levels of gene expression related to neurogenic differentiation (βIII-tubulin and glial fibrillary acidic protein) via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Western blot analysis shows the importance of elasticity of the matrix and the presence of NGF in the neurogenic differentiation of encapsulated MSCs. In vivo, immunofluorescence staining for neurogenic specific protein markers confirms islands of dense positively stained structures inside transplanted hydrogels. As far as it is known, this study is the first demonstration of the application of PDLSCs and GMSCs as promising cell therapy candidates for nerve regeneration. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Differential osteogenicity of multiple donor-derived human mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts in monolayer, scaffold-based 3D culture and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quent, Verena M C; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Reichert, Johannes C

    2016-06-01

    We set out to compare the osteogenicity of human mesenchymal stem (hMSCs) and osteoblasts (hOBs). Upon osteogenic induction in monolayer, hMSCs showed superior matrix mineralization expressing characteristic bone-related genes. For scaffold cultures, both cell types presented spindle-shaped, osteoblast-like morphologies forming a dense, interconnected network of high viability. On the scaffolds, hOBs proliferated faster. A general upregulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), osteoprotegrin (OPG), receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), sclerostin (SOST), and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) was observed for both cell types. Simultaneously, PTHrP, RANKL and DMP-1 expression decreased under osteogenic stimulation, while OPG and SOST increased significantly. Following transplantation into NOD/SCID mice, μCT and histology showed increased bone deposition with hOBs. The bone was vascularized, and amounts further increased for both cell types after recombinant human bone morphogenic protein 7 (rhBMP-7) addition also stimulating osteoclastogenesis. Complete bone organogenesis was evidenced by the presence of osteocytes and hematopoietic precursors. Our study results support the asking to develop 3D cellular models closely mimicking the functions of living tissues suitable for in vivo translation.

  18. Medium-Term Function of a 3D Printed TCP/HA Structure as a New Osteoconductive Scaffold for Vertical Bone Augmentation: A Simulation by BMP-2 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Moussa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A 3D-printed construct made of orthogonally layered strands of tricalcium phosphate (TCP and hydroxyapatite has recently become available. The material provides excellent osteoconductivity. We simulated a medium-term experiment in a sheep calvarial model by priming the blocks with BMP-2. Vertical bone growth/maturation and material resorption were evaluated. Materials and methods: Titanium hemispherical caps were filled with either bare- or BMP-2 primed constructs and placed onto the calvaria of adult sheep (n = 8. Histomorphometry was performed after 8 and 16 weeks. Results: After 8 weeks, relative to bare constructs, BMP-2 stimulation led to a two-fold increase in bone volume (Bare: 22% ± 2.1%; BMP-2 primed: 50% ± 3% and a 3-fold decrease in substitute volume (Bare: 47% ± 5%; BMP-2 primed: 18% ± 2%. These rates were still observed at 16 weeks. The new bone grew and matured to a haversian-like structure while the substitute material resorbed via cell- and chemical-mediation. Conclusion: By priming the 3D construct with BMP-2, bone metabolism was physiologically accelerated, that is, enhancing vertical bone growth and maturation as well as material bioresorption. The scaffolding function of the block was maintained, leaving time for the bone to grow and mature to a haversian-like structure. In parallel, the material resorbed via cell-mediated and chemical processes. These promising results must be confirmed in clinical tests.

  19. Development and Assessment of a 3D-Printed Scaffold with rhBMP-2 for an Implant Surgical Guide Stent and Bone Graft Material: A Pilot Animal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Cheol Bae

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new concept of a 3D-printed scaffold was introduced for the accurate placement of an implant and the application of a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2-loaded bone graft. This preliminary study was conducted using two adult beagles to evaluate the 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP/bone decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 for the simultaneous use as an implant surgical guide stent and bone graft material that promotes new bone growth. Teeth were extracted from the mandible of the beagle model and scanned by computed tomography (CT to fabricate a customized scaffold that would fit the bone defect. After positioning the implant guide scaffold, the implant was placed and rhBMP-2 was injected into the scaffold of the experimental group. The two beagles were sacrificed after three months. The specimen block was obtained and scanned by micro-CT. Histological analysis showed that the control and experimental groups had similar new bone volume (NBV, % but the experimental group with BMP exhibited a significantly higher bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %. Within the limitations of this preliminary study, a 3D-printed scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 can be used simultaneously as an implant surgical guide and a bone graft in a large bone defect site. Further large-scale studies will be needed to confirm these results.

  20. Development and Assessment of a 3D-Printed Scaffold with rhBMP-2 for an Implant Surgical Guide Stent and Bone Graft Material: A Pilot Animal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jin-Ju; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Park, Keun-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Seok; Bae, Eun-Bin; Choi, Jae-Won; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new concept of a 3D-printed scaffold was introduced for the accurate placement of an implant and the application of a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)-loaded bone graft. This preliminary study was conducted using two adult beagles to evaluate the 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/bone decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM) scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 for the simultaneous use as an implant surgical guide stent and bone graft material that promotes new bone growth. Teeth were extracted from the mandible of the beagle model and scanned by computed tomography (CT) to fabricate a customized scaffold that would fit the bone defect. After positioning the implant guide scaffold, the implant was placed and rhBMP-2 was injected into the scaffold of the experimental group. The two beagles were sacrificed after three months. The specimen block was obtained and scanned by micro-CT. Histological analysis showed that the control and experimental groups had similar new bone volume (NBV, %) but the experimental group with BMP exhibited a significantly higher bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %). Within the limitations of this preliminary study, a 3D-printed scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 can be used simultaneously as an implant surgical guide and a bone graft in a large bone defect site. Further large-scale studies will be needed to confirm these results. PMID:29258172

  1. Three dimensional poly(ε-caprolactone) and silk fibroin nanocomposite fibrous matrix for artificial dermis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Min; Chae, Taesik; Sheikh, Faheem A.; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Hyun Jung; Park, Ye Ri; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-01-01

    Ideal dermal substitutes should have comparable physicochemical and biological properties to the natural skin tissue. In this study, we report a novel strategy to “engineer” controlled 3D nanocomposite fibrous matrix of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and silk fibroin (SF) for an artificial dermis application. Using a custom-designed cold-plate electrospinning and automatic magnet agitation system, up to 6 mm of the thickness was achieved resulting from the accumulation of ice crystal layers on the PCL nanofibers surface-modified with the SF particles. The sacrificed ice crystals induced interconnected macro-pores ranging from tens to hundreds μm. The agitation system introduced uniform distribution of the SF protein within/on the nanofibers, preventing the particles from precipitation and agglomeration. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts proliferated in vitro on the PCL and PCL/SF scaffolds for 7 days, but there was no statistical difference between the groups. Conversely, In vivo rat model studies revealed that the wound healing rate and collagen deposition increased with the SF content within the nanocomposites. The unique 3D construct with the PCL/SF nanocomposite fibers provided desirable spatial cues, surface topography, and surface chemistry for the native cells to infiltrate into the scaffolds. The wound healing potential of the nanocomposites was comparable to the commercial Matriderm® artificial dermis. - Highlights: • 3D macro-porous tissue engineering scaffold constructed with PCL nanofibers and SF nanoparticles. • Fabrication of the PCL/SF nanocomposite fibrous scaffold via a custom-designed cold plate electrospinning (CPE) and automatic magnet agitation (AMA) system. • Comparable wound healing capacity of the PCL/SF scaffolds to the commercial Matriderm® artificial dermis.

  2. Development of regenerative and flexible fibroin-based wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Angelica; Paladini, Federica; Pollini, Mauro

    2018-02-16

    Skin injuries represent a health problem with consequences in terms of morbidity, disability and life quality. Numerous strategies have been developed for the treatment of wounds, including skin substitutes, biomembranes, scaffolds, and smart dressings. The excellent properties of fibroin can be exploited for the development of advanced wound dressing biomaterials, aiming at promoting the wound healing process. In this work, silk fibroin films modified through the addition of glucose were developed to enhance flexibility of medical device without affecting the biocompatibility, to promote wound healing and to improve the patient well-being. The glucose/fibroin blend was characterized through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry to analyze the protein structure. Absorption capacity, mechanical properties, wettability and bacterial biofilm formation on silk fibroin films were also analyzed to study the effect of the addition of a plasticizer on the properties of the wound dressing. The stability of the films was analyzed through in vitro biodegradability tests. The biocompatibility and regenerative properties were demonstrated through appropriate cellular assays. The results demonstrated that the addition of glucose induced crystallization and provided good flexibility and absorption capacity of silk fibroin films. Glucose modified silk fibroin films were biocompatible and had a positive effect in promoting the wound closure. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Silver nanoparticle containing silk fibroin bionanotextiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calamak, Semih; Aksoy, Eda Ayse [Hacettepe University, Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy (Turkey); Erdogdu, Ceren; Sagıroglu, Meral [Hacettepe University, Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy (Turkey); Ulubayram, Kezban, E-mail: ukezban@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy (Turkey)

    2015-02-15

    Development of new generation bionanotextiles is an important growing field, and they have found applications as wound dressings, bandages, tissue scaffolds, etc. In this study, silver nanoparticle (AgNP) containing silk-based bionanotextiles were fabricated by electrospinning, and processing parameters were optimized and discussed in detail. AgNPs were in situ synthesized within fibroin nanofibers by UV reduction of silver ions to metallic silver. The influence of post-treatments via methanol treatment and glutaraldehyde (GA) vapor exhibited changes in the secondary structure of silk. Methanol treatment increased the tensile properties of fibers due to supported crystalline silk structure, while GA vapor promoted amorphous secondary structure. AgNP containing silk fibroin bionanotextiles had strong antibacterial activity against gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  4. Comparison of the Ex Vivo Expansion of UCB-Derived CD34+ in 3D DBM/MBA Scaffolds with USSC as a Feeder Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat Hashemi, Zahra; Forouzandeh Moghadam, Mahdi; Soleimani, Masoud

    2013-10-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoitic stem cells is an alternative way to increase umbilical cord blood (UCB)-CD34+ cells for bone marrow transplantation. For this purpose demineralized bone matrix (DBM) and mineralized bone allograft (MBA) as two scaffolds based on bone matrix and stem cell niche, were simultaneously used to enhance the effect of human mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) - unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) - as a feeder layer. USSCs were isolated and characterized by morphological and immunological analysis then seeded on both scaffolds as a feeder layer. UCB-CD34(+) were isolated by MACS method and were co-culture expanded by USSC in 3D and 2D environments. After 3 weeks expansion, cells were counted and were assessed by karyotype, flow cytometry, clonogenic activity, and long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC). Co-culture expansion in DBM and MBA was 29.22-fold and 27.77-fold, no significant differences in colony and LTC-IC were obtained. Maximum number of colonies belonged to the day 14 with the 73% CFU-GM (Colony Forming Unit- Granulocyte/Macrophage) in contrast to the day 0 which was BFU-E/CFU-E (Burst/Colony Forming Unit-Erythroid). Flow cytometry indicated that the percentage of CD34+ marker was decreased in USSC co-culture and the highest percentage was observed in simple 2D culture. Because of acid extraction in the DBM production process, mineral materials were removed and the protein background that was more flexible was presented. Therefore these results suggest that USSC-DBM can be a suitable ex vivo mimicry niche by intensifying of surface/volume ratio and supporting the stem cell differentiation and expansion.

  5. A Review of Structure Construction of Silk Fibroin Biomaterials from Single Structures to Multi-Level Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The biological performance of artificial biomaterials is closely related to their structure characteristics. Cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation are all strongly affected by the different scale structures of biomaterials. Silk fibroin (SF, extracted mainly from silkworms, has become a popular biomaterial due to its excellent biocompatibility, exceptional mechanical properties, tunable degradation, ease of processing, and sufficient supply. As a material with excellent processability, SF can be processed into various forms with different structures, including particulate, fiber, film, and three-dimensional (3D porous scaffolds. This review discusses and summarizes the various constructions of SF-based materials, from single structures to multi-level structures, and their applications. In combination with single structures, new techniques for creating special multi-level structures of SF-based materials, such as micropatterning and 3D-printing, are also briefly addressed.

  6. Studies of a new class of high electro-thermal performing Polyimide embedded with 3D scaffold in the harsh environment of outer space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeblein, Manuela; Bolker, Asaf; Tsang, Siu Hon; Atar, Nurit; Uzan-Saguy, Cecile; Verker, Ronen; Gouzman, Irina; Grossman, Eitan; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    The polymer class of Polyimides (PIs) has been wide-spread in the use of outer space coatings due to their chemical stability and flexibility. Nevertheless, their poor thermal conductivity and completely electrically insulating characteristics have caused severe limitations, such as thermal management challenges and spacecraft electrostatic charging, which forces the use of additional materials such as brittle ITO in order to completely resist the harsh environment of space. For this reason, we developed a new composite material via infiltration of PI with a 3D scaffold which improves PIs performance and resilience and enables the use of only a single flexible material to protect spacecraft. Here we present a study of this new material based on outer-space environment simulated on ground. It includes an exhaustive range of tests simulating space environments in accordance with European Cooperation for Space Standard (ECSS), which includes atomic oxygen (AO) etching, Gamma-ray exposure and outgassing properties over extended periods of time and under strenuous mechanical bending and thermal annealing cycles. Measurement methods for the harsh environment of space and the obtained results will be presented.

  7. Design and Fabrication of 3D printed Scaffolds with a Mechanical Strength Comparable to Cortical Bone to Repair Large Bone Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Newman, Peter; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in regenerating large bone defects under load is to create scaffolds with large and interconnected pores while providing a compressive strength comparable to cortical bone (100-150 MPa). Here we design a novel hexagonal architecture for a glass-ceramic scaffold to fabricate an anisotropic, highly porous three dimensional scaffolds with a compressive strength of 110 MPa. Scaffolds with hexagonal design demonstrated a high fatigue resistance (1,000,000 cycles at 1-10 MPa compressive cyclic load), failure reliability and flexural strength (30 MPa) compared with those for conventional architecture. The obtained strength is 150 times greater than values reported for polymeric and composite scaffolds and 5 times greater than reported values for ceramic and glass scaffolds at similar porosity. These scaffolds open avenues for treatment of load bearing bone defects in orthopaedic, dental and maxillofacial applications.

  8. Enhancing surface properties of breast implants by using electrospun silk fibroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Lazcano, A A; Román-Doval, R; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Millán-Casarrubias, E J; Rodríguez-Ortega, A

    2017-08-24

    In the present study, a new electrospun silk fibroin coating of silicone breast implants with improved biocompatibility and mechanical properties was obtained. Fibrous scaffolds were produced by electrospinning a solution containing silk fibroin, derived from Bombyx mori cocoons, and polyethylene oxide (PEO) to be used as a coating of breast implants. A randomly oriented structure of fibroin/PEO was electrospun on implants as assessed by SEM analysis, roughness measurements and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. The scaffold showed 0.25 µm diameter fibres, 0.76 µm size superficial pores, arithmetic roughness of 0.632 ± 0.12 µm and texture aspect ratio of 0.893 ± 0.04. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy demonstrates the presence of PEO and fibroin in the coating. The mechanical characterisation of the implants before and after being coated with fibroin/PEO demonstrated that the fibroin/PEO scaffold contributes to the increase in the elastic modulus from 0.392 ± 0.02 to 0.560 ± 0.03 MPa and to a more elastic behaviour of the breast implants. Using the fibroin/PEO coating, human fibroblasts seeded on this matrix increased viability up to 30% compared to conventional breast implants. Electrospun silk fibroin could represent a clinically compatible, viable form to coat breast implants. Low cytotoxicity by the fibroin coating and its physico-chemical and mechanical properties may find application in improving breast implants biocompatibility. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Novel 3D porous semi-IPN hydrogel scaffolds of silk sericin and poly(N-hydroxyethyl acrylamide for dermal reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ross

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a novel semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN hydrogel scaffold based on silk sericin (SS and poly(N-hydroxyethyl acrylamide (PHEA was successfully fabricated via conventional free-radical polymerization. The porous structure of the scaffolds was introduced using a lyophilization technique and the effect of cross-linker (XL on morphology, gelation time and physical properties of hydrogel scaffold was first studied. The results show that using low cross-linker content (0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 wt% XL produced flexible scaffolds and appropriate gelation times for fabricating the scaffold. Therefore, the polymerization system with a constant percentage of XL at 0.5 wt% was chosen to study further the effect of SS on the physical properties and cell culture of the scaffolds. It was observed that the hydrogel scaffold of PHEA without SS (PHEA/SS-0 had no cell proliferation, whereas hydrogel scaffolds with SS enhanced cell viability when compared to the positive control. The sample of PHEA/SS at 1.25 wt% of SS and 0.5 wt% of cross-linker was the most suitable for HFF-1 cells to migrate and cell proliferation due to possessing a connective porous structure, along with silk sericin. The results proved that this novel porous semi-IPN hydrogel has the potential to be used as dermal reconstruction scaffold.

  10. Substrate Modulus of 3D-Printed Scaffolds Regulates the Regenerative Response in Subcutaneous Implants through the Macrophage Phenotype and Wnt Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, R; Merkel, AR; Sterling, JA; Davidson, JM

    2016-01-01

    The growing need for therapies to treat large cutaneous defects has driven recent interest in the design of scaffolds that stimulate regenerative wound healing. While many studies have investigated local delivery of biologics as a restorative approach, an increasing body of evidence highlights the contribution of the mechanical properties of implanted scaffolds to wound healing. In the present study, we designed poly(ester urethane) scaffolds using a templated-Fused Deposition Modeling (t-FDM) process to test the hypothesis that scaffolds with substrate modulus comparable to that of collagen fibers enhance a regenerative versus a fibrotic response. We fabricated t-FDM scaffolds with substrate moduli varying from 5 – 266 MPa to investigate the effects of substrate modulus on healing in a rat subcutaneous implant model. Angiogenesis, cellular infiltration, collagen deposition, and directional variance of collagen fibers were maximized for wounds treated with scaffolds having a substrate modulus (Ks = 24 MPa) comparable to that of collagen fibers. The enhanced regenerative response in these scaffolds was correlated with down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in fibroblasts, as well as increased polarization of macrophages toward the restorative M2 phenotype. These observations highlight the substrate modulus of the scaffold as a key parameter regulating the regenerative versus scarring phenotype in wound healing. Our findings further point to the potential use of scaffolds with substrate moduli tuned to that of the native matrix as a therapeutic approach to improve cutaneous healing. PMID:26406449

  11. Three dimensional poly(ε-caprolactone) and silk fibroin nanocomposite fibrous matrix for artificial dermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Min; Chae, Taesik; Sheikh, Faheem A; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Hyun Jung; Park, Ye Ri; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-11-01

    Ideal dermal substitutes should have comparable physicochemical and biological properties to the natural skin tissue. In this study, we report a novel strategy to "engineer" controlled 3D nanocomposite fibrous matrix of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and silk fibroin (SF) for an artificial dermis application. Using a custom-designed cold-plate electrospinning and automatic magnet agitation system, up to 6mm of the thickness was achieved resulting from the accumulation of ice crystal layers on the PCL nanofibers surface-modified with the SF particles. The sacrificed ice crystals induced interconnected macro-pores ranging from tens to hundreds μm. The agitation system introduced uniform distribution of the SF protein within/on the nanofibers, preventing the particles from precipitation and agglomeration. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts proliferated in vitro on the PCL and PCL/SF scaffolds for 7days, but there was no statistical difference between the groups. Conversely, In vivo rat model studies revealed that the wound healing rate and collagen deposition increased with the SF content within the nanocomposites. The unique 3D construct with the PCL/SF nanocomposite fibers provided desirable spatial cues, surface topography, and surface chemistry for the native cells to infiltrate into the scaffolds. The wound healing potential of the nanocomposites was comparable to the commercial Matriderm® artificial dermis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Distribution and Viability of Fetal and Adult Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in a Biaxial Rotating Vessel Bioreactor after Seeding on Polymeric 3D Additive Manufactured Scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Anne M; Chng, Yhee-Cheng; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with

  13. Distribution and viability of fetal and adult human bone marrow stromal cells in a biaxial rotating vessel bioreactor after seeding on polymeric 3D additive manufactured scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Anne Marijke; Chng, Yhee-Cheng; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with

  14. Metallic powder-bed based 3D printing of cellular scaffolds for orthopaedic implants: A state-of-the-art review on manufacturing, topological design, mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X P; Tan, Y J; Chow, C S L; Tor, S B; Yeong, W Y

    2017-07-01

    Metallic cellular scaffold is one of the best choices for orthopaedic implants as a replacement of human body parts, which could improve life quality and increase longevity for the people needed. Unlike conventional methods of making cellular scaffolds, three-dimensional (3D) printing or additive manufacturing opens up new possibilities to fabricate those customisable intricate designs with highly interconnected pores. In the past decade, metallic powder-bed based 3D printing methods emerged and the techniques are becoming increasingly mature recently, where selective laser melting (SLM) and selective electron beam melting (SEBM) are the two representatives. Due to the advantages of good dimensional accuracy, high build resolution, clean build environment, saving materials, high customisability, etc., SLM and SEBM show huge potential in direct customisable manufacturing of metallic cellular scaffolds for orthopaedic implants. Ti-6Al-4V to date is still considered to be the optimal materials for producing orthopaedic implants due to its best combination of biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. This paper presents a state-of-the-art overview mainly on manufacturing, topological design, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of cellular Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds via SLM and SEBM methods. Current manufacturing limitations, topological shortcomings, uncertainty of biocompatible test were sufficiently discussed herein. Future perspectives and recommendations were given at the end. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sphere-shaped nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan/gelatin 3D porous scaffolds increase proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from gingival fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Jun; Tong, Xin; Huang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Tiancong; Lin, Zitong; Cao, Yazhou; Qin, Haiyan; Hu, Qingang; Zhang, Junfeng; Dong, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is an important component of human bone and bone tissue engineering scaffolds. A plethora of bone tissue engineering scaffolds have been synthesized so far, including nano-HA/chitosan/gelatin (nHA/CG) scaffolds; and for seeding cells, stem cells, especially induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), have been a promising cell source for bone tissue engineering recently. However, the influence of different HA nano-particle morphologies on the osteogenic differentiation of human iPSCs (hiPSCs) from human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the osteogenic differentiation of hiPSCs from hGFs seeded on nHA/CG scaffolds with 2 shapes (rod and sphere) of nHA particles. Firstly, hGFs isolated from discarded normal gingival tissues were reprogrammed into hiPSCs. Secondly, hiPSCs were seeded on rod-like nHA/CG (rod-nHA/CG) and sphere-shaped nHA/CG (sphere-nHA/CG) scaffolds respectively and then cell/scaffold complexes were cultured in vitro. Scanning electron microscope, hematoxyline and eosin (HE) staining, Masson’s staining, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction techniques were used to examine hiPSC morphology, proliferation, and differentiation on rod-nHA/CG and sphere-nHA/CG scaffolds. Finally, hiPSCs composited with 2 kinds of nHA/CG were transplanted in vivo in a subcutaneous implantation model for 12 weeks; pure scaffolds were also transplanted as a blank control. HE, Masson’s, and immunohistochemistry staining were applied to detect new bone regeneration ability. The results showed that sphere-nHA/CG significantly increased hiPSCs from hGF proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. hiPSCs and sphere-nHA/CG composities generated large bone, whereas hiPSCs and rod-nHA/CG composities produced tiny bone in vivo. Moreover, pure scaffolds without cells almost produced no bone. In conclusion, our work provided a potential innovative bone tissue engineering approach using

  16. Distribution and viability of fetal and adult human bone marrow stromal cells in a biaxial rotating vessel bioreactor after seeding on polymeric 3D additive manufactured scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eLeferink

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising candidates for tissue engineering based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix (ECM distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation.

  17. Novel control of gel fraction and enhancement of bonding strength for constructing 3D architecture of tissue engineering scaffold with alginate tubular fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Liu, Yuanyuan; Li, Shuai; Liang, Gang; Jiang, Chen; Hu, Qingxi

    2016-01-01

    Alginate tubular fiber has been successfully prepared via coaxial fluid crosslink mode, which is potentially used for the construction of vascularized tissue engineering scaffolds (VTES). However, its elastic and smooth surface is negative for the adhesion of fibers. In this study, the gel fractions were controlled in a novel way of two-step crosslink process in order to meet the needs of each processing link. Based on such consideration, an appropriate formulation was selected to direct write single fiber, which ensured the tubular structure with enough gel portion as well as adhesion between fibers with the reserved sol. Finally, the integrity of the scaffolds had a further development within the 2nd crosslink bath process, which would help to solve the question of poor shear resistance for hydrogel scaffolds. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Poly(Dopamine-Assisted Immobilization of Xu Duan on 3D Printed Poly(Lactic Acid Scaffolds to Up-Regulate Osteogenic and Angiogenic Markers of Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Yeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional printing is a versatile technique to generate large quantities of a wide variety of shapes and sizes of polymer. The aim of this study is to develop functionalized 3D printed poly(lactic acid (PLA scaffolds and use a mussel-inspired surface coating and Xu Duan (XD immobilization to regulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs. We prepared PLA scaffolds and coated with polydopamine (PDA. The chemical composition and surface properties of PLA/PDA/XD were characterized by XPS. PLA/PDA/XD controlled hBMSCs’ responses in several ways. Firstly, adhesion and proliferation of hBMSCs cultured on PLA/PDA/XD were significantly enhanced relative to those on PLA. In addition, the focal adhesion kinase (FAK expression of cells was increased and promoted cell attachment depended on the XD content. In osteogenesis assay, the osteogenesis markers of hBMSCs cultured on PLA/PDA/XD were significantly higher than seen in those cultured on a pure PLA/PDA scaffolds. Moreover, hBMSCs cultured on PLA/PDA/XD showed up-regulation of the ang-1 and vWF proteins associated with angiogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that the bio-inspired coating synthetic PLA polymer can be used as a simple technique to render the surfaces of synthetic scaffolds active, thus enabling them to direct the specific responses of hBMSCs.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of polycaprolactone cross- linked and highly-aligned 3-D artificial scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration via electrospinning technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodzha, S. N.; Surmeneva, M. A.; Surmenev, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    Novel technologies allowed the scientific community to develop scaffolds for regeneration of bone tissue. A successful scaffold should possess specific macroscopic geometry and internal architecture to perform biological and biophysical functions. In this study the process of polycaprolactone microfibrous development with either cross-linked or highly-aligned three-dimensional artificial mats via electrospinning technology for potential application in tissue engineering is described. The morphology and size of electrospun fibers were assessed systematically by varying the rotation speed of grounded collector. It was found that the diameter of the fibers decreased by increasing the rotation speed of collector. The morphology of the fibers changed from cross-linked to highly-aligned at appr. 1000-1100 rpm.

  20. Development of a pre-vascularized 3D scaffold-hydrogel composite graft using an arterio-venous loop for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Subha N; Arkudas, Andreas; Lam, Christopher Xf; Olkowski, Radoslaw; Polykandroitis, Elias; Chróscicka, Anna; Beier, Justus P; Horch, Raymund E; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Kneser, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and fibrin glue (FG) are effective hydrogels for tissue engineering applications as they support tissue in-growth, retain growth factors, and release them slowly with time. The scaffolds, in combination with a hydrogel, effectuate a successful graft. However, the survival of a graft entirely depends upon a functional vascular supply. Therefore, hydrogels must support the in-growing vasculature. To study and compare the vascular patterns, HA and FG hydrogel-containing PLDLLA-TCP-PCL scaffolds were implanted in the groin of male Lewis rats and supplied with a micro-surgically prepared arterio-venous (A-V) loop. The rats were perfused with a vascular contrast media after 4 and 8 weeks and sacrificed for further analysis. The specimens were scanned with micro-CT to find the vascular growth patterns. Corrosion casting of blood vessels followed by SEM demonstrated a high vascular density near the parent blood vessels. Histologically, HA and FG implanted animal groups showed significant angiogenetic activity, especially within the pores of the scaffold. However, formation of new blood vessels was more conspicuously observed at 4 weeks in FG than HA implants. Furthermore, by 8 weeks, the number and pattern of blood vessels were comparable between them. At this time, HA was still present indicating its slow degradation. The finding was confirmed by histomorphometric analysis. This experimental study demonstrates that HA containing composite scaffold systems permit stabile in-growth of blood vessels due to sustained degradation over 8 weeks. HA is a potential matrix for a tissue engineered composite graft.

  1. Biomimetic Composite Scaffold for Breast Reconstruction Following Tumor Resection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrick, Jr, Charles W

    2005-01-01

    ... of life and outcomes are markedly improved. We hypothesized that a novel composite material consisting of silk fibroin and chitosan will act as a biomimetic scaffold amenable to in vivo adipogenesis. The specific aims (SAs...

  2. Physicomechanical, In Vitro and In Vivo Performance of 3D Printed Doped Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Solaiman

    Although tricalcium phosphate (TCP) is widely used in bone tissue engineering, the strength degradation kinetics is not well controlled. This study focuses on the underlying mechanism of strength degradation kinetics by incorporating trace elements in TCP. The objective of this research is to modify the mechanical properties of TCP to achieve the desired degradation rate for the specific need, and improve the in vivo bioactivity for early wound healing by incorporating trace elements such as strontium (Sr2+), magnesium (Mg2+) and silicon (Si4+) as dopants. The hypothesis of this research is that the presence of different trace elements in TCP will influence its phase stability, microstructure, mechanical strength, and both in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. Direct three dimensional printing (3DP) was used to fabricate designed interconnected macroporous pure and doped TCP scaffolds. Microwave sintering as opposed to conventional sintering was also used for better densification and higher mechanical strength. A maximum compressive strength of 10.95 +/- 1.28 MPa and 12.01 +/- 1.56 MPa were achieved for pure and Sr2+-Mg2+ doped TCP scaffolds with 500 microm designed pores (˜400 microm after sintering) sintered in microwave furnace, respectively. Substitution of Mg2+ and Sr2+ into calcium (Ca2+) sites of TCP crystal lattice contributed to phase stability and controlled gradual degradation. On the other hand, Si4+ substitution into phosphorous (P5+) sites destabilized the crystal structure and accelerated degradation of TCP. Interconnected macroporous beta-TCP scaffolds facilitated in vivo guided bone tissue regeneration through infiltration of cells and extracellular matrix into the designed pores. Presence of Sr2+, Mg2+ and Si4+ into beta-TCP induced increased in vivo early bone formation and better bone remodeling through increased extracellular matrix production such as, collagen and osteocalcin, when tested in rat and rabbit distal femur model. The presence of Si4

  3. Improving the mechanical properties of collagen-based membranes using silk fibroin for corneal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kai; Liu, Yang; Li, Weichang; Wang, Lin; Liu, Sa; Wang, Yingjun; Wang, Zhichong; Ren, Li

    2015-03-01

    Although collagen with outstanding biocompatibility has promising application in corneal tissue engineering, the mechanical properties of collagen-based scaffolds, especially suture retention strength, must be further improved to satisfy the requirements of clinical applications. This article describes a toughness reinforced collagen-based membrane using silk fibroin. The collagen-silk fibroin membranes based on collagen [silk fibroin (w/w) ratios of 100:5, 100:10, and 100:20] were prepared by using silk fibroin and cross-linking by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide. These membranes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and their optical property, and NaCl and tryptophan diffusivity had been tested. The water content was found to be dependent on the content of silk fibroin, and CS10 membrane (loading 10 wt % of silk fibroin) performed the optimal mechanical properties. Also the suture experiments have proved CS10 has high suture retention strength, which can be sutured in rabbit eyes integrally. Moreover, the composite membrane proved good biocompatibility for the proliferation of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Lamellar keratoplasty shows that CS10 membrane promoted complete epithelialization in 35 ± 5 days, and their transparency is restored quickly in the first month. Corneal rejection reaction, neovascularization, and keratoconus are not observed. The composite films show potential for use in the field of corneal tissue engineering. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. An electrically conductive 3D scaffold based on a nonwoven web of poly(L-lactic acid) and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xufeng; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Chiffot, Nicolas; King, Martin W; Zhang, Ze

    2015-08-01

    This study was to demonstrate that an extremely thin coating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on nonwoven microfibrous poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) web is of sufficient electrical conductivity and stability in aqueous environment to sustain electrical stimulation (ES) to cultured human skin fibroblasts. The PEDOT imparted the web a surface resistivity of approximately 0.1 KΩ/square without altering the web morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the surface chemistry of the PLLA/PEDOT is characteristic of both PLLA and PEDOT. The PEDOT-coated web also showed higher hydrophilicity, lower glass transition temperature and unchanged fiber crystallinity and thermal stability compared with the PLLA web. The addition of PEDOT to the web marginally increased the web's tensile strength and lowered the elongation. An electrical stability test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT structure was more stable than a polypyrrole treated PLLA fabric, showing only a slow deterioration in conductivity when exposed to culture medium. The cytotoxicity test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT scaffold was not cytotoxic and supported human dermal fibroblast adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Preliminary ES experiments have demonstrated that this conductive web mediated effective ES to fibroblasts. Therefore, this new conductive biodegradable scaffold may be used to electrically modulate cellular activity and tissue regeneration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nanofibrous nonmulberry silk/PVA scaffold for osteoinduction and osseointegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Promita; Kundu, Banani; Naskar, Deboki; Maiti, Tapas K; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Kundu, Subhas C

    2015-05-01

    Poly-vinyl alcohol and nonmulberry tasar silk fibroin of Antheraea mylitta are blended to fabricate nanofibrous scaffolds for bone regeneration. Nanofibrous matrices are prepared by electrospinning the equal volume ratio blends of silk fibroin (2 and 4 wt%) with poly-vinyl alcohol solution (10 wt%) and designated as 2SF/PVA and 4SF/PVA, respectively with average nanofiber diameters of 177 ± 13 nm (2SF/PVA) and 193 ± 17 nm (4SF/PVA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms retention of the secondary structure of fibroin in blends indicating the structural stability of neo-matrix. Both thermal stability and contact angle of the blends decrease with increasing fibroin percentage. Conversely, fibroin imparts mechanical stability to the blends; greater tensile strength is observed with increasing fibroin concentration. Blended scaffolds are biodegradable and support well the neo-bone matrix synthesis by human osteoblast like cells. The findings indicate the potentiality of nanofibrous scaffolds of nonmulberry fibroin as bone scaffolding material. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mechanically-reinforced electrospun composite silk fibroin nanofibers containing hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyunryung; Che, Lihua; Ha, Yoon; Ryu, WonHyoung

    2014-01-01

    Electrospun silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds provide large surface area, high porosity, and interconnection for cell adhesion and proliferation and they may replace collagen for many tissue engineering applications. Despite such advantages, electrospun SF scaffolds are still limited as bone tissue replacement due to their low mechanical strengths. While enhancement of mechanical strengths by incorporating inorganic ceramics into polymers has been demonstrated, electrospinning of a mixture of SF and inorganic ceramics such as hydroxyapatite is challenging and less studied due to the aggregation of ceramic particles within SF. In this study, we aimed to enhance the mechanical properties of electrospun SF scaffolds by uniformly dispersing hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles within SF nanofibers. HAp nanoaprticles were modified by γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) for uniform dispersion and enhanced interfacial bonding between HAp and SF fibers. Optimal conditions for electrospinning of SF and GPTMS-modified HAp nanoparticles were identified to achieve beadless nanofibers without any aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. The MTT and SEM analysis of the osteoblasts-cultured scaffolds confirmed the biocompatibility of the composite scaffolds. The mechanical properties of the composite scaffolds were analyzed by tensile tests for the scaffolds with varying contents of HAp within SF fibers. The mechanical testing showed the peak strengths at the HAp content of 20 wt.%. The increase of HAp content up to 20 wt.% increased the mechanical properties of the composite scaffolds, while further increase above 20 wt.% disrupted the polymer chain networks within SF nanofibers and weakened the mechanical strengths. - Highlights: • Electrospun composite silk fibroin scaffolds were mechanically-reinforced. • GPTMS enhanced hydroxyapatite distribution in silk fibroin nanofibers. • Mechanical property of composite scaffolds increased up to 20% of hydroxyapatite. • Composite

  7. Printability of calcium phosphate: calcium sulfate powders for the application of tissue engineered bone scaffolds using the 3D printing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zuoxin; Buchanan, Fraser; Mitchell, Christina; Dunne, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    In this study, calcium phosphate (CaP) powders were blended with a three-dimensional printing (3DP) calcium sulfate (CaSO4)-based powder and the resulting composite powders were printed with a water-based binder using the 3DP technology. Application of a water-based binder ensured the manufacture of CaP:CaSO4 constructs on a reliable and repeatable basis, without long term damage of the printhead. Printability of CaP:CaSO4 powders was quantitatively assessed by investigating the key 3DP process parameters, i.e. in-process powder bed packing, drop penetration behavior and the quality of printed solid constructs. Effects of particle size, CaP:CaSO4 ratio and CaP powder type on the 3DP process were considered. The drop penetration technique was used to reliably identify powder formulations that could be potentially used for the application of tissue engineered bone scaffolds using the 3DP technique. Significant improvements (pstrength was obtained for the powders with the higher CaP:CaSO4 ratio. Hydroxyapatite (HA):CaSO4 powders showed better results than beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP):CaSO4 powders. Solid and porous constructs were manufactured using the 3DP technique from the optimized CaP:CaSO4 powder formulations. High-quality printed constructs were manufactured, which exhibited appropriate green compressive strength and a high level of printing accuracy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fabrication of highly modulable fibrous 3D extracellular microenvironments

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xixiang

    2017-06-13

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro scaffolds that mimic the irregular fibrous structures of in vivo extracellular matrix (ECM) are critical for many important biological applications. However, structural properties modulation of fibrous 3D scaffolds remains a challenge. Here, we report the first highly modulable 3D fibrous scaffolds self-assembled by high-aspect-ratio (HAR) microfibers. The scaffolds structural properties can be easily tailored to incorporate various physical cues, including geometry, stiffness, heterogeneity and nanotopography. Moreover, the fibrous scaffolds are readily and accurately patterned on desired locations of the substrate. Cell culture exhibits that our scaffolds can elicit strong bidirectional cell-material interactions. Furthermore, a functional disparity between the two-dimensional substrate and our 3D scaffolds is identified by cell spreading and proliferation data. These results prove the potential of the proposed scaffold as a biomimetic extracellular microenvironment for cell study.

  9. Studies on [5,6]-Fused Bicyclic Scaffolds Derivatives as Potent Dual B-RafV600E/KDR Inhibitors Using Docking and 3D-QSAR Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Chun; Tang, San-Zhi; Lu, Shuai; Ran, Ting; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yan-Min; Xu, An-Yang; Lu, Tao; Chen, Ya-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Research and development of multi-target inhibitors has attracted increasing attention as anticancer therapeutics. B-RafV600E synergistically works with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (KDR) to promote the occurrence and progression of cancers, and the development of dual-target drugs simultaneously against these two kinds of kinase may offer a better treatment advantage. In this paper, docking and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies were performed on a series of dual B-Raf/KDR inhibitors with a novel hinge-binding group, [5,6]-fused bicyclic scaffold. Docking studies revealed optimal binding conformations of these compounds interacting with both B-Raf and KDR. Based on these conformations, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) 3D-QSAR models were constructed, and the best CoMFA (q2 = 0.542, r2 = 0.989 for B-Raf; q2 = 0.768, r2 = 0.991 for KDR) and CoMSIA models (q2 = 0.519, r2 = 0.992 for B-Raf; q2 = 0.849, r2 = 0.993 for KDR) were generated. Further external validations confirmed their predictability, yielding satisfactory correlation coefficients (r2pred = 0.764 (CoMFA), r2pred = 0.841 (CoMSIA) for B-Raf, r2pred = 0.912 (CoMFA), r2pred = 0.846 (CoMSIA) for KDR, respectively). Through graphical analysis and comparison on docking results and 3D-QSAR contour maps, key amino acids that affect the ligand-receptor interactions were identified and structural features influencing the activities were discussed. New potent derivatives were designed, and subjected to preliminary pharmacological evaluation. The study may offer useful references for the modification and development of novel dual B-Raf/KDR inhibitors. PMID:26501259

  10. Understanding the structural requirements in diverse scaffolds for the inhibition of P. falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) using 2D-QSAR, 3D-pharmacophore and structure-based energy- optimized pharmacophore models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aher, Rahul Balasaheb; Roy, Kunal

    2015-01-01

    P. falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway offers a promising target for the development of antimalarial drugs in the scenario of widespread P. falciparum resistance. In this background, we have made an effort to decipher the structural requirements for the inhibition of PfDHODH using regression-based 2DQSAR, 3D-pharmacophore modeling and energy-based pharmacophoric (e-pharmacophore) studies. The 2D-QSAR and 3D-pharmacophore models were built from a structurally diverse set of 38 dihydrothiophenone derivatives, while the e-pharmacophore models were developed from two different co-crystal structures (PDB ID: 3O8A, 3I68) with varied scaffolds (benzimidazole, IC50: 22 nM and triazolopyrimidine, IC50: 56 nM) showing an inhibitory activity against the PfDHODH. The 2D-QSAR modeling study depicted the contribution of constitutional (number of oxygen atoms), spatial (molar volume), structural (number of rotatable bonds), and electronic (dipole moment) descriptors in predicting the PfDHODH inhibitory activity. The regression model showed the maximum contribution of constitutional descriptor (number of oxygen atoms representing the hydrogen bond acceptor feature) in determining the inhibitory activity. The best 3D-pharmacophore model (Hypo-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.960 showed two hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) and one ring aromatic (RA) features as the essential structural requirements for predicting the inhibitory activity. The e-pharmacophores derived from two different co-crystal structures highlighted the energy-based contribution of one hydrogen bond acceptor (e-HBA), one hydrogen bond donor (e-HBD) and three/four ring aromatic (e-RA) features for the inhibitory activity. The screening of external sets by the e-pharmacophores showed that both the models are capable of identifying the structurally diverse and potent compounds.

  11. 3D Printability of Alginate-Carboxymethyl Cellulose Hydrogel

    OpenAIRE

    Ahasan Habib; Venkatachalem Sathish; Sanku Mallik; Bashir Khoda

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bio-printing is a revolutionary technology to reproduce a 3D functional living tissue scaffold in-vitro through controlled layer-by-layer deposition of biomaterials along with high precision positioning of cells. Due to its bio-compatibility, natural hydrogels are commonly considered as the scaffold material. However, the mechanical integrity of a hydrogel material, especially in 3D scaffold architecture, is an issue. In this research, a novel hybrid hydrogel, that is, ...

  12. Heterometallic modular metal-organic 3D frameworks assembled via new tris-β-diketonate metalloligands: nanoporous materials for anion exchange and scaffolding of selected anionic guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Lucia; Ciani, Gianfranco; Maggini, Simona; Proserpio, Davide M; Visconti, Marco

    2010-11-02

    The modular engineering of heterometallic nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) based on novel tris-chelate metalloligands, prepared using the functionalised β-diketone 1,3-bis(4'-cyanophenyl)-1,3-propanedione (HL), is described. The complexes [M(III)L(3)] (M=Fe(3+), Co(3+)) and [M(II)L(3)](NEt(4)) (M=Mn(2+), Co(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+)) have been synthesised and characterised, all of which exhibit a distorted octahedral chiral structure. The presence of six exo-oriented cyano donor groups on each complex makes it a suitable building block for networking through interactions with external metal ions. We have prepared two families of MOFs by reacting the metalloligands [M(III)L(3)] and [M(II)L(3)](-) with many silver salts AgX (X=NO(3)(-), BF(4)(-), PF(6)(-), AsF(6)(-), SbF(6)(-), CF(3)SO(3)(-), tosylate), specifically the [M(III)L(3)Ag(3)]X(3)·Solv and [M(II)L(3)Ag(3)]X(2)·Solv network species. Very interestingly, all of these network species exhibit the same type of 3D structure and crystallise in the same trigonal space group with similar cell parameters, in spite of the different metal ions, ionic charges and X(-) counteranions of the silver salts. We have also succeeded in synthesising trimetallic species such as [Zn(x)Fe(y)L(3)Ag(3)](ClO(4))((2x+3y))·Solv and [Zn(x)Cd(y)L(3)Ag(3)](ClO(4))(2)·Solv (with x+y=1). All of the frameworks can be described as sixfold interpenetrated pcu nets, considering the Ag(+) ions as simple digonal spacers. Each individual net is homochiral, containing only Δ or Λ nodes; the whole array contains three nets of type Δ and three nets of type Λ. Otherwise, taking into account the presence of weak Ag-C σ bonds involving the central carbon atoms of the β-diketonate ligands of adjacent nets, the six interpenetrating pcu networks are joined into a unique non-interpenetrated six-connected frame with the rare acs topology. The networks contain large parallel channels of approximate hexagonal-shaped sections that represent 37

  13. Effect of degumming ph value on electrospining of silk fibroin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Shen-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerated silk fibroin fibers show properties dependent on the molecular weight of fibroin. The cocoon-degumming approaches had great impact on the degradation of silk fibroin. The effect of degumming pH value to electrospining of fibroin was studied in this paper. The viscosity and molecular weight of regenerated silk fibroin were studied using rheometer and gel electrophoresis. The results showed that the weaker the alkalinity of degumming reagent, there was the milder the effect on silk fibroin molecular. The fibroin fibers can be prepared by electrospining with low concentration of regenerated silk fibroin solution.

  14. Biocompatible Silk Noil-Based Three-Dimensional Carded-Needled Nonwoven Scaffolds Guide the Engineering of Novel Skin Connective Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Anna; Freddi, Giuliano; Liu, Daisong; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2016-08-01

    Retracting hypertrophic scars resulting from healed burn wounds heavily impact on the patients' life quality. Biomaterial scaffolds guiding burned-out skin regeneration could suppress or lessen scar retraction. Here we report a novel silk noil-based three-dimensional (3D) nonwoven scaffold produced by carding and needling with no formic acid exposure, which might improve burn healing. Once wetted, it displays human skin-like physical features and a high biocompatibility. Human keratinocyte-like cervical carcinoma C4-I cells seeded onto the carded-needled nonwovens in vitro quickly adhered to them, grew, and actively metabolized glutamine releasing lactate. As on plastic, they released no proinflammatory IL-1β, although secreting tumor necrosis factor-alpha, an inducer of the autocrine mitogen amphiregulin in such cells. Once grafted into interscapular subcutaneous tissue of mice, carded-needled nonwovens guided the afresh assembly of a connective tissue enveloping the fibroin microfibers and filling the interposed voids within 3 months. Fibroblasts and a few poly- or mononucleated macrophages populated the engineered tissue. Besides, its extracellular matrix contained thin sparse collagen fibrils and a newly formed vascular network whose endothelin-1-expressing endothelial cells grew first on the fibroin microfibrils and later expanded into the intervening matrix. Remarkably, no infiltrates of inflammatory leukocytes and no packed collagen fibers bundles among fibroin microfibers, no fibrous capsules at the grafts periphery, and hence no foreign body response was obtained at the end of 3 months of observation. Therefore, we posit that silk noil-based 3D carded-needled nonwoven scaffolds are tools for translational medicine studies as they could guide connective tissue regeneration at deep burn wounds averting scar retraction with good functional results.

  15. Structural characteristics and biological performance of silk fibroin nanofiber containing microalgae Spirulina extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bum-Gyu; Kwak, Hyo Won; Park, A Reum; Kim, Shin Hwan; Park, Sook-Young; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Ick-Soo; Lee, Ki Hoon; Park, Young Hwan

    2014-04-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) nanofiber scaffold containing microalgae Spirulina extract were prepared by electrospinning and the performance and functionality of the scaffold were evaluated. The viscosity and conductivity of the dope solution of Spirulina containing SF were examined for electrospinability and we found that the morphological structure of SF nanofiber is affected by the concentration of Spirulina extract added. The platelet adhesion and coagulation time test confirmed that the Spirulina containing SF nanofiber scaffold had excellent ability to prevent blood clotting or antithrombogenicity that is comparable to heparin. Low cytotoxicity and excellent cell adhesion and proliferation were also observed for Sprulina containing SF nanofiber scaffold by methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and confocal fluorescence microscope using fibroblast and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Based on these results, we believe SF nanofiber scaffold containing Spirulina extract has the potential to be used as tissue engineering scaffold that requires high hemocompatibility. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Nano-scaled hydroxyapatite/polymer composite IV. Fabrication and cell adhesion properties of a three-dimensional scaffold made of composite material with a silk fibroin substrate to develop a percutaneous device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuzono, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Shoji; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kyotani, Singo; Tanaka, Junzo; Kishida, Akio

    2004-01-01

    Nano-scaled sintered hydroxyapatite (HAp) particles with an a-axis length of 87 +/- 23 nm, a c-axis length of 236 +/- 81 nm, and a mean aspect ratio ( c/ a) of 2.72 were covalently linked onto a silk fibroin (SF) substrate chemically modified by graft polymerization with gamma-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTS). Graft polymerization with poly(MPTS) on SF was conducted by free-radical initiation in a water solvent with pentaethylene glycol dodecyl ether as a nonionic surfactant. The alkoxysilyl groups of the graft polymers avoided hydrolysis and maintained their activity in coupling with the hydroxyl groups on the HAp surface despite the use of water as the reaction solvent. The weight gain of poly(MPTS) on SF increased with increasing the reaction time, eventually reaching a plateau value of about 15 wt% after 50 min of reaction time. After HAp covalent coating, the particles separated or aggregated into several crystals, as shown by scanning electron microscopic observation. L929 fibroblast cells adhered more plentifully on HAp-coated SF compared to untreated SF and hydrolyzed poly(MPTS)-grafted SF during 24 h or 48 h of incubation. The cells adhered only on the HAp surface but not at all on the dehydrated grafted surface of SF without HAp. A button-shaped prototype for a percutaneous device was manufactured by transplantation of HAp-coated SF fibers of about 100 microm in length onto silicone moldings using an adhesive, and the device showed good cell adhesiveness.

  17. Electrospinning of silk fibroin from all aqueous solution at low concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Yuki; Morikawa, Hideaki; Yamanaka, Shigeru; Tamada, Yasushi

    2017-04-01

    Non-woven mats of Bombyx mori silk fibroin were fabricated using electrospinning with an all aqueous solution at electrospinning at low concentrations of 5wt%. Evaluation of structural and mechanical properties of the non-woven mat fabricated with water solvent revealed that it is safe for use in the human body. It is anticipated for wider use in medical materials such as cellular scaffolds for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Endothelialization of a non-woven silk fibroin net for use in tissue engineering: growth and gene regulation of human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, R E; Peters, K; Wolf, M; Motta, A; Migliaresi, C; Kirkpatrick, C J

    2004-09-01

    We have previously shown that a biomaterial consisting of a non-woven fibroin net produced from silk (Bombyx mori) cocoons is an excellent scaffolding material for a wide variety of human cells of different tissue types. Endothelialization must take place for a biomaterial to be successful after implantation. Therefore, primary human endothelial cells and the human endothelial cell lines, HPMEC-ST1.6R and ISO-HAS-1, were examined for adherence and growth patterns on the fibroin nets by confocal laser scanning microscopy after vital staining of the cells and by electron microscopy. Endothelial cells adhered and spread along individual fibers of the nets and did not fill the gaps between individual fibers. Higher attachment and growth coverage was obtained if nets were first coated with gelatin, fibronectin or collagen type I. Proinflammatory markers of endothelial cells on the fibers exhibited a non-activated state and LPS-stimulated cells exhibited activation of these markers. Furthermore, a typical PECAM-1 localization at cell-cell contacts was observed. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fibroin nets after removal of cells did not demonstrate any changes to the fibroin structure. HUVEC and HDMEC on fibroin nets embedded in collagen type I gels formed microvessel-like structures. Thus, silk fibroin nets are a highly endothelial cell-compatible scaffolding material that support the growth, normal and inducible cell functions and angiogenesis potential of human endothelial cells in vitro similar to that observed in vivo.

  19. Review: Polymeric-Based 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Geng-Hsi; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also referred to as additive manufacturing, is a technology that allows for customized fabrication through computer-aided design. 3D printing has many advantages in the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds, including fast fabrication, high precision, and customized production. Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography. Many 3D printing methods have been employed for tissue engineering. There are advantages and limitations for each method. Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

  20. Developing 3D microstructures for tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    casting process to generate various large scale tissue engineering constructs with single pore geometry with the desired mechanical stiffness and porosity. In addition, a new technique was developed to fa bricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue-engineering applications where 3D printing...... of a hydrogel to create an additional interpenetrating network (IPN) of hydrogel nanodeposits. Biocompatible IPNs of silicone elastomer with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and Poly(ethylene glycol) methylether acrylate (PEGMEA) hydrogel 3D scaffolds were produced in this way. The model drug...... of hiPSC-derived DE cells cultured for 25 days in a 3D perfusion bioreactor system with an array of 16 small-scale tissue-bioreactors with integrated dual-pore pore scaffolds and flow rates. Hepatic differentiation and functionality of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes were successfully assessed and compared...

  1. 3D Microperfusion Model of ADPKD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AutoCAD and the system was optimized based on concurrent COMSOL modeling. The final design depicted in Figure 1 allows for the bottom of a 12 x 10 mm...fabrication was accomplished using a custom multistep fabrication process. A negative mold of the bioreactor, designed in AutoCAD , was created using a...Scaffold a) b) Figure 1 (a) AutoCAD model of the 3D perfusion bioreactor. The silk scaffold dimensions are several millimeters wider than the channel

  2. 3D video

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  3. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  4. Europeana and 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  5. EUROPEANA AND 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pletinckx

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  6. Open 3D Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many professionals and 3D artists consider Blender as being the best open source solution for 3D computer graphics. The main features are related to modeling, rendering, shading, imaging, compositing, animation, physics and particles and realtime 3D/game creation.

  7. Open 3D Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Felician ALECU

    2010-01-01

    Many professionals and 3D artists consider Blender as being the best open source solution for 3D computer graphics. The main features are related to modeling, rendering, shading, imaging, compositing, animation, physics and particles and realtime 3D/game creation.

  8. IZDELAVA TISKALNIKA 3D

    OpenAIRE

    Brdnik, Lovro

    2015-01-01

    Diplomsko delo analizira trenutno stanje 3D tiskalnikov na trgu. Prikazan je razvoj in principi delovanja 3D tiskalnikov. Predstavljeni so tipi 3D tiskalnikov, njihove prednosti in slabosti. Podrobneje je predstavljena zgradba in delovanje koračnih motorjev. Opravljene so meritve koračnih motorjev. Opisana je programska oprema za rokovanje s 3D tiskalniki in komponente, ki jih potrebujemo za izdelavo. Diploma se oklepa vprašanja, ali je izdelava 3D tiskalnika bolj ekonomična kot pa naložba v ...

  9. Melt impregnation as a post processing treatment for performance enhancement in high capacity 3D microporous tin-copper-nickel intermetallic anode for Li-ion battery supported by electrodeposited nickel scaffold: A structural study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Srijan; Patra, Arghya; Mitra, Arijit; Jena, Sambedan; Das, Karabi; Majumder, Subhasish Basu; Das, Siddhartha

    2018-05-01

    This paper communicates stabilization of a Sn anode by impregnating it within the porous framework of a Ni-scaffold. The impregnation is carried out by electrodeposition Sn on Ni-foam followed by heating at 300 °C for 1 h. The Ni-foam was also electrodeposited on a Cu foil prior to deposition of Sn. The melting step leads to the formation of Nisbnd Sn and Cusbnd Sn intermetallics within pores of the Ni-scaffold. Snsbnd Cu/Ni intermetallics lithiate following the active-inactive strategy in which the inactive Cu/Ni buffers the volume expansion while Sn lithiates. Furthermore, this entire process takes place within Ni-scaffold which resists material pulverization and delamination and provide better electronic pathway for charge transfer. This active-inactive Sn:Snsbnd Cu/Ni intermetallic within a protected Ni-scaffold assembly results in 100th cycle discharge capacity of 587.9 mA h/g at a rate of 500 mA/g (0.5 C), and superior rate capability delivering 463 mAh/g at a rate of 2 A/g (2 C) while retaining structural integrity as compared to pure Sn electrodeposited (without heat-treatment) on the nickel scaffold.

  10. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; van Loon, Mark

    2017-04-01

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N = 2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N = 2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N = 2∗ theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-'t Hooft loops in the 4d N = 2∗ theory. In the presence of a mass parameter cfor the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  11. A 3d-3d appetizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2016-11-02

    We test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T[L(p,1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p,1). In particular, for p=1, we show how the familiar S{sup 3} partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p,1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p,1)] on the squashed three-sphere S{sub b}{sup 3}. This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent G{sub ℂ} complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  12. 3D virtuel udstilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tournay, Bruno; Rüdiger, Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s.......3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s....

  13. 3D Ground Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Poverud, Therese Tokle; Christensen, Ole Petter; Jacop, Asadullah; Mpoyi, Giresse Kadima; Mann, Harjit Laly Singh; Albert, Ngenzi; Dalset, Bjørnar

    2015-01-01

    Utført i samarbeid med Cube AS Cube AS wants a system for 3D mapping of terrain using an UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle). We chose to equip the UAV with a camera to take aerial photos that are processed through image processing software to produce detailed, digital 3D maps.

  14. Underwater 3D filming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rinaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  15. Designing Biomaterials for 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvendiren, Murat; Molde, Joseph; Soares, Rosane M D; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-10-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is becoming an increasingly common technique to fabricate scaffolds and devices for tissue engineering applications. This is due to the potential of 3D printing to provide patient-specific designs, high structural complexity, rapid on-demand fabrication at a low-cost. One of the major bottlenecks that limits the widespread acceptance of 3D printing in biomanufacturing is the lack of diversity in "biomaterial inks". Printability of a biomaterial is determined by the printing technique. Although a wide range of biomaterial inks including polymers, ceramics, hydrogels and composites have been developed, the field is still struggling with processing of these materials into self-supporting devices with tunable mechanics, degradation, and bioactivity. This review aims to highlight the past and recent advances in biomaterial ink development and design considerations moving forward. A brief overview of 3D printing technologies focusing on ink design parameters is also included.

  16. One-Pot Eco-Safe Saccharin-Catalyzed Procedure for Expedient and Convenient Synthesis of Dihydropyrano[2,3-c]pyrazole, Tetrahydrobenzo[b]pyran and Pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidinone Scaffolds as a Green and Versatile Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Mohamadpour

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A green and facile saccharin-catalyzed procedure is developed for the one-pot convenient synthesis of dihydropyrano[2,3-c]pyrazole, tetrahydrobenzo[b]pyran and pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidinone scaffolds via multi-component tandem Knoevenagel cyclocondensation reaction. This procedure has the chief advantages of green, inexpensive and readily available catalyst, high atom-economy, high to quantitative yields and the reaction procedure is mild and involves facile workup procedure to obtain the desired products in short reaction times.

  17. Blender 3D cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Valenza, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book is aimed at the professionals that already have good 3D CGI experience with commercial packages and have now decided to try the open source Blender and want to experiment with something more complex than the average tutorials on the web. However, it's also aimed at the intermediate Blender users who simply want to go some steps further.It's taken for granted that you already know how to move inside the Blender interface, that you already have 3D modeling knowledge, and also that of basic 3D modeling and rendering concepts, for example, edge-loops, n-gons, or samples. In any case, it'

  18. TISKALNIK 3D DLP

    OpenAIRE

    Debeljak, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    Diplomska naloga opisuje različne vrste 3D tiskalnikov in izdelavo 3D tiskalnika s tehnologijo digitalnega svetlobnega procesa (Digital Light Processing ali DLP) za potrebe podjetja Doorson d.o.o. V nalogi je opisan postopek izdelave, deljen na mehanski, elektro in programski del ter podrobnejša predstavitev komponent, med katere kot pomembnejše sodijo Raspberry Pi in koračni motor. Prikazana je primerjava obstoječega 3D tiskalnika s tehnologijo ciljnega nalaganja (Fused Deposition Modeling a...

  19. DELTA 3D PRINTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ȘOVĂILĂ Florin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a very used process in industry, the generic name being “rapid prototyping”. The essential advantage of a 3D printer is that it allows the designers to produce a prototype in a very short time, which is tested and quickly remodeled, considerably reducing the required time to get from the prototype phase to the final product. At the same time, through this technique we can achieve components with very precise forms, complex pieces that, through classical methods, could have been accomplished only in a large amount of time. In this paper, there are presented the stages of a 3D model execution, also the physical achievement after of a Delta 3D printer after the model.

  20. 3D Nanoprinting Technologies for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering recovers an original function of tissue by replacing the damaged part with a new tissue or organ regenerated using various engineering technologies. This technology uses a scaffold to support three-dimensional (3D tissue formation. Conventional scaffold fabrication methods do not control the architecture, pore shape, porosity, or interconnectivity of the scaffold, so it has limited ability to stimulate cell growth and to generate new tissue. 3D printing technologies may overcome these disadvantages of traditional fabrication methods. These technologies use computers to assist in design and fabrication, so the 3D scaffolds can be fabricated as designed and standardized. Particularly, because nanofabrication technology based on two-photon absorption (2PA and on controlled electrospinning can generate structures with submicron resolution, these methods have been evaluated in various areas of tissue engineering. Recent combinations of 3D nanoprinting technologies with methods from molecular biology and cell dynamics have suggested new possibilities for improved tissue regeneration. If the interaction between cells and scaffold system with biomolecules can be understood and controlled and if an optimal 3D environment for tissue regeneration can be realized, 3D nanoprinting will become an important tool in tissue engineering.

  1. Nanorheology of regenerated silk fibroin solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. We have investigated the rheological properties of regenerated silk fibroin (RSF), a viscoelastic material at micro and nano length scales, by video microscopy. We describe here the principles and technique of video microscopy as a tool in such investigations. In this work, polystyrene beads were dispersed in the ...

  2. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  3. Impresora 3D

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Iveth; Serracín, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    La idea de llevar a la realidad un objeto dibujado en un software de diseño asistido por computadora, da lugar a la creación de las impresoras 3D. Los orígenes de la impresión 3D se dieron para los años 80, y desde aquella época hasta hoy en día, este tipo de impresión ha contribuido en diversos campos del saber, que van desde la ingeniería hasta la medicina. En sus inicios las impresoras 3D además de costosas, eran de uso exclusivo para la creación de piezas de prototipado con una fuerte apl...

  4. 3D Digital Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper

    wave of new building information modelling tools demands further investigation, not least because of industry representatives' somewhat coarse parlance: Now the word is spreading -3D digital modelling is nothing less than a revolution, a shift of paradigm, a new alphabet... Research qeustions. Based...... on empirical probes (interviews, observations, written inscriptions) within the Danish construction industry this paper explores the organizational and managerial dynamics of 3D Digital Modelling. The paper intends to - Illustrate how the network of (non-)human actors engaged in the promotion (and arrest) of 3...... important to appreciate the analysis. Before turning to the presentation of preliminary findings and a discussion of 3D digital modelling, it begins, however, with an outline of industry specific ICT strategic issues. Paper type. Multi-site field study...

  5. 3D Projection Installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halskov, Kim; Johansen, Stine Liv; Bach Mikkelsen, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    contributes to the understanding of the distinctive characteristics of such a new medium, and identifies three strategies for designing 3-D projection installations: establishing space; interplay between the digital and the physical; and transformation of materiality. The principal empirical case, From......Three-dimensional projection installations are particular kinds of augmented spaces in which a digital 3-D model is projected onto a physical three-dimensional object, thereby fusing the digital content and the physical object. Based on interaction design research and media studies, this article...

  6. Herramientas SIG 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Feito Higueruela

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Geographical Information Systems on several Archeology fields have been increasing during the last years. Recent avances in these technologies make possible to work with more realistic 3D models. In this paper we introduce a new paradigm for this system, the GIS Thetrahedron, in which we define the fundamental elements of GIS, in order to provide a better understanding of their capabilities. At the same time the basic 3D characteristics of some comercial and open source software are described, as well as the application to some samples on archeological researchs

  7. DELTA 3D PRINTER

    OpenAIRE

    ȘOVĂILĂ Florin; ȘOVĂILĂ Claudiu; BAROIU Nicuşor

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a very used process in industry, the generic name being “rapid prototyping”. The essential advantage of a 3D printer is that it allows the designers to produce a prototype in a very short time, which is tested and quickly remodeled, considerably reducing the required time to get from the prototype phase to the final product. At the same time, through this technique we can achieve components with very precise forms, complex pieces that, through classical methods, could have been...

  8. DNA origami design of 3D nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig

    2009-01-01

    [8]. We have recently developed a semi-automated DNA origami software package [9] that uses a 2D sequence editor in conjunction with several automated tools to facilitate the design process. Here we extend the use of the program for designing DNA origami structures in 3D and show the application......Structural DNA nanotechnology has been heavily dependent on the development of dedicated software tools for the design of unique helical junctions, to define unique sticky-ends for tile assembly, and for predicting the products of the self-assembly reaction of multiple DNA strands [1-3]. Recently......, several dedicated 3D editors for computer-aided design of DNA structures have been developed [4-7]. However, many of these tools are not efficient for designing DNA origami structures that requires the design of more than 200 unique DNA strands to be folded along a scaffold strand into a defined 3D shape...

  9. Tangible 3D Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejlesen, Aske K.; Ovesen, Nis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental approach to teaching 3D modelling techniques in an Industrial Design programme. The approach includes the use of tangible free form models as tools for improving the overall learning. The paper is based on lecturer and student experiences obtained through...

  10. Feasibility of Bioprinting with a Modified Desktop 3D Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Todd A; Epstein, Casey J; Schwartz, John; Krush, Alex; Lagalante, Dan J; Mercadante, Kevin P; Zeltsman, David; Smith, Lee P; Grande, Daniel A

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown the capabilities of three-dimensional (3D) printing for use in the medical industry. At the time of this publication, basic home desktop 3D printer kits can cost as little as $300, whereas medical-specific 3D bioprinters can cost more than $300,000. The purpose of this study is to show how a commercially available desktop 3D printer could be modified to bioprint an engineered poly-l-lactic acid scaffold containing viable chondrocytes in a bioink. Our bioprinter was used to create a living 3D functional tissue-engineered cartilage scaffold. In this article, we detail the design, production, and calibration of this bioprinter. In addition, the bioprinted cells were tested for viability, proliferation, biochemistry, and gene expression; these tests showed that the cells survived the printing process, were able to continue dividing, and produce the extracellular matrix expected of chondrocytes.

  11. Effects of composite films of silk fibroin and graphene oxide on the proliferation, cell viability and mesenchymal phenotype of periodontal ligament stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lozano, F J; García-Bernal, D; Aznar-Cervantes, S; Ros-Roca, M A; Algueró, M C; Atucha, N M; Lozano-García, A A; Moraleda, J M; Cenis, J L

    2014-12-01

    In regenerative dentistry, stem cell-based therapy often requires a scaffold to deliver cells and/or growth factors to the injured site. Graphene oxide (GO) and silk fibroin (SF) are promising biomaterials for tissue engineering as they are both non toxic and promote cell proliferation. On the other hand, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are mesenchymal stem cells readily accessible with a promising use in cell therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of composite films of GO, SF and GO combined with fibroin in the mesenchymal phenotype, viability, adhesion and proliferation rate of PDLSCs. PDLSCs obtained from healthy extracted teeth were cultured on GO, SF or combination of GO and SF films up to 10 days. Adhesion level of PDSCs on the different biomaterials were evaluated after 12 h of culture, whereas proliferation rate of cells was assessed using the MTT assay. Level of apoptosis was determined using Annexin-V and 7-AAD and mesenchymal markers expression of PDLSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. At day 7 of culture, MTT experiments showed a high rate of proliferation of PDLSCs growing on GO films compared to the other tested biomaterials, although it was slightly lower than in plastic (control). However PDLSCs growing in fibroin or GO plus fibroin films showed a discrete proliferation. Importantly, at day 10 of culture it was observed a significant increase in PDLSCs proliferation rate in GO films compared to plastic (P < 0.05), as well as in GO plus fibroin compared to fibroin alone (P < 0.001). Flow cytometry analysis showed that culture of PDLSCs in fibroin, GO or GO plus fibroin films did not significantly alter the level of expression of the mesenchymal markers CD73, CD90 or CD105 up to 168 h, being the cell viability in GO even better than obtained in plastic. Our findings suggest that the combination of human dental stem cells/fibroin/GO based-bioengineered constructs have strong potential for their therapeutic

  12. Three-dimensional (3D) printing of mouse primary hepatocytes to generate 3D hepatic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yohan; Kang, Kyojin; Jeong, Jaemin; Paik, Seung Sam; Kim, Ji Sook; Park, Su A; Kim, Wan Doo; Park, Jisun; Choi, Dongho

    2017-02-01

    The major problem in producing artificial livers is that primary hepatocytes cannot be cultured for many days. Recently, 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology draws attention and this technology regarded as a useful tool for current cell biology. By using the 3D bio-printing, these problems can be resolved. To generate 3D bio-printed structures (25 mm × 25 mm), cells-alginate constructs were fabricated by 3D bio-printing system. Mouse primary hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of 6-8 weeks old mice by a 2-step collagenase method. Samples of 4 × 10 7 hepatocytes with 80%-90% viability were printed with 3% alginate solution, and cultured with well-defined culture medium for primary hepatocytes. To confirm functional ability of hepatocytes cultured on 3D alginate scaffold, we conducted quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence with hepatic marker genes. Isolated primary hepatocytes were printed with alginate. The 3D printed hepatocytes remained alive for 14 days. Gene expression levels of Albumin , HNF-4α and Foxa3 were gradually increased in the 3D structures. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the primary hepatocytes produced hepatic-specific proteins over the same period of time. Our research indicates that 3D bio-printing technique can be used for long-term culture of primary hepatocytes. It can therefore be used for drug screening and as a potential method of producing artificial livers.

  13. Powder-based 3D printing for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunello, G; Sivolella, S; Meneghello, R; Ferroni, L; Gardin, C; Piattelli, A; Zavan, B; Bressan, E

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue engineered 3-D constructs customized to patient-specific needs are emerging as attractive biomimetic scaffolds to enhance bone cell and tissue growth and differentiation. The article outlines the features of the most common additive manufacturing technologies (3D printing, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, and selective laser sintering) used to fabricate bone tissue engineering scaffolds. It concentrates, in particular, on the current state of knowledge concerning powder-based 3D printing, including a description of the properties of powders and binder solutions, the critical phases of scaffold manufacturing, and its applications in bone tissue engineering. Clinical aspects and future applications are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Physical Properties of 3D Interconnected Graphite Networks - Aerographite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    networks: Aerographite Grant Number: FA8655-13-1-3058 Principal investigator: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Karl Schulte Institute of Polymers & Composites Hamburg...step process: first, ZnO is manufactured, in a flame spray process forming a solid 3-D scaffold as template, followed by a CVD process in which the...tured graphitic scaffold , the so called Aerographite, in which the graphitic ligaments are directly interconnected by covalent bonds. This rare

  15. Twin Peaks - 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. Shaping 3-D boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2011-01-01

    Enabling users to shape 3-D boxes in immersive virtual environments is a non-trivial problem. In this paper, a new family of techniques for creating rectangular boxes of arbitrary position, orientation, and size is presented and evaluated. These new techniques are based solely on position data......F) docking experiment against an existing technique, which requires the user to perform the rotation and scaling of the box explicitly. The precision of the users' box construction is evaluated by a novel error metric measuring the difference between two boxes. The results of the experiment strongly indicate...

  17. 3D Audio System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  18. Fluid Mechanical Properties of Silkworm Fibroin Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akira

    2005-11-01

    The aqueous solution behavior of silk fibroin is of interest due to the assembly and processing of this protein related to the spinning of protein fibers that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. To gain insight into the origins of this functional feature, it is desired to determine how the protein behaves under a range of solution conditions. Pure fibroin at different concentrations in water was studied for surface tension, as a measure of surfactancy. In addition, shear induced changes on these solutions in terms of structure and morphology was also determined. Fibroin solutions exhibited shear rate-sensitive viscosity changes and precipitated at a critical shear rate where a dramatic increase of 75-150% of the initial value was observed along with a decrease in viscosity. In surface tension measurements, critical micelle concentrations were in the range of 3-4% w/v. The influence of additional factors, such as sericin protein, divalent and monovalent cations, and pH on the solution behavior in relation to structural and morphological features will also be described.

  19. 3D Surgical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  20. Recent Advances in Biomaterials for 3D Printing and Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Udayabhanu Jammalamadaka; Karthik Tappa

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing has significant potential as a fabrication method in creating scaffolds for tissue engineering. The applications of 3D printing in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering are limited by the variety of biomaterials that can be used in this technology. Many researchers have developed novel biomaterials and compositions to enable their use in 3D printing methods. The advantages of fabricating scaffolds using 3D printing are numerous, including the abi...

  1. Mechanically Oriented 3D Collagen Hydrogel for Directing Neurite Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antman-Passig, Merav; Levy, Shahar; Gartenberg, Chaim; Schori, Hadas; Shefi, Orit

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies in the field of neuro-tissue engineering have demonstrated the promising effects of aligned contact guidance cue to scaffolds of enhancement and direction of neuronal growth. In vivo, neurons grow and develop neurites in a complex three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding. Studies have utilized hydrogel scaffolds derived from ECM molecules to better simulate natural growth. While many efforts have been made to control neuronal growth on 2D surfaces, the development of 3D scaffolds with an elaborate oriented topography to direct neuronal growth still remains a challenge. In this study, we designed a method for growing neurons in an aligned and oriented 3D collagen hydrogel. We aligned collagen fibers by inducing controlled uniaxial strain on gels. To examine the collagen hydrogel as a suitable scaffold for neuronal growth, we evaluated the physical properties of the hydrogel and measured collagen fiber properties. By combining the neuronal culture in 3D collagen hydrogels with strain-induced alignment, we were able to direct neuronal growth in the direction of the aligned collagen matrix. Quantitative evaluation of neurite extension and directionality within aligned gels was performed. The analysis showed neurite growth aligned with collagen matrix orientation, while maintaining the advantageous 3D growth.

  2. 3D Wire 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordi, Moréton; F, Escribano; J. L., Farias

    , therefore, we’ve drawn conclusions and recommendations for future editions of the event, also generalizable to other experiences of gamification especially in events. This report details the methodology and working elements from the design phase, human resources and organization of production......This document is a general report on the implementation of gamification in 3D Wire 2015 event. As the second gamification experience in this event, we have delved deeply in the previous objectives (attracting public areas less frequented exhibition in previous years and enhance networking) and have...... proposed new ones (viralization of the event on social networks and improvement of the integration of international attendees). On the other hand we defined a set of research objectives related to the study of gamification in an eminently social place like an event. Most of the goals have been met and...

  3. Silk fibroin/gelatin–chondroitin sulfate–hyaluronic acid effectively enhances in vitro chondrogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawatjui, Nopporn [Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Damrongrungruang, Teerasak [Department of Oral Diagnosis, Faculty of Dentistry, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat [Stem Cell Therapy and Transplantation Research Group, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); School of Microbiology, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Jearanaikoon, Patcharee [Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Hongeng, Suradej [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Limpaiboon, Temduang, E-mail: temduang@kku.ac.th [Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)

    2015-07-01

    Tissue engineering is becoming promising for cartilage repair due to the limited self-repair capacity of cartilage tissue. We previously fabricated and characterized a three-dimensional silk fibroin/gelatin–chondroitin sulfate–hyaluronic acid (SF–GCH) scaffold and showed that it could promote proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). This study aimed to evaluate its biological performance as a new biomimetic material for chondrogenic induction of BM-MSCs in comparison to an SF scaffold and conventional pellet culture. We found that the SF–GCH scaffold significantly enhanced the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs compared to the SF scaffold and pellet culture in which the production of sulfated glycoaminoglycan was increased in concordance with the up-regulation of chondrogenic-specific gene markers. Our findings indicate the significant role of SF–GCH by providing a supportive structure and the mimetic cartilage environment for chondrogenesis which enables cartilage regeneration. Thus, our fabricated SF–GCH scaffold may serve as a potential biomimetic material for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • SF–GCH scaffold enhances proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs. • SF–GCH acts as a supportive and biomimetic material for BM-MSC chondrogenesis. • SF–GCH is a potential biomimetic scaffold suitable for cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. Silk fibroin/gelatin–chondroitin sulfate–hyaluronic acid effectively enhances in vitro chondrogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawatjui, Nopporn; Damrongrungruang, Teerasak; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Jearanaikoon, Patcharee; Hongeng, Suradej; Limpaiboon, Temduang

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is becoming promising for cartilage repair due to the limited self-repair capacity of cartilage tissue. We previously fabricated and characterized a three-dimensional silk fibroin/gelatin–chondroitin sulfate–hyaluronic acid (SF–GCH) scaffold and showed that it could promote proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). This study aimed to evaluate its biological performance as a new biomimetic material for chondrogenic induction of BM-MSCs in comparison to an SF scaffold and conventional pellet culture. We found that the SF–GCH scaffold significantly enhanced the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs compared to the SF scaffold and pellet culture in which the production of sulfated glycoaminoglycan was increased in concordance with the up-regulation of chondrogenic-specific gene markers. Our findings indicate the significant role of SF–GCH by providing a supportive structure and the mimetic cartilage environment for chondrogenesis which enables cartilage regeneration. Thus, our fabricated SF–GCH scaffold may serve as a potential biomimetic material for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • SF–GCH scaffold enhances proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs. • SF–GCH acts as a supportive and biomimetic material for BM-MSC chondrogenesis. • SF–GCH is a potential biomimetic scaffold suitable for cartilage tissue engineering

  5. Contribution of seismic processing to put up the scaffolding for the 3-dimensional study of deep sedimentary basins: the fundaments of trans-national 3D modelling in the project GeoMol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capar, Laure

    2013-04-01

    Within the framework of the transnational project GeoMol geophysical and geological information on the entire Molasse Basin and on the Po Basin are gathered to build consistent cross-border 3D geological models based on borehole evidence and seismic data. Benefiting from important progress in seismic processing, these new models will provide some answers to various questions regarding the usage of subsurface resources, as there are geothermal energy, CO2 and gas storage, oil and gas production, and support decisions-making to national and local administrations as well as to industries. More than 28 000 km of 2D seismic lines are compiled reprocessed and harmonized. This work faces various problems like the vertical drop of more than 700 meters between West and East of the Molasse Basin and to al lesser extent in the Po Plain, the heterogeneities of the substratum, the large disparities between the period and parameters of seismic acquisition, and depending of their availability, the use of two types of seismic data, raw and processed seismic data. The main challenge is to harmonize all lines at the same reference level, amplitude and step of signal processing from France to Austria, spanning more than 1000 km, to avoid misfits at crossing points between seismic lines and artifacts at the country borders, facilitating the interpretation of the various geological layers in the Molasse Basin and Po Basin. A generalized stratigraphic column for the two basins is set up, representing all geological layers relevant to subsurface usage. This stratigraphy constitutes the harmonized framework for seismic reprocessing. In general, processed seismic data is available on paper at stack stage and the mandatory information to take these seismic lines to the final stage of processing, the migration step, are datum plane and replacement velocity. However several datum planes and replacement velocities were used during previous processing projects. Our processing sequence is to

  6. Fundamental studies on the synthesis, characterization, stabilization, 3-D scaffolds, and trafficking mechanisms of nano-structured calcium phosphates (NanoCaPs) for non-viral gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olton, Dana

    Non-viral transfer of therapeutic genes into mammalian cells represents a potentially viable approach to (1) treat and cure acute and chronic genetically transferred congenital disorders and to (2) aid in tissue regeneration. Non-viral vectors have been praised for their potential to circumvent some of the limitations associated with viral vectors including immunogenicity, cytotoxicity and insertional mutagenesis. Among the various types of non-viral gene delivery vectors, nano-structured ceramic particles, particularly, particles of calcium phosphate (CaP) remain an attractive option because of their safety, biocompatibility, biodegradability, ease of handling as well as their adsorptive capacity for DNA. CaP-DNA complexes have been used in vitro since the 1970s and have recently been tested in vivo. However, despite CaPs' extensive use, concerns still remain regarding the synthesis and colloidal instability of this vector. Also, towards the development of a more efficient gene delivery agent, there is a need to understand the mechanisms involved in both the cellular uptake as well as in the subsequent intracellular processing of CaP-DNA complexes. Moreover, although significant advances have been made in the synthesis and design of tissue engineered constructs, the development of a safe, effective scaffold has yet to be realized. As such, the focus of this thesis has been to address these four concerns. In this work, we begin by presenting a novel aqueous-based approach to synthesize nano-particles of CaP (NanoCaPs). Our results show that this approach generates nano-crystalline hydroxyapatite particles. When tested in vitro, transfection of these complexes resulted in higher, more consistent levels of gene expression when compared to particles synthesized via manual mixing. The optimized forms of these particles both effectively bound (90% efficient) and condensed (70% efficient) plasmid DNA (pDNA) and possessed negative zeta potentials of approximately -20m

  7. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Hybrid Hydrogel Composed of Bombyx mori Fibroin and Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel hybrid hydrogel was prepared and investigated based on silkworm silk fibroin and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAm. PNIPAAm was introduced to silk fibroin, the resultant composite hydrogel was examined, and freeze-dried SF/PNIPAAm scaffold was analyzed using LB-550 dynamic light scattering particle-size analyzer, circular dichroism (CD, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Our results suggested that the hybrid hydrogels owned the porous sponge-like structures, and the gelation time of SF/PNIPAAm hybrids decreased with an increase in temperature and concentration of each polymer. Results of rheological analysis suggested that the rheological property of resultant SF/PNIPAAm gel depended on the concentration combinations as well as the aging time, which elapsed after mixing the two polymers. Results of CD spectra demonstrated that pH showed little influence on the secondary structure of silk fibroin, and significant changes of , , and G* as surrounding increase temperature above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST.

  8. Design Strategies for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papenburg, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on various aspects involved in scaffold design and the cell-scaffold interaction. The ultimate goal is to design a scaffold that supports functional tissue formation, resembling in vivo tissue organization, combined with good nutrient supply to the cells. In our concept 3D

  9. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Andersen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent, and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue.

  10. The Marine Sponge-Derived Inorganic Polymers, Biosilica and Polyphosphate, as Morphogenetically Active Matrices/Scaffolds for the Differentiation of Human Multipotent Stromal Cells: Potential Application in 3D Printing and Distraction Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2014-02-01

    alginate, supplemented with polyP and/or biosilica, is a suitable biomaterial that promotes the growth and differentiation of hMSCs and might be beneficial for application in 3D tissue printing of hMSCs and for the delivery of hMSCs in fractures, surgically created during distraction osteogenesis.

  11. The marine sponge-derived inorganic polymers, biosilica and polyphosphate, as morphogenetically active matrices/scaffolds for the differentiation of human multipotent stromal cells: potential application in 3D printing and distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Grebenjuk, Vladislav; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Mailänder, Volker; Steffen, Renate; Schloßmacher, Ute; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-02-21

    , supplemented with polyP and/or biosilica, is a suitable biomaterial that promotes the growth and differentiation of hMSCs and might be beneficial for application in 3D tissue printing of hMSCs and for the delivery of hMSCs in fractures, surgically created during distraction osteogenesis.

  12. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  13. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  14. DPSC colonization of functionalized 3D textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Marine; Rosales-Ibáñez, Raúl; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; De Bien, Charlotte; Toye, Dominique; Flores, Héctor; Grandfils, Christian

    2017-05-01

    Fiber scaffolds are attractive materials for mimicking, within a 3D in vitro system, any living environment in which animal cells can adhere and proliferate. In three dimensions, cells have the ability to communicate and organize into complex architectures similar to those found in their natural environments. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in terms of cell reactivity, a new in vitro cell model: dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in a 3D polymeric textile. Scaffolds were knitted from polyglycolic acid (PGA) or polydioxanone (PDO) fibers differing in surface roughness. To promote cell adhesion, these hydrophobic fabrics were also functionalized with either chitosan or the peptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD). Cell behavior was examined 1, 10, and 21 days post-seeding with a LIVE/DEAD ® Kit. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) highlighted the biocompatibility of these materials (cell survival rate: 94% to 100%). Fiber roughness was found to influence cell adhesion and viability significantly and favorably. A clear benefit of polymeric textile functionalization with chitosan or RGD was demonstrated in terms of cell adhesion and viability. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 785-794, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. 3D printing for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Get started printing out 3D objects quickly and inexpensively! 3D printing is no longer just a figment of your imagination. This remarkable technology is coming to the masses with the growing availability of 3D printers. 3D printers create 3-dimensional layered models and they allow users to create prototypes that use multiple materials and colors.  This friendly-but-straightforward guide examines each type of 3D printing technology available today and gives artists, entrepreneurs, engineers, and hobbyists insight into the amazing things 3D printing has to offer. You'll discover methods for

  16. 3D-DART: a DNA structure modelling server

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in structural studies of DNA by both experimental and computational approaches. Often, 3D-structural models of DNA are required, for instance, to serve as templates for homology modeling, as starting structures for macro-molecular docking or as scaffold for NMR structure

  17. 3D Printability of Alginate-Carboxymethyl Cellulose Hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Ahasan; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Mallik, Sanku; Khoda, Bashir

    2018-03-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) bio-printing is a revolutionary technology to reproduce a 3D functional living tissue scaffold in-vitro through controlled layer-by-layer deposition of biomaterials along with high precision positioning of cells. Due to its bio-compatibility, natural hydrogels are commonly considered as the scaffold material. However, the mechanical integrity of a hydrogel material, especially in 3D scaffold architecture, is an issue. In this research, a novel hybrid hydrogel, that is, sodium alginate with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) is developed and systematic quantitative characterization tests are conducted to validate its printability, shape fidelity and cell viability. The outcome of the rheological and mechanical test, filament collapse and fusion test demonstrate the favorable shape fidelity. Three-dimensional scaffold structures are fabricated with the pancreatic cancer cell, BxPC3 and the 86% cell viability is recorded after 23 days. This hybrid hydrogel can be a potential biomaterial in 3D bioprinting process and the outlined characterization techniques open an avenue directing reproducible printability and shape fidelity.

  18. 3D Printability of Alginate-Carboxymethyl Cellulose Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahasan Habib

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D bio-printing is a revolutionary technology to reproduce a 3D functional living tissue scaffold in-vitro through controlled layer-by-layer deposition of biomaterials along with high precision positioning of cells. Due to its bio-compatibility, natural hydrogels are commonly considered as the scaffold material. However, the mechanical integrity of a hydrogel material, especially in 3D scaffold architecture, is an issue. In this research, a novel hybrid hydrogel, that is, sodium alginate with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC is developed and systematic quantitative characterization tests are conducted to validate its printability, shape fidelity and cell viability. The outcome of the rheological and mechanical test, filament collapse and fusion test demonstrate the favorable shape fidelity. Three-dimensional scaffold structures are fabricated with the pancreatic cancer cell, BxPC3 and the 86% cell viability is recorded after 23 days. This hybrid hydrogel can be a potential biomaterial in 3D bioprinting process and the outlined characterization techniques open an avenue directing reproducible printability and shape fidelity.

  19. A Bioactive Hydrogel and 3D Printed Polycaprolactone System for Bone Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Ivan; Kumar, Alok; Joddar, Binata

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a hybrid system consisting of 3D printed polycaprolactone (PCL) filled with hydrogel was developed as an application for reconstruction of long bone defects, which are innately difficult to repair due to large missing segments of bone. A 3D printed gyroid scaffold of PCL allowed a larger amount of hydrogel to be loaded within the scaffolds as compared to 3D printed mesh and honeycomb scaffolds of similar volumes and strut thicknesses. The hydrogel was a mixture of alginate, gel...

  20. 3D game environments create professional 3D game worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Ahearn, Luke

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate resource to help you create triple-A quality art for a variety of game worlds; 3D Game Environments offers detailed tutorials on creating 3D models, applying 2D art to 3D models, and clear concise advice on issues of efficiency and optimization for a 3D game engine. Using Photoshop and 3ds Max as his primary tools, Luke Ahearn explains how to create realistic textures from photo source and uses a variety of techniques to portray dynamic and believable game worlds.From a modern city to a steamy jungle, learn about the planning and technological considerations for 3D modelin

  1. Lunaserv Global Explorer, 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miconi, C. E.; Estes, N. M.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Robinson, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    Lunaserv Global Explorer 3D is a platform independent, planetary data visualization application, which serves high resolution base-map imagery and terrain from web map service data sources, and displays it on a 3D spinning-globe interface.

  2. Immobilization of thorium over fibroin by polyacrylonitrile (PAN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslani, M.A.A.; Akyil, S.; Eral, M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes a process for immobilization of thorium over fibroin, which was used as a bio-adsorbant, by polyacrylonitrile. The amounts of thorium in aqueous solutions which may be leached in various aqueous ambients were detected by a spectrophotometer. The results show that polyacrylonitrile processes are feasible to immobilize spent fibroins. The leachability of the materials immobilized with polyacrylonitrile can meet the requirements of storage and final disposal. The leachability of thorium ions from immobilized spent fibroin was rather low for 8 months

  3. The Future Is 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Luke

    2015-01-01

    3D printers are a way of producing a 3D model of an item from a digital file. The model builds up in successive layers of material placed by the printer controlled by the information in the computer file. In this article the author argues that 3D printers are one of the greatest technological advances of recent times. He discusses practical uses…

  4. The 3D additivist cookbook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allahyari, Morehshin; Rourke, Daniel; Rasch, Miriam

    The 3D Additivist Cookbook, devised and edited by Morehshin Allahyari & Daniel Rourke, is a free compendium of imaginative, provocative works from over 100 world-leading artists, activists and theorists. The 3D Additivist Cookbook contains .obj and .stl files for the 3D printer, as well as critical

  5. Recent advances in 3D printing of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Helena N; Wu, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    3D Printing promises to produce complex biomedical devices according to computer design using patient-specific anatomical data. Since its initial use as pre-surgical visualization models and tooling molds, 3D Printing has slowly evolved to create one-of-a-kind devices, implants, scaffolds for tissue engineering, diagnostic platforms, and drug delivery systems. Fueled by the recent explosion in public interest and access to affordable printers, there is renewed interest to combine stem cells with custom 3D scaffolds for personalized regenerative medicine. Before 3D Printing can be used routinely for the regeneration of complex tissues (e.g. bone, cartilage, muscles, vessels, nerves in the craniomaxillofacial complex), and complex organs with intricate 3D microarchitecture (e.g. liver, lymphoid organs), several technological limitations must be addressed. In this review, the major materials and technology advances within the last five years for each of the common 3D Printing technologies (Three Dimensional Printing, Fused Deposition Modeling, Selective Laser Sintering, Stereolithography, and 3D Plotting/Direct-Write/Bioprinting) are described. Examples are highlighted to illustrate progress of each technology in tissue engineering, and key limitations are identified to motivate future research and advance this fascinating field of advanced manufacturing.

  6. Rheological and Mechanical Behavior of Silk Fibroin Reinforced Waterborne Polyurethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhen Tao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Waterborne polyurethane (WPU is a versatile and environment-friendly material with growing applications in both industry and academia. Silk fibroin (SF is an attractive material known for its structural, biological and hemocompatible properties. The SF reinforced waterborne polyurethane (WPU is a promising scaffold material for tissue engineering applications. In this work, we report synthesis and characterization of a novel nanocomposite using SF reinforced WPU. The rheological behaviors of WPU and WPU-SF dispersions with different solid contents were investigated with steady shear and dynamic oscillatory tests to evaluate the formation of the cross-linked gel structure. The average particle size and the zeta potential of WPU-SF dispersions with different SF content were examined at 25 °C to investigate the interaction between SF and WPU. FTIR, SEM, TEM and tensile testing were performed to study the effects of SF content on the structural morphology and mechanical properties of the resultant composite films. Experimental results revealed formation of gel network in the WPU dispersions at solid contents more than 17 wt %. The conjugate reaction between the WPU and SF as well as the hydrogen bond between them helped in dispersing the SF powder into the WPU matrix as small aggregates. Addition of SF to the WPU also improved the Young’s modulus from 0.30 to 3.91 MPa, tensile strength from 0.56 to 8.94 MPa, and elongation at break from 1067% to 2480%, as SF was increased up to 5 wt %. Thus, significant strengthening and toughening can be achieved by introducing SF powder into the WPU formulations.

  7. 3-D contextual Bayesian classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    distribution for the pixel values as well as a prior distribution for the configuration of class variables within the cross that is made of a pixel and its four nearest neighbours. We will extend these algorithms to 3-D, i.e. we will specify a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for a pixel and its 6 nearest 3......-D neighbours, and generalise the class variable configuration distributions within the 3-D cross given in 2-D algorithms. The new 3-D algorithms are tested on a synthetic 3-D multivariate dataset....

  8. Gelation Behaviors and Mechanism of Silk Fibroin According to the Addition of Nitrate Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Su Im

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Silk fibroin (SF is a typical fibrous protein that is secreted by silkworms and spiders. It has been used in a variety of areas, and especially for tissue-engineering scaffolds, due to its sound processability, mechanical properties, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. With respect to gelation, the SF gelation time is long in aqueous solutions, so a novel approach is needed to shorten this time. The solubility of regenerated SF is sound in formic acid (FA, which is a carboxylic acid of the simplest structure. In this study, SF was dissolved in formic acid, and the addition of salts then induced a rapid gelation that accompanied a solution-color change. Based on the gelation behaviors of the SF solution according to different SF and salt concentrations, the gelation mechanism was investigated.

  9. Collaboration of 3D context and extracellular matrix in the development of glioma stemness in a 3D model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Nina K L; Lim, Jia Kai; Leong, Meng Fatt; Sandanaraj, Edwin; Ang, Beng Ti; Tang, Carol; Wan, Andrew C A

    2016-02-01

    A hierarchy of cellular stemness exists in certain cancers, and any successful strategy to treat such cancers would have to eliminate the self-renewing tumor-initiating cells at the apex of the hierarchy. The cellular microenvironment, in particular the extracellular matrix (ECM), is believed to have a role in regulating stemness. In this work, U251 glioblastoma cells are cultured on electrospun polystyrene (ESPS) scaffolds coated with an array of 7 laminin isoforms to provide a 3D model for stem cell-related genes and proteins expression studies. We observed collaboration between 3D context and laminins in promoting glioma stemness. Depending on the laminin isoform presented, U251 cells cultured on ESPS scaffolds (3D) exhibited increased expression of stemness markers compared to those cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (2D). Our results indicate the influence of 3D (versus 2D) context on integrin expression, specifically, the upregulation of the laminin-binding integrins alpha 6 and beta 4. By a colony forming assay, we showed enhanced clonogenicity of cells grown on ESPS scaffolds in collaboration with laminins 411, 421, 511 and 521. Evaluation of patient glioma databases demonstrated significant enrichment of integrin and ECM pathway networks in tumors of worse prognosis, consistent with our observations. The present results demonstrate how 3D versus 2D context profoundly affects ECM signaling, leading to stemness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Silk fibroin membrane used for guided bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yurong; Guo, Junmao; Chen, Cen; Yao, Chenxue; Chung, Sung-Min; Yao, Juming; Lee, In-Seop; Kong, Xiangdong

    2017-01-01

    With the aim to develop a novel membrane with an appropriate mechanical property and degradation rate for guided bone tissue regeneration, lyophilized and densified silk fibroin membrane was fabricated and its mechanical behavior as well as biodegradation property were investigated