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Sample records for fibrocartilage

  1. Triangular fibrocartilage complex injury treated with prolotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Kesikburun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Triangular fibrocartilage complex has a crucial role in stability and functionality of the wrist. Traumatic or degenerative injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex is a common cause of ulnar side wrist pain. Arthroscopic treatment has been offered in chronic triangular fibrocartilage complex injury. A 19-year old male patient presented with pain at ulnar side of the wrist. He was diagnosed as having triangular fibrocartilage complex injury after assessment with MR imaging. The patients who did not benefit from drugs underwent prolotherapy three times. After treatment, he had pain relief and reported that he could use his wrist better. In this case, triangular fibrocartilage complex injury improved with prolotherapy and arthroscopic treatment was not required. Further clinical trials are needed to show better the role of prolotherapy in the treatment of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 403-405

  2. Response of knee fibrocartilage to joint destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, N A; Hagiwara, Y; Jiang, X; Huang, J; Adams, D J; Rowe, D W

    2015-06-01

    A major challenge to understanding osteoarthritis (OA) pathology is identifying the cellular events that precede the onset of cartilage damage. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of joint destabilization on early changes to fibrocartilage in the joint. The anterior cruciate ligament was transected in collagen reporter mice (Col1CFP and ColXRFP). Mineralization labels were given every 2 weeks to measure new mineralized cartilage apposition. Novel fluorescent histology of mineralized tissue was used to characterize the changes in fibrocartilage at 2 and 4 weeks post-injury. Changes in fibrocartilaginous structures of the joint occur as early as 2 weeks after injury and are well developed by 4 weeks. The alterations are seen in multiple entheses and in the medial surface of the femoral and tibial condyles. In the responding entheses, mineral apposition towards the ligament midsubstance results in thickening of the mineralize fibrocartilage. These changes are associated with increases in ColX-RFP, Col1-CFP reporter activity and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. Mineral apposition also occurs in the fibrocartilage of the non-articular regions of the medial condyles by 2 weeks and develops into osteophytes by 4 weeks post-injury. An unexpected observation is punctate expression of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase activity in unmineralized fibrochondrocytes adjacent to active appositional mineralization. These observations suggest that fibrocartilage activates prior to degradation of the articular cartilage. Thus clinical and histological imaging of fibrocartilage may be an earlier indicator of disease initiation and may indicate a more appropriate time to start preventative treatment. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Histological assessment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex.

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    Semisch, M; Hagert, E; Garcia-Elias, M; Lluch, A; Rein, S

    2016-06-01

    The morphological structure of the seven components of triangular fibrocartilage complexes of 11 cadaver wrists of elderly people was assessed microscopically, after staining with Hematoxylin-Eosin and Elastica van Gieson. The articular disc consisted of tight interlaced fibrocartilage without blood vessels except in its ulnar part. Volar and dorsal radioulnar ligaments showed densely parallel collagen bundles. The subsheath of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle, the ulnotriquetral and ulnolunate ligament showed mainly mixed tight and loose parallel tissue. The ulnolunate ligament contained tighter parallel collagen bundles and clearly less elastic fibres than the ulnotriquetral ligament. The ulnocarpal meniscoid had an irregular morphological composition and loose connective tissue predominated. The structure of the articular disc indicates a buffering function. The tight structure of radioulnar and ulnolunate ligaments reflects a central stabilizing role, whereas the ulnotriquetral ligament and ulnocarpal meniscoid have less stabilizing functions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Wrist stability after experimental traumatic triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Bo; Jensen, Steen Lund; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in stability of the wrist after experimental traumatic triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions.......The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in stability of the wrist after experimental traumatic triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions....

  5. Fibrocartilage in the attachment zones of the quadriceps tendon and patellar ligament of man.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, E J; Benjamin, M; Pemberton, D J

    1990-01-01

    Differences are reported in the quantities and distribution of uncalcified fibrocartilage at the attachment sites of the quadriceps tendon and the patellar ligament. The largest quantity of fibrocartilage was characteristic of the quadriceps tendon. A prominent wedge of fibrocartilage was seen in the proximal part of the tibial attachment of the patellar ligament, though there was no fibrocartilage in the most superficial fibres. Little fibrocartilage was seen at the patellar attachment of th...

  6. MR Imaging of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Michael E; Nakamura, David T; Small, Kirstin M; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    MR imaging has emerged as the mainstay in imaging internal derangement of the soft tissues of the musculoskeletal system largely because of superior contrast resolution. The complex geometry and diminutive size of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and its constituent structures can make optimal imaging of the TFCC challenging; therefore, production of clinically useful images requires careful optimization of image acquisition parameters. This article provides a foundation for advanced TFCC imaging including factors to optimize magnetic resonance images, arthrography, detailed anatomy, and classification of injury. In addition, clinical presentations and treatments for TFCC injury are briefly considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arthroscopic-Assisted Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu-Kay Mak, Michael; Ho, Pak-Cheong

    2017-11-01

    Injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is a common cause of ulnar-sided wrist pain. Volar and dorsal radioulnar ligaments and their foveal insertion are the most important stabilizing components of the TFCC. In irreparable tears, anatomic reconstruction of the TFCC aims to restore normal biomechanics and stability of the distal radioulnar joint. We proposed a novel arthroscopic-assisted technique using a palmaris longus tendon graft. Arthroscopic-assisted TFCC reconstruction is a safe and effective approach with outcomes comparable to conventional open reconstruction and may result in a better range of motion from minimizing soft tissue dissection and subsequent scarring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthrography in lesions of triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, W.S.; Seifert, J.

    1982-01-01

    Arthography of the wrist is a safe method to demonstrate lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage. Indications are posttraumatic pain and restriction of movement of the wrist. Lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage are caused by a distal fracture of the radius with shortening, sudden drop on the overextended hand and work with rock drills. The extent of injury is quite different: small fissures and splits, detachment of the discus from the lower end of the ulna, fragmentation and destruction of the fibrocartilage. Problems of therapy, however, are greater than problems of diagnosis: actually there is no generally adopted surgical method for the treatment of discus lections. (orig./MG)

  9. Arthrography in lesions of triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, W.S.; Seifert, J.

    1982-05-01

    Arthography of the wrist is a safe method to demonstrate lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage. Indications are posttraumatic pain and restriction of movement of the wrist. Lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage are caused by a distal fracture of the radius with shortening, sudden drop on the overextended hand and work with rock drills. The extent of injury is quite different: small fissures and splits, detachment of the discus from the lower end of the ulna, fragmentation and destruction of the fibrocartilage. Problems of therapy, however, are greater than problems of diagnosis: actually there is no generally adopted surgical method for the treatment of discus lesions.

  10. Temporomandibular joint fibrocartilage degeneration from unilateral dental splints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Lowe, Jesse R; Tudares, Mauro A; Gold, Michael S; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which altered loading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), as might be associated with a malocclusion, drives degeneration of articulating surfaces in the TMJ. We therefore sought to quantify the effects of altered joint loading on the mechanical properties and biochemical content and distribution of TMJ fibrocartilage in the rabbit. Altered TMJ loading was induced with a 1mm splint placed unilaterally over the maxillary and mandibular molars for 6 weeks. At that time, TMJ fibrocartilage was assessed by compression testing, biochemical content (collagen, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), DNA) and distribution (histology), for both the TMJ disc and the condylar fibrocartilage. There were no changes in the TMJ disc for any of the parameters tested. The condylar fibrocartilage from the splinted animals was significantly stiffer and the DNA content was significantly lower than that in control animals. There was significant remodeling in the condylar fibrocartilage layers as manifested by a change in GAG and collagen II distribution and a loss of defined cell layers. A connection between the compressive properties of TMJ condylar fibrocartilage after 6 weeks of splinting and the changes in histology was observed. These results suggest a change in joint loading leads to condylar damage, which may contribute to pain associated with at least some forms of TMJ disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanoactive scaffold induces tendon remodeling and expression of fibrocartilage markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Vyner, Moira C; Jacobs, Matthew T; Moffat, Kristen L; Lu, Helen H

    2008-08-01

    Biological fixation of soft tissue-based grafts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction poses a major clinical challenge. The ACL integrates with subchondral bone through a fibrocartilage enthesis, which serves to minimize stress concentrations and enables load transfer between two distinct tissue types. Functional integration thus requires the reestablishment of this fibrocartilage interface on reconstructed ACL grafts. We designed and characterized a novel mechanoactive scaffold based on a composite of poly-alpha-hydroxyester nanofibers and sintered microspheres; we then used the scaffold to test the hypothesis that scaffold-induced compression of tendon grafts would result in matrix remodeling and the expression of fibrocartilage interface-related markers. Histology coupled with confocal microscopy and biochemical assays were used to evaluate the effects of scaffold-induced compression on tendon matrix collagen distribution, cellularity, proteoglycan content, and gene expression over a 2-week period. Scaffold contraction resulted in over 15% compression of the patellar tendon graft and upregulated the expression of fibrocartilage-related markers such as Type II collagen, aggrecan, and transforming growth factor-beta3 (TGF-beta3). Additionally, proteoglycan content was higher in the compressed tendon group after 1 day. The data suggest the potential of a mechanoactive scaffold to promote the formation of an anatomic fibrocartilage enthesis on tendon-based ACL reconstruction grafts.

  12. Engineering functional anisotropy in fibrocartilage neotissues.

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    MacBarb, Regina F; Chen, Alison L; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2013-12-01

    The knee meniscus, intervertebral disc, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc all possess complex geometric shapes and anisotropic matrix organization. While these characteristics are imperative for proper tissue function, they are seldom recapitulated following injury or disease. Thus, this study's objective was to engineer fibrocartilages that capture both gross and molecular structural features of native tissues. Self-assembled TMJ discs were selected as the model system, as the disc exhibits a unique biconcave shape and functional anisotropy. To drive anisotropy, 50:50 co-cultures of meniscus cells and articular chondrocytes were grown in biconcave, TMJ-shaped molds and treated with two exogenous stimuli: biomechanical (BM) stimulation via passive axial compression and bioactive agent (BA) stimulation via chondroitinase-ABC and transforming growth factor-β1. BM + BA synergistically increased Col/WW, Young's modulus, and ultimate tensile strength 5.8-fold, 14.7-fold, and 13.8-fold that of controls, respectively; it also promoted collagen fibril alignment akin to native tissue. Finite element analysis found BM stimulation to create direction-dependent strains within the neotissue, suggesting shape plays an essential role toward driving in vitro anisotropic neotissue development. Methods used in this study offer insight on the ability to achieve physiologic anisotropy in biomaterials through the strategic application of spatial, biomechanical, and biochemical cues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Decellularized Fibrocartilage "Book" Scaffold for Use in Tissue Engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun Guo

    Full Text Available At the tendon-to-bone insertion, there is a unique transitional structure: tendon, non-calcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. The reconstruction of this special graded structure after defects or damage is an important but challenging task in orthopedics. In particular, reconstruction of the fibrocartilage zone has yet to be successfully achieved. In this study, the development of a novel book-shape scaffold derived from the extracellular matrix of fibrocartilage was reported. Specifically, fibrocartilage from the pubic symphysis was obtained from rabbits and sliced into the shape of a book (dimensions: 10 mm × 3 mm × 1 mm with 10 layers, each layer (akin to a page of a book with a thickness of 100-μm. These fibrocartilage "book" scaffolds were decellularized using sequentially 3 freeze-thaw cycles, 0.1% Triton X-100 with 1.5 M KCl, 0.25% trypsin, and a nuclease. Histology and DNA quantification analysis confirmed substantial removal of cells from the fibrocartilage scaffolds. Furthermore, the quantities of DNA, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan in the fibrocartilage were markedly reduced following decellularization. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the intrinsic ultrastructure of the fibrocartilage tissue was well preserved. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the novel "book" fibrocartilage scaffold could have potential applications in tissue engineering.

  14. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Decellularized Fibrocartilage "Book" Scaffold for Use in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liyun; Qu, Jin; Zheng, Cheng; Cao, Yong; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Hongbin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    At the tendon-to-bone insertion, there is a unique transitional structure: tendon, non-calcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. The reconstruction of this special graded structure after defects or damage is an important but challenging task in orthopedics. In particular, reconstruction of the fibrocartilage zone has yet to be successfully achieved. In this study, the development of a novel book-shape scaffold derived from the extracellular matrix of fibrocartilage was reported. Specifically, fibrocartilage from the pubic symphysis was obtained from rabbits and sliced into the shape of a book (dimensions: 10 mm × 3 mm × 1 mm) with 10 layers, each layer (akin to a page of a book) with a thickness of 100-μm. These fibrocartilage "book" scaffolds were decellularized using sequentially 3 freeze-thaw cycles, 0.1% Triton X-100 with 1.5 M KCl, 0.25% trypsin, and a nuclease. Histology and DNA quantification analysis confirmed substantial removal of cells from the fibrocartilage scaffolds. Furthermore, the quantities of DNA, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan in the fibrocartilage were markedly reduced following decellularization. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the intrinsic ultrastructure of the fibrocartilage tissue was well preserved. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the novel "book" fibrocartilage scaffold could have potential applications in tissue engineering.

  15. Arthroscopic assisted tendon reconstruction for triangular fibrocartilage complex irreparable tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, R; Atzei, A

    2017-05-01

    We report our 11-year experience of performing arthroscopically assisted triangular fibrocartilage complex reconstruction in the treatment of chronic distal radio-ulnar joint instability resulting from irreparable triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries. Eleven patients were treated. Three skin incisions were made in order to create radial and ulna tunnels for passage of the tendon graft, which is used to reconstruct the dorsal and palmar radio-ulnar ligaments, under fluoroscopic and arthroscopic guidance. At a mean follow-up of 68 months all but one had a stable distal radio-ulnar joint. Pain and grip strength, Mayo wrist score, Disability of the Arm Hand and Shoulder and patient-rated wrist and hand evaluation scores improved. The ranges of forearm rotation remained largely unchanged. Complications included an early tendon graft tear, two late-onset graft ruptures, one ulna styloid fracture during surgery and persistent wrist discomfort during forearm rotation requiring tendon graft revision in one case. An arthroscopic assisted approach for triangular fibrocartilage complex reconstruction appears safe and produces comparable results with the open technique. IV.

  16. MR imaging of the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golimbu, C.N.; Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Melone, C.; Leber, C.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the wrist was performed in 25 patients who had pain or localized soft-tissue swelling in the ulnar side of the wrist. T1-weighted coronal images were obtained in all patients. In addition, coronal or axial images with T2-weighted or fast-field-echo sequences were obtained in 16 of these patients. MR imaging demonstrated tears of the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist in 13 patients. Twelve of these tears were confirmed at surgery. In one patient, the triangular fibrocartilage was found at surgery to be stretched and folded on itself but not torn. This represents the one false-positive MR image in this group of patients. In 12 patients, the symptoms could be explained by a diversity of MR abnormalities, such as aseptic necrosis of carpal bones, subluxation of distal radioulnar joint, and synovitis of the tendon sheaths. MR imaging offers the advantage of investigating the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist in a noninvasive manner; it may be used as a screening method in patients considered for surgery

  17. Indications, techniques, and outcomes of arthroscopic repair of scapholunate ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathoulin, C L

    2017-07-01

    This review includes updated understanding of the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic carpal ligaments in scapholunate instability and details the author's experience of indications, arthroscopic repair methods, and outcomes of treating the instability. A classification on triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries is reviewed, followed by author's indications, methods, and outcomes of arthroscopic repair of triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries.

  18. Arthroscopic Management of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Peripheral Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, Jan Ragnar; Søreide, Endre

    2017-11-01

    Patients suffering from ulnar-sided wrist pain after trauma may develop tenderness, clicking, a positive fovea sign, or instability of the distal radioulnar joint. If the pain is persistent, conservative treatment does not help, and the patient agrees to surgery, arthroscopy may reveal a triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury with capsular detachment, foveal avulsion, or a combination thereof. Capsular reattachment is possible using an arthroscopic assisted technique. The reattachment can be performed with an inside-out, outside-in, or all-inside technique, providing good to excellent results, which tend to persist over time, in 60% to 90% of cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arthroscopic Management of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Foveal Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujio, Keiji

    2017-11-01

    The deep component of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) inserts onto the fovea of the ulnar head. This component is critical to provide distal radioulnar joint stability. The surgical techniques and results of transosseous inside-out TFCC foveal repair are discussed. The rewarding results encouraged the repair of TFCC to the fovea arthroscopically. Although the results are good, the factors of age (traumatic or degenerative) and quality of stump and TFCC proper, which relate to the results should be considered in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnosis of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury using arthrography and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Kiyonobu; Soejima, Osamu; Naito, Masatoshi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    Twenty patients (twenty-one wrists) with chronic ulnar wrist pain who had undergone radiocarpal arthrography and MRI before arthroscopic examination were evaluated to determine the usefulness of these preoperative diagnostic procedures (arthrogrphy and MRI) for the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury. Based on the arthroscopic findings, the sensitivity and specificity of arthrography were 63% and 100% respectively for detecting TFCC lesions, while they were 68% and 50% respectively for MRI. Although no significant superiority was observed between arthrography and MRI in this study, further improrumchts in the preoperative diagnostic procedures are still needed in order to more accurately detect TFCC injuries. (author)

  1. Classification of ulnar triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. A treatment algorithm for Palmer type IB tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzei, A; Luchetti, R; Garagnani, L

    2017-05-01

    The classical definition of 'Palmer Type IB' triangular fibrocartilage complex tear, includes a spectrum of clinical conditions. This review highlights the clinical and arthroscopic criteria that enable us to categorize five classes on a treatment-oriented classification system of triangular fibrocartilage complex peripheral tears. Class 1 lesions represent isolated tears of the distal triangular fibrocartilage complex without distal radio-ulnar joint instability and are amenable to arthroscopic suture. Class 2 tears include rupture of both the distal triangular fibrocartilage complex and proximal attachments of the triangular fibrocartilage complex to the fovea. Class 3 tears constitute isolated ruptures of the proximal attachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex to the fovea; they are not visible at radio-carpal arthroscopy. Both Class 2 and Class 3 tears are diagnosed with a positive hook test and are typically associated with distal radio-ulnar joint instability. If required, treatment is through reattachment of the distal radio-ulnar ligament insertions to the fovea. Class 4 lesions are irreparable tears due to the size of the defect or to poor tissue quality and, if required, treatment is through distal radio-ulnar ligament reconstruction with tendon graft. Class 5 tears are associated with distal radio-ulnar joint arthritis and can only be treated with salvage procedures. This subdivision of type IB triangular fibrocartilage complex tear provides more insights in the pathomechanics and treatment strategies. II.

  2. Improved identification of the palmar fibrocartilage of the navicular bone with saline magnetic resonance bursography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramme, Michael; Kerekes, Zoltan; Hunter, Stuart; Nagy, Krisztina; Pease, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Fibrocartilage degeneration is the earliest pathologic finding in navicular disease but remains difficult to detect, even with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We hypothesized that injection of the navicular bursa with saline would improve accuracy of MR imaging evaluation of palmar fibrocartilage. Thoracic limbs were collected from 11 horses within 6 h of death. Imaging was performed with a 1.5 T magnet using sagittal 2D proton density and transverse 3D FLASH sequences with fat saturation. For the purpose of determining sensitivity and specificity of the MR images, fibrocartilage was classified as normal or abnormal, based on combination of the findings of gross and microscopic pathology. Thickness of fibrocartilage was measured on histologic sections and corresponding transverse FLASH MR images before and after injection of saline. A paired Student's t-test was used for comparison of measurements. Partial thickness fibrocartilage loss was present in 6 of 22 limbs. Sensitivity of precontrast MR images for detection of lesions was 100% while specificity was 6%. Saline MR arthrography resulted in both sensitivity and specificity of 100% based on consensus review. Mean histologic fibrocartilage thickness was 0.75 +/- 0.12 mm. Mean fibrocartilage thickness on precontrast transverse FLASH images was 0.93 +/- 0.065 and 0.73 +/- 0.09 mm on postsaline images. The histologic cartilage thickness was signficantly different from that in precontrast images (Pfibrocartilage can only be evaluated reliably for the presence of partial thickness lesions after intrabursal injection of saline.

  3. Extracorporeal shockwave enhanced regeneration of fibrocartilage in a delayed tendon-bone insertion repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Dick Ho Kiu; Suen, Pui Kit; Huang, Le; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Ng, Chun; Shi, San Qiang; Wong, Margaret Wan Nar; Qin, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Fibrous tissue is often formed in delayed healing of tendon bone insertion (TBI) instead of fibrocartilage. Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) provides mechanical cues and upregulates expression of fibrocartilage-related makers and cytokines. We hypothesized that ESW would accelerate fibrocartilage regeneration at the healing interface in a delayed TBI healing model. Partial patellectomy with shielding at the TBI interface was performed on 32 female New Zealand White Rabbits for establishing this delayed TBI healing model. The rabbits were separated into the control and ESW group for evaluations at postoperative week 8 and 12. Shielding was removed at week 4 and a single ESW treatment was applied at week 6. Fibrocartilage regeneration was evaluated histomorphologically and immunohistochemically. Vickers hardness of the TBI matrix was measured by micro-indentation. ESW group showed higher fibrocartilage area, thickness, and proteoglycan deposition than the control in week 8 and 12. ESW increased expression of SOX9 and collagen II significantly in week 8 and 12, respectively. ESW group showed a gradual transition of hardness from bone to fibrocartilage to tendon, and had a higher Vickers hardness than the control group at week 12. In conclusion, ESW enhanced fibrocartilage regeneration at the healing interface in a delayed TBI healing model. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. In vitro engineering of fibrocartilage using CDMP1 induced dermal fibroblasts and polyglycolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guiqing; Yin, Shuo; Liu, Guangpeng; Cen, Lian; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Heng; Liu, Wei; Cui, Lei; Cao, Yilin

    2009-07-01

    This study was designed to explore the feasibility of using cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-1 (CDMP1) induced dermal fibroblasts (DFs) as seed cells and polyglycolide (PGA) as scaffold for fibrocartilage engineering. DFs isolated from canine were expanded and seeded on PGA scaffold to fabricate cell/scaffold constructs which were cultured with or without CDMP1. Proliferation and differentiation of DFs in different constructs were determined by DNA assay and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production. Histological and immunohistochemical staining of the constructs after being in vitro cultured for 4 and 6 weeks were carried out to observe the fibrocartilage formation condition. The fibrocartilage-specific gene expression by cells in the constructs was analyzed by real-time PCR. It was shown that in the presence of CDMP1 the proliferation and GAG synthesis of DFs were significantly enhanced compared to those without CDMP1. Fibrocartilage-like tissue was formed in the CDMP1 induced construct after being cultured for 4 weeks, and it became more matured at 6 weeks as stronger staining for GAG and higher gene expression of collagen type II was observed. Since only weak staining for GAG and collagen type II was observed for the construct engineered without CDMP1, the induction effect on the fibrocartilage engineering can be ascertained when using DFs as seed cells. Furthermore, the potential of using DFs as seed cells to engineer fibrocartilage is substantiated and further study on using the engineered tissue to repair fibrocartilage defects is currently ongoing in our group.

  5. Optimizing gelling parameters of gellan gum for fibrocartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeyeon; Fisher, Stephanie; Kallos, Michael S; Hunter, Christopher J

    2011-08-01

    Gellan gum is an attractive biomaterial for fibrocartilage tissue engineering applications because it is cell compatible, can be injected into a defect, and gels at body temperature. However, the gelling parameters of gellan gum have not yet been fully optimized. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanics, degradation, gelling temperature, and viscosity of low acyl and low/high acyl gellan gum blends. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that increased concentrations of low acyl gellan gum resulted in increased stiffness and the addition of high acyl gellan gum resulted in greatly decreased stiffness. Degradation studies showed that low acyl gellan gum was more stable than low/high acyl gellan gum blends. Gelling temperature studies showed that increased concentrations of low acyl gellan gum and CaCl₂ increased gelling temperature and low acyl gellan gum concentrations below 2% (w/v) would be most suitable for cell encapsulation. Gellan gum blends were generally found to have a higher gelling temperature than low acyl gellan gum. Viscosity studies showed that increased concentrations of low acyl gellan gum increased viscosity. Our results suggest that 2% (w/v) low acyl gellan gum would have the most appropriate mechanics, degradation, and gelling temperature for use in fibrocartilage tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of a Novel Decellularized Fibrocartilage “Book” Scaffold for Use in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liyun; Qu, Jin; Zheng, Cheng; Cao, Yong; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Hongbin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    At the tendon-to-bone insertion, there is a unique transitional structure: tendon, non-calcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. The reconstruction of this special graded structure after defects or damage is an important but challenging task in orthopedics. In particular, reconstruction of the fibrocartilage zone has yet to be successfully achieved. In this study, the development of a novel book-shape scaffold derived from the extracellular matrix of fibrocartilage was reported. Specifically, fibrocartilage from the pubic symphysis was obtained from rabbits and sliced into the shape of a book (dimensions: 10 mm × 3 mm × 1 mm) with 10 layers, each layer (akin to a page of a book) with a thickness of 100-μm. These fibrocartilage “book” scaffolds were decellularized using sequentially 3 freeze-thaw cycles, 0.1% Triton X-100 with 1.5 M KCl, 0.25% trypsin, and a nuclease. Histology and DNA quantification analysis confirmed substantial removal of cells from the fibrocartilage scaffolds. Furthermore, the quantities of DNA, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan in the fibrocartilage were markedly reduced following decellularization. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the intrinsic ultrastructure of the fibrocartilage tissue was well preserved. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the novel “book” fibrocartilage scaffold could have potential applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26636672

  7. Diagnosing central lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage as traumatic or degenerative: a review of clinical accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, S; Erne, H; Pillukat, T; Mühldorfer-Fodor, M; Unglaub, F; Spies, C K

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the reliability of surgeons' estimations as to whether central lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex were traumatic or degenerative. A total of 50 consecutive central triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions were independently rated by ten experienced wrist surgeons viewing high-quality arthroscopy videos. The videos were reassessed after intervals of 3 months; at the second assessment surgeons were given the patient's history, radiographs and both, each in a randomized order. Finally, the surgeons assessed the histories and radiographs without the videos. Kappa statistics revealed fair interrater agreement when the histories were added to the videos. The other four modalities demonstrated moderate agreement, with lower Kappa values for the assessment without videos. Intra-rater reliability showed fair agreement for three surgeons, moderate agreement for two surgeons and substantial agreement for five surgeons. It appears that classification of central triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions depends on the information provided upon viewing the triangular fibrocartilage complex at arthroscopy. II.

  8. Ultrastructure of the developing fibrocartilage of the os penis of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, K; Yamaoka, I; Murakami, R

    2000-02-01

    Development of the fibrocartilage of the os penis of rat was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Prepubertal (0-4 weeks of development) and pubertal (4-8 weeks of development) males were examined. Effects of castration on the development of the fibrocartilage were also examined. During the first 0-4 weeks of development, cells in the primordium of the fibrocartilage became large and the cytoplasm had well-developed rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) and many intermediate filaments. Collagen fibers increased markedly in amount in the extracellular matrix (ECM) during the period. For 4-6 weeks, when gonadal secretion of androgens increases, the cells developed into mature chondrocytes with lacunae. Collagenous bundles were pushed away from the lacunae, resulting in a characteristic appearance of this fibrocartilage. The cytoplasm of the mature chondrocytes of the fibrocartilage was characterized by many intermediate filaments, oil droplets, glycogen granules, and well-developed rER. At 6 weeks, calcification started on the cell membrane of the mature chondrocytes. At 8 weeks, a large part of the cartilage matrix was calcified. Matrix vesicles that originate from degenerated chondrocytes were found in the ECM of decalcified samples. In castrated males, cells of the primordium of the fibrocartilage ceased further development after castration. Intermediate filaments were still abundant in the cytoplasm and collagen fibers increased even after castration, but mature chondrocytes never differentiated. There were no signs of matrix vesicle formation, calcification, or cell degeneration in the fibrocartilage primordium. The developmental process of the fibrocartilage can be subdivided into two phases: collagenous matrix formation during the prepubertal period (0-4 weeks), and maturation of chondrocytes and calcification after puberty (4-8 weeks). Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Fibrocartilage in various regions of the human glenoid labrum. An immunohistochemical study on human cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockert, Ben; Braunstein, Volker; Sprecher, Christoph M; Shinohara, Yasushi; Milz, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    The nature and the distribution of fibrocartilage at the human glenoid labrum are unclear, and a better understanding may help to restore its function in open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Aim of this study was to describe the fibrocartilage extent within the labrum at clinically relevant sites of the glenoid in order to relate the molecular composition of the labrum to its mechanical environment. Twelve fresh frozen human cadaveric shoulders (mean age 38 years) were obtained, and sections perpendicular to the glenoid rim at the 12, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 9 o' clock position were labelled with antibodies against collagen I and II, aggrecan and link protein. A fibrocartilaginous transition zone with a characteristic collagen fibre orientation was found in 81% of cases, evenly distributed (83-92%) around the glenoid rim. The percentage of labrum cross-sectional area comprised of fibrocartilage averaged 28% and ranged from 26% at 12 o'clock on the glenoid clock face to 30% at 3 o'clock. The highest amount of fibrocartilage (82%) was found in the region neighbouring the hyaline articular cartilage. In the region beyond the bony edge of the glenoid, fibrocartilage cross-sectional area did not exceed 12-17%. Fibrocartilage is present at all examined positions around the glenoid rim and constitutes up to 1/3 of the cross-sectional area of the labrum. In turn, the percentage of fibrocartilage in different regions of its cross-section varies considerably. The findings suggest that the penetration of fibrocartilaginous tissue may be reduced by avoiding the highly fibrocartilage transition zone during restoration of labral detachment.

  10. [CONDITIONS OF SYNOVIAL MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS DIFFERENTIATING INTO FIBROCARTILAGE CELLS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peiliang; Cong, Ruijun; Chen, Song; Zhang, Lei; Ding, Zheru; Zhou, Qi; Li, Lintao; Xu, Zhenyu; Wu, Yuli; Wu, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    To explore the conditions of synovial derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) differentiating into the fibrocartilage cells by using the orthogonal experiment. The synovium was harvested from 5 adult New Zealand white rabbits, and SMSCs were separated by adherence method. The flow cytometry and multi-directional differentiation method were used to identify the SMSCs. The conditions were found from the preliminary experiment and literature review. The missing test was carried out to screen the conditions and then 12 conditions were used for the orthogonal experiment, including transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2), dexamethasone (DEX), proline, ascorbic acid (ASA), pyruvic acid, insulin + transferrin + selenious acid pre-mixed solution (ITS), bovin serum albumin (BSA), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), intermittent hydraulic pressure (IHP), bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF). The L60 (212) orthogonal experiment was designed using the SPSS 18.0 with 2 level conditions and the cells were induced to differentiate on the small intestinal submucosa (SIS)-3D scaffold. The CD151+/CD44+ cells were detected with the flow cytometry and then the differentiation rate was recorded. The immumohistochemical staining, cellular morphology, toluidine blue staining, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR examination for the gene expressions of sex determining region Y (SRY)-box 9 gene (Sox9), aggrecan gene (AGN), collagen type I gene (Col I), collagen type II gene (Col II), collagen type IX gene (Col IX) were used for result confirmation. The differentiation rate was calculated as the product of CD151/CD44+ cells and cells with Col I high expression. The grow curve was detected with the DNA abundance using the PicoGreen Assay. The visual observation and the variances analysis among the variable were used to evaluate the result of the orthogonal experiment, 1 level interaction was considered. The q-test and the

  11. Growth factor effects on costal chondrocytes for tissue engineering fibrocartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, D.E.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineered fibrocartilage could become a feasible option for replacing tissues like the knee meniscus or temporomandibular joint disc. This study employed five growth factors insulin-like growth factor-I, transforming growth factor-β1, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, and basic fibroblast growth factor in a scaffoldless approach with costal chondrocytes, attempting to improve biochemical and mechanical properties of engineered constructs. Samples were quantitatively assessed for total collagen, glycosaminoglycans, collagen type I, collagen type II, cells, compressive properties, and tensile properties at two time points. Most treated constructs were worse than the no growth factor control, suggesting a detrimental effect, but the IGF treatment tended to improve the constructs. Additionally, the 6wk time point was consistently better than 3wks, with total collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and aggregate modulus doubling during this time. Further optimization of the time in culture and exogenous stimuli will be important in making a more functional replacement tissue. PMID:18597118

  12. Chronologic and Geographic Trends of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taichi; Sterbenz, Jennifer M; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-11-01

    This article shows trends in triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) repair since 1990 by geographic area and year. The repair methods presented in the literature were inside-out, outside-in, all-inside, and open repair. The outside-in technique was reported most often for ulnar-side tears, whereas the inside-out technique was reported most frequently for radial-side tears. Recently, a foveal reattachment technique for ulnar-side tears has garnered attention and has been reported with increasing frequency, especially in Asia, because the deepest portion of TFCC, attached to fovea, plays a key role in stabilizing the distal radioulnar joint. Understanding these trends can help clinicians best treat TFCC tears. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fibrocartilage tissue engineering: the role of the stress environment on cell morphology and matrix expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Das, Rosalina; Birman, Victor; Smith, Lester; Ku, Katherine; Elson, Elliott L; Pryse, Kenneth M; Marquez, Juan Pablo; Genin, Guy M

    2011-04-01

    Although much is known about the effects of uniaxial mechanical loading on fibrocartilage development, the stress fields to which fibrocartilaginous regions are subjected to during development are mutiaxial. That fibrocartilage develops at tendon-to-bone attachments and in compressive regions of tendons is well established. However, the three-dimensional (3D) nature of the stresses needed for the development of fibrocartilage is not known. Here, we developed and applied an in vitro system to determine whether fibrocartilage can develop under a state of periodic hydrostatic tension in which only a single principal component of stress is compressive. This question is vital to efforts to mechanically guide morphogenesis and matrix expression in engineered tissue replacements. Mesenchymal stromal cells in a 3D culture were exposed to compressive and tensile stresses as a result of an external tensile hydrostatic stress field. The stress field was characterized through mechanical modeling. Tensile cyclic stresses promoted spindle-shaped cells, upregulation of scleraxis and type one collagen, and cell alignment with the direction of tension. Cells experiencing a single compressive stress component exhibited rounded cell morphology and random cell orientation. No difference in mRNA expression of the genes Sox9 and aggrecan was observed when comparing tensile and compressive regions unless the medium was supplemented with the chondrogenic factor transforming growth factor beta3. In that case, Sox9 was upregulated under static loading conditions and aggrecan was upregulated under cyclic loading conditions. In conclusion, the fibrous component of fibrocartilage could be generated using only mechanical cues, but generation of the cartilaginous component of fibrocartilage required biologic factors in addition to mechanical cues. These studies support the hypothesis that the 3D stress environment influences cell activity and gene expression in fibrocartilage development.

  14. The correlation of initial radiographic characteristics of distal radius fractures and injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasapinova, K; Kamiloski, V

    2016-06-01

    Our purpose was to determine the correlation of initial radiographic parameters of a distal radius fracture with an injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. In a prospective study, 85 patients with surgically treated distal radius fractures were included. Wrist arthroscopy was used to identify and classify triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions. The initial radial length and angulation, dorsal angulation, ulnar variance and distal radioulnar distance were measured. Wrist arthroscopy identified a triangular fibrocartilage complex lesion in 45 patients. Statistical analysis did not identify a correlation with any single radiographic parameter of the distal radius fractures with the associated triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries. The initial radiograph of a distal radius fracture does not predict a triangular fibrocartilage complex injury. III. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Craniocervical junction in dogs revisited--new ligaments and confirmed presence of enthesis fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczynska, M; Wieladek, A; Janczyk, P

    2012-06-01

    The study was performed to investigate and to describe features of gross and microscopic morphology of craniocervical junction (CCJ) in dogs. Seventy mature dogs (38 females, 32 males) of different body weight, representing small, medium and large breeds of dolicho-, mesati-, and brachycephalic morphotype were dissected. Morphological details were localised using an operating microscope with integrated video channel. Occurrence and distribution of fibrocartilage in the ligaments from 10 dogs was analysed histologically. Three new pairs of ligaments were described and named: dorsal ligaments of atlas, cranial internal collateral ligaments of atlas, and caudal internal collateral ligaments of atlas. Several new findings in the course of the known ligaments were found relating to breed and body weight. For the first time enthesis fibrocartilage was identified in ligaments of CCJ in dogs. Sesamoidal fibrocartilage was identified in the transversal ligament of atlas in large dogs. The findings are discussed for clinical importance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Kartogenin with PRP promotes the formation of fibrocartilage zone in the tendon-bone interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yiqin; Zhang, Jianying; Yang, Jinsong; Narava, Manoj; Zhao, Guangyi; Yuan, Ting; Wu, Haishan; Zheng, Nigel; Hogan, MaCalus V; Wang, James H-C

    2017-12-01

    Treatment of tendon-bone junction injuries is a challenge because tendon-bone interface often heals poorly and the fibrocartilage zone, which reduces stress concentration, at the interface is not formed. In this study, we used a compound called kartogenin (KGN) with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to induce the formation of fibrocartilage zone in a rat tendon graft-bone tunnel model. The experimental rats received KGN-PRP or PRP injections in the tendon graft-bone tunnel interface. The control group received saline. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, Safranin O staining of the tendon graft-bone tunnels revealed abundant proteoglycans in the KGN-PRP group indicating the formation of cartilage-like transition zone. Immunohistochemical and immuno-fluorescence staining revealed collagen types I (Col-I) and II (Col-II) in the newly formed fibrocartilage zone. Both fibrocartilage zone formation and maturation were healing time dependent. In contrast, the PRP and saline control groups had no cartilage-like tissues and minimal Col-I and Col-II staining. Some gaps were also present in the saline control group. Finally, pull-out strength in the KGN-PRP-treated group at 8 weeks was 1.4-fold higher than the PRP-treated group and 1.6-fold higher than the saline control group. These findings indicate that KGN, with PRP as a carrier, promotes the formation of fibrocartilage zone between the tendon graft and bone interface. Thus, KGN-PRP may be used as a convenient cell-free therapy in clinics to promote fibrocartilage zone formation in rotator calf repair and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, thereby enhancing the mechanical strength of the tendon-bone interface and hence the clinical outcome of these procedures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR TRIQUETROUS FIBROCARTILAGE COMPLEX DAMAGES AT WRIST JOINT INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kadubovskaya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of the literature on normal anatomy and pathological changes of trihedral fibro-cartilage complex of wrist. The authors described in detail a method of wrist MRI, MR-image of normal and damaged articular disk, considered possible variants for his injuries. The results of MRI of wrist in 110 people including 40 patients with suspected damage were analyzed. At present MRI is the only available non-invasive method for diagnosing injuries of intraarticular structures, in particular trihedral fibro-cartilage complex.

  18. [Treatment of triangular fibrocartilage complex tear under wrist arthroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Kun; Liu, Wu; Liu, Pengfei; Feng, Zhibin; Li, Yuwen; Hui, Guisheng

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment and effects of wrist arthroscopy in tear of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). Between January 2006 and December 2008, 16 patients with tear of TFCC were treated. Of 16 patients, 11 were male and 5 were female with an average age of 32.5 years (range, 25-51 years). Injury was caused by sprain in 12 cases, and by falling in 4 cases. The locations were the left side in 10 cases and the right side in 6 cases. The mean injury duration was 3 months to 6 years and 2 months. The main clinical symptoms included wrist powerlessness and ulnar-sided wrist pain which was aggravated with clench fist and lifting heavy things. The results of the ulnar-sided wrist stress test were positive in 14 cases and negative in 2 cases. The preoperative values of wrist range of motion (ROM) were (45.58 +/- 5.18) degrees at volar flexion, (41.22 +/- 3.83) degrees at dorsal extension, (17.82 +/- 2.48) degrees at radial deviation, (21.35 +/- 4.61) degrees at ulnar deviation, (69.85 +/- 8.36) degrees at pronation, and (70.13 +/- 6.34) degrees at supination. According to Palmer standard, 10 cases of IA were treated with debridement; 3 cases of IB with suture and 1 of them failed and was partially excised; 2 cases of IC with debridement on triangular fibrocartilage disc, ulnolunate ligament, and ulnotriguetrum ligament; and 1 case of ID with trimming plastic operation. All incisions healed by first intention, and no complications of joint infection or neurovascular injury was found. All patients were followed up 14-38 months (mean, 18.5 months). Fifteen patients were restored to normal life and work without ulnar-sided wrist pain. One patient had no pain, but he had wrist powerless. The values of ROM at last follow-up were (50.16 +/- 6.21) degrees at volar flexion, (45.37 +/- 4.65) degrees at dorsal extension, (18.95 +/- 3.56) degrees at radial deviation, (26.28 +/- 5.09) degrees at ulnar deviation, (78.87 +/- 7.69) degrees at pronation, and (76.46 +/- 8

  19. Triangular fibrocartilage lesions: comparison STIR sequence versus arthroscopy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi; Meng; Xianghong; Wang Linsen; Suo Yongmei

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of short TI inversion recovery (STIR) sequence in evaluating triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) lesions, and to compare the findings with the arthroscopy findings. Materials and Methods: Wrist joint MR examination using STIR sequence and arthroscopy were performed in 56 patients with TFC lesions. The parameters of STIR sequence were: TR: 1164 ms, TE: 16 ms, and TI: 90 ms. The sensibility, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy in the diagnosis of TFC lesions with STIR sequence were calculated, using arthroscopy as the standard. Results: (1) STIR manifested 10 patients with normal TFC; 6 with small edema or mucous degeneration in the body portion but not involving joint surface edge; 6 with horizontal avulsion in the body portion, but not involving joint surface edge; 6 with avulsion involving joint surface edge; 11 with perforation in central portion; 6 with avulsion in radial attached end; 5 with avulsion in ulnar attached end; 3 with avulsion in both radial and ulnar attached ends; 3 with irregular shape and thin on the whole TFC. (2) Arthroscopy manifested 21 patients with normal TFC; 8 with avulsion involving joint surface edge; 10 with perforation in central portion; 7 with avulsion in radial attached end; 5 with avulsion in ulnar attached end; 2 with avulsion in both radial and ulnar attached ends; 3 with irregular shape on the whole TFC. Using STIR sequence, the sensibility, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value. and accuracy were 85.7%, 23.8%, 65.2%, 50%, and 62.5%, respectively, in detection of TFC lesions, with arthroscopy as the standard. Conclusion: STIR sequence has high diagnostic value in detection of TFC lesions. (authors)

  20. The structure of the coracoacromial ligament: fibrocartilage differentiation does not necessarily mean pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milz, S; Jakob, J; Büttner, A; Tischer, T; Putz, R; Benjamin, M

    2008-02-01

    The coracoacromial ligament forms part of the coracoacromial arch and is implicated in impingement syndrome and acromial spur formation. Here, we describe its structure and the composition of its extracellular matrix. Ligaments were obtained from 15 cadavers, nine from older people (average age 74.7 years) and six from younger individuals (average age 24.2 years). Cryosections of methanol-fixed tissue were cut and sections were immunolabelled with monoclonal antibodies against collagens, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans, matrix proteins and neurofilament proteins. Both ligament entheses were highly fibrocartilaginous and immunolabelled strongly for type II collagen, aggrecan and link protein. The area of labelling was more extensive in older people. However, fibrocartilage also characterized the ligament midsubstance, particularly with increased age. Signs of fibrocartilage degeneration were more common in older people. Ligament fat (containing blood vessels and nerve fibers) was conspicuous in both age groups, especially between fiber bundles at the entheses. We conclude that fibrocartilage is a normal feature but becomes more pronounced with age. It is not necessarily pathological, for it simply indicates that the ligament is subject to compression and/or shear. Nevertheless, the prominence of fibrocartilage at the acromial enthesis may relate to the frequency with which enthesophytes develop.

  1. [Classification and MR imaging of triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, H L; Liu, Y; Bai, R J; Qian, Z H; Ye, W; Li, Y X; Wu, B D

    2016-06-07

    To explore the MRI characteristics of injuries of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and provide imaging basis for the early diagnosis and treatment of the injuries. A total of 10 healthy volunteers without wrist injuries and 200 patients from Beijing Jishuitan Hospital who complained ulnar-sided wrist pain and were highly suspected as the injury of TFCC underwent the wrist magnetic resonance examination. All subjects were in a prone position and underwent examination on coronal T1WI scan and PD-FS on 3 planes respectively. Then the MRI characteristics of 3 healthy volunteers and 67 patients with TFCC injuries that confirmed by operation were analyzed. According to the comparative analysis of normal anatomy and Palmer classification, the injuries were classified and MRI features of different types of injuries were analyzed. At last, imaging findings were compared with surgical results. Three healthy volunteers without injuries showed mainly in low signal intensity on T1WI and PD-FS images. According to Palmer classification, there were 52 traumatic injuries (ⅠA 9, ⅠB 25, ⅠC 3, ⅠD 13, In addition, 1 has central perforation and ulnar avulsion and 1 has ulnar and radial injuries simultaneously) and 15 degenerative injuries (ⅡA 5, ⅡB 1, ⅡC 2 , ⅡD 1 , ⅡE 6) among 67 patients. The central perforation mainly demonstrated as linear high signal perpendicular to the disk, and run in a sagittal line. The ulnar, distal, and radial avulsion mainly showed the injuries were irregular, the structures were ambiguous, and there was high signal intensity in the injured structures on PD-FS. Degenerative injuries demonstrated the irregularity of TFC and heterogeneous signals on PD-FS. There were mixed intermediate-high signals and changes in the articular cartilage of lunate and ulna, high signal in the lunotriquetral ligament and ulnocarpal or radioulnar arthritis. MRI can demonstrate the anatomy of TFCC accurately, evaluate and make the general classification

  2. Regional fibrocartilage variations in human anterior cruciate ligament tibial insertion: a histological three-dimensional reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Can; Guo, Lin; Yang, Liu; Wu, Yi; Gou, Jingyue; Li, Bangchun

    2015-02-01

    We studied anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial insertion architecture in humans and investigated regional differences that could suggest unequal force transmission from ligament to bone. ACL tibial insertions were processed histologically. With Photoshop software, digital images taken from the histological slides were collaged, contour lines were drawn, and different gray values were filled based on the structure. The data were exported to Amira software for three-dimensional reconstruction. The uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF) layer was divided into three regions: lateral, medial and posterior according to the architecture. The UF zone was significantly thicker laterally than medially or posteriorly (p fibrocartilage (CF) thickness was significantly greater in the lateral part of the enthesis compared to the medial and posterior parts (p < 0.05). The UF quantity (more UF laterally) corresponding to the CF quantity (more CF laterally) at the ACL tibial insertion provides further evidence suggesting that the load transferred from the ACL to the tibia was greater laterally than medially and posteriorly.

  3. Effect of platelet-rich plasma on fibrocartilage, cartilage, and bone repair in temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kütük, Nükhet; Baş, Burcu; Soylu, Emrah; Gönen, Zeynep Burçin; Yilmaz, Canay; Balcioğlu, Esra; Özdamar, Saim; Alkan, Alper

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the potential use of platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) in the treatment of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). Surgical defects were created bilaterally on the condylar fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone to induce an osteoarthritic TMJ in rabbits. PRP was applied to the right joints of the rabbits (PRP group), and the left joints received physiologic saline (control group). After 4 weeks, the rabbits were sacrificed for histologic and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations. The data were analyzed statistically. The new bone regeneration was significantly greater in the PRP group (P fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage was greater in the PRP group, no statistically significant difference was found between the 2 groups. SEM showed better ultrastructural architecture of the collagen fibrils in the PRP group. PRP might enhance the regeneration of bone in TMJ-OA. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Age-related carbonylation of fibrocartilage structural proteins drives tissue degenerative modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Brian; Clement, Cristina C; Yodmuang, Supansa; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Aphkhazava, David; Thi, Mia M; Perino, Giorgio; Hardin, John A; Cobelli, Neil; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Santambrogio, Laura

    2013-07-25

    Aging-related oxidative stress has been linked to degenerative modifications in different organs and tissues. Using redox proteomic analysis and illustrative tandem mass spectrometry mapping, we demonstrate oxidative posttranslational modifications in structural proteins of intervertebral discs (IVDs) isolated from aging mice. Increased protein carbonylation was associated with protein fragmentation and aggregation. Complementing these findings, a significant loss of elasticity and increased stiffness was measured in fibrocartilage from aging mice. Studies using circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence revealed a significant loss of secondary and tertiary structures of purified collagens following oxidation. Collagen unfolding and oxidation promoted both nonenzymatic and enzymatic degradation. Importantly, induction of oxidative modification in healthy fibrocartilage recapitulated the biochemical and biophysical modifications observed in the aging IVD. Together, these results suggest that protein carbonylation, glycation, and lipoxidation could be early events in promoting IVD degenerative changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploiting endogenous fibrocartilage stem cells to regenerate cartilage and repair joint injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embree, Mildred C.; Chen, Mo; Pylawka, Serhiy; Kong, Danielle; Iwaoka, George M.; Kalajzic, Ivo; Yao, Hai; Shi, Chancheng; Sun, Dongming; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Koslovsky, David A.; Koch, Alia; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration using stem cell-based transplantation faces many hurdles. Alternatively, therapeutically exploiting endogenous stem cells to regenerate injured or diseased tissue may circumvent these challenges. Here we show resident fibrocartilage stem cells (FCSCs) can be used to regenerate and repair cartilage. We identify FCSCs residing within the superficial zone niche in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. A single FCSC spontaneously generates a cartilage anlage, remodels into bone and organizes a haematopoietic microenvironment. Wnt signals deplete the reservoir of FCSCs and cause cartilage degeneration. We also show that intra-articular treatment with the Wnt inhibitor sclerostin sustains the FCSC pool and regenerates cartilage in a TMJ injury model. We demonstrate the promise of exploiting resident FCSCs as a regenerative therapeutic strategy to substitute cell transplantation that could be beneficial for patients suffering from fibrocartilage injury and disease. These data prompt the examination of utilizing this strategy for other musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:27721375

  6. In vitro study of stem cell communication via gap junctions for fibrocartilage regeneration at entheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Bibhukalyan Prasad; Goh, James Cho Hong; Toh, Siew Lok; Satpathy, Gyan Ranjan

    2010-03-01

    Entheses are fibrocartilaginous organs that bridge ligament with bone at their interface and add significant insertional strength. To replace a severely damaged ligament, a tissue-engineered graft preinstalled with interfacial fibrocartilage, which is being regenerated from stem cells, appears to be more promising than ligament-alone graft. Such a concept can be realized by a biomimetic approach of establishing a dynamic communication of stem cells with bone cells and/or ligament fibroblasts in vitro. The current study has two objectives. The first objective is to demonstrate functional coculture of bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) with mature bone cells/ligament fibroblasts as evidenced by gap-junctional communication in vitro. The second objective is to investigate the role of BMSCs in the regeneration of fibrocartilage within the coculture. Rabbit bone/ligament fibroblasts were dual-stained with DiI-Red and calcein (gap-junction permeable dye), and cocultured with unlabeled BMSCs at fixed ratio (1:10). The functional gap junction was demonstrated by the transfer of calcein from donor to recipient cells that was confirmed and quantified by flow cytometry. Type 2 collagen (cartilage extracellular matrix-specific protein) expressed by the mixed cell lines in the cocultures were estimated by real-time reverse transcription PCR and compared with that of the ligament-bone coculture (control). Significant transfer of calcein into BMSCs was observed and flow cytometry analyses showed a gradual increase in the percentage of BMSCs acquiring calcein with time. Cocultures that included BMSCs expressed significantly more type 2 collagen compared with the control. The current study, for the first time, reported the expression of gap-junctional communication of BMSCs with two adherent cell lines of musculoskeletal system in vitro and also confirmed that incorporation of stem cells augments fibrocartilage regeneration. The results open up a path to envisage a composite

  7. A Systematic Review of Outcomes after Arthroscopic Débridement for Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taichi; Malay, Sunitha; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-11-01

    Evidence regarding the effectiveness of arthroscopic débridement for a triangular fibrocartilage complex tear is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of débridement for triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. The authors searched all available literature in the PubMed, Embase, and MEDLINE (Ovid) databases for articles reporting on triangular fibrocartilage complex tear débridement. Data collection included arc of motion, grip strength, patient-reported outcomes, and complications. A total of 1723 unique studies were identified, of which 18 studies met the authors' criteria. The mean before and after arc of wrist extension/flexion motion values were 120 and 146 degrees (six studies). The mean before and after grip strength values were 65 percent and 91 percent of the contralateral side (10 studies). Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores (six studies) and pain visual analogue scale scores (seven studies) improved from 39 to 18, and from 7 to 3, respectively. The mean pain visual analogue scale score after débridement was 1.9 in the ulnar-positive group and 2.4 in the ulnar-neutral and ulnar-negative groups. Eighty-seven percent of patients returned to their original work. Patients reported reduced pain and improved functional and patient-reported outcomes after débridement of triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. Most patients after débridement returned to previous work, with few complications. Although some of these cases may require secondary procedures, simple débridement can be performed with suitable satisfactory outcomes for cases with any type of ulnar variance.

  8. Ganglion Cyst Associated with Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear That Caused Ulnar Nerve Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Anil Bingol, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ganglions are the most frequently seen soft-tissue tumors in the hand. Nerve compression due to ganglion cysts at the wrist is rare. We report 2 ganglion cysts arising from triangular fibrocartilage complex, one of which caused ulnar nerve compression proximal to the Guyonʼs canal, leading to ulnar neuropathy. Ganglion cysts seem unimportant, and many surgeons refrain from performing a general hand examination.

  9. Electron microscopy of CO/sub 2/-laser-induced effects in human fibrocartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whipple, T.L.; Marotta, J.J.; May, T.C.; Caspari, R.B.; Meyers, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Previous reports of effects of CO/sub 2/ laser energy on human fibrocartilage suggest thermal injury extends to a depth of approximately 70 microns from the target surface with power settings of 35 W and exposure times of 0.5 seconds. The present study was undertaken to look for more subtle evidence of thermal alteration of human fibrocartilage treated with CO/sub 2/ laser irradiation. Fifteen human menisci were irradiated at power settings of 10, 20, and 30 W with exposure times of 0.1 and 0.5 seconds. The specimens were immediately fixed and sectioned for electron microscopic examination. Loss of a normal cross banding, and marginal clarity of individual collagen fibers were observed in the extracellular matrix and were observed at distances up to 300 microns from the exposed tissue surface. In addition, cellular changes at similar tissue depth consisted of cell membrane invaginations, clumping of nuclear chromatin, breakdown of endoplasmic reticulum architecture, and loss of mitochondria and Golgi complexes from the cytoplasm were observed. This study demonstrates deeper penetration of a radiation that was previously appreciated by light microscopy in irradiated human fibrocartilage, although the implications with respect to contraside viability and healing potential of the tissue in vivo is not known.

  10. [Self-assembly tissue engineering fibrocartilage model of goat temporomandibular joint disc].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong; Li, Zhen-Qiang; Bi, Yan-Da

    2011-06-01

    To construct self-assembly fibrocartilage model of goat temporomandibular joint disc and observe the biological characteristics of the self-assembled fibrocartilage constructs, further to provide a basis for tissue engineering of the temporomandibular joint disc and other fibrocartilage. Cells from temporomandibular joint discs of goats were harvested and cultured. 5.5 x 10(6) cells were seeded in each agarose well with diameter 5 mm x depth 10 mm, daily replace of medium, cultured for 2 weeks. One day after seeding, goat temporomandibular joint disc cells in agarose wells were gathered and began to self-assemble into a disc-shaped base, then gradually turned into a round shape. When cultured for 2 weeks, hematoxylin-eosin staining was conducted and observed that cells were round and wrapped around by the matrix. Positive Safranin-O/fast green staining for glycosaminoglycans was observed throughout the entire constructs, and picro-sirius red staining was examined and distribution of numerous type I collagen was found. Immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated brown yellow particles in cytoplasm and around extracellular matrix, which showed self-assembly construct can produce type I collagen as native temporomandibular joint disc tissue. Production of extracellular matrix in self-assembly construct as native temporomandibular joint disc tissue indicates that the use of agarose wells to construct engineered temporomandibular joint disc will be possible and practicable.

  11. Tensile loading modulates bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and the development of engineered fibrocartilage constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, John T; Vanderploeg, Eric J; Mouw, Janna K; Wilson, Christopher G; Levenston, Marc E

    2010-06-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors such as bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are an attractive cell source for fibrocartilage tissue engineering, but the types or combinations of signals required to promote fibrochondrocyte-specific differentiation remain unclear. The present study investigated the influences of cyclic tensile loading on the chondrogenesis of BMSCs and the development of engineered fibrocartilage. Cyclic tensile displacements (10%, 1 Hz) were applied to BMSC-seeded fibrin constructs for short (24 h) or extended (1-2 weeks) periods using a custom loading system. At early stages of chondrogenesis, 24 h of cyclic tension stimulated both protein and proteoglycan synthesis, but at later stages, tension increased protein synthesis only. One week of intermittent cyclic tension significantly increased the total sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen contents in the constructs, but these differences were lost after 2 weeks of loading. Constraining the gels during the extended culture periods prevented contraction of the fibrin matrix, induced collagen fiber alignment, and increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan release to the media. Cyclic tension specifically stimulated collagen I mRNA expression and protein synthesis, but had no effect on collagen II, aggrecan, or osteocalcin mRNA levels. Overall, these studies suggest that the combination of chondrogenic stimuli and tensile loading promotes fibrochondrocyte-like differentiation of BMSCs and has the potential to direct fibrocartilage development in vitro.

  12. Prevalence of triangular fibrocartilage complex abnormalities regardless of symptoms rise with age: systematic review and pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jimmy J; Teunis, Teun; Ring, David

    2014-12-01

    Triangular fibrocartilage complex abnormalities seem to be more common with age, but the degree to which this is so, and the degree to which the presence of an abnormality is associated with symptoms, are topics of controversy. We wished to perform a systematic review to determine the prevalence of triangular fibrocartilage complex abnormalities, and to determine if the prevalence of abnormalities are greater with increasing age. In addition, we stratified age groups based on symptoms. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library through August 15, 2013. Studies that reported triangular fibrocartilage complex abnormalities by age were included. Fifteen studies including 977 wrists met our criteria and reported a total of 368 (38%) triangular fibrocartilage complex abnormalities. Eight studies included symptomatic patients; the remainder studied cadavers (six studies) or asymptomatic volunteers (one study). Patients were divided into four age groups (fibrocartilage complex abnormalities increased with age, from 27% (80/301) in patients younger than 30 years to 49% (130/265) in patients 70 years and older (p fibrocartilage complex prevalence abnormality increased from 15% (24/159) to 49% (129/263) in the same age groups (p fibrocartilage complex abnormalities are common in symptomatic and asymptomatic wrists, and they are increasingly common with age. As in all situations where abnormalities are so common that they may be incidental, we need (1) a reliable and accurate method for determining whether these abnormalities are the cause of symptoms; and (2) evidence that treatment of these abnormalities improves symptoms better than placebo. Level III, prognostic study. See the Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  13. The Degeneration of Meniscus Roots Is Accompanied by Fibrocartilage Formation, Which May Precede Meniscus Root Tears in Osteoarthritic Knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Do Young; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Young Jick; Kim, Mijin; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Joon Ho

    2015-12-01

    Fibrocartilage metaplasia in tendons and ligaments is an adaptation to compression as well as a pathological feature during degeneration. Medial meniscus posterior roots are unique ligaments that resist multidirectional forces, including compression. To characterize the degeneration of medial meniscus posterior root tears in osteoarthritic knees, with an emphasis on fibrocartilage and calcification. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Samples of medial meniscus posterior roots were harvested from cadaveric specimens and patients during knee replacement surgery and grouped as follows: normal reference, no tear, partial tear, and complete tear. Degeneration was analyzed with histology, immunohistochemistry, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed on specimens with and without fibrocartilage. Quantifiable data were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test with the Dunn comparison test. Thirty, 28, and 42 samples harvested from 99 patients were allocated into the no tear, partial tear, and complete tear groups, respectively. Mean modified Bonar tendinopathy scores for each group were 3.97, 9.31, and 14.15, respectively, showing a higher degree of degeneration associated with the extent of the tear (P fibrocartilage according to the extent of the tear. Tear margins revealed fibrocartilage in 59.3% of partial tear samples and 76.2% of complete tear samples, with a distinctive cleavage-like shape. Root tears with a similar shape were induced within fibrocartilaginous areas during uniaxial tensile testing. Even in the no tear group, 56.7% of samples showed fibrocartilage in the anterior margin of the root, adjacent to the meniscus. An increased stained area of calcification and expression of the ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 gene were observed in the complete tear group compared with the no tear group (P Fibrocartilage and calcification increased in medial meniscus posterior roots, associated

  14. Homologous structure-function relationships between native fibrocartilage and tissue engineered from MSC-seeded nanofibrous scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerurkar, Nandan L; Han, Woojin; Mauck, Robert L; Elliott, Dawn M

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the interplay of composition, organization and mechanical function in load-bearing tissues is a prerequisite in the successful engineering of tissues to replace diseased ones. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on electrospun scaffolds have been successfully used to generate organized tissues that mimic fibrocartilages such as the knee meniscus and the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc. While matrix deposition has been observed in parallel with improved mechanical properties, how composition, organization, and mechanical function are related is not known. Moreover, how this relationship compares to that of native fibrocartilage is unclear. Therefore, in the present work, functional fibrocartilage constructs were formed from MSC-seeded nanofibrous scaffolds, and the roles of collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in compressive and tensile properties were determined. MSCs deposited abundant collagen and GAG over 120 days of culture, and these extracellular molecules were organized in such a way that they performed similar mechanical functions to their native roles: collagen dominated the tensile response while GAG was important for compressive properties. GAG removal resulted in significant stiffening in tension. A similar stiffening response was observed when GAG was removed from native inner annulus fibrosus, suggesting an interaction between collagen fibers and their surrounding extrafibrillar matrix that is shared by both engineered and native fibrocartilages. These findings strongly support the use of electrospun scaffolds and MSCs for fibrocartilage tissue engineering, and provide insight on the structure-function relations of both engineered and native biomaterials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-mineralized fibrocartilage shows the lowest elastic modulus in the rabbit supraspinatus tendon insertion: measurement with scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Hirotaka; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Kokubun, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    The acoustic properties of rabbit supraspinatus tendon insertions were measured by scanning acoustic microscopy. After cutting parallel to the supraspinatus tendon fibers, specimens were fixed with 10% neutralized formalin, embedded in paraffin, and sectioned. Both the sound speed and the attenuation constant were measured at the insertion site. The 2-dimensional distribution of the sound speed and that of the attenuation constant were displayed with color-coded scales. The acoustic properties reflected both the histologic architecture and the collagen type. In the tendon proper and the non-mineralized fibrocartilage, the sound speed and attenuation constant gradually decreased as the predominant collagen type changed from I to II. In the mineralized fibrocartilage, they increased markedly with the mineralization of the fibrocartilaginous tissue. These results indicate that the non-mineralized fibrocartilage shows the lowest elastic modulus among 4 zones at the insertion site, which could be interpreted as an adaptation to various types of biomechanical stress.

  16. A Case Report of Intra-articular Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture for Partial Tear of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee, Kwangho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This case was to report a case of Partial Tear of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex treated by Intra-articular bee venom Pharmacopuncture. Methods: The patient was treated by Intra-articular bee venom Pharmacopuncture. The Effect of Treatment was evaluated by Visual Analog Scale(VAS and Modified Mayo Wrist Score(Wrist Score. Results & Conclusions: After Treatment, Patient's VAS decreased and Wrist Score increased. For this results, Intra-articular Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture may be effective for Partial Tear of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex.

  17. A comparison of different bioinks for 3D bioprinting of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Andrew C; Critchley, Susan E; Rencsok, Emily M; Kelly, Daniel J

    2016-10-07

    Cartilage is a dense connective tissue with limited self-repair capabilities. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) laden hydrogels are commonly used for fibrocartilage and articular cartilage tissue engineering, however they typically lack the mechanical integrity for implantation into high load bearing environments. This has led to increased interested in 3D bioprinting of cell laden hydrogel bioinks reinforced with stiffer polymer fibres. The objective of this study was to compare a range of commonly used hydrogel bioinks (agarose, alginate, GelMA and BioINK™) for their printing properties and capacity to support the development of either hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in vitro. Each hydrogel was seeded with MSCs, cultured for 28 days in the presence of TGF-β3 and then analysed for markers indicative of differentiation towards either a fibrocartilaginous or hyaline cartilage-like phenotype. Alginate and agarose hydrogels best supported the development of hyaline-like cartilage, as evident by the development of a tissue staining predominantly for type II collagen. In contrast, GelMA and BioINK ™ (a PEGMA based hydrogel) supported the development of a more fibrocartilage-like tissue, as evident by the development of a tissue containing both type I and type II collagen. GelMA demonstrated superior printability, generating structures with greater fidelity, followed by the alginate and agarose bioinks. High levels of MSC viability were observed in all bioinks post-printing (∼80%). Finally we demonstrate that it is possible to engineer mechanically reinforced hydrogels with high cell viability by co-depositing a hydrogel bioink with polycaprolactone filaments, generating composites with bulk compressive moduli comparable to articular cartilage. This study demonstrates the importance of the choice of bioink when bioprinting different cartilaginous tissues for musculoskeletal applications.

  18. Evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex tears by arthrography and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Makoto; Shibata, Yasushi [Hokkaido Kin-i-kyou Central Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Takahata, Naoji

    1995-08-01

    Arthroscopic or open surgical findings in 21 wrists with chronic ulnar painful lesion were compared both with arthrography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging results to evaluate the accuracy of the two diagnostic procedures in the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions. Arthrography investigations were performed for the 20 wrists but one that had allergy for iodine and MR imagings were performed for the recent 12 wrists. Arthrography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were almost equally useful for the detection of the TFCC injury and their injury sites. (author).

  19. Patients with triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries and distal radioulnar joint instability have reduced rotational torque in the forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, J K; Axelsson, P; Strömberg, J; Karlsson, J; Fridén, J

    2016-09-01

    A total of 20 patients scheduled for wrist arthroscopy, all with clinical signs of rupture to the triangular fibrocartilage complex and distal radioulnar joint instability, were tested pre-operatively by an independent observer for strength of forearm rotation. During surgery, the intra-articular pathology was documented by photography and also subsequently individually analysed by another independent hand surgeon. Arthroscopy revealed a type 1-B injury to the triangular fibrocartilage complex in 18 of 20 patients. Inter-rater reliability between the operating surgeon and the independent reviewer showed absolute agreement in all but one patient (95%) in terms of the injury to the triangular fibrocartilage complex and its classification. The average pre-operative torque strength was 71% of the strength of the non-injured contralateral side in pronation and supination. Distal radioulnar joint instability with an arthroscopically verified injury to the triangular fibrocartilage complex is associated with a significant loss of both pronation and supination torque. Case series, Level IV. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Enthesis fibrocartilage cells originate from a population of Hedgehog-responsive cells modulated by the loading environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrea G; Long, Fanxin; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Tendon attaches to bone across a specialized tissue called the enthesis. This tissue modulates the transfer of muscle forces between two materials, i.e. tendon and bone, with vastly different mechanical properties. The enthesis for many tendons consists of a mineralized graded fibrocartilage that develops postnatally, concurrent with epiphyseal mineralization. Although it is well described that the mineralization and development of functional maturity requires muscle loading, the biological factors that modulate enthesis development are poorly understood. By genetically demarcating cells expressing Gli1 in response to Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, we discovered a unique population of Hh-responsive cells in the developing murine enthesis that were distinct from tendon fibroblasts and epiphyseal chondrocytes. Lineage-tracing experiments revealed that the Gli1 lineage cells that originate in utero eventually populate the entire mature enthesis. Muscle paralysis increased the number of Hh-responsive cells in the enthesis, demonstrating that responsiveness to Hh is modulated in part by muscle loading. Ablation of the Hh-responsive cells during the first week of postnatal development resulted in a loss of mineralized fibrocartilage, with very little tissue remodeling 5 weeks after cell ablation. Conditional deletion of smoothened, a molecule necessary for responsiveness to Ihh, from the developing tendon and enthesis altered the differentiation of enthesis progenitor cells, resulting in significantly reduced fibrocartilage mineralization and decreased biomechanical function. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Hh signaling within developing enthesis fibrocartilage cells is required for enthesis formation. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongbin; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi; Wu, Tianding; Cao, Yong; Zhou, Jingyong; Zheng, Cheng; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-09-01

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution-function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella-patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage zone of

  2. A chondroitinase-ABC and TGF-β1 treatment regimen for enhancing the mechanical properties of tissue engineered fibrocartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBarb, Regina F.; Makris, Eleftherios A.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of functionally equivalent fibrocartilage remains elusive despite efforts to engineer tissues such as the knee menisci, intervertebral disc, and TMJ disc. Attempts to engineer these structures often fail to create tissues with mechanical properties on par with native tissue, resulting in constructs unsuitable for clinical applications. The objective of this study was to engineer a spectrum of biomimetic fibrocartilages representative of the distinct functional properties found in native tissues. Using the self-assembly process, different co-cultures of meniscus cells (MCs) and articular chondrocytes (ACs) were seeded into agarose wells and treated with the catabolic agent chondroitinase-ABC (C-ABC) and the anabolic agent transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) via a two-factor (cell ratio and bioactive treatment), full factorial study design. Application of both C-ABC and TGF-β1 resulted in a beneficial or positive increase in the collagen content of treated constructs compared to controls. Significant increases in both the collagen density and fiber diameter were also seen with this treatment, increasing these values 32% and 15%, respectively, over control values. Mechanical testing found the combined bioactive treatment to synergistically increase the Young’s modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the engineered fibrocartilages compared to controls, with values reaching the lower spectrum of those found in native tissues. Together, these data demonstrate that C-ABC and TGF-β1 interact to develop a denser collagen matrix better able to withstand tensile loading. This study highlights a way to optimize the tensile properties of engineered fibrocartilage using a biochemical and biophysical agent together to create distinct fibrocartilages with functional properties mimicking those of native tissue. PMID:23041782

  3. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone–tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongbin; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi [Department of Sports Medicine, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Wu, Tianding; Cao, Yong [Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Zhou, Jingyong; Zheng, Cheng [Department of Sports Medicine, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Hu, Jianzhong, E-mail: jianzhonghu@hotmail.com [Department of Sports Medicine, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China)

    2015-09-01

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone–tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution–function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella–patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage

  4. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone–tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Hongbin; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi; Wu, Tianding; Cao, Yong; Zhou, Jingyong; Zheng, Cheng; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone–tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution–function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella–patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage

  5. MRI findings in bucket-handle tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, Jean; Arizpe, Azael; Chen, David; Barrera, Carlos M.; Ezuddin, Nisreen Shabbir

    2018-01-01

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is an intricate ligamentous and cartilaginous structure that helps transmit axial load across the wrist, and provide stability to the ulnocarpal and distal radioulnar joints (DRUJ). Because the blood supply to the TFCC varies depending on location, certain types of tears are more amenable to surgical repair than others. Since Palmer proposed his classification system of TFCC tears in 1989, only 1 case of a ''bucket-handle'' type tear has been reported. In this article, we describe two new cases of bucket-handle tears of the TFCC. In both cases, the torn fragment was displaced into a previously undescribed location (intra-articular DRUJ and prestyloid recess). Because this type of injury pattern has not been previously well characterized in the literature and such cases rarely reported, MRI findings have not been fully described and its implications on clinical management have largely yet to be determined. (orig.)

  6. [Kinematics of the triangular fibrocartilage complex during forearm rotation in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Tang, Jin-bo; Jia, Zhong-zheng; Xie, Ren-guo

    2009-11-01

    To investigate three-dimensional kinematics of the superficial and deep portion of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) in different parts of the forearm rotation. Six wrists of 6 volunteers were used to obtain CT scans at different positions of the wrist. The wrists were scanned from 90 degrees of pronation to 90 degrees of supination at an interval of 30 degrees. The 3-dimensional radius and ulna were reconstructed with customized software and changes in length of the superficial and deep portion of TFCC during forearm rotation. In forearm pronation, the superficial dorsal portion and the deep palmar portion of the TFCC were tight. While the superficial palmar portion and the deep dorsal potion of the TFCC were lax. In supination, the changes in length of all these fibers were reverse. In forearm rotation one portion fibers of dorsal TFCC and one portion fibers of palmar TFCC are tight, and this mechanism controls stability during DRUJ rotation.

  7. [Instability of the distal radioulnar joint: Treatment options for ulnar lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, C K; Prommersberger, K J; Langer, M; Müller, L P; Hahn, P; Unglaub, F

    2015-08-01

    Injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) may be fatal to the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). This structure is one of the crucial stabilizers and guarantees unrestricted pronosupination of the forearm. A systematic examination is mandatory to diagnose DRUJ instability reliably. A clinical examination in comparison to the contralateral side is obligatory. Plain radiographs are required to exclude osseous lesions or deformities. Computed tomography of both wrists in neutral, pronation and supination is necessary to verify DRUJ instability in ambiguous situations. Based on a systematic examination wrist and DRUJ arthroscopy identify lesions clearly. Injuries of the radioulnar ligaments which entail DRUJ instability, should be reconstructed preferably anatomically. Ulnar-sided TFCC lesions may often cause DRUJ instability. Osseous ligament avulsions are mostly treated osteosynthetically. Ligament tears may be refixated using anchor or transosseous sutures. Tendon transplants are necessary for an anatomical reconstruction in cases of irreparable ruptures.

  8. In-vitro ablation of fibrocartilage by XeCl excimer laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchelt, Martin; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Fishbein, Michael C.; Peters, Werner; Beeder, Clain; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1991-07-01

    A 308 nm excimer laser was employed for ablation of human fibrocartilage. Experiments were conducted in vitro. The tissue response was investigated with respect to dosimetry (ablation rate versus radiant exposure) and thermal effect (thermographic analysis). Irradiation was performed via a 600 um fiber, with radiant exposures ranging between 20mj/mm2 and 80mj/mm2, at 20Hz. The ablation rates were found to range from 3um/pulse to 80um/pulse depending on the radiant exposure and/or the applied pressure on the delivery system. Thermographic analysis, during ablation, revealed maximum average temperatures of about 65 degree(s)C. Similar measurements performed, for the purpose of comparison, with a CW Nd:YAG and a CW CO2 laser showed higher values, of the order of 200 degree(s)C.

  9. MRI on the tear of the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yoko; Sasaki, Taisuke; Sasaki, Yukio; Nishi, Naoko; Yodono, Hiraku; Takekawa, Shoichi; Toh, Satoshi; Harata, Seikou (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-07-01

    MRI of the wrist joints in the normal volunteers and patients with triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) injury was performed and usefulness of MRI of TFC injury was discussed. Small FOV and thin slice thickness were selected. Normal TFCs were shown as low signal intensity areas. Injury of TFC was demonstrated as increased signal intensity areas. Diagnosis of TFC injury should be made after considering their ages and symptoms because TFC shows degenerative change with aging. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in the detection of TFC tears were 80.0%, 81.8% and 81.0% respectively. MRI is considered to be a non-invasive good modality to demonstrate TFC tears. (author).

  10. Acute and chronic response of meniscal fibrocartilage to holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Patrick J.; Popovic, Neven A.; Islinger, Richard B.; Kuklo, Timothy R.; Dick, Edward J.

    1997-05-01

    The acute and chronic (10 week) histological effects of the holmium:YAG laser during partial meniscectomy in an in vivo rabbit model were investigated. Twenty-four adult male New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral parapatellar medial knee arthrotomies. In the right knee, a partial medial meniscectomy was done through the avascular zone using a standard surgical blade. In the left knee, an anatomically similar partial medial meniscectomy was performed using a Ho:YAG laser (Coherent, USA). This study indicates that the laser creates two zones of damage in the meniscal fibrocartilage and that the zone of thermal change may act as a barrier to healing. The zone of thermal change which is eventually debrided was thought at the time of surgery to be viable. In the laser cut menisci, the synovium appears to have greater inflammation early and to be equivalent with the scalpel cut after three weeks. At all time periods there appeared more cellular damage in the laser specimens.

  11. Immunohistochemical Mapping of Sensory Nerve Endings in the Human Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Susanne; Semisch, Manuel; Garcia-Elias, Marc; Lluch, Alex; Zwipp, Hans; Hagert, Elisabet

    2015-10-01

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex is the main stabilizer of the distal radioulnar joint. While static joint stability is constituted by osseous and ligamentous integrity, the dynamic aspects of joint stability chiefly concern proprioceptive control of the compressive and directional muscular forces acting on the joint. Therefore, an investigation of the pattern and types of sensory nerve endings gives more insight in dynamic distal radioulnar joint stability. We aimed to (1) analyze the general distribution of sensory nerve endings and blood vessels; (2) examine interstructural distribution of sensory nerve endings and blood vessels; (3) compare the number and types of mechanoreceptors in each part; and (4) analyze intrastructural distribution of nerve endings at different tissue depth. The subsheath of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon sheath, the ulnocarpal meniscoid, the articular disc, the dorsal and volar radioulnar ligaments, and the ulnolunate and ulnotriquetral ligaments were dissected from 11 human cadaver wrists. Sensory nerve endings were counted in five levels per specimen as total cell amount/cm(2) after staining with low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75, protein gene product 9.5, and S-100 protein and thereafter classified according to Freeman and Wyke. All types of sensory corpuscles were found in the various structures of the triangular fibrocartilage complex with the exception of the ulnolunate ligament, which contained only Golgi-like endings, free nerve endings, and unclassifiable corpuscles. The articular disc had only free nerve endings. Furthermore, free nerve endings were the predominant sensory nerve ending (median, 72.6/cm(2); range, 0-469.4/cm(2)) and more prevalent than all other types of mechanoreceptors: Ruffini (median, 0; range, 0-5.6/cm(2); difference of medians, 72.6; p fibrocartilage complex (p ≤ 0.001, respectively) except the ulnolunate ligament. More blood vessels were seen in the volar radioulnar ligament (median, 363

  12. MR imaging of the triangular fibrocartilage complex and intercarpal ligaments of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H.S.; Kindynis, P.; Brahme, S.K.; Resnick, D.L.; Haghighi, P.; Haller, J.; Sartoris, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    To understand MR signal characteristics in the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) complex, the authors performed MR imaging with gross pathologic and histologic analysis in 10 fresh cadaveric wrists. Spin-echo T1-and T2-weighted coronal images were obtained at 1.5T (10-cm field of view, 3-mm thickness, 256 x 256 matrix). Normal portions of the TFC showed a smooth surface with homogeneous low signal intensity except near the radial and lunar attachments. Mucoid degeneration of the TFC, present in all cases, was more severe on the proximal surface and was characterized by bright signal on T1-weighted and less bright signal on T2-weighted images. These findings differed from those of TFC perforation. Similar signal characteristics accompanied degeneration in the scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments. The author's findings indicate that MR imaging can accurately delineate degeneration as well as perforation of TFC and intercarpal ligaments

  13. MRI findings in bucket-handle tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose, Jean [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Uhealth Sports Medicine Institute, Miami, FL (United States); Arizpe, Azael; Chen, David [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Barrera, Carlos M.; Ezuddin, Nisreen Shabbir [University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    2018-03-15

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is an intricate ligamentous and cartilaginous structure that helps transmit axial load across the wrist, and provide stability to the ulnocarpal and distal radioulnar joints (DRUJ). Because the blood supply to the TFCC varies depending on location, certain types of tears are more amenable to surgical repair than others. Since Palmer proposed his classification system of TFCC tears in 1989, only 1 case of a ''bucket-handle'' type tear has been reported. In this article, we describe two new cases of bucket-handle tears of the TFCC. In both cases, the torn fragment was displaced into a previously undescribed location (intra-articular DRUJ and prestyloid recess). Because this type of injury pattern has not been previously well characterized in the literature and such cases rarely reported, MRI findings have not been fully described and its implications on clinical management have largely yet to be determined. (orig.)

  14. Hyaline cartilage cells outperform mandibular condylar cartilage cells in a TMJ fibrocartilage tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Lazebnik, M; Detamore, M S

    2009-03-01

    To compare temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage cells in vitro to hyaline cartilage cells cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) environment for tissue engineering of mandibular condylar cartilage. Mandibular condylar cartilage and hyaline cartilage cells were harvested from pigs and cultured for 6 weeks in polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds. Both types of cells were treated with glucosamine sulfate (0.4 mM), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (100 ng/ml) and their combination. At weeks 0 and 6, cell number, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content were determined, types I and II collagen were visualized by immunohistochemistry and GAGs were visualized by histology. Hyaline cartilage cells produced from half an order to a full order of magnitude more GAGs and collagen than mandibular condylar cartilage cells in 3D culture. IGF-I was a highly effective signal for biosynthesis with hyaline cartilage cells, while glucosamine sulfate decreased cell proliferation and biosynthesis with both types of cells. In vitro culture of TMJ condylar cartilage cells produced a fibrous tissue with predominantly type I collagen, while hyaline cartilage cells formed a fibrocartilage-like tissue with types I and II collagen. The combination of IGF and glucosamine had a synergistic effect on maintaining the phenotype of TMJ condylar cells to generate both types I and II collagen. Given the superior biosynthetic activity by hyaline cartilage cells and the practical surgical limitations of harvesting cells from the TMJ of a patient requiring TMJ reconstruction, cartilage cells from elsewhere in the body may be a potentially better alternative to cells harvested from the TMJ for TMJ tissue engineering. This finding may also apply to other fibrocartilages such as the intervertebral disc and knee meniscus in applications where a mature cartilage cell source is desired.

  15. Assessment of growth factor treatment on fibrochondrocyte and chondrocyte co-cultures for TMJ fibrocartilage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpakci, Kerem N; Kim, Eric J; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2011-04-01

    Treatments for patients suffering from severe temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction are limited, motivating the development of strategies for tissue regeneration. In this study, co-cultures of fibrochondrocytes (FCs) and articular chondrocytes (ACs) were seeded in agarose wells, and supplemented with growth factors, to engineer tissue with biomechanical properties and extracellular matrix composition similar to native TMJ fibrocartilage. In the first phase, growth factors were applied alone and in combination, in the presence or absence of serum, while in the second phase, the best overall treatment was applied at intermittent dosing. Continuous treatment of AC/FC co-cultures with TGF-β1 in serum-free medium resulted in constructs with glycosaminoglycan/wet weight ratios (12.2%), instantaneous compressive moduli (790 kPa), relaxed compressive moduli (120 kPa) and Young's moduli (1.87 MPa) that overlap with native TMJ disc values. Among co-culture groups, TGF-β1 treatment increased collagen deposition ∼20%, compressive stiffness ∼130% and Young's modulus ∼170% relative to controls without growth factor. Serum supplementation, though generally detrimental to functional properties, was identified as a powerful mediator of FC construct morphology. Finally, both intermittent and continuous TGF-β1 treatment showed positive effects, though continuous treatment resulted in greater enhancement of construct functional properties. This work proposes a strategy for regeneration of TMJ fibrocartilage and its future application will be realized through translation of these findings to clinically viable cell sources. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Palmar reconstruction of the triangular fibrocartilage complex for instability of the distal radioulnar joint: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, T; Moritomo, H; Omokawa, S; Iida, A; Wada, T; Aoki, M

    2013-06-01

    We developed a new triangular fibrocartilage complex reconstruction technique for distal radioulnar joint instability in which the palmar portion of the triangular fibrocartilage complex was predominantly reconstructed, and evaluated whether such reconstruction can restore stability of the distal radioulnar joint in seven fresh cadaver upper extremities. Distal radioulnar joint instability was induced by cutting all soft-tissue stabilizers around the distal ulna. Using a palmar approach, a palmaris longus tendon graft was sutured to the remnant of the palmar radioulnar and ulnocarpal ligaments. The graft was then passed through a bone tunnel created at the fovea and was sutured. Loads were applied to the radius, and dorsopalmar displacements of the radius relative to the ulna were measured using an electromagnetic tracking device in neutral rotation, 60° supination and 60° pronation. We compared the dorsopalmar displacements before sectioning, before reconstruction and after reconstruction. Dorsopalmar instability produced by sectioning significantly improved in all forearm positions after reconstruction.

  17. The role of imaging in diagnosing diseases of the distal radioulnar joint, triangular fibrocartilage complex, and distal ulna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Judy H; England, Eric; Mehta, Kaushal; Wissman, Robert D

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the anatomy, biomechanics, and multimodality imaging findings of common and uncommon distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ), triangular fibrocartilage complex, and distal ulna abnormalities. The DRUJ is a common site for acute and chronic injuries and is frequently imaged to evaluate chronic wrist pain, forearm dysfunction, and traumatic forearm injury. Given the complex anatomy of the wrist, the radiologist plays a vital role in the diagnosis of wrist pain and dysfunction.

  18. Gdf5 progenitors give rise to fibrocartilage cells that mineralize via hedgehog signaling to form the zonal enthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Nathaniel A; Breidenbach, Andrew P; Schwartz, Andrea G; Russell, Ryan P; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey; Liu, Han; Hagiwara, Yusuke; Jiang, Rulang; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Butler, David L; Rowe, David W

    2015-09-01

    The sequence of events that leads to the formation of a functionally graded enthesis is not clearly defined. The current study demonstrates that clonal expansion of Gdf5 progenitors contributes to linear growth of the enthesis. Prior to mineralization, Col1+ cells in the enthesis appose Col2+ cells of the underlying primary cartilage. At the onset of enthesis mineralization, cells at the base of the enthesis express alkaline phosphatase, Indian hedgehog, and ColX as they mineralize. The mineralization front then extends towards the tendon midsubstance as cells above the front become encapsulated in mineralized fibrocartilage over time. The hedgehog (Hh) pathway regulates this process, as Hh-responsive Gli1+ cells within the developing enthesis mature from unmineralized to mineralized fibrochondrocytes in response to activated signaling. Hh signaling is required for mineralization, as tissue-specific deletion of its obligate transducer Smoothened in the developing tendon and enthesis cells leads to significant reductions in the apposition of mineralized fibrocartilage. Together, these findings provide a spatiotemporal map of events - from expansion of the embryonic progenitor pool to synthesis of the collagen template and finally mineralization of this template - that leads to the formation of the mature zonal enthesis. These results can inform future tendon-to-bone repair strategies to create a mechanically functional enthesis in which tendon collagen fibers are anchored to bone through mineralized fibrocartilage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Attachment sites of the coracoclavicular ligaments are characterized by fibrocartilage differentiation: a study on human cadaveric tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockert, B; Braunstein, V; Sprecher, C; Shinohara, Y; Kirchhoff, C; Milz, S

    2012-02-01

    We analyzed the immunohistochemical labeling patterns of the extracellular matrix of the coracoclavicular ligaments (CCL) in order to relate the molecular composition of the attachment sites to their mechanical environment. Ligaments were exposed from 12 fresh-frozen human cadaveric samples (four males, mean age: 48.6 ± 12.1 years). Cryosection of methanol-fixed and decalcified tissue was cut and sections were labeled with a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against collagens, proteoglycans and proteins of vascular components. Attachment sites of both ligaments showed characteristic fibrocartilaginous labeling of collagen type II, aggrecan and link protein in all samples. Labeling for type II collagen was most conspicuous at the insertion of the coracoid process. Morphometry of adjacent samples revealed a fibrocartilage zone of 10-15% in relationship with the ligament proper, where labeling for type II collagen, aggrecan and link protein was negative. The presence of fibrocartilage at both entheses of the trapezoid and conoid ligament suggests that the CCL complex is subject to shear/compression forces. A variable fibrocartilage differentiation at the entheses of both ligaments may be related to the marked change in loading and insertion angle that the ligaments undergo during shoulder movement. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Effects on the Distal Radioulnar Joint of Ablation of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tears With Radiofrequency Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Michaela; Loibl, Markus; Eder, Christoph; Kujat, Richard; Nerlich, Michael; Gehmert, Sebastian

    2016-11-01

    This cadaver study investigated the temperature profile in the wrist joint and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) during radiofrequency energy (RFE) application for triangular fibrocartilage complex resection. An arthroscopic partial resection of the triangular fibrocartilage complex using monopolar and bipolar RFE was simulated in 14 cadaver limbs. The temperature was recorded simultaneously in the DRUJ and at 6 other anatomic locations of the wrist during RFE application. The mean temperature in the DRUJ was 43.3 ± 8.2°C for the bipolar system in the ablation mode (60 W) and 30.4 ± 3.4°C for the monopolar system in the cut mode (20 W) after 30 seconds. The highest measured temperature in the DRUJ was 54.3°C for the bipolar system and 68.1°C for the monopolar system. The application of RFE for debridement or resection of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in a clinical setting can induce peak temperatures that might cause damage to the cartilage of the DRUJ. Bipolar systems produce higher mean temperatures than monopolar devices. RFE application increases the mean temperature in the DRUJ after 30 seconds to a level that may jeopardize cartilage tissue. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biochemical characterisation of navicular hyaline cartilage, navicular fibrocartilage and the deep digital flexor tendon in horses with navicular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, M; Bird, J; Smith, R; Tulamo, R-M; May, S A

    2003-10-01

    The study hypothesis was that navicular disease is a process analogous to degenerative joint disease, which leads to changes in navicular fibrocartilage and in deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) matrix composition and that the process extends to the adjacent distal interphalangeal joint. The objectives were to compare the biochemical composition of the navicular articular and palmar cartilages from 18 horses with navicular disease with 49 horses with no history of front limb lameness, and to compare navicular fibrocartilage with medial meniscus of the stifle and collateral cartilage of the hoof. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), total glycosaminoglycan (GAG), metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and water content in tissues were measured. Hyaline cartilage had the highest content of COMP and COMP content in hyaline cartilage and tendon was higher in lame horses than in sound horses (phyaline cartilage was higher in lame horses than in sound horses. The MMP-2 amounts were significantly higher in tendons compared to other tissue types. Overall, 79% of the lame horses with lesions had MMP-9 in their tendons and the amount was higher than in sound horses (phyaline and fibrocartilage as well as the DDFT with potential implications for the pathogenesis and management of the condition.

  2. The combined use of kartogenin and platelet-rich plasma promotes fibrocartilage formation in the wounded rat Achilles tendon entheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Yuan, T; Zheng, N; Zhou, Y; Hogan, M V; Wang, J H-C

    2017-04-01

    After an injury, the biological reattachment of tendon to bone is a challenge because healing takes place between a soft (tendon) and a hard (bone) tissue. Even after healing, the transition zone in the enthesis is not completely regenerated, making it susceptible to re-injury. In this study, we aimed to regenerate Achilles tendon entheses (ATEs) in wounded rats using a combination of kartogenin (KGN) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Wounds created in rat ATEs were given three different treatments: kartogenin platelet-rich plasma (KGN-PRP); PRP; or saline (control), followed by histological and immunochemical analyses, and mechanical testing of the rat ATEs after three months of healing. Histological analysis showed well organised arrangement of collagen fibres and proteoglycan formation in the wounded ATEs in the KGN-PRP group. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed fibrocartilage formation in the KGN-PRP-treated ATEs, evidenced by the presence of both collagen I and II in the healed ATE. Larger positively stained collagen III areas were found in both PRP and saline groups than those in the KGN-PRP group. Chondrocyte-related genes, SOX9 and collagen II, and tenocyte-related genes, collagen I and scleraxis (SCX), were also upregulated by KGN-PRP. Moreover, mechanical testing results showed higher ultimate tensile strength in the KGN-PRP group than in the saline control group. In contrast, PRP treatment appeared to have healed the injured ATE but induced no apparent formation of fibrocartilage. The saline-treated group showed poor healing without fibrocartilage tissue formation in the ATEs. Our results show that injection of KGN-PRP induces fibrocartilage formation in the wounded rat ATEs. Hence, KGN-PRP may be a clinically relevant, biological approach to regenerate injured enthesis effectively. Cite this article: J. Zhang, T. Yuan, N. Zheng, Y. Zhou, M. V. Hogan, J. H-C. Wang. The combined use of kartogenin and platelet-rich plasma promotes

  3. MR morphology of triangular fibrocartilage complex: correlation with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon [Mahidol University, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Rachathewi, Bangkok (Thailand); Biswas, Reni; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda [University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate pathology of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using high-resolution morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compare with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties. Five cadaveric wrists (22-70 years) were imaged at 3 T using morphologic (proton density weighted spin echo, PD FS, and 3D spoiled gradient echo, 3D SPGR) and quantitative MR sequences to determine T2 and T1rho properties. In eight geographic regions, morphology of TFC disc and laminae were evaluated for pathology and quantitative MR values. Samples were disarticulated and biomechanical indentation testing was performed on the distal surface of the TFC disc. On morphologic PD SE images, TFC disc pathology included degeneration and tears, while that of the laminae included degeneration, degeneration with superimposed tear, mucinous transformation, and globular calcification. Punctate calcifications were highly visible on 3D SPGR images and found only in pathologic regions. Disc pathology occurred more frequently in proximal regions of the disc than distal regions. Quantitative MR values were lowest in normal samples, and generally higher in pathologic regions. Biomechanical testing demonstrated an inverse relationship, with indentation modulus being high in normal regions with low MR values. The laminae studied were mostly pathologic, and additional normal samples are needed to discern quantitative changes. These results show technical feasibility of morphologic MR, quantitative MR, and biomechanical techniques to characterize pathology of the TFCC. Quantitative MRI may be a suitable surrogate marker of soft tissue mechanical properties, and a useful adjunct to conventional morphologic MR techniques. (orig.)

  4. MR morphology of triangular fibrocartilage complex: correlation with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.; Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon; Biswas, Reni; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate pathology of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using high-resolution morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compare with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties. Five cadaveric wrists (22-70 years) were imaged at 3 T using morphologic (proton density weighted spin echo, PD FS, and 3D spoiled gradient echo, 3D SPGR) and quantitative MR sequences to determine T2 and T1rho properties. In eight geographic regions, morphology of TFC disc and laminae were evaluated for pathology and quantitative MR values. Samples were disarticulated and biomechanical indentation testing was performed on the distal surface of the TFC disc. On morphologic PD SE images, TFC disc pathology included degeneration and tears, while that of the laminae included degeneration, degeneration with superimposed tear, mucinous transformation, and globular calcification. Punctate calcifications were highly visible on 3D SPGR images and found only in pathologic regions. Disc pathology occurred more frequently in proximal regions of the disc than distal regions. Quantitative MR values were lowest in normal samples, and generally higher in pathologic regions. Biomechanical testing demonstrated an inverse relationship, with indentation modulus being high in normal regions with low MR values. The laminae studied were mostly pathologic, and additional normal samples are needed to discern quantitative changes. These results show technical feasibility of morphologic MR, quantitative MR, and biomechanical techniques to characterize pathology of the TFCC. Quantitative MRI may be a suitable surrogate marker of soft tissue mechanical properties, and a useful adjunct to conventional morphologic MR techniques. (orig.)

  5. Engineering Anisotropic Biomimetic Fibrocartilage Microenvironment by Bioprinting Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Nanoliter Gel Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, bioprinting has emerged as a promising patterning strategy to organize cells and extracellular components both in two and three dimensions (2D and 3D) to engineer functional tissue mimicking constructs. So far, tissue printing has neither been used for 3D patterning of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in multiphase growth factor embedded 3D hydrogels nor been investigated phenotypically in terms of simultaneous differentiation into different cell types within the same micropatterned 3D tissue constructs. Accordingly, we demonstrated a biochemical gradient by bioprinting nanoliter droplets encapsulating human MSCs, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF- β1), engineering an anisotropic biomimetic fibrocartilage microenvironment. Assessment of the model tissue construct displayed multiphasic anisotropy of the incorporated biochemical factors after patterning. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) results suggested genomic expression patterns leading to simultaneous differentiation of MSC populations into osteogenic and chondrogenic phenotype within the multiphasic construct, evidenced by upregulation of osteogenesis and condrogenesis related genes during in vitro culture. Comprehensive phenotypic network and pathway analysis results, which were based on genomic expression data, indicated activation of differentiation related mechanisms, via signaling pathways, including TGF, BMP, and vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:24495169

  6. Arthroscopic knotless anchor repair of triangular fibrocartilage in distal radius fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruano, Á A; Najarro-Cid, F; Jiménez-Martín, A; Gómez de los Infantes-Troncoso, J G; Sicre-González, M

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) are associated with distal radioulnar joint instability. Arthroscopic treatment of these lesions improves functional outcome of affected patients. The aim of the present work is to evaluate functional and occupational outcome of TCF repair using an arthroscopic knotless anchor device in patients with associated distal radius fracture. An observational, descriptive study was carried out between November 2011 and January 2014 including 21 patients with distal radius fracture and Palmer 1B lesions of TCF (Atzei class 2 and 3) that were treated by arthroscopic knotless anchor (PopLok® 2,8mm, ConMed, USA). Mean follow-up was 18 months. Functional (Mayo Wrist Score) and occupational outcome results were analyzed. Mean age of the group was 43.0±8.8 years, with 19% of the patients being female. There was an associated scapholunate lesion in 5 cases. Functional results reached a mean of 83.4±16.1 points onMayo Wrist Score. Mean sick-leave time was 153.16±48.5 days. Complete occupational reintegration was reached in 89.5% of cases. There were no postoperative complications. Arthroscopic knotless anchor repair of 1B TFC tears is a minimally invasive method of treatment that improves tension of fixation, avoiding subsequent loosen, in our experience, with few complications and good functional and occupational results. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Engineering anisotropic biomimetic fibrocartilage microenvironment by bioprinting mesenchymal stem cells in nanoliter gel droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkan, Umut A; El Assal, Rami; Yildiz, Simin E; Sung, Yuree; Trachtenberg, Alexander J; Kuo, Winston P; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-07-07

    Over the past decade, bioprinting has emerged as a promising patterning strategy to organize cells and extracellular components both in two and three dimensions (2D and 3D) to engineer functional tissue mimicking constructs. So far, tissue printing has neither been used for 3D patterning of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in multiphase growth factor embedded 3D hydrogels nor been investigated phenotypically in terms of simultaneous differentiation into different cell types within the same micropatterned 3D tissue constructs. Accordingly, we demonstrated a biochemical gradient by bioprinting nanoliter droplets encapsulating human MSCs, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF- β1), engineering an anisotropic biomimetic fibrocartilage microenvironment. Assessment of the model tissue construct displayed multiphasic anisotropy of the incorporated biochemical factors after patterning. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) results suggested genomic expression patterns leading to simultaneous differentiation of MSC populations into osteogenic and chondrogenic phenotype within the multiphasic construct, evidenced by upregulation of osteogenesis and condrogenesis related genes during in vitro culture. Comprehensive phenotypic network and pathway analysis results, which were based on genomic expression data, indicated activation of differentiation related mechanisms, via signaling pathways, including TGF, BMP, and vascular endothelial growth factor.

  8. MR morphology of triangular fibrocartilage complex: correlation with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Won C; Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon; Chang, Eric Y; Biswas, Reni; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda; Chung, Christine B

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate pathology of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using high-resolution morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compare with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties. Five cadaveric wrists (22-70 years) were imaged at 3 T using morphologic (proton density weighted spin echo, PD FS, and 3D spoiled gradient echo, 3D SPGR) and quantitative MR sequences to determine T2 and T1rho properties. In eight geographic regions, morphology of TFC disc and laminae were evaluated for pathology and quantitative MR values. Samples were disarticulated and biomechanical indentation testing was performed on the distal surface of the TFC disc. On morphologic PD SE images, TFC disc pathology included degeneration and tears, while that of the laminae included degeneration, degeneration with superimposed tear, mucinous transformation, and globular calcification. Punctate calcifications were highly visible on 3D SPGR images and found only in pathologic regions. Disc pathology occurred more frequently in proximal regions of the disc than distal regions. Quantitative MR values were lowest in normal samples, and generally higher in pathologic regions. Biomechanical testing demonstrated an inverse relationship, with indentation modulus being high in normal regions with low MR values. The laminae studied were mostly pathologic, and additional normal samples are needed to discern quantitative changes. These results show technical feasibility of morphologic MR, quantitative MR, and biomechanical techniques to characterize pathology of the TFCC. Quantitative MRI may be a suitable surrogate marker of soft tissue mechanical properties, and a useful adjunct to conventional morphologic MR techniques.

  9. Rotator cuff repair with a tendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Chen, Qingshan; Thoreson, Andrew R; Qu, Jin; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Steinmann, Scott P; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-11-01

    To compare the mechanical performance of a rotator cuff repaired with a novel tendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch vs the traditional Mason-Allen repair in an in vitro canine model. Twenty shoulders and 10 bridging patches from patellar tendon were harvested. The patches were trimmed and sliced into 2 layers. An infraspinatus tendon tear was created in each shoulder. Modified Mason-Allen sutures were used to repair the infraspinatus tendon to the greater tuberosity, with or without the bridging patch (bridging patch group and controls, respectively). Shoulders were loaded to failure under displacement control at a rate of 0.5mm/s. The ultimate tensile load was significantly higher in the bridging patch group than control (mean [SD], 365.46 [36.45] vs 272.79 [48.88] N; Pfibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch achieved higher ultimate tensile load and stiffness at the patch-greater tuberosity repair site compared with traditional repair in a canine model. This composite tissue transforms the traditional tendon-to-bone healing interface (with dissimilar tissues) into a pair of bone-to-bone and tendon-to-tendon interfaces, which may improve healing quality and reduce retear rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Arthroscopic-assisted repair of triangular fibrocartilage complex foveal avulsion in distal radioulnar joint injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sung Jong; Jegal, Midum; Park, Min Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) foveal insertion can lead to distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability accompanied by ulnar-sided pain, weakness, snapping, and limited forearm rotation. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients with TFCC foveal tears treated with arthroscopic-assisted repair. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients underwent foveal repair of avulsed TFCC with the assistance of arthroscopy between 2011 and 2013. These patients were followed up for an average of 19 months (range 14–25 months). The avulsed TFCC were reattached to the fovea using a transosseous pull-out suture or a knotless suture anchor. At the final followup, the range of motion, grip strength and DRUJ stability were measured as objective outcomes. Subjective outcomes were assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH score) and return to work. Results: Based on the DRUJ stress test, 5 patients had normal stability and 7 patients showed mild laxity as compared with the contralateral side. Postoperatively, the mean range of pronation supination increased from 141° to 166°, and the mean VAS score for pain decreased from 5.3 to 1.7 significantly. The PRWE and DASH questionnaires also showed significant functional improvement. All patients were able to return to their jobs. However, two patients complained of persistent pain. Conclusions: Arthroscopically assisted repair of TFCC foveal injury can provide significant pain relief, functional improvement and restoration of DRUJ stability. PMID:27293286

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. Usefulness of the fat suppression MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshiyasu [Fujita Health Univ., Nagoya (Japan). Second Hospital; Yabe, Yutaka; Horiuchi, Yukio; Kikuchi, Yoshito; Makita, Satoo

    1996-08-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now allow for the visualization of small structures, such as the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) of the wrist. Recent investigators suggested that MRI is useful in delineation of the TFCC itself and its abnormality, and supported that diagnostic value of MRI for the TFCC tears is almost equal to those of arthrography and arthroscopy. In contrast, there were several reports that representation of the TFCC in MRI was less worth than in arthrography. Further, it was reported that MRI was not useful because abnormal findings existed at normal volunteers` wrists. Recent development of the pulse sequence is remarkable, such as gradient echo, fast spin echo and fat suppression method. However, as the previous MR studies of the TFCC mainly using conventional spin echo pulse sequence, there were a few comparison of each pulse sequence and we do not know how each pulse sequence delineates the TFCC. Therefore, we studied MRI of the TFCC using several pulse sequence in normal volunteers, and compared MR slices of the TFCC with corresponding histological sections to evaluate shape detectability of MRI. (J.P.N.)

  12. High-Resolution 3T MR Imaging of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borstel, Donald; Wang, Michael; Small, Kirstin; Nozaki, Taiki; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2017-01-10

    This study is intended as a review of 3Tesla (T) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). The recent advances in MR imaging, which includes high field strength magnets, multi-channel coils, and isotropic 3-dimensional (3D) sequences have enabled the visualization of precise TFCC anatomy with high spatial and contrast resolution. In addition to the routine wrist protocol, there are specific techniques used to optimize 3T imaging of the wrist; including driven equilibrium sequence (DRIVE), parallel imaging, and 3D imaging. The coil choice for 3T imaging of the wrist depends on a number of variables, and the proper coil design selection is critical for high-resolution wrist imaging with high signal and contrast-to-noise ratio. The TFCC is a complex structure and is composed of the articular disc (disc proper), the triangular ligament, the dorsal and volar radioulnar ligaments, the meniscus homologue, the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon sheath, and the ulnolunate and ulnotriquetral ligaments. The Palmer classification categorizes TFCC lesions as traumatic (type 1) or degenerative (type 2). In this review article, we present clinical high-resolution MR images of normal TFCC anatomy and TFCC injuries with this classification system.

  13. Influence of Structure and Composition on Dynamic Viscoelastic Property of Cartilaginous Tissue: Criteria for Classification between Hyaline Cartilage and Fibrocartilage Based on Mechanical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Shogo; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Katsuko; Ushida, Takashi

    Recently, many types of methodologies have been developed to regenerate articular cartilage. It is important to assess whether the reconstructed cartilaginous tissue has the appropriate mechanical functions to qualify as hyaline (articular) cartilage. In some cases, the reconstructed tissue may become fibrocartilage and not hyaline cartilage. In this study, we determined the dynamic viscoelastic properties of these two types of cartilage by using compression and shear tests, respectively. Hyaline cartilage specimens were harvested from the articular surface of bovine knee joints and fibrocartilage specimens were harvested from the meniscus tissue of the same. The results of this study revealed that the compressive energy dissipation of hyaline cartilage showed a strong dependence on testing frequency at low frequencies, while that of fibrocartilage did not. Therefore, the compressive energy dissipation that is indicated by the loss tangent could become the criterion for the in vitro assessment of the mechanical function of regenerated cartilage.

  14. The Traumatized TFCC: An Illustrated Review of the Anatomy and Injury Patterns of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, Matthew R; White, Eric A; Patel, Dakshesh B; Schein, Aaron J; RiveraMelo, Hector; Matcuk, George R

    2016-01-01

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) plays an important role in wrist biomechanics and is prone to traumatic and degenerative injury, making it a common source of ulnar-sided wrist pain. Because of this, the TFCC is frequently imaged, and a detailed understanding of its anatomy and injury patterns is critical in generating an accurate report to help guide treatment. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of TFCC anatomy, its normal appearance on magnetic resonance imaging, the spectrum of TFCC injuries based on the Palmer classification system, and pitfalls in accurate assessment. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. How does ulnar shortening osteotomy influence morphologic changes in the triangular fibrocartilage complex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Sato, Kazuki; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2014-11-01

    Ulnar shortening osteotomy often is indicated for treatment of injuries to the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). However, the effect of ulnar shortening osteotomy on the changes in shape of the TFCC is unclear. In our study, quantitative evaluations were performed using MRI to clarify the effect of ulnar shortening on triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) thickness attributable to disc regeneration of the TFC and TFC angle attributable to the suspension effect of ulnar shortening on the TFC. The purposes of this study were (1) to compare preoperative and postoperative TFC thickness and TFC angle on MR images to quantitatively evaluate the effect of ulnar shortening osteotomy on disc regeneration and the suspension effect on the TFC; and (2) to assess whether changes in TFC thickness and TFC angle correlated with the Mayo wrist score. Between 1995 and 2008, 256 patients underwent ulnar shortening osteotomy for TFCC injuries. The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 51 months; range, 24-210 months). A total of 79 patients (31%) with complete followup including preoperative and postoperative MR images and the Mayo wrist score was included in this retrospective study. Evaluation of the postoperative MR images and the Mayo wrist score were performed at the final followup. The remaining 177 patients did not undergo postoperative MRI, or they had a previous fracture, large tears of the disc proper, or were lost to followup. Two orthopaedists, one of whom performed the surgeries, measured the TFC thickness and the TFC angle on coronal MR images before and after surgery for each patient. Correlations of the percent change in the TFC thickness and the magnitude of TFC angle change with age, sex, postoperative MR images, extent of ulnar shortening, preoperative ulnar variance, and postoperative Mayo wrist score were assessed. Stepwise regression analysis showed a correlation between the percent change in TFC thickness and preoperative ulnar variance (R2=0.21; β=-0.33; 95

  16. Effect of Strain, Region, and Tissue Composition on Glucose Partitioning in Meniscus Fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Kelsey L; Jackson, Alicia R

    2017-03-01

    A nearly avascular tissue, the knee meniscus relies on diffusive transport for nutritional supply to cells. Nutrient transport depends on solute partitioning in the tissue, which governs the amount of nutrients that can enter a tissue. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of mechanical strain, tissue region, and tissue composition on the partition coefficient of glucose in meniscus fibrocartilage. A simple partitioning experiment was employed to measure glucose partitioning in porcine meniscus tissues from two regions (horn and central), from both meniscal components (medial and lateral), and at three levels of compression (0%, 10%, and 20%). Partition coefficient values were correlated to strain level, water volume fraction, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of tissue specimens. Partition coefficient values ranged from 0.47 to 0.91 (n = 48). Results show that glucose partition coefficient is significantly (p < 0.001) affected by compression, decreasing with increasing strain. Furthermore, we did not find a statistically significant effect of tissue when comparing medial versus lateral (p = 0.181) or when comparing central and horn regions (p = 0.837). There were significant positive correlations between tissue water volume fraction and glucose partitioning for all groups. However, the correlation between GAG content and partitioning was only significant in the lateral horn group. Determining how glucose partitioning is affected by tissue composition and loading is necessary for understanding nutrient availability and related tissue health and/or degeneration. Therefore, this study is important for better understanding the transport and nutrition-related mechanisms of meniscal degeneration.

  17. The significance of calcified fibrocartilage on the cortical endplate of the translational sheep spine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Sarina K; Bell, Spencer; Epperson, Richard Tyler; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2013-05-01

    To gain an understanding of the vertebral cortical endplate and factors that may affect the ability to achieve skeletal attachment to intervertebral implants and fusion, this study aimed to characterize the hypermineralized tissue on the cortical endplate of the vertebral body on a commonly used animal model. Skeletally mature sheep were injected with tetracycline prior to euthanasia and the C2-C3, T5-T6, and L2-L3 spinal motion segments were excised and prepared. Vertebral tissues were imaged using backscatter electron (BSE) imaging, histology, and tetracycline labeling was used to assess bone remodeling within different tissue layers. It was determined that the hypermineralized tissue layer was calcified fibrocartilage (CFC). No tetracycline labels were identified in the CFC layer, in contrast to single and double labels that were present in the underlying bone, indicating the CFC present on the cortical endplate was not being actively remodeled. The average thickness of the CFC layer was 146.3 ± 70.53 µm in the cervical region, 98.2 ± 40.29 µm in the thoracic region, and 150.89 ± 69.25 µm in the lumbar region. This difference in thickness may be attributed to the regional biomechanical properties of the spine. Results from this investigation indicate the presence of a nonremodeling tissue on the cortical endplate of the vertebral body in sheep spines, which attaches the intervertebral disc to the vertebrae. This tissue, if not removed, would likely prevent successful bony attachment to an intervertebral device in spinal fusion studies and total disc replacement surgeries. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Arthroscopically assisted transcapsular refixation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillukat, T; Fuhrmann, R A; Windolf, J; van Schoonhoven, J

    2016-08-01

    Refixation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) to the ulnar capsule of the wrist. Distal TFCC tears without instability, proximal TFCC intact. Loose ulnar TFCC attachment without tear or instability. Peripheral TFCC tears with instability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Complex or proximal tears of the TFCC. Isolated, central degenerative tears without healing potential. Arthroscopically guided, minimally invasive suture of the TFCC to the base of the sixth extensor compartment. Above elbow plaster splint, 70° flexion of the elbow joint, 45° supination for 6 weeks. Skin suture removal after 2 weeks. No physiotherapy to extend pronation and supination during the first 3 months. In an ongoing long-term study, 7 of 31 patients who underwent transcapsular refixation of the TFCC between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2010 were evaluated after an average follow-up interval of 116 ± 34 months (range 68-152 months). All patients demonstrated an almost nearly unrestricted range of wrist motion and grip strength compared to the unaffected side. All distal radioulnar joints were stable. On the visual analogue scale (VAS 0-10), pain at rest was 1 ± 1 (range 0-2) and pain during exercise 2 ± 2 (range 0-5); the DASH score averaged 10 ± 14 points (range 0-39 points). All patients were satisfied. The modified Mayo wrist score showed four excellent, two good, and one fair result. These results correspond to the results of other series. Transcapsular refixation is a reliable, technically simple procedure in cases with ulnar-sided TFCC tears without instability leading to good results.

  19. The effect of magnesium ion concentration on the fibrocartilage regeneration potential of goat costal chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagandora, Catherine K; Tudares, Mauro A; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2012-03-01

    Magnesium has recently been explored as a potential biomaterial for degradable orthopedic implants but its effect on fibrocartilage remains unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of high concentrations of magnesium ions on the matrix production of goat costal fibrochondrocytes in vitro. Cells were cultured using a scaffoldless approach with media containing magnesium chloride (MgCl(2)) or magnesium sulfate (MgSO(4)) at concentrations of 20, 50, and 100 mM in addition to the baseline magnesium concentration of 0.8 mM MgSO(4). At 4 weeks, there were no significant differences in compressive tangent modulus and total matrix production between constructs cultured in 20 mM Mg(2+) and the 0.8 mM Mg(2+) control (435 ± 47 kPa). There was a significant decrease in compressive tangent modulus compared to the 0.8 mM Mg(2+) constructs in the 50 mM MgCl(2) and MgSO(4) groups, while the 100 mM groups were not mechanically testable (p < 0.05). The collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of the 50 and 100 mM MgCl(2) and MgSO(4) constructs was significantly lower than the control (6.9 ± 0.5% and 16.5 ± 1.3% per dry weight, respectively) (p < 0.05). The results show that goat costal fibrochondrocytes exhibit a high degree of resiliency to magnesium ion concentrations up to 20 mM in vitro.

  20. An immunohistochemical study of the triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist: regional variations in cartilage phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milz, S; Sicking, B; Sprecher, C M; Putz, R; Benjamin, M

    2007-01-01

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) transmits load from the wrist to the ulna and stabilizes the distal radioulnar joint. Damage to it is a major cause of wrist pain. Although its basic structure is well established, little is known of its molecular composition. We have analysed the immunohistochemical labelling pattern of the extracellular matrix of the articular disc and the meniscal homologue of the TFCC in nine elderly individuals (age range 69–96 years), using a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against collagens, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Although many of the molecules (types I, III and VI collagen, chondroitin 4 sulphate, dermatan sulphate and keratan sulphate, the oversulphated epitope of chondroitin 6 sulphate, versican and COMP) were found in all parts of the TFCC, aggrecan, link protein and type II collagen were restricted to the articular disc and to entheses. They were thus not a feature of the meniscal homologue. The shift in tissue phenotype within the TFCC, from a fibrocartilaginous articular disc to a more fibrous meniscal homologue, correlates with biomechanical data suggesting that the radial region is stiff and subject to considerable stress concentration. The presence of aggrecan, link protein and type II collagen in the articular disc could explain why the TFCC is destroyed in rheumatoid arthritis, given that it has been suggested that autoimmunity to these antigens results in the destruction of articular cartilage. The differential distribution of aggrecan within the TFCC is likely to be reflected by regional differences in water content and mobility on the radial and ulnar side. This needs to be taken into account in the design of improved MRI protocols for visualizing this ulnocarpal complex of the wrist. PMID:17532798

  1. Arthroscopic Diagnosis of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Foveal Tear: A Cadaver Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Samir K; Wall, Lindley B; Calfee, Ryan P; Shen, Tony S; Dy, Christopher J; Yannascoli, Sarah M; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2018-01-25

    To determine whether the arthroscopic hook and trampoline tests are accurate and reliable diagnostic tests for foveal triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) detachment. Wrist arthroscopy was performed on 10 cadaveric upper extremities. Arthroscopic hook and trampoline tests were performed and videos recorded (baseline). The deep foveal TFCC insertion was then sharply detached. Arthroscopic hook and trampoline tests were repeated. Subsequently, the foveal detachment was repaired via an ulnar tunnel technique and the hook test was repeated for a third time. Videos were independently reviewed at 2 time points by 2 fellowship-trained hand surgeons and 1 hand surgery fellow in a randomized and blinded fashion. Hook and trampoline tests were graded as positive or negative. Proportions of categorical variables were compared via 2-tailed Fisher exact test. Inter- and intraobserver reliabilities were assessed via Cohen kappa coefficient. The sensitivity and specificity of the hook test for foveal detachment diagnosis were 90% and 90%, respectively. There was 90% agreement among all 3 observers for the baseline and foveal detachment hook tests. Cohen kappa coefficients for the inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the hook test were 0.87 and 0.81, respectively. Seventeen percent of trampoline tests were positive at baseline versus 43% after foveal detachment. The trampoline test had 45% agreement between the 3 observers. Cohen kappa coefficients for the inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the trampoline test were 0.16 and 0.63, respectively. Following ulnar tunnel repair, 20% of hook tests were positive. The hook test is highly sensitive, specific, and reliable for the diagnosis of isolated TFCC foveal detachment. The trampoline test has insufficient reliability to assess foveal detachment. A TFCC foveal repair using an ulnar tunnel technique returns the hook test to baseline. The hook test is a sensitive, specific, and reliable test for the diagnosis of

  2. The performance of magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z X; Chen, S L; Wang, Q Q; Liu, B; Zhu, J; Shen, J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury through a meta-analysis. A comprehensive literature search was conducted before 1 April 2014. All studies comparing magnetic resonance imaging results with arthroscopy or open surgery findings were reviewed, and 25 studies that satisfied the eligibility criteria were included. Data were pooled to yield pooled sensitivity and specificity, which were respectively 0.83 and 0.82. In detection of central and peripheral tears, magnetic resonance imaging had respectively a pooled sensitivity of 0.90 and 0.88 and a pooled specificity of 0.97 and 0.97. Six high-quality studies using Ringler's recommended magnetic resonance imaging parameters were selected for analysis to determine whether optimal imaging protocols yielded better results. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these six studies were 0.92 and 0.82, respectively. The overall accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging was acceptable. For peripheral tears, the pooled data showed a relatively high accuracy. Magnetic resonance imaging with appropriate parameters are an ideal method for diagnosing different types of triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Endochondral fracture healing with external fixation in the Sost knockout mouse results in earlier fibrocartilage callus removal and increased bone volume fraction and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, A; Yu, N Y C; Peacock, L; Mikulec, K; Kramer, I; Kneissel, M; McDonald, M M; Little, D G

    2015-02-01

    Sclerostin deficiency, via genetic knockout or anti-Sclerostin antibody treatment, has been shown to cause increased bone volume, density and strength of calluses following endochondral bone healing. However, there is limited data on the effect of Sclerostin deficiency on the formative early stage of fibrocartilage (non-bony tissue) formation and removal. In this study we extensively investigate the early fibrocartilage callus. Closed tibial fractures were performed on Sost(-/-) mice and age-matched wild type (C57Bl/6J) controls and assessed at multiple early time points (7, 10 and 14days), as well as at 28days post-fracture after bony union. External fixation was utilized, avoiding internal pinning and minimizing differences in stability stiffness, a variable that has confounded previous research in this area. Normal endochondral ossification progressed in wild type and Sost(-/-) mice with equivalent volumes of fibrocartilage formed at early day 7 and day 10 time points, and bony union in both genotypes by day 28. There were no significant differences in rate of bony union; however there were significant increases in fibrocartilage removal from the Sost(-/-) fracture calluses at day 14 suggesting earlier progression of endochondral healing. Earlier bone formation was seen in Sost(-/-) calluses over wild type with greater bone volume at day 10 (221%, p<0.01). The resultant Sost(-/-) united bony calluses at day 28 had increased bone volume fraction compared to wild type calluses (24%, p<0.05), and the strength of the fractured Sost(-/-) tibiae was greater than that that of wild type fractured tibiae. In summary, bony union was not altered by Sclerostin deficiency in externally-fixed closed tibial fractures, but fibrocartilage removal was enhanced and the resultant united bony calluses had increased bone fraction and increased strength. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A chondroitinase-ABC and TGF-β1 treatment regimen for enhancing the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBarb, Regina F; Makris, Eleftherios A; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2013-01-01

    The development of functionally equivalent fibrocartilage remains elusive despite efforts to engineer tissues such as knee meniscus, intervertebral disc and temporomandibular joint disc. Attempts to engineer these structures often fail to create tissues with mechanical properties on a par with native tissue, resulting in constructs unsuitable for clinical applications. The objective of this study was to engineer a spectrum of biomimetic fibrocartilages representative of the distinct functional properties found in native tissues. Using the self-assembly process, different co-cultures of meniscus cells and articular chondrocytes were seeded into agarose wells and treated with the catabolic agent chondroitinase-ABC (C-ABC) and the anabolic agent transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) via a two-factor (cell ratio and bioactive treatment), full factorial study design. Application of both C-ABC and TGF-β1 resulted in a beneficial or positive increase in the collagen content of treated constructs compared to controls. Significant increases in both the collagen density and fiber diameter were also seen with this treatment, increasing these values by 32 and 15%, respectively, over control values. Mechanical testing found the combined bioactive treatment to synergistically increase the Young's modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the engineered fibrocartilages compared to controls, with values reaching the lower spectrum of those found in native tissues. Together, these data demonstrate that C-ABC and TGF-β1 interact to develop a denser collagen matrix better able to withstand tensile loading. This study highlights a way to optimize the tensile properties of engineered fibrocartilage using a biochemical and a biophysical agent together to create distinct fibrocartilages with functional properties mimicking those of native tissue. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Functionality after arthroscopic debridement of central triangular fibrocartilage tears with central perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möldner, Meike; Unglaub, Frank; Hahn, Peter; Müller, Lars P; Bruckner, Thomas; Spies, Christian K

    2015-02-01

    To investigate functional and subjective outcome parameters after arthroscopic debridement of central articular disc lesions (Palmer type 2C) and to correlate these findings with ulna length. Fifty patients (15 men; 35 women; mean age, 47 y) with Palmer type 2C lesions underwent arthroscopic debridement. Nine of these patients (3 men; 6 women; mean static ulnar variance, 2.4 mm; SD, 0.5 mm) later underwent ulnar shortening osteotomy because of persistent pain and had a mean follow-up of 36 months. Mean follow-up was 38 months for patients with debridement only (mean static ulnar variance, 0.5 mm; SD, 1.2 mm). Examination parameters included range of motion, grip and pinch strengths, pain (visual analog scale), and functional outcome scores (Modified Mayo Wrist score [MMWS] and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand [DASH] questionnaire). Patients who had debridement only reached a DASH questionnaire score of 18 and an MMWS of 89 with significant pain reduction from 7.6 to 2.0 on the visual analog scale. Patients with additional ulnar shortening reached a DASH questionnaire score of 18 and an MMWS of 88, with significant pain reduction from 7.4 to 2.5. Neither surgical treatment compromised grip and pinch strength in comparison with the contralateral side. We identified 1.8 mm or more of positive ulnar variance as an indication for early ulnar shortening in the case of persistent ulnar-sided wrist pain after arthroscopic debridement. Arthroscopic debridement was a sufficient and reliable treatment option for the majority of patients with Palmer type 2C lesions. Because reliable predictors of the necessity for ulnar shortening are lacking, we recommend arthroscopic debridement as a first-line treatment for all triangular fibrocartilage 2C lesions, and, in the presence of persistent ulnar-sided wrist pain, ulnar shortening osteotomy after an interval of 6 months. Ulnar shortening proved to be sufficient and safe for these patients. Patients with persistent ulnar

  6. Arthroscopically assisted reconstruction of triangular fibrocartilage complex foveal avulsion in the ulnar variance-positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, ByungSung; Yoon, Hong-Kee; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Park, Kang Hee; Park, Sung-Yong; Yoon, Jun-Hee; Song, Hyun Seok

    2013-11-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the clinical results of patients treated by arthroscopically assisted reconstruction of foveal avulsion injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using a suture anchor. We retrospectively reviewed the results of 15 patients (11 men and 4 women; mean age, 30.5 years) who underwent surgical procedures for the treatment of TFCC foveal avulsion at our hospital. The patients were followed up for a mean of 29 months. The patients had TFCC foveal avulsion caused by sprains (n = 8), falls (n = 4), playing baseball (n = 2), and a motor vehicle accident (n = 1). All the patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Radiographs obtained to assess ulnar variance (UV), ulnar-dorsal subluxation, and function of the wrist based on grip power; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; and Mayo wrist score were examined for all patients both preoperatively and postoperatively. On preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, TFCC foveal avulsion was observed in 13 of 15 cases. The mean UV value based on preoperative simple radiographic findings was 1.7 ± 1.0 mm, and dorsal subluxation at the distal ulna improved from 2.9 ± 3.0 mm to 0.2 ± 0.9 mm (P = .017). In all cases the distal radioulnar joint instability disappeared postoperatively. Grip power (compared with the uninvolved limb) was 79.3% preoperatively and 82.9% postoperatively (P = .086). The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were 28.4 points preoperatively and 16.6 points postoperatively (P = .061). The Mayo wrist scores were excellent in 10 cases, good in 2, and fair in 3, and the mean score improved significantly from 64 points preoperatively to 84 points postoperatively (P = .007). Arthroscopic-assisted suture anchor reattachment of the TFCC in patients with traumatic TFCC foveal avulsion can prevent or reduce distal radioulnar joint instability and reduce pain even in chronic cases with positive UV. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013

  7. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freemont, Anthony J.; Hoyland, Judith

    2006-01-01

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed

  8. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemont, Anthony J. [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Tony.freemont@man.ac.uk; Hoyland, Judith [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed.

  9. Combined use of chondroitinase-ABC, TGF-β1, and collagen crosslinking agent lysyl oxidase to engineer functional neotissues for fibrocartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Eleftherios A; MacBarb, Regina F; Paschos, Nikolaos K; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2014-08-01

    Patients suffering from damaged or diseased fibrocartilages currently have no effective long-term treatment options. Despite their potential, engineered tissues suffer from inferior biomechanical integrity and an inability to integrate in vivo. The present study identifies a treatment regimen (including the biophysical agent chondroitinase-ABC, the biochemical agent TGF-β1, and the collagen crosslinking agent lysyl oxidase) to prime highly cellularized, scaffold-free neofibrocartilage implants, effecting continued improvement in vivo. We show these agents drive in vitro neofibrocartilage matrix maturation toward synergistically enhanced Young's modulus and ultimate tensile strength values, which were increased 245% and 186%, respectively, over controls. Furthermore, an in vitro fibrocartilage defect model found this treatment regimen to significantly increase the integration tensile properties between treated neofibrocartilage and native tissue. Through translating this technology to an in vivo fibrocartilage defect model, our results indicate, for the first time, that a pre-treatment can prime neofibrocartilage for significantly enhanced integration potential in vivo, with interfacial tensile stiffness and strength increasing by 730% and 745%, respectively, compared to integration values achieved in vitro. Our results suggest that specifically targeting collagen assembly and organization is a powerful means to augment overall neotissue mechanics and integration potential toward improved clinical feasibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Histomorphological analyse of accelerating the fibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction in rabbits by low intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoliang; Lü, Hongbin; Hu, Jianzhong; Xu, Daqi; Zhou, Jingyong; Wang, Ye

    2013-08-01

    To analyse the effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation (LIPUS) on accelerating the fibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction. A total of 60 mature female New Zealand white rabbits undergoing standard partial patellectomy were divided into 2 groups randomly. The control group was given comfort treatment and the treatment group was given LIPUS treatment starting from day 3 to the end of week 6 postoperatively. The scheduled time points of animal euthanization would be at week 6, week 12 and week 18 postoperatively. The patella-patellar tendon (PPT) complex would be harvested and cut into sections after decalcification for H&E staining, Safranine o/fast green staining. The thickness and gray value of fibrocartilage layer were analyzed by SANO Microscope Partner image analyzer. At week 6, week 12 and week 18 postoperatively, the fibrocartilage layer in the treatment group was significantly thicker than that in the control group (Pfibrocartilage layer was significantly smaller than that in the control group (Pfibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction in rabbit models.

  11. Identification of a progenitor cell population destined to form fracture fibrocartilage callus in Dickkopf-related protein 3-green fluorescent protein reporter mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yu; Adams, Douglas; Hagiwara, Yusuke; Yoshida, Ryu; Kamimura, Masayuki; Itoi, Eiji; Rowe, David W

    2016-11-01

    Fracture healing is a complex biological process involving the proliferation of mesenchymal progenitor cells, and chondrogenic, osteogenic, and angiogenic differentiation. The mechanisms underlying the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate Dickkopf-related protein 3 (Dkk3) expression in periosteal cells using Dkk3-green fluorescent protein reporter mice. We found that proliferation of mesenchymal progenitor cells began in the periosteum, involving Dkk3-positive cell proliferation near the fracture site. In addition, Dkk3 was expressed in fibrocartilage cells together with smooth muscle α-actin and Col3.6 in the early phase of fracture healing as a cell marker of fibrocartilage cells. Dkk3 was not expressed in mature chondrogenic cells or osteogenic cells. Transient expression of Dkk3 disappeared in the late phase of fracture healing, except in the superficial periosteal area of fracture callus. The Dkk3 expression pattern differed in newly formed type IV collagen positive blood vessels and the related avascular tissue. This is the first report that shows Dkk3 expression in the periosteum at a resting state and in fibrocartilage cells during the fracture healing process, which was associated with smooth muscle α-actin and Col3.6 expression in mesenchymal progenitor cells. These fluorescent mesenchymal lineage cells may be useful for future studies to better understand fracture healing.

  12. Comparison between open and arthroscopic-assisted foveal triangular fibrocartilage complex repair for post-traumatic distal radio-ulnar joint instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, R; Atzei, A; Cozzolino, R; Fairplay, T; Badur, N

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the objective and subjective functional outcomes after foveal reattachment of proximal or complete ulnar-sided triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions by two surgical procedures: an open technique or an arthroscopically assisted repair. The study was done prospectively on 49 wrists affected by post-traumatic distal radio-ulnar joint instability. Twenty-four patients were treated with the open technique (Group 1) and 25 by the arthroscopically assisted technique (Group 2). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a clear foveal detachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in 67% of the cases. Arthroscopy showed a positive ulnar-sided detachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (positive hook test) in all cases. Distal radio-ulnar joint stability was obtained in all but five patients at a mean follow-up of 6 months. Both groups had improvement of all parameters with significant differences in wrist pain scores, Mayo wrist score, Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire and Patient-Rated Wrist/Hand Evaluation questionnaire scores. There were no significant post-operative differences between the two groups in the outcome parameters except for the Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand questionnaire score, which was significantly better in Group 2 (p < 0.001). © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. High-resolution 3-T MRI of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist: injury pattern and MR features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Huili; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Heng [Peking University Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhang, Huibo [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital of Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua [Peking University Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Beijing Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China); Yin, Yuming [Radiology Associates, LLP, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    2017-12-15

    To investigate if using high-resolution 3-T MRI can identify additional injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) beyond the Palmer classification. Eighty-six patients with surgically proven TFCC injury were included in this study. All patients underwent high-resolution 3-T MRI of the injured wrist. The MR imaging features of TFCC were analyzed according to the Palmer classification. According to the Palmer classification, 69 patients could be classified as having Palmer injuries (52 had traumatic tears and 17 had degenerative tears). There were 17 patients whose injuries could not be classified according to the Palmer classification: 13 had volar or dorsal capsular TFC detachment and 4 had a horizontal tear of the articular disk. Using high-resolution 3-T MRI, we have not only found all the TFCC injuries described in the Palmer classification, additional injury types were found in this study, including horizontal tear of the TFC and capsular TFC detachment. We propose the modified Palmer classification and add the injury types that were not included in the original Palmer classification. (orig.)

  14. High-resolution 3-T MRI of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist: injury pattern and MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Huili; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Huibo; Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua; Yin, Yuming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate if using high-resolution 3-T MRI can identify additional injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) beyond the Palmer classification. Eighty-six patients with surgically proven TFCC injury were included in this study. All patients underwent high-resolution 3-T MRI of the injured wrist. The MR imaging features of TFCC were analyzed according to the Palmer classification. According to the Palmer classification, 69 patients could be classified as having Palmer injuries (52 had traumatic tears and 17 had degenerative tears). There were 17 patients whose injuries could not be classified according to the Palmer classification: 13 had volar or dorsal capsular TFC detachment and 4 had a horizontal tear of the articular disk. Using high-resolution 3-T MRI, we have not only found all the TFCC injuries described in the Palmer classification, additional injury types were found in this study, including horizontal tear of the TFC and capsular TFC detachment. We propose the modified Palmer classification and add the injury types that were not included in the original Palmer classification. (orig.)

  15. Dynamic tensile loading improves the functional properties of mesenchymal stem cell-laden nanofiber-based fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brendon M; Shah, Roshan P; Huang, Alice H; Mauck, Robert L

    2011-05-01

    Fibrocartilaginous tissues such as the meniscus serve critical load-bearing roles, relying on arrays of collagen fibers to resist tensile loads experienced with normal activity. As these structures are frequently injured and possess limited healing capacity, there exists great demand for tissue-engineered replacements. Toward recreating the structural features of these anisotropic tissues in vitro, we employ scaffolds composed of co-aligned nanofibers that direct mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) orientation and the formation of organized extracellular matrix (ECM). Concomitant with ECM synthesis, the mechanical properties of constructs increase with free-swelling culture, but ultimately failed to achieve equivalence with meniscal fibrocartilage. As mechanical forces are essential to the development and maintenance of musculoskeletal tissues, this work examined the effect of cyclic tensile loading on MSC-laden nanofibrous constructs. We hypothesized that loading would modulate the transcriptional behavior of MSCs, spur the deposition of ECM, and lead to enhancements in construct mechanical properties compared to free-swelling controls. Fiber-aligned scaffolds were seeded with MSCs and dynamically loaded daily in tension or maintained as nonloaded controls for 4 weeks. With mechanical stimulation, fibrous gene expression increased, collagen deposition increased, and the tensile modulus increased by 16% relative to controls. These results show that dynamic tensile loading enhances the maturation of MSC-laden aligned nanofibrous constructs, suggesting that recapitulation of the structural and mechanical environment of load-bearing tissues results in increases in functional properties that can be exploited for tissue engineering applications.

  16. Combined Palmer Type 1A and 1B Traumatic Lesions of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex A New Category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Erin; Ayalon, Omri; Yang, Steven

    2016-06-01

    We present a series of eight patients who underwent wrist arthroscopy for presumed solitary tears of the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) and were, instead, found to have combined 1A (central tear) and 1B (ulnar avulsion) tears. The Palmer Classification does not currently categorize this combined pattern. All but one patient had a traumatic injury. Each subject had preoperative radiographs and MRI scans. TFC tears were evident on all MRI scans, though only one was suggestive of a combined tear pat - tern. Surgical management included arthroscopic central tear debridement and ulnar peripheral repair. Average follow-up was 22 months. Grip strength in the affected hand improved from 16% deficit as compared to the unaffected side, to 3.5% deficit postoperatively (p = 0.003), and visual analog scores (VAS) decreased from an average of 7.1/10 preoperatively to 2.3/10 postoperatively (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant change in wrist range of motion (ROM), however. Arthroscopic debridement of the central perforation (1A lesion) with concomitant repair of the ulnar detachment (1B lesion) resulted in functional and symptomatic improvement. This combined 1A/1B TFC injury is not reliably diagnosed preoperatively and should be considered a new subset in the Palmer classification, as this will raise awareness of its presence and assist in preoperative planning of such lesions.

  17. T2[sup *] weighted MR imaging for the diagnosis of the perforation of triangular fibrocartilage; Comparison with arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Taro; Nakamura, Eiziro; Ahsoh, Kuniichi; Masumi, Shogo (Oita Medical Univ., Takatsuki (Japan))

    1994-05-01

    Perforation of the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) has been considered an important factor in the etiology of pain in the ulnar wrist joint, and arthrography has been used conventionally to diagnose the perforation. Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to diagnose TFC perforation. Gundy et al. examined cadaver wrists with Tl weighted imaging and arthrography, and obtained findings suggesting that arthrography provides a more accurate diagnosis of the TFC perforation. To our knowledge, no comparison has yet been made between T2[sup *] weighted imaging and arthrography in the diagnosis of TFC perforation. The present study compared the usefulness of T2[sup *]-weighted imaging and arthrography in the diagnosis of TFC perforation in 22 wrist joints of 11 cadavers (5 males and 6 females with ages ranging from 61 to 92 years and an average age of 78.8 years) fixed in 60% formalin. The specimens were firstly analyzed by a T2[sup *]-weighted 0.5T MRI scan and subsequently by arthrography. After diagnosing the image obtained by the two methods, the accuracy of the diagnosis was determined by comparison with the macroscopic findings of autopsy, including the presence and degree of TFC perforation. A T2[sup *]-weighted MRI scan of the TFC perforation showed high-intensity areas over the distal radio-ulnar joint, and demonstrated the same diagnostic accuracy as arthrography, providing correct diagnoses in all cases other than linear perforation. However, neither of the image diagnostic methods allowed definition of the type of perforation. (author).

  18. Comparison of osmotic swelling influences on meniscal fibrocartilage and articular cartilage tissue mechanics in compression and shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, An M; Levenston, Marc E

    2012-01-01

    Although the contribution of the circumferential collagen bundles to the anisotropic tensile stiffness of meniscal tissue has been well described, the implications of interactions between tissue components for other mechanical properties have not been as widely examined. This study compared the effects of the proteoglycan-associated osmotic swelling stress on meniscal fibrocartilage and articular cartilage (AC) mechanics by manipulating the osmotic environment and tissue compressive offset. Cylindrical samples were obtained from the menisci and AC of bovine stifles, equilibrated in phosphate-buffered saline solutions ranging from 0.1× to 10×, and tested in oscillatory torsional shear and unconfined compression. Biochemical analysis indicated that treatments and testing did not substantially alter tissue composition. Mechanical testing revealed tissue-specific responses to both increasing compressive offset and decreasing bath salinity. Most notably, reduced salinity dramatically increased the shear modulus of both axially and circumferentially oriented meniscal tissue explants to a much greater extent than for cartilage samples. Combined with previous studies, these findings suggest that meniscal proteoglycans have a distinct structural role, stabilizing, and stiffening the matrix surrounding the primary circumferential collagen bundles. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  19. Effect of low-dose irradiation on structural and mechanical properties of hyaline cartilage-like fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öncan, Tevfik; Demirağ, Burak; Ermutlu, Cenk; Yalçinkaya, Ulviye; Özkan, Lütfü

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of low-dose irradiation on fibrous cartilage and to obtain a hyaline cartilage-like fibrocartilage (HCLF) with similar structural and mechanical properties to hyaline cartilage. An osteochondral defect was created in 40 knees of 20 rabbits. At the 7th postoperative day, a single knee of each rabbit was irradiated with a total dose of 5.0 Gy in 1.0 Gy fractions for 5 days (radiotherapy group), while the other knee was not irradiated (control group). Rabbits were then divided into four groups of 5 rabbits each. The first three groups were sacrificed at the 4th, 8th and the 12th postoperative weeks and cartilage defects were macroscopically and microscopically evaluated. The remaining group of 5 rabbits was sacrificed at the 12th week and biomechanical compression tests were performed on the cartilage defects. There was no significant biomechanical difference between the radiotherapy and the control group (p=0.686). There was no significant macroscopic and microscopic difference between groups (p=0.300). Chondrocyte clustering was observed in the irradiated group. Low-dose irradiation does not affect the mechanical properties of HCLF in vivo. However, structural changes such as chondrocyte clustering were observed.

  20. Patterns of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury associated with severely dorsally displaced extra-articular distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Johan H; Adolfsson, Lars E

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine triangular fibrocartilage (TFCC) injury patterns associated with unstable, extra-articular dorsally displaced distal radius fractures. Twenty adult patients with an Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO), type A2 or A3, distal radius fracture with an initial dorsal angulation greater than 20° were included. Nine had a tip fracture (distal to the base) of the ulnar styloid and 11 had no such fracture. They were all openly explored from an ulnopalmar approach and TFCC injuries were documented. Eleven patients also underwent arthroscopy and intra-articular pathology was recorded. All patients had TFCC lesions of varying severity, having an extensor carpi ulnaris subsheath avulsion in common. Eighteen out of 20 also displayed deep foveal radioulnar ligament lesions, with decreasingly dorsal fibres remaining. The extent of this foveal injury could not be appreciated by radiocarpal arthroscopy. Severe displacement of an extra-articular radius fracture suggests an ulnar-sided ligament injury to the TFCC. The observed lesions concur with findings in a previous cadaver study. The lesions follow a distinct pattern affecting both radioulnar as well as ulnocarpal stabilisers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint – a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Objective To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. Design MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)2-, i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. Results 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (p fibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. PMID:25131629

  2. Biomechanical Analysis of All-Inside, Arthroscopic Suture Repair Versus Extensor Retinaculum Capsulorrhaphy for Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tears With Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amar A; Alhandi, Ali A; Milne, Edward; Dy, Christopher J; Latta, Loren L; Ouellette, E Anne

    2016-03-01

    To assess ulnocarpal joint stability after treatment of a peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury with all-inside arthroscopic suture repair (SR), extensor retinaculum capsulorrhaphy with the Herbert sling (HS), and a combination of both (SR+HS). Twelve fresh-frozen, age-matched, upper-extremity specimens intact from the distal humerus were prepared. Nondestructive mechanical testing was performed to assess native ulnocarpal joint stability and load-displacement curves were recorded. A peripheral, ulnar-sided TFCC injury was created with arthroscopic assistance, and mechanical testing was performed. Each specimen was treated with SR or HS and testing was repeated. The 6 specimens treated with SR were then treated with HS (SR+HS), and testing was repeated. We used paired Student t tests for statistical analysis within cohorts. For all cohorts, there was an average increase in ulnar translation after the creation of a peripheral TFCC injury and an average decrease after repair. Herbert sling decreased translation by 21%, SR decreased translation by 12%, and SR+HS decreased translation by 26%. Suture repair plus HS and HS reduce ulnar translation the most after a peripheral TFCC injury, followed by SR alone. Ulnocarpal joint stability should be assessed clinically in patients with peripheral TFCC injury, and consideration should be made for using extensor capsulorrhaphy in isolation or as an adjunct to SR as a treatment option. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. High-resolution 3-T MRI of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist: injury pattern and MR features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Huili; Zhang, Huibo; Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Heng; Yin, Yuming

    2017-12-01

    To investigate if using high-resolution 3-T MRI can identify additional injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) beyond the Palmer classification. Eighty-six patients with surgically proven TFCC injury were included in this study. All patients underwent high-resolution 3-T MRI of the injured wrist. The MR imaging features of TFCC were analyzed according to the Palmer classification. According to the Palmer classification, 69 patients could be classified as having Palmer injuries (52 had traumatic tears and 17 had degenerative tears). There were 17 patients whose injuries could not be classified according to the Palmer classification: 13 had volar or dorsal capsular TFC detachment and 4 had a horizontal tear of the articular disk. Using high-resolution 3-T MRI, we have not only found all the TFCC injuries described in the Palmer classification, additional injury types were found in this study, including horizontal tear of the TFC and capsular TFC detachment. We propose the modified Palmer classification and add the injury types that were not included in the original Palmer classification.

  4. Which cartilage is regenerated, hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage? Non-invasive ultrasonic evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K; Takakura, Y; Ohgushi, H; Habata, T; Uematsu, K; Takenaka, M; Ikeuchi, K

    2004-09-01

    To investigate ultrasonic evaluation methods for detecting whether the repair tissue is hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in new cartilage regeneration therapy. We examined four experimental rabbit models: a spontaneous repair model (group S), a large cartilage defect model (group L), a periosteal graft model (group P) and a tissue-engineered cartilage regeneration model (group T). From the resulting ultrasonic evaluation, we used %MM (the maximum magnitude of the measurement area divided by that of the intact cartilage) as a quantitative index of cartilage regeneration. The results of the ultrasonic evaluation were compared with the histological findings and histological score. The %MM values were 61.1 +/- 16.5% in group S, 29.8 +/- 15.1% in group L, 36.3 +/- 18.3% in group P and 76.5 +/- 18.7% in group T. The results showed a strong similarity to the histological scoring. The ultrasonic examination showed that all the hyaline-like cartilage in groups S and T had a high %MM (more than 60%). Therefore, we could define the borderline between the two types of regenerated cartilage by the %MM.

  5. [In vitro differentiation of synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells infected by adenovirus vector mediated by bone morphogenetic protein 2/7 genes into fibrocartilage cells in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peiliang; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Haishan; Cong, Ruijun; Chen, Song; Ding, Zheru; Hu, Kaimen

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the feasibility of rabbit synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) differentiating into fibrocartilage cells by the recombinant adenovirus vector mediated by bone morphogenetic protein 2/7 (BMP-2/7) genes in vitro. SMSCs were isolated and purified from 3-month-old New Zealand white rabbits [male or female, weighing (2.1 +/- 0.3) kg]; the morphology was observed; the cells were identified with immunocytological fluorescent staining, flow cytometry, and cell cycles. The adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiations were detected. The recombinant plasmid of pAdTrack-BMP-2-internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-BMP-7 was constructed and then was used to infect SMSCs. The cell DNA content and the oncogenicity were tested to determine the safety. Then infected SMSCs were cultured in incomplete chondrogenic medium in vitro. Chondrogenic differentiation of infected SMSCs was detected by RT-PCR, immunofluorescent staining, and toluidine blue staining. SMSCs expressed surface markers of stem cells, and had multi-directional potential. The transfection efficiency of SMSCs infected by recombinant plasmid of pAdTrack-BMP-2-IRES-BMP-7 was about 70%. The safety results showed that infected SMSCs had normal double time, normal chromosome number, and normal DNA content and had no oncogenicity. At 21 days after cultured in incomplete chondrocyte medium, RT-PCR results showed SMSCs had increased expressions of collegan type I and collegan type II, particularly collegan type II; the expressions of RhoA and Sox-9 increased obviously. Immunofluorescent staining and toluidine blue staining showed differentiation of SMSCs into fibrocartilage cells. It is safe to use pAdTrack-BMP-2-IRES-BMP-7 for infecting SMSCs. SMSCs infected by pAdTrack-BMP-2-IRES-BMP-7 can differentiate into fibrocartilage cells spontaneously in vitro.

  6. High-resolution MR imaging of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC): comparison of microscopy coils and a conventional small surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, 02115, Boston, MA (United States); Ueno, Teruko; Itai, Yuji [Department of Radiology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Tanaka, Toshikazu [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tsukuba Kinen Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Shindo, Masashi [Tsukuba University Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2003-10-01

    To compare MR images of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using microscopy coils with those using a conventional surface coil qualitatively and quantitatively. Proton density-weighted images and T2*-weighted images of the TFCC from ten normal volunteers were obtained with a conventional surface coil (C4 coil; 80 mm in diameter), a 47-mm microscopy surface coil and a 23-mm microscopy surface coil at 1.5 T. Qualitative image analysis of MR images with three coils was performed by two radiologists who assigned one of five numerical scores (0, nonvisualization; 1, poor; 2, average; 3, good; 4, excellent) for five TFCC components, which were disc proper, triangular ligament, meniscus homologue, ulnotriquetral and ulnolunate ligament. Quantitative analysis included the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the disc proper of TFCC, the lunate cartilage, the lunate bone and the contrast-noise-ratio (C/N) between articular cartilage and disc proper or bone marrow were measured. All structures show higher scores qualitatively on MR with microscopy coils than those with a C4 coil, and the difference was significant with the exception of the ulnolunate ligament. MR with microscopy coils showed significantly higher S/N values than those with a conventional surface coil (P<0.05 to P<0.001). T2*-weighted images using microscopy coils showed significantly higher cartilage-disc proper C/N and cartilage-bone marrow C/N (P<0.01 to P<0.001). On proton density-weighted images, the C/N between cartilage and disc proper with two microscopy coils was significantly higher (P<0.01) than that with a conventional coil. High-resolution MR images of the normal wrist using microscopy coils were superior to those using a conventional surface coil qualitatively and quantitatively. High-resolution MR imaging with a microscopy coil would be a promising method to diagnose TFCC lesions. (orig.)

  7. The Role of Wrist Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in Diagnosing Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tears; Experience at King Hussein Medical Center, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asem A. Al-Hiari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aims of the study were to evaluate the role of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA of the wrist in detecting full-thickness tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC and to compare the results of the magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA with the gold standard arthroscopic findings. Methods:The study was performed at King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan, between January 2008 and December 2011. A total of 42 patients (35 males and 7 females who had ulnar-sided wrist pain and clinical suspicions of TFCC tears were included in the study. All patients underwent wrist magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA and then a wrist arthroscopy. The results of MRA were compared with the arthroscopic findings. Results: After comparison with the arthroscopic findings, the MRA had three false-negative results (sensitivity = 93% and no false-positive results. A total of 39 patients were able to return to work. Satisfaction was high in 38 of the patients and 33 had satisfactorypain relief. The sensitivity of the wrist MRA in detecting TFCC full-thickness tears was 93% (39, and specificity was 80% (16/20. The overall accuracy of wrist arthroscopy in detecting a full-thickness tear of the TFCC in our study was 85% (29/34. Conclusion: These results illustrate the role of wrist MRA in assessing the TFCC pathology and suggest its use as the first imaging technique, following a plain X-ray, in evaluating patients with chronic ulnar side wrist pain with suspected TFCC injuries.

  8. Wrist Traction During MR Arthrography Improves Detection of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex and Intrinsic Ligament Tears and Visibility of Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ryan K L; Griffith, James F; Ng, Alex W H; Nung, Ryan C H; Yeung, David K W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of traction during MR arthrography of the wrist on joint space widening, cartilage visibility, and detection of tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and intrinsic ligaments. A prospective study included 40 wrists in 39 patients (25 men, 14 women; mean age, 35 years). MR arthrography was performed with a 3-T MRI system with and without axial traction. Two radiologists independently measured wrist and carpal joint space widths and semiquantitatively graded articular cartilage visibility. Using conventional arthrography as the reference standard and working in consensus, they assessed for the presence of tears of the TFCC, lunotriquetral ligament (LTL), and scapholunate ligament (SLL). Visibility of a tear before traction was compared with visibility after traction. With traction, all joint spaces in the wrist and carpus were significantly widened (change, 0.15-1.01 mm; all p < 0.006). Subjective cartilage visibility of all joint spaces improved after traction (all p ≤ 0.048) except for that of the radioscaphoid space, which was well visualized even before traction. Conventional arthrography depicted 24 TFCC tears, seven LTL tears, and three SLL tears. The accuracy of tear detection improved after traction for the TFCC (98% after traction vs 83% before traction), the LTL (100% vs 88%), and the SLL (100% vs 95%). Tear visibility improved after traction for 54% of TFCC tears, 71% of LTL tears, and 66% of SLL tears. Wrist MR arthrography with axial traction significantly improved the visibility of articular cartilage and the detection and visibility of tears of the TFCC and intrinsic ligaments. The results favor more widespread use of traction during MR arthrography of the wrist.

  9. Validation of ultrasound imaging for Achilles entheseal fibrocartilage in bovines and description of changes in humans with spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Bas, Emine; Basci, Onur; Filippucci, Emilio; Wakefield, Richard J; Celikel, Cigdem; Karahan, Mustafa; Atagunduz, Pamir; Benjamin, Mike; Direskeneli, Haner; McGonagle, Dennis

    2010-12-01

    Entheseal fibrocartilage (EF) derangement is hypothesised to be pivotal to the pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis. Ultrasound is useful for visualisation of the enthesis but its role in EF visualisation is uncertain. This work aimed to demonstrate face and content validity of ultrasound for EF visualisation both by bovine histological evaluation and EF imaging in spondyloarthritis. Achilles enthesis of 18 bovine hindfeet was visualised using a MyLab 70 ultrasound machine. The presence of tissue with EF characteristics was documented and histological confirmation was performed on five randomly selected sections using Masson trichrome staining. Ultrasound of the Achilles tendon (AT) was performed in 19 patients with spondyloarthritis and 21 healthy controls (HC). The bovine EF could be visualised in all cases and seen as a thin, uncompressible, well-defined, anechoic layer between the hyperechoic bone and the hyperechoic fibrils of the enthesis both in longitudinal and transverse scans. This region corresponded to EF on histological examination. The same pattern of low signal corresponding to EF location was seen in 17/19 patients and all HC. Discontinuities of the anechoic layer around the erosions and enthesophytes were observed in the spondyloarthritis group. The thickness of the anechoic layer was not significantly different in spondyloarthritis and HC (0.5 ± 0.1 vs 0.5 ± 0.2 mm, p=0.9) whereas the thickness of the EF was greater in men (0.6 ± 0.2 vs 0.5 ± 0.1 mm; p=0.009) compared with women. Ultrasound can visualise EF of the AT insertion, which can be abnormal in cases of spondyloarthritis. This has implications for a better understanding of enthesopathy.

  10. Clinical experience with arthroscopically-assisted repair of peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex tears in adolescents--technique and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Sebastian; Zechmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Rudolf; Girsch, Werner

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our preliminary results after arthroscopically-assisted repair of peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears in adolescent patients. All children and adolescents who underwent arthroscopically-assisted repair of a Palmer 1B tear were identified and prospectively evaluated after a mean follow-up of 1.3 years. The postoperative assessment included documentation of clinical parameters, pain score (visual analogue scale, VAS), grip strength and completion of validated outcome scores (Modified Mayo Wrist Score, MMWS; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Inventory, DASH). A total of 12 patients (four males, eight females) with a mean age of 16.3 years at the time of surgery were evaluated. The mean VAS decreased significantly from 7.0 to 1.7 after the procedure. We observed a significant increase of the MMWS after surgery; however, MMWS was still significantly lower at final follow-up when compared to the contralateral side. A mean postoperative DASH score of 16 indicated an excellent outcome after the procedure. DASH Sports and Work Modules showed fair and good overall outcomes in the short-term, respectively. Grip strength averaged 86 % of the contralateral side at final follow-up, with no significant difference being found between both sides. Arthroscopically-assisted repair of peripheral TFCC tears in adolescents provided predictable pain relief and markedly improved functional outcome scores. Concomitant pathologies may have to be addressed at the same time to eventually achieve a satisfactory outcome. Sports participation, however, may be compromised in the short-term and should therefore be resumed six months postoperatively.

  11. Computed tomography arthrography using a radial plane view for the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex foveal tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritomo, Hisao; Arimitsu, Sayuri; Kubo, Nobuyuki; Masatomi, Takashi; Yukioka, Masao

    2015-02-01

    To classify triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) foveal lesions on the basis of computed tomography (CT) arthrography using a radial plane view and to correlate the CT arthrography results with surgical findings. We also tested the interobserver and intra-observer reliability of the radial plane view. A total of 33 patients with a suspected TFCC foveal tear who had undergone wrist CT arthrography and subsequent surgical exploration were enrolled. We classified the configurations of TFCC foveal lesions into 5 types on the basis of CT arthrography with the radial plane view in which the image slices rotate clockwise centered on the ulnar styloid process. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were calculated for each type of foveal lesion in CT arthrography to detect foveal tears. We determined interobserver and intra-observer agreements using kappa statistics. We also compared accuracies with the radial plane views with those with the coronal plane views. Among the tear types on CT arthrography, type 3, a roundish defect at the fovea, and type 4, a large defect at the overall ulnar insertion, had high specificity and positive predictive value for the detection of foveal tears. Specificity and positive predictive values were 90% and 89% for type 3 and 100% and 100% for type 4, respectively, whereas sensitivity was 35% for type 3 and 22% for type 4. Interobserver and intra-observer agreement was substantial and almost perfect, respectively. The radial plane view identified foveal lesion of each palmar and dorsal radioulnar ligament separately, but accuracy results with the radial plane views were not statistically different from those with the coronal plane views. Computed tomography arthrography with a radial plane view exhibited enhanced specificity and positive predictive value when a type 3 or 4 lesion was identified in the detection of a TFCC foveal tear compared with historical controls. Diagnostic II. Copyright © 2015 American Society for

  12. Comparison of arthoroscopic findings and high-resolution MRI using a microscopy coil findings for triangle fibrocartilage complex injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satomi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Arai, Takeshi; Izumiyama, Kou; Beppu, Moroe

    2008-01-01

    Triangle fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is very small and can be visualized in MRI. We compared image findings acquired by high-resolution MRI using a 47-mm-diameter microscopy coil with arthroscopic findings and reviewed the availability and possibility of application of both these techniques. The subjects were 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy of the radiocarpal joint and MRI for the diagnosis of pain in the ulnar wrist joint. Based on image evaluation, the impaired site was categorized as follows radius attachment, disc proper, triangular ligament (upper lamina), triangular ligament (lower lamina), lunate bone cartilage face, and triquete bone cartilage face; the findings of both techniques for impaired site around part 6 were compared. Joint morphology was assessed by the gradient-recalled echo (GRE) method with T2-weighted images, and the cartilage side was analyzed the fast SE (FSE) method with proton density-weighted image. Three orthopedic surgeons and 1 radiologist interpreted the results. The impaired site was verified in all 16 patients by high-resolution MRI using a microscopy coil. The MRI findings were as follows radius attachment in 2 patients, disc proper in 4, upper lamina in 7, lower lamina in 5, lunate bone cartilage face in 3, and triquete bone cartilage face in 0. The frequency of injury according to arthroscopic findings was as follows: radius attachment in 2 patients, disc proper in 4, lunate bone cartilage face in 6, and triquete bone cartilage face in 0. The sensibility/specificity of arthroscopic findings in comparison with MRI findings was as follows: radius attachment 100%/100%, disc proper 75%/91.7%, lunate bone cartilage face 50%/100%, and triquete bone cartilage face 0%/100%. Eight of 16 patients had depression of TFCC tone, and the sensibility/specificity of arthroscopic findings in comparison with MRI findings for the depression of site and TFCC tone was as follows: upper lamina 75%/87.5% and lower lamina 50%/87.5%. High

  13. Effect of Electrothermal Treatment on Nerve Tissue Within the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex, Scapholunate, and Lunotriquetral Interosseous Ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirolo, Joseph M; Le, Wei; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of thermal treatment on neural tissue in the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL), and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (LTIL). The intact TFCC, SLIL, and LTIL were harvested from cadaveric specimens and treated with a radiofrequency probe as would be performed intraoperatively. Slides were stained using a triple-stain technique for neurotrophin receptor p75, pan-neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole for neural identification. Five TFCC, 5 SLIL, and 4 LTIL specimens were imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Imaging software was used to measure fluorescence signals and compare thermally treated areas with adjacent untreated areas. A paired t test was used to compare treated versus untreated areas. P < .05 was considered significant. For the TFCC, a mean of 94.9% ± 2.7% of PGP 9.5-positive neural tissue was ablated within a mean area of 11.7 ± 2.5 mm(2) (P = .02). For the SLIL treated from the radiocarpal surface, 97.4% ± 1.0% was ablated to a mean depth of 2.4 ± 0.3 mm from the surface and a mean horizontal spread of 3.4 ± 0.5 mm (P = .01). For the LTIL, 96.0% ± 1.5% was ablated to a mean depth of 1.7 ± 0.7 mm and a mean horizontal spread of 2.6 ± 1.0 mm (P = .02). Differences in the presence of neural tissue between treated areas and adjacent untreated areas were statistically significant for all specimens. Our study confirms elimination of neuronal markers after thermal treatment of the TFCC, SLIL, and LTIL in cadaveric specimens. This effect penetrates below the surface to innervated collagen tissue that is left structurally intact after treatment. Electrothermal treatment as commonly performed to treat symptomatic SLIL, LTIL, and TFCC tears eliminates neuronal tissue in treated areas and may function to relieve pain through a denervation effect. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by

  14. High-resolution 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex in Chinese Wrists: Correlation with Cross-sectional Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Hui-Li; Li, Wen-Ting; Bai, Rong-Jie; Wang, Nai-Li; Qian, Zhan-Hua; Ye, Wei; Yin, Yu-Ming

    2017-04-05

    The injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is a common cause of ulnar-sided wrist pain. The aim of this study was to investigate if the high-resolution 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could demonstrate the detailed complex anatomy of TFCC in Chinese. Fourteen Chinese cadaveric wrists (from four men and three women; age range at death from 30 to 60 years; mean age at 46 years) and forty healthy Chinese wrists (from 20 healthy volunteers, male/female: 10/10; age range from 21 to 53 years with a mean age of 32 years) in Beijing Jishuitan Hospital from March 2014 to March 2016 were included in this study. All cadavers and volunteers had magnetic resonance (MR) examination of the wrist with coronal T1-weighted and proton density-weighted imaging with fat suppression in three planes, respectively. MR arthrography (MRAr) was performed on one of the cadaveric wrists. Subsequently, all 14 cadaveric wrists were sliced into 2 mm thick slab with band saw (six in coronal plane, four in sagittal plane, and four in axial plane). The MRI features of normal TFCC were analyzed in these specimens and forty healthy wrists. Triangular fibrocartilage, the ulnar collateral ligament, and the meniscal homolog could be best observed on images in coronal plane. The palmar and dorsal radioulnar ligaments were best evaluated in transverse plane. The ulnotriquetral and ulnolunate ligaments were best visualized in sagittal plane. The latter two structures and the volar and dorsal capsules were better demonstrated on MRAr. High-resolution 3T MRI is capable to show the detailed complex anatomy of the TFCC and can provide valuable information for the clinical diagnosis in Chinese.

  15. Implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath enhances fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in a large harvest site defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasukazu; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kondo, Eiji; Katsura, Taro; Tanabe, Yoshie; Kimura, Masashi; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2010-04-01

    Concerning meniscal tissue regeneration, many investigators have studied the development of a tissue-engineered meniscus. However, the utility still remains unknown. Implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath into the donor site meniscal defect may significantly enhance fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in the defect. Controlled laboratory study. Seventy-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In each animal, an anterior one-third of the right medial meniscus was resected. Then, the animals were divided into the following 3 groups of 25 rabbits each: In group 1, no treatment was applied to the meniscal defect. In group 2, the defect was covered with a fascia sheath. In group 3, after the resected meniscus was fragmented into small pieces, the fragments were grafted into the defect. Then, the defect with the meniscal fragments was covered with a fascia sheath. In each group, 5 rabbits were used for histological evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery, and 5 rabbits were used for biomechanical evaluation at 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. Histologically, large round cells in group 3 were scattered in the core portion of the meniscus-shaped tissue, and the matrix around these cells was positively stained by safranin O and toluisin blue at 12 weeks. The histological score of group 3 was significantly higher than that of group 1 and group 2. Biomechanically, the maximal load and stiffness of group 3 were significantly greater than those of groups 1 and 2. This study clearly demonstrated that implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath into the donor site meniscal defect significantly enhanced fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in the defect at 12 weeks after implantation in the rabbit. This study proposed a novel strategy to treat a large defect after a meniscectomy.

  16. Intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears of the wrist: comparison of MDCT arthrography, conventional 3-T MRI, and MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan K.L.; Ng, Alex W.H.; Tong, Cina S.L.; Griffith, James F. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); Tse, W.L.; Wong, C.; Ho, P.C. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China)

    2013-09-15

    This study compares the diagnostic performance of multidetector CT arthrography (CTA), conventional 3-T MR and MR arthrography (MRA) in detecting intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears of the wrist. Ten cadaveric wrists of five male subjects with an average age 49.6 years (range 26-59 years) were evaluated using CTA, conventional 3-T MR and MRA. We assessed the presence of scapholunate ligament (SLL), lunotriquetral ligament (LTL), and TFCC tears using a combination of conventional arthrography and arthroscopy as a gold standard. All images were evaluated in consensus by two musculoskeletal radiologists with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy being calculated. Sensitivities/specificity/accuracy of CTA, conventional MRI, and MRA were 100 %/100 %/100 %, 66 %/86 %/80 %, 100 %/86 %/90 % for the detection of SLL tear, 100 %/80 %/90 %, 60 %/80 %/70 %, 100 %/80 %/90 % for the detection of LTL tear, and 100 %/100 %/100 %, 100 %/86 %/90 %, 100 %/100 %/100 % for the detection of TFCC tear. Overall CTA had the highest sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy among the three investigations while MRA performed better than conventional MR. CTA also had the highest sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for identifying which component of the SLL and LTL was torn. Membranous tears of both SLL and LTL were better visualized than dorsal or volar tears on all three imaging modalities. Both CT and MR arthrography have a very high degree of accuracy for diagnosing tears of the SLL, LTL, and TFCC with both being more accurate than conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  17. Can the Diagnostics of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Lesions Be Improved by MRI-Based Soft-Tissue Reconstruction? An Imaging-Based Workup and Case Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Niels; Hirschfeld, Ulrich; Strunz, Hendrik; Werner, Michael; Wolfskämpf, Thomas; Löffler, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Introduction . The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) provides both mobility and stability of the radiocarpal joint. TFCC lesions are difficult to diagnose due to the complex anatomy. The standard treatment for TFCC lesions is arthroscopy, posing surgery-related risks onto the patients. This feasibility study aimed at developing a workup for soft-tissue reconstruction using clinical imaging, to verify these results in retrospective patient data. Methods . Microcomputed tomography ( μ -CT), 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and plastination were used to visualize the TFCC in cadaveric specimens applying segmentation-based 3D reconstruction. This approach further trialed the MRI dataset of a patient with minor radiological TFCC alterations but persistent pain. Results . TFCC reconstruction was impossible using μ -CT only but feasible using MRI, resulting in an appreciation of its substructures, as seen in the plastinates. Applying this approach allowed for visualizing a Palmer 2C lesion in a patient, confirming ex postum the arthroscopy findings, being markedly different from MRI (Palmer 1B). Discussion . This preliminary study showed that image-based TFCC reconstruction may help to identify pathologies invisible in standard MRI. The combined approach of μ -CT, MRI, and plastination allowed for a three-dimensional appreciation of the TFCC. Image quality and time expenditure limit the approach's usefulness as a diagnostic tool.

  18. A Comparison of Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy Alone Versus Combined Arthroscopic Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Debridement and Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy for Ulnar Impaction Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun Seok

    2011-01-01

    Background This study compared the results of patients treated for ulnar impaction syndrome using an ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) alone with those treated with combined arthroscopic debridement and USO. Methods The results of 27 wrists were reviewed retrospectively. They were divided into three groups: group A (USO alone, 10 cases), group B (combined arthroscopic debridement and USO, 9 cases), and group C (arthroscopic triangular fibrocartilage complex [TFCC] debridement alone, 8 cases). The wrist function was evaluated using the modified Mayo wrist score, disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score and Chun and Palmer grading system. Results The modified Mayo wrist score in groups A, B, and C was 74.5 ± 8.9, 73.9 ± 11.6, and 61.3 ± 10.2, respectively (p 0.05). Conclusions Both USO alone and combined arthroscopic TFCC debridement with USO improved the wrist function and reduced the level of pain in the patients treated for ulnar impaction syndrome. USO alone may be the preferred method of treatment in patients if the torn flap of TFCC is not unstable. PMID:21909465

  19. Can the Diagnostics of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Lesions Be Improved by MRI-Based Soft-Tissue Reconstruction? An Imaging-Based Workup and Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC provides both mobility and stability of the radiocarpal joint. TFCC lesions are difficult to diagnose due to the complex anatomy. The standard treatment for TFCC lesions is arthroscopy, posing surgery-related risks onto the patients. This feasibility study aimed at developing a workup for soft-tissue reconstruction using clinical imaging, to verify these results in retrospective patient data. Methods. Microcomputed tomography (μ-CT, 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and plastination were used to visualize the TFCC in cadaveric specimens applying segmentation-based 3D reconstruction. This approach further trialed the MRI dataset of a patient with minor radiological TFCC alterations but persistent pain. Results. TFCC reconstruction was impossible using μ-CT only but feasible using MRI, resulting in an appreciation of its substructures, as seen in the plastinates. Applying this approach allowed for visualizing a Palmer 2C lesion in a patient, confirming ex postum the arthroscopy findings, being markedly different from MRI (Palmer 1B. Discussion. This preliminary study showed that image-based TFCC reconstruction may help to identify pathologies invisible in standard MRI. The combined approach of μ-CT, MRI, and plastination allowed for a three-dimensional appreciation of the TFCC. Image quality and time expenditure limit the approach’s usefulness as a diagnostic tool.

  20. 3-T direct MR arthrography of the wrist: value of finger trap distraction to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Milena; Marlois, Romain; Theumann, Nicolas; Bollmann, Christof; Wehrli, Laurent; Richarme, Delphine; Meuli, Reto; Becce, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    To determine the value of applying finger trap distraction during direct MR arthrography of the wrist to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears. Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively investigated by three-compartment wrist MR arthrography. Imaging was performed with 3-T scanners using a three-dimensional isotropic (0.4 mm) T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequence, with and without finger trap distraction (4 kg). In a blind and independent fashion, two musculoskeletal radiologists measured the width of the scapholunate (SL), lunotriquetral (LT) and ulna-TFC (UTFC) joint spaces. They evaluated the amount of contrast medium within these spaces using a four-point scale, and assessed SL, LT and TFCC tears, as well as the disruption of Gilula's carpal arcs. With finger trap distraction, both readers found a significant increase in width of the SL space (mean Δ = +0.1mm, p ≤ 0.040), and noticed more contrast medium therein (p ≤ 0.035). In contrast, the differences in width of the LT (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≥ 0.057) and UTFC (mean Δ = 0mm, p ≥ 0.728) spaces, as well as the amount of contrast material within these spaces were not statistically significant (p = 0.607 and ≥ 0.157, respectively). Both readers detected more SL (Δ = +1, p = 0.157) and LT (Δ = +2, p = 0.223) tears, although statistical significance was not reached, and Gilula's carpal arcs were more frequently disrupted during finger trap distraction (Δ = +5, p = 0.025). The application of finger trap distraction during direct wrist MR arthrography may enhance both detection and characterisation of SL and LT ligament tears by widening the SL space and increasing the amount of contrast within the SL and LT joint spaces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 3-T direct MR arthrography of the wrist: Value of finger trap distraction to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerny, Milena; Marlois, Romain [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Theumann, Nicolas [Institute of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, Avenue d’Ouchy 31, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bollmann, Christof; Wehrli, Laurent [Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Clinique Longeraie and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Avenue de la Gare 9, 1003 Lausanne (Switzerland); Richarme, Delphine [Institute of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, Avenue d’Ouchy 31, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Becce, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.becce@chuv.ch [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of applying finger trap distraction during direct MR arthrography of the wrist to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears. Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively investigated by three-compartment wrist MR arthrography. Imaging was performed with 3-T scanners using a three-dimensional isotropic (0.4 mm) T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequence, with and without finger trap distraction (4 kg). In a blind and independent fashion, two musculoskeletal radiologists measured the width of the scapholunate (SL), lunotriquetral (LT) and ulna-TFC (UTFC) joint spaces. They evaluated the amount of contrast medium within these spaces using a four-point scale, and assessed SL, LT and TFCC tears, as well as the disruption of Gilula's carpal arcs. Results: With finger trap distraction, both readers found a significant increase in width of the SL space (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≤ 0.040), and noticed more contrast medium therein (p ≤ 0.035). In contrast, the differences in width of the LT (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≥ 0.057) and UTFC (mean Δ = 0 mm, p ≥ 0.728) spaces, as well as the amount of contrast material within these spaces were not statistically significant (p = 0.607 and ≥0.157, respectively). Both readers detected more SL (Δ = +1, p = 0.157) and LT (Δ = +2, p = 0.223) tears, although statistical significance was not reached, and Gilula's carpal arcs were more frequently disrupted during finger trap distraction (Δ = +5, p = 0.025). Conclusion: The application of finger trap distraction during direct wrist MR arthrography may enhance both detection and characterisation of SL and LT ligament tears by widening the SL space and increasing the amount of contrast within the SL and LT joint spaces.

  2. Temporal development of near-native functional properties and correlations with qMRI in self-assembling fibrocartilage treated with exogenous lysyl oxidase homolog 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, Pasha; Cissell, Derek D; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2017-12-01

    Advances in cartilage tissue engineering have led to constructs with mechanical integrity and biochemical composition increasingly resembling that of native tissues. In particular, collagen cross-linking with lysyl oxidase has been used to significantly enhance the mechanical properties of engineered neotissues. In this study, development of collagen cross-links over time, and correlations with tensile properties, were examined in self-assembling neotissues. Additionally, quantitative MRI metrics were examined in relation to construct mechanical properties as well as pyridinoline cross-link content and other engineered tissue components. Scaffold-free meniscus fibrocartilage was cultured in the presence of exogenous lysyl oxidase, and assessed at multiple time points over 8weeks starting from the first week of culture. Engineered constructs demonstrated a 9.9-fold increase in pyridinoline content, reaching 77% of native tissue values, after 8weeks of culture. Additionally, engineered tissues reached 66% of the Young's modulus in the radial direction of native tissues. Further, collagen cross-links were found to correlate with tensile properties, contributing 67% of the tensile strength of engineered neocartilages. Finally, examination of quantitative MRI metrics revealed several correlations with mechanical and biochemical properties of engineered constructs. This study displays the importance of culture duration for collagen cross-link formation, and demonstrates the potential of quantitative MRI in investigating properties of engineered cartilages. This is the first study to demonstrate near-native cross-link content in an engineered tissue, and the first study to quantify pyridinoline cross-link development over time in a self-assembling tissue. Additionally, this work shows the relative contributions of collagen and pyridinoline to the tensile properties of collagenous tissue for the first time. Furthermore, this is the first investigation to identify a

  3. What happens to the triangular fibrocartilage complex during pronation and supination of the forearm? Analysis of its morphology and diagnostic assessment with MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfirrmann, C.W.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Theumann, N.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Service de Radiologie, CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chung, C.B.; Trudell, D.J.; Resnick, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Botte, M.J. [Div. of Orthopedic Surgery, Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dynamic morphologic changes of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) during pronation and supination of the forearm using high-resolution MR arthrography in cadavers and to evaluate the impact of these changes on the diagnostic assessment of the normal and abnormal TFCC. Design and specimens: High-resolution MR arthrography of 10 wrists of cadaveric specimens was obtained in maximum pronation, in the neutral position, and in maximum supination of the forearm. The structures of the TFCC were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists and correlated with anatomic sections. The position of the forearm that allowed the best visualization of normal structures and lesions of the TFCC was determined. Results: The shape and extent of the articular disc as well as the radial portions of the radioulnar ligaments did not change with pronation and supination. The articular disc was horizontal in the neutral position and tilted more distally to align with the proximal carpal row in pronation and supination. The fibers of the ulnar part of the radioulnar ligaments (ulnar attachment of the articular disc) revealed the most significant changes: their orientation was coronal in the neutral position and sagittal in positions of pronation and supination. The ulnomeniscal homologue was largest in the neutral position and was reduced in size during pronation and supination. The extensor carpi ulnaris tendon was centered in its groove in the neutral position and pronation. In supination this tendon revealed subluxation from this groove. The dorsal capsule of the distal radioulnar joint was taut in pronation, and the palmar capsule was taut in supination. The preferred forearm position for analysis of most of the structures of the TFCC was the neutral position, followed by the pronated position. The neutral position was rated best for the detection of ulnar and radial detachments of the TFCC, followed by the pronated position, except for two central

  4. Proximity of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex to Key Surrounding Structures and Safety Assessment of an Arthroscopic Repair Technique: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuremsky, Marshall A; Habet, Nahir; Peindl, Richard D; Gaston, R Glenn

    2016-12-01

    To quantify the distance of the dorsal ulnar sensory branch, floor of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) subsheath, and ulnar neurovascular bundles from the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and secondarily to assess the safety of an all-inside arthroscopic repair of the TFCC with a commonly used meniscal repair device with respect to the aforementioned structures. A custom K-wire with 1-mm gradation was used to determine the distance of at-risk structures from the periphery of the TFCC in 13 above-elbow human cadaver specimens. An all-inside repair of the TFCC at the location of a Palmer 1B tear was then performed using a commonly employed meniscal repair device. The distance from the deployed devices to the structure in closest proximity was then measured using digital calipers. The mean distance from the deployed device to the nearest structure of concern for iatrogenic injury was 9.4 mm (range, 5-15 mm). The closest structure to iatrogenic injury was usually, but not always, the dorsal ulnar sensory nerve in 9 of 13 wrists (69.2%) at 9.3 mm (range, 5-15 mm); on 3 occasions it was instead the ulnar nerve (23.1%) at 9.5 mm (range, 9-10 mm), and on 1 occasion 6 mm from the flexor digitorum profundus to the little finger (7.7%). Forearm rotation had no significant effect on measured distances (ulnar nerve: P = .98; dorsal sensory: P = .89; ECU: P = .90). The largest influence of forearm rotation was a 0.4-mm difference between pronation and supination with respect to the distance of the TFCC periphery on the ECU subsheath. An all-inside arthroscopic TFCC repair using a commonly used meniscal repair device appears safe with respect to nearby neurovascular structures and tendons under typical arthroscopic conditions. An all-inside arthroscopic TFCC repair using a commonly employed meniscal repair device appears safe in terms of proximity to important structures although further clinical investigation is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy

  5. High-resolution 3 T MRI of traumatic and degenerative triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) abnormalities using Palmer and Outerbridge classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, T; Rafijah, G; Yang, L; Ueno, T; Horiuchi, S; Hitt, D; Yoshioka, H

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the usefulness of high-resolution 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the evaluation of traumatic and degenerative triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) abnormalities among three groups: patients presenting with wrist pain who were (a) younger than age 50 years or (b) age 50 or older (PT<50 and PT≥50, respectively), and (c) asymptomatic controls who were younger than age 50 years (AC). High-resolution 3 T MRI was evaluated retrospectively in 96 patients, including 47 PT<50, 38 PT≥50, and 11 AC. Two board-certified radiologists reviewed the MRI images independently. MRI features of TFCC injury were analysed according to the Palmer classification, and cartilage degeneration around the TFCC was evaluated using the Outerbridge classification. Differences in MRI findings among these groups were detected using chi-square test. Cohen's kappa was calculated to assess interobserver and intra-observer reliability. The incidence of Palmer class 1A, 1C and 1D traumatic TFCC injury was significantly (p<0.05) higher in PT≥50 than in PT<50 (class 1A: 47.4% versus 27.7%, class 1C: 31.6% versus 12.8%, and class 1D: 21.1% versus 2.1%). Likewise, MRI findings of TFCC degeneration were observed more frequently in PT≥50 than in PT<50 (p<0.01). Outerbridge grade 2 or higher cartilage degeneration was significantly (p<0.01) more frequently seen in PT≥50 than in PT<50 (55.3% versus 17% in the lunate, 28.9% versus 4.3% in the triquetrum, 73.7% versus 12.8% in the ulna). High-resolution wrist MRI at 3 T enables detailed evaluation of TFCC traumatic injury and degenerative changes using the Palmer and Outerbridge classifications, with good or excellent interobserver and intra-observer reliability. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The concentration, gene expression, and spatial distribution of aggrecan in canine articular cartilage, meniscus, and anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments: a new molecular distinction between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage in the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Mort, John S; McDevitt, Cahir A

    2005-01-01

    The concentration, spatial distribution, and gene expression of aggrecan in meniscus, articular cartilage, and the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL) was determined in the knee joints of five mature dogs. An anti-serum against peptide sequences specific to the G1 domain of aggrecan was employed in competitive-inhibition ELISA of guanidine HCl extracts and immunofluorescence microscopy. Gene expression was determined by Taqman real-time PCR. The concentration of aggrecan in articular cartilage (240.1 +/- 32 nMol/g dry weight) was higher than that in meniscus (medial meniscus: 33.4 +/- 4.3 nMol/g) and ligaments (ACL: 6.8 +/- 0.9 nMol/g). Aggrecan was more concentrated in the inner than the outer zone of the meniscus. Aggrecan in meniscus showed an organized, spatial network, in contrast to its diffuse distribution in articular cartilage. Thus, differences in the concentration, gene expression, and spatial distribution of aggrecan constitute another molecular distinction between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage of the knee.

  7. Comparison of two-dimensional fast spin echo T2 weighted sequences and three-dimensional volume isotropic T2 weighted fast spin echo (VISTA) MRI in the evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Kang, Kyung A; Kim, Eun Young; Shin, Hun Kyu; Park, Se Jin; Park, Jai Hyung; Kim, Eugene

    2018-04-01

    To compare image quality of three-dimensional volume isotropic T 2 weighted fast spin echo (3D VISTA) and two-dimensional (2D) T 2 weighted images (T2WI) for evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) and to investigate whether 3D VISTA can replace 2D T 2 WI in evaluating TFC injury. This retrospective study included 69 patients who received wrist MRIs using both 2D T 2 WI and 3D VISTA techniques for assessment of wrist pathology, including TFC injury. Two radiologists measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the two sequences. The anatomical identification score and diagnostic performance were independently assessed by two interpreters. The diagnostic abilities of 3D VISTA and 2D T 2 WI were analysed by sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing TFC injury using surgically or clinically confirmed diagnostic reference standards. 17 cases (25%) were classified as having TFC injury. 2 cases (12%) were diagnosed surgically, and 15 cases (88%) were diagnosed by physical examination. 52 cases (75%) were diagnosed as having intact TFC. 8 of these cases (15%) were surgically confirmed, while the others were diagnosed by physical examination and clinical findings. The 3D VISTA images had significantly higher SNR and CNR values for the TFC than 2D T 2 WI images. The scores of 3D VISTA's total length, full width and sharpness were similar to those of 2D T 2 WI. We were unable to find a significant difference between 3D VISTA and 2D T 2 WI in the ability to diagnose TFC injury. 3D VISTA image quality is similar to that of 2D T 2 WI for TFC evaluation and is also excellent for tissue contrast. 3D VISTA can replace 2D images in TFC injury assessment. Advances in knowledge: 3D VISTA image quality is similar to that of 2D T 2 WI for TFC evaluation and is also excellent for tissue contrast. 3D VISTA can replace 2D images in TFC injury assessment.

  8. Avaliação artroscópica e macroscópica do complexo da fibrocartilagem triangular do punho. Estudo em cadáveres Arthroscopic and gross evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist: a cadaver-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Inácio de Souza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O complexo da fibrocartilagem triangular tem importante papel na biomecânica do punho. O diagnóstico preciso das lesões é fundamental para se obter sucesso no tratamento. Há controvérsias acerca da especificidade e sensibilidade dos métodos de imagem empregados atualmente. A artroscopia de punho é um método pouco empregado para o diagnóstico das lesões do CFCT em nosso meio, embora apresente grandes vantagens, como possibilidade de visão direta das lesões e tratamento no mesmo tempo cirúrgico. O objetivo deste estudo foi o de avaliar o papel da artroscopia de punho na inspeção do CFCT, bem como na detecção de possíveis lesões, comparando os dados com a dissecção macroscópica. Foram avaliados 15 punhos de cadáveres sexo masculino, média de idade de 56,1 anos. A artroscopia demonstrou presença de lesões em 33,3% dos punhos avaliados. Estes achados foram coincidentes após estudo anatômico com ampla dissecção. Concluímos que houve absoluta correlação entre o exame artroscópico e a dissecção macroscópica na detecção de lesões do CFCT.The triangular fibrocartilage complex plays a key role on wrist biomechanics. An accurate injuries diagnosis is paramount for a successful treatment. There are controversies regarding specificity and sensitiveness of imaging methods employed today. Wrist arthroscopy is a method uncommonly used for diagnosing TFCC injuries in our environment, although it presents good advantages, such as the potential of direct viewing injuries, and treatment at the same surgical time. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of wrist arthroscopy for inspecting TFCC, as well as for detecting potential injuries, comparing those data to gross dissection. Fifteen wrists of male cadavers (mean age: 56.1 years old were assessed. Arthroscopy showed the presence of injuries in 33.3% of the assessed wrists. Those findings showed consistency after an anatomical study with broad dissection. We

  9. Engineering a fibrocartilage spectrum through modulation of aggregate redifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan K; Masters, Taylor E; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-01-01

    Expanded costochondral cells provide a clinically relevant cell source for engineering both fibrous and hyaline articular cartilage. Expanding chondrocytes in a monolayer results in a shift toward a proliferative, fibroblastic phenotype. Three-dimensional aggregate culture may, however, be used to recover chondrogenic matrix production. This study sought to engineer a spectrum of fibrous to hyaline neocartilage from a single cell source by varying the duration of three-dimensional culture following expansion. In third passage porcine costochondral cells, the effects of aggregate culture duration were assessed after 0, 8, 11, 14, and 21 days of aggregate culture and after 4 subsequent weeks of neocartilage formation. Varying the duration of aggregate redifferentiation generated a spectrum of fibrous to hyaline neocartilage. Within 8 days of aggregation, proliferation ceased, and collagen and glycosaminoglycan production increased, compared with monolayer cells. In self-assembled neocartilage, type II-to-I collagen ratio increased with increasing aggregate duration, yet glycosaminoglycan content varied minimally. Notably, 14 days of aggregate redifferentiation increased collagen content by 25%, tensile modulus by over 110%, and compressive moduli by over 50%, compared with tissue formed in the absence of redifferentiation. A spectrum of fibrous to hyaline cartilage was generated using a single, clinically relevant cell source, improving the translational potential of engineered cartilage.

  10. Osteoid Osteoma Mimicking Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Injury: Diagnosis and Review of Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Lamo-Espinosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of osteoid osteoma (OO with ulnar styloid involvement. A review of the literature has been made with the aim of defining the special behaviour of OO when it is near the articular surface. That behaviour can affect the diagnosis, masking the real etiology of the pain, delaying the diagnosis, missing the diagnosis, or what is more serious, conducting an inadequate treatment. We propose a treatment algorithm conducted based on the localization near or far from articular surface and the superficial or deep localization.

  11. Bonding and fusion of meniscus fibrocartilage using a novel chondroitin sulfate bone marrow tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simson, Jacob A; Strehin, Iossif A; Allen, Brian W; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2013-08-01

    The weak intrinsic meniscus healing response and technical challenges associated with meniscus repair contribute to a high rate of repair failures and meniscectomies. Given this limited healing response, the development of biologically active adjuncts to meniscal repair may hold the key to improving meniscal repair success rates. This study demonstrates the development of a bone marrow (BM) adhesive that binds, stabilizes, and stimulates fusion at the interface of meniscus tissues. Hydrogels containing several chondroitin sulfate (CS) adhesive levels (30, 50, and 70 mg/mL) and BM levels (30%, 50%, and 70%) were formed to investigate the effects of these components on hydrogel mechanics, bovine meniscal fibrochondrocyte viability, proliferation, matrix production, and migration ability in vitro. The BM content positively and significantly affected fibrochondrocyte viability, proliferation, and migration, while the CS content positively and significantly affected adhesive strength (ranged from 60±17 kPa to 335±88 kPa) and matrix production. Selected material formulations were translated to a subcutaneous model of meniscal fusion using adhered bovine meniscus explants implanted in athymic rats and evaluated over a 3-month time course. Fusion of adhered meniscus occurred in only the material containing the highest BM content. The technology can serve to mechanically stabilize the tissue repair interface and stimulate tissue regeneration across the injury site.

  12. MENISCAL REPAIR BY FIBROCARTILAGE - AN EXPERIMENTAL-STUDY IN THE DOG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSEN, HWB; VETH, RPH; NIELSEN, HKL; DEGROOT, JH; PENNINGS, AJ; KUIJER, R

    Longitudinal lesions in the avascular part of the dog's meniscus were repaired by implantation of a porous polyurethane. Ingrowing repair tissue was characterized by biochemical and immunological analysis. Histologically, repair tissue initially was composed of fibrous tissue containing type I

  13. Microstructural Heterogeneity in Native and Engineered Fibrocartilage Directs Micromechanics and Mechanobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Woojin M; Heo, Su-Jin; Driscoll, Tristan P; Delucca, John F; McLeod, Claire M; Smith, Lachlan J; Duncan, Randall L; Mauck, Robert L; Elliott, Dawn M

    2015-01-01

    Treatment strategies to address pathologies of fibrocartilaginous tissue are in part limited by an incomplete understanding of structure-function relationships in these load-bearing tissues. There is therefore a pressing need to develop microengineered tissue platforms that can recreate the highly inhomogeneous tissue microstructures that are known to influence mechanotransductive processes in normal and diseased tissue. Here, we report the quantification of proteoglycan-rich microdomains in developing, aging, and diseased fibrocartilaginous tissues, and the impact of these microdomains on endogenous cell responses to physiologic deformation within a native-tissue context. We also developed a method to generate heterogeneous tissue engineered constructs (hetTECs) with microscale non-fibrous proteoglycan-rich microdomains engineered into the fibrous structure, and show that these hetTECs match the microstructural, micromechanical, and mechanobiological benchmarks of native tissue. Our tissue engineered platform should facilitate the study of the mechanobiology of developing, homeostatic, degenerating, and regenerating fibrous tissues. PMID:26726994

  14. Microstructural heterogeneity directs micromechanics and mechanobiology in native and engineered fibrocartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Woojin M.; Heo, Su-Jin; Driscoll, Tristan P.; Delucca, John F.; McLeod, Claire M.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Duncan, Randall L.; Mauck, Robert L.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2016-04-01

    Treatment strategies to address pathologies of fibrocartilaginous tissue are in part limited by an incomplete understanding of structure-function relationships in these load-bearing tissues. There is therefore a pressing need to develop micro-engineered tissue platforms that can recreate the highly inhomogeneous tissue microstructures that are known to influence mechanotransductive processes in normal and diseased tissue. Here, we report the quantification of proteoglycan-rich microdomains in developing, ageing and diseased fibrocartilaginous tissues, and the impact of these microdomains on endogenous cell responses to physiologic deformation within a native-tissue context. We also developed a method to generate heterogeneous tissue-engineered constructs (hetTECs) with non-fibrous proteoglycan-rich microdomains engineered into the fibrous structure, and show that these hetTECs match the microstructural, micromechanical and mechanobiological benchmarks of native tissue. Our tissue-engineered platform should facilitate the study of the mechanobiology of developing, homeostatic, degenerating and regenerating fibrous tissues.

  15. In vitro synthesis of tensioned synoviocyte bioscaffolds for meniscal fibrocartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Jennifer J; Baker, Lindsay; Ballard, George A; Ott, Jesse

    2013-12-03

    Meniscal injury is a common cause of lameness in the dog. Tissue engineered bioscaffolds may be a treatment option for meniscal incompetency, and ideally would possess meniscus- like extracellular matrix (ECM) and withstand meniscal tensile hoop strains. Synovium may be a useful cell source for meniscal tissue engineering because of its natural role in meniscal deficiency and its in vitro chondrogenic potential. The objective of this study is to compare meniscal -like extracellular matrix content of hyperconfluent synoviocyte cell sheets ("HCS") and hyperconfluent synoviocyte sheets which have been tensioned over wire hoops (tensioned synoviocyte bioscaffolds, "TSB") and cultured for 1 month. Long term culture with tension resulted in higher GAG concentration, higher chondrogenic index, higher collagen concentration, and type II collagen immunoreactivity in TSB versus HCS. Both HCS and TSB were immunoreactive for type I collagen, however, HCS had mild, patchy intracellular immunoreactivity while TSB had diffuse moderate immunoreactivity over the entire bisocaffold. The tissue architecture was markedly different between TSB and HCS, with TSB containing collagen organized in bands and sheets. Both HCS and TSB expressed alpha smooth muscle actin and displayed active contractile behavior. Double stranded DNA content was not different between TSB and HCS, while cell viability decreased in TSB. Long term culture of synoviocytes with tension improved meniscal- like extra cellular matrix components, specifically, the total collagen content, including type I and II collagen, and increased GAG content relative to HCS. Future research is warranted to investigate the potential of TSB for meniscal tissue engineering.

  16. Meniscal repair by fibrocartilage in the dog : Characterization of the repair tissue and the role of vascularity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veth, RPH; Jansen, HWB; Nielsen, HKL; deGroot, JH; Pennings, AJ; Kuijer, R

    Lesions in the avascular part of 20 canine menisci were repaired by implantation of a porous polyurethane. Seven menisci were not repaired and served as controls. The repair tissue was characterized by biochemical and immunological analysis. The role of vascularity in healing was studied by

  17. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint--a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-12-01

    To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)(2-), i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (pfibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical and functional outcome of open primary repair of triangular fibrocartilage complex tears associated with distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johandi, Faisal; Sechachalam, Sreedharan

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the clinical and functional outcome of open primary repair of acute TFCC tears in distal radius fracture, when there is gross intraoperative distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability after fixation of the distal radius, in the absence of an ulnar styloid fracture or when the ulnar fracture fragment is too small to be fixed. A retrospective review of our institution's distal radius fracture database over a 4-year period (January 2010 to December 2013). A total of 12 (1.38%) out of 3379 patients had an open TFCC repair in the same setting as fixation of distal radius. Assessment of outcome involved the analysis of objective and subjective clinical and functional outcomes. All patient regained Activities of Daily Living (ADL) independence; eleven out of 12 patients (91.7%) returned to pre-injury function and 8 out of 11 patients (72.7%) returned to their jobs. DRUJ stability was preserved in 10 patients (83.3%) with 10 patients (83.3%) having grip strength of at least 50%, compared to the uninjured hand, and 7 (58.3%) with grip strength of more than or equal to 75%. Complications of surgery identified can be classified into 4 broad categories: infection, neurological complications, persistent DRUJ instability and prolonged pain. The authors believe a primary open repair of the TFCC should be considered when patients present with instability during intra-operative DRUJ ballottement test after distal radius fixation, in the absence of an ulnar styloid fracture or when the ulnar fracture fragment is too small to be fixed.

  19. Commentary on Kataoka et al. Palmar reconstruction of the triangular fibrocartilage complex for instability of the distal radioulnar joint: a biomechanical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentohami, A.; Bijlsma, T. S.; Goslings, J. C.; de Reuver, P.; Kaufmann, L.; Schep, N. W. L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the association between arm-specific disability measured with the QuickDASH questionaire and radiological criteria in patients with extra-articular distal radial fractures. A consecutive series of 385 patients were initially treated non-operatively for an

  20. Identification and Manipulation of a Novel Signaling Mechanism to Improve Articular Cartilage Restoration After Posttraumatic Joint Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    collagen II (COL II). As a result, the newly-formed fibrocartilage has poor biomechanical properties and often evidences poor integration with the... fibrocartilage generation at the site of injury defines a new potential avenue of intervention in the field of cartilage restoration. We defined the...lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-autotaxin (ATX; encoded by the ENPP2 gene) signaling axis as an important mediator of fibrocartilage formation both in vitro and in

  1. Arthroscopic Wrist Anatomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Nathan

    2004-01-01

    .... Arthroscopy of the wrist is now a primary method of evaluating and treating many intra-articular wrist conditions including triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, chondral injuries, distal radius...

  2. The Influence of Physical Forces on Progenitor Cell Migration, Proliferation and Differentiation in Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    fibrocartilage formation is promoted since it requires less vascularization (30). Therefore, it may be beneficial to the overall healing outcome to delay... fibrocartilage formation since it requires less vascularization [20]. Therefore, it may be beneficial to the overall healing outcome to delay initiation of

  3. Quantitative Comparison of the Microscopic Anatomy of the Human ACL Femoral and Tibial Entheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Mélanie L.; Carey, Grace E.; Schlecht, Stephen H.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The femoral enthesis of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is known to be more susceptible to injury than the tibial enthesis. To determine whether anatomic differences might help explain this difference, we quantified the microscopic appearance of both entheses in 15 unembalmed knee specimens using light microscopy, toluidine blue stain and image analysis. The amount of calcified fibrocartilage and uncalcified fibrocartilage, and the ligament entheseal attachment angle were then compared between the femoral and tibial entheses via linear mixed-effects models. The results showed marked differences in anatomy between the two entheses. The femoral enthesis exhibited a 3.9-fold more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis (p fibrocartilage tissue area (p fibrocartilage depth (p fibrocartilage and a more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis, which provides insight into why it is more vulnerable to failure. PMID:26134706

  4. Augmented cartilage regeneration by implantation of cellular versus acellular implants after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, M.W.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Gonzales, V.K.; Buma, P.; Hout, J. in't; Vries, R.B.M. de; Daamen, W.F.

    2017-01-01

    Bone marrow stimulation may be applied to regenerate focal cartilage defects, but generally results in transient clinical improvement and formation of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strive to develop new solutions to regenerate hyaline

  5. Regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage in situ with SOX9 stimulation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Wu, Shili; Naccarato, Ty; Prakash-Damani, Manan; Chou, Yuan; Chu, Cong-Qiu; Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Microfracture, a common procedure for treatment of cartilage injury, induces fibrocartilage repair by recruiting bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to the site of cartilage injury. However, fibrocartilage is inferior biomechanically to hyaline cartilage. SRY-type high-mobility group box-9 (SOX9) is a master regulator of chondrogenesis by promoting proliferation and differentiation of MSC into chondrocytes. In this study we aimed to test the therapeutic potential of cell penetrat...

  6. Androgen-dependent and independent process of bone formation in the distal segment of Os penis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, R; Izumi, K; Yamaoka, I

    1995-11-01

    The distal segment of the os penis of the rat develops as a fibrocartilage which is replaced with non-lamellar bone by endochondral ossification after puberty. Development of the fibrocartilage and its calcification have been shown to be induced by androgens, but androgen-dependency of the endochondral ossification has not been studied in detail. In the present study, immature male rats of various ages were castrated and the ossification of the fibrocartilage of os penis was examined. In rats castrated at 6 weeks, when the fibrocartilage was scarcely calcified, ossification did not occur even at 24 weeks. When the castrated rats were treated with testosterone, ossification started before 12 weeks of age. In rats castrated at 8 weeks, when the fibrocartilage was heavily calcified, endochondral ossification was observed in some of the animals (5/7) at 24 weeks of age. The results of this study indicate that once the fibrocartilage is calcified, the endochondral ossification can take place without androgen, although the androgen can promote the process of ossification.

  7. Articular Cartilage Increases Transition Zone Regeneration in Bone-tendon Junction Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ling; Lee, Kwong Man; Leung, Kwok Sui

    2008-01-01

    The fibrocartilage transition zone in the direct bone-tendon junction reduces stress concentration and protects the junction from failure. Unfortunately, bone-tendon junctions often heal without fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration. We hypothesized articular cartilage grafts could increase fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration. Using a goat partial patellectomy repair model, autologous articular cartilage was harvested from the excised distal third patella and interposed between the residual proximal two-thirds bone fragment and tendon during repair in 36 knees. We evaluated fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration, bone formation, and mechanical strength after repair at 6, 12, and 24 weeks and compared them with direct repair. Autologous articular cartilage interposition resulted in more fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration (69.10% ± 14.11% [mean ± standard deviation] versus 8.67% ± 7.01% at 24 weeks) than direct repair at all times. There was no difference in the amount of bone formation and mechanical strength achieved. Autologous articular cartilage interposition increases fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration in bone-tendon junction healing, but additional research is required to ascertain the mechanism of stimulation and to establish the clinical applicability. PMID:18987921

  8. Quantitative comparison of the microscopic anatomy of the human ACL femoral and tibial entheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Carey, Grace E; Schlecht, Stephen H; Wojtys, Edward M; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2015-12-01

    The femoral enthesis of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is known to be more susceptible to injury than the tibial enthesis. To determine whether anatomic differences might help explain this difference, we quantified the microscopic appearance of both entheses in 15 unembalmed knee specimens using light microscopy, toluidine blue stain and image analysis. The amount of calcified fibrocartilage and uncalcified fibrocartilage, and the ligament entheseal attachment angle were then compared between the femoral and tibial entheses via linear mixed-effects models. The results showed marked differences in anatomy between the two entheses. The femoral enthesis exhibited a 3.9-fold more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis (p<0.001), a 43% greater calcified fibrocartilage tissue area (p<0.001), and a 226% greater uncalcified fibrocartilage depth (p<0.001), with the latter differences being particularly pronounced in the central region. We conclude that the ACL femoral enthesis has more fibrocartilage and a more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis, which provides insight into why it is more vulnerable to failure. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nd:YAG 1.44 laser ablation of human cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Robert S.; Prodoehl, John A.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Black, Johnathan D.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1993-07-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of a Neodymium:YAG 1.44 micrometers wavelength laser on human cartilage. This wavelength is strongly absorbed by water. Cadaveric meniscal fibrocartilage and articular hyaline cartilage were harvested and placed in normal saline during the study. A 600 micrometers quartz fiber was applied perpendicularly to the tissues with a force of 0.098 N. Quantitative measurements were then made of the ablation rate as a function of fluence. The laser energy was delivered at a constant repetition rate of 5 Hz., 650 microsecond(s) pulsewidth, and energy levels ranging from 0.5 joules to 2.0 joules. Following the ablation of the tissue, the specimens were fixed in formalin for histologic evaluation. The results of the study indicate that the ablation rate is 0.03 mm/mj/mm2 for hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. Fibrocartilage was cut at approximately the same rate as hyaline cartilage. There was a threshold fluence projected to be 987 mj/mm2 for hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. Our results indicate that the pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.44 micrometers has a threshold fluence above which it will ablate human cartilage, and that its ablation rate is directly proportional to fluence over the range of parameters tested. Fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage demonstrated similar threshold fluence and ablation rates which is related to the high water content of these tissues.

  10. Measurements of surface layer of the articular cartilage using microscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryniewicz, A. M; Ryniewicz, W.; Ryniewicz, A.; Gaska, A.

    2010-01-01

    The articular cartilage is the structure that directly cooperates tribologically in biobearing. It belongs to the connective tissues and in the joints it assumes two basic forms: hyaline cartilage that builds joint surfaces and fibrocartilage which may create joint surfaces. From this fibrocartilage are built semilunar cartilage and joint disc are built as well. The research of articular cartilage have been done in macro, micro and nano scale. In all these measurement areas characteristic features occur which can identify biobearing tribology. The aim of the research was the identification of surface layer of articular cartilage by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom force microscopy (AFM) and the analysis of topography of these layers. The material used in the research of surface layer was the animal articular cartilage: hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage.

  11. Measurements of surface layer of the articular cartilage using microscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryniewicz, A. M.; Ryniewicz, A.; Ryniewicz, W.; Gaska, A.

    2010-07-01

    The articular cartilage is the structure that directly cooperates tribologically in biobearing. It belongs to the connective tissues and in the joints it assumes two basic forms: hyaline cartilage that builds joint surfaces and fibrocartilage which may create joint surfaces. From this fibrocartilage are built semilunar cartilage and joint disc are built as well. The research of articular cartilage have been done in macro, micro and nano scale. In all these measurement areas characteristic features occur which can identify biobearing tribology. The aim of the research was the identification of surface layer of articular cartilage by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom force microscopy (AFM) and the analysis of topography of these layers. The material used in the research of surface layer was the animal articular cartilage: hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage.

  12. Arthrography of the traumatized wrist: correlation with radiography and the carpal instability series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinsohn, E.M.; Palmer, A.K.

    1983-03-01

    Arthrography with fluoroscopic monitoring was used to assess the soft tissues of the wrist in 100 patients who had chronic traumatic pain but did not have rheumatoid arthritis. Findings were correlated with plain radiographs and the carpal instability series. Arthrograms were normal in 26% of cases and demonstrated perforation of the triangular fibrocartilage in 26%, radiocarpal-midcarpal communication in 30%, capsular lesions in 31%, lymphatic opacification in 12%, and tendon sheath filling in 10%. Communication between the radiocarpal and pisiform-troiquetral compartments, a normal finding, was seen in 69%. There was a significant association between perforation of the triangular fibrocartilage and both ulna-plus variance and carpal instability.

  13. MR imaging of the traumatic triangular fibrocartilaginous complex tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James F.; Fung, Cindy S. Y.; Lee, Ryan K. L.; Tong, Cina S. L.; Wong, Clara W. Y.; Tse, Wing Lim; Ho, Pak Cheong

    2017-01-01

    Triangular fibrocartilage complex is a major stabilizer of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). However, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tear is difficult to be diagnosed on MRI for its intrinsic small and thin structure with complex anatomy. The purpose of this article is to review the anatomy of TFCC, state of art MRI imaging technique, normal appearance and features of tear on MRI according to the Palmar’s classification. Atypical tear and limitations of MRI in diagnosis of TFCC tear are also discussed. PMID:28932701

  14. Temporomandibular joint articular cartilage structure and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, Lambertus Gijsbertus Maria de

    1985-01-01

    One of the aims of this investigation is to obtain more insight in the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. The starting point for this investigation of the fibrocartilage of the mandibular condyle was the hypothesis of Freeman and Meachim (1979), which states that collagen network fragmentation

  15. Tendon and ligament as novel cell sources for engineering the knee meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, P; Paschos, N K; Huang, B J; Aryaei, A; Hu, J C; Athanasiou, K A

    2016-12-01

    The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is hindered by the difficulty of acquiring adequate numbers of competent cells. For the knee meniscus in particular, this may be solved by harvesting tissue from neighboring tendons and ligaments. In this study, we have investigated the potential of cells from tendon and ligament, as compared to meniscus cells, to engineer scaffold-free self-assembling fibrocartilage. Self-assembling meniscus-shaped constructs engineered from a co-culture of articular chondrocytes and either meniscus, tendon, or ligament cells were cultured for 4 weeks with TGF-β1 in serum-free media. After culture, constructs were assessed for their mechanical properties, histological staining, gross appearance, and biochemical composition including cross-link content. Correlations were performed to evaluate relationships between biochemical content and mechanical properties. In terms of mechanical properties as well as biochemical content, constructs engineered using tenocytes and ligament fibrocytes were found to be equivalent or superior to constructs engineered using meniscus cells. Furthermore, cross-link content was found to be correlated with engineered tissue tensile properties. Tenocytes and ligament fibrocytes represent viable cell sources for engineering meniscus fibrocartilage using the self-assembling process. Due to greater cross-link content, fibrocartilage engineered with tenocytes and ligament fibrocytes may maintain greater tensile properties than fibrocartilage engineered with meniscus cells. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Arthroscopic Findings of the Joint Distraction for the Patient With Chondrolysis of the Ankle

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuaki Kanbe; Atsushi Hasegawa; Kenji Takagishi; Hiroyuki Kaneko; Yasuyuki Nakajima

    1997-01-01

    This case report describes arthroscopic findings of the effect on articular distraction of ankle joint by means of external fixator for the patient with chondrolysis. Arthroscopy showed fibrocartilage tissue lying between the talus and tibia to protect damaged articular surfaces although apparent repair of surface cartilage failed to find.

  17. An experimental study of reconstructive procedures in lesions of the meniscus. Use of synovial flaps and carbon fiber implants for artificially made lesions in the meniscus of the rabbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veth, R. P.; den Heeten, G. J.; Jansen, H. W.; Nielsen, H. K.

    1983-01-01

    Reconstructive procedures were investigated in meniscal lesions in 25 rabbits. Large meniscal defects were repaired with either a synovial flap or a carbon fiber implant. Fibrous tissue healing with occasional areas of fibrocartilage occurred after both types of reconstruction. When carbon fibers

  18. Repair of the meniscus. An experimental investigation in rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veth, R. P.; den Heeten, G. J.; Jansen, H. W.; Nielsen, H. K.

    1983-01-01

    The healing process of wedge-shaped and longitudinal lesions in the meniscus of the knee was investigated in 74 menisci in 24 Chinchilla rabbits. In four cases the whole meniscus was removed and reimplanted. healing was most evident in the wedge-shaped lesions, which were repaired by fibrocartilage.

  19. Fibrochondrogenic potential of synoviocytes from osteoarthritic and normal joints cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds for meniscal tissue engineering in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Warnock

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Meniscal tears are a common cause of stifle lameness in dogs. Use of autologous synoviocytes from the affected stifle is an attractive cell source for tissue engineering replacement fibrocartilage. However, the diseased state of these cells may impede in vitro fibrocartilage formation. Synoviocytes from 12 osteoarthritic (“oaTSB” and 6 normal joints (“nTSB” were cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds and compared for their ability to synthesize fibrocartilage sheets. Gene expression of collagens type I and II were higher and expression of interleukin-6 was lower in oaTSB versus nTSB. Compared with nTSB, oaTSB had more glycosaminoglycan and alpha smooth muscle staining and less collagen I and II staining on histologic analysis, whereas collagen and glycosaminoglycan quantities were similar. In conclusion, osteoarthritic joint—origin synoviocytes can produce extracellular matrix components of meniscal fibrocartilage at similar levels to normal joint—origin synoviocytes, which makes them a potential cell source for canine meniscal tissue engineering.

  20. Meniscal replacement using a porous polymer prosthesis : A preliminary study in the dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veth, RPH; Jansen, HWB; Nielsen, HKL; deGroot, JH; Pennings, AJ

    A porous polyurethane prosthesis was used to replace the lateral meniscus in the dog. After an initial ingrowth of fibrous tissue, the prostheses became filled with tissue strongly resembling normal meniscal fibrocartilage. Although less severe than seen after total meniscectomy, cartilage

  1. Traumatic separation of a type I patella bipartite in a sportsman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Casper Smedegaard; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Holck, Kim

    2014-01-01

    fibrocartilage was found on both parts of the patella. Asymptomatic patella bi-partite was found on X-ray imaging of the patient's left knee, and he was diagnosed to have traumatic separation of a type I patella bipartite. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgical and radiological findings....

  2. The Usefulness of Dynamic Cine-Arthrography for Wrist Instability as Correlated with Arthroscopic Palmer Classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim TaeYeon; Lee, Guen Young; Kim, Baek Hyun; Park, Jong Woong; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Cha, Sang Hoon [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    To introduce dynamic cine-arthrography and compare it with MR arthrography in the diagnosis of intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, based on arthroscopic findings. A total of thirty-eight wrists of 38 patients who had undergone both dynamic cine-arthrography and MR arthrography were enrolled. Dynamic cinearthrography was performed after puncture of the radiocarpal joint by slow injection of contrast under continuous fluoroscopic guidance during passive wrist exercise. We obtained 1.5- or 3-T MR arthrography with fat-suppressed T1-weighted coronal and axial images. We evaluated scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears according to the Palmer classification system. Based on the arthroscopic findings, we compared the diagnostic values between the two examinations using Kappa values. The overall sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis of intrinsic ligament tears was similar between dynamic cine-arthrography and MR arthrography (scapholunate ligament: sensitivity 66.7% vs. 80%, specificity 100% vs. 95.7%, lunotriquetral ligament: sensitivity 75.0% vs. 75.0%, specificity 94.1% vs. 91.2%). For triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, all diagnostic values were the same (sensitivity 96.4%, specificity 100%). The inter-examination agreement was substantial to perfect (kappa value 1.000). Dynamic cine-arthrography is valuable in the diagnosis of intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears compared to MR arthrography.

  3. INJURED ARTICULAR CARTILAGE REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Barlič

    2008-02-01

    Surveys show that the most frequently used surgical methods are mosaicplasty and bonemarrow stimulation with microfracturing. The efficacy of the autologous chondrocyte implantationmethod should be superior to microfracturing on a long run. Especially when(regeneration of the hyaline cartilage instead of fibrous tissue (fibrocartilage is concerned.However, it has not been scientifically proved yet

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of entheses. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, M. [School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Milz, S. [AO Research Institute, Davos (Switzerland); Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, San Diego (United States)], E-mail: gbydder@ucsd.edu

    2008-06-15

    Entheses are the sites of attachment of a tendon, ligament, or joint capsule to bone. Many features of entheses are adapted to disperse stress and accommodate compressive and shear forces at, or near, boundaries between tendons or ligaments and bone. Of particular interest is calcified and uncalcified fibrocartilage, which has mechanical properties that differ from those of tensile regions of tendons or ligaments, and from bone. Ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequences can identify the specific tissue components of entheses and differentiate cortical bone, calcified fibrocartilage, uncalcified fibrocartilage, and fibrous connective tissue. Magic angle imaging can also differentiate tissues, such as fibrocartilage and tendon, which have different fibre orientations. Understanding the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of entheses involves consideration of tissue properties, fibre-to-field angle, magic angle effects, pulse sequences, and geometrical factors including fibre-to-section orientation and partial volume effects. New approaches using MR imaging, allow entheses to be visualised with much greater detail than previously possible, and this may help in biomechanical studies, diagnosis of disease including overuse syndromes and spondyloarthropathies, as well as monitoring tissue repair and healing.

  5. A retrospective analysis of two independent prospective cartilage repair studies : autogenous perichondrial grafting versus subchondral drilling 10 years post-surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, PSJM; Homminga, GN; Bulstra, SK; Geesink, RGT; Kuijer, Roelof

    Background: Experimental data indicate that perichondrial grafting to restore articular cartilage defects will result in repair with hyaline-like cartilage, In contrast, debridement and drilling results in repair with fibro-cartilage. In this retrospective study the long-term clinical results of

  6. Advances in cartilage tissue engineering : in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. Mandl (Erik)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWithin the body three subtypes of cartilage can be distinguished: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrocartilage. Hyaline cartilage is the predominant subtype and is mainly located in articular joints and in less extent in the nasal septum and cricoid. Elastic cartilage can be

  7. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering.

  8. Morpho-functional changes in human tendon tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Galliani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Insertion tissue biopsies of right arm common extensor tendons from 11 patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis were processed for light and electron microscopy. The subjects were aged between 38 and 54 years (only one was 25. The specimens showed a variety of structural changes such as biochemical and spatial alteration of collagen, hyaline degeneration, loss of tenocytes, fibrocartilage metaplasia, calcifying processes, neovascularization and vessel wall modifications. Tissue alterations were evident in limited zones of the tendon fibrocartilage in which the surgical resection was generally visible. The areas where the degenerative processes were localized, were restricted and in spatial contiguity with morphologically normal ones. The observed cases presented histological and electron microscopic findings that characterize lateral epicondylitis as a degenerative phenomenon involving all tendon components.

  9. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs in 3D Collagen Microspheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejin Han

    Full Text Available Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering.

  10. Deep erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone diagnosed by standing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, C; Mair, T; Blunden, T

    2008-11-01

    Erosion of the palmar (flexor) aspect of the navicular bone is difficult to diagnose with conventional imaging techniques. To review the clinical, magnetic resonance (MR) and pathological features of deep erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone. Cases of deep erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone, diagnosed by standing low field MR imaging, were selected. Clinical details, results of diagnostic procedures, MR features and pathological findings were reviewed. Deep erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone were diagnosed in 16 mature horses, 6 of which were bilaterally lame. Sudden onset of lameness was recorded in 63%. Radiography prior to MR imaging showed equivocal changes in 7 horses. The MR features consisted of focal areas of intermediate or high signal intensity on T1-, T2*- and T2-weighted images and STIR images affecting the dorsal aspect of the deep digital flexor tendon, the fibrocartilage of the palmar aspect, subchondral compact bone and medulla of the navicular bone. On follow-up, 7/16 horses (44%) had been subjected to euthanasia and only one was being worked at its previous level. Erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone were confirmed post mortem in 2 horses. Histologically, the lesions were characterised by localised degeneration of fibrocartilage with underlying focal osteonecrosis and fibroplasia. The adjacent deep digital flexor tendon showed fibril formation and fibrocartilaginous metaplasia. Deep erosions of the palmar aspect of the navicular bone are more easily diagnosed by standing low field MR imaging than by conventional radiography. The lesions involve degeneration of the palmar fibrocartilage with underlying osteonecrosis and fibroplasia affecting the subchondral compact bone and medulla, and carry a poor prognosis for return to performance. Diagnosis of shallow erosive lesions of the palmar fibrocartilage may allow therapeutic intervention earlier in the disease process, thereby preventing

  11. Flexible bipolar nanofibrous membranes for improving gradient microstructure in tendon-to-bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxi; Cheng, Ruoyu; Sun, Zhiyong; Su, Wei; Pan, Guoqing; Zhao, Song; Zhao, Jinzhong; Cui, Wenguo

    2017-10-01

    Enthesis is a specialized tissue interface between the tendon and bone. Enthesis structure is very complex because of gradient changes in its composition and structure. There is currently no strategy to create a suitable environment and to regenerate the gradual-changing enthesis because of the modular complexities between two tissue types. Herein, a dual-layer organic/inorganic flexible bipolar fibrous membrane (BFM) was successfully fabricated by electrospinning to generate biomimetic non-mineralized fibrocartilage and mineralized fibrocartilage in tendon-to-bone integration of enthesis. The growth of the in situ apatite nanoparticle layer was induced on the nano hydroxyapatite-poly-l-lactic acid (nHA-PLLA) fibrous layer in simulated body solution, and the poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) fibrous layer retained its original properties to induce tendon regeneration. The in vivo results showed that BFM significantly increased the area of glycosaminoglycan staining at the tendon-bone interface and improved collagen organization when compared to the simplex fibrous membrane (SFM) of PLLA. Implanting the bipolar membrane also induced bone formation and fibrillogenesis as assessed by micro-CT and histological analysis. Biomechanical testing showed that the BFM group had a greater ultimate load-to-failure and stiffness than the SFM group at 12weeks after surgery. Therefore, this flexible bipolar nanofibrous membrane improves the healing and regeneration process of the enthesis in rotator cuff repair. In this study, we generated a biomimetic dual-layer organic/inorganic flexible bipolar fibrous membrane by sequential electrospinning and in situ biomineralization, producing integrated bipolar fibrous membranes of PLLA fibrous membrane as the upper layer and nHA-PLLA fibrous membrane as the lower layer to mimic non-mineralized fibrocartilage and mineralized fibrocartilage in tendon-to-bone integration of enthesis. Flexible bipolar nanofibrous membranes could be easily fabricated

  12. Aetiology and pathogenesis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in cats by histological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Marlis; Reese, Sven; Schnabl-Feichter, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine histologically intact and ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cats, in order to evaluate whether degeneration is a prerequisite for rupture. Methods We performed a histological examination of 50 intact and 19 ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cadaver or client-owned cats, respectively, using light microscopy. Cats with stifle pathology were further divided into five age groups in order to investigate the relationship of changes in the ligament with lifespan. Cats with ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments were divided into two groups according to medical history (with presumed history of trauma or without any known history of trauma) in order to investigate the relationship of ligament rupture with a traumatic event. Data from 200 healthy cats were selected randomly and reviewed to make a statistical comparison of cats with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture (reference group). Results On histological examination, the intact cranial cruciate ligaments showed basic parallel arrangement of the collagen fibres, with no relation to age. While cats of a more advanced age showed fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament - a likely physiological reaction to compression forces over the lifespan - degenerative changes within the fibrocartilage were absent in all cases, regardless of age or rupture status. Cats suffering from cranial cruciate ligament rupture without history of trauma were significantly older than cats in the reference group. Conclusions and relevance This study showed that differentiation of fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament is likely a physiological reaction to compressive forces and not a degenerative change associated with greater risk of rupture in advanced age. This finding in cats is distinct from the known decrease in differentiation of fibrocartilage in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Furthermore, the histological examination

  13. MRI of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Elizabeth A. [Department of MRI, St Mary' s Hospital, Praed St, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)], E-mail: dickelizabeth@hotmail.com; Burnett, Carole; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M.W. [Department of MRI, St Mary' s Hospital, Praed St, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist is increasingly recognised as the imaging modality of choice in wrist disorders as image resolution improves and clinicians realise its potential. Consequently the ability to confidently interpret such imaging will become more important to both general and musculoskeletal radiologists. This article reviews current optimal imaging protocols and describes common abnormalities with a particular emphasis on less well understood topics such as intercalated segment instability, the triangular fibrocartilage complex and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  14. Evaluation of TFC tears with magnetic resonance imaging; Comparison with arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushida, Manabu; Imamura, Koutaro; Sumi, Mitsuhiro; Uetani, Masataka (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Nagatani, Yoshifumi

    1993-09-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of tears of the trianglar fibrocartilage (TFC). Eighteen patients with chronic pain in the ulnar side of their wrist were examined by MRI and arthrography. Compared with arthrography, MRI was effective in the evaluation of TFC tears with a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 67%, and an accuracy of 83%. (author).

  15. MRI of the cartilages of the knee, 3-D imaging with a rapid computer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, G.; Bohndorf, K.; Prescher, A.; Drobnitzky, M.; Guenther, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    2-D spin-echo sequences were compared with 3-D gradient-echo sequences using normal and cadaver knee joints. The important advantages of 3-D-imaging are: sections of less than 1 mm, reconstruction in any required plane, which can be related to the complex anatomy of the knee joint, and very good distinction between intra-articular fluid, fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. (orig./GDG).

  16. Rabbit articular cartilage defects treated by allogenic chondrocyte transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Boopalan, P. R. J. V. C.; Sathishkumar, Solomon; Kumar, Senthil; Chittaranjan, Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects have a poor capacity for repair. Most of the current treatment options result in the formation of fibro-cartilage, which is functionally inferior to normal hyaline articular cartilage. We studied the effectiveness of allogenic chondrocyte transplantation for focal articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Chondrocytes were cultured in vitro from cartilage harvested from the knee joints of a New Zealand White rabbit. A 3 mm defect was created in the articular cartilag...

  17. The use of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair and regeneration: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, A.; Mitchell, K.; Soans, J.; Kim, L.; Zaidi, R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The management of articular cartilage defects presents many clinical challenges due to its avascular, aneural and alymphatic nature. Bone marrow stimulation techniques, such as microfracture, are the most frequently used method in clinical practice however the resulting mixed fibrocartilage tissue which is inferior to native hyaline cartilage. Other methods have shown promise but are far from perfect. There is an unmet need and growing interest in regenerative medicine and tissue ...

  18. The use of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair and regeneration: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Andy; Mitchell, Katrina; Soans, Julian; Kim, Louise; Zaidi, Razi

    2017-01-01

    Background The management of articular cartilage defects presents many clinical challenges due to its avascular, aneural and alymphatic nature. Bone marrow stimulation techniques, such as microfracture, are the most frequently used method in clinical practice however the resulting mixed fibrocartilage tissue which is inferior to native hyaline cartilage. Other methods have shown promise but are far from perfect. There is an unmet need and growing interest in regenerative medicine and tissue e...

  19. The fibrocartilaginous sesamoid: a cause of size and signal variation in the normal distal posterior tibial tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfaut, E.M.; Bieganski, A.; Cotten, A. [Department of Skeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, CHRU of Lille, Bd du Professeur Jules Leclercq, 59037, Lille Cedex (France); Demondion, X. [Department of Skeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, CHRU of Lille, Bd du Professeur Jules Leclercq, 59037, Lille Cedex (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Place de Verdun, 59037, Lille Cedex (France); Cotten, H. [Pathology Laboratory, 128 Bd de la Liberte, 59000, Lille Cedex (France); Mestdagh, H. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Roger Salengro Hospital, CHRU of Lille, Bd du Professeur Jules Leclercq, 59037, Lille Cedex (France)

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of fibrocartilage within the distal posterior tibial tendon (PTT) before its division correlating with size and signal variation on MR images through a radio-anatomic and pathologic study. Eight fresh cadaveric feet underwent MR imaging were cut into 4-mm slices in the axial plane. The PTT specimens were harvested at the tendon distal portion before its division and sent to pathology. Thirty-three asymptomatic subjects underwent axial double-echo turbo-spin-echo MR imaging. Proximal and distal PTT signal and diameter were evaluated. In cadavers, every PTT flared distally. Intratendinous fibrocartilage and ossified sesamoid were found in, respectively, 87.5 and 12.5% of the cases. Distal PTT flaring was demonstrated in 100% of the asymptomatic subjects (mean diameter 8 mm). An intratendinous high signal intensity on proton-density-weighted images and sesamoid bone were evidenced in, respectively, 36 and 33% of the cases. Proximally, PTT presented a 4-mm mean diameter and was hypointense in 100% of the cases. Only one accessory navicular bone was detected. Laterally off-centered increased intratendinous signal intensity as well as PTT distal widening with otherwise normal MR imaging features are related to an intratendinous fibrocartilage. (orig.)

  20. Low‑dose halofuginone inhibits the synthesis of type I collagen without influencing type II collagen in the extracellular matrix of chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeng; Fei, Hao; Wang, Zhen; Zhu, Tianyi

    2017-09-01

    Full‑thickness and large area defects of articular cartilage are unable to completely repair themselves and require surgical intervention, including microfracture, autologous or allogeneic osteochondral grafts, and autologous chondrocyte implantation. A large proportion of regenerative cartilage exists as fibrocartilage, which is unable to withstand impacts in the same way as native hyaline cartilage, owing to excess synthesis of type I collagen in the matrix. The present study demonstrated that low‑dose halofuginone (HF), a plant alkaloid isolated from Dichroa febrifuga, may inhibit the synthesis of type I collagen without influencing type II collagen in the extracellular matrix of chondrocytes. In addition, HF was revealed to inhibit the phosphorylation of mothers against decapentaplegic homolog (Smad)2/3 and promoted Smad7 expression, as well as decrease the synthesis of type I collagen synthesis. Results from the present study indicated that HF treatment suppressed the synthesis of type I collagen by inhibiting the transforming growth factor‑β signaling pathway in chondrocytes. These results may provide an alternative solution to the problems associated with fibrocartilage, and convert fibrocartilage into hyaline cartilage at the mid‑early stages of cartilage regeneration. HF may additionally be used to improve monolayer expansion or 3D cultures of seed cells for the tissue engineering of cartilage.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist: Diagnostic performance statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobby, Jonathan L.; Tom, Brian D.M.; Bearcroft, Philip W.P.; Dixon, Adrian K.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To review the published diagnostic performance statistics for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist for tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, the intrinsic carpal ligaments, and for osteonecrosis of the carpal bones. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used Medline and Embase to search the English language literature. Studies evaluating the diagnostic performance of MRI of the wrist in living patients with surgical confirmation of MR findings were identified. RESULTS: We identified 11 studies reporting the diagnostic performance of MRI for tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex for a total of 410 patients, six studies for the scapho-lunate ligament (159 patients), six studies for the luno-triquetral ligament (142 patients) and four studies (56 patients) for osteonecrosis of the carpal bones. CONCLUSIONS: Magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate means of diagnosing tears of the triangular fibrocartilage and carpal osteonecrosis. Although MRI is highly specific for tears of the intrinsic carpal ligaments, its sensitivity is low. The diagnostic performance of MRI in the wrist is improved by using high-resolution T2* weighted 3D gradient echo sequences. Using current imaging techniques without intra-articular contrast medium, magnetic resonance imaging cannot reliably exclude tears of the intrinsic carpal ligaments. Hobby, J.L. (2001)

  2. MR imaging of the intraarticular disk of the acromioclavicular joint: a comparison with anatomical, histological and in-vivo findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heers, Guido; Goetz, Juergen; Schubert, Thomas; Schachner, Henrik; Neumaier, Ulrich; Grifka, Joachim; Hedtmann, Achim [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Regensburg, Asklepios Klinikum Bad Abbach, Bad Abbach (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    To characterize MRI features of the intraarticular disk of the acromioclavicular joint. We studied the appearance of 11 acromioclavicular joints of six cadavers (subjects aged 57-89 years at the time of death) and six healthy shoulders on T1-weighted, T2 (TSE)-weighted, STIR and PD (fat saturated) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compared the findings with observations during dissection and histological examination. Macroscopic examinations showed two wedge-shaped disks underneath the superior and above the inferior joint capsule in nine specimens. In two specimens the acromioclavicular joints were degenerated. Histologically, the disk tissue consisted of fibrocartilage whereas the joint cartilage was partly degenerated, containing zones of fibrocartilage amidst degenerated hyaline cartilage, which may explain the similar signal intensity of both structures in all sequences used. MR appearance of the intraarticular structures of the acromioclavicular joint was similar in cadaveric and healthy shoulders. The difficulties related to imaging the acromioclavicular joint may be explained by the anatomy. Similar signal intensity of cartilage and disk may be explained by their similar histological structure (fibrocartilage). MRI findings should be interpreted with respect to the variable anatomy. These results may serve as a basis for further radiological studies of the acromioclavicular joint. (orig.)

  3. MR imaging of the intraarticular disk of the acromioclavicular joint: a comparison with anatomical, histological and in-vivo findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heers, Guido; Goetz, Juergen; Schubert, Thomas; Schachner, Henrik; Neumaier, Ulrich; Grifka, Joachim; Hedtmann, Achim

    2007-01-01

    To characterize MRI features of the intraarticular disk of the acromioclavicular joint. We studied the appearance of 11 acromioclavicular joints of six cadavers (subjects aged 57-89 years at the time of death) and six healthy shoulders on T1-weighted, T2 (TSE)-weighted, STIR and PD (fat saturated) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compared the findings with observations during dissection and histological examination. Macroscopic examinations showed two wedge-shaped disks underneath the superior and above the inferior joint capsule in nine specimens. In two specimens the acromioclavicular joints were degenerated. Histologically, the disk tissue consisted of fibrocartilage whereas the joint cartilage was partly degenerated, containing zones of fibrocartilage amidst degenerated hyaline cartilage, which may explain the similar signal intensity of both structures in all sequences used. MR appearance of the intraarticular structures of the acromioclavicular joint was similar in cadaveric and healthy shoulders. The difficulties related to imaging the acromioclavicular joint may be explained by the anatomy. Similar signal intensity of cartilage and disk may be explained by their similar histological structure (fibrocartilage). MRI findings should be interpreted with respect to the variable anatomy. These results may serve as a basis for further radiological studies of the acromioclavicular joint. (orig.)

  4. 308-nm excimer laser ablation of human cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodoehl, John A.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1993-07-01

    The XeCl excimer laser was investigated as an ablating tool for human fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Quantitative measurements were made of tissue ablation rates as a function of fluence in meniscal fibrocartilage and articular hyaline cartilage. A force of 1.47 Newtons was applied to an 800 micrometers fiber with the laser delivering a range of fluences (40 to 190 mj/mm2) firing at a frequency of 5 Hz. To assess the effect of repetition rate on ablation rate, a set of measurements was made at a constant fluence of 60 mj/mm2, with the repetition rate varying from 10 to 40 Hz. Histologic and morphometric analysis was performed using light microscopy. The results of these studies revealed that the ablation rate was directly proportional to fluence over the range tested. Fibrocartilage was ablated at a rate 2.56 times faster than hyaline cartilage at the maximum fluence tested. Repetition rate had no effect on the penetration per pulse. Adjacent tissue damage was noted to be minimal (10 - 70 micrometers ).

  5. Quantitative mapping of matrix content and distribution across the ligament-to-bone insertion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P Spalazzi

    Full Text Available The interface between bone and connective tissues such as the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL constitutes a complex transition traversing multiple tissue regions, including non-calcified and calcified fibrocartilage, which integrates and enables load transfer between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. The objective of this study was to investigate region-dependent changes in collagen, proteoglycan and mineral distribution, as well as collagen orientation, across the ligament-to-bone insertion site using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIR-I. Insertion site-related differences in matrix content were also evaluated by comparing tibial and femoral entheses. Both region- and site-related changes were observed. Collagen content was higher in the ligament and bone regions, while decreasing across the fibrocartilage interface. Moreover, interfacial collagen fibrils were aligned parallel to the ligament-bone interface near the ligament region, assuming a more random orientation through the bulk of the interface. Proteoglycan content was uniform on average across the insertion, while its distribution was relatively less variable at the tibial compared to the femoral insertion. Mineral was only detected in the calcified interface region, and its content increased exponentially across the mineralized fibrocartilage region toward bone. In addition to new insights into matrix composition and organization across the complex multi-tissue junction, findings from this study provide critical benchmarks for the regeneration of soft tissue-to-bone interfaces and integrative soft tissue repair.

  6. Critical seeding density improves properties and translatability of self-assembling anatomically shaped knee menisci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, Pasha; Yeh, Timothy C.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2014-01-01

    A recent development in the field of tissue engineering is the rise of all-biologic, scaffold-free engineered tissues. Since these biomaterials rely primarily upon cells, investigation of initial seeding densities constitutes a particularly relevant aim for tissue engineers. In this study, a scaffold-free method was used to create fibrocartilage in the shape of the rabbit knee meniscus. The objectives of this study were: (i) to determine the minimum seeding density, normalized by an area of 44 mm2, necessary for the self-assembling process of fibrocartilage to occur, (ii) examine relevant biomechanical properties of engineered fibrocartilage, such as tensile and compressive stiffness and strength, and their relationship to seeding density, and (iii) identify a reduced, or optimal, number of cells needed to produce this biomaterial. It was found that a decreased initial seeding density, normalized by the area of the construct, produced superior mechanical and biochemical properties. Collagen per wet weight, glycosaminoglycans per wet weight, tensile properties, and compressive properties were all significantly greater in the 5 million cells per construct group as compared to the historical 20 million cells per construct group. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that a lower seeding density results in a denser tissue. Additionally, the translational potential of the self-assembling process for tissue engineering was improved though this investigation, as fewer cells may be used in the future. The results of this study underscore the potential for critical seeding densities to be investigated when researching scaffold-free engineered tissues. PMID:25234157

  7. Quantitative Mapping of Matrix Content and Distribution across the Ligament-to-Bone Insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalazzi, Jeffrey P.; Boskey, Adele L.; Pleshko, Nancy; Lu, Helen H.

    2013-01-01

    The interface between bone and connective tissues such as the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) constitutes a complex transition traversing multiple tissue regions, including non-calcified and calcified fibrocartilage, which integrates and enables load transfer between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. The objective of this study was to investigate region-dependent changes in collagen, proteoglycan and mineral distribution, as well as collagen orientation, across the ligament-to-bone insertion site using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIR-I). Insertion site-related differences in matrix content were also evaluated by comparing tibial and femoral entheses. Both region- and site-related changes were observed. Collagen content was higher in the ligament and bone regions, while decreasing across the fibrocartilage interface. Moreover, interfacial collagen fibrils were aligned parallel to the ligament-bone interface near the ligament region, assuming a more random orientation through the bulk of the interface. Proteoglycan content was uniform on average across the insertion, while its distribution was relatively less variable at the tibial compared to the femoral insertion. Mineral was only detected in the calcified interface region, and its content increased exponentially across the mineralized fibrocartilage region toward bone. In addition to new insights into matrix composition and organization across the complex multi-tissue junction, findings from this study provide critical benchmarks for the regeneration of soft tissue-to-bone interfaces and integrative soft tissue repair. PMID:24019964

  8. Influence of Gradual Elongation to the Patella Tendon Insertion in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Mutsuzaki

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the histological changes at the patella tendon (PT insertion site under gradual elongation in rabbits. Gradual elongation of the PT was performed using external fixation for 4 weeks, with a lengthening speed of 0.5 mm/day (elongation group; n = 24. Rabbits in the sham group underwent the same surgical procedure without gradual elongation (sham group; n = 24. Eight animals were sacrificed 1, 2 and 4 weeks after surgery in each group, respectively. Average thicknesses of stained glycosaminoglycan (GAGs areas by Safranin-O staining in the total cartilage layer and the uncalcified fibrocartilage layer in the elongation group were significantly higher than that in the sham group at 4 weeks (p < 0.05 and that in the intact PT group (n = 6, p < 0.05. In the elongation group, the peak in the average thicknesses of the stained GAGs areas in the total cartilage layer and the uncalcified fibrocartilage layer were observed at 4 weeks. Gradual elongation of PT insertion significantly affected the increase in the average thicknesses of the stained GAGs areas in the cartilage layer especially in the uncalcified fibrocartilage layer at 4 weeks in rabbits. Clinically, insertions of tendon and ligament can extend during gradual elongation using external fixation more than 4 weeks after the operation.

  9. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: superior biologic properties of hyaline cartilage repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Ian; Lavigne, Patrick; Valenzuela, Herminio; Oakes, Barry

    2007-02-01

    Information regarding the quality of autologous chondrocyte implantation repair is needed to determine whether the current autologous chondrocyte implantation surgical technology and the subsequent biologic repair processes are capable of reliably forming durable hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage in vivo. We report and analyze the properties and qualities of autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs. We evaluated 66 autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs in 57 patients, 55 of whom had histology, indentometry, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring at reoperation for mechanical symptoms or pain. International Knee Documentation Committee scores were used to address clinical outcome. Maximum stiffness, normalized stiffness, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring were higher for hyaline articular cartilage repairs compared with fibrocartilage, with no difference in clinical outcome. Reoperations revealed 32 macroscopically abnormal repairs (Group B) and 23 knees with normal-looking repairs in which symptoms leading to arthroscopy were accounted for by other joint disorders (Group A). In Group A, 65% of repairs were either hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage compared with 28% in Group B. Autologous chondrocyte repairs composed of fibrocartilage showed more morphologic abnormalities and became symptomatic earlier than hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage repairs. The hyaline articular cartilage repairs had biomechanical properties comparable to surrounding cartilage and superior to those associated with fibrocartilage repairs.

  10. MRI of fractures of the distal radius: comparison with conventional radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, L.D.; Eustace, S.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To compare the evaluation of fractures of the distal radius with MRI and conventional radiographs. To demonstrate the ability of MRI to detect unsuspected soft tissue derangement accompanying this common injury. Design and patients. Twenty-one consecutive inpatients admitted following fracture of the distal radius underwent preoperative evaluation with both conventional radiographs and MRI. In each case, analysis was made of both the osseous and soft tissue injury. MRI findings were compared with those identified on conventional radiographs and at subsequent surgical fixation. Results. Of 21 patients with fractures of the distal radius, 20 had extension to the radiocarpal articulation, 14 had distal radio-ulnar joint extension and 5 had avulsion of the ulnar styloid.Occult carpal bone fractures accompanying fracture of the distal radius were identified in two patients: one of the capitate and the other of the second metacarpal base. Ten patients (48%) had associated soft tissue injury: six patients had scapholunate ligament rupture, two patients had disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage, one patient had extensor carpi ulnaris tenosynovitis and one patient had a tear of a dorsal radiocarpal ligament. Of five patients with ulnar styloid avulsions, none had evidence of triangular fibrocartilage tears. Conclusion. MRI affords better evaluation of osseous injury accompanying distal radial fractures than conventional radiographs. Intra-articular soft tissue injury accompanies distal radial fractures in almost 50% of cases. Scapholunate ligament disruption commonly accompanies intra-articular fracture through the lunate facet of the distal radius. Fracture of the ulnar styloid is infrequently associated with tear of the triangular fibrocartilage. (orig.)

  11. TGIF1 Gene Silencing in Tendon-Derived Stem Cells Improves the Tendon-to-Bone Insertion Site Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyang Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The slow healing process of tendon-to-bone junctions can be accelerated via implanted tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs with silenced transforming growth interacting factor 1 (TGIF1 gene. Tendon-to-bone insertion site is the special form of connective tissues derivatives of common connective progenitors, where TGF-β plays bidirectional effects (chondrogenic or fibrogenic through different signaling pathways at different stages. A recent study revealed that TGF-β directly induces the chondrogenic gene Sox9. However, TGIF1 represses the expression of the cartilage master Sox9 gene and changes its expression rate against the fibrogenesis gene Scleraxis (Scx. Methods: TGIF1 siRNA was transduced or TGIF1 was over-expressed in tendon-derived stem cells. Following suprapinatus tendon repair, rats were either treated with transduced TDSCs or nontransduced TDSCs. Histologic examination and Western blot were performed in both groups. Results: In this study, the silencing of TGIF1 significantly upregulated the chondrogenic genes and markers. Similarly, TGIF1 inhibited TDSC differentiation into cartilage via interactions with TGF-β-activated Smad2 and suppressed the phosphorylation of Smad2. The area of fibrocartilage at the tendon-bone interface was significantly increased in the TGIF1 (- group compared with the control and TGIF1-overexpressing groups in the early stages of the animal model. The interface between the tendon and bone showed a increase of new bone and fibrocartilage in the TGIF1 (- group at 4 weeks. Fibrovascular scar tissue was observed in the TGIF1-overexpressing group and the fibrin glue only group. Low levels of fibrocartilage and fibrovascular scar tissue were found in the TDSCs group. Conclusion: Collectively, this study shows that the tendon-derived stem cell modified with TGIF1 gene silencing has promising effects on tendon-to-bone healing which can be further explored as a therapeutic tool in regenerative medicine.

  12. MRI of fractures of the distal radius: comparison with conventional radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, L.D.; Eustace, S. [Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiol.; Savenor, A.; Nwachuku, I.; Tilsley, J. [Department of Orthopedics, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Objective. To compare the evaluation of fractures of the distal radius with MRI and conventional radiographs. To demonstrate the ability of MRI to detect unsuspected soft tissue derangement accompanying this common injury. Design and patients. Twenty-one consecutive inpatients admitted following fracture of the distal radius underwent preoperative evaluation with both conventional radiographs and MRI. In each case, analysis was made of both the osseous and soft tissue injury. MRI findings were compared with those identified on conventional radiographs and at subsequent surgical fixation. Results. Of 21 patients with fractures of the distal radius, 20 had extension to the radiocarpal articulation, 14 had distal radio-ulnar joint extension and 5 had avulsion of the ulnar styloid.Occult carpal bone fractures accompanying fracture of the distal radius were identified in two patients: one of the capitate and the other of the second metacarpal base. Ten patients (48%) had associated soft tissue injury: six patients had scapholunate ligament rupture, two patients had disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage, one patient had extensor carpi ulnaris tenosynovitis and one patient had a tear of a dorsal radiocarpal ligament. Of five patients with ulnar styloid avulsions, none had evidence of triangular fibrocartilage tears. Conclusion. MRI affords better evaluation of osseous injury accompanying distal radial fractures than conventional radiographs. Intra-articular soft tissue injury accompanies distal radial fractures in almost 50% of cases. Scapholunate ligament disruption commonly accompanies intra-articular fracture through the lunate facet of the distal radius. Fracture of the ulnar styloid is infrequently associated with tear of the triangular fibrocartilage. (orig.) With 5 figs., 16 refs.

  13. Study of differential properties of fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes in growing rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Li, M; Li, H; Yang, C; Cai, X

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to build a culture model of chondrocytes in vitro, and to study the differential properties between fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes. Histological sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin so that we could analyse the histological structure of the fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Condylar fibrochondrocytes and femoral hyaline chondrocytes were cultured from four, 4-week-old, New Zealand white rabbits. The production of COL2A1, COL1OA1, SOX9 and aggrecan was detected by real time-q polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunoblotting and the differences between them were compared statistically. Histological structures obviously differed between fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. COL2A1 and SOX9 were highly expressed within cell passage 2 (P2) of both fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes, and reduced significantly after cell passage 4 (P4). The mRNA expressions of COL2A1 (p=0.05), COL10A1 (p=0.04), SOX9 (p=0.03), and aggrecan (p=0.04) were significantly higher in hyaline chondrocytes than in fibrochondrocytes, whereas the expression of COL1A1 (p=0.02) was the opposite. Immunoblotting showed similar results. We have built a simple and effective culture model of chondrocytes in vitro, and the P2 of chondrocytes is recommended for further studies. Condylar fibrocartilage and femoral hyaline cartilage have unique biological properties, and the regulatory mechanisms of endochondral ossification for the condyle should be studied independently in the future. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Stereological Method for the Quantitative Evaluation of Cartilage Repair Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2015-01-01

    Objective To implement stereological principles to develop an easy applicable algorithm for unbiased and quantitative evaluation of cartilage repair. Design Design-unbiased sampling was performed by systematically sectioning the defect perpendicular to the joint surface in parallel planes providing 7 to 10 hematoxylin–eosin stained histological sections. Counting windows were systematically selected and converted into image files (40-50 per defect). The quantification was performed by two-step point counting: (1) calculation of defect volume and (2) quantitative analysis of tissue composition. Step 2 was performed by assigning each point to one of the following categories based on validated and easy distinguishable morphological characteristics: (1) hyaline cartilage (rounded cells in lacunae in hyaline matrix), (2) fibrocartilage (rounded cells in lacunae in fibrous matrix), (3) fibrous tissue (elongated cells in fibrous tissue), (4) bone, (5) scaffold material, and (6) others. The ability to discriminate between the tissue types was determined using conventional or polarized light microscopy, and the interobserver variability was evaluated. Results We describe the application of the stereological method. In the example, we assessed the defect repair tissue volume to be 4.4 mm3 (CE = 0.01). The tissue fractions were subsequently evaluated. Polarized light illumination of the slides improved discrimination between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage and increased the interobserver agreement compared with conventional transmitted light. Conclusion We have applied a design-unbiased method for quantitative evaluation of cartilage repair, and we propose this algorithm as a natural supplement to existing descriptive semiquantitative scoring systems. We also propose that polarized light is effective for discrimination between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. PMID:26069715

  15. MR imaging of chondramalacia patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulish, B.S.; Montanez, J.; Mulopulos, G.P.; Goodfellow, D.; Dollinger, B.; Bryan, P.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    Because of its inherent soft-tissue contrast, MR imaging can distinguish hyaline articular cartilage, fibrocartilage, and cortical and medullary bone, and thus seems a method ideally suited to examine the posterior patellar hyaline articular cartilage. The authors studied the knees of people with suspected chondromalacia patella using MR imagine and compared our findings to normal knees and, where available, results of surgery. They find that we can distinguish swollen cartilage, irregular cartilage, absent cartilage, and bony patellar defects. Joint fluid and meniscal injuries could also be identified. MR imaging is a useful method for evaluation of chondromalacia patella and may reduce the need for arthroscopy and arthrography for diagnosis

  16. Quantitative 3D ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) MRI and micro-CT (μCT) evaluation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Daniel [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Bae, Won C.; Statum, Sheronda; Du, Jiang; Chung, Christine B. [University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Temporomandibular dysfunction involves osteoarthritis of the TMJ, including degeneration and morphologic changes of the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of novel 3D-UTE MRI versus micro-CT (μCT) for quantitative evaluation of mandibular condyle morphology. Nine TMJ condyle specimens were harvested from cadavers (2 M, 3 F; age 85 ± 10 years, mean ± SD). 3D-UTE MRI (TR = 50 ms, TE = 0.05 ms, 104-μm isotropic-voxel) was performed using a 3-T MR scanner and μCT (18-μm isotropic-voxel) was also performed. MR datasets were spatially registered with a μCT dataset. Two observers segmented bony contours of the condyles. Fibrocartilage was segmented on the MR dataset. Using a custom program, bone and fibrocartilage surface coordinates, Gaussian curvature, volume of segmented regions, and fibrocartilage thickness were determined for quantitative evaluation of joint morphology. Agreement between techniques (MRI vs. μCT) and observers (MRI vs. MRI) for Gaussian curvature, mean curvature, and segmented volume of the bone were determined using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis. Between MRI and μCT, the average deviation of surface coordinates was 0.19 ± 0.15 mm, slightly higher than the spatial resolution of MRI. Average deviation of the Gaussian curvature and volume of segmented regions, from MRI to μCT, was 5.7 ± 6.5 % and 6.6 ± 6.2 %, respectively. ICC coefficients (MRI vs. μCT) for Gaussian curvature, mean curvature, and segmented volumes were 0.892, 0.893, and 0.972, respectively. Between observers (MRI vs. MRI), the ICC coefficients were 0.998, 0.999, and 0.997, respectively. Fibrocartilage thickness was 0.55 ± 0.11 mm, as previously described in the literature for grossly normal TMJ samples. 3D-UTE MR quantitative evaluation of TMJ condyle morphology ex-vivo, including surface, curvature, and segmented volume, shows high correlation against μCT and between observers. In addition, UTE MRI allows

  17. Effectiveness of using ultrasound therapy and manual therapy in the conservative treatment of calcaneal spur – pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twarowska Natalia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calcaneal spur is a pathology of the fibrocartilage enthesis of the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia or a pathology of the mixed enthesis of the flexor digitorum brevis muscle. Ultrasound therapy is commonly applied in the conservative treatment of a calcaneal spur. Foot muscle strengthening exercises, stretching exercises and soft tissue therapy are indicated as effective methods of conservative treatment. The aim of the study was to compare and assess the effects of ultrasound therapy and selected techniques of manual therapy on pain level and functional state in patients with calcaneal spur.

  18. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Yoshioka, Hiroshi [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of California-Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. (orig.)

  19. Change perspective to increase diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease! A new approach: the axial scan of the meniscus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Filippou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography (US is a relevant tool in the study of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP deposition disease. However, differential diagnosis of hyperechoic deposits within the fibrocartilage can be difficult; moreover, US study is limited by the need of an adequate acoustic window. We describe a US scanning technique that offers a new viewpoint in the study of knee meniscal structure: a longitudinal scan performed according to the long axis of meniscus. This technique proves to be particularly useful for the identification of CPP deposition, but could also improve the US diagnostic utility and accuracy in other meniscal pathologies.

  20. Gitelman syndrome disclosed by calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease: early diagnosis by ultrasonographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zabotti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gitelman’s syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive tubular disorder characterized by hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria associated to hypokalemia. The clinical spectrum is wide and usually characterized by chronic fatigue, cramps, muscle weakness and paresthesiae. We describe a case of a 43 year-old male patient with early onset of knee arthritis and no other symptoms. Ultrasound revealed diffuse and confluent hyperechoic deposits in cartilage, fibrocartilage of the menisci and synovium and calcium pyrophosphate crystals were observed in the synovial fluid of the knee. The concomitant presence of hypomagnesemia, hypocalciuria and hypokalemia made clear the diagnosis of Gitelman’s syndrome associated with chondrocalcinosis.

  1. A histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopy study of human condylar cartilage and bone tissue changes in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Hans Ulrik; Thomsen, J.S.; Hougen, Hans Petter

    1999-01-01

    To determine the possibility for adaptive growth in human condyles, quantifying the thickness of fibrocartilage and the constitution of cells with potential activity, the trabecular bone volume, and the structural parameter: marrow space star volume in a larger sample of human autopsy condyles....... EXPERIMENTAL SETTING AND DESIGN: A histomorphometric and scanning electron microscopic analysis of cartilage characteristics and bone remodelling activity. The Departments of Orthodontics and Cell Biology at Aarhus University, Denmark. An autopsy sample of condyles from 20 individuals, 18-31 years of age...

  2. Foraminal stenosis in spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greselle, J.F.; Grenier, N.; Douws, C.; Bernard, S.; Vital, J.M.; Caille, J.M.; Broussin, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports eighteen patients with spondylolysis evaluated with sagittal MR imaging to correlate the factors and degree of faoraminal stenosis at the level of the lysis with clinical findings. Fifteen presented with low back pain, eight with radiculopathy and one with paresthesia in the lower limbs, and two were asymptomatic. The degree of foraminal stenosis, quantified in three grades, was not correlated with the onset of radiculopathy. Three foraminal herniations were responsible for radiculopathy. Presence of isthmic bony tip and fibrocartilage buildup were not correlated with symptoms. Foraminal compression can be demonstrated by MR imaging, but without clinical correlations

  3. Diagnosis of spondyloarthritis of the axial skeleton; Diagnostik der Spondyloarthritiden am Achsenskelett

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Kay-Geert A. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Bollow, Matthias [Augusta-Kranken-Anstalt Bochum (Germany); Bochum Univ. (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Conventional radiography is used as the first-line imaging test in evaluating the axial skeleton for manifestations of spondyloarthritis, which is a cover term for five entities: ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatric spondyloarthritis, reactive arthritis, enteropathic arthritis, and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis. However, as it often takes many years from the onset of clinical symptoms and the first appearance of radiographic changes, a cross-sectional imaging is warranted (CT and/or MRI) for early diagnosis. MRI sensitively detects early inflammatory stages of spondyloarthritis and can thus fill the gap by markedly reducing the interval between initial symptoms and diagnosis. The aim of this article is to show that all manifestations and forms of spondyloarthritis share the same pathogenetic inflammatory pattern, namely a mixture of bone destruction and bone proliferation: enthesis - enthesitis - enthesiophyte. An enthesis in the true sense is a fibrocartilaginous junction (uncalcified fibrocartilage - tidemark - calcified fibrocartilage) between a tendon, ligament, joint capsule, or fascia and bone. The sacroiliac joint is a special form, a so-called articular fibrocartilaginous enthesis. A wide range of images - including radiographs, CT scans, and MR images - will be presented to provide a comprehensive picture of the entheseal manifestations and inflammatory patterns of the sacroiliac joints, vertebral endplates and ridges, facet joints, costovertebral junctions, and spinal ligaments in spondyloarthritis. (orig.)

  4. Role of MR imaging in chronic wrist pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetti, Marco; Saupe, Nadja; Nagy, Ladislav

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for chronic wrist pain is challenging. Correct assessment of the triangular fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, ligaments, and tendons has become mandatory for comprehensive decision making in wrist surgery. The MR technique, potential and limits of MR imaging in patients with chronic wrist pain will be discussed. MR arthrography with injection of gadolinium-containing contrast material into the distal radioulnar joint is suggested for evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage. The clinically meaningful ulnar-sided peripheral tears are otherwise hard to diagnose. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging for interosseous ligament tears varies considerably. The sensitivity for scapholunate ligament tears is consistently better than for lunotriquetral ligament tears. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is considered to be the best technique for detecting established avascularity of bone, but the assessment of the MR results remains challenging. Most cases of ulnar impaction syndrome have characteristic focal signal intensity changes in the ulnar aspect of the lunate. Avascular necrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck's disease) is characterized by signal changes starting in the proximal radial aspect of the lunate. MR imaging is extremely sensitive for occult fractures. Questions arise if occult posttraumatic bone lesions seen on MR images only necessarily require the same treatment as fractures evident on plain films or computed tomography (CT) images. MR imaging and ultrasound are equally effective for detecting occult carpal ganglia. Carpe bossu (carpal boss) is a bony protuberance of a carpometacarpal joint II and III which may be associated with pain. (orig.)

  5. Immobilized Lentivirus Vector on Chondroitin Sulfate-Hyaluronate Acid-Silk Fibroin Hybrid Scaffold for Tissue-Engineered Ligament-Bone Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of a fibrocartilage layer between graft and bone remains the leading cause of graft failure after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. The objective of this study was to develop a gene-modified silk cable-reinforced chondroitin sulfate-hyaluronate acid-silk fibroin (CHS hybrid scaffold for reconstructing the fibrocartilage layer. The scaffold was fabricated by lyophilizing the CHS mixture with braided silk cables. The scanning electronic microscopy (SEM showed that microporous CHS sponges were formed around silk cables. Each end of scaffold was modified with lentiviral-mediated transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3 gene. The cells on scaffold were transfected by bonded lentivirus. In vitro culture demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on scaffolds proliferated vigorously and produced abundant collagen. The transcription levels of cartilage-specific genes also increased with culture time. After 2 weeks, the MSCs were distributed uniformly throughout scaffold. Deposited collagen was also found to increase. The chondral differentiation of MSCs was verified by expressions of collagen II and TGF-β3 genes in mRNA and protein level. Histology also confirmed the production of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM components. The results demonstrated that gene-modified silk cable-reinforced CHS scaffold was capable of supporting cell proliferation and differentiation to reconstruct the cartilage layer of interface.

  6. Cell biological and biomechanical evaluation of two different fixation techniques for rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, H-M; Koelling, S; Baums, M H; Kahl, E; Steckel, H; Smith, M M; Schultz, W; Miosge, N

    2009-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the cell biology and biomechanical aspects of the healing process after two different techniques in open rotator cuff surgery - double-loaded bio-absorbable suture anchors combined with so-called arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitches (AAMA) and a trans-osseous suture technique combined with traditional modified Mason-Allen stitches (SMMA). Thirty-six mature sheep were randomized into two repair groups. After 6, 12, or 26 weeks, evaluation of the reinsertion site of the infraspinatus tendon was performed. The mechanical load-to-failure and stiffness results did not indicate a significant difference between the two groups. After 26 weeks, fibrocartilage was sparse in the AAMA group, whereas the SMMA group showed the most pronounced amount of fibrocartilage. We found no ultrastructural differences in collagen fiber organization between the two groups. The relative expression of collagen type II mRNA in the normal group was 1.11. For the AAMA group, 6 weeks after surgery, the relative expression was 55.47, whereas for the SMMA group it was 1.90. This in vivo study showed that the AAMA group exhibited a tendon-to-bone healing process more favorable in its cell biology than that of the traditional SMMA technique. Therefore, the AAMA technique might also be more appropriate for arthroscopic repair.

  7. Graft fixation in cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J; Weiler, A; Caborn, D N; Brown, C H; Johnson, D L

    2000-01-01

    Cruciate ligament reconstruction has progressed dramatically in the last 20 years. Anatomic placement of ligament substitutes has fostered rehabilitation efforts that stress immediate and full range of motion, immediate weightbearing, neuromuscular strength and coordination, and early return to athletic competition (3 months). This has placed extreme importance on secure graft fixation at the time of ligament reconstruction. Current ligament substitutes require a bony or soft tissue component to be fixed within a bone tunnel or on the periosteum at a distance from the normal ligament attachment site. Fixation devices have progressed from metal to biodegradable and from far to near-normal native ligament attachment sites. Ideally, the biomechanical properties of the entire graft construct would approach those of the native ligament and facilitate biologic incorporation of the graft. Fixation should be done at the normal anatomic attachment site of the native ligament (aperture fixation) and, over time, allow the biologic return of the histologic transition zone from ligament to fibrocartilage, to calcified fibrocartilage, to bone. The purpose of this article is to review current fixation devices and techniques in cruciate ligament surgery.

  8. In Vitro Expression of the Extracellular Matrix Components Aggrecan, Collagen Types I and II by Articular Cartilage-Derived Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneevoigt, J; Fabian, C; Leovsky, C; Seeger, J; Bahramsoltani, M

    2017-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of hyaline cartilage is perfectly suited to transmit articular pressure load to the subchondral bone. Pressure is transferred by a high amount of aggrecan-based proteoglycans and collagen type II fibres in particular. After any injury, the hyaline cartilage is replaced by fibrocartilage, which is low in proteoglycans and contains collagen type I predominantly. Until now, long-term results of therapeutic procedures including cell-based therapies like autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) lead to a replacement tissue meeting the composition of fibrocartilage. Therefore, it is of particular interest to discover how and to what extent isolation and in vitro cultivation of chondrocytes affect the cells and their expression of ECM components. Hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes were cultivated in vitro and observed microscopically over a time period of 35 days. The expression of collagen type I, collagen type II and aggrecan was analysed using RT-qPCR and Western blot at several days of cultivation. Chondrocytes presented a longitudinal shape for the entire cultivation period. While expression of collagen type I prevailed within the first days, only prolonged cultivation led to an increase in collagen type II and aggrecan expression. The results indicate that chondrocyte isolation and in vitro cultivation lead to a dedifferentiation at least to the stage of chondroprogenitor cells. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. In Vivo Study of Ligament-Bone Healing after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Autologous Tendons with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Affinity Peptide Conjugated Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning nanofibrous scaffold was commonly used in tissue regeneration recently. Nanofibers with specific topological characteristics were reported to be able to induce osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. In this in vivo study, autologous tendon grafts with lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold wrapping at two ends of autologous tendon were used to promote early stage of ligament-bone healing after rabbit ACL reconstruction. To utilize native MSCs from bone marrow, an MSCs specific affinity peptide E7 was conjugated to nanofibrous meshes. After 3 months, H-E assessment and specific staining of collagen type I, II, and III showed direct ligament-bone insertion with typical four zones (bone, calcified fibrocartilage, fibrocartilage, and ligament in bioactive scaffold reconstruction group. Diameters of bone tunnel were smaller in nanofibrous scaffold conjugated E7 peptide group than those in control group. The failure load of substitution complex also indicated a stronger ligament-bone insertion healing using bioactive scaffold. In conclusion, lattice-like nanofibrous scaffold with specific MSCs affinity peptide has great potential in promoting early stage of ligament-bone healing after ACL reconstruction.

  10. Experimental chemonucleolysis with chymopapain in canine intervertebral disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, T.; Sumi, A.; Hashimoto, A.

    1993-01-01

    The present study describes the radiological and histological changes in the canine intervertebral disk after the experimental injection of chymopapain as the chemical reagent, and determines the appropriate dose of the enzyme for treatment of herniated disks. By radiography, narrowing of the disk space was observed within 2 weeks after the injection of chymopapain, and recovered to 74.1% in the 0.1 mg group, 61.1% in the 1.0 mg group and 71.7% in the 10.0 mg group at 12 weeks. The disk space recovery showed a tendency to delay with aging. Microscopically, proteoglycan positive matrix appeared and the nuclear space was reduced in each disk at 2 weeks after chymopapain injection. The nucleus pulposus contained an irregularly-defined mass consisting of clusters of degenerated notochordal cells surrounded by proliferated chondrocytes and collagen matrix. In each disk at 12 weeks after chymopapain injection, the center of the nucleus pulposus was replaced by fibrocartilage tissue. In the disk into which 10.0 mg chymopapain was injected, the nuclear space filled with dense fibrocartilage tissue without a regenerated matrix component and narrowing of the disk were maintained. It is suggested that canine chemonucleolysis with 10.0 mg of chymopapain reduces the interdiskal pressure. This treatment may therefore relieve the signs and symptoms of herniation of the nucleus pulposus, and may effect chemical disk decompression

  11. Cartilage ablation studies using mid-IR free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Jong-In; Peavy, George M.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2005-04-01

    The ablation rate of articular cartilage and fibrocartilage (meniscus), were quantified to examine wavelength and tissue-composition dependence of ablation efficiency for selected mid-infrared wavelengths. The wavelengths tested were 2.9 um (water dominant absorption), 6.1 (protein and water absorption) and 6.45 um (protein dominant absorption) generated by the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Vanderbilt University. The measurement of tissue mass removal using a microbalance during laser ablation was conducted to determine the ablation rates of cartilage. The technique can be accurate over methods such as profilometer and histology sectioning where tissue surface and the crater morphology may be affected by tissue processing. The ablation efficiency was found to be dependent upon the wavelength. Both articular cartilage and meniscus (fibrocartilage) ablations at 6.1 um were more efficient than those at the other wavelengths evaluated. We observed the lowest ablation efficiency of both types of cartilage with the 6.45 um wavelength, possibly due to the reduction in water absorption at this wavelength in comparison to the other wavelengths that were evaluated.

  12. The Effect of Rotating Collector Design on Tensile Properties and Morphology of Electrospun Polycaprolactone Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindyajati Adhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is a technique that can produce fibres in the nanoscale range. This process is useful for many applications, including fabrication of fibrous scaffolds for fibrocartilage tissue engineering. For this application, cell attachment and tissue development is influenced by fibre morphology and mechanical properties. This electrospinning study investigated the influence of rotating collector design on morphology and mechanical properties of electrospun polycaprolactone fibre. The experiment employed 4 mandrel designs: 1 full surface of aluminium; 2 with gap feature; 3 with gap feature and teflon support; 4 with gap feature and tape support. The highest elastic modulus was obtained from mandrel with gap and tape support, which was 24.6 MPa and significantly higher compared to fibres acquired from other collector designs. Fibre diameter attained was identical across the different collectors, ranging from 0.5 - 2 μm. Gap introduction showed enhanced alignment in the resultant fibre. It can be concluded that fibre alignment and tensile properties can be improved by simply modifying the collector design. This improved fibre mat can be developed as a biomaterial for fibrocartilage tissue engineering scaffolds.

  13. Regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage in situ with SOX9 stimulation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Zhang

    Full Text Available Microfracture, a common procedure for treatment of cartilage injury, induces fibrocartilage repair by recruiting bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC to the site of cartilage injury. However, fibrocartilage is inferior biomechanically to hyaline cartilage. SRY-type high-mobility group box-9 (SOX9 is a master regulator of chondrogenesis by promoting proliferation and differentiation of MSC into chondrocytes. In this study we aimed to test the therapeutic potential of cell penetrating recombinant SOX9 protein in regeneration of hyaline cartilage in situ at the site of cartilage injury. We generated a recombinant SOX9 protein which was fused with super positively charged green fluorescence protein (GFP (scSOX9 to facilitate cell penetration. scSOX9 was able to induce chondrogenesis of bone marrow derived MSC in vitro. In a rabbit cartilage injury model, scSOX9 in combination with microfracture significantly improved quality of repaired cartilage as shown by macroscopic appearance. Histological analysis revealed that the reparative tissue induced by microfracture with scSOX9 had features of hyaline cartilage; and collagen type II to type I ratio was similar to that in normal cartilage. This short term in vivo study demonstrated that when administered at the site of microfracture, scSOX9 was able to induce reparative tissue with features of hyaline cartilage.

  14. The development and morphogenesis of the tendon-to-bone insertion What development can teach us about healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Genin, Guy M.; Galatz, Leesa M.

    2013-01-01

    The attachment of dissimilar materials is a major challenge because of the high levels of stress that develop at such interfaces. An effective solution to this problem develops at the attachment of tendon (a compliant “soft tissue”) to bone (a stiff “hard tissue”). This tissue, the “enthesis”, transitions from tendon to bone through gradations in structure, composition, and mechanical properties. These gradations are not regenerated during tendon-to-bone healing, leading to a high incidence of failure after surgical repair. Understanding the development of the enthesis may allow scientists to develop treatments that regenerate the natural tendon-to-bone insertion. Recent work has demonstrated that both biologic and mechanical factors drive the development and morphogenesis of the enthesis. A cascade of biologic signals similar to those seen in the growth plate promotes mineralization of cartilage on the bony end of the enthesis and the formation of fibrocartilage on the tendon end of the enthesis. Mechanical loading is also necessary for the development of the enthesis. Removal of muscle load impairs the formation of bone, fibrocartilage, and tendon at the developing enthesis. This paper reviews recent work on the development of the enthesis, with an emphasis on the roles of biologic and mechanical factors. PMID:20190378

  15. Discrimination of meniscal cell phenotypes using gene expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Son

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of quantitative and objective metrics to assess cartilage and meniscus cell phenotypes contributes to the challenges in fibrocartilage tissue engineering. Although functional assessment of the final resulting tissue is essential, initial characterization of cell sources and quantitative description of their progression towards the natural, desired cell phenotype would provide an effective tool in optimizing cell-based tissue engineering strategies. The purpose of this study was to identify quantifiable characteristics of meniscal cells and thereby find phenotypical markers that could effectively categorize cells based on their tissue of origin (cartilage, inner, middle, and outer meniscus. The combination of gene expression ratios collagen VI/collagen II, ADAMTS-5/collagen II, and collagen I/collagen II was the most effective indicator of variation among different tissue regions. We additionally demonstrate a possible application of these quantifiable metrics in evaluating the use of serially passaged chondrocytes as a possible cell source in fibrocartilage engineering. Comparing the ratios of the passaged chondrocytes and the native meniscal cells may provide direction to optimize towards the desired cell phenotype. We have thus shown that measurable markers defining the characteristics of the native meniscus can establish a standard by which different tissue engineering strategies can be objectively assessed. Such metrics could additionally be useful in exploring the different stages of meniscal degradation in osteoarthritis and provide some insight in the disease progression.

  16. Indirect wrist MR arthrography: the effects of passive motion versus active exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M.E.; Natale, P.; Winalski, C.S.; Culp, R. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. In the wrist, to determine whether passive motion or active exercise yields a better indirect MR arthrographic effect following intravenous gadolinium administration.Design and patients. Twenty-six consecutive patients were studied by indirect wrist MR arthrography. In half active exercise and in half passive motion was performed. Four regions of interest were studied including the distal radioulnar joint, the radiocarpal joint, the midcarpal joint, and the triangular fibrocartilage. Ranges and means of signal intensity were calculated. Surgical follow-up was performed in 22 patients.Results. The joint fluid intensity was greatest in the distal radioulnar joint. Fluid signal intensity was greater and more consistent in the passive motion group although the results did not achieve statistical significance. Imaging accuracy appeared similar in the two groups and was excellent for the triangular fibrocartilage (100%) and scapholunate ligaments (96%).Conclusion. Active exercise and passive motion yield similar degrees of wrist arthrographic effect, but the effect of passive motion is somewhat more consistent. Preliminary data show good accuracy for internal derangements. (orig.)

  17. Role of MR imaging in chronic wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, Marco; Saupe, Nadja [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Nagy, Ladislav [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for chronic wrist pain is challenging. Correct assessment of the triangular fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, ligaments, and tendons has become mandatory for comprehensive decision making in wrist surgery. The MR technique, potential and limits of MR imaging in patients with chronic wrist pain will be discussed. MR arthrography with injection of gadolinium-containing contrast material into the distal radioulnar joint is suggested for evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage. The clinically meaningful ulnar-sided peripheral tears are otherwise hard to diagnose. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging for interosseous ligament tears varies considerably. The sensitivity for scapholunate ligament tears is consistently better than for lunotriquetral ligament tears. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is considered to be the best technique for detecting established avascularity of bone, but the assessment of the MR results remains challenging. Most cases of ulnar impaction syndrome have characteristic focal signal intensity changes in the ulnar aspect of the lunate. Avascular necrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck's disease) is characterized by signal changes starting in the proximal radial aspect of the lunate. MR imaging is extremely sensitive for occult fractures. Questions arise if occult posttraumatic bone lesions seen on MR images only necessarily require the same treatment as fractures evident on plain films or computed tomography (CT) images. MR imaging and ultrasound are equally effective for detecting occult carpal ganglia. Carpe bossu (carpal boss) is a bony protuberance of a carpometacarpal joint II and III which may be associated with pain. (orig.)

  18. Histological evaluation of calcaneal tuberosity cartilage--A proposed donor site for osteochondral autologous transplant for talar dome osteochondral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, James D F; Ballal, Moez S; Deol, Rupinderbir S; Pearce, Christopher J; Hamilton, Paul; Lutz, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Osteochondral Autologous Transplant (OATs) as a treatment option for Osteochondral lesions (OCLs) of the talar dome frequently uses the distal femur as the donor site which is associated with donor site morbidity in up to 50%. Some studies have described the presence of hyaline cartilage in the posterior superior calcaneal tuberosity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the posterior superior calcaneal tuberosity to determine if it can be a suitable donor site for OATs of the talus In this cadaveric study, we histologically evaluated 12 osteochondral plugs taken from the posterior superior calcaneal tuberosity and compared them to 12 osteochondral plugs taken from the talar dome. In the talar dome group, all samples had evidence of hyaline cartilage with varying degrees of GAG staining. The average hyaline cartilage thickness in the samples was 1.33 mm. There was no evidence of fibrocartilage, fibrous tissue or fatty tissue in this group. In contrast, the Calcaneal tuberosity samples had no evidence of hyaline cartilage. Fibrocartilage was noted in 3 samples only. We believe that the structural differences between the talus and calcanium grafts render the posterior superior clancaneal tuberosity an unsuitable donor site for OATs in the treatment of OCL of the talus. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ablating hedgehog signaling in tenocytes during development impairs biomechanics and matrix organization of the adult murine patellar tendon enthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenbach, Andrew P; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey; Lu, Yinhui; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Liu, Chia-Feng; Liu, Han; Wylie, Chris; Rao, Marepalli; Shearn, Jason T; Rowe, David W; Kadler, Karl E; Jiang, Rulang; Butler, David L

    2015-08-01

    Restoring the native structure of the tendon enthesis, where collagen fibers of the midsubstance are integrated within a fibrocartilaginous structure, is problematic following injury. As current surgical methods fail to restore this region adequately, engineers, biologists, and clinicians are working to understand how this structure forms as a prerequisite to improving repair outcomes. We recently reported on the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a novel enthesis marker, in regulating early postnatal enthesis formation. Here, we investigate how inactivating the Hh pathway in tendon cells affects adult (12-week) murine patellar tendon (PT) enthesis mechanics, fibrocartilage morphology, and collagen fiber organization. We show that ablating Hh signaling resulted in greater than 100% increased failure insertion strain (0.10 v. 0.05 mm/mm, p<0.01) as well as sub-failure biomechanical deficiencies. Although collagen fiber orientation appears overtly normal in the midsubstance, ablating Hh signaling reduces mineralized fibrocartilage by 32%, leading to less collagen embedded within mineralized tissue. Ablating Hh signaling also caused collagen fibers to coalesce at the insertion, which may explain in part the increased strains. These results indicate that Ihh signaling plays a critical role in the mineralization process of fibrocartilaginous entheses and may be a novel therapeutic to promote tendon-to-bone healing. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Electrical conductivity and ion diffusion in porcine meniscus: effects of strain, anisotropy, and tissue region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Kelsey L; McMahan, Jeffrey B; Jackson, Alicia R

    2016-09-06

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of mechanical strain, anisotropy, and tissue region on electrical conductivity and ion diffusivity in meniscus fibrocartilage. A one-dimensional, 4-wire conductivity experiment was employed to measure the electrical conductivity in porcine meniscus tissues from two tissue regions (horn and central), for two tissue orientations (axial and circumferential), and for three levels of compressive strain (0%, 10%, and 20%). Conductivity values were then used to estimate the relative ion diffusivity in meniscus. The water volume fraction of tissue specimens was determined using a buoyancy method. A total of 135 meniscus samples were measured; electrical conductivity values ranged from 2.47mS/cm to 4.84mS/cm, while relative ion diffusivity was in the range of 0.235 to 0.409. Results show that electrical conductivity and ion diffusion are significantly anisotropic (pmeniscus fibrocartilage, which is essential in developing new strategies to treat and/or prevent tissue degeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage in situ with SOX9 stimulation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Wu, Shili; Naccarato, Ty; Prakash-Damani, Manan; Chou, Yuan; Chu, Cong-Qiu; Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Microfracture, a common procedure for treatment of cartilage injury, induces fibrocartilage repair by recruiting bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to the site of cartilage injury. However, fibrocartilage is inferior biomechanically to hyaline cartilage. SRY-type high-mobility group box-9 (SOX9) is a master regulator of chondrogenesis by promoting proliferation and differentiation of MSC into chondrocytes. In this study we aimed to test the therapeutic potential of cell penetrating recombinant SOX9 protein in regeneration of hyaline cartilage in situ at the site of cartilage injury. We generated a recombinant SOX9 protein which was fused with super positively charged green fluorescence protein (GFP) (scSOX9) to facilitate cell penetration. scSOX9 was able to induce chondrogenesis of bone marrow derived MSC in vitro. In a rabbit cartilage injury model, scSOX9 in combination with microfracture significantly improved quality of repaired cartilage as shown by macroscopic appearance. Histological analysis revealed that the reparative tissue induced by microfracture with scSOX9 had features of hyaline cartilage; and collagen type II to type I ratio was similar to that in normal cartilage. This short term in vivo study demonstrated that when administered at the site of microfracture, scSOX9 was able to induce reparative tissue with features of hyaline cartilage.

  2. Effect of cyclic training model on terminal structure of rabbit Achilles tendon: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-lin HUANG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the effect of cyclic training on histomorphology of the terminal structure of rabbit Achilles tendon, and explore its preventive effect on training-based enthesiopathy. Methods  Seventy-two Japanese white rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups: control group, jumping group, running group and cyclic training group, 18 for each. Three rabbits of each group were sacrificed at the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week. The terminal insertion tissues of bilateral Achilles tendons were harvested from these rabbits for observing the pathomorphological changes under light microscope, and pathological scoring and statistical analysis were carried out. Results  Light microscopy showed that the tendon fibers and fibrocartilage in the Achilles tendon insertion region were severely damaged in the jumping group, and though the tendon fibers were damaged severely, the injury to the fibrocartilage was comparatively less serious in the running group. The injuries to the tendon fibers and fibrocartilage were milder in the cyclic training group than in the jumping group and running group. In the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th and 8th week, the histopathology score of insertion of Achilles tendon was 1.17±0.12, 2.19±0.15, 3.23±0.20, 4.66±0.16, 4.71±0.18, 4.63±0.13 respectively in the jumping group, and 1.16±0.13, 1.15±0.14, 2.18±0.12, 2.99±0.15, 3.98±0.16, 4.01±0.12 respectively in the running group. Increase in pathological score appeared earlier in the jumping group than in the running group, and a significant increase began at the 3rd week. The difference in pathological score between the two groups originated mainly from the changes in the tidemark. In the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week, the pathological score of Achilles tendon insertion was 1.13±0.14, 1.16±0.17, 1.15±0.13, 2.18±0.13, 2.17±0.12, 2.92±0.11 respectively in the cyclic training group, and they showed no significant changes as compared with control

  3. Effect of the Interposition of Calcium Phosphate Materials on Tendon-Bone Healing During Repair of Chronic Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Peng, Lingjie; Xie, Guoming; Li, Dingfeng; Zhao, Jinzhong; Ning, Congqin

    2014-08-01

    The current nature of tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff (RC) repair is still the formation of granulation tissue at the tendon-bone interface rather than the formation of fibrocartilage, which is the crucial structure in native tendon insertion and can be observed after knee ligament reconstruction. The interposition of calcium phosphate materials has been found to be able to enhance tendon-bone healing in knee ligament reconstruction. However, whether the interposition of these kinds of materials can enhance tendon-bone healing or even change the current nature of tendon-bone healing after RC repair still needs to be explored. The interposition of calcium phosphate materials during RC repair would enhance tendon-bone healing or change its current nature of granulation tissue formation into a more favorable process. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 144 male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon, followed by delayed repair after 3 weeks. The animals were allocated into 1 of 3 groups: (1) repair alone, (2) repair with Ca5(PO4)2SiO4 (CPS) bioceramic interposition, or (3) repair with hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic interposition at the tendon-bone interface. Animals were sacrificed at 2, 4, or 8 weeks postoperatively, and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) was used to quantify the new bone formation at the repair site. New fibrocartilage formation and collagen organization at the tendon-bone interface was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis. Biomechanical testing of the supraspinatus tendon-bone complex was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using 1-way analysis of variance. Significance was set at P repair, CPS bioceramic significantly increased the area of fibrocartilage at the tendon-bone interface compared with the control and HA groups. Moreover, CPS and HA bioceramics had significantly improved collagen organization. Biomechanical tests indicated that the CPS and HA groups have greater ultimate

  4. Magnetic resonance arthrography in chronic wrist pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeri, G.; Ferrara, C.; Carloni, S.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical role of Magnetic Resonance Arthrography (MRA) of the wrist in subjects with chronic pain. Thirty-five patients complaining of wrist pain for more than 6 months were submitted to MRI an MRA. All patients received and intra-articular injection of 2-10 mL of a 10 mmol saline solution of Gd-DPTA. The overall diagnostic accuracy rates of MRI and MRA were 40% and 81% respectively, with sensitivity and specificity of 63% and 39% (MRI) and of 82% and 79% (MRA). The conclusion is that compared with MRI, MRA can be considered a useful tool for the visualization of interosseus carpal ligaments and of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. MRA also helps detect injuries in these structures [it

  5. The role of laminins in cartilaginous tissues: from development to regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Wang, T L; Toh, W S; Pei, M

    2017-07-21

    As a key molecule of the extracellular matrix, laminin provides a delicate microenvironment for cell functions. Recent findings suggest that laminins expressed by cartilage-forming cells (chondrocytes, progenitor cells and stem cells) could promote chondrogenesis. However, few papers outline the effect of laminins on providing a favorable matrix microenvironment for cartilage regeneration. In this review, we delineated the expression of laminins in hyaline cartilage, fibrocartilage and cartilage-like tissue (nucleus pulposus) throughout several developmental stages. We also examined the effect of laminins on the biological activities of chondrocytes, including adhesion, migration and survival. Furthermore, we scrutinized the potential influence of various laminin isoforms on cartilage-forming cells' proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation. With this information, we hope to facilitate the understanding of the spatial and temporal interactions between cartilage-forming cells and laminin microenvironment to eventually advance cell-based cartilage engineering and regeneration.

  6. The role of laminins in cartilaginous tissues: from development to regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Sun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As a key molecule of the extracellular matrix, laminin provides a delicate microenvironment for cell functions. Recent findings suggest that laminins expressed by cartilage-forming cells (chondrocytes, progenitor cells and stem cells could promote chondrogenesis. However, few papers outline the effect of laminins on providing a favorable matrix microenvironment for cartilage regeneration. In this review, we delineated the expression of laminins in hyaline cartilage, fibrocartilage and cartilage-like tissue (nucleus pulposus throughout several developmental stages. We also examined the effect of laminins on the biological activities of chondrocytes, including adhesion, migration and survival. Furthermore, we scrutinized the potential influence of various laminin isoforms on cartilage-forming cells’ proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation. With this information, we hope to facilitate the understanding of the spatial and temporal interactions between cartilage-forming cells and laminin microenvironment to eventually advance cell-based cartilage engineering and regeneration.

  7. Advanced imaging of the musculoskeletal system: Standard, three-dimensional, and contrast-enhanced CT and MR imaging, and quantitative bone densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnick, D.; Sartoris, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This course reviews the application of advanced imaging techniques to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders. The indications for and utility of standard CT in both the axial and the appendicular skeleton is explored. The combined use of CT with air and contrast arthrography at sites including the hip, knee, and shoulder is discussed. A summary of the proved and potential applications of MR imaging in osseous, articular, bone marrow, and soft-tissue disorders is provided. The utility of intraarticular contrast agents in enhancing the diagnostic capabilities of MR imaging for disorders of hyaline cartilage and and fibrocartilage is demonstrated. The advantages of multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional image reconstruction of cross-sectional imaging data are described in conjunction with the fundamental technological principles of these strategies. Accepted methods as well as investigative techniques for the diagnosis and follow-up of metabolic bone disease are contrasted with regard to relative indications, advantages, and limitations

  8. MR imaging of articular cartilage disorders: Specificity of fast imaging and CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konig, H.; Sauter, R.; Kueper, K.; Deimling, M.; Vogt, M.

    1986-01-01

    MR imaging is the first imaging method that allows visualization of cartilage tissues. The authors compared standard spin-echo sequences and selective water images obtained using the CHESS method as well as fast sequences in patients with inflammatory, degenerative, and traumatic alterations of the hip, knee, and radiocarpal joint. Measurements were carried out using Magnetom imaging systems operating at 1.0 and 1.5 T. With the use of different types of surface coils high spatial resolution (pixel size, 0.5-1.0 mm; section thickness, 3-8 mm) could be obtained. Pure water images are superior for showing changes of the hyaline cartilage, whereas spin-echo sequences remain the basic procedure, especially for imaging fibrocartilage disorders

  9. Possibilities opened up by MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Steinbach, L.; Stoller, D.; Genant, H.

    1989-01-01

    MRI studies of 63 patients with various abnormalities of the hand and wrist were analyzed. Studies were performed on scanners with a field strength of 0.35, 0.5, or 1.5 T. Imaging parameters included T1- and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal and transverse planes and contiguous slices 3-5 mm thick. In 37 patients with post-traumatic disorders, MRI revealed carpal avascular necrosis, tendon abnormalities and, in some cases, abnormalities of interosseous ligaments and the triangular fibrocartilage. In 15 patients with such inflammatory diseases as arthritis, tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel syndrome and in 11 patients with tumors, MRI provided clear delineation of osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. The current role of MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities is discussed on the basis of these results. (orig.) [de

  10. Distal radioulnar joint: functional anatomy, including pathomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, J R; Langer, M F; Berger, R A

    2017-05-01

    The distal radioulnar joint allows the human to rotate the forearm to place the hand in a desired position to perform different tasks, without interfering with the grasping function of the hand. The ulna is the stable part of the forearm around which the radius rotates; the stability of the distal radioulnar joint is provided by the interaction between ligaments, muscles and bones. The stabilizing structures are the triangular fibrocartilage complex, the ulnocarpal ligament complex, the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and tendon sheath, the pronator quadratus, the interosseous membrane and ligament, the bone itself and the joint capsule. The purpose of this review article is to present and illustrate the current understanding of the functional anatomy and pathomechanics of this joint.

  11. Long-term results of uncemented alumina acetabular implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, M; Knahr, K; Plenk, H; Walter, A; Salzer, M; Schreiber, V

    1994-01-01

    We report the clinical and tribological performance of 67 ceramic acetabular prostheses implanted between 1976 and 1979 without bone cement. They articulated with ceramic femoral heads mounted on mental femoral stems. After a mean elapsed period of 144 months, 59 sockets were radiographically stable but two showed early signs and six showed late signs of loosening. Four of the loose sockets have been revised. Histological analysis of the retrieved tissue showed a fibrous membrane around all the implants, with fibrocartilage in some. There was no bone ingrowth, and the fibrous membrane was up to 6 mm thick and infiltrated with lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Intra- and extracellular birefringent wear particles were seen. Tribological analysis showed total wear rates in two retrieved alumina-on-alumina joints of 2.6 microns per year in a stable implant and 68 microns in a loose implant. Survival analysis showed a revision rate of 12.4% at 136 months.

  12. Cartilage constructs from human cord blood stem cells seeded in structurally-graded polycaprolactone scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Samir; Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Foldager, Casper Bindzus

    Cartilage is an avascular tissue incapable of regeneration. Current treatment modalities for joint cartilage injuries are inefficient in regenerating hyaline cartilage and often leads to the formation of fibrocartilage with undesirable mechanical properties. There is an increasing interest...... in investigating alternative treatments such as tissue engineering, which combines stem cells with scaffolds to produce cartilage in vitro for subsequent transplant. Previous studies have shown that chondrogenesis of induced stem cells is influenced by various growth factors, oxygen tensions and mechanical...... this novel SGS-PCL scaffold supports the chondrogenic differentiation of MLPCs will be interesting to evaluate since this scaffold possesses mechanical properties absent from other “soft” scaffolds currently being investigated for cartilage regeneration and implantation....

  13. Endoscopic Pubic Symphysectomy for Athletic Osteitis Pubis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Dean K; Sehgal, Bantoo; Matsuda, Nicole A

    2015-06-01

    Osteitis pubis is a common form of athletic pubalgia associated with femoroacetabular impingement. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy was developed as a less invasive option than open surgical curettage for recalcitrant osteitis pubis. This technical note demonstrates the use of the anterior and suprapubic portals in the supine lithotomy position for endoscopic burr resection of pubic symphyseal fibrocartilage and hyaline endplates. Key steps include use of the suprapubic portal for burr resection of the posteroinferior symphysis and preservation of the posterior and arcuate ligaments. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy is a minimally invasive bone-conserving surgery that retains stability and may be useful in the treatment of recalcitrant osteitis pubis or osteoarthritis. It nicely complements arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement and may find broader application in this group of co-affected athletes.

  14. Wrist arthrography: The value of the three compartment injection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinsohn, E.M.; Coren, A.B.; Palmer, A.K.; Zinberg, E.

    1987-10-01

    Arthrography of the wrist was performed on 50 consecutive patients with obscure post-traumatic wrist pain by injecting contrast separately into the radiocarpal joint, midcarpal compartment, and distal radioulnar joint. When distal radioulnar joint and midcarpal compartment injections were added to the standard radiocarpal injection, many significant unsuspected abnormalities were identified. Of the 25 triangular fibrocartilage complex abnormalities identified, six (24%) were found only with the distal radioulnar joint injection. Of the 29 abnormal communications between the midcarpal compartment and the radiocarpal joint, ten (35%) were found only with the midcarpal injection. Similarly, five of 29 (17%) of the abnormal radiocarpal-midcarpal communications would have been missed if a midcarpal injection alone had been performed. These findings indicate that separate injections into the radiocarpal joint, midcarpal compartment, and distal radioulnar joint are needed to identify a large number of abnormalities not seen with injections into one compartment alone.

  15. Epidemiology of gout and chondrocalcinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Govoni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout is the most common cause of inflammatory arthritis affecting at least 1% of the population in industrialized countries. It is closely associated with hyperuricemia and is characterized by formation and reversible deposition of monosodium urate crystals in joints and extra-articular tissues. Several studies suggest that the prevalence and incidence of gout are rising. Numerous risk factors may in part explain this increasing trend including dietary and lifestyle changes, genetic factors, diuretic use and comorbid conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, chronic renal disease and the metabolic syndrome. Chondrocalcinosis is characterized by the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate crystals in articular tissues, most commonly fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Sporadic chondrocalcinosis is a common condition in the elderly and frequently associates with osteoarthritis. Hereditary haemochromatosis, hyperparathyroidism and hypomagnesaemia are metabolic disorders that predispose to secondary chondrocalcinosis.The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis is still rather uncertain and varies depending on the diagnostic criterion used in different studies.

  16. Diagnosis of TFCC lesions. Its clinical findings and diagnosis

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    Imaeda, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Ryogo; Shionoya, Kaoru; Goto, Yasuko; Hosokawa, Hisayo [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Branch Hospital

    1996-12-01

    Thirty-five patients with persistent ulnar wrist pain after conservative treatment and with positive ulnocarpal stress test underwent several examinations. X-ray findings revealed a lunate ulcer or cyst in 20% and accumulation of isotopes in the ulnar wrist was identified in 94% by scintigraphy. Arthroscopy revealed triangular fibrocartilage lesions in 60%. Ulnocarpal stress test is sensitive enough to note arthroscopic pathology of TFC lesions. One hundred and two wrists had undergone MRI and radiocarpal arthrography before arthroscopic examination. Arthrography had a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 100% in detection of TFC lesions. MRI had a sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 72%. These were lower than the corresponding values of arthrography. (author)

  17. Combined Effect of Subchondral Drilling and Hyaluronic Acid with/without Diacerein in Full-Thickness Articular Cartilage Lesion in Rabbits

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    Wanwisa Suwannaloet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The osteochondral healing potential of hyaluronic acid (HA plus diacerein was evaluated in subchondral-drilling- (SCD- induced fibrocartilage generation in rabbits. A full-thickness chondral defect was created along the patellar groove of both knees and then SCD was subsequently performed only in the left knee. A week later, the rabbits were allocated into 3 groups to receive weekly intra-articular (IA injection for 5 weeks with normal saline solution (NSS (group 1 or with HA (group 2 and group 3. Starting at the first IA injection, rabbits were also gavaged daily for 9 weeks with NSS (group 1 and group 2 or with diacerein (group 3. The animals were then sacrificed for evaluation. The newly formed tissue in SCD lesions showed significantly better histological grading scale and had higher content of type II collagen in HA-treated group compared to NSS control. In addition, adding oral diacerein to HA injection enhanced healing potential of HA.

  18. Wrist arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, S.G. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden))

    1993-03-01

    The ligaments of the proximal row of carpal bones and the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) strongly influence the function and stability of the wrist. Injury to the ligaments may result in chronic wrist pain or instability. Wrist arthrography is valuable in the investigation of such damage when surgical intervention is considered and plain radiography is unrewarding. There are also several technical modifications of the standard radiocarpal arthrography available. Owing to the possibility of congential perforations and degenerative changes in these ligaments the arthrographic findings should be related to the clinical signs and the age of the patient. CT has less diagnostic importance in this respect while MR imaging is an alternative and may become the method of choice. Both these methods have great potential in the evaluation of soft tissues of the wrist other than the TFC. (orig.).

  19. ARTHROSCOPIC FOR TREATMENT OF WRIST PATHOLOGIES

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    I. O. Golubev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostics and treatment of wrist joint pathologies still remain one the key problems in hand traumatology and orthopaedics. Extremal sports availability as well as new options for recreation transportation means only sustains the statistics of such injuries. On the other hand, the technological improvements allowed to develop precise optics for surgeries on small joints. Possibilities of minimally invasive closer visualization at magnification substantially changed not only the approach to treatment of wrist joint pathology but also allowed to describe types of lesions unknown earlier. The authors describe basic principles of wrist joint arthroscopy and features of its application in various injuries: scaphoid fractures, intraarticular fractures of distal radius metaepiphysis, triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries.

  20. Histochemistry for studying structure and function of the articular disc of the human temporomandibular joint

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    N. Kiga

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is composed of fibrocartilage, and the extracellular matrix of this disc is composed mainly of collagen, glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycans. Research on the changes that occur in the composition of the articular disc of the TMJ is necessary for understanding the basis of the pathological process of internal derangement (ID, and a number of reports have been published in recent years on the application of refined histochemical techniques to investigate the structure and function of the TMJ. The direction of future TMJ disc studies should be towards obtaining more evidence to support previous results, and should hopefully be of practical use in terms of prevention and cure of ID.

  1. A Misdiagnosis of Traumatic Hypersupination of the Distal Radioulnar Joint: A Case Report

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    Vipin Asopa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic hypersupination injury of the distal radioulnar joint is a rare injury, and occurs when sufficient supination force is applied to the joint so as to tear the volar radioulnar ligament, resulting in separation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, and subluxation of the tendon of extensor carpi ulnaris. This allows the distal ulna to rotate such that the ulnar styloid comes to lie adjacent to the ulna notch of the radius. Treatment of this injury requires manipulation of the joint, under anaesthesia or sedation. We describe a case where posttraumatic radiological investigation of a patient with an anatomical variation of the wrist when in supination resembled a traumatic hypersupination injury of the distal radioulnar joint. A review of the literature has revealed this to be the first reported case of this type.

  2. Variants, pitfalls and asymptomatic findings in wrist and hand imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, University of Zurich Switzerland, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: christian@pfirrmann.ch; Zanetti, Marco [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, University of Zurich Switzerland, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-12-15

    Anatomic variants of the bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles are frequent findings in imaging of the wrist and hand. Many findings especially changes in the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) and the interosseous ligaments are asymptomatic, their incidence is increasing with age, and they are frequently found bilaterally. Abnormalities such as increased signal within tendons are common in asymptomatic subjects. They may be explained by normal physiology, anatomical variability, MR artifacts or true abnormalities without clinical importance. Although it is not always possible to differentiate variants and artifacts from clinically relevant findings it is important to know their potential etiology and clinical importance and not to over report them as abnormality requiring additional imaging or treatment.

  3. Magnetic resonance arthrography in chronic wrist pain. Artografia con Risonanza Magnetica (arto-RM) nelle malattie dolorose croniche del polso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valeri, G.; Ferrara, C. (Ancona Univ. (Italy). Cattedra di Radiologia); Carloni, S. (Ancona Univ. (Italy). Cattedra di Ortopedia) (and others)

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical role of Magnetic Resonance Arthrography (MRA) of the wrist in subjects with chronic pain. Thirty-five patients complaining of wrist pain for more than 6 months were submitted to MRI an MRA. All patients received and intra-articular injection of 2-10 mL of a 10 mmol saline solution of Gd-DPTA. The overall diagnostic accuracy rates of MRI and MRA were 40% and 81% respectively, with sensitivity and specificity of 63% and 39% (MRI) and of 82% and 79% (MRA). The conclusion is that compared with MRI, MRA can be considered a useful tool for the visualization of interosseus carpal ligaments and of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. MRA also helps detect injuries in these structures.

  4. A meniscus causing painful snapping of the elbow joint: MR imaging with arthroscopic and histologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Guo-Shu; Chen, Cheng-Yu [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Lee, Chian-Her [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Lee, Herng-Sheng [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2005-12-01

    Snapping of the elbow joint can cause pain. We report a case of painful snapping elbow produced by an interposed meniscus in the radiohumeral joint in a 20-year-old man. The MR arthrogram demonstrated a meniscus-like tissue interposed between the radial head and humeral capitellum. The MR-arthrographic findings were well correlated with surgical findings. The location and appearance of the meniscus-like tissue was similar to that of meniscus in the knee joint. Histologic findings of the excised meniscus-like tissue showed a typical presentation of fibrocartilage. A meniscus may exist in the elbow joint and can be a rare cause of painful snapping elbow. MR arthrography is helpful for identifying the snapping tissue in the elbow joint. (orig.)

  5. Pulsed Tm:YAG laser ablation of knee joint tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Qiang; Vari, Sandor G.; Duffy, J. T.; Miller, J. M.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effect of a free-running 2.01 micron pulsed Tm:YAG laser on bovine knee joint tissues. Ablation rates of fresh fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone were measured in saline as a function of laser fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and fiber core size (400 and 600 microns). All tissues could be effectively ablated and the ablation rate increased linearly with the increasing fluence. Use of fibers of different core sizes, while maintaining constant energy fluence, did not result in significant difference in ablation rate. Histology analyses of the ablated tissue samples reveal average Tm:YAG radiation induced thermal damage (denatunalization) zones ranging between 130 and 540 microns, depending on the laser parameters and the tissue type.

  6. Cartilage tissue engineering: Role of mesenchymal stem cells along with growth factors & scaffolds

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    M B Gugjoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage injury poses a major challenge for both the patient and orthopaedician. Articular cartilage defects once formed do not regenerate spontaneously, rather replaced by fibrocartilage which is weaker in mechanical competence than the normal hyaline cartilage. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs along with different growth factors and scaffolds are currently incorporated in tissue engineering to overcome the deficiencies associated with currently available surgical methods and to facilitate cartilage healing. MSCs, being readily available with a potential to differentiate into chondrocytes which are enhanced by the application of different growth factors, are considered for effective repair of articular cartilage after injury. However, therapeutic application of MSCs and growth factors for cartilage repair remains in its infancy, with no comparative clinical study to that of the other surgical techniques. The present review covers the role of MSCs, growth factors and scaffolds for the repair of articular cartilage injury.

  7. A Three-Component Model for Magnetization Transfer. Solution by Projection-Operator Technique, and Application to Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Ronald S.; Swanson, Scott D.; Yeung, Hong N.

    1996-01-01

    A projection-operator technique is applied to a general three-component model for magnetization transfer, extending our previous two-component model [R. S. Adler and H. N. Yeung,J. Magn. Reson. A104,321 (1993), and H. N. Yeung, R. S. Adler, and S. D. Swanson,J. Magn. Reson. A106,37 (1994)]. The PO technique provides an elegant means of deriving a simple, effective rate equation in which there is natural separation of relaxation and source terms and allows incorporation of Redfield-Provotorov theory without any additional assumptions or restrictive conditions. The PO technique is extended to incorporate more general, multicomponent models. The three-component model is used to fit experimental data from samples of human hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. The fits of the three-component model are compared to the fits of the two-component model.

  8. Physical properties of hydrated tissue determined by surface interferometry of laser-induced thermoelastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Marta L.; Perelman, Lev T.; Itzkan, Irving; Schaffer, Jonathan L.; Feld, Michael S.

    2000-02-01

    Knee meniscus is a hydrated tissue; it is a fibrocartilage of the knee joint composed primarily of water. We present results of interferometric surface monitoring by which we measure physical properties of human knee meniscal cartilage. The physical response of biological tissue to a short laser pulse is primarily thermomechanical. When the pulse is shorter than characteristic times (thermal diffusion time and acoustic relaxation time) stresses build and propagate as acoustic waves in the tissue. The tissue responds to the laser-induced stress by thermoelastic expansion. Solving the thermoelastic wave equation numerically predicts the correct laser-induced expansion. By comparing theory with experimental data, we can obtain the longitudinal speed of sound, the effective optical penetration depth and the Grüneisen coefficient. This study yields information about the laser-tissue interaction and determines properties of the meniscus samples that could be used as diagnostic parameters.

  9. Gross and histological evaluation of early lesions of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses

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    Komosa Marcin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at evaluation of pathological lesions on flexor surface of navicular bone and deep digital flexor tendon in horses graded in standard X-ray examination as 2 (fair. The evaluation was performed on fifteen horses (6-9 years of age. Analysis procedure involved examining navicular bones on X-ray pictures, post-slaughter preparation of navicular bones from the hoof capsule, macroscopic evaluation of fibrocartilage on flexor surface, and analysis of histologic preparations. In horses with navicular bones graded as 2, early pathological changes have already developed, even if such horses were not lame. The pathological changes included fibrillation and disruption of deep digital flexor tendon surface, loss of fibrocartillage in sagittal ridge area of navicular bone, thinning of subchondral bone on its flexor surface, and fibromyxoid changes in chondroid matrix. In terms of clinical relevance, more studies are needed to understand the sequence of changes in a better way.

  10. MR imaging of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanase, Mitsuhiro; Yone, Kazunori; Taketomi, Eiji; Kawaida, Hidefumi; Sakou, Takashi (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images from consecutive 100 patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) were retrospectively reviewed to determine MR manifestations of OPLL foci (ossificated foci) and the surrounding tissue. MR images from 50 patients with cervical spondylosis served as controls for comparison. Inside ossificated foci were isointense or hyperintense on T1-weighted images in 43% of the OPLL cases and on T2-weighted images in 38%. According to X-ray proven ossification form, both T1- and T2-weighted images showed isointensity or hyperintensity in approximately half of the cases of continuous and mixed types of ossificated foci. Two characteristic morphologies of cervical disc were seen more frequently in OPLL than cervical spondylosis, which has clinical implication for continuously proliferated fibrocartilage in the cervical disc. Hypertrophy of the posterior longitudinal ligament was seen in 7% of OPLL cases on MR images, reflecting the likelihood of precursor condition of ossification. (N.K.).

  11. MR anatomy of the joints: an MR-cadaveric correlative study: part I. wrist

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    Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Donald Resnick [University of California, San Diego (United States)

    1991-07-15

    To acquire the anatomic information necessary for correct interpretation of MR images of the wrist, transverse, coronal, and sagittal MR images of 3 fresh cadaveric wrists were obtained and, subsequently, sectioned along the MR imaging planes. For the precise correlation of anatomic features depicted with MR and with specimen section, cadaveric wrists were fixed in a rectangular cardboard box using paraffin and frozen after MR imaging. High contrast and spatial resolution enabled delineation of small structures including tendons, nerves, vessels, and ligaments, as well as osseous structures. Transverse images provided the best delineation of the carpal tunnel, tendons, nerves, and vessels. Coronal images permitted optimal visualization of triangular fibrocartilage and lunotriquetral and scapholunate ligaments. We conclude that MR imaging accurately and reliably displays the anatomy of the wrist.

  12. Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Products for Chondral Knee Injuries

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    Adriana Flórez Cabrera

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The articular cartilage is prone to suffer lesions of different etiology, being the articular cartilage lesions of the knee the most common. Although most conventional treatments reduce symptoms they lead to the production of fibrocartilage, which has different characteristics than the hyaline cartilage of the joint. There are few therapeutic approaches that promote the replacement of damaged tissue by functional hyaline cartilage. Among them are the so-called advanced therapies, which use cells and tissue engineering products to promote cartilage regeneration. Most of them are based on scaffolds made of different biomaterials, which seeded or not with endogenous or exogenous cells, can be used as cartilage artificial replacement to improve joint function. This paper reviews some therapeutic approaches focused on the regeneration of articular cartilage of the knee and the biomaterials used to develop scaffolds for cell therapy and tissue engineering of cartilage.

  13. Tissue effects of Ho:YAG laser with varying fluences and pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the effect of varying fluence and pulse width on the ablation rate and consequent thermal damage of the Ho:YAG (2.130 micrometers ) laser. The rate of ablation on fresh bovine knee joint tissues, fibrous cartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone in saline was determined after varying the fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and pulse width (150, 250, 450 microsecond(s) ec, FWHM) at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A 400/440 micrometers fiber was used. The ablation rate increased linearly with the fluence. In fibrocartilage, different pulse durations generated significant changes in the ablation rates, but showed minor effects on hyaline cartilage and bone. The heat of ablation for all three tissue types decreased after lengthening the pulse.

  14. Fluoroscopic and arthrographic evaluation of carpal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Louis, D.S.; Greene, T.L.; Hankin, F.M.

    1985-06-01

    The efficacy of a diagnostic protocol involving videotape fluoroscopy of carpal motion and radiocarpal arthrography was evaluated in patients with wrist pain unexplained by physical examination and conventional radiographs. Videotape fluoroscopy was performed as the first study in 68 consecutive cases and was positive in 44 (66%). Radiocarpal arthrography was performed after videotape fluoroscopy in 39 of the cases (57%), including the 24 in which videotape fluoroscopy was normal and 15 others in which further information was desired in spite of positive videotape fluoroscopy. The addition of radiocarpal arthrography to videotape fluoroscopy increased the diagnostic yield to 52 (76%) of the 68 cases and excluded significant anatomic or dynamic abnormality in the others. The diagnosis was proven surgically in 25 cases. This protocol was efficacious for ligament tears of the proximal carpal row, triangular fibrocartilage tears, and proximal and midcarpal instability.

  15. Possibilities opened up by MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuck, A; Steinbach, L; Stoller, D; Genant, H; Neumann, C

    1989-02-01

    MRI studies of 63 patients with various abnormalities of the hand and wrist were analyzed. Studies were performed on scanners with a field strength of 0.35, 0.5, or 1.5 T. Imaging parameters included T1- and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal and transverse planes and contiguous slices 3-5 mm thick. In 37 patients with post-traumatic disorders, MRI revealed carpal avascular necrosis, tendon abnormalities and, in some cases, abnormalities of interosseous ligaments and the triangular fibrocartilage. In 15 patients with such inflammatory diseases as arthritis, tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel syndrome and in 11 patients with tumors, MRI provided clear delineation of osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. The current role of MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities is discussed on the basis of these results.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of hyaline cartilage regeneration in neocartilage graft implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C F; Ng, K K; Ng, S H; Cheung, Y C

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of hyaline cartilage in a neocartilage graft implant with the aid of MR cartilage imaging using a rabbit model. Surgical osteochondral defects were created in the femoral condyles of 30 mature New Zealand rabbits. The findings of neocartilage in autologous cartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects were compared with control group of no implant to the osteochondral defect. The outcome of the implantations was correlated with histologic and MR cartilage imaging findings over a 3-month interval. Neocartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects showed regeneration of hyaline cartilage at the outer layer of the implant using MR cartilage imaging. Fibrosis of fibrocartilage developed at the outer layer of the autologous cartilage graft together with an inflammatory reaction within the osteochondral defect. This animal study provides evidence of the regenerative ability of hyaline cartilage in neocartilage transplants to repair articular cartilage.

  17. Masticatory loading, function, and plasticity: a microanatomical analysis of mammalian circumorbital soft-tissue structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasarević, Eldin; Ning, Jie; Daniel, Ashley N; Menegaz, Rachel A; Johnson, Jeffrey J; Stack, M Sharon; Ravosa, Matthew J

    2010-04-01

    In contrast to experimental evidence regarding the postorbital bar, postorbital septum, and browridge, there is exceedingly little evidence regarding the load-bearing nature of soft-tissue structures of the mammalian circumorbital region. This hinders our understanding of pronounced transformations during primate origins, in which euprimates evolved a postorbital bar from an ancestor with the primitive mammalian condition where only soft tissues spanned the lateral orbital margin between frontal bone and zygomatic arch. To address this significant gap, we investigated the postorbital microanatomy of rabbits subjected to long-term variation in diet-induced masticatory stresses. Rabbits exhibit a masticatory complex and feeding behaviors similar to primates, yet retain a more primitive mammalian circumorbital region. Three cohorts were obtained as weanlings and raised on different diets until adult. Following euthanasia, postorbital soft tissues were dissected away, fixed, and decalcified. These soft tissues were divided into inferior, intermediate, and superior units and then dehydrated, embedded, and sectioned. H&E staining was used to characterize overall architecture. Collagen orientation and complexity were evaluated via picrosirius-red staining. Safranin-O identified proteoglycan content with additional immunostaining performed to assess Type-II collagen expression. Surprisingly, the ligament along the lateral orbital wall was composed of elastic fibrocartilage. A more degraded organization of collagen fibers in this postorbital fibrocartilage is correlated with increased masticatory forces due to a more fracture-resistant diet. Furthermore, the lack of marked changes in the extracellular composition of the lateral orbital wall related to tissue viscoelasticity suggests it is unlikely that long-term exposure to elevated masticatory stresses underlies the development of a bony postorbital bar. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. THE EFFECTS OF AN EARLY RETURN TO TRAINING ON THE BONE-TENDON JUNCTION POST-ACUTE MICRO-INJURY HEALING

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    Lin Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone-tendon junction (BTJ overuse injuries are common athletic and occupational problems. BTJ injuries may sometimes be caused by resuming training too early after injury. To study the effects of post-injury resuming training within 48 hours on the acute injury healing process, as it is often the case for athletes. Twelve mature female rabbits were assigned to one of the following groups: acute injury (AI, n = 6, post-injury early return to training (PIERT, n = 6 and normal control (CON, n = 6. Tissue specimens were harvested at week 4. The radiological and histological characteristics of the AI and PIERT groups were compared among the groups. The trabecular thickness of the PIERT group was significantly different from those of the AI and CON group. A histological evaluation revealed poor collagen fibre alignment, extensive scar tissue and lowered cell density in the AI and PIERT groups compared with the CON group, but no significant differences were observed between the AI group and the PIERT group. The fibrocartilage zone and proteoglycan area in the PIERT group were significantly different from those in AI group. No differences were observed in the Total VOI volume (TV, Object volume (OBV, Percent object volume (BV/TV and trabecular number (Tb.N among the AI, PIERT and CON groups. In conclusion, a repeatable animal model of bone-tendon junction acute micro-damage by puncture was established. Resuming training in 48 hours did not significantly deteriorate the BTJ injury healing, but improved bone remodelling and increased fibrocartilage zone thickness

  19. Transcriptional profiling differences for articular cartilage and repair tissue in equine joint surface lesions

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    Stromberg Arnold J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Full-thickness articular cartilage lesions that reach to the subchondral bone yet are restricted to the chondral compartment usually fill with a fibrocartilage-like repair tissue which is structurally and biomechanically compromised relative to normal articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to evaluate transcriptional differences between chondrocytes of normal articular cartilage and repair tissue cells four months post-microfracture. Methods Bilateral one-cm2 full-thickness defects were made in the articular surface of both distal femurs of four adult horses followed by subchondral microfracture. Four months postoperatively, repair tissue from the lesion site and grossly normal articular cartilage from within the same femorotibial joint were collected. Total RNA was isolated from the tissue samples, linearly amplified, and applied to a 9,413-probe set equine-specific cDNA microarray. Eight paired comparisons matched by limb and horse were made with a dye-swap experimental design with validation by histological analyses and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Results Statistical analyses revealed 3,327 (35.3% differentially expressed probe sets. Expression of biomarkers typically associated with normal articular cartilage and fibrocartilage repair tissue corroborate earlier studies. Other changes in gene expression previously unassociated with cartilage repair were also revealed and validated by RT-qPCR. Conclusion The magnitude of divergence in transcriptional profiles between normal chondrocytes and the cells that populate repair tissue reveal substantial functional differences between these two cell populations. At the four-month postoperative time point, the relative deficiency within repair tissue of gene transcripts which typically define articular cartilage indicate that while cells occupying the lesion might be of mesenchymal origin, they have not recapitulated differentiation to

  20. Whole meniscus regeneration using polymer scaffolds loaded with fibrochondrocytes

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    LU Hua-ding

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To study the feasibility of regenerating a whole menisci using poly- (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV scaffolds loaded with meniscal cells in rabbits undergoing total meniscectomy, and to explore its protective effect on cartilage degeneration. Methods: A solvent casting and particulate leaching technique was employed to fabricate biodegradable PHBV scaffolds into a meniscal shape. The proliferated meniscal cells were seeded onto the polymer scaffolds, transplanted into rabbit knee joints whose lateral menisci had been removed. Eight to 18 weeks after transplantation, the regenerated neomenisci were evaluated by gross and histological observations. Cartilage degeneration was assessed by Mankin score. Results: Eighteen weeks after transplantation, the implants formed neomenisci. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE staining of the neomenisci sections revealed regeneration of fibrocartilage. Type I collagen in the neomenisci was also proved similar to normal meniscal tissue by immunohistochemical analysis and Sirius scarlet trinitrophenol staining. Articular cartilage degeneration was observed 8 weeks after implantation. It was less severe as compared with that in total meniscectomy controls and no further degeneration was observed at 18 weeks. At that time, the regenerated neomenisci strongly resembled normal meniscal fibrocartilage in gross and histological appearance, and its mechani- cal property was also close to that of normal meniscus. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates the feasibility of tissue-engineering a whole meniscal structure in total meniscectomy rabbit models using biodegradable PHBV scaffolds together with cultured allogeneic meniscal cells. Cartilage degeneration is decreased. But long-term in vivo investigations on the histological structure and cartilage degeneration of the neomenisci regenerated by this method are still necessary to determine the clinical potential of this tissue

  1. Time dependence of changes of two cartilage layers in anterior cruciate ligament insertion after resection on chondrocyte apoptosis and decrease in glycosaminoglycan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakane Masataka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to clarify the differences in time-dependent histological changes (chondrocyte apoptosis and glycosaminoglycan (GAG layer thickness decrease between uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF and calcified fibrocartilage (CF layers at the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL insertion after ACL resection of rabbits. Methods Forty male Japanese white rabbits underwent ACL substance resection in the right knee (resection group and same operation without resection in the left knee (sham group. Animals were sacrificed 1, 2, 4 and 6 weeks after surgery. Results In the UF layer, the apoptosis rate in the resection group was significantly higher than that in the sham group at 1 and 2 weeks. The GAG layer thicknesses of the UF layer in the resection group at 1, 2, 4 and 6 weeks were lower than those in the sham group. In the CF layer, the apoptosis rate in the resection group was significantly higher than that in the sham group at 2 and 4 weeks. The GAG layer thickness of the CF layer in the resection group was lower than that in the sham group only at 6 weeks. Conclusion The increase in chondrocyte apoptosis rate preceded the decrease in GAG layer thickness in both layers. In the UF layer, the increase in chondrocyte apoptosis rate and the decrease in GAG layer thickness preceded those in the CF layer. Using a surviving ligament and minimizing a debridement of ACL remnant during ACL reconstruction may be important to maintain cartilage layers of ACL insertion. An injured ACL should be repaired before degenerative changes of the insertion occur.

  2. Relaxin's induction of metalloproteinases is associated with the loss of collagen and glycosaminoglycans in synovial joint fibrocartilaginous explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Tabassum; Duong, Trang T; Hashem, Gihan; Shiga, Momotoshi; Zhang, Qin; Kapila, Sunil

    2005-01-01

    Diseases of specific fibrocartilaginous joints are especially common in women of reproductive age, suggesting that female hormones contribute to their etiopathogenesis. Previously, we showed that relaxin dose-dependently induces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in isolated joint fibrocartilaginous cells. Here we determined the effects of relaxin with or without β-estradiol on the modulation of MMPs in joint fibrocartilaginous explants, and assessed the contribution of these proteinases to the loss of collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in this tissue. Fibrocartilaginous discs from temporomandibular joints of female rabbits were cultured in medium alone or in medium containing relaxin (0.1 ng/ml) or β-estradiol (20 ng/ml) or relaxin plus β-estradiol. Additional experiments were done in the presence of the MMP inhibitor GM6001 or its control analog. After 48 hours of culture, the medium was assayed for MMPs and the discs were analyzed for collagen and GAG concentrations. Relaxin and β-estradiol plus relaxin induced the MMPs collagenase-1 and stromelysin-1 in fibrocartilaginous explants – a finding similar to that which we observed in pubic symphysis fibrocartilage, but not in articular cartilage explants. The induction of these proteinases by relaxin or β-estradiol plus relaxin was accompanied by a loss of GAGs and collagen in joint fibrocartilage. None of the hormone treatments altered the synthesis of GAGs, suggesting that the loss of this matrix molecule probably resulted from increased matrix degradation. Indeed, fibrocartilaginous explants cultured in the presence of GM6001 showed an inhibition of relaxin-induced and β-estradiol plus relaxin-induced collagenase and stromelysin activities to control baseline levels that were accompanied by the maintenance of collagen or GAG content at control levels. These findings show for the first time that relaxin has degradative effects on non-reproductive synovial joint fibrocartilaginous tissue and

  3. Use of collagen scaffold and autologous bone marrow concentrate as a one-step cartilage repair in the knee: histological results of second-look biopsies at 1 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, A; Calcagno, S; Cecconi, S; Ramazzotti, D; Manzotti, S; Enea, D

    2011-01-01

    Chondral articular defects are a key concern in orthopaedic surgery. To overcome the disadvantages of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and to improve the outcomes of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), the latter technique is currently augmented with bone marrow concentrate injected under or seeded onto the scaffold. However, to date, only a little is known about histological outcomes of either the AMIC technique or AMIC associated with bone marrow concentrate. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of the repair tissue obtained from biopsies harvested during second-look arthroscopy after arthroscopic AMIC augmented with bone marrow concentrate. We analysed five second-look core biopsies harvested at 12 months follow-up. At the time of biopsy the surgeon reported the quality of the repair tissue using the standard ICRS Cartilage Repair Assessment (CRA). Every biopsy together with patient data was sent to our centre to undergo blind histological evaluation (ICRS II Visual Histological Assessment Scale) and data analysis. Five asymptomatic patients (mean age 43.4 years) had isolated lesions (mean size was 3.7 cm2) at the medial femoral condyle. All the implants appeared nearly normal (ICRS CRA) at arthroscopic evaluation and had a mean overall histological (ICRS II) of 59.8±14,5. Hyaline-like matrix was found in only one case, a mixture of hyaline/fibrocartilage was found in one case and fibrocartilage was found three cases. Our clinical and histological data suggest that this procedure achieved a nearly normal arthroscopic appearance and a satisfactory repair tissue, which was possibly still maturing at 12 months follow-up. Further studies are needed to understand the true potential of one-step procedures in the repair of focal chondral lesions in the knee.

  4. Effect of Footprint Preparation on Tendon-to-Bone Healing: A Histologic and Biomechanical Study in a Rat Rotator Cuff Repair Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Haruhiko; Morihara, Toru; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kabuto, Yukichi; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Kida, Yoshikazu; Furukawa, Ryuhei; Arai, Yuji; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Masaki; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2017-08-01

    To compare the histologic and biomechanical effects of 3 different footprint preparations for repair of tendon-to-bone insertions and to assess the behavior of bone marrow-derived cells in each method of insertion repair. We randomized 81 male Sprague-Dawley rats and green fluorescent protein-bone marrow chimeric rats into 3 groups. In group A, we performed rotator cuff repair after separating the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tuberosity and removing the residual tendon tissue. In group B, we also drilled 3 holes into the footprint. The native fibrocartilage was preserved in groups A and B. In group C, we excavated the footprint until the cancellous bone was exposed. Histologic repair of the tendon-to-bone insertion, behavior of the bone marrow-derived cells, and ultimate force to failure were examined postoperatively. The areas of metachromasia in groups A, B, and C were 0.033 ± 0.019, 0.089 ± 0.022, and 0.002 ± 0.001 mm 2 /mm 2 , respectively, at 4 weeks and 0.029 ± 0.022, 0.090 ± 0.039, and 0.003 ± 0.001 mm 2 /mm 2 , respectively, at 8 weeks. At 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, significantly higher cartilage matrix production was observed in group B than in group C (4 weeks, P = .002; 8 weeks, P repair tissue and biomechanical strength at the tendon-to-bone insertion after rotator cuff repair in an animal model. Drilling into the footprint and preserving the fibrocartilage can enhance repair of tendon-to-bone insertions. This method may be clinically useful in rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Microscopic analysis of the temporomandibular joint in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.) using an occlusal interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Karen; Munerato, Maria Cristina; Ligocki, Anelise; Lauxen, Isabel; de Quadros, Onofre Francisco

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the tissue alterations in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of the New Zealand White rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.), after a unilateral occlusal interference insertion on the animal's right side back teeth. A total of 36 animals were used, thirty of which belonged to the experimental group and six to the control group. We established three experimental periods: 24 hours, three days and seven days. The control group animals were divided two by two; each pair followed the same experimental periods of the former one. The experimental group animals were submitted to the use of a 0.3 mm thick metallic cap with a visor. All animals were euthanized, and the TMJs were removed. Using a microscope for examination we observed, in all experimental periods, the presence of intra-articular hemorrhage in the supra- and infra-disk compartments as well as in the retro-disk zone. There were no inflammatory cells detected. The thickness of the condylar fibrocartilage presented significant alterations among the animals of the three experimental groups. In the left TMJs no inflammatory cells were detected. The results suggest that the insertion of a unilateral occlusal interference in rabbit back teeth does not cause any inflammatory intra-articular process within seven days; however, it does cause bilateral intra-articular hemorrhage and a larger compression of the condylar fibrocartilage in the joint opposite the side where the interference is placed. We also concluded that, in order to do research on the temporomandibular joint using animals, it is necessary have an independent (or separate) group of animals as controls.

  6. Ligament regeneration using an absorbable stent-shaped poly-L-lactic acid scaffold in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Hanako; Kokubu, Takeshi; Inui, Atsuyuki; Mifune, Yutaka; Nishida, Kotaro; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Kumiko; Hiwa, Chiaki; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    Ligaments are frequently damaged in sports activities and trauma, and severe ligament injury can lead to joint instability and osteoarthritis. In this study, we aimed to regenerate the medial collateral ligament (MCL) using an absorbable stent-shaped poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) scaffold in a rabbit model to examine the biocompatibility and mechanical properties. Twenty-three Japanese white rabbits were used in this study. MCL defects were surgically created in the knee joints and then reconstructed using stent-shaped PLLA scaffolds. As controls, flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendons were implanted into the contralateral knees. Seven rabbits were sacrificed at three time points, conducted four, eight and 16 weeks after the operation. The regenerated tissues were histologically evaluated using fibre alignment scoring, morphology of fibroblast scoring and immunohistochemical analysis of types I and III collagen. The regenerated tissues were also biomechanically evaluated by measuring the ultimate failure load and stiffness. At four weeks post-operation, spindle-shaped cells were observed on the inside of the scaffolds. At eight weeks, maturation of the regenerated tissues and collagen fibre alignment parallel to the ligaments was observed. At 16 weeks, the fibre alignment had become denser. The fibre alignment and morphology of fibroblast scores significantly increased in a time-dependent manner. Expression of type I collagen was more strongly observed in the scaffold group at eight and 16 weeks post-operation than at four weeks. Type III collagen was also observed at four, eight and 16 weeks post-operation. A thin layer of fibrocartilage was observed at the ligament-bone junction at eight and 16 weeks. The ultimate failure load of the scaffold group was 46.7 ± 20.7 N, 66.5 ± 11.0 N and 74.3 ± 11.5 N at four, eight and 16 weeks post-operation, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the normal MCL and the scaffold group at 16 weeks post

  7. Imaging diagnostics of the wrist: MRI and Arthrography/Arthro-CT; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Handgelenkes: MRT und Arthrographie/Arthro-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, H.M.; Balas, R.; Neugebauer, F. [Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Betzdorf (Germany); Vrsalovic, V. [Handchirugie, Marienhospital Siegen, Siegen (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with arthrography and arthro-CT (AG/ACT) in patients with wrist pain. Methods: MRI and arthrography/arthro-CT (AG/ACT) of the wrist joint were retrospectively evaluated in 346 patients over a three-year period. Imaging findings were correlated to surgical results (n=78) or clinical course in an at least 6-month follow-up. Results: For tears of the triangular fibrocartilage, arthrography, arthro-CT, and MRI demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of more than 0.96. Only the positive predictive value was superior for arthrography/arthro-CT (0.99 and 0.98, respectively) compared with MRI (0.94). Arthrography was superior for functional diagnosis of scapho-lunate ligament tears (n=25). Ulno-lunate and ulno-triquetral ligament defects were demonstrated more exactly by arthrography. Traumatic osseous defects, particularly scaphoid fractures (n=33) and avascular necrosis (n=17), were better diagnosed using MRI. Conclusion: For suspected lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, AG/ACT is slightly more reliable than MRI. However, MRI was found to be highly accurate in diagnosing TFC tears, and is superior to AG/ACT in detecting traumatic and vascular lesions of the wrist. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Untersuchung der diagnostischen Aussagekraft von Magnetresonanz-Tomographie (MRT), Arthrographie (AG) und Arthro-CT (ACT) bei Erkrankungen des Handgelenkes. Methodik: Insgesamt 346 Untersuchungen des Handgelenkes wurden fuer einen dreijaehrigen Beobachtungszeitraum retrospektiv ausgewertet. Es wurden 211 MRT, 151 Arthrographien (AG) und 126 Arthro-CT (ACT) durchgefuehrt. Alle Diagnosen wurden operativ (n=78) oder durch den klinischen Verlauf in einer 6-monatigen Nachbeobachtung gesichert. Ergebnisse: Fuer die Diagnostik von Laesionen des diskoulnaren Komplexes lag die Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet von AG, ACT und MRT ueber 0,96. Lediglich der positive Vorhersagewert differierte, allerdings nicht

  8. A New Promising Technique of 3D Isovoxel Imaging Using 3T MRI in the Wrist: Comparison with 3T MR Arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Guen Young; Kim, Baek Hyun; Park, Jong Woong

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of 3D isovoxel MR imaging using 3T MRI in the wrist joint, as compared with 3T MR arthrography. A total of 33 patients underwent both MR arthrography and 3D isovoxel imaging of the wrist joints using 3T MR, including 11 patients with arthroscopic confirmation. 3D isovoxel MR imaging was performed using an intermediateweighted fast spin echo coronal scan with a 0.4-mm slice thickness and the axial images were reconstructed with a 1-mm slice thickness. One radiologist evaluated for the presence of scapholunate or lunotriquetral ligament tear and she determined the grade of the triangular fibrocartilage complex tear and chondromalacia with its location. We compared the two examinations using kappa values. The rates of detecting wrist injury were similar for both exams with substantial to almost perfect inter-examination agreement (kappa value = 0.864 for scapholunate ligament tear, 0.835 for lunotriquetral ligament tear, 0.799 for TFCC tear and 0.940 for chondromalacia). For the eleven cases that underwent arthroscopy, their results of 3D isovoxel MRI were also similar to that of MR arthrography. 3D isovoxel MR imaging is useful for the evaluation of the wrist joint

  9. Acute and chronic response of articular cartilage to Ho:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauner, Kenneth B.; Nishioka, Norman S.; Flotte, Thomas J.; Patel, Dinesh K.

    1992-06-01

    A Ho:YAG laser system operating at a wavelength of 2.1 microns has recently been introduced for use in arthroscopic surgery. The acceptability of this new tool will be determined not only by its ability to resect tissue, but also by its long term effects on articular surfaces. In order to investigate these issues further, we performed two studies to evaluate the acute and chronic effects of the laser on cartilaginous tissue. We evaluated the acute, in vitro effects of 2.1 micron laser irradiation on articular and fibrocartilage. This included the measurement of ablation efficiency, ablation threshold and thermal damage in both meniscus and articular cartilage. To document the chronic effects on articular cartilage in vivo, we next performed a ten week healing study. Eight sheep weighing 30 - 40 kg underwent bilateral arthrotomy procedures. Multiple full thickness and partial thickness defects were created. Animals were sacrificed at 0, 2, 4, and 10 weeks. The healing study demonstrated: (1) no healing of full or partial thickness defects at 10 weeks with hyaline cartilage; (2) fibrocartilaginous granulation tissue filling full thickness defects at two and four weeks, but no longer evident at ten weeks; (3) chondrocyte necrosis extending to greater than 900 microns distal to ablation craters at four weeks with no evidence of repair at later dates; and (4) chondrocyte hyperplasia at the borders of the damage zone at two weeks but no longer evident at later sacrifice dates.

  10. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Contribute to Chondrogenesis in Coculture with Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingfu; Duan, Li; Liang, Yujie; Zhu, Weimin; Xiong, Jianyi; Wang, Daping

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) have been shown as the most potential stem cell source for articular cartilage repair. In this study, we aimed to develop a method for long-term coculture of human articular chondrocytes (hACs) and hUCB-MSCs at low density in vitro to determine if the low density of hACs could enhance the hUCB-MSC chondrogenic differentiation as well as to determine the optimal ratio of the two cell types. Also, we compared the difference between direct coculture and indirect coculture at low density. Monolayer cultures of hUCB-MSCs and hACs were investigated at different ratios, at direct cell-cell contact groups for 21 days. Compared to direct coculture, hUCB-MSCs and hACs indirect contact culture significantly increased type II collagen (COL2) and decreased type I collagen (COL1) protein expression levels. SRY-box 9 (SOX9) mRNA levels and protein expression were highest in indirect coculture. Overall, these results indicate that low density direct coculture induces fibrocartilage. However, indirect coculture in conditioned chondrocyte cell culture medium can increase expression of chondrogenic markers and induce hUCB-MSCs differentiation into mature chondrocytes. This work demonstrates that it is possible to promote chondrogenesis of hUCB-MSCs in combination with hACs, further supporting the concept of novel coculture strategies for tissue engineering.

  11. MR imaging of overuse injuries in the skeletally immature gymnast: spectrum of soft-tissue and osseous lesions in the hand and wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwek, Jerry R.; Cardoso, Fabiano; Chung, Christine B.

    2009-01-01

    In the pediatric gymnast, stress-related physeal injuries have been well described with characteristic imaging findings. However, a spectrum of overuse injuries, some rarely reported in the literature, can be encountered in the gymnast's hand and wrist. To demonstrate the MR appearance of a spectrum of overuse injuries in the skeletally immature wrist and hand of pediatric gymnasts. A total of 125 MR exams of the hand and wrist in skeletally immature children were performed at our institution during a 2-year period. Clinical histories were reviewed for gymnastics participation. MR studies of that subpopulation were reviewed and abnormalities tabulated. Of the MR studies reviewed, ten gymnasts were identified, all girls age 12-16 years (mean age 14.2 years) who presented with wrist or hand pain. Three of these children had bilateral MR exams. Abnormalities included chronic physeal injuries in three children. Two girls exhibited focal lunate osteochondral defects. Triangular fibrocartilage tears were present in three girls, one of whom had a scapholunate ligament tear. Two girls manifested metacarpal head flattening and necrosis. A variety of soft-tissue and osseous lesions can be encountered in the skeletally immature gymnast. Familiarity with these stress-related injuries is important for accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. High-resolution MR imaging of the proximal zone of the lunotriquetral ligament with a microscopy coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Carrino, John A.; Lang, Philipp; Winalski, Carl S.; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Ueno, Teruko; Shindo, Masashi

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate high-resolution MRI of the proximal zone of the lunotriquetral ligament (LTL) using a microscopy surface coil with a 1.5 T scanner. The proximal zone of the LTL was reviewed in 90 subjects (23 asymptomatic normal volunteers and 67 patients with suspicion of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury) with high-resolution MRI using a 47-mm microscopy surface coil. High-resolution MR images were obtained with gradient recalled echo (GRE) T2*-weighted sequence and short tau inversion recovery imaging, with a 1- to 1.5-mm slice thickness, a 50-mm field of view, an imaging matrix of 140-224 x 512 using zero fill interpolation, and 3-4 excitations. As a qualitative analysis, the LTL was classified in shape and signal intensity. The triangle-shaped low-signal-intensity LTL was identified in 77 of 90 subjects (85.6%) on GRE images. The triangle was classified as regular (41.1%), broad-based (20.0%), narrow-based (6.7%), or asymmetrical (17.8%). The bar-shaped ligament was seen in one patient, and unclassified ligaments were seen in 12 patients. All volunteers showed triangle-shaped LTL. The MR signal intensity of the proximal zone in the LTL was characterized as homogeneously low intensity (type 1; 33.8%). (orig.)

  13. High-resolution morphologic and ultrashort time-to-echo quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Biswas, Reni; Statum, Sheronda; Chung, Christine B. [Veterans Administration San Diego Healthcare System, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Tafur, Monica; Du, Jiang; Healey, Robert [University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Ajou University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Wonchon-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Gyeonggi-do, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To implement high-resolution morphologic and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) techniques in cadavers and volunteers. This study was approved by the institutional review board. TMJs of cadavers and volunteers were imaged on a 3-T MR system. High-resolution morphologic and quantitative sequences using conventional and UTE techniques were performed in cadaveric TMJs. Morphologic and UTE quantitative sequences were performed in asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. Morphologic evaluation demonstrated the TMJ structures in open- and closed-mouth position. UTE techniques facilitated the visualization of the disc and fibrocartilage. Quantitative UTE MRI was successfully performed ex vivo and in vivo, reflecting the degree of degeneration. There was a difference in the mean UTE T2* values between asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. MRI evaluation of the TMJ using UTE techniques allows characterization of the internal structure and quantification of the MR properties of the disc. Quantitative UTE MRI can be performed in vivo with short scan times. (orig.)

  14. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF BIOMECHANICS OF PROXIMAL ROW CARPAL INSTABILITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinhai; Huang, Fuguo

    2015-01-01

    To review the research progress of the biomechanics of proximal row carpal instability (IPRC). The related literature concerning IPRC was extensively reviewed. The biomechanical mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue in maintaining the stability of the proximal row carpal (PRC) was analyzed, and the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC were summarized from two aspects including basic biomechanics and clinical biomechanics. The muscles and ligaments of the PRC are critical to its stability. Most scholars have reached a consensus about biomechanical mechanism of the PRC, but there are still controversial conclusions on the biomechanics mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue to stability of distal radioulnar joint when the triangular fibrocartilage complex are damaged and the biomechanics mechanism of the scapholunate ligament. At present, there is no unified standard about the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC. So, it is difficult for clinical practice. Some strides have been made in the basic biomechanical study on muscle and ligament and clinical biomechanical study on the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of PRC, but it will be needed to further study the morphology of carpal articular surface and the adjacent articular surface, the pressure of distal carpals to proximal carpal and so on.

  15. Torn ACL: A New Bioengineered Substitute Brought from the Laboratory to the Knee Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Goulet

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries occur at an annual rate of 120 000 in the USA, and many need reconstructive surgery. We report successful results at 1–13 months following implantation of bioengineered ACL (bACL in goats. A bACL has been developed using autologous ACL cells, a collagen matrix and bone plugs. The extremities of the bACL were fully integrated into the femur and tibia of the host. Vascularisation of the grafts was extensive 1 month post-surgery and improved with time. At 6 months post-grafting, histological and ultrastructural observations demonstrated a highly organised ligamentous structure, rich in type I collagen fibres and fibroblasts. At the implants' insertion sites, characteristic fibrocartilage was observed having well aligned chondrocytes and collagen fibrils. After a year, mechanical rupture of the grafts demonstrated a major gain in strength. Eventual applications of this new technology in humans include multiple uses in orthopaedic, dental and reconstructive surgeries.

  16. An overview of MR arthrography with emphasis on the current technique and applicational hints and tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Guelden; Demirtas, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been investigated in every major peripheral joint of the body, and has been proven to be effective in determining the integrity of intraarticular ligamentous and fibrocartilaginous structures and in the detection or assessment of osteochondral lesions and loose bodies in selected cases. Several methods could be used to create arthrogram effect during MR imaging, however, direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent is the most commonly used technique and is the most reliable of all. MR arthrography is useful for demonstrating labrocapsular-ligamentous abnormalities and distinguishing partial thickness rotator cuff tears from focal full thickness tears in the shoulder, identifying or excluding recurrent tears following meniscal operations in the knee, demonstrating perforations of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and ligaments in the wrist, showing labral tears in the hip, diagnosing ligament tears in the ankle and identifying osteochondral lesions or loose bodies in any of the aforementioned joints. In this article, an overview of techniques of MR arthrography is provided with emphasis on direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent. The current applications of the technique in major peripheral joints are reviewed, with emphasis given to the shoulder joint where the role of this technique has become well established

  17. Different findings in bone scintigraphy between ulnar impaction syndrome and Kienbock's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J.K.; Lee, H.Y.; Lee, M.C.; Baik, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: There is an ethnic variance on the length of the ulnar and radius. In Caucasian the length of the radius is relatively longer than the ulnar, but in Oriental the length of the ulnar is longer. This difference results in the different ethnic prevalence of ulnar impaction syndrome and Kienbock's disease, avascular necrosis of the lunate. It is important to differentiate ulnar impaction syndrome from Kienbock's disease, because they show similar symptoms but need different treatment and different method of operation. Methods: Seventeen patients with the wrist pain were enrolled in this study (mean age: 45+/-13yrs M:F=12:5). Nine patients were diagnosed as Kienbock's disease and Eight patients were diagnosed as ulnar impaction. Three to four hours after injection of 20mCi of Tc-99m MDP, bone scintigraphy images of the both hands were obtained and analyzed visually. Results: In Kienbock's disease, 8 patients showed increased uptake in the lunate with or without other carpal bones. One patient showed photon defect in the lunate. Otherwise in all patients with ulnar impaction syndrome, increased uptakes were found in the lunate, with or without increase uptake in the triquetrum or the distal ulnar, which are related to triangular fibrocartilage complex. Pin hole scintigraphy and pin hole SPECT demonstrated more precise structure of the wrist. Conclusion: We could differentiate ulnar impaction syndrome from Kienbock's disease in bone scan. We should carefully evaluate bone scintigraphic findings in patients with wrist pain

  18. Association of gastrocnemius tendon calcification with chondrocalcinosis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foldes, K. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[National Institute of Rheumatology and Physiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Lenchik, L. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Jaovisidha, S. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Clopton, P. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States); Sartoris, D.J. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Objective. Chondrocalcinosis of the knee is a common radiological finding in the elderly. However, visualization of chondrocalcinosis may be difficult in patients with advanced cartilage loss.The purpose of this study was to determine sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of gastrocnemius tendon calcification that might serve as a radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with painful knees. Design and patients. We prospectively evaluated 37 knee radiographs in 30 consecutive patients (29 men, 8 women; mean age 67 years, age range 37-90 years) with painful knees who had radiographic evidence of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and gastrocnemius tendon calcification was determined. For a control group, we evaluated knee radiographs in 65 consecutive patients with knee pain (54 men, 11 women; mean age 59 years, age range 40-93 years) who had no radiological signs of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of gastrocnemius tendon calcification in the control group was determined. Results. Gastrocnemius tendon calcification was 41% sensitive, 100% specific, and 78% accurate in predicting chondrocalcinosis. The gastrocnemius tendon was calcified on 15 of 37 (41%) radiographs in the experimental group and on 0 of 67 radiographs in the control group. In the chondrocalcinosis group, 23 (62%) had posterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 14 (38%) had anterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 31 (84%) had medial meniscus calcification, and 36 (97%) had lateral meniscus calcification. Conclusions. Our results show that gastrocnemius tendon calcification is an accurate radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with knee pain. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Association of gastrocnemius tendon calcification with chondrocalcinosis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foldes, K.; Lenchik, L.; Jaovisidha, S.; Clopton, P.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. Chondrocalcinosis of the knee is a common radiological finding in the elderly. However, visualization of chondrocalcinosis may be difficult in patients with advanced cartilage loss.The purpose of this study was to determine sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of gastrocnemius tendon calcification that might serve as a radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with painful knees. Design and patients. We prospectively evaluated 37 knee radiographs in 30 consecutive patients (29 men, 8 women; mean age 67 years, age range 37-90 years) with painful knees who had radiographic evidence of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and gastrocnemius tendon calcification was determined. For a control group, we evaluated knee radiographs in 65 consecutive patients with knee pain (54 men, 11 women; mean age 59 years, age range 40-93 years) who had no radiological signs of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of gastrocnemius tendon calcification in the control group was determined. Results. Gastrocnemius tendon calcification was 41% sensitive, 100% specific, and 78% accurate in predicting chondrocalcinosis. The gastrocnemius tendon was calcified on 15 of 37 (41%) radiographs in the experimental group and on 0 of 67 radiographs in the control group. In the chondrocalcinosis group, 23 (62%) had posterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 14 (38%) had anterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 31 (84%) had medial meniscus calcification, and 36 (97%) had lateral meniscus calcification. Conclusions. Our results show that gastrocnemius tendon calcification is an accurate radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with knee pain. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Longitudinal follow-up of patients with conservatively treated and arthroscopically repaired peripheral meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, A.L.; Mink, J.H.; Rothman, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    Tears involving the peripheral third of the meniscus represent an important subgroup of meniscal injuries due to their unique ability to heal by synovial ingrowth and vascular proliferation. Serial MR images were obtained in 14 patients with arthroscopically proved peripheral meniscal tears to assess changes in MR appearance associated with meniscal healing. Six patients were treated conservatively, and eight underwent arthroscopic repair. All patients were considered clinically stable and presumably healed based on commonly accepted orthopedic criteria. Persistent grade 3 signal was seen in all patients up to 6 months after injury. In two patients more than 14 months after repair, grade 3 signal was present but decreased. In no patient did the signal entirely resolve. The authors concluded that signal from conservatively treated and repaired meniscal tears may persist long after the tear has become asymptomatic and presumable healed. This likely reflects known histologic differences between the native meniscus and reparative fibrocartilage. Persistence of grade 3 signal should not be interpreted as reflective of nonhealing in patients with persistent symptoms or as evidence of another tear in those with recurrent symptoms

  1. A New Promising Technique of 3D Isovoxel Imaging Using 3T MRI in the Wrist: Comparison with 3T MR Arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Guen Young; Kim, Baek Hyun; Park, Jong Woong [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of 3D isovoxel MR imaging using 3T MRI in the wrist joint, as compared with 3T MR arthrography. A total of 33 patients underwent both MR arthrography and 3D isovoxel imaging of the wrist joints using 3T MR, including 11 patients with arthroscopic confirmation. 3D isovoxel MR imaging was performed using an intermediateweighted fast spin echo coronal scan with a 0.4-mm slice thickness and the axial images were reconstructed with a 1-mm slice thickness. One radiologist evaluated for the presence of scapholunate or lunotriquetral ligament tear and she determined the grade of the triangular fibrocartilage complex tear and chondromalacia with its location. We compared the two examinations using kappa values. The rates of detecting wrist injury were similar for both exams with substantial to almost perfect inter-examination agreement (kappa value = 0.864 for scapholunate ligament tear, 0.835 for lunotriquetral ligament tear, 0.799 for TFCC tear and 0.940 for chondromalacia). For the eleven cases that underwent arthroscopy, their results of 3D isovoxel MRI were also similar to that of MR arthrography. 3D isovoxel MR imaging is useful for the evaluation of the wrist joint

  2. Ultrasound guidance to perform intra-articular injection of gadolinium-based contrast material for magnetic resonance arthrography as an alternative to fluoroscopy: the time is now

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Banfi, Giuseppe [IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Universita Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Aliprandi, Alberto [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); Mauri, Giovanni [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Unita di Radiologia Interventistica, Milano (Italy); Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Servizio di Radiologia, San Donato, Milanese (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been definitively established as the reference standard in the evaluation of joints in the body. Similarly, magnetic resonance arthrography has emerged as a technique that has been proven to increase significantly the diagnostic performance if compared with conventional MR imaging, especially when dealing with fibrocartilage and articular cartilage abnormalities. Diluted gadolinium can be injected in the joint space using different approaches: under palpation using anatomic landmarks or using an imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy, computed tomography, or ultrasound. Fluoroscopy has been traditionally used, but the involvement of ionizing radiation should represent a remarkable limitation of this modality. Conversely, ultrasound has emerged as a feasible, cheap, quick, and radiation-free modality that can be used to inject joints, with comparable accuracy of fluoroscopy. In the present paper, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using fluoroscopy or ultrasound in injecting gadolinium-based contrast agents in joints to perform magnetic resonance arthrography, also in view of the new EuroSAFE Imaging initiative promoted by the European Society of Radiology and the recent updates to the European Atomic Energy Community 2013/59 directive on the medical use of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  3. MR imaging of overuse injuries in the skeletally immature gymnast: spectrum of soft-tissue and osseous lesions in the hand and wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwek, Jerry R. [Department of Radiology, Rady Children' s Hospital and Health Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Cardoso, Fabiano; Chung, Christine B. [University of California at San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    In the pediatric gymnast, stress-related physeal injuries have been well described with characteristic imaging findings. However, a spectrum of overuse injuries, some rarely reported in the literature, can be encountered in the gymnast's hand and wrist. To demonstrate the MR appearance of a spectrum of overuse injuries in the skeletally immature wrist and hand of pediatric gymnasts. A total of 125 MR exams of the hand and wrist in skeletally immature children were performed at our institution during a 2-year period. Clinical histories were reviewed for gymnastics participation. MR studies of that subpopulation were reviewed and abnormalities tabulated. Of the MR studies reviewed, ten gymnasts were identified, all girls age 12-16 years (mean age 14.2 years) who presented with wrist or hand pain. Three of these children had bilateral MR exams. Abnormalities included chronic physeal injuries in three children. Two girls exhibited focal lunate osteochondral defects. Triangular fibrocartilage tears were present in three girls, one of whom had a scapholunate ligament tear. Two girls manifested metacarpal head flattening and necrosis. A variety of soft-tissue and osseous lesions can be encountered in the skeletally immature gymnast. Familiarity with these stress-related injuries is important for accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Intracapsular and para-articular chondroma adjacent to large joints: report of three cases and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Lois, C.; Garcia-de-la-Torre, J.P.; SantosBriz-Terron, A.; Martinez-Tello, F.J.; Vila, J.; Manrique-Chico, J.

    2001-01-01

    Para-articular chondroma is a rare tumor that has been reported in only 30 cases adjacent to large joints in the Anglo-Saxon literature. We report three new cases of this entity, describe its clinical, radiological and pathological features, and review the previous literature. Para-articular chondromas have an insidious clinical presentation and on radiographs show a large soft tissue mass with variable ossification. They appear as a lobulated mass of hyaline cartilage with variable endochondral ossification in the central area. These rare benign tumors arise from the capsule or the para-articular connective tissue of a large joint (mainly the knee), which suffers cartilaginous metaplasia and subsequent ossification. Cases 1 and 2 of this presentation fit all the features described previously. Case 3 has identical clinical features but differs from the former two cases in its microscopic appearance, being composed almost entirely of fibrocartilage and myxoid areas within the fibroadipose tissue of the joint instead of mature trabecular bone surrounded by hyaline cartilage. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of this histological variant of para-articular chondroma. (orig.)

  5. Intracapsular and para-articular chondroma adjacent to large joints: report of three cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Lois, C.; Garcia-de-la-Torre, J.P.; SantosBriz-Terron, A.; Martinez-Tello, F.J. [Dept. of Pathology, University Hospital ' ' Doce de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Vila, J. [Dept. of Orthopedics and Traumatology, University Hospital ' ' Doce de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain); Manrique-Chico, J. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital ' ' Doce de Octubre' ' , Madrid (Spain)

    2001-12-01

    Para-articular chondroma is a rare tumor that has been reported in only 30 cases adjacent to large joints in the Anglo-Saxon literature. We report three new cases of this entity, describe its clinical, radiological and pathological features, and review the previous literature. Para-articular chondromas have an insidious clinical presentation and on radiographs show a large soft tissue mass with variable ossification. They appear as a lobulated mass of hyaline cartilage with variable endochondral ossification in the central area. These rare benign tumors arise from the capsule or the para-articular connective tissue of a large joint (mainly the knee), which suffers cartilaginous metaplasia and subsequent ossification. Cases 1 and 2 of this presentation fit all the features described previously. Case 3 has identical clinical features but differs from the former two cases in its microscopic appearance, being composed almost entirely of fibrocartilage and myxoid areas within the fibroadipose tissue of the joint instead of mature trabecular bone surrounded by hyaline cartilage. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of this histological variant of para-articular chondroma. (orig.)

  6. The effect of methotrexate on the bone healing of mandibular condylar process fracture: an experimental study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Samantha Cristine Santos X B; Corrêa, Luciana; Mello, Suzana Beatriz Veríssimo; Luz, João Gualberto C

    2014-10-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an anti-metabolite used in rheumatology and oncology. High doses are indicated for oncological treatment, whereas low doses are indicated for chronic inflammatory diseases. This study evaluated the effect of two MTX treatment schedules on the bone healing of the temporomandibular joint fracture in rats. Seventy-five adult male Wistar rats were used to generate an experimental unilateral medially rotated condylar fracture model that allows an evaluation of bone healing and the articular structures. The animals were subdivided into three groups that each received one of the following treatments intraperitoneally: saline (1 mL/week), low-dose MTX (3 mg/kg/week) and high-dose MTX (30 mg/kg). The histological study comprised fracture site and temporomandibular joint evaluations and bone neoformation was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis. A biochemical parameter of bone formation was also assessed. When compared with saline, high-dose MTX delayed bone fracture repairs. In this latter group, after 90 days, the histological analysis revealed atrophy of the fibrocartilage and the presence of fibrous tissue in the joint space. The histomorphometric analysis revealed diminished bone neoformation. The alkaline phosphatase levels also decreased after MTX treatment. It was concluded that high-dose MTX impaired mandibular condyle repair and induced degenerative articular changes. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MDCT arthrography of the wrist: Diagnostic accuracy and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Filippo, Massimo; Pogliacomi, Francesco; Bertellini, Annalisa; Araoz, Philip A.; Averna, Raffaele; Sverzellati, Nicola; Ingegnoli, Anna; Corradi, Maurizio; Costantino, Cosimo; Zompatori, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with Multidetector Computed Tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the wrist in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: After intra-articular injection of iodixanol and volumetric acquisition, 43 wrists in patients of both genders (18 females, 25 males, age range 32-60 years) were examined with a 16-detector-row CT scanner. Fifteen patients had prior wrist surgery. The patients had arthralgia, degenerative and traumatic arthropathies as well as limited range of motion, but no radiologically detected fractures. All examinations were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The findings were compared with arthroscopic findings carried out within 28 days of the CT study. Results: In non-operated and operated wrists the comparison between arthro-MDCT and arthroscopy showed sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranging between 92% and 94% for triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), between 80% and 100% for intrinsic ligaments located within the proximal carpal compartment, and between 94% and 100% for articular cartilage. Inter-observer agreement between two radiologists, in the evaluation of all types of lesions, was almost perfect (k = 0.96) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Arthro-MDCT of the wrist provides an accurate diagnosis to identify chondral, fibrocartilaginous and intra-articular ligament lesions in patients who cannot be evaluated by MRI, and in post-surgical patients.

  8. Differentiation of osteophyte types in osteoarthritis - proposal of a histological classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Susann; Krumbholz, Grit; Frommer, Klaus W; Rehart, Stefan; Steinmeyer, Jürgen; Rickert, Markus; Schett, Georg; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neumann, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is not only characterized by cartilage degradation but also involves subchondral bone remodeling and osteophyte formation. Osteophytes are fibrocartilage-capped bony outgrowths originating from the periosteum. The pathophysiology of osteophyte formation is not completely understood. Yet, different research approaches are under way. Therefore, a histological osteophyte classification to achieve comparable results in osteophyte research was established for application to basic science research questions. The osteophytes were collected from knee joints of osteoarthritis patients (n=10, 94 osteophytes in total) after joint replacement surgery. Their size and origin in the respective joint were photo-documented. To develop an osteophyte classification, serial tissue sections were evaluated using histological (hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, toluidine blue) and immunohistochemical staining (collagen type II). Based on the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation, osteophytes were categorized into four different types depending on the degree of ossification and the percentage of mesenchymal connective tissue. Size and localization of osteophytes were independent from the histological stages. This histological classification system of osteoarthritis osteophytes provides a helpful tool for analyzing and monitoring osteophyte development and for characterizing osteophyte types within a single human joint and may therefore contribute to achieve comparable results when analyzing histological findings in osteophytes. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnostic values of bone scintigram for painful disorders of the hand and the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Kazuhisa; Yamauchi, Yasuo; Kusunose, Koichi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Honjou, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    From April 1993 to April 1997, 43 patients underwent bone scintigraphic examination for various painful conditions in the hand and the wrist joint. Three hours after an intravenous injection of 740 MBq of TC-99m HMDP, wrist scintigram was obtained. Of 18 patients with ulnar wrist pain, 12 patients had positive scan. The accumulation pattern in the five cases of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome showed different patterns. Slight difference of the accumulation between the ulnar head and the ulnar styloid process was well differentiated. Each carpal bone could be well identified, but when two bones were overlapping as in the triquetrum and the pisiform, additional physical findings were helpful. Six patients showed negative scan. The two patients with positive triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) tear but with negative bone scan showed no bony involvement, whereas those with TFC tear and positive scan were the ones having some bony disorders such as ulnocarpal abutment syndrome. Of 25 patients with wrist pain other than ulnar pain, 14 patients had positive scan. The remaining 11 patients who had negative scan included three patients with occult ganglion, two with wrist sprain and six with various disorders. (K.H.)

  10. Avascular necrosis of the lunate bone (Kienböck’s disease) secondary to scapholunate ligament tear as a consequence of trauma – a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulhawik, Dorota; Szałaj, Tomasz; Grabowska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Avascular necrosis of the lunate bone (Kienböck’s disease), is a condition in which lunate bone, loses its blood supply, leading to necrosis of the bone. There is probably no single cause of Kienbock’s disease. Its origin may involve multiple factors, such as the blood supply (arteries), blood drainage (veins), and skeletal variations. Trauma, either isolated or repeated, may possibly be a factor in some cases. This case presented with multifactorial etiology. In the presented case, a patient with negative ulnar variant had injured her right wrist and presented at an orthopedic clinic due to nonspecific pain 6 months later. An arthro-MRI examination revealed necrosis of the lunate bone, scapholunate ligament tear and coexisting TFCC (triangular fibrocartilage complex) tear. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent progression of necrotic lesions and bone collapse. MRI examination seems to be the key diagnostic method in the early stage of the Kienböck’s disease with negative x-ray and CT images. Arthro-MRI examination also allows us to identify the underlying ligamentous injury. In cases of traumatic etiology, an additional CT test enables stating the final diagnosis

  11. Virtual MR arthroscopy of the wrist joint: a new intraarticular perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Guelden; Dogan, Basak Erguvan; Demirtas, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether virtual MR arthroscopy could be used to visualize the internal architecture of the radiocarpal compartment of the wrist joint in comparison to surgical arthroscopy. Diluted paramagnetic contrast material was injected into the radiocarpal compartment prior to MR examination in all patients. A fat-suppressed T1-weighted three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo sequence was acquired in addition to our standard MR imaging protocol in each patient. Three-dimensional data sets were then transferred to an independent workstation and were postprocessed using navigator software to generate surface rendered virtual MR arthroscopic images. Nineteen patients referred for chronic ulnar-sided wrist pain were evaluated with conventional MR arthrography prospectively. Virtual MR arthroscopic images demonstrating the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) in an intraarticular perspective were achieved in 12 out of 19 patients. Our preliminary investigation suggests that although it has several limitations, virtual MR arthroscopy shows promise in visualizing the TFCC from an intraarticular perspective. (orig.)

  12. MDCT arthrography of the wrist: Diagnostic accuracy and indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Filippo, Massimo [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy)], E-mail: massimo.defilippo@unipr.it; Pogliacomi, Francesco [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Bertellini, Annalisa [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Araoz, Philip A. [Department of Radiology, Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Averna, Raffaele; Sverzellati, Nicola; Ingegnoli, Anna [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Corradi, Maurizio; Costantino, Cosimo [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio [Department of Radiological and Histopathological Sciences, Policlinic S.Orsola-Malpighi, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with Multidetector Computed Tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the wrist in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: After intra-articular injection of iodixanol and volumetric acquisition, 43 wrists in patients of both genders (18 females, 25 males, age range 32-60 years) were examined with a 16-detector-row CT scanner. Fifteen patients had prior wrist surgery. The patients had arthralgia, degenerative and traumatic arthropathies as well as limited range of motion, but no radiologically detected fractures. All examinations were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The findings were compared with arthroscopic findings carried out within 28 days of the CT study. Results: In non-operated and operated wrists the comparison between arthro-MDCT and arthroscopy showed sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranging between 92% and 94% for triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), between 80% and 100% for intrinsic ligaments located within the proximal carpal compartment, and between 94% and 100% for articular cartilage. Inter-observer agreement between two radiologists, in the evaluation of all types of lesions, was almost perfect (k = 0.96) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Arthro-MDCT of the wrist provides an accurate diagnosis to identify chondral, fibrocartilaginous and intra-articular ligament lesions in patients who cannot be evaluated by MRI, and in post-surgical patients.

  13. Tissue engineering in the treatment of cartilage lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Naranđa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage lesions with the inherent limited healing potential are difficult to treat and thus remain a challenging problem for orthopaedic surgeons. Regenerative treatment techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI, are promising as a treatment option to restore hyaline-like cartilage tissue in damaged articular surfaces, as opposed to the traditional reparative procedures (e.g. bone marrow stimulation – microfracture, which promote a fibrocartilage formation with lower tissue biomechanical properties and poorer clinical results. ACI technique has undergone several advances and is constantly improving. The new concept of cartilage tissue preservation uses tissue-engineering technologies, combining new biomaterials as a scaffold, application of growth factors, use of stem cells, and mechanical stimulation. The recent development of new generations of ACI uses a cartilage-like tissue in a 3-dimensional culture system that is based on the use of biodegradable material which serves as a temporary scaffold for the in vitro growth and subsequent implantation into the cartilage defect. For clinical practice, single stage procedures appear attractive to reduce cost and patient morbidity. Finally, modern concept of tissue engineering facilitates hyaline-like cartilage formation and a permanent treatment of cartilage lesions.Conclusion: The review focuses on innovations in the treatment of cartilage lesions and covers modern concepts of tissue engineering with the use of biomaterials, growth factors, stem cells and bioreactors, and presents options for clinical use.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacroiliitis in patients with spondyloarthritis. Correlation with anatomy and histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, K.G.A. [Charite Medical School, Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Bollow, M. [Augusta Hospital, Bochum (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2014-03-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) has become established as a valuable modality for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis in patients with inconclusive radiographic findings. Positive MRI findings have the same significance as a positive test for HLA-B27. Sacroiliitis is one of the key features of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) in the classification proposed by the Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) group. Early signs of sacroiliitis include enthesitis of articular fibrocartilage, capsulitis, and osteitis. In more advanced disease, structural (chronic) lesions will be visible, including periarticular fatty deposition, erosions, subchondral sclerosis, and transarticular bone buds and bridges. In this article we describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings and provide histologic biopsy specimens of the respective disease stages. The predominant histologic feature of early and active sacroiliitis is the destruction of cartilage and bone by proliferations consisting of fibroblasts and fibrocytes, T-cells, and macrophages. Advanced sacroiliitis is characterized by new bone formation with enclosed cartilaginous islands and residual cellular infiltrations, which may ultimately lead to complete ankylosis. Knowledge of the morphologic appearance of the sacroiliac joints and their abnormal microscopic and gross anatomy is helpful in correctly interpreting MR findings. (orig.)

  15. Successful treatment of recalcitrant nonunions with combined magnetic field stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, J A

    1997-01-01

    Nonunions and delayed unions have been classically defined by Bassett as an arrest of the fracture healing process at an intermediary stage of repair, at which time the fracture gap is bridged by fibrocartilage. It is estimated that approximately 10-20 % of long bone fractures in the United States will result in delayed unions when compared to the average rate of healing for the location and type of fracture. Many of these will go on to a nonunion if biological or biomechanical factors are not optimized to enhance healing. Additional commorbities such as smoking, ethanol abuse, malnutrition, malabsorption and altered neurologic conditions can contribute to delayed unions or nonunions. Even despite appropriate and aggressive early management of long bone fractures, a certain percentage still lack progression of healing and go on to nonunion. Classical surgical management of nonunions includes obtaininjg fracture stabilization with ORIF techniques and bone grafting, with reported clinical successes ranging from 50-80%. Those that fail to achieve union despite classical management are indeed recalcitrant nonunions.

  16. High-resolution MR imaging of the proximal zone of the lunotriquetral ligament with a microscopy coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Carrino, John A.; Lang, Philipp; Winalski, Carl S. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Tanaka, Toshikazu [Tsukuba Memorial Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tsukuba (Japan); Ueno, Teruko [University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology, Tsukuba (Japan); Shindo, Masashi [Tsukuba University Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    To evaluate high-resolution MRI of the proximal zone of the lunotriquetral ligament (LTL) using a microscopy surface coil with a 1.5 T scanner. The proximal zone of the LTL was reviewed in 90 subjects (23 asymptomatic normal volunteers and 67 patients with suspicion of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury) with high-resolution MRI using a 47-mm microscopy surface coil. High-resolution MR images were obtained with gradient recalled echo (GRE) T2*-weighted sequence and short tau inversion recovery imaging, with a 1- to 1.5-mm slice thickness, a 50-mm field of view, an imaging matrix of 140-224 x 512 using zero fill interpolation, and 3-4 excitations. As a qualitative analysis, the LTL was classified in shape and signal intensity. The triangle-shaped low-signal-intensity LTL was identified in 77 of 90 subjects (85.6%) on GRE images. The triangle was classified as regular (41.1%), broad-based (20.0%), narrow-based (6.7%), or asymmetrical (17.8%). The bar-shaped ligament was seen in one patient, and unclassified ligaments were seen in 12 patients. All volunteers showed triangle-shaped LTL. The MR signal intensity of the proximal zone in the LTL was characterized as homogeneously low intensity (type 1; 33.8%). (orig.)

  17. Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in the cartilage and subchondral bone repair of dogs - Histological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Eleotério

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate nutraceuticals are commonly used in the management of degenerative articular disease in veterinary routine. However, there are controversies on the contribution of these substances to articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate-based veterinary nutraceutical on the repair of an induced osteochondral defect in a dog femoral condyle, by macroscopic, histological and histomorphometric analyses. The nutraceutical was orally administered the day following injury induction, every 24 hours (treated group, TG, n=24, compared with animals that did not receive the product (control group, CG, n=24. Six animals per group were anaesthetized for sample collection at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after surgery. At 15 days, defects were macroscopically filled with red-pinkish tissue. After 30 days, whitish color tissue was observed, both in TG and CG animals, with firmer consistency to touch at 60 and 90 postoperative days. Histological analysis demonstrated that, in both groups, there was initial blood clot formation, which was subsequently substituted by a fibrin net, with capillary proliferation from the adjacent bone marrow and infiltration of mesenchymal cells in clot periphery. As cellular differentiation developed, repair tissue presented a fibrocartilage aspect most of the time, and new subchondral bone formation occurred in the deepest area corresponding to the defect. Histomorphometry suggested that the nutraceutical did not favor the articular cartilage repair process. It was concluded that nutraceutical did not significantly influence chondrocytes proliferation or hyaline architecture restoration.

  18. Structural and Ultrastructural Characteristics of Bone-Tendon Junction of the Calcaneal Tendon of Adult and Elderly Wistar Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury, Diego Pulzatto; Dias, Fernando José; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Watanabe, Ii-sei

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are transition tissues that transfer the contractile forces generated by the muscles to the bones, allowing movement. The region where the tendon attaches to the bone is called bone-tendon junction or enthesis and may be classified as fibrous or fibrocartilaginous. This study aims to analyze the collagen fibers and the cells present in the bone-tendon junction using light microscopy and ultrastructural techniques as scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Forty male Wistar rats were used in the experiment, being 20 adult rats at 4 months-old and 20 elderly rats at 20 months-old. The hind limbs of the rats were removed, dissected and prepared to light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The aging process showed changes in the collagen fibrils, with a predominance of type III fibers in the elderly group, in addition to a decrease in the amount of the fibrocartilage cells, fewer and shorter cytoplasmic processes and a decreased synthetic capacity due to degradation of the organelles involved in synthesis. PMID:27078690

  19. Ganglion cysts in the paediatric wrist: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Jennifer; Bartlett, Murray [Royal Children' s Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    The majority of published literature on ganglion cysts in children has been from a surgical perspective, with no dedicated radiologic study yet performed. Our aim was to assess the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of ganglion cysts in a series of paediatric MR wrist examinations. Ninety-seven consecutive paediatric MR wrist examinations were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of ganglion cysts. Only those studies with wrist ganglia were included. Cysts were assessed for location, size, internal characteristics and secondary effect(s). Forty-one ganglion cysts (2-32 mm in size) were seen in 35/97 (36%) patients (24 female, 11 male), mean age: 13 years 11 months (range: 6 years 3 months-18 years). The majority were palmar (63.4%) with the remainder dorsal. Of the cysts, 43.9% were related to a wrist ligament(s), 36.6% to a joint and 17.1% to the triangular fibrocartilage complex. Of the patients, 91.4% had wrist symptoms: pain (n=29, 82.9%), swelling (n=7, 20%) and/or palpable mass (n=4, 11.4%); 71.4% patients had significant additional wrist abnormalities. Ganglion cysts were frequently found in children referred for wrist MRI. (orig.)

  20. An overview of MR arthrography with emphasis on the current technique and applicational hints and tips

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    Sahin, Guelden [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Samanpazari, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: gsahin@medicine.ankara.edu.tr; Demirtas, Mehmet [Department of Hand Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Samanpazari, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been investigated in every major peripheral joint of the body, and has been proven to be effective in determining the integrity of intraarticular ligamentous and fibrocartilaginous structures and in the detection or assessment of osteochondral lesions and loose bodies in selected cases. Several methods could be used to create arthrogram effect during MR imaging, however, direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent is the most commonly used technique and is the most reliable of all. MR arthrography is useful for demonstrating labrocapsular-ligamentous abnormalities and distinguishing partial thickness rotator cuff tears from focal full thickness tears in the shoulder, identifying or excluding recurrent tears following meniscal operations in the knee, demonstrating perforations of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and ligaments in the wrist, showing labral tears in the hip, diagnosing ligament tears in the ankle and identifying osteochondral lesions or loose bodies in any of the aforementioned joints. In this article, an overview of techniques of MR arthrography is provided with emphasis on direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent. The current applications of the technique in major peripheral joints are reviewed, with emphasis given to the shoulder joint where the role of this technique has become well established.

  1. Structural and Ultrastructural Characteristics of Bone-Tendon Junction of the Calcaneal Tendon of Adult and Elderly Wistar Rats.

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    Diego Pulzatto Cury

    Full Text Available Tendons are transition tissues that transfer the contractile forces generated by the muscles to the bones, allowing movement. The region where the tendon attaches to the bone is called bone-tendon junction or enthesis and may be classified as fibrous or fibrocartilaginous. This study aims to analyze the collagen fibers and the cells present in the bone-tendon junction using light microscopy and ultrastructural techniques as scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Forty male Wistar rats were used in the experiment, being 20 adult rats at 4 months-old and 20 elderly rats at 20 months-old. The hind limbs of the rats were removed, dissected and prepared to light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The aging process showed changes in the collagen fibrils, with a predominance of type III fibers in the elderly group, in addition to a decrease in the amount of the fibrocartilage cells, fewer and shorter cytoplasmic processes and a decreased synthetic capacity due to degradation of the organelles involved in synthesis.

  2. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Contribute to Chondrogenesis in Coculture with Chondrocytes

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    Xingfu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs have been shown as the most potential stem cell source for articular cartilage repair. In this study, we aimed to develop a method for long-term coculture of human articular chondrocytes (hACs and hUCB-MSCs at low density in vitro to determine if the low density of hACs could enhance the hUCB-MSC chondrogenic differentiation as well as to determine the optimal ratio of the two cell types. Also, we compared the difference between direct coculture and indirect coculture at low density. Monolayer cultures of hUCB-MSCs and hACs were investigated at different ratios, at direct cell-cell contact groups for 21 days. Compared to direct coculture, hUCB-MSCs and hACs indirect contact culture significantly increased type II collagen (COL2 and decreased type I collagen (COL1 protein expression levels. SRY-box 9 (SOX9 mRNA levels and protein expression were highest in indirect coculture. Overall, these results indicate that low density direct coculture induces fibrocartilage. However, indirect coculture in conditioned chondrocyte cell culture medium can increase expression of chondrogenic markers and induce hUCB-MSCs differentiation into mature chondrocytes. This work demonstrates that it is possible to promote chondrogenesis of hUCB-MSCs in combination with hACs, further supporting the concept of novel coculture strategies for tissue engineering.

  3. Spectrocolorimetric evaluation of repaired articular cartilage after a microfracture

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    Dohi Yoshihiro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical practice, surgeons differentiate color changes in repaired cartilage compared with surrounding intact cartilage, but cannot quantify these color changes. Objective assessments are required. A spectrocolorimeter was used to evaluate whether intact and repaired cartilage can be quantified. Findings We investigated the use of a spectrocolorimeter and the application of two color models (L* a* b* colorimetric system and spectral reflectance distribution to describe and quantify articular cartilage. In this study, we measured the colors of intact and repaired cartilage after a microfracture. Histologically, the repaired cartilage was a mixture of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. In the L* a* b* colorimetric system, the L* and a* values recovered to close to the values of intact cartilage, whereas the b* value decreased over time after the operation. Regarding the spectral reflectance distribution at 12 weeks after the operation, the repaired cartilage had a higher spectral reflectance ratio than intact cartilage between wavelengths of 400 to 470 nm. Conclusion This study reports the first results regarding the relationship between spectrocolorimetric evaluation and the histological findings of repair cartilage after a microfracture. Our findings demonstrate the ability of spectrocolorimetric measurement to judge the repair cartilage after treatment on the basis of objective data such as the L*, a* and b* values and the SRP as a coincidence index of the spectral reflectance curve.

  4. Pulsed CO2 laser for intra-articular cartilage vaporization and subchondral bone perforation in horses

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    Nixon, Alan J.; Roth, Jerry E.; Krook, Lennart P.

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed carbon dioxide laser was used to vaporize articular cartilage in four horses, and perforate the cartilage and subchondral bone in four horses. Both intercarpal joints were examined arthroscopically and either a 1 cm cartilage crater or a series of holes was created in the third carpal bone of one joint. The contralateral carpus served as a control. The horses were evaluated clinically for 8 weeks, euthanatized and the joints examined radiographically, grossly, and histologically. Pulsed carbon dioxide laser vaporized cartilage readily but penetrated bone poorly. Cartilage vaporization resulted in no greater swelling, heat, pain on flexion, lameness, or synovial fluid reaction than the sham procedure. Laser drilling resulted in a shallow, charred hole with a tenacious carbon residue, and in combination with the thermal damage to deeper bone, resulted in increased swelling, mild lameness and a low-grade, but persistent synovitis. Cartilage removal by laser vaporization resulted in rapid regrowth with fibrous and fibrovascular tissue and occasional regions of fibrocartilage at week 8. The subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and draining lymph nodes appeared essentially unaffected by the laser cartilage vaporization procedure. Conversely, carbon dioxide laser drilling of subchondral bone resulted in poor penetration, extensive areas of thermal necrosis of bone, and significant secondary damage to the apposing articular surface of the radial carpal bone. The carbon dioxide laser is a useful intraarticular instrument for removal of cartilage and has potential application in inaccessible regions of diarthrodial joints. It does not penetrate bone sufficiently to have application in subchondral drilling.

  5. Stem Cells and Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

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    Umile Giuseppe Longo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage defects represent a common problem in orthopaedic practice. Predisposing factors include traumas, inflammatory conditions, and biomechanics alterations. Conservative management of cartilage defects often fails, and patients with this lesions may need surgical intervention. Several treatment strategies have been proposed, although only surgery has been proved to be predictably effective. Usually, in focal cartilage defects without a stable fibrocartilaginous repair tissue formed, surgeons try to promote a natural fibrocartilaginous response by using marrow stimulating techniques, such as microfracture, abrasion arthroplasty, and Pridie drilling, with the aim of reducing swelling and pain and improving joint function of the patients. These procedures have demonstrated to be clinically useful and are usually considered as first-line treatment for focal cartilage defects. However, fibrocartilage presents inferior mechanical and biochemical properties compared to normal hyaline articular cartilage, characterized by poor organization, significant amounts of collagen type I, and an increased susceptibility to injury, which ultimately leads to premature osteoarthritis (OA. Therefore, the aim of future therapeutic strategies for articular cartilage regeneration is to obtain a hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue by transplantation of tissues or cells. Further studies are required to clarify the role of gene therapy and mesenchimal stem cells for management of cartilage lesions.

  6. A comparison of MRI and wrist arthrography in the diagnosis of TFC injury

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    Shionoya, Kaori; Nakamura, Ryogo; Imaeda, Toshihiko [Nagoya Univ., Aichi (Japan). Branch Hospital; Tsunoda, Kenji; Makino, Naoki

    1995-08-01

    The present study compared the diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and wrist arthrography in triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) injuries. The subjects were 102 wrists with arthroscopically confirmed presence or absence of TFC perforation. TFC perforation was present in 35 and 47 wrists and absent in the other 67 and 55 wrists on arthrography and MRI, respectively. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, arthrography for the detection of TFC perforation had a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 100%. All 6 false negative cases on arthrography had scarring adhesions of the TFC in the wrist. On the other hand, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 73% and 72%, respectively. An accuracy was 94% for arthrography and 73% for MRI. It was difficult to detect qualitative TFC injury and the presence or absence of TFC perforation on MRI. Arthrography is thus superior to MRI in both sensitivity and specificity. The complementary use of arthrography and MRI is considered to increase the diagnostic accuracy. (S.Y.).

  7. Periodontal Ligament Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Increase Proliferation and Glycosaminoglycans Formation of Temporomandibular Joint Derived Fibrochondrocytes

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    Jianli Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorders are common disease in maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this study is to regenerate fibrocartilage with a mixture of TMJ fibrochondrocytes and periodontal ligament derived mesenchymal stem cells (PD-MSCs. Materials and Methods. Fibrochondrocytes and PD-MSC were cocultured (ratio 1 : 1 for 3 weeks. Histology and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs assay were performed to examine the deposition of GAG. Green florescent protein (GFP was used to track PD-MSC. Conditioned medium of PD-MSCs was collected to study the soluble factors. Gene expression of fibrochondrocytes cultured in conditioned medium was tested by quantitative PCR (qPCR. Results. Increased proliferation of TMJ-CH was observed in coculture pellets when compared to monoculture. Enhanced GAG production in cocultures was shown by histology and GAG quantification. Tracing of GFP revealed the fact that PD-MSC disappears after coculture with TMJ-CH for 3 weeks. In addition, conditioned medium of PD-MSC was also shown to increase the proliferation and GAG deposition of TMJ-CH. Meanwhile, results of qPCR demonstrated that conditioned medium enhanced the expression levels of matrix-related genes in TMJ-CH. Conclusions. Results from this study support the mechanism of MSC-chondrocyte interaction, in which MSCs act as secretor of soluble factors that stimulate proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition of chondrocytes.

  8. Expression of lumican related to CD34 and VEGF in the articular disc of the human temporomandibular joint.

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    N. Kiga

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Lumican belongs to the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan (SLRP gene family and has been reported to exist in the cornea, intervertebral disc and tendon. Lumican plays a significant role in the assembly and regulation of collagen fibres. The human temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc is made up of fibrocartilage with an extracellular matrix (ECM composed of collagen and proteoglycans. The existence and behaviour of lumican have not been studied in the human TMJ disc. Therefore, we used immunohistochemical methods to detect lumican, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and histochemical staining with toluidine blue in 13 human TMJ specimens (10 surgically removed and 3 obtained from autopsy. In both normal and deformed discs we observed staining with toluidine blue. We found that the area of metachromasia inside the deformed disc was uneven and expression of lumican was strong in the areas negative for metachromasia. Staining of VEGF and CD34 inside the deformed disc was seen. We confirmed the expression of lumican in the human TMJ disc and showed that a large number of fibroblastlike cells existed in the area of strong lumican expression. These new findings about the behaviour of lumican suggest that it may play a key role in the generation of a new collagen network by fibroblast-like cells.

  9. BMPRIA mediated signaling is essential for temporomandibular joint development in mice.

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    Shuping Gu

    Full Text Available The central importance of BMP signaling in the development and homeostasis of synovial joint of appendicular skeleton has been well documented, but its role in the development of temporomandibular joint (TMJ, also classified as a synovial joint, remains completely unknown. In this study, we investigated the function of BMPRIA mediated signaling in TMJ development in mice by transgenic loss-of- and gain-of-function approaches. We found that BMPRIA is expressed in the cranial neural crest (CNC-derived developing condyle and glenoid fossa, major components of TMJ, as well as the interzone mesenchymal cells. Wnt1-Cre mediated tissue specific inactivation of BmprIa in CNC lineage led to defective TMJ development, including failure of articular disc separation from a hypoplastic condyle, persistence of interzone cells, and failed formation of a functional fibrocartilage layer on the articular surface of the glenoid fossa and condyle, which could be at least partially attributed to the down-regulation of Ihh in the developing condyle and inhibition of apoptosis in the interzone. On the other hand, augmented BMPRIA signaling by Wnt1-Cre driven expression of a constitutively active form of BmprIa (caBmprIa inhibited osteogenesis of the glenoid fossa and converted the condylar primordium from secondary cartilage to primary cartilage associated with ectopic activation of Smad-dependent pathway but inhibition of JNK pathway, leading to TMJ agenesis. Our results present unambiguous evidence for an essential role of finely tuned BMPRIA mediated signaling in TMJ development.

  10. Injuries of the scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments as well as the TFCC in intra-articular distal radius fractures. Prevalence assessed with MDCT arthrography

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    Klempka, A.; Wagner, M.; Fodor, S.; Schmitt, R. [Cardiovascular Center Bad Neustadt an der Saale, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Prommersberger, K.J. [Clinic for Hand Surgery, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Uder, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the prevalence of injuries of the scapholunate and lunotriquetral interosseous ligaments (SLIL, LTIL) as well as the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) in intra-articular distal radius fractures (iaDRF). Two hundred and thirty-three patients with acute iaDRF underwent MDCT arthrography. The SLIL and LTIL were described as normal, partially or completely ruptured. Major injuries of the SLIL were defined as completely ruptured dorsal segments, those of the LTIL as completely ruptured palmar segments. The TFCC was judged as normal or injured. Interobserver variability was calculated. Injury findings were correlated with the types of iaDRF (AO classification). In 159 patients (68.2 %), no SLIL injuries were seen. Minor SLIL injuries were detected in 54 patients (23.2 %), major injuries in 20 patients (8.6 %). No correlation was found between the presence of SLIL lesions and the types of iaDRF. Minor LTIL injuries were seen in 23 patients (9.9 %), major injuries in only 5 patients (2.2 %). The TFCC was altered in 141 patients (60.5 %). Interobserver variability was high for MDCT arthrography in assessing SLIL and TFC lesions, and fair for LTIL lesions. In iaDRF, prevalence of major injuries of the most relevant SLIL is about 9 % as evaluated with CT arthrography. (orig.)

  11. Articular Cartilage Repair Using Marrow Stimulation Augmented with a Viable Chondral Allograft: 9-Month Postoperative Histological Evaluation

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    James K. Hoffman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marrow stimulation is frequently employed to treat focal chondral defects of the knee. However, marrow stimulation typically results in fibrocartilage repair tissue rather than healthy hyaline cartilage, which, over time, predisposes the repair to failure. Recently, a cryopreserved viable chondral allograft was developed to augment marrow stimulation. The chondral allograft is comprised of native viable chondrocytes, chondrogenic growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins within the superficial, transitional, and radial zones of hyaline cartilage. Therefore, host mesenchymal stem cells that infiltrate the graft from the underlying bone marrow following marrow stimulation are provided with the optimal microenvironment to undergo chondrogenesis. The present report describes treatment of a trochlear defect with marrow stimulation augmented with this novel chondral allograft, along with nine month postoperative histological results. At nine months, the patient demonstrated complete resolution of pain and improvement in function, and the repair tissue consisted of 85% hyaline cartilage. For comparison, a biopsy obtained from a patient 8.2 months after treatment with marrow stimulation alone contained only 5% hyaline cartilage. These outcomes suggest that augmenting marrow stimulation with the viable chondral allograft can eliminate pain and improve outcomes, compared with marrow stimulation alone.

  12. Distal radioulnar joint injuries

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    Binu P Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint , forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments.The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis.

  13. Analysis of human knee osteoarthritic cartilage using polarization sensitive second harmonic generation microscopy

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    Kumar, Rajesh; Grønhaug, Kirsten M.; Romijn, Elisabeth I.; Drogset, Jon O.; Lilledahl, Magnus B.

    2014-05-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most prevalent joint diseases in the world. Although the cause of osteoarthritis is not exactly clear, the disease results in a degradation of the quality of the articular cartilage including collagen and other extracellular matrix components. We have investigated alterations in the structure of collagen fibers in the cartilage tissue of the human knee using mulitphoton microscopy. Due to inherent high nonlinear susceptibility, ordered collagen fibers present in the cartilage tissue matrix produces strong second harmonic generation (SHG) signals. Significant morphological differences are found in different Osteoarthritic grades of cartilage by SHG microscopy. Based on the polarization analysis of the SHG signal, we find that a few locations of hyaline cartilage (mainly type II collagen) is being replaced by fibrocartilage (mainly type I cartilage), in agreement with earlier literature. To locate the different types and quantify the alteration in the structure of collagen fiber, we employ polarization-SHG microscopic analysis, also referred to as _-tensor imaging. The image analysis of p-SHG image obtained by excitation polarization measurements would represent different tissue constituents with different numerical values at pixel level resolution.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Normal Stifle Joint in Buffaloes (Bos Bubalis: An Anatomic Study

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    Moustafa Samy Sherif

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to describe the normal anatomy of the stifle joint in buffaloes (Bos bubalis on magnetic resonance images and related anatomical sectional slices to facilitate the interpretation of all these images, as well as to understand the basis for diseases diagnosis. The hind limbs of ten healthy adult buffaloes (Twenty stifle joints were used. After slaughtering, MR images were made in sagittal, transverse, and dorsal planes. The limbs then were frozen at -20° then correspondingly sectioned using an electric band saw. Clinically relevant anatomic structures were identified and labeled at each level in the corresponding images (MR and anatomic slices. MRI images were used to identify the bony and soft tissue structures of the stifle joint. The articular cartilage appeared with hyperintense signal and separated from the subcondral bone by gray line (moderate signal intensity. It is difficult to differentiate between the synovia, infrapatellar fat body and the articular cartilage because they appeared with hyperintense signal. The meniscial, femoropatellar and cruciate ligaments recognized as moderate signal intensity. However, the collateral and intermediate patellar ligaments, the common tendon of the Mm. extensor digitorum longus and peroneus tertius as well as the menisci and the medial patellar fibrocartilage appeared with hypointense signal. The knowledge of normal anatomy of the buffalo stifle joint would serve as initial reference to the evaluation of MR images in this species.

  15. Morphologic characterization of meniscal root ligaments in the human knee with magnetic resonance microscopy at 11.7 and 3 T

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    Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Biswas, Reni; DiCamillo, Paul; Statum, Sheronda; Tafur, Monica; Bydder, Graeme M. [University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    To determine the feasibility of using MR microscopy to characterize the root ligaments of the human knee at both ultra-high-field (11.7 T) and high-field (3 T) strengths. Seven fresh cadaveric knees were used for this study. Six specimens were imaged at 11.7 T and one specimen at 3 T using isotropic or near-isotropic voxels. Histologic correlation was performed on the posteromedial root ligament of one specimen. Meniscal root ligament shape, signal intensity, and ultrastructure were characterized. High-resolution, high-contrast volumetric images were generated from both MR systems. Meniscal root ligaments were predominantly oval in shape. Increased signal intensity was most evident at the posteromedial and posterolateral root ligaments. On the specimen that underwent histologic preparation, increased signal intensity corresponded to regions of enthesis fibrocartilage. Collagen fascicles were continuous between the menisci and root ligaments. Predominantly horizontal meniscal radial tie fibers continued into the root ligaments as vertical endoligaments. MR microscopy can be used to characterize and delineate the distinct ultrastructure of the root ligaments on both ultra-high-field- and high-field-strength MR systems. (orig.)

  16. Treatment of tophaceous pseudogout with custom-fitted temporomandibular joint: a two-staged approach

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    Robert Pellecchia, DDS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tophaceous pseudogout, a variant of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition, is a relatively rare juxta-articular disease. It is a metabolic condition, in which patients develop pseudo-tumoral calcifications associated with peri-articular structures secondary to calcium pyrophosphate deposition into joints with fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage. These lesions are reported in the knee, wrist, pubis, shoulder, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ and induce a histocytic foreign body giant cell reaction. We report a case of tophaceous pseudogout affecting the left TMJ with destruction of the condyle and glenoid and middle cranial fossa that was reconstructed with a TMJ Concepts (Ventura, CA custom-fitted prosthesis in a 2-staged surgical approach using a silicone spacer. The surgical management using a patient-specific TMJ is a viable option when the fossa or condylar component has been compromised due to breakdown of bone secondary to a pathologic process. Our case describes and identifies the lesion and its rare occurrence in the region of the temporomandibular region. The successful management of tophaceous pseudogout of the TMJ must include a thorough patient workup including the involvement of other joints as well as the modification of bone of the glenoid fossa and condylar relationship of the TMJ.

  17. Meniscus repair and regeneration: review on current methods and research potential

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    C Scotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscus regeneration is an unsolved clinical challenge. Despite the wide acceptance of the degenerative consequences of meniscectomy, no surgical procedure has succeeded to date in regenerating a functional and long-lasting meniscal fibrocartilage. Research proposed a number of experimental approaches encompassing all the typical strategies of regenerative medicine: cell-free scaffolds, gene therapy, intra-articular delivery of progenitor cells, biological glues for enhanced bonding of reparable tears, partial and total tissue engineered meniscus replacement. None of these approaches has been completely successful and can be considered suitable for all patients, as meniscal tears require specific and patient-related treatments depending on the size and type of lesion. Recent advances in cell biology, biomaterial science and bioengineering (e.g., bioreactors have now the potential to drive meniscus regeneration into a series of clinically relevant strategies. In this tutorial paper, the clinical need for meniscus regeneration strategies will be explained, and past and current experimental studies on meniscus regeneration will be reported.

  18. Diagnostic values of bone scintigram for painful disorders of the hand and the wrist

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    Ogura, Kazuhisa; Yamauchi, Yasuo; Kusunose, Koichi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Honjou, Yuji [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-02-01

    From April 1993 to April 1997, 43 patients underwent bone scintigraphic examination for various painful conditions in the hand and the wrist joint. Three hours after an intravenous injection of 740 MBq of TC-99m HMDP, wrist scintigram was obtained. Of 18 patients with ulnar wrist pain, 12 patients had positive scan. The accumulation pattern in the five cases of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome showed different patterns. Slight difference of the accumulation between the ulnar head and the ulnar styloid process was well differentiated. Each carpal bone could be well identified, but when two bones were overlapping as in the triquetrum and the pisiform, additional physical findings were helpful. Six patients showed negative scan. The two patients with positive triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) tear but with negative bone scan showed no bony involvement, whereas those with TFC tear and positive scan were the ones having some bony disorders such as ulnocarpal abutment syndrome. Of 25 patients with wrist pain other than ulnar pain, 14 patients had positive scan. The remaining 11 patients who had negative scan included three patients with occult ganglion, two with wrist sprain and six with various disorders. (K.H.)

  19. Quantification of collagen distributions in rat hyaline and fibro cartilages based on second harmonic generation imaging

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    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Liao, Chenxi; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Liu, Wenge; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a semitransparent tissue composed of proteoglycan and thicker type II collagen fibers, while fibro cartilage large bundles of type I collagen besides other territorial matrix and chondrocytes. It is reported that the meniscus (fibro cartilage) has a greater capacity to regenerate and close a wound compared to articular cartilage (hyaline cartilage). And fibro cartilage often replaces the type II collagen-rich hyaline following trauma, leading to scar tissue that is composed of rigid type I collagen. The visualization and quantification of the collagen fibrillar meshwork is important for understanding the role of fibril reorganization during the healing process and how different types of cartilage contribute to wound closure. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope was applied to image the articular and meniscus cartilage, and textural analysis were developed to quantify the collagen distribution. High-resolution images were achieved based on the SHG signal from collagen within fresh specimens, and detailed observations of tissue morphology and microstructural distribution were obtained without shrinkage or distortion. Textural analysis of SHG images was performed to confirm that collagen in fibrocartilage showed significantly coarser compared to collagen in hyaline cartilage (p < 0.01). Our results show that each type of cartilage has different structural features, which may significantly contribute to pathology when damaged. Our findings demonstrate that SHG microscopy holds potential as a clinically relevant diagnostic tool for imaging degenerative tissues or assessing wound repair following cartilage injury.

  20. Giant-Cell Tumor of the Distal Ulna Treated by Wide Resection and Ulnar Support Reconstruction: A Case Report

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    Akio Minami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant-cell tumor of bone occurred in the distal end of the ulna is extremely uncommon. A 23-year-old male had a giant-cell tumor occurred in the distal end of the ulna. After wide resection of the distal segment of the ulna including giant-cell tumor, ulnar components of the wrist joint were reconstructed with modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure using the iliac bone graft, preserving the triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar collateral ligament in order to maintain ulnar support of the wrist, and the proximal stump of the resected ulna was stabilized by tenodesis using the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. One year after operation, the patient's wrist was pain-free and had a full range of motion. Postoperative X-rays showed no abnormal findings including recurrence of the giant-cell tumor and ulnar translation of the entire carpus. The stability of the proximal stump of the distal ulna was also maintained.

  1. Wrist ligament injuries: value of post-arthrography computed tomography

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    Theumann, N.; Schnyder, P.; Meuli, R. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital, CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Favarger, N. [Clinique Longeraie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-02-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of post-arthrography high-resolution computed tomography in wrist ligament injuries.Design and patients: Thirty-six consecutive patients who had a history and clinical findings suggestive of ligamentous injuries of the wrist were prospectively studied. The findings of three-compartment arthrography and post-arthrography computed tomography (arthro-CT) were compared with those of arthroscopy. The evaluation concentrates on the detection and precise localization of ligament lesions in the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC), the scapholunate ligament (SLL) and the lunotriquetral ligament (LTL).Results: For TFC, SLL and LTL lesions, standard arthrography responded with a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 85% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively, while arthro-CT showed a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 100% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively. The precise localization of the lesions was possible only with arthro-CT.Conclusion: The sensitivity and specificity of standard arthrography and arthro-CT are similar, although the latter shows the site of tears or perforation with greater precision, while conventional arthrography demonstrates them indirectly. This precision is essential and may have clinical implications for the success of treatment procedures. (orig.)

  2. Radiological evaluation of the skeleton: traumatology of the distal forearm, wrist, and hand; Radiologische Skelettdiagnostik: Traumatologie des distalen Unterarmes, der Handgelenke und der Hand

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    Neumann, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Zentralinstitut fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Langer, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Zentralinstitut fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    1996-07-01

    Plain X-ray films including some special radiographic views are still the basis of the radiological evaluation of injuries of the distal forearm, the wrist, and the hand. Especially, in the diagnosis of fractures of the distal radius the exact positioning of the arm and hand is essential. For the description of fractures of the distal forearm the AO classification of fractures should be used, which is comprehensive and universally applicable. Conventional tomography and computed tomography (CT) of the radio-ulnar joint and the wrist are used in patients with persisting complaints or equivocal findings on plain radiographs, and difficult anatomical situations. Suspected ligamentous injuries of the wrist including tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) are evaluated by wrist arthrography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the latter requiring a highly skilled imaging and interpretation technique. MRI is the method of choice for the detection of osteonecrosis. Ultrasound examinations are of minor importance in the work up of wrist and hand injuries. (orig.) [Deutsch] Fuer die radiologische Beurteilung von Verletzungen des distalen Unterarmes, des Handgelenkes und der Hand steht die konventionelle Roentgenuntersuchung einschliesslich einiger Spezialeinstellungen nach wie vor im Vordergrund. Bei der Beschreibung insbesondere der distalen Radiusfrakturen sollten die historische Benennung oder aeltere Einteilungen zugunsten der allgemeingueltigen und umfassenderen AO-Klassifikation verlassen werden. Die Computertomographie und Magnetresonanztomographie kommen in der Frakturdiagnostik bei unklaren anatomischen Verhaeltnissen oder konventionell nicht zufriedenstellend erklaerbaren Beschwerden zur Anwendung. Vermutete ligamentaere Verletzungen der Handwurzel lassen sich arthrographisch oder magnetresonanztomographisch abklaeren. (orig.)

  3. Regulation of fibrochondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells in an integrated microfluidic platform embedded with biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds.

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    Weiliang Zhong

    Full Text Available In native fibrocartilage, mechanotransduction allows the cells to perceive the physical microenvironment not only through topographical cues from the extracellular matrix, but also through mechanical cues, such as interstitial flow. To create a microenvironment that simultaneously integrates nanotopography and flow stimulus, we developed a biomimetic microfluidic device embedded with aligned nanofibers to contain microchambers of different angles, which enabled the flow direction to form different angles with the fibers. Using this device, we investigated the effects of microfluidic and nanotopographical environment on the morphology and fibrochondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and the involvement of RhoA/ROCK pathway and Yes-associated protein (YAP/transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ. The results showed that the flow direction perpendicular to aligned nanofibers was conducive to fibrochondrogenesis of MSCs. In addition, ROCK inhibitor and knockdown of YAP/TAZ disrupted fibrochondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. In conclusion, our data suggest the crucial role of mechanotransduction in regulating fibrochondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, which may be mediated by RhoA/ROCK pathway and YAP/TAZ.

  4. Xenoimplantation of an Extracellular-Matrix-Derived, Biphasic, Cell-Scaffold Construct for Repairing a Large Femoral-Head High-Load-Bearing Osteochondral Defect in a Canine Model

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    Yang Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to develop an ECM-derived biphasic scaffold and to investigate its regeneration potential loaded with BM-MSCs in repair of large, high-load-bearing osteochondral defects of the canine femoral head. The scaffolds were fabricated using cartilage and bone ECM as a cartilage and bone layer, respectively. Osteochondral constructs were fabricated using induced BM-MSCs and the scaffold. Osteochondral defects (11 mm diameter × 10 mm depth were created on femoral heads of canine and treated with the constructs. The repaired tissue was evaluated for gross morphology, radiography, histological, biomechanics at 3 and 6 months after implantation. Radiography revealed that femoral heads slightly collapsed at 3 months and severely collapsed at 6 months. Histology revealed that some defects in femoral heads were repaired, but with fibrous tissue or fibrocartilage, and femoral heads with different degrees of collapse. The bone volume fraction was lower for subchondral bone than normal femoral bone at 3 and 6 months. Rigidity was lower in repaired subchondral bone than normal femoral bone at 6 months. The ECM-derived, biphasic scaffold combined with induced BM-MSCs did not successfully repair large, high-load-bearing osteochondral defects of the canine femoral head. However, the experience can help improve the technique of scaffold fabrication and vascularization.

  5. Treatment of articular cartilage lesions of the knee by microfracture or autologous chondrocyte implantation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oussedik, Sam; Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Parker, David

    2015-04-01

    We performed a systematic review of the treatment of articular cartilage lesions of the knee by microfracture or autologous chondrocyte implantation to determine the differences in patient outcomes after these procedures. We searched PubMed/Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library databases in the period from January 10 through January 20, 2013, and included 34 articles in our qualitative analysis. All studies showed improvement in outcome scores in comparison with baseline values, regardless of the treatment modality. The heterogeneity of the results presented in the studies precluded a meta-analysis. Microfracture appears to be effective in smaller lesions and is usually associated with a greater proportion of fibrocartilage production, which may have an effect on durability and eventual failure. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is an effective treatment that may result in a greater proportion of hyaline-like tissue at the repair site, which may in turn have a beneficial effect on durability and failure; it appears to be effective in larger lesions. Autologous chondrocyte implantation with periosteum has been shown to be associated with symptomatic cartilage hypertrophy more frequently than autologous chondrocyte implantation with collagen membrane. Matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation is technically less challenging than the other techniques available, and in lesions greater than 4 cm(2), it has been shown to be more effective than microfracture. Level IV, systematic review of Level I-IV studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ectopic mineralization of cartilage and collagen-rich tendons and ligaments in Enpp1asj-2J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jieyu; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Rowe, David W; Siu, Sarah Y; Sundberg, John P; Uitto, Jouni; Li, Qiaoli

    2016-03-15

    Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ENPP1 gene, manifests with extensive mineralization of the cardiovascular system. A spontaneous asj-2J mutant mouse has been characterized as a model for GACI. Previous studies focused on phenotypic characterization of skin and vascular tissues. This study further examined the ectopic mineralization phenotype of cartilage, collagen-rich tendons and ligaments in this mouse model. The mice were placed on either control diet or the "acceleration diet" for up to 12 weeks of age. Soft connective tissues, such as ear (elastic cartilage) and trachea (hyaline cartilage), were processed for standard histology. Assessment of ectopic mineralization in articular cartilage and fibrocartilage as well as tendons and ligaments which are attached to long bones were performed using a novel cryo-histological method without decalcification. These analyses demonstrated ectopic mineralization in cartilages as well as tendons and ligaments in the homozygous asj-2J mice at 12 weeks of age, with the presence of immature osteophytes displaying alkaline phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activities as early as at 6 weeks of age. Alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly increased in asj-2J mouse serum as compared to wild type mice, indicating increased bone formation rate in these mice. Together, these data highlight the key role of ENPP1 in regulating calcification of both soft and skeletal tissues.

  7. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lui PPY

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis" which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be paid to augment tendon to bone insertion (TBI healing. Apart from surgical fixation, biological and biophysical interventions have been studied aiming at regeneration of TBI healing complex, especially the regeneration of interpositioned fibrocartilage and new bone at the healing junction. This paper described the biology and the factors influencing TBI healing using patella-patellar tendon (PPT healing and tendon graft to bone tunnel healing in ACL reconstruction as examples. Recent development in the improvement of TBI healing and directions for future studies were also reviewed and discussed.

  8. Distraction arthroplasty with arthroscopic microfracture in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis of the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Adachi, Nobuo; Kato, Tomohiro; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    We treated a 39-year-old female who had experienced destruction of her ankle joint owing to rheumatoid arthritis. This relatively young patient wished to avoid ankle fusion and joint replacement. Therefore, distraction arthroplasty with arthroscopic microfracture was performed to improve her symptoms and preserve motion. A microfracture procedure specifically for cartilage defects of the tibial plafond and talar dome was performed with the arthroscope, after which a hinged external fixator was applied to distract the ankle joint. The ankle joint space was enlarged by the external device and joint movement allowed. After 3 months, removal of the external device and repeat arthroscopy revealed newly formed fibrocartilage on the surfaces of both the tibia and the talus. At 2 years after the surgery, a radiograph showed that the joint space enlargement of the ankle had been maintained. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score improved from 37 points preoperatively to 82 points at 2 years postoperatively. Our findings suggest that good clinical results can be achieved with distraction arthroplasty and arthroscopic microfracture in a relatively young patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacroiliitis in patients with spondyloarthritis. Correlation with anatomy and histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, K.G.A.; Bollow, M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) has become established as a valuable modality for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis in patients with inconclusive radiographic findings. Positive MRI findings have the same significance as a positive test for HLA-B27. Sacroiliitis is one of the key features of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) in the classification proposed by the Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) group. Early signs of sacroiliitis include enthesitis of articular fibrocartilage, capsulitis, and osteitis. In more advanced disease, structural (chronic) lesions will be visible, including periarticular fatty deposition, erosions, subchondral sclerosis, and transarticular bone buds and bridges. In this article we describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings and provide histologic biopsy specimens of the respective disease stages. The predominant histologic feature of early and active sacroiliitis is the destruction of cartilage and bone by proliferations consisting of fibroblasts and fibrocytes, T-cells, and macrophages. Advanced sacroiliitis is characterized by new bone formation with enclosed cartilaginous islands and residual cellular infiltrations, which may ultimately lead to complete ankylosis. Knowledge of the morphologic appearance of the sacroiliac joints and their abnormal microscopic and gross anatomy is helpful in correctly interpreting MR findings. (orig.)

  10. Physiologically Distributed Loading Patterns Drive the Formation of Zonally Organized Collagen Structures in Tissue-Engineered Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetzer, Jennifer L; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2016-07-01

    The meniscus is a dense fibrocartilage tissue that withstands the complex loads of the knee via a unique organization of collagen fibers. Attempts to condition engineered menisci with compression or tensile loading alone have failed to reproduce complex structure on the microscale or anatomic scale. Here we show that axial loading of anatomically shaped tissue-engineered meniscus constructs produced spatial distributions of local strain similar to those seen in the meniscus when the knee is loaded at full extension. Such loading drove formation of tissue with large organized collagen fibers, levels of mechanical anisotropy, and compressive moduli that match native tissue. Loading accelerated the development of native-sized and aligned circumferential and radial collagen fibers. These loading patterns contained both tensile and compressive components that enhanced the major biochemical and functional properties of the meniscus, with loading significantly improved glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation 200-250%, collagen accumulation 40-55%, equilibrium modulus 1000-1800%, and tensile moduli 500-1200% (radial and circumferential). Furthermore, this study demonstrates local changes in mechanical environment drive heterogeneous tissue development and organization within individual constructs, highlighting the importance of recapitulating native loading environments. Loaded menisci developed cartilage-like tissue with rounded cells, a dense collagen matrix, and increased GAG accumulation in the more compressively loaded horns, and fibrous collagen-rich tissue in the more tensile loaded outer 2/3, similar to native menisci. Loaded constructs reached a level of organization not seen in any previous engineered menisci and demonstrate great promise as meniscal replacements.

  11. Mechanical Loading Improves Tendon-Bone Healing in a Rabbit Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Model by Promoting Proliferation and Matrix Formation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Tendon Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanglong Song

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study investigated the effect of mechanical stress on tendon-bone healing in a rabbit anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction model as well as cell proliferation and matrix formation in co-culture of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs and tendon cells (TCs. Methods: The effect of continuous passive motion (CPM therapy on tendon-bone healing in a rabbit ACL reconstruction model was evaluated by histological analysis, biomechanical testing and gene expressions at the tendon-bone interface. Furthermore, the effect of mechanical stretch on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis in BMSC/TC co-culture was also examined. Results: Postoperative CPM therapy significantly enhanced tendon-bone healing, as evidenced by increased amount of fibrocartilage, elevated ultimate load to failure levels, and up-regulated gene expressions of Collagen I, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, Tenascin C and tenomodulin at the tendon-bone junction. In addition, BMSC/TC co-culture treated with mechanical stretch showed a higher rate of cell proliferation and enhanced expressions of Collagen I, Collagen III, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, Tenascin C and tenomodulin than that of controls. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that proliferation and differentiation of local precursor cells could be enhanced by mechanical stimulation, which results in enhanced regenerative potential of BMSCs and TCs in tendon-bone healing.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacroiliitis in patients with spondyloarthritis: correlation with anatomy and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, K-G A; Bollow, M

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) has become established as a valuable modality for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis in patients with inconclusive radiographic findings. Positive MRI findings have the same significance as a positive test for HLA-B27. Sacroiliitis is one of the key features of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) in the classification proposed by the Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) group. Early signs of sacroiliitis include enthesitis of articular fibrocartilage, capsulitis, and osteitis. In more advanced disease, structural (chronic) lesions will be visible, including periarticular fatty deposition, erosions, subchondral sclerosis, and transarticular bone buds and bridges. In this article we describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings and provide histologic biopsy specimens of the respective disease stages. The predominant histologic feature of early and active sacroiliitis is the destruction of cartilage and bone by proliferations consisting of fibroblasts and fibrocytes, T-cells, and macrophages. Advanced sacroiliitis is characterized by new bone formation with enclosed cartilaginous islands and residual cellular infiltrations, which may ultimately lead to complete ankylosis. Knowledge of the morphologic appearance of the sacroiliac joints and their abnormal microscopic and gross anatomy is helpful in correctly interpreting MR findings. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. A road map to the internal carotid artery in expanded endoscopic endonasal approaches to the ventral cranial base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Mohamed A; Prevedello, Daniel M; Carrau, Ricardo; Kerr, Edward E; Naudy, Cristian; Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; Corsten, Martin; Kassam, Amin

    2014-09-01

    Injuring the internal carotid artery (ICA) is a feared complication of endoscopic endonasal approaches. To introduce a comprehensive ICA classification scheme pertinent to safe endoscopic endonasal cranial base surgery. Anatomic dissections were performed in 33 cadaveric specimens (bilateral). Anatomic correlations were analyzed. Based on anatomic correlations, the ICA may be described as 6 distinct segments: (1) parapharyngeal (common carotid bifurcation to ICA foramen); (2) petrous (carotid canal to posterolateral aspect of foramen lacerum); (3) paraclival (posterolateral foramen lacerum to the superomedial aspect of the petrous apex); (4) parasellar (superomedial petrous apex to the proximal dural ring); (5) paraclinoid (from the proximal to the distal dural rings); and (6) intradural (distal ring to ICA bifurcation). Corresponding surgical landmarks included the Eustachian tube, the fossa of Rosenmüller, and levator veli palatini for the parapharyngeal segment; the vidian canal and V3 for the petrous segment; the fibrocartilage of foramen lacerum, foramen rotundum, maxillary strut, lingular process of the sphenoid bone, and paraclival protuberance for the paraclival segment; the sellar floor and petrous apex for the parasellar segment; and the medial and lateral opticocarotid and lateral tubercular recesses, as well as the distal osseous arch of the carotid sulcus for the paraclinoid segment. The proposed endoscopic classification outlines key anatomic reference points independent of the vessel's geometry or the sinonasal pneumatization, thus serving as (1) a practical guide to navigate the ventral cranial base while avoiding injury to the ICA and (2) further foundation for a modular access system.

  14. Cauliflower ear – a minimally invasive treatment method in a wrestling athlete: a case report

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    Haik J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Josef Haik,1–4 Or Givol,2 Rachel Kornhaber,1,5 Michelle Cleary,6 Hagit Ofir,1,2 Moti Harats1–3 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan, 2Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; 3Burn Injury Research Node, Institute for Health Research University of Notre Dame Fremantle, Fremantle WA, Australia; 4Talpiot Leadership Program, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan, Israel; 5Faculty of Health, 6School of Health Sciences, College of Health and Medicine, University of Tasmania, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Acute auricular hematoma can be caused by direct blunt trauma or other injury to the external ear. It is typically seen in those who practice full contact sports such as boxing, wrestling, and rugby. “Cauliflower ear” deformity, fibrocartilage formation during scarring, is a common complication of auricular hematomas. Therefore, acute drainage of the hematoma and postprocedural techniques for preventing recurrence are necessary for preventing the deformity. There are many techniques although no superior method of treatment has been found. In this case report, we describe a novel method using needle aspiration followed by the application of a magnet and an adapted disc to the affected area of the auricular. This minimally invasive, simple, and accessible method could potentially facilitate the treatment of cauliflower ear among full contact sports athletes. Keywords: cauliflower ear, hematoma, ear deformity, athletic injuries, wrestling, case report

  15. rhPDGF-BB promotes early healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, David; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Ying, Liang; Ehteshami, John R; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Rodeo, Scott A

    2015-05-01

    Tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair occurs by fibrovascular scar tissue formation, which is weaker than a normal tendon-bone insertion site. Growth factors play a role in tissue formation and have the potential to augment soft tissue healing in the perioperative period. Our study aim was to determine if rhPDGF-BB delivery on a collagen scaffold can improve tendon-to-bone healing after supraspinatus tendon repair compared with no growth factor in rats as measured by (1) gross observations; (2) histologic analysis; and (3) biomechanical testing. Ninety-five male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent acute repair of the supraspinatus tendon. Rats were randomized into one of five groups: control (ie, repair only), scaffold only, and three different platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) doses on the collagen scaffold. Animals were euthanized 5 days after surgery to assess cellular proliferation and angiogenesis. The remaining animals were analyzed at 4 weeks to assess repair site integrity by gross visualization, fibrocartilage formation with safranin-O staining, and collagen fiber organization with picrosirius red staining, and to determine the biomechanical properties (ie, load-to-failure testing) of the supraspinatus tendon-bone construct. The repaired supraspinatus tendon was in continuity with the bone in all animals. At 5 days, rhPDGF-BB delivery on a scaffold demonstrated a dose-dependent response in cellular proliferation and angiogenesis compared with the control and scaffold groups. At 28 days, with the numbers available, rhPDGF-BB had no effect on increasing fibrocartilage formation or improving collagen fiber maturity at the tendon-bone insertion site compared with controls. The control group had higher tensile loads to failure and stiffness (35.5 ± 8.8 N and 20.3 ± 4.5 N/mm) than all the groups receiving the scaffold, including the PDGF groups (scaffold: 27 ± 6.4 N, p = 0.021 and 13 ± 5.7 N/mm, p = 0.01; 30 µg/mL PDGF: 26.5 ± 7.5 N, p = 0.014 and 13

  16. Lower limb entheseal morphology in the Neandertal Krapina population (Croatia, 130,000 BP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Valentina; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna

    2011-06-01

    Although the Neandertal locomotor system has been shown to differ from Homo sapiens, characteristics of Neandertal entheses, the skeletal attachments for muscles, tendons, ligaments and joint capsules, have never been specifically investigated. Here, we analyse lower limb entheses of the Krapina Neandertal bones (Croatia, 130,000 BP) with the aim of determining how they compare with modern humans, using a standard developed by our research group for describing modern human entheseal variability. The entheses examined are those of the gluteus maximus, iliopsoas and vastus medialis on the femur, the quadriceps tendon on the patella, and soleus on the tibia. For the entheses showing a different morphological pattern from H. sapiens, we discuss the possibility of recognising genetic versus environmental causes. Our results indicate that only the gluteus maximus enthesis (the gluteal tuberosity), falls out of the modern human range of variation. It displays morphological features that could imply histological differences from modern humans, in particular the presence of fibrocartilage. In both H. sapiens and the Krapina Neandertals, the morphological pattern of this enthesis is the same in adult and immature femurs. These results can be interpreted in light of genetic differences between the two hominins. The possibility of functional adaptations to higher levels of mechanical load during life in the Neandertals seems less likely. The particular morphology and large dimensions of the Krapina enthesis, and perhaps its fibrocartilaginous nature, could have been selected for in association with other pelvic and lower limb characteristics, even if genetic drift cannot be ruled out. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells

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    W Ando

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  18. Tissue-engineered cartilaginous constructs for the treatment of caprine cartilage defects, including distribution of laminin and type IV collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Lily; Hsu, Hu-Ping; Spector, Myron

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of (1) cartilage tissue-engineered constructs; and (2) the tissue filling cartilage defects in a goat model into which the constructs were implanted, particularly for the presence of the basement membrane molecules, laminin and type IV collagen. Basement membrane molecules are localized to the pericellular matrix in normal adult articular cartilage, but have not been examined in tissue-engineered constructs cultured in vitro or in tissue filling cartilage defects into which the constructs were implanted. Cartilaginous constructs were engineered in vitro using caprine chondrocyte-seeded type II collagen scaffolds. Autologous constructs were implanted into 4-mm-diameter defects created to the tidemark in the trochlear groove in the knee joints of skeletally mature goats. Eight weeks after implantation, the animals were sacrificed. Constructs underwent immunohistochemical and histomorphometric evaluation. Widespread staining for the two basement membrane molecules was observed throughout the extracellular matrix of in vitro and in vivo samples in a distribution unlike that previously reported for cartilage. At sacrifice, 70% of the defect site was filled with reparative tissue, which consisted largely of fibrous tissue and some fibrocartilage, with over 70% of the reparative tissue bonded to the adjacent host tissue. A novel finding of this study was the observation of laminin and type IV collagen in in vitro engineered cartilaginous constructs and in vivo cartilage repair samples from defects into which the constructs were implanted, as well as in normal caprine articular cartilage. Future work is needed to elucidate the role of basement membrane molecules during cartilage repair and regeneration.

  19. Distribution of Basement Membrane Molecules, Laminin and Collagen Type IV, in Normal and Degenerated Cartilage Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Toh, Wei Seong; Gomoll, Andreas H; Olsen, Bjørn Reino; Spector, Myron

    2014-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of 2 basement membrane (BM) molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in healthy and degenerative cartilage tissues. Normal and degenerated tissues were obtained from goats and humans, including articular knee cartilage, the intervertebral disc, and meniscus. Normal tissue was also obtained from patella-tibial enthesis in goats. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using anti-laminin and anti-collagen type IV antibodies. Human and goat skin were used as positive controls. The percentage of cells displaying the pericellular presence of the protein was graded semiquantitatively. When present, laminin and collagen type IV were exclusively found in the pericellular matrix, and in a discrete layer on the articulating surface of normal articular cartilage. In normal articular (hyaline) cartilage in the human and goat, the proteins were found co-localized pericellularly. In contrast, in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage, collagen type IV but not laminin was found in the pericellular region. Nonpathological fibrocartilaginous tissues from the goat, including the menisci and the enthesis, were also positive for both laminin and collagen type IV pericellularly. In degenerated fibrocartilage, including intervertebral disc, as in degenerated hyaline cartilage only collagen type IV was found pericellularly around chondrocytes but with less intense staining than in non-degenerated tissue. In calcified cartilage, some cells were positive for laminin but not type IV collagen. We report differences in expression of the BM molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in normal and degenerative cartilaginous tissues from adult humans and goats. In degenerative tissues laminin is depleted from the pericellular matrix before collagen type IV. The findings may inform future studies of the processes underlying cartilage degeneration and the functional roles of these 2 extracellular matrix proteins

  20. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Wataru; Fujie, Hiromichi; Moriguchi, Yu; Nansai, Ryosuke; Shimomura, Kazunori; Hart, David A; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2012-09-28

    The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  1. Optimization strategies on the structural modeling of gelatin/chitosan scaffolds to mimic human meniscus tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarem, Melika; Moztarzadeh, Fathollah; Mozafari, Masoud; Shastri, V. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Meniscus lesions are frequently occurring injuries with poor ability to heal. Typical treatment procedure includes removal of damaged regions, which can lead to sub-optimal knee biomechanics and early onset of osteoarthritis. Some of the drawbacks of current treatment approach present an opportunity for a tissue engineering solution. In this study, gelatin (G)/chitosan (Cs) scaffolds were synthesized via gel casting method and cross-linked with naturally derived cross-linker, genipin, through scaffold cross-linking method. Based on the characteristics of native meniscus tissue microstructure and function, three different layers were chosen to design the macroporous multilayered scaffolds. The multi-layered scaffolds were investigated for their ability to support human-derived meniscus cells by evaluating their morphology and proliferation using MTT assay at various time points. Based on structural, mechanical and cell compatibility considerations, laminated scaffolds composed of G60/Cs40, G80/Cs20 and G40/Cs60 samples, for the first, second and third layers, respectively, could be an appropriate combination for meniscus tissue engineering applications. - Graphical abstract: The wedge shaped multilayer/multiporous G/Cs meniscus scaffolds were mimicked by MR images of anatomical knee meniscus. The layers were chosen as G60/Cs40, G80/Cs20 and G40/Cs60, according to their characteristics similar to meniscus natural tissue, as the first, second and third layers, respectively. - Highlights: • Different gelatin/chitosan systems were chosen to engineer a multilayered scaffold. • The compressive modulus increased gradually by increasing the gelatin concentration. • Further addition of gelatin showed a meaningful decrease in the water uptake degree. • The layers supported cell growth and mimicked the meniscus fibrocartilage structure

  2. Mechanobiological Assessment of TMJ Disc Surfaces: Nanoindentation and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra M. Juran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Temporomandibular disc is a mechanically robust fibrocartilage tissue exhibiting highly elastic compressive, shear, and tensile moduli with structurally dense extracellular matrix that supports functional loading of the joint. The aim of this study was to illustrate structural complexities of the superior and inferior disc surfaces, to demonstrate the robust mechanical ability of the disc as a whole may be due to depth-dependent regional/layered variation, and also to provide characterization data imperative for future tissue engineering efforts focused on restoring function to the joint. Material and Methods: Nanoindentation was used to assess tissue zones in conjunction with detailed Transmission Electron Microscopy to define structural attributes that influence the temporomandibular disc function. Results: The disc architecture adjacent to the superior surface was shown to have three distinct regional segments within the interface layer: 1-a surface peripheral layer; 2-subsurface region; and 3-a layer of helical matrix bundles. The inferior surface displayed an interface layer (20 µm that showed limited cell populations with little depth-dependent structural variation, a stiffer elastic modulus and reduced energy dissipation compared to the superior surface. These data indicate that the primary function of the inferior surface is resistance to compression rather than load distribution during joint motion. Conclusions: These are the first works that demonstrate that the superior central surface of the he temporomandibular disc is structured in depth-dependent isometric layers, each of which provides different mechanical function supporting the bulk tissue’s properties. From a clinical perspective these data have potential to define regions susceptible to fatigue that may translate to diagnostic criteria to better define the stages of dysfunction.

  3. Biofabrication of soft tissue templates for engineering the bone-ligament interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ella; Liu, Yurong; Cunniffe, Grainne; Morrissey, David; Carroll, Simon; Mulhall, Kevin; Kelly, Daniel J

    2017-10-01

    Regenerating damaged tissue interfaces remains a significant clinical challenge, requiring recapitulation of the structure, composition, and function of the native enthesis. In the ligament-to-bone interface, this region transitions from ligament to fibrocartilage, to calcified cartilage and then to bone. This gradation in tissue types facilitates the transfer of load between soft and hard structures while minimizing stress concentrations at the interface. Previous attempts to engineer the ligament-bone interface have utilized various scaffold materials with an array of various cell types and/or biological cues. The primary goal of this study was to engineer a multiphased construct mimicking the ligament-bone interface by driving differentiation of a single population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), seeded within blended fibrin-alginate hydrogels, down an endochondral, fibrocartilaginous, or ligamentous pathway through spatial presentation of growth factors along the length of the construct within a custom-developed, dual-chamber culture system. MSCs within these engineered constructs demonstrated spatially distinct regions of differentiation, adopting either a cartilaginous or ligamentous phenotype depending on their local environment. Furthermore, there was also evidence of spatially defined progression toward an endochondral phenotype when chondrogenically primed MSCs within this construct were additionally exposed to hypertrophic cues. The study demonstrates the feasibility of engineering spatially complex soft tissues within a single MSC laden hydrogel through the defined presentation of biochemical cues. This novel approach represents a new strategy for engineering the ligament-bone interface. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2400-2411. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparison of conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the evaluation of wrist ligament tears: A preliminary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Shivani; Srivastava, Deep N; Sharma, Raju; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Kotwal, Prakash P; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To compare conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and intrinsic wrist ligament tears. Materials and Methods: T1-weighted, fat suppressed (FS) proton density plus T2-weighted (FS PD/T2), 3D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) sequences and direct MR arthrography were performed in 53 patients with wrist pain. Images were evaluated for the presence and location of TFCC, scapholunate ligament (SLL) and lunatotriquetral ligament (LTL) tears, and imaging findings were compared with operative findings in 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery (gold standard). Results: Sixteen patients underwent arthroscopy/open surgery: 12 TFCC tears were detected arthroscopically out of which 9 were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, 10 on MEDIC sequence, and all 12 were detected on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in the detection of TFCC tears were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. Out of the eight arthroscopically confirmed SLL tears, three tears were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, five on MEDIC sequence, and all eight were visualized on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting SLL tears were 37.5%, 62.5%, and 100%, respectively. One arthroscopically confirmed LTL tear was diagnosed on FS PD/T2 sequence, three on MEDIC sequence, and all five arthroscopically confirmed LTL tears were detected with MR arthrography. The sensitivities of PD, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting LTL tears were 20%, 40%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: MR arthrography is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament tears. PMID:25114389

  5. Fibril deformation under load of the rabbit Achilles tendon and medial collateral ligament femoral entheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevick, Johnathan L; Abusara, Ziad; Andrews, Stephen H; Xu, Minjia; Khurshid, Saad; Chatha, Jansher; Hart, David A; Shrive, Nigel G

    2018-04-10

    Microscopic visualization under load of the region connecting ligaments/tendons to bone, the enthesis, has been performed previously; however, specific investigation of individual fibril deformation may add insight to such studies. Detailed visualization of fibril deformation would inform on the mechanical strategies employed by this tissue in connecting two mechanically disparate materials. Clinically, an improved understanding of enthesis mechanics may help guide future restorative efforts for torn or injured ligaments/tendons, where the enthesis is often a point of weakness. In this study, a custom ligament/tendon enthesis loading device was designed and built, a unique method of sample preparation was devised, and second harmonic and two-photon fluorescence microscopy were used to capture the fibril-level load response of the rabbit Achilles tendon and medial collateral ligament femoral entheses. A focus was given to investigation of the mechanical problem of fibril embedment. Resultant images indicate a rapid (occurring over approximately 60 μm) change in fibril orientation at the interface of ligament/tendon and calcified fibrocartilage early in the loading regime, before becoming relatively constant. Such a change in fibril angle helps confirm the materially graded region demonstrated by others, while, in this case, providing additional insight into fibril bending. We speculate that the scale of the mechanical problem (i.e., fibril diameters being on the order of 250 nm) allows fibrils to bend over the small (relative to the imaging field of view, but large relative to fibril diameter) distances observed; thus, potentially lessening required embedment lengths. Nevertheless, this behavior merits further investigation to be confirmed. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Role of MRI in the diagnosis and management of patients with clinical scaphoid fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibrewal, Saket; Jayakumar, Prakash; Vaidya, Sujit; Ang, Swee Chai

    2012-01-01

    The American College of Radiologists (ACR) recognises the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the investigation of choice in patients with a clinically suspected scaphoid fracture but normal plain radiographs. The Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in the UK produces no similar guidelines, as evidenced by the inconsistent management of such cases in hospitals around the UK. In discussion with our musculoskeletal radiologists, we implemented new guidelines to standardise management of our patients and now report our findings. A consecutive series of 137 patients referred to the orthopaedic department with clinically suspected scaphoid fracture but normal series of plain radiographs were prospectively followed up over a two-year period. We implemented the use of early MRI for these patients and determined its incidence of detected scaphoid injury in addition to other occult injuries. We then prospectively examined results of these findings on patient management. Thirty-seven (27%) MRI examinations were normal with no evidence of a bony or soft-tissue injury. Soft-tissue injury was diagnosed in 59 patients (43.4%). Of those, 46 were triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears (33.8%) and 18 were intercarpal ligament injuries (13.2 %). Bone marrow oedema with no distinct fracture was discovered in 55 cases (40.4%). In 17 (12.5%) cases, this involved only the scaphoid. In the remainder, it also involved the other carpal bones or distal radius. Fracture(s) were diagnosed on 30 examinations (22.0%). MRI should be regarded as the gold standard investigation for patients in whom a scaphoid fracture is suspected clinically. It allows the diagnosis of occult bony and soft-tissue injuries that can present clinically as a scaphoid fracture; it also helps exclude patients with no fracture. We believe that there is a need to implement national guidelines for managing occult scaphoid fractures.

  7. Micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printing for complex tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Solaiman; Koch, Alia; Jun, Yena; Chou, Conrad; Awadallah, Mary R; Lee, Chang H

    2016-04-25

    Three dimensional (3D) printing has emerged as an efficient tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, given its advantages for constructing custom-designed scaffolds with tunable microstructure/physical properties. Here we developed a micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printed scaffolds. PLGA microspheres (μS) were encapsulated with growth factors (GFs) and then embedded inside PCL microfibers that constitute custom-designed 3D scaffolds. Given the substantial difference in the melting points between PLGA and PCL and their low heat conductivity, μS were able to maintain its original structure while protecting GF's bioactivities. Micro-precise spatial control of multiple GFs was achieved by interchanging dispensing cartridges during a single printing process. Spatially controlled delivery of GFs, with a prolonged release, guided formation of multi-tissue interfaces from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs). To investigate efficacy of the micro-precise delivery system embedded in 3D printed scaffold, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc scaffolds were fabricated with micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery of CTGF and TGFβ3, mimicking native-like multiphase fibrocartilage. In vitro, TMJ disc scaffolds spatially embedded with CTGF/TGFβ3-μS resulted in formation of multiphase fibrocartilaginous tissues from MSCs. In vivo, TMJ disc perforation was performed in rabbits, followed by implantation of CTGF/TGFβ3-μS-embedded scaffolds. After 4 wks, CTGF/TGFβ3-μS embedded scaffolds significantly improved healing of the perforated TMJ disc as compared to the degenerated TMJ disc in the control group with scaffold embedded with empty μS. In addition, CTGF/TGFβ3-μS embedded scaffolds significantly prevented arthritic changes on TMJ condyles. In conclusion, our micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printing may serve as an efficient tool to regenerate complex and inhomogeneous tissues.

  8. Effect of single- and double-row rotator cuff repair at the tendon-to-bone interface: preliminary results using an in vivo sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, M H; Schminke, B; Posmyk, A; Miosge, N; Klinger, H-M; Lakemeier, S

    2015-01-01

    The clinical superiority of the double-row technique is still a subject of controversial debate in rotator cuff repair. We hypothesised that the expression of different collagen types will differ between double-row and single-row rotator cuff repair indicating a faster healing response by the double-row technique. Twenty-four mature female sheep were randomly assembled to two different groups in which a surgically created acute infraspinatus tendon tear was fixed using either a modified single- or double-row repair technique. Shoulder joints from female sheep cadavers of identical age, bone maturity, and weight served as untreated control cluster. Expression of type I, II, and III collagen was observed in the tendon-to-bone junction along with recovering changes in the fibrocartilage zone after immunohistological tissue staining at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 26 weeks postoperatively. Expression of type III collagen remained positive until 6 weeks after surgery in the double-row group, whereas it was detectable for 12 weeks in the single-row group. In both groups, type I collagen expression increased after 12 weeks. Type II collagen expression was increased after 12 weeks in the double-row versus single-row group. Clusters of chondrocytes were only visible between week 6 and 12 in the double-row group. The study demonstrates differences regarding the expression of type I and type III collagen in the tendon-to-bone junction following double-row rotator cuff repair compared to single-row repair. The healing response in this acute repair model is faster in the double-row group during the investigated healing period.

  9. Elastin-like protein-hyaluronic acid (ELP-HA) hydrogels with decoupled mechanical and biochemical cues for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Danqing; Wang, Huiyuan; Trinh, Pavin; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Yang, Fan

    2017-05-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a major component of cartilage extracellular matrix and is an attractive material for use as 3D injectable matrices for cartilage regeneration. While previous studies have shown the promise of HA-based hydrogels to support cell-based cartilage formation, varying HA concentration generally led to simultaneous changes in both biochemical cues and stiffness. How cells respond to the change of biochemical content of HA remains largely unknown. Here we report an adaptable elastin-like protein-hyaluronic acid (ELP-HA) hydrogel platform using dynamic covalent chemistry, which allows variation of HA concentration without affecting matrix stiffness. ELP-HA hydrogels were created through dynamic hydrazone bonds via the reaction between hydrazine-modified ELP (ELP-HYD) and aldehyde-modified HA (HA-ALD). By tuning the stoichiometric ratio of aldehyde groups to hydrazine groups while maintaining ELP-HYD concentration constant, hydrogels with variable HA concentration (1.5%, 3%, or 5%) (w/v) were fabricated with comparable stiffness. To evaluate the effects of HA concentration on cell-based cartilage regeneration, chondrocytes were encapsulated within ELP-HA hydrogels with varying HA concentration. Increasing HA concentration led to a dose-dependent increase in cartilage-marker gene expression and enhanced sGAG deposition while minimizing undesirable fibrocartilage phenotype. The use of adaptable protein hydrogels formed via dynamic covalent chemistry may be broadly applicable as 3D scaffolds with decoupled niche properties to guide other desirable cell fates and tissue repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimization strategies on the structural modeling of gelatin/chitosan scaffolds to mimic human meniscus tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarem, Melika [Sports Engineering Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Freiburg, Hermann Staudinger Haus, Freiburg D-79104 (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute: Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Moztarzadeh, Fathollah [Sports Engineering Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biomaterials Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mozafari, Masoud, E-mail: mozafari.masoud@gmail.com [Sports Engineering Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biomaterials Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, School of Material Science and Engineering, Oklahoma State University, OK 74106 (United States); Shastri, V. Prasad [Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Freiburg, Hermann Staudinger Haus, Freiburg D-79104 (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute: Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Meniscus lesions are frequently occurring injuries with poor ability to heal. Typical treatment procedure includes removal of damaged regions, which can lead to sub-optimal knee biomechanics and early onset of osteoarthritis. Some of the drawbacks of current treatment approach present an opportunity for a tissue engineering solution. In this study, gelatin (G)/chitosan (Cs) scaffolds were synthesized via gel casting method and cross-linked with naturally derived cross-linker, genipin, through scaffold cross-linking method. Based on the characteristics of native meniscus tissue microstructure and function, three different layers were chosen to design the macroporous multilayered scaffolds. The multi-layered scaffolds were investigated for their ability to support human-derived meniscus cells by evaluating their morphology and proliferation using MTT assay at various time points. Based on structural, mechanical and cell compatibility considerations, laminated scaffolds composed of G60/Cs40, G80/Cs20 and G40/Cs60 samples, for the first, second and third layers, respectively, could be an appropriate combination for meniscus tissue engineering applications. - Graphical abstract: The wedge shaped multilayer/multiporous G/Cs meniscus scaffolds were mimicked by MR images of anatomical knee meniscus. The layers were chosen as G60/Cs40, G80/Cs20 and G40/Cs60, according to their characteristics similar to meniscus natural tissue, as the first, second and third layers, respectively. - Highlights: • Different gelatin/chitosan systems were chosen to engineer a multilayered scaffold. • The compressive modulus increased gradually by increasing the gelatin concentration. • Further addition of gelatin showed a meaningful decrease in the water uptake degree. • The layers supported cell growth and mimicked the meniscus fibrocartilage structure.

  11. The hamatolunate facet: characterization and association with cartilage lesions - magnetic resonance arthrography and anatomic correlation in cadaveric wrists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfirrmann, C.W.A. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Forchstrasse 340, 8008 Zurich (Switzerland); Theumann, N.H.; Chung, C.B.; Trudell, D.J.; Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the appearance of the hamatolunate facet using high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in cadavers and to correlate the presence of this anatomic variant with the presence of osteoarthritis in the wrist. High-resolution MR images of 22 cadaveric wrist specimens were obtained after tri-compartmental arthrography. Two readers in consensus analyzed the MR images and recoded the presence or absence of a hamatolunate facet. Geometric characteristics and cartilage and ligament integrity were analyzed. A third reader, who was blinded to the purpose of the study, recorded cartilage lesions of all the bones of the proximal and distal carpal rows. A hamatolunate facet was present in 11 of 22 wrists (50%). The mean coronal size of the lunate facet at the lunate (type II lunate) was 4.5 mm (range, 2-6 mm). The highest frequencies of cartilage lesions were seen in the scapho-trapezio-trapezoid joint (45.5%) and at the proximal pole of the hamate (54.4% and 40.9% for consensus reading/blinded reading, respectively). In cases with a hamatolunate facet, the frequency of cartilage lesions in the proximal pole of the hamate was 81.8% and 63.6% versus 27.3% and 18.2% without such a facet (chi-squared, P=0.01/P=0.03). No correlation of the presence of a hamatolunate facet with interosseous ligament tears or lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage was seen. In conclusion, the hamatolunate facet is a very common anatomic variant. The presence of a hamatolunate facet is associated with cartilage damage in the proximal pole of the hamate. (orig.)

  12. Mediolateral Differences of Proteoglycans Distribution at the ACL Tibial Footprint: Experimental Study of 16 Cadaveric Knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Ho Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the staining pattern of ACL attachment blended with cartilage of the medial tibial plateau at the tibial insertion and histologically characterize the tibial footprint. Sixteen fresh frozen cadaveric knees (mean age: 52.0±6.2 years were used for this study. The specimens were bisected in the coronal plane, in accordance with the fiber orientation of the ACL tibial attachment. Adjacent sections were then stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E to observe the morphology of the ACL insertion and with fast green and Safranin-O protocols to evaluate for collagen and proteoglycans (PG. The insertion area on the tibial footprint was divided into five zones in the medial to lateral direction, which was determined by division of the section from most prominent medial tibial spine to most lateral margin of ACL attachment. Then rectangular area with a vertical length that is twice the width of respective five zones was set. Stained areas of all images were quantified positively by using ImageJ software, and the value for staining area measured was defined in percentage by multiplying whole image area by 100. The mean proportion of Safranin-O staining is significantly greater nearer to the medial tibial spine (59% in zone 1, 32% in zone 2, 13% in zone 3, 13% in zone 4, and 4% in zone 5, P<0.001. The medial section of the tibial insertion area grew in size and increased in PG staining with more densely organized collagen arrangement with more fibrocartilage cells. The ACL tibial insertion showed a medially eccentric staining pattern by histological evaluation of the ACL attachment to cartilage. Our histological results of the eccentric biomaterial property in the medial tibial spine of ACL insertion area can be considered in making a more functional anatomic tibial tunnel placement.

  13. Comparison of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and conventional X-ray of the equine digit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiter, M.

    1996-10-01

    An anatomical study of the equine digit with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was performed. In addition, the observed pathologic findings were compared with their diagnosticity in associated radiographs. Twenty isolated forelimbs were radiographed and compared with the according CT-images. From 19 isolated forelimbs and one hindlimb MR-images were taken using spinecho and overview gradient-echo sequences. The appearance of bone and soft tissue is described in various sectional positions. CT images allow excellent evaluation of bone tissue in cases in which the X-ray examination suffers from the superimposition of adjacent structures. Thus, in several cases of navicular disease additional findings were made using CT. An insertional desmopathy of the interosseus, a cartilagineous fetlock chip, a separation of the hoof wall and osteophytes of the distal phalanx were found with CT but not in the associated radiographs. MRI allows the specific diagnosis of joint-, ligament- and tendon diseases also in the hoof region. The possibility to evaluate the navicular region, the distal interphalangeal joint and the hoof matrix is of great diagnostic value. In one case of navicular d sease a defect of the flexor cortex with pannus formation could be diagnosed. In a case with chronical laminitis the separation of the epidermal lamellae and the growth of the scar horn were depicted. A tendinitis of the interosseus, fibrocartilage in the insertion of the deep digital flexor tendon, the interosseus and in the distal sesamoid ligaments are well documented. It is concluded that in some equine patients CT and MRI are indicated due to the substantial diagnostic information. (author)

  14. Distribution of aromatase and sex steroid receptors in the baculum during the rat life cycle: effects of estrogen during the early development of the baculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Higashi, Mayuko; Yoshioka, Kazuki; Mutoh, Ken-ichiro

    2011-07-01

    The baculum, also called os penis, plays an important role during copulation. However, the hormonal regulation of its development remains to be elucidated. To determine the direct involvement of sex steroids in the development of the baculum of rats, the distributions of androgen receptors (ARs), aromatase, and estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) were observed immunohistochemically. On Postnatal Day 1, the rudiment of the baculum expressed ARs, aromatase, and ESR1. In the proximal segment of the baculum of neonatal rats, ARs were expressed in the parosteal layer but not in the periosteum or osteoblasts. Aromatase was expressed from the parosteal layer to the endosteum, particularly in the inner osteogenic layer. ESR1 was also abundantly expressed in almost all cells from the parosteal layer to the endosteum. ARs, aromatase, and ESR1 were all abundantly expressed during the neonatal period in the hyaline cartilage of the proximal segment and in fibrocartilage of the distal segment of the baculum. Expression in all the tissues was attenuated in an age-dependent manner and became quite weak at puberty. To determine the effect of estrogen on the growth of the baculum, the aromatase inhibitor 1,4,6-androstatrien-3,17-dione (ATD) was subcutaneously injected daily into pregnant rats from Days 19 to 23 of gestation and into pups on postnatal Days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9. On Day 10, the length of the baculum in the ATD-treated rats was significantly shorter than that in the controls, although the body weight did not change. These findings suggest that not only androgen but also locally aromatized estrogen is involved in the early growth and development of the baculum.

  15. Intraoperative Physical Examination for Diagnosis of Interosseous Ligament Rupture-Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Rivlin, Michael; Wu, Fei; Faghfouri, Aram; Eberlin, Kyle R; Ring, David

    2015-09-01

    To study the intraobserver and interobserver reliability of the diagnosis of interosseous ligament (IOL) rupture in a cadaver model. On 12 fresh frozen cadavers, radial heads were cut using an identical incision and osteotomy. After randomization, the soft tissues of the limbs were divided into 4 groups: both IOL and triangular fibrocartilage (TFCC) intact; IOL disruption but TFCC intact; both IOL and TFCC divided; and IOL intact but TFCC divided. All incisions had identical suturing. After standard instruction and demonstration of radius pull-push and radius lateral pull tests, 10 physician evaluators with different levels of experience examined the cadaver limbs in a standardized way (elbow at 90° with the forearm held in both supination and pronation) and were asked to classify them into one of the 4 groups. Next, the same examiners were asked to re-examine the limbs after randomly changing the order of examination. The interobserver reliability of agreement for the diagnosis of IOL injury (groups 2 and 3) was fair in both rounds of examination and the intraobserver reliability was moderate. The intra- and interobserver reliabilities of agreement for the 4 groups of injuries among the examiners were fair in both rounds of examination. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive, and negative predictive values were all around 70%. The likelihood of a positive test corresponding with the presence of IOL rupture (positive likelihood ratio) was 2.2. The likelihood of a negative test correctly diagnosing an intact IOL was 0.40. In cadavers, intraoperative tests had fair reliability and 70% accuracy for the diagnosis of IOL rupture using the push-pull and lateral pull maneuvers. The level of experience did not have any effect on the correct diagnosis of intact versus disrupted IOL. Although not common, some failure of surgeries for traumatic elbow fracture-dislocations is because of failure in timely diagnosis of IOL disruption. Copyright © 2015 American

  16. Distribution of Basement Membrane Molecules, Laminin and Collagen Type IV, in Normal and Degenerated Cartilage Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Seong; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Olsen, Bjørn Reino; Spector, Myron

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of 2 basement membrane (BM) molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in healthy and degenerative cartilage tissues. Design: Normal and degenerated tissues were obtained from goats and humans, including articular knee cartilage, the intervertebral disc, and meniscus. Normal tissue was also obtained from patella-tibial enthesis in goats. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using anti-laminin and anti–collagen type IV antibodies. Human and goat skin were used as positive controls. The percentage of cells displaying the pericellular presence of the protein was graded semiquantitatively. Results: When present, laminin and collagen type IV were exclusively found in the pericellular matrix, and in a discrete layer on the articulating surface of normal articular cartilage. In normal articular (hyaline) cartilage in the human and goat, the proteins were found co-localized pericellularly. In contrast, in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage, collagen type IV but not laminin was found in the pericellular region. Nonpathological fibrocartilaginous tissues from the goat, including the menisci and the enthesis, were also positive for both laminin and collagen type IV pericellularly. In degenerated fibrocartilage, including intervertebral disc, as in degenerated hyaline cartilage only collagen type IV was found pericellularly around chondrocytes but with less intense staining than in non-degenerated tissue. In calcified cartilage, some cells were positive for laminin but not type IV collagen. Conclusions: We report differences in expression of the BM molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in normal and degenerative cartilaginous tissues from adult humans and goats. In degenerative tissues laminin is depleted from the pericellular matrix before collagen type IV. The findings may inform future studies of the processes underlying cartilage degeneration and the functional

  17. Advances in the Surgical Management of Articular Cartilage Defects: Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques in the Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Spencer; Strauss, Eric; Bosco, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to gain insight into the latest methods of articular cartilage implantation (ACI) and to detail where they are in the Food and Drug Administration approval and regulatory process. A PubMed search was performed using the phrase "Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation" alone and with the words second generation and third generation. Additionally, clinicaltrials.gov was searched for the names of the seven specific procedures and the parent company websites were referenced. Two-Stage Techniques: BioCart II uses a FGF2v1 culture and a fibrinogen, thrombin matrix, whereas Hyalograft-C uses a Hyaff 11 matrix. MACI uses a collagen I/III matrix. Cartipatch consists of an agarose-alginate hydrogel. Neocart uses a high-pressure bioreactor for culturing with a type I collagen matrix. ChondroCelect makes use of a gene expression analysis to predict chondrocyte proliferation and has demonstrated significant clinical improvement, but failed to show superiority to microfracture in a phase III trial. One Step Technique: CAIS is an ACI procedure where harvested cartilage is minced and implanted into a matrix for defect filling. As full thickness defects in articular cartilage continue to pose a challenge to treat, new methods of repair are being researched. Later generation ACI has been developed to address the prevalence of fibrocartilage with microfracture and the complications associated with the periosteal flap of first generation ACI such as periosteal hypertrophy. The procedures and products reviewed here represent advances in tissue engineering, scaffolds and autologous chondrocyte culturing that may hold promise in our quest to alter the natural history of symptomatic chondral disease.

  18. Loss of HIF-1α in the notochord results in cell death and complete disappearance of the nucleus pulposus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merceron, Christophe; Mangiavini, Laura; Robling, Alexander; Wilson, Tremika LeShan; Giaccia, Amato J; Shapiro, Irving M; Schipani, Ernestina; Risbud, Makarand V

    2014-01-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is one of the largest avascular organs in vertebrates. The nucleus pulposus (NP), a highly hydrated and proteoglycan-enriched tissue, forms the inner portion of the IVD. The NP is surrounded by a multi-lamellar fibrocartilaginous structure, the annulus fibrosus (AF). This structure is covered superior and inferior side by cartilaginous endplates (CEP). The NP is a unique tissue within the IVD as it results from the differentiation of notochordal cells, whereas, AF and CEP derive from the sclerotome. The hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is expressed in NP cells but its function in NP development and homeostasis is largely unknown. We thus conditionally deleted HIF-1α in notochordal cells and investigated how loss of this transcription factor impacts NP formation and homeostasis at E15.5, birth, 1 and 4 months of age, respectively. Histological analysis, cell lineage studies, and TUNEL assay were performed. Morphologic changes of the mutant NP cells were identified as early as E15.5, followed, postnatally, by the progressive disappearance and replacement of the NP with a novel tissue that resembles fibrocartilage. Notably, lineage studies and TUNEL assay unequivocally proved that NP cells did not transdifferentiate into chondrocyte-like cells but they rather underwent massive cell death, and were completely replaced by a cell population belonging to a lineage distinct from the notochordal one. Finally, to evaluate the functional consequences of HIF-1α deletion in the NP, biomechanical testing of mutant IVD was performed. Loss of the NP in mutant mice significantly reduced the IVD biomechanical properties by decreasing its ability to absorb mechanical stress. These findings are similar to the changes usually observed during human IVD degeneration. Our study thus demonstrates that HIF-1α is essential for NP development and homeostasis, and it raises the intriguing possibility that this transcription factor could be involved in IVD

  19. Cone-beam computed tomography arthrography: an innovative modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament and cartilage injuries

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    Ramdhian-Wihlm, Reeta [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Strasbourg (France); Le Minor, Jean-Marie [University of Strasbourg, Institute of Anatomy, Strasbourg (France); University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Dentistry, Strasbourg (France); Schmittbuhl, Matthieu [University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Dentistry, Strasbourg (France); Jeantroux, Jeremy; Veillon, Francis; Dosch, Jean-Claude; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Bierry, Guillaume [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology, Strasbourg (France); Mahon, Peter Mac [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become an important modality in dento-facial imaging but remains poorly used in the exploration of the musculoskeletal system. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the performance and radiation exposure of CBCT arthrography in the evaluation of ligament and cartilage injuries in cadaveric wrists, with gross pathology findings as the standard of reference. Conventional arthrography was performed under fluoroscopic guidance on 10 cadaveric wrists, followed by MDCT acquisition and CBCT acquisition. CBCT arthrography and MDCT arthrography images were independently analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists working independently and then in consensus. The following items were observed: scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) (tear, integrity), and proximal carpal row cartilage (chondral tears). Wrists were dissected and served as the standard of reference for comparisons. Interobserver agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined. Radiation dose (CTDI) of both modalities was recorded. CBCT arthrography provides equivalent results to MDCT arthrography in the evaluation of ligaments and cartilage with sensitivity and specificity between 82 and 100%, and interobserver agreement between 0.83 and 0.97. However, radiation dose was significantly lower (p < 0.05) for CBCT arthrography than for MDCT arthrography with a mean CTDI of 2.1 mGy (range 1.7-2.2) versus a mean of 15.1 mGy (range 14.7-16.1). CBCT arthrography appears to be an innovative alternative to MDCT arthrography of the wrist as it allows an accurate and low radiation dose evaluation of ligaments and cartilage. (orig.)

  20. MRI of the wrist: Comparison of high resolution pulse sequences and different fat-suppression techniques; Magnetresonanztomographie des Handgelenks - Vergleich hochaufloesender Pulssequenzen und unterschiedlicher Fettsignalunterdrueckungen an Leichenpraeparaten

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    Staebler, A.; Spieker, A.; Bonel, H.; Glaser, C.; Reiser, M. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Schrank, C.; Putz, R. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Anatomische Anstalt; Petsch, R. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany). Unternehmensbereich Medizinische Technik

    2000-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high resolution sequences with and without fat-suppression techniques for MR imaging of the wrist. Results: The highest homogeneity and the least artifacts were achieved by the T{sub 1}-w SE sequence. For the STIR and PD-FS TSE sequence high rankings were found for the detection of free water. The PD FS sequence had high ranking also for visualization of the SL ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage. The best sequence for the assessment of hyaline cartilage was the FLASH-FS sequence. For detailed analysis of bony structures the CISS sequence performed best. Conclusion: The isolated use of a PD-FS-TSE sequence enables for evaluation of all clinically relevant structures at the wrist. Dedicated questions for hyaline cartilage are answered best by the use of a FLASH 3D-FS sequence. Selective water excitation reduces acquisition time to 60%, nevertheless FS sequences are still diagnostically superior to WE sequences. (orig./AJ) [German] Ziel: Beurteilung der Wertigkeit hochaufloesender MRT-Sequenzen ohne und mit Fettsignalunterdrueckung (FS) und selektiver Wasseranregung (WE) fuer Untersuchungen des Handgelenkes. Ergebnisse: SE-T{sub 1} zeigte die hoechste Signalhomogenitaet bei geringsten Artefakten. Die STIR und PD FS-Sequenz stellten Signal von freiem Wasser am besten dar. Die beste Knorpeldarstellung erreicht die FLASH 3D-FS-Sequenz. Die Kortikalis und die Spongiosa konnten am besten mit der CISS-Sequenz beurteilt werden. Die FS-Sequenzen waren den WE-Sequenzen diagnostisch ueberlegen. Schlussfolgerungen: Mit der PD FS TSE-Sequenz mit verlaengerter Echozeit ist eine gute Beurteilung aller klinisch wichtigen Strukturen moeglich. Die beste Darstellung des hyalinen Knorpels wird mit der FLASH-3D-FS-, des Knochens mit der CISS-Sequenz erreicht. Die selektive Wasseranregung bei FLASH- und DESS-Sequenzen reduziert die Aufnahmezeit, ohne die diagnostische Aussagekraft der FS-Sequenzen zu erreichen. (orig./AJ)

  1. Validity of T2 mapping in characterization of the regeneration tissue by bone marrow derived cell transplantation in osteochondral lesions of the ankle

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    Battaglia, M., E-mail: milva.battaglia@ior.it [Service of Ecography and Radiology, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, via Pupilli n. 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, E. [Service of Ecography and Radiology, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, via Pupilli n. 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Monti, C. [Service of CT and MRI, Casa di Cura Madre Fortunata Toniolo, Bologna (Italy); Guaraldi, F. [Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sant' Andrea, A. [Service of CT and MRI, Casa di Cura Madre Fortunata Toniolo, Bologna (Italy); Buda, R.; Cavallo, M.; Giannini, S.; Vannini, F. [Clinical Orthopaedic and Traumatology Unit II, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: Bone marrow derived cell transplantation (BMDCT) has been recently suggested as a possible surgical technique to repair osteochondral lesions. To date, no qualitative MRI studies have evaluated its efficacy. The aim of our study is to investigate the validity of MRI T2-mapping sequence in characterizing the reparative tissue obtained and its ability to correlate with clinical results. Methods and materials: 20 patients with an osteochondral lesion of the talus underwent BMDCT and were evaluated at 2 years follow up using MRI T2-mapping sequence. 20 healthy volunteers were recruited as controls. MRI images were acquired using a protocol suggested by the International Cartilage Repair Society, MOCART scoring system and T2 mapping. Results were then correlated with AOFAS clinical score. Results: AOFAS score increased from 66.8 {+-} 14.5 pre-operatively to 91.2 {+-} 8.3 (p < 0.0005) at 2 years follow-up. T2-relaxation time value of 35-45 ms was derived from healthy ankles evaluation and assumed as normal hyaline cartilage value and used as a control. Regenerated tissue with a T2-relaxation time value comparable to hyaline cartilage was found in all the cases treated, covering a mean of 78% of the repaired lesion area. A high clinical score was related directly to isointense signal in DPFSE fat sat (p = 0.05), and percentage of regenerated hyaline cartilage (p = 0.05), inversely to the percentage of regenerated fibrocartilage. Lesion's depth negatively related to the integrity of the repaired tissue's surface (tau = -0.523, p = 0.007), and to the percentage of regenerated hyaline cartilage (rho = -0.546, p = 0.013). Conclusions: Because of its ability to detect cartilage's quality and to correlate to the clinical score, MRI T2-mapping sequence integrated with Mocart score represent a valid, non-invasive technique for qualitative cartilage assessment after regenerative surgical procedures.

  2. Molecular Characteristics of the Equine Periodontal Ligament

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    Antje Pöschke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The equine periodontal ligament (PDL is a fibrous connective tissue that covers the intra-alveolar parts of the tooth and anchors it to the alveolar bone—it, therefore, provides a similar function to a tendinous structure. While several studies have considered the formation and structure of tendons, there is insufficient information particularly on the molecular composition of the PDL. Especially for the equine PDL, there is limited knowledge concerning the expression of genes commonly regarded as typical for tendon tissue. In this study, the gene expression of, e.g., collagen type 1 alpha 1 (COL1, collagen type 3 alpha 1 (COL3, scleraxis (SCX, and fibrocartilage markers was examined in the functional mature equine PDL compared with immature and mature equine tendon tissue. PDL samples were obtained from incisor, premolar, and molar teeth from seven adult horses. Additionally, tendon samples were collected from four adult horses and five foals at different sampling locations. Analyses of gene expression were performed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Significantly higher expression levels of COL1 and 3 were found in the mature equine PDL in comparison with mature tendon, indicating higher rates of collagen production and turnover in the mature equine PDL. The expression levels of SCX, a specific marker for tenogenic-differentiated cells, were on a similar level in functional mature PDL and in mature tendon tissue. Evidence of chondrogenic metaplasia, often found in tendon entheses or in pressurized regions of tendons, was not found in the mature equine PDL. The obtained results justify further experiments focused on the possible use of equine PDL cells for cell-based regenerative therapies.

  3. Regenerative potential of the cartilaginous tissue in mesenchymal stem cells: update, limitations, and challenges

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    Ivana Beatrice Mânica da Cruz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Advances in the studies with adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have turned tissue regenerative therapy into a promising tool in many areas of medicine. In orthopedics, one of the main challenges has been the regeneration of cartilage tissue, mainly in diarthroses. In the induction of the MSCs, in addition to cytodifferentiation, the microenvironmental context of the tissue to be regenerated and an appropriate spatial arrangement are extremely important factors. Furthermore, it is known that MSC differentiation is fundamentally determined by mechanisms such as cell proliferation (mitosis, biochemical-molecular interactions, movement, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. Although the use of MSCs for cartilage regeneration remains at a research level, there are important questions to be resolved in order to make this therapy efficient and safe. It is known, for instance, that the expansion of chondrocytes in cultivation, needed to increase the number of cells, could end up producing fibrocartilage instead of hyaline cartilage. However, the latest results are promising. In 2014, the first stage I/II clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the intra-articular injection of MSCs in femorotibial cartilage regeneration was published, indicating a decrease in injured areas. One issue to be explored is how many modifications in the articulate inflammatory environment could induce differentiation of MSCs already allocated in that region. Such issue arose from studies that suggested that the suppression of the inflammation may increase the efficiency of tissue regeneration. Considering the complexity of the events related to the chondrogenesis and cartilage repair, it can be concluded that the road ahead is still long, and that further studies are needed.

  4. Pseudotear of the peroneus longus tendon on MRI, secondary to a fibrocartilaginous node

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    Didolkar, Manjiri M. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Malone, Alfred L. [Radiology of Huntsville, PC, Huntsville, AL (United States); Nunley, James A. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Durham, NC (United States); Dodd, Leslie G. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Durham, NC (United States); Helms, Clyde A. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the presence of a fibrocartilaginous node within the distal peroneus longus tendon (PLT) just proximal to the cubital tunnel and correlate this with MRI signal characteristics of the distal PLT, which could result in a pseudotear appearance on MRI. We correlated imaging characteristics with pathologic specimens. Institutional review board approval was obtained. Retrospectively, 91 ankle MRIs utilizing a standard ankle protocol were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Four cadaver ankles were imaged using a standard ankle MRI protocol and reviewed by the same radiologists. All the MRIs were examined for signal changes in the PLT. The cadaver ankles then underwent PLT dissection by an orthopaedic surgeon, and a pathologic review was undertaken by a pathologist with orthopaedic specialization, who looked for an os peroneum or proposed fibrocartilaginous node relating to the signal change found on the MRIs. In the 91 ankle MRI studies, the PLT demonstrated normal low and increased signals. On the fat-saturated T2-weighted sequence, 76 (83.5%) ankles demonstrated low signal and 15 (16.5%) demonstrated increased signal. Of the cadaver ankle MRIs, all four demonstrated increased signal within the PLT; three contained a fibrocartilaginous node and one contained an os peroneum in that same region. The MRI signal of the PLT can change with the presence of a fibrocartilaginous node, which may be due to the molecular and chemical content of the fibrocartilage. This node increases the MRI signal in the distal PLT and gives the appearance of a pseudotear. (orig.)

  5. Disease progression and phasic changes in gene expression in a mouse model of osteoarthritis.

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    Richard F Loeser

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common form of arthritis and has multiple risk factors including joint injury. The purpose of this study was to characterize the histologic development of OA in a mouse model where OA is induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM model and to identify genes regulated during different stages of the disease, using RNA isolated from the joint "organ" and analyzed using microarrays. Histologic changes seen in OA, including articular cartilage lesions and osteophytes, were present in the medial tibial plateaus of the DMM knees beginning at the earliest (2 week time point and became progressively more severe by 16 weeks. 427 probe sets (371 genes from the microarrays passed consistency and significance filters. There was an initial up-regulation at 2 and 4 weeks of genes involved in morphogenesis, differentiation, and development, including growth factor and matrix genes, as well as transcription factors including Atf2, Creb3l1, and Erg. Most genes were off or down-regulated at 8 weeks with the most highly down-regulated genes involved in cell division and the cytoskeleton. Gene expression increased at 16 weeks, in particular extracellular matrix genes including Prelp, Col3a1 and fibromodulin. Immunostaining revealed the presence of these three proteins in cartilage and soft tissues including ligaments as well as in the fibrocartilage covering osteophytes. The results support a phasic development of OA with early matrix remodeling and transcriptional activity followed by a more quiescent period that is not maintained. This implies that the response to an OA intervention will depend on the timing of the intervention. The quiescent period at 8 weeks may be due to the maturation of the osteophytes which are thought to temporarily stabilize the joint.

  6. TOB1 Deficiency Enhances the Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Tendon-Bone Healing in a Rat Rotator Cuff Repair Model

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    Yulei Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study investigated the effect of silencing TOB1 (Transducer of ERBB2, 1 expression in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on MSC-facilitated tendon-bone healing in a rat supraspinatus repair model. Methods: Rat MSCs were transduced with a recombinant lentivirus encoding short hairpin RNA (shRNA against TOB1. MSC cell proliferation was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. The effect of MSCs with TOB1 deficiency on tendon-bone healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model was evaluated by biomechanical testing, histological analysis and collagen type I and II gene expression. An upstream regulator (miR-218 of TOB1 was determined in MSCs. Results: We found that knockdown of TOB1 significantly increased the proliferative activity of rat MSCs in vitro. When MSCs with TOB1 deficiency were injected into injured rat supraspinatus tendon-bone junctions, the effect on tendon-bone healing was enhanced compared to treatment with control MSCs with normal TOB1 expression, as evidenced by elevated levels of ultimate load to failure and stiffness, increased amount of fibrocartilage and augmented expression of collagen type I and type II genes. In addition, we found that the TOB1 3′ untranslated region is a direct target of miR-218. Similar to the effect of TOB1 deficiency, overexpression of miR-218 effectively promoted tendon-bone healing in rat. Conclusion: These results suggest that TOB1 may play a negative role in the effect of MSCs on tendon-bone healing, and imply that expression of TOB1 may be regulated by miR-218.

  7. Early-onset osteoarthritis, Charcot-Marie-Tooth like neuropathy, autoimmune features, multiple arterial aneurysms and dissections: an unrecognized and life threatening condition.

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    Mélodie Aubart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe osteoarthritis and thoracic aortic aneurysms have recently been associated with mutations in the SMAD3 gene, but the full clinical spectrum is incompletely defined. METHODS: All SMAD3 gene mutation carriers coming to our centre and their families were investigated prospectively with a structured panel including standardized clinical workup, blood tests, total body computed tomography, joint X-rays. Electroneuromyography was performed in selected cases. RESULTS: Thirty-four SMAD3 gene mutation carriers coming to our centre were identified and 16 relatives were considered affected because of aortic surgery or sudden death (total 50 subjects. Aortic disease was present in 72%, complicated with aortic dissection, surgery or sudden death in 56% at a mean age of 45 years. Aneurysm or tortuosity of the neck arteries was present in 78%, other arteries were affected in 44%, including dissection of coronary artery. Overall, 95% of mutation carriers displayed either aortic or extra-aortic arterial disease. Acrocyanosis was also present in the majority of patients. Osteoarticular manifestations were recorded in all patients. Joint involvement could be severe requiring surgery in young patients, of unusual localization such as tarsus or shoulder, or mimicking crystalline arthropathy with fibrocartilage calcifications. Sixty eight percent of patients displayed neurological symptoms, and 9 suffered peripheral neuropathy. Electroneuromyography revealed an axonal motor and sensory neuropathy in 3 different families, very evocative of type II Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT2 disease, although none had mutations in the known CMT2 genes. Autoimmune features including Sjogren's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto's disease, or isolated autoantibodies- were found in 36% of patients. INTERPRETATION: SMAD3 gene mutations are associated with aortic dilatation and osteoarthritis, but also autoimmunity and peripheral neuropathy which mimics type II

  8. Indirect MR-arthrography in osteochondral autograft and crushed bone graft with a collagen membrane-Correlation with histology

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    Streitparth, F. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Schoettle, P.; Schell, H. [Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Lehmkuhl, L.; Madej, T.; Wieners, G. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Duda, G.N. [Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Schroeder, R.J. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Objective: To analyze the spectrum of findings in indirect MR-arthrography following osteochondral autograft transfer system (OATS) and crushed bone graft using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring and grading system in relation to histology as the standard of reference. Materials and methods: Iatrogenic lesions were set at ovine condylar facets (n = 6/group), treated with OATS or crushed bone graft. 1.5 T MRI was performed 6 months after surgery using PD-weighted (w fat saturated (fs) fast spin echo (FSE), T1-w 2D, and 3D fs gradient echo (GE) sequences 30 min. after i.v. Gd-DTPA administration and passive joint exercise. The repair tissue was evaluated by two independent radiologists. The MR findings were compared to histology. Results: In all cases, MRI and histologic grading correlated well and showed significant superior repair in OATS at 6 months (p < 0.05), reproducing the original articular contour and a good subchondral restoration. FsT1-w3DGE proved most appropriate identifying characteristic post-operative findings: the OATS group demonstrated bone marrow edema at the donor site and the graft/host interface showed significant enhancement in indirect MR-arthrography, indicating fibrocartilage. After crushed bone graft, we found an irregular structure and significant contrast uptake, consistent with remnants of bone grafts surrounded by inflammatory tissue. Conclusion: Indirect MR-arthrography is an accurate, non-invasive monitoring tool following OATS and crushed bone graft as the MRI scoring and grading system allows a reliable evaluation of normal and pathological osteochondral repair with a high histologic correlation.

  9. Augmented cartilage regeneration by implantation of cellular versus acellular implants after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

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    Michiel W. Pot

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stimulation may be applied to regenerate focal cartilage defects, but generally results in transient clinical improvement and formation of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strive to develop new solutions to regenerate hyaline cartilage tissue. This systematic review and meta-analysis provides a comprehensive overview of current literature and assesses the efficacy of articular cartilage regeneration by implantation of cell-laden versus cell-free biomaterials in the knee and ankle joint in animals after bone marrow stimulation. PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP were systematically searched using tissue engineering, cartilage and animals search strategies. Included were primary studies in which cellular and acellular biomaterials were implanted after applying bone marrow stimulation in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals. Study characteristics were tabulated and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis for studies applying semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure (117 studies. Cartilage regeneration was expressed on an absolute 0–100% scale and random effects meta-analyses were performed. Implantation of cellular biomaterials significantly improved cartilage regeneration by 18.6% compared to acellular biomaterials. No significant differences were found between biomaterials loaded with stem cells and those loaded with somatic cells. Culture conditions of cells did not affect cartilage regeneration. Cartilage formation was reduced with adipose-derived stem cells compared to other cell types, but still improved compared to acellular scaffolds. Assessment of the risk of bias was impaired due to incomplete reporting for most studies. Implantation of cellular biomaterials improves cartilage regeneration compared to acellular biomaterials.

  10. Similar properties of chondrocytes from osteoarthritis joints and mesenchymal stem cells from healthy donors for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

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    Amilton M Fernandes

    Full Text Available Lesions of hyaline cartilage do not heal spontaneously, and represent a therapeutic challenge. In vitro engineering of articular cartilage using cells and biomaterials may prove to be the best solution. Patients with osteoarthritis (OA may require tissue engineered cartilage therapy. Chondrocytes obtained from OA joints are thought to be involved in the disease process, and thus to be of insufficient quality to be used for repair strategies. Bone marrow (BM derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from healthy donors may represent an alternative cell source. We have isolated chondrocytes from OA joints, performed cell culture expansion and tissue engineering of cartilage using a disc-shaped alginate scaffold and chondrogenic differentiation medium. We performed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to evaluate mRNA and protein expression for a range of molecules involved in chondrogenesis and OA pathogenesis. Results were compared with those obtained by using BM-MSCs in an identical tissue engineering strategy. Finally the two populations were compared using genome-wide mRNA arrays. At three weeks of chondrogenic differentiation we found high and similar levels of hyaline cartilage-specific type II collagen and fibrocartilage-specific type I collagen mRNA and protein in discs containing OA and BM-MSC derived chondrocytes. Aggrecan, the dominant proteoglycan in hyaline cartilage, was more abundantly distributed in the OA chondrocyte extracellular matrix. OA chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels also of other hyaline extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly BM-MSC derived chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels of OA markers such as COL10A1, SSP1 (osteopontin, ALPL, BMP2, VEGFA, PTGES, IHH, and WNT genes, but lower levels of MMP3 and S100A4. Based on the results presented here, OA chondrocytes may be suitable for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

  11. Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease: clinical manifestations

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    M.A. Cimmino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD disease is an arthropathy caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP crystal deposits in articular tissues, most commonly fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. According to EULAR, four different clinical presentations can be observed: 1 asymptomatic CPPD; 2 osteoarthritis (OA with CPPD; 3 acute CPP crystal arthritis; 4 chronic CPP inflammatory crystal arthritis. Acute CPP crystal arthritis is characterized by sudden onset of pain, swelling and tenderness with overlying erythema, usually in a large joint, most often the knee, wrist, shoulder, and hip. Occasionally, ligaments, tendons, bursae, bone and the spine can be involved. CPPD of the atlanto-occipital joint (crowned dens syndrome can cause periodic acute cervico-occipital pain with fever, neck stiffness and laboratory inflammatory syndrome. Chronic inflammatory arthritis is characterized by joint swelling, morning stiffness, pain, and high ESR and CRP. The relationship between OA and CPPD is still unclear. The main problem is whether such crystals are directly involved in the pathogenesis of OA or if they are the result of joint degeneration. Diagnosis is based on evaluation of history and clinical features, conventional radiology, and synovial fluid examination. Non-polarized light microscopy should be used initially to screen for CPPD crystals based upon their characteristic morphology, and compensated polarized light microscopy, showing the crystals to be weakly positive birefringent, is recommended for definitive identification, although this last pattern only occurs in about 20% of samples. The main goals of CPPD therapy are control of the acute or chronic inflammatory reaction and prevention of further episodes.

  12. Tendon Reattachment to Bone in an Ovine Tendon Defect Model of Retraction Using Allogenic and Xenogenic Demineralised Bone Matrix Incorporated with Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

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    Tanujan Thangarajah

    Full Text Available Tendon-bone healing following rotator cuff repairs is mainly impaired by poor tissue quality. Demineralised bone matrix promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface but its role in the treatment of tendon tears with retraction has not been investigated. We hypothesized that cortical demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells will result in improved function and restoration of the tendon-bone interface with no difference between xenogenic and allogenic scaffolds.In an ovine model, the patellar tendon was detached from the tibial tuberosity and a complete distal tendon transverse defect measuring 1 cm was created. Suture anchors were used to reattach the tendon and xenogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5, or allogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5 were used to bridge the defect. Graft incorporation into the tendon and its effect on regeneration of the enthesis was assessed using histomorphometry. Force plate analysis was used to assess functional recovery.Compared to the xenograft, the allograft was associated with significantly higher functional weight bearing at 6 (P = 0.047, 9 (P = 0.028, and 12 weeks (P = 0.009. In the allogenic group this was accompanied by greater remodeling of the demineralised bone matrix into tendon-like tissue in the region of the defect (p = 0.015, and a more direct type of enthesis characterized by significantly more fibrocartilage (p = 0.039. No failures of tendon-bone healing were noted in either group.Demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface in an ovine model of acute tendon retraction, with superior mechanical and histological results associated with use of an allograft.

  13. Comparison of conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the evaluation of wrist ligament tears: A preliminary experience

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    Shivani Pahwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and direct magnetic resonance (MR arthrography in the evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC and intrinsic wrist ligament tears. Materials and Methods: T1-weighted, fat suppressed (FS proton density plus T2-weighted (FS PD/T2, 3D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC sequences and direct MR arthrography were performed in 53 patients with wrist pain. Images were evaluated for the presence and location of TFCC, scapholunate ligament (SLL and lunatotriquetral ligament (LTL tears, and imaging findings were compared with operative findings in 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery (gold standard. Results: Sixteen patients underwent arthroscopy/open surgery: 12 TFCC tears were detected arthroscopically out of which 9 were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, 10 on MEDIC sequence, and all 12 were detected on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in the detection of TFCC tears were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. Out of the eight arthroscopically confirmed SLL tears, three tears were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, five on MEDIC sequence, and all eight were visualized on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting SLL tears were 37.5%, 62.5%, and 100%, respectively. One arthroscopically confirmed LTL tear was diagnosed on FS PD/T2 sequence, three on MEDIC sequence, and all five arthroscopically confirmed LTL tears were detected with MR arthrography. The sensitivities of PD, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting LTL tears were 20%, 40%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: MR arthrography is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament tears.

  14. Fourier transform infrared imaging and infrared fiber optic probe spectroscopy identify collagen type in connective tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Hanifi

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in

  15. Increasing the Dose of Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Articular Cartilage Repair: Histological and Molecular Study in the Sheep Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén-García, Pedro; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Guillén-Vicente, Isabel; Caballero-Santos, Rosa; Guillén-Vicente, Marta; Abelow, Stephen; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; López-Alcorocho, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    We hypothesized that implanting cells in a chondral defect at a density more similar to that of the intact cartilage could induce them to synthesize matrix with the features more similar to that of the uninjured one. We compared the implantation of different doses of chondrocytes: 1 million (n = 5), 5 million (n = 5), or 5 million mesenchymal cells (n = 5) in the femoral condyle of 15 sheep. Tissue generated by microfracture at the trochlea, and normal cartilage from a nearby region, processed as the tissues resulting from the implantation, were used as references. Histological and molecular (expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan) studies were performed. The features of the cartilage generated by implantation of mesenchymal cells and elicited by microfractures were similar and typical of a poor repair of the articular cartilage (presence of fibrocartilage, high expression of type I collagen and a low mRNA levels of type II collagen and aggrecan). Nevertheless, in the samples obtained from tissues generated by implantation of chondrocytes, hyaline-like cartilage, cell organization, low expression rates of type I collagen and high levels of mRNA corresponding to type II collagen and aggrecan were observed. These histological features, show less variability and are more similar to those of the normal cartilage used as control in the case of 5 million cells implantation than when 1 million cells were used. The implantation of autologous chondrocytes in type I/III collagen membranes at high density could be a promising tool to repair articular cartilage.

  16. Augmented cartilage regeneration by implantation of cellular versus acellular implants after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot, Michiel W; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Gonzales, Veronica K; Buma, Pieter; IntHout, Joanna; de Vries, Rob B M; Daamen, Willeke F

    2017-01-01

    Bone marrow stimulation may be applied to regenerate focal cartilage defects, but generally results in transient clinical improvement and formation of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strive to develop new solutions to regenerate hyaline cartilage tissue. This systematic review and meta-analysis provides a comprehensive overview of current literature and assesses the efficacy of articular cartilage regeneration by implantation of cell-laden versus cell-free biomaterials in the knee and ankle joint in animals after bone marrow stimulation. PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP) were systematically searched using tissue engineering, cartilage and animals search strategies. Included were primary studies in which cellular and acellular biomaterials were implanted after applying bone marrow stimulation in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals. Study characteristics were tabulated and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis for studies applying semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure (117 studies). Cartilage regeneration was expressed on an absolute 0-100% scale and random effects meta-analyses were performed. Implantation of cellular biomaterials significantly improved cartilage regeneration by 18.6% compared to acellular biomaterials. No significant differences were found between biomaterials loaded with stem cells and those loaded with somatic cells. Culture conditions of cells did not affect cartilage regeneration. Cartilage formation was reduced with adipose-derived stem cells compared to other cell types, but still improved compared to acellular scaffolds. Assessment of the risk of bias was impaired due to incomplete reporting for most studies. Implantation of cellular biomaterials improves cartilage regeneration compared to acellular biomaterials.

  17. Healing of Osteochondral Defects Implanted with Biomimetic Scaffolds of Poly(ε-Caprolactone)/Hydroxyapatite and Glycidyl-Methacrylate-Modified Hyaluronic Acid in a Minipig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ho; Shen, Bo-Yuan; Wang, Yao-Horng; Lin, Bojain; Lee, Hung-Maan; Hsieh, Ming-Fa

    2018-04-09

    Articular cartilage is a structure lack of vascular distribution. Once the cartilage is injured or diseased, it is unable to regenerate by itself. Surgical treatments do not effectively heal defects in articular cartilage. Tissue engineering is the most potential solution to this problem. In this study, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (mPEG-PCL) and hydroxyapatite at a weight ratio of 2:1 were mixed via fused deposition modeling (FDM) layer by layer to form a solid scaffold. The scaffolds were further infiltrated with glycidyl methacrylate hyaluronic acid loading with 10 ng/mL of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and photo cross-linked on top of the scaffolds. An in vivo test was performed on the knees of Lanyu miniature pigs for a period of 12 months. The healing process of the osteochondral defects was followed by computer tomography (CT). The defect was fully covered with regenerated tissues in the control pig, while different tissues were grown in the defect of knee of the experimental pig. In the gross anatomy of the cross section, the scaffold remained in the subchondral location, while surface cartilage was regenerated. The cross section of the knees of both the control and experimental pigs were subjected to hematoxylin and eosin staining. The cartilage of the knee in the experimental pig was partially matured, e.g., few chondrocyte cells were enclosed in the lacunae. In the knee of the control pig, the defect was fully grown with fibrocartilage. In another in vivo experiment in a rabbit and a pig, the composite of the TGF-β1-loaded hydrogel and scaffolds was found to regenerate hyaline cartilage. However, scaffolds that remain in the subchondral lesion potentially delay the healing process. Therefore, the structural design of the scaffold should be reconsidered to match the regeneration process of both cartilage and subchondral bone.

  18. Tissue-Engineered Tendon for Enthesis Regeneration in a Rat Rotator Cuff Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Smietana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Healing of rotator cuff (RC injuries with current suture or augmented scaffold techniques fails to regenerate the enthesis and instead forms a weaker fibrovascular scar that is prone to subsequent failure. Regeneration of the enthesis is the key to improving clinical outcomes for RC injuries. We hypothesized that the utilization of our tissue-engineered tendon to repair either an acute or a chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tear would regenerate a functional enthesis and return the biomechanics of the tendon back to that found in native tissue. Engineered tendons were fabricated from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells utilizing our well-described fabrication technology. Forty-three rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon followed by acute (immediate or chronic (4 weeks retracted repair by using either our engineered tendon or a trans-osseous suture technique. Animals were sacrificed at 8 weeks. Biomechanical and histological analyses of the regenerated enthesis and tendon were performed. Statistical analysis was performed by using a one-way analysis of variance with significance set at p < 0.05. Acute repairs using engineered tendon had improved enthesis structure and lower biomechanical failures compared with suture repairs. Chronic repairs with engineered tendon had a more native-like enthesis with increased fibrocartilage formation, reduced scar formation, and lower biomechanical failure compared with suture repair. Thus, the utilization of our tissue-engineered tendon showed improve enthesis regeneration and improved function in chronic RC repairs compared with suture repair. Clinical Significance: Our engineered tendon construct shows promise as a clinically relevant method for repair of RC injuries.

  19. Does footprint preparation influence tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair in an animal model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficklscherer, Andreas; Loitsch, Thomas; Serr, Michaela; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F; Niethammer, Thomas R; Müller, Hans-Helge; Milz, Stefan; Pietschmann, Matthias F; Müller, Peter E

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of footprint spongialization and radiofrequency ablation on rotator cuff repair outcomes compared with an untreated group in a rat model. We randomly assigned 189 Sprague-Dawley rats to either a spongialization, radiofrequency ablation, or untreated group. After separation of the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tubercle, the footprint was prepared by removing the cortical bone with a burr (spongialization), was prepared by ablating soft tissue with a radiofrequency ablation device, or was left unaltered (untreated). Biomechanical testing (after 7 weeks, n = 165) and histologic analysis after 1 and 7 weeks (n = 24) followed reinsertion. The mean load to failure was 17.51 ± 4.46 N/mm(2) in the spongialization group, 15.56 ± 4.85 N/mm(2) in the radiofrequency ablation group, and 19.21 ± 5.19 N/mm(2) in the untreated group. A significant difference was found between the spongialization and radiofrequency ablation groups (P = .0409), as well as between the untreated and radiofrequency ablation groups (P = .0014). There was no significant difference between the spongialization and untreated groups (P = .2456). The mean area of fibrocartilage transition, characterized by the presence of type II collagen, was larger after 1 and 7 weeks in the spongialization group (0.57 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.58 ± 0.1 mm(2), respectively) and untreated group (0.51 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.51 ± 0.2 mm(2), respectively) than in the radiofrequency ablation group (0.11 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.4 ± 0.1 mm(2), respectively) with P rotator cuff repair may influence tendon-to-bone healing. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Involvement of Indian hedgehog signaling in mesenchymal stem cell-augmented rotator cuff tendon repair in an athymic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Jian-Chun; Mosca, Michael J; Degen, Ryan M; Lebaschi, Amir; Carballo, Camila; Carbone, Andrew; Cong, Guang-Ting; Ying, Liang; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-04-01

    Bone marrow aspirate has been used in recent years to augment tendon-to-bone healing, including in rotator cuff repair. However, the healing mechanism in cell-based therapy has not been elucidated in detail. Sixteen athymic nude rats were randomly allocated to 2 groups: experimental (human mesenchymal stem cells in fibrin glue carrier) and control (fibrin glue only). Animals were sacrificed at 2 and 4 weeks. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to evaluate Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling and SOX9 signaling in the healing enthesis. Macrophages were identified using CD68 and CD163 staining, and proliferating cells were identified using proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining. More organized and stronger staining for collagen II and a higher abundance of SOX9 + cells were observed at the enthesis in the experimental group at 2 weeks. There was significantly higher Gli1 and Patched1 expression in the experimental group at the enthesis at 2 weeks and higher numbers of Ihh + cells in the enthesis of the experimental group vs control at both 2 weeks and 4 weeks postoperatively. There were more CD68 + cells localized to the tendon midsubstance at 2 weeks compared with 4 weeks, and there was a higher level of CD163 staining in the tendon midsubstance in the experimental group than in the control group at 4 weeks. Stem cell application had a positive effect on fibrocartilage formation at the healing rotator cuff repair site. Both SOX9 and Ihh signaling appear to play an important role in the healing process. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Composition and structure of porcine digital flexor tendon-bone insertion tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Sandhya; Pankow, Mark; Peters, Kara; Huang, Hsiao-Ying Shadow

    2017-11-01

    Tendon-bone insertion is a functionally graded tissue, transitioning from 200 MPa tensile modulus at the tendon end to 20 GPa tensile modulus at the bone, across just a few hundred micrometers. In this study, we examine the porcine digital flexor tendon insertion tissue to provide a quantitative description of its collagen orientation and mineral concentration by using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based image analysis and mass spectrometry, respectively. Histological results revealed uniformity in global collagen orientation at all depths, indicative of mechanical anisotropy, although at mid-depth, the highest fiber density, least amount of dispersion, and least cellular circularity were evident. Collagen orientation distribution obtained through 2D FFT of histological imaging data from fluorescent microscopy agreed with past measurements based on polarized light microscopy. Results revealed global fiber orientation across the tendon-bone insertion to be preserved along direction of physiologic tension. Gradation in the fiber distribution orientation index across the insertion was reflective of a decrease in anisotropy from the tendon to the bone. We provided elemental maps across the fibrocartilage for its organic and inorganic constituents through time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The apatite intensity distribution from the tendon to bone was shown to follow a linear trend, supporting past results based on Raman microprobe analysis. The merit of this study lies in the image-based simplified approach to fiber distribution quantification and in the high spatial resolution of the compositional analysis. In conjunction with the mechanical properties of the insertion tissue, fiber, and mineral distribution results for the insertion from this may potentially be incorporated into the development of a structural constitutive approach toward computational modeling. Characterizing the properties of the native insertion tissue would provide the

  2. Elastic fiber-mediated enthesis in the human middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Tetsuaki; Shibata, Shunichi; Katori, Yukio; Ohtsuka, Aiji; Murakami, Gen; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2012-10-01

    Adaptation to constant vibration (acoustic oscillation) is likely to confer a specific morphology at the bone-tendon and bone-ligament interfaces at the ear ossicles, which therefore represent an exciting target of enthesis research. We histologically examined (i) the bone attachments of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and (ii) the annular ligament of the incudostapedial joint obtained from seven elderly donated cadavers. Notably, both aldehyde-fuchsin and elastic-Masson staining demonstrated that the major fibrous component of the entheses was not collagen fibers but mature elastic fibers. The positive controls for elastic fiber staining were the arterial wall elastic laminae included in the temporal bone materials. The elastic fibers were inserted deeply into the type II collagen-poor fibrocartilage covering the ear ossicles. The muscle tendons were composed of an outer thin layer of collagen fibers and an inner thick core of elastic fibers near the malleus or stapes. In the unique elastic fiber-mediated entheses, hyaluronan, versican and fibronectin were expressed strongly along the elastic fibers. The hyaluronan seemed to act as a friction-reducing lubricant for the elastic fibers. Aggrecan was labeled strongly in a disk- or plica-like fibrous mass on the inner side of the elastic fiber-rich ligament, possibly due to compression stress from the ligament. Tenascin-c was not evident in the entheses. The elastic fiber-mediated entheses appeared resistant to tissue destruction in an environment exposed to constant vibration. The morphology was unlikely to be the result of age-related degeneration. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  3. The sacroiliac joint: anatomy, physiology and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Stacy L; Wheeler, Michael T; Fortin, Joseph D; Vilensky, Joel A

    2006-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a putative source of low back pain. The objective of this article is to provide clinicians with a concise review of SIJ structure and function, diagnostic indicators of SIJ-mediated pain, and therapeutic considerations. The SIJ is a true diarthrodial joint with unique characteristics not typically found in other diarthrodial joints. The joint differs with others in that it has fibrocartilage in addition to hyaline cartilage, there is discontinuity of the posterior capsule, and articular surfaces have many ridges and depressions. The sacroiliac joint is well innervated. Histological analysis of the sacroiliac joint has verified the presence of nerve fibers within the joint capsule and adjoining ligaments. It has been variously described that the sacroiliac joint receives its innervation from the ventral rami of L4 and L5, the superior gluteal nerve, and the dorsal rami of L5, S1, and S2, or that it is almost exclusively derived from the sacral dorsal rami. Even though the sacroiliac joint is a known putative source of low back and lower extremity pain, there are few findings that are pathognomonic of sacroiliac joint pain. The controlled diagnostic blocks utilizing the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) criteria demonstrated the prevalence of pain of sacroiliac joint origin in 19% to 30% of the patients suspected to have sacroiliac joint pain. Conservative management includes manual medicine techniques, pelvic stabilization exercises to allow dynamic postural control, and muscle balancing of the trunk and lower extremities. Interventional treatments include sacroiliac joint, intra-articular joint injections, radiofrequency neurotomy, prolotherapy, cryotherapy, and surgical treatment. The evidence for intra-articular injections and radiofrequency neurotomy has been shown to be limited in managing sacroiliac joint pain.

  4. Articular soft tissue anatomy of the archosaur hip joint: Structural homology and functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Henry P; Holliday, Casey M

    2015-06-01

    Archosaurs evolved a wide diversity of locomotor postures, body sizes, and hip joint morphologies. The two extant archosaurs clades (birds and crocodylians) possess highly divergent hip joint morphologies, and the homologies and functions of their articular soft tissues, such as ligaments, cartilage, and tendons, are poorly understood. Reconstructing joint anatomy and function of extinct vertebrates is critical to understanding their posture, locomotor behavior, ecology, and evolution. However, the lack of soft tissues in fossil taxa makes accurate inferences of joint function difficult. Here, we describe the soft tissue anatomies and their osteological correlates in the hip joint of archosaurs and their sauropsid outgroups, and infer structural homology across the extant taxa. A comparative sample of 35 species of birds, crocodylians, lepidosaurs, and turtles ranging from hatchling to skeletally mature adult were studied using dissection, imaging, and histology. Birds and crocodylians possess topologically and histologically consistent articular soft tissues in their hip joints. Epiphyseal cartilages, fibrocartilages, and ligaments leave consistent osteological correlates. The archosaur acetabulum possesses distinct labrum and antitrochanter structures on the supraacetabulum. The ligamentum capitis femoris consists of distinct pubic- and ischial attachments, and is homologous with the ventral capsular ligament of lepidosaurs. The proximal femur has a hyaline cartilage core attached to the metaphysis via a fibrocartilaginous sleeve. This study provides new insight into soft tissue structures and their osteological correlates (e.g., the antitrochanter, the fovea capitis, and the metaphyseal collar) in the archosaur hip joint. The topological arrangement of fibro- and hyaline cartilage may provide mechanical support for the chondroepiphysis. The osteological correlates identified here will inform systematic and functional analyses of archosaur hindlimb evolution and

  5. NIRS report of utilization of MRI machine for research. Results in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    imaging of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). (J.P.N.)

  6. Pseudotear of the peroneus longus tendon on MRI, secondary to a fibrocartilaginous node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didolkar, Manjiri M.; Malone, Alfred L.; Nunley, James A.; Dodd, Leslie G.; Helms, Clyde A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the presence of a fibrocartilaginous node within the distal peroneus longus tendon (PLT) just proximal to the cubital tunnel and correlate this with MRI signal characteristics of the distal PLT, which could result in a pseudotear appearance on MRI. We correlated imaging characteristics with pathologic specimens. Institutional review board approval was obtained. Retrospectively, 91 ankle MRIs utilizing a standard ankle protocol were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Four cadaver ankles were imaged using a standard ankle MRI protocol and reviewed by the same radiologists. All the MRIs were examined for signal changes in the PLT. The cadaver ankles then underwent PLT dissection by an orthopaedic surgeon, and a pathologic review was undertaken by a pathologist with orthopaedic specialization, who looked for an os peroneum or proposed fibrocartilaginous node relating to the signal change found on the MRIs. In the 91 ankle MRI studies, the PLT demonstrated normal low and increased signals. On the fat-saturated T2-weighted sequence, 76 (83.5%) ankles demonstrated low signal and 15 (16.5%) demonstrated increased signal. Of the cadaver ankle MRIs, all four demonstrated increased signal within the PLT; three contained a fibrocartilaginous node and one contained an os peroneum in that same region. The MRI signal of the PLT can change with the presence of a fibrocartilaginous node, which may be due to the molecular and chemical content of the fibrocartilage. This node increases the MRI signal in the distal PLT and gives the appearance of a pseudotear. (orig.)

  7. Protein-releasing polymeric scaffolds induce fibrochondrocytic differentiation of endogenous cells for knee meniscus regeneration in sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang H.; Rodeo, Scott A.; Fortier, Lisa Ann; Lu, Chuanyong; Erisken, Cevat

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of complex tissues, such as kidney, liver, and cartilage, continues to be a scientific and translational challenge. Survival of ex vivo cultured, transplanted cells in tissue grafts is among one of the key barriers. Meniscus is a complex tissue consisting of collagen fibers and proteoglycans with gradient phenotypes of fibrocartilage and functions to provide congruence of the knee joint, without which the patient is likely to develop arthritis. Endogenous stem/progenitor cells regenerated the knee meniscus upon spatially released human connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor–β3 (TGFβ3) from a three-dimensional (3D)–printed biomaterial, enabling functional knee recovery. Sequentially applied CTGF and TGFβ3 were necessary and sufficient to propel mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, as a heterogeneous population or as single-cell progenies, into fibrochondrocytes that concurrently synthesized procollagens I and IIα. When released from microchannels of 3D–printed, human meniscus scaffolds, CTGF and TGFβ3 induced endogenous stem/progenitor cells to differentiate and synthesize zone-specific type I and II collagens. We then replaced sheep meniscus with anatomically correct, 3D–printed scaffolds that incorporated spatially delivered CTGF and TGFβ3. Endogenous cells regenerated the meniscus with zone-specific matrix phenotypes: primarily type I collagen in the outer zone, and type II collagen in the inner zone, reminiscent of the native meniscus. Spatiotemporally delivered CTGF and TGFβ3 also restored inhomogeneous mechanical properties in the regenerated sheep meniscus. Survival and directed differentiation of endogenous cells in a tissue defect may have implications in the regeneration of complex (heterogeneous) tissues and organs. PMID:25504882

  8. Regenerative potential of the cartilaginous tissue in mesenchymal stem cells: update, limitations, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica da; Severo, Antônio Lourenço; Azzolin, Verônica Farina; Garcia, Luiz Filipe Machado; Kuhn, André; Lech, Osvandré

    2017-01-01

    Advances in the studies with adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have turned tissue regenerative therapy into a promising tool in many areas of medicine. In orthopedics, one of the main challenges has been the regeneration of cartilage tissue, mainly in diarthroses. In the induction of the MSCs, in addition to cytodifferentiation, the microenvironmental context of the tissue to be regenerated and an appropriate spatial arrangement are extremely important factors. Furthermore, it is known that MSC differentiation is fundamentally determined by mechanisms such as cell proliferation (mitosis), biochemical-molecular interactions, movement, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. Although the use of MSCs for cartilage regeneration remains at a research level, there are important questions to be resolved in order to make this therapy efficient and safe. It is known, for instance, that the expansion of chondrocytes in cultivation, needed to increase the number of cells, could end up producing fibrocartilage instead of hyaline cartilage. However, the latest results are promising. In 2014, the first stage I/II clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the intra-articular injection of MSCs in femorotibial cartilage regeneration was published, indicating a decrease in injured areas. One issue to be explored is how many modifications in the articulate inflammatory environment could induce differentiation of MSCs already allocated in that region. Such issue arose from studies that suggested that the suppression of the inflammation may increase the efficiency of tissue regeneration. Considering the complexity of the events related to the chondrogenesis and cartilage repair, it can be concluded that the road ahead is still long, and that further studies are needed.

  9. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  10. Hyaline cartilage regeneration by combined therapy of microfracture and long-term bone morphogenetic protein-2 delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Seok; La, Wan-Geun; Bhang, Suk Ho; Kim, Hak-Jun; Im, Gun-Il; Lee, Haeshin; Park, Jung-Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2011-07-01

    Microfracture of cartilage induces migration of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. However, this treatment often results in fibrocartilage regeneration. Growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 induce the differentiation of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, which can be used for hyaline cartilage regeneration. Here, we tested the hypothesis that long-term delivery of BMP-2 to cartilage defects subjected to microfracture results in regeneration of high-quality hyaline-like cartilage, as opposed to short-term delivery of BMP-2 or no BMP-2 delivery. Heparin-conjugated fibrin (HCF) and normal fibrin were used as carriers for the long- and short-term delivery of BMP-2, respectively. Rabbit articular cartilage defects were treated with microfracture combined with one of the following: no treatment, fibrin, short-term delivery of BMP-2, HCF, or long-term delivery of BMP-2. Eight weeks after treatment, histological analysis revealed that the long-term delivery of BMP-2 group (microfracture + HCF + BMP-2) showed the most staining with alcian blue. A biochemical assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and Western blot analysis all revealed that the long-term delivery of BMP-2 group had the highest glucosaminoglycan content as well as the highest expression level of collagen type II. Taken together, the long-term delivery of BMP-2 to cartilage defects subjected to microfracture resulted in regeneration of hyaline-like cartilage, as opposed to short-term delivery or no BMP-2 delivery. Therefore, this method could be more convenient for hyaline cartilage regeneration than autologous chondrocyte implantation due to its less invasive nature and lack of cell implantation.

  11. Healing of Osteochondral Defects Implanted with Biomimetic Scaffolds of Poly(ε-Caprolactone/Hydroxyapatite and Glycidyl-Methacrylate-Modified Hyaluronic Acid in a Minipig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ho Hsieh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a structure lack of vascular distribution. Once the cartilage is injured or diseased, it is unable to regenerate by itself. Surgical treatments do not effectively heal defects in articular cartilage. Tissue engineering is the most potential solution to this problem. In this study, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(ε-caprolactone (mPEG-PCL and hydroxyapatite at a weight ratio of 2:1 were mixed via fused deposition modeling (FDM layer by layer to form a solid scaffold. The scaffolds were further infiltrated with glycidyl methacrylate hyaluronic acid loading with 10 ng/mL of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and photo cross-linked on top of the scaffolds. An in vivo test was performed on the knees of Lanyu miniature pigs for a period of 12 months. The healing process of the osteochondral defects was followed by computer tomography (CT. The defect was fully covered with regenerated tissues in the control pig, while different tissues were grown in the defect of knee of the experimental pig. In the gross anatomy of the cross section, the scaffold remained in the subchondral location, while surface cartilage was regenerated. The cross section of the knees of both the control and experimental pigs were subjected to hematoxylin and eosin staining. The cartilage of the knee in the experimental pig was partially matured, e.g., few chondrocyte cells were enclosed in the lacunae. In the knee of the control pig, the defect was fully grown with fibrocartilage. In another in vivo experiment in a rabbit and a pig, the composite of the TGF-β1-loaded hydrogel and scaffolds was found to regenerate hyaline cartilage. However, scaffolds that remain in the subchondral lesion potentially delay the healing process. Therefore, the structural design of the scaffold should be reconsidered to match the regeneration process of both cartilage and subchondral bone.

  12. The use of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair and regeneration: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Andy; Mitchell, Katrina; Soans, Julian; Kim, Louise; Zaidi, Razi

    2017-03-09

    The management of articular cartilage defects presents many clinical challenges due to its avascular, aneural and alymphatic nature. Bone marrow stimulation techniques, such as microfracture, are the most frequently used method in clinical practice however the resulting mixed fibrocartilage tissue which is inferior to native hyaline cartilage. Other methods have shown promise but are far from perfect. There is an unmet need and growing interest in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering to improve the outcome for patients requiring cartilage repair. Many published reviews on cartilage repair only list human clinical trials, underestimating the wealth of basic sciences and animal studies that are precursors to future research. We therefore set out to perform a systematic review of the literature to assess the translation of stem cell therapy to explore what research had been carried out at each of the stages of translation from bench-top (in vitro), animal (pre-clinical) and human studies (clinical) and assemble an evidence-based cascade for the responsible introduction of stem cell therapy for cartilage defects. This review was conducted in accordance to PRISMA guidelines using CINHAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and Web of Knowledge databases from 1st January 1900 to 30th June 2015. In total, there were 2880 studies identified of which 252 studies were included for analysis (100 articles for in vitro studies, 111 studies for animal studies; and 31 studies for human studies). There was a huge variance in cell source in pre-clinical studies both of terms of animal used, location of harvest (fat, marrow, blood or synovium) and allogeneicity. The use of scaffolds, growth factors, number of cell passages and number of cells used was hugely heterogeneous. This review offers a comprehensive assessment of the evidence behind the translation of basic science to the clinical practice of cartilage repair. It has revealed a lack of connectivity between the in vitro, pre

  13. MR imaging of the normal sacroiliac joint with correlation to histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puhakka, K.B.; Jurik, A.G.; Egund, N. [Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus Kommunehospital, 8000, Aarhus (Denmark); Melsen, F. [Institute of Pathology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus Amtssygehus, Aarhus (Denmark); Boel, L.W.; Vesterby, A. [Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic study of the various components of joints provide a proper basis for understanding the nature of pathologic lesions to which they are subject and their imaging appearances. This study was designed to correlate MR imaging with a systematic histological study of the normal sacroiliac joint (SIJ), which to our knowledge is not available in the literature. Five male cadavers, aged 20 to 45 years, and seven male and seven female volunteers, aged 23 to 44 years, were investigated with oblique transaxial and coronal MR imaging of the SIJs. A variety of sequences including pre- and post-contrast T1 fat-saturated studies in the volunteers were used. Cryosectioning was performed in six SIJs of the five cadavers and compared with the MR images for the microscopic joint anatomy and assessed for the presence of abnormalities resembling those associated with sacroiliitis. Throughout the SIJ, the hyaline cartilage of the sacral bone and the proximal third of the hyaline iliac cartilage was strongly attached to the surrounding stabilizing ligaments, forming wide margins of fibrocartilage. In the distal one-third of the joint only, the margins of the iliac joint facet resemble that of a synovial joint, which include an inner capsule with synovial cells. The MR anatomy of the ventral and dorsal aspects of the SIJ was only adequately visualized at oblique transaxial MR imaging. No contrast enhancement occurred in the synovial tissue or in the cartilaginous joint space. The dorsal transition between the proximal 2/3 and distal 1/3 of the cartilaginous joint was at microscopy rich in anatomical and histological variants, including osseous clefts, cartilage and subchondral defects, and vascular connective tissue in the bone marrow. These were all recognized at oblique transaxial MR imaging and in coronal MR sectioning may resemble abnormalities. Otherwise, no erosions, bone marrow abnormalities, bone sclerosis or abnormal contrast enhancement occurred in the normal

  14. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of wrist MRI at 3.0T - Comparison between isotropic 3D turbo spin echo and isotropic 3D fast field echo and 2D turbo spin echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jee Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jung, Jin Young; Choe, Bong-Keun

    2013-01-01

    Background: Isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applied to various joints. However, comparison for image quality between isotropic 3D MRI and two-dimensional (2D) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence of the wrist at a 3T MR system has not been investigated. Purpose: To compare the image quality of isotropic 3D MRI including TSE intermediate-weighted (VISTA) sequence and fast field echo (FFE) sequence with 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequence of the wrist joint at 3.0 T. Material and Methods: MRI was performed in 10 wrists of 10 healthy volunteers with isotropic 3D sequences (VISTA and FFE) and 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequences at 3.0 T. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was obtained by imaging phantom and noise-only image. Contrast ratios (CRs) were calculated between fluid and cartilage, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and the scapholunate ligament. Two radiologists independently assessed the visibility of TFCC, carpal ligaments, cartilage, tendons and nerves with a four-point grading scale. Statistical analysis to compare CRs (one way ANOVA with a Tukey test) and grades of visibility (Kruskal-Wallis test) between three sequences and those for inter-observer agreement (kappa analysis) were performed. Results: The SNR of 2D TSE (46.26) was higher than those of VISTA (23.34) and 3D FFE (19.41). CRs were superior in 2D TSE than VISTA (P = 0.02) for fluid-cartilage and in 2D TSE than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for fluid-TFCC. The visibility was best in 2D TSE (P < 0.01) for TFCC and in VISTA (P = 0.01) for scapholunate ligament. The visibility was better in 2D TSE and 3D FFE (P 0.04) for cartilage and in VISTA than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for TFCC. The inter-observer agreement for the visibility of anatomic structures was moderate or substantial. Conclusion: Image quality of 2D TSE was superior to isotropic 3D MR imaging for cartilage, and TFCC. 3D FFE has better visibility for cartilage than VISTA and VISTA has superior visibility for

  15. Differentiation of stem cells from human infrapatellar fat pad: characterization of cells undergoing chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felimban, Raed; Ye, Ken; Traianedes, Kathy; Di Bella, Claudia; Crook, Jeremy; Wallace, Gordon G; Quigley, Anita; Choong, Peter F M; Myers, Damian E

    2014-08-01

    Hyaline cartilage repair is a significant challenge in orthopedics and current techniques result in formation of fibrocartilage. Human infrapatellar fat pad (hIPFP)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of differentiation into multiple tissue lineages, including cartilage and bone. Chondrogenesis is a crucial part of normal skeletal development but the molecular mechanisms are yet to be completely defined. In this study we sourced hIPFP-derived MSCs utilizing chondrogenic growth factors, transforming growth factor beta-3, and bone morphogenetic protein-6, to form hyaline-like cartilage in micromass cultures and we studied chondrogenic development of 7, 14, and 28 days. The purpose of this study was (1) to characterize chondrogenesis from MSCs derived from hIPFP tissue by conventional techniques and (2) to characterize temporal changes of key molecular components during chondrogenesis using microarray gene expression. Endpoints included histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), gene expression profiles using a microarray technique, and changes in expression of specific genes using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Over 14-28 days, clusters of encapsulated chondrocytes formed surrounded by collagen type II and aggrecan in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Collagen type II and aggrecan production was confirmed using IHC and chondrogenic lineage markers were studied; SRY-related transcription factor (SOX9), collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1), and aggrecan gene expression increased significantly over the time course. Normalized microarray highlighted 608 differentially expressed genes; 10 chondrogenic genes were upregulated (2- to 87-fold), including COL2A1, COL10A1, COL9A1, COL11A1, COL9A2, COL11A2, COL1A1, COMP, SOX9, and COL3A1. We found that the upregulated genes (twofold or greater) represent significant level of expression (enrichment score) for the ECM structural constituent of the molecular functional at days 7, 14, and 28 during

  16. Minimally Manipulated Bone Marrow Concentrate Compared with Microfracture Treatment of Full-Thickness Chondral Defects: A One-Year Study in an Equine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Constance R; Fortier, Lisa A; Williams, Ashley; Payne, Karin A; McCarrel, Taralyn M; Bowers, Megan E; Jaramillo, Diego

    2018-01-17

    Microfracture is commonly performed for cartilage repair but usually results in fibrocartilage. Microfracture augmented by autologous bone marrow concentrate (BMC) was previously shown to yield structurally superior cartilage repairs in an equine model compared with microfracture alone. The current study was performed to test the hypothesis that autologous BMC without concomitant microfracture improves cartilage repair compared with microfracture alone. Autologous sternal bone marrow aspirate (BMA) was concentrated using a commercial system. Cells from BMC were evaluated for chondrogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. Bilateral full-thickness chondral defects (15-mm diameter) were created on the midlateral trochlear ridge in 8 horses. Paired defects were randomly assigned to treatment with BMC without concomitant microfracture, or to microfracture alone. The repairs were evaluated at 1 year by in vitro assessment, arthroscopy, morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), quantitative T2-weighted and ultrashort echo time enhanced T2* (UTE-T2*) MRI mapping, and histological assessment. Culture-expanded but not freshly isolated cells from BMA and BMC underwent cartilage differentiation in vitro. In vivo, cartilage repairs in both groups were fibrous to fibrocartilaginous at 1 year of follow-up, with no differences observed between BMC and microfracture by arthroscopy, T2 and UTE-T2* MRI values, and histological assessment (p > 0.05). Morphological MRI showed subchondral bone changes not observed by arthroscopy and improved overall outcomes for the BMC repairs (p = 0.03). Differences in repair tissue UTE-T2* texture features were observed between the treatment groups (p BMC was applied directly to critical-sized, full-thickness chondral defects in an equine model, the cartilage repair results were similar to those of microfracture. Our data suggest that, given the few mesenchymal stem cells in minimally manipulated BMC, other mechanisms such as paracrine, anti

  17. Feasibility and preliminary results of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Klaus [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Luzern, Roentgeninstitut/Nuklearmedizin, Luzern (Switzerland); Steurer-Dober, Isabelle; Huellner, Martin W.; Sol Perez Lago, Maria del; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Tornquist, Katharina [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Silva, Angela J. da [Advanced Molecular Imaging, Philips Healthcare, San Jose, CA (United States); Bodmer, Elvira; Wartburg, Urs von; Hug, Urs [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Division of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and performance of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction. This prospective study included 28 wrists of 27 patients evaluated with SPECT/CT arthrography and MR arthrography. Iodine contrast medium and gadolinium were injected into the distal radioulnar and midcarpal joints. Late-phase SPECT/CT was performed 3.5 h after intravenous injection of approximately 650 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-DPD. MR and SPECT/CT images were separately reviewed in relation to bone marrow oedema, radionuclide uptake, and tears in the scapholunate (SL) and lunotriquetral (LT) ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and an overall diagnosis of ulnar impaction. MR, CT and SPECT/CT imaging findings were compared with each other, with the surgical findings in 12 patients and with clinical follow-up. The quality of MR arthrography and SPECT/CT arthrography images was fully diagnostic in 23 of 28 wrists (82 %) and 25 of 28 wrists (89 %), respectively. SPECT/CT arthrography was not diagnostic for ligament lesions due to insufficient intraarticular contrast in one wrist. MR and SPECT/CT images showed concordant findings regarding TFCC lesions in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %), SL ligament in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %) and LT ligament in 23 of 27 wrists (85 %). Bone marrow oedema on MR images and scintigraphic uptake were concordant in 21 of 28 wrists (75 %). MR images showed partial TFCC defects in four patients with normal SPECT/CT images. MR images showed bone marrow oedema in 4 of 28 wrists (14 %) without scintigraphic uptake, and scintigraphic uptake was present without MR bone marrow oedema in three wrists (11 %). Regarding diagnosis of ulnar impaction the concordance rate between CT and SPECT/CT was 100 % and reached 96 % (27 of 28) between MR and SPECT/CT arthrography. The sensitivity and specificity of MR, CT and SPECT/CT arthrography were 93 %, 100 % and 100 %, and 93 %, 93 % and 93

  18. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The ''rheumatoid'' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with PsA of

  19. Three-Dimensional Bio-Printed Scaffold Sleeves With Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Enhancement of Tendon-to-Bone Healing in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Soft-Tissue Tendon Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sin Hyung; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Moon, Sang Won; Lee, Byung Hoon; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Cho, Dong-Woo; Wang, Joon Ho

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of the insertion of 3-dimensional (3D) bio-printed scaffold sleeves seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to enhance osteointegration between the tendon and tunnel bone in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a rabbit model. Scaffold sleeves were fabricated by 3D bio-printing. Before ACL reconstruction, MSCs were seeded into the scaffold sleeves. ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon was performed on both legs of 15 adult rabbits (aged 12 weeks). We implanted 15 bone tunnels with scaffold sleeves with MSCs and implanted another 15 bone tunnels with scaffold sleeves without MSCs before passing the graft. The specimens were harvested at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. H&E staining, immunohistochemical staining of type II collagen, and micro-computed tomography of the tunnel cross-sectional area were evaluated. Histologic assessment was conducted with a histologic scoring system. In the histologic assessment, a smooth bone-to-tendon transition through broad fibrocartilage formation was identified in the treatment group, and the interface zone showed abundant type II collagen production on immunohistochemical staining. Bone-tendon healing histologic scores were significantly higher in the treatment group than in the control group at all time points. Micro-computed tomography at 12 weeks showed smaller tibial (control, 9.4 ± 0.9 mm 2 ; treatment, 5.8 ± 2.9 mm 2 ; P = .044) and femoral (control, 9.6 ± 2.9 mm 2 ; treatment, 6.0 ± 1.0 mm 2 ; P = .03) bone-tunnel areas in the treated group than in the control group. The 3D bio-printed scaffold sleeve with MSCs exhibited excellent results in osteointegration enhancement between the tendon and tunnel bone in ACL reconstruction in a rabbit model. If secure biological healing between the tendon graft and tunnel bone can be induced in the early postoperative period, earlier, more successful rehabilitation may be facilitated. Three-dimensional bio-printed scaffold sleeves with

  20. Healing improvement after rotator cuff repair using gelatin-grafted poly(L-lactide) electrospun fibrous membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Xie, Xiaoxing; Pan, Guoqing; Shen, Peng; Zhao, Jinzhong; Cui, Wenguo

    2015-01-01

    fibrocartilage, and improve collagen organization compared with repair alone. Augmentation with gelatin-grafted PLLA may enhance healing after RC repair and might eventually lead to improvement of clinical surgical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Initial experience with 3D isotropic high-resolution 3 T MR arthrography of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, John K; Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; J Yu, Hon; Rafijah, Gregory; Hitt, David; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-16

    obliquity to follow the components of ulnar side wrist structures including triangular fibrocartilage complex. Additionally, isotropic imaging provides thinner slice thickness with less partial volume averaging allowing for identification of subtle injuries.

  2. Arthroplasty of the distal ulna distal in managing patients with post-traumatic disorders of the distal radioulnar joint: measurement of quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Aurélio Aita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To measure the quality of life and clinical-functional results from patients diagnosed with osteoarthrosis of the distal radioulnar joint who underwent surgical treatment using the technique of total arthroplasty of the ulna, with a total or partial Ascension(r prosthesis of the distal ulna. METHODS: Ten patients were evaluated after 12 months of follow-up subsequent to total or partial arthroplasty of the distal ulna. All of them presented post-traumatic osteoarthrosis and/or chronic symptomatic instability of the distal radioulnar joint. The study was prospective. Seven patients had previously undergone wrist procedures (two cases with Darrach, three with Sauvé-Kapandji and two with ligament reconstruction of the fibrocartilage complex and three presented fractures of the distal ulna that evolved with pain, instability and osteoarthrosis of the distal radioulnar joint. The following were assessed: quality of life (DASH scale; percentage degree of palm grip strength (kgf and pronosupination range of motion in relation to the unaffected side; pain (VAS; return to work; subjective evaluation of radiography; and complications. RESULTS: The patients presented a mean range of motion of 174.5° (normal side: 180°. Quality of life was analyzed by applying the DASH questionnaire and the mean value found was 5.9. The mean pain score using the VAS was 2.3. The mean degree of palm grip strength (kgf was 50.7, which represented 90.7% of the strength on the unaffected side. The complication rate was 10%: this patient presented slight dorsal instability of the ulna and persistent pain, and did not return to work. This patient is still being followed up in the outpatient clinic and occupational therapy sector, with little improvement. He does not wish to undergo a new procedure. The mean length of follow-up was 16.8 months, with a minimum of 10 and maximum of 36 months. CONCLUSION: This concept is subject to the test of time

  3. Culture of equine fibroblast-like synoviocytes on synthetic tissue scaffolds towards meniscal tissue engineering: a preliminary cell-seeding study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Warnock

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tissue engineering is a new methodology for addressing meniscal injury or loss. Synovium may be an ideal source of cells for in vitro meniscal fibrocartilage formation, however, favorable in vitro culture conditions for synovium must be established in order to achieve this goal. The objective of this study was to determine cellularity, cell distribution, and extracellular matrix (ECM formation of equine fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS cultured on synthetic scaffolds, for potential application in synovium-based meniscal tissue engineering. Scaffolds included open-cell poly-L-lactic acid (OPLA sponges and polyglycolic acid (PGA scaffolds cultured in static and dynamic culture conditions, and PGA scaffolds coated in poly-L-lactic (PLLA in dynamic culture conditions.Materials and Methods. Equine FLS were seeded on OPLA and PGA scaffolds, and cultured in a static environment or in a rotating bioreactor for 12 days. Equine FLS were also seeded on PGA scaffolds coated in 2% or 4% PLLA and cultured in a rotating bioreactor for 14 and 21 days. Three scaffolds from each group were fixed, sectioned and stained with Masson’s Trichrome, Safranin-O, and Hematoxylin and Eosin, and cell numbers and distribution were analyzed using computer image analysis. Three PGA and OPLA scaffolds from each culture condition were also analyzed for extracellular matrix (ECM production via dimethylmethylene blue (sulfated glycosaminoglycan assay and hydroxyproline (collagen assay. PLLA coated PGA scaffolds were analyzed using double stranded DNA quantification as areflection of cellularity and confocal laser microscopy in a fluorescent cell viability assay.Results. The highest cellularity occurred in PGA constructs cultured in a rotating bioreactor, which also had a mean sulfated glycosaminoglycan content of 22.3 µg per scaffold. PGA constructs cultured in static conditions had the lowest cellularity. Cells had difficulty adhering to OPLA and the PLLA

  4. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of wrist MRI at 3.0T - Comparison between isotropic 3D turbo spin echo and isotropic 3D fast field echo and 2D turbo spin echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jee Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chungang Univ. Hospital, School of Medicine, Chungang Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Cheol [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ. (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: ycyoon@skku.edu; Jung, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Saint Paul' s Hospital, The Catholic Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong-Keun [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applied to various joints. However, comparison for image quality between isotropic 3D MRI and two-dimensional (2D) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence of the wrist at a 3T MR system has not been investigated. Purpose: To compare the image quality of isotropic 3D MRI including TSE intermediate-weighted (VISTA) sequence and fast field echo (FFE) sequence with 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequence of the wrist joint at 3.0 T. Material and Methods: MRI was performed in 10 wrists of 10 healthy volunteers with isotropic 3D sequences (VISTA and FFE) and 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequences at 3.0 T. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was obtained by imaging phantom and noise-only image. Contrast ratios (CRs) were calculated between fluid and cartilage, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and the scapholunate ligament. Two radiologists independently assessed the visibility of TFCC, carpal ligaments, cartilage, tendons and nerves with a four-point grading scale. Statistical analysis to compare CRs (one way ANOVA with a Tukey test) and grades of visibility (Kruskal-Wallis test) between three sequences and those for inter-observer agreement (kappa analysis) were performed. Results: The SNR of 2D TSE (46.26) was higher than those of VISTA (23.34) and 3D FFE (19.41). CRs were superior in 2D TSE than VISTA (P = 0.02) for fluid-cartilage and in 2D TSE than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for fluid-TFCC. The visibility was best in 2D TSE (P < 0.01) for TFCC and in VISTA (P = 0.01) for scapholunate ligament. The visibility was better in 2D TSE and 3D FFE (P 0.04) for cartilage and in VISTA than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for TFCC. The inter-observer agreement for the visibility of anatomic structures was moderate or substantial. Conclusion: Image quality of 2D TSE was superior to isotropic 3D MR imaging for cartilage, and TFCC. 3D FFE has better visibility for cartilage than VISTA and VISTA has superior visibility for

  5. Direct lentiviral-cyclooxygenase 2 application to the tendon-bone interface promotes osteointegration and enhances return of the pull-out tensile strength of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H Rundle

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine if direct application of the lentiviral (LV-cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 vector to the tendon-bone interface would promote osteointegration of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy was chosen for investigation because a similar COX2 gene transfer strategy promoted bony bridging of the fracture gap during bone repair, which involves similar histologic transitions that occur in osteointegration. Briefly, a 1.14-mm diameter tunnel was drilled in the mid-groove of the humerus of adult Fischer 344 rats. The LV-COX2 or βgal control vector was applied directly into the bone tunnel and onto the end of the tendon graft, which was then pulled into the bone tunnel. A poly-L-lactide pin was press-fitted into the tunnel as interference fixation. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 5, or 8 weeks for histology analysis of osteointegration. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy enhanced neo-chondrogenesis at the tendon-bone interface but with only marginal effect on de novo bone formation. The tendon-bone interface of the LV-COX2-treated tenodesis showed the well-defined tendon-to-fibrocartilage-to-bone histologic transitions that are indicative of osteointegration of the tendon graft. The LV-COX2 in vivo gene transfer strategy also significantly enhanced angiogenesis at the tendon-bone interface. To determine if the increased osteointegration was translated into an improved pull-out mechanical strength property, the pull-out tensile strength of the LV-COX2-treated tendon grafts was determined with a pull-out mechanical testing assay. The LV-COX2 strategy yielded a significant improvement in the return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft after 8 weeks. In conclusion, the COX2-based in vivo gene transfer strategy enhanced angiogenesis, osteointegration and improved return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft. Thus, this strategy has great potential to be developed into an

  6. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States); University of California Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences R-140, Orange, CA (United States); Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The 'rheumatoid' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with

  7. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel W. Pot

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found. For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0–100% scale. Implantation of acellular

  8. Harnessing biomechanics to develop cartilage regeneration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Responte, Donald J; Brown, Wendy E; Hu, Jerry C

    2015-02-01

    As this review was prepared specifically for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers H.R. Lissner Medal, it primarily discusses work toward cartilage regeneration performed in Dr. Kyriacos A. Athanasiou's laboratory over the past 25 years. The prevalence and severity of degeneration of articular cartilage, a tissue whose main function is largely biomechanical, have motivated the development of cartilage tissue engineering approaches informed by biomechanics. This article provides a review of important steps toward regeneration of articular cartilage with suitable biomechanical properties. As a first step, biomechanical and biochemical characterization studies at the tissue level were used to provide design criteria for engineering neotissues. Extending this work to the single cell and subcellular levels has helped to develop biochemical and mechanical stimuli for tissue engineering studies. This strong mechanobiological foundation guided studies on regenerating hyaline articular cartilage, the knee meniscus, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) fibrocartilage. Initial tissue engineering efforts centered on developing biodegradable scaffolds for cartilage regeneration. After many years of studying scaffold-based cartilage engineering, scaffoldless approaches were developed to address deficiencies of scaffold-based systems, resulting in the self-assembling process. This process was further improved by employing exogenous stimuli, such as hydrostatic pressure, growth factors, and matrix-modifying and catabolic agents, both singly and in synergistic combination to enhance neocartilage functional properties. Due to the high cell needs for tissue engineering and the limited supply of native articular chondrocytes, costochondral cells are emerging as a suitable cell source. Looking forward, additional cell sources are investigated to render these technologies more translatable. For example, dermis isolated adult stem (DIAS) cells show potential as a source of

  9. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot, Michiel W; Gonzales, Veronica K; Buma, Pieter; IntHout, Joanna; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; de Vries, Rob B M; Daamen, Willeke F

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling) compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP) using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found). For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies) was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0-100% scale. Implantation of acellular biomaterials significantly

  10. Direct MR Arthrography of the wrist in comparison with Arthroscopy: A prospective study on 125 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Christopoulos, G.; Coblenz, G.; Froehner, S.; Meier, R.; Lanz, U.; Krimmer, H.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In literature the diagnostic value of MRI for detecting lesions of the carpal ligaments and the TFCC is judged controversially. The aim of the following study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of direct MR arthrography for depicting and staging of intraarticular lesions of the wrist. Material and methods: One day before undergoing arthroscopy, 125 patients suffering from wrist pain were examined with direct MR arthrography in a prospective and blinded study. A mixture of contrast medium (iodine-containing contrast medium and gadopentetate in relation 200:1) was injected into both radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5T scanner: coronal T1-weighted SE, coronal fat-saturated T1-weighted SE, coronal T1-/T2*-DESS-3D, and sagittal T2*-weighted MEDIC. MRI results were compared with arthroscopic findings using statistical analysis (SEN=sensitivity, SPE=specificity, PPV=positive predictive value, NPV=negative predictive value, ACC=accuracy). Results: In comparison to arthroscopy as the accepted diagnostic gold standard, the following results were found for MR arthrography. Detection of TFCC lesions: SEN 97.1%, SPE 96.4%, PPV 97.1%, NPV 96.4%, ACC 96.8%. Detection of complete tears of the scapholunate ligament: SEN 91.7%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 99.1%, ACC 99.2%. Detection of partial tears: SEN 62.5%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 94.8%, ACC 95.2%. Detection of cartilage defects: SEN 84.2%, SPE 96.2%, PPV 80%, NPV 97.1%, ACC 94.4%. In total, only three lesions of the lunotriquetral ligament were present. Conclusion: Direct MR arthrographic imaging is well suited for detecting intraarticular lesions of the wrist. The presented diagnostic results of MR arthrography are superior to the results of unenhanced MRI reported in the literature. Direct MR arthrography as a reliable diagnostic tool is strongly recommended if lesions of the scapholunate ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage complex are suspected. In contrast, an

  11. Inhibition of 5-LOX, COX-1, and COX-2 increases tendon healing and reduces muscle fibrosis and lipid accumulation after rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, Nikhil R; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Flood, Michael D; Saripalli, Anjali L; Davis, Max E; Harning, Julie A; Lynch, Evan B; Roche, Stuart M; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2014-12-01

    The repair and restoration of function after chronic rotator cuff tears are often complicated by muscle atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty degeneration of the diseased muscle. The inflammatory response has been implicated in the development of fatty degeneration after cuff injuries. Licofelone is a novel anti-inflammatory drug that inhibits 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 enzymes, which play important roles in inducing inflammation after injuries. While previous studies have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and selective inhibitors of COX-2 (coxibs) may prevent the proper healing of muscles and tendons, studies about bone and cartilage have demonstrated that drugs that inhibit 5-LOX concurrently with COX-1 and COX-2 may enhance tissue regeneration. After the repair of a chronic rotator cuff tear in rats, licofelone would increase the load to failure of repaired tendons and increase the force production of muscle fibers. Controlled laboratory study. Rats underwent supraspinatus release followed by repair 28 days later. After repair, rats began a treatment regimen of either licofelone or a vehicle for 14 days, at which time animals were euthanized. Supraspinatus muscles and tendons were then subjected to contractile, mechanical, histological, and biochemical analyses. Compared with controls, licofelone-treated rats had a grossly apparent decrease in inflammation and increased fibrocartilage formation at the enthesis, along with a 62% increase in the maximum load to failure and a 51% increase in peak stress to failure. Licofelone resulted in a marked reduction in fibrosis and lipid content in supraspinatus muscles as well as reduced expression of several genes involved in fatty infiltration. Despite the decline in fibrosis and fat accumulation, muscle fiber specific force production was reduced by 23%. The postoperative treatment of cuff repair with licofelone may reduce fatty degeneration and enhance the development

  12. Calcium-phosphate matrix with or without TGF-β3 improves tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, David; Fox, Alice J; Bedi, Asheesh; Ying, Liang; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A

    2011-04-01

    Rotator cuff tendon heals by formation of an interposed zone of fibrovascular scar tissue. Recent studies demonstrate that transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-β(3)) is associated with tissue regeneration and "scarless" healing, in contrast to scar-mediated healing that occurs with TGF-β(1). Delivery of TGF-β(3) in an injectable calcium-phosphate matrix to the healing tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair will result in increased attachment strength secondary to improved bone formation and collagen organization and reduced scar formation of the healing enthesis. Controlled laboratory study. Ninety-six male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon followed by acute repair using transosseous suture fixation. Animals were allocated into 1 of 3 groups: (1) repair alone (controls, n = 32), (2) repair augmented by application of an osteoconductive calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) matrix only (n = 32), or (3) repair augmented with Ca-P matrix + TGF-β(3) (2.75 µg) at the tendon-bone interface (n = 32). Animals were euthanized at either 2 weeks or 4 weeks postoperatively. Biomechanical testing of the supraspinatus tendon-bone complex was performed at 2 and 4 weeks (n = 8 per group). Microcomputed tomography was utilized to quantitate bone microstructure at the repair site. The healing tendon-bone interface was evaluated with histomorphometry and immunohistochemical localization of collagen types I (COLI) and III (COLIII). Statistical analysis was performed using 2-way analysis of variance with significance set at P repair site is associated with new bone formation, increased fibrocartilage, and improved collagen organization at the healing tendon-bone interface in the early postoperative period after rotator cuff repair. The addition of TGF-β(3) significantly improved strength of the repair at 4 weeks postoperatively and resulted in a more favorable COLI/COLIII ratio. The delivery of TGF-β(3) with an injectable Ca-P matrix

  13. Efficacy of bone marrow-stimulating technique in rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilsel, Kerem; Yildiz, Fatih; Kapicioglu, Mehmet; Uzer, Gokcer; Elmadag, Mehmet; Pulatkan, Anil; Esrefoglu, Mukaddes; Bozdag, Ergun; Milano, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    This study used a chronic rotator cuff (RC) tear model to investigate the effect of microfracture as a bone marrow-stimulating (BMS) technique for RC healing. A chronic retracted RC tendon tear model was created bilaterally in the subscapularis tendons of 20 New Zealand rabbits. The tendons were repaired after 8 weeks using a single-row configuration. Tendons in the right shoulder were repaired in standard fashion (control group). Microfractures were performed in the left shoulders before repair (microfracture group). The animals were euthanized 8 and 16 weeks after repair. The repaired tendons were tested biomechanically for their ultimate failure load, linear stiffness, and elongation at failure. Gross and histologic evaluations of the tendon-to-bone healing were evaluated. Macroscopically, subscapularis tendons were attached on the lesser tuberosity. In the microfracture group, collagen fibers were organized in relatively thicker bundles. The mean ultimate failure load of the microfracture group was significantly greater at 8 weeks (148.4 ± 31 N vs. 101.4 ± 26 N, respectively; P = .011) and 16 weeks (155 ± 30 N vs. 114.9 ± 25 N, respectively; P = .017) after repair. There were no significant differences between the groups for linear stiffness at 8 weeks (15.9 ± 2.7 N/mm vs. 15.8 ± 1.3 N/mm, respectively; P = .798) and 16 weeks (16.9 ± 4.3 N/mm vs. 17.1 ± 3.6 N/mm, respectively, P = .848) and elongation at failure at 8 weeks (4.7 ± 1.1 mm vs. 4.7 ± 1.3 mm, respectively; P = .848) and 16 weels (4.8 ± 1.5 mm vs. 4.9 ± 0.9 mm, respectively; P = .749). The microfracture on the tuberosity of the repaired chronic rotator cuff tear promoted dynamic tendon healing with significantly increased ultimate force to failure and with thicker collagen bundles and more fibrocartilage histologically at 8 weeks. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of

  14. Rapidly dissociated autologous meniscus tissue enhances meniscus healing: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numpaisal, Piya-On; Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Gottardi, Riccardo; Chien, Chung-Liang; Tuan, Rocky S

    Treatment of meniscus tears is a persistent challenge in orthopedics. Although cell therapies have shown promise in promoting fibrocartilage formation in in vitro and preclinical studies, clinical application has been limited by the paucity of autologous tissue and the need for ex vivo cell expansion. Rapid dissociation of the free edges of the anterior and posterior meniscus with subsequent implantation in a meniscus lesion may overcome these limitations. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of rapidly dissociated meniscus tissue in enhancing neotissue formation in a radial meniscus tear, as simulated in an in vitro explant model. All experiments in this study, performed at minimum with biological triplicates, utilized meniscal tissues from hind limbs of young cows. The effect of varying collagenase concentration (0.1%, 0.2% and 0.5% w/v) and treatment duration (overnight and 30 minutes) on meniscus cell viability, organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM), and gene expression was assessed through a cell metabolism assay, microscopic examination, and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, respectively. Thereafter, an explant model of a radial meniscus tear was used to evaluate the effect of a fibrin gel seeded with one of the following: (1) fibrin alone, (2) isolated and passaged (P2) meniscus cells, (3) overnight digested tissue, and (4) rapidly dissociated tissue. The quality of in vitro healing was determined through histological analysis and derivation of an adhesion index. Rapid dissociation in 0.2% collagenase yielded cells with higher levels of metabolism than either 0.1% or 0.5% collagenase. When seeded in a three-dimensional fibrin hydrogel, both overnight digested and rapidly dissociated cells expressed greater levels of collagens type I and II than P2 meniscal cells at 1 week. At 4 and 8 weeks, collagen type II expression remained elevated only in the rapid dissociation group. Histological

  15. Anatomical region-dependent enhancement of 3-dimensional chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells by soluble meniscus extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Shimomura, Kazunori; Gottardi, Riccardo; Alexander, Peter G; Tuan, Rocky S

    2017-02-01

    decellularized meniscus tissue may promote homologous differentiation of progenitor cells, thereby enhancing fibrocartilage formation within a meniscal lesion. However, the meniscus possesses regional variation in ultrastructure, biochemical composition, and cell phenotype, which may affect the bioactivity of soluble ECM derived from different regions of decellularized menisci. In this study, we demonstrate that urea-extracted fractions of ECM derived from the inner and outer regions of menisci enhance chondrogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells seeded in 3-dimensional photocrosslinkable hydrogels and that this effect is more strongly mediated by inner meniscal ECM. These findings suggest region-specific bioactivity of decellularized meniscal ECM. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cartilage T2 assessment: differentiation of normal hyaline cartilage and reparative tissue after arthroscopic cartilage repair in equine subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lawrence M; Sussman, Marshall S; Hurtig, Mark; Probyn, Linda; Tomlinson, George; Kandel, Rita

    2006-11-01

    significant trend of increasing T2 values (from deep to superficial) was found in hyaline cartilage (P .59). Qualitative and quantitative T2 mapping helped differentiate hyaline cartilage from reparative fibrocartilage after cartilage repair at 1.5-T MR imaging.

  17. The post-arthro-CT of the wrist: clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurecker, G.

    2001-03-01

    To compare the diagnostic effectiveness of post-arthro-CT (PACT) and 3-compartment wrist arthrography (AG) both separate and combined versus wrist arthroscopy for scapho-lunate ligament (SLL), luno-triquetral ligament (LTL) and triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) defects and chondromalacia of the carpal bones. Material and methods: In 58 patients (16-69 years) the affected wrist was examined initially by conventional 3-compartment wrist arthrography with digital subtraction technique during injection followed by digital stress images. Afterwards spiral arthro-CT was performed in the semi-coronal and axial plane with 1 mm slice thickness and secondary true-coronal and sagittal reconstructions. Within 1 month arthroscopy was performed in general anesthesia utilizing standard joint entry points combined with routine digital picture archiving. All examinations were evaluated for SLL, LTL and TFC defects, PACT and AS for ChM too. Results: AG versus AS: The following detection rates were observed (AG and AS positive/AG negative - AS positive/AG positive - AS negative/ AG and AS negative): SLL: 16/8/0/34, LTL: 13/4/8/33, TFC: 28/5/1/24. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity (%) values: SLL 67/100, LTL 76/80, TFC 85/96. PACT versus AS: The following detection rates were observed (PACT and AS positive/PACT negative - AS positive/PACT positive - AS negative/ PACT and AS negative): SLL: 18/6/0/34, LTL: 15/2/8/33, TFC: 31/2/2/23, ChM: 20/15/3/20. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity (%) values: SLL 75/100, LTL 88/80, TFC 94/92, ChM 57/87. AG+PACT versus AS: The following detection rates were observed (AG+PACT and AS positive/AG+PACT negative - AS positive/AG+PACT positive - AS negative/ AG+PACT and AS negative): SLL: 19/5/0/34, LTL: 15/2/8/33, TFC: 31/2/2/23, ChM 20/15/3/20. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity

  18. The post-arthro-CT of the wrist: clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurecker, G.

    2001-03-01

    To compare the diagnostic effectiveness of post-arthro-CT (PACT) and 3-compartment wrist arthrography (AG) both separate and combined versus wrist arthroscopy for scapho-lunate ligament (SLL), luno-triquetral ligament (LTL) and triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) defects and chondromalacia of the carpal bones. Material and methods: in 58 patients (16-69 years) the affected wrist was examined initially by conventional 3-compartment wrist arthrography with digital subtraction technique during injection followed by digital stress images. Afterwards spiral arthro-CT was performed in the semi-coronal and axial plane with 1 mm slice thickness and secondary true-coronal and sagittal reconstructions. Within 1 month arthroscopy was performed in general anesthesia utilizing standard joint entry points combined with routine digital picture archiving. All examinations were evaluated for SLL, LTL and TFC defects, PACT and AS for ChM too. Results: AG versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG and AS positive/AG negative - AS positive/AG positive - AS negative/ AG and AS negative): SLL: 16/8/0/34, LTL: 13/4/8/33, TFC: 28/5/1/24. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity (%) values: SLL 67/100, LTL 76/80, TFC 85/96. PACT versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (PACT and AS positive/PACT negative - AS positive/PACT positive - AS negative/ PACT and AS negative): SLL: 18/6/0/34, LTL: 15/2/8/33, TFC: 31/2/2/23, ChM: 20/15/3/20. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity (%) values: SLL 75/100, LTL 88/80, TFC 94/92, ChM 57/87. AG+PACT versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG+PACT and AS positive/AG+PACT negative - AS positive/AG+PACT positive - AS negative/ AG+PACT and AS negative): SLL: 19/5/0/34, LTL: 15/2/8/33, TFC: 31/2/2/23, ChM 20/15/3/20. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity

  19. Estudo macroscópico e histológico de reparos osteocondrais biologicamente aceitáveis Macroscopic and histological study of biologically acceptable osteochondral repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Leão Ribeiro

    2004-03-01

    . The macroscopic evaluation of all defects demostrated evolution in repairs called "biologically acceptable". The "biologically acceptable" term was used to define repairs, that at macrocospic observation, presented as neo-formed tissue similar to fibrocartilage, brilliant, smooth, firm, in continuity with the adjacent cartilage. As all the defects, treated and untreated, were macroscopically similar, a histological comparative study was made to verify which type of repair tissue was formed in the surface of both defects. By histologic analysis of the biologically acceptable repairs, the authors conclude that: treated defects with autologous grafts were filled with hyaline cartilaginous tissue and untreated defects were filled with fibrocartilaginous tissue.

  20. Enhancement of Tendon–Bone Healing for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL Reconstruction Using Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Infected with BMP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyi Chen

    2012-10-01

    histological findings, there was an increased amount of perpendicular collagen fibers formed between the tendon and bone in the bMSCs+Lv-Control and bMSCs+Lv-BMP-2 group, compared with the gastrocnemius tendons. The proliferation of cartilage-like cells and the formation of fibrocartilage-like tissue were highest within the bone tunnels in the bMSCs+Lv-BMP-2 group. These results suggest that this lentivirus can be used to efficiently infect bMSCs with BMP-2. Furthermore, tendons wrapped by bMSCs+Lv-BMP-2 improved tendon–bone healing.

  1. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Although assessment of internal derangements of the knee begins with clinical evaluation including careful physical examination, imaging is fundamental to accurate diagnosis of many of these derangements. MRI has become a valuable diagnostic modality for the evaluation of neoplastic, traumatic, and inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. MRI not only depicts osseous lesions, but provides information on the cartilage, menisci, ligaments and surrounding soft-tissues. The menisci of the knee are composed of fibrocartilage. Advanced degeneration is observed during aging, although it is difficult to determine which changes are age-related alone and which are caused by prior overuse of trauma. Although meniscal tears may be discovered incidentally, they may have a variety of clinical manifestations. Two categories of meniscal tears commonly are identified: traumatic and degenerative. This categorization generally is based on analysis of the clinical history, the age of the patients, and the gross morphology of the meniscus at the time of arthroscopy. Sometimes torn meniscal fragments may be displaced and lead to restriction of movement in the knee joint. MRI is the method of choice in the preoperative diagnosis of meniscal injuries of the knee. Sensitivities and specificities for meniscal tears above 95% with a negative predictive value of almost 100% are reported. In the evaluation of postoperative menisci, however, the above mentioned criteria have proved more problematic if diagnosis is uncertain, therefore, MR-arthrography seems to be a reasonable alternative to repeat arthroscopy in patients who have had surgical treatment of meniscal tears. MR imaging diagnosis of injuries to the anterior acruciate ligament is based on direct signs and abnormalities in the surrounding structures (indirect or secondary signs). The two major alterations occurring within the ligament itself are changes in this morphology or courses and changes in its signal

  2. Tissue Engineering Based Therapy for Articular Cartilage Defects - A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage, the load-bearing tissue in diarthrodial joints, when damaged due to trauma could lead to osteoarthritis. At present Autologous Cartilage Implantation is an established method in which patients own chondrocytes are isolated and then implanted after in vitro expansion over the affected area with bovine or porcine collagen matrix. This procedure results in more of Collagen Type I during in vitro expansion, which eventually becomes fibrocartilage. Also it requires growth factors. We have in this study tried growing human Chondrocytes without growth factors using synthetic scaffolds to grow more Collagen Type II Materials and Methods: Human cartilage specimens were harvested through arthroscopy from the non-weight bearing area of the knee joint from 13 patients who underwent surgical procedures of the knee joint after getting their informed consent. The tissues were transported in saline taking 1 hour to laboratory and subjected to digestion with Collagenase type II for 16~18 Hrs. The chondrocyte cells obtained after dissociation were divided into two groups for culture. Gr. I were embedded in a Thermogelation polymer (TGP and Gr. II in basal culture media (DMEM + Ascorbic Acid without using any growth factors. The Group II cells were viable only for 4 weeks and then started degenerating. The TGP-Chondrocytes scaffolds were grown for 16 weeks and the specimens were harvested at 4, 8, 12 and 16-week intervals and their morphology and molecular characteristics were studied by H&E staining, S-100 protein analysis and RT-PCR.Results: Human chondrocytes could be cultured in both TGP (group I and Basal culture media (group II. The Gr. I cells were viable upto the 16th week while the Group II chondrocytes started degenerating after the 4 week. Both the groups were proven positive for S-100 protein, a Chondrocyte specific marker protein; Gr. II specimens after 4 weeks, and Gr. I specimens after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks. RT

  3. Positive effects of cell-free porous PLGA implants and early loading exercise on hyaline cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Jen; Lin, Chih-Chan; Shie, Ming-You; Yeh, Ming-Long; Li, Chien-Feng; Liang, Peir-In; Lee, Kuan-Wei; Shen, Pei-Hsun; Chu, Chih-Jou

    2015-12-01

    -thickness osteochondral regeneration in rabbit knee joint models. Promoting effective hyaline cartilage regeneration rather than fibrocartilage scar tissue remains clinically challenging. To address the obstacle, we fabricated a spongy cell-free PLGA scaffold, and designed a reasonable exercise program to generate combined therapeutic effects. First, the implanting scaffold generates an affordable mechanical structure to bear the loading forces and bridge with the host to offer a space in the full-thickness osteochondral regeneration in rabbit knee joint. After implantation, rabbits were performed by an early treadmill exercise 15 min/day, 5 days/week for 2 weeks that directly exerts in situ endogenous growth factor and anti-inflammatory effects in the reparative site. The advanced therapeutic strategy showed that neo-hyaline cartilage formation with enriched collagen type II, higher glycosaminoglycan, integrating subchondral bone formation and modest inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Restricted motion after total knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T; Urban, K; Karpas, K; Sponer, P

    2007-10-01

    patients. In these, the average value of knee flexion increased by 17 degrees only and, in the patients suffering from excessive adhesion production, this value remained almost unchanged. Revision TKA was carried out in four patients, in whom knee joint flexion increased on average by 35 degrees to achieve an average flexion of 83 degrees. Restricted motion after TKA has been reported to range from 1.3 % to 12.0 %, but consistent criteria have not been set up. In our study it was 4.14 %. In agreement with the literature data, one of the reasons was pre-operative restricted motion, which was recorded in 16 of 32 patients. Similarly, also in our patients, biological predisposition to excessive production of fibrocartilage associated with adhesions in all knee joint compartments was the major therapeutic problem. Intra-operative fractures, ligament tears requiring post-operative fixation and unremoved dorsal osteophytes lead to the restriction of knee joint motion. By inadequate resection of articular surface, the original joint line may be at a higher level; this results in an increased tension of the posterior cruciate ligament and patella infera development, both influencing knee flexion. In our study, three patients were affected. Knee joint stiffness can also develop in patients declining physical therapy or in whom this is not correctly performed, often for insufficient analgesia. In contrast to the data reported in the literature, 17 of 32 patients in this study had no need for surgical treatment of restricted knee joint motion. Redress under general anesthesia was not effective. For markedly restricted motion of the knee joint, reimplantation can be recommended or, in less severe cases, an intervention on adjacent soft tissues. Restricted motion of the knee joint after TKA is difficult to treat and, therefore, prevention is recommended. This should include thorough conservative treatment of gonarthrosis, early indication for surgery, prevention of elevation in the

  5. Histological and MR quantitative analysis of repaired tissue following microfracture treatment for knee joint osteochondritis dissecans in rabbit models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Hongyue; Chen Shuang; Feng Xiaoyuan; Wang Zhan; Li Hong; Hua Yinghui; Chen Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    fully recovered while the defects of the debridement in 7-week group were not. The T_2 value index of microfracture group was lower than that of debridement group at 3-week point (1.338 ± 0.043 vs 1.510 ± 0.009, t = 6.583, P < 0.05), but it was higher than that of debridement group at 5-week and 7-week points (5-week: 1.284 ± 0.097 vs 1.116 ± 0.068, t = 2.663; 7-week: 0.916 ± 0.036 vs 0.843 ± 0.016, t = 3.283; P < 0.05). The O'Driscoll score of microfracture group was higher than that of joint debridement at every time point (3-week: 7.167 ± 0.753 vs 4.667 ± 0.577, t = 5.000; 5-week: 9.833 ± 1.169 vs 7.667 ± 0.577, t = 2.960; 7-week: 11.167 ± 0.753 vs 8.333 ± 1.155, t = 4.520; P < 0.05). For microfracture group, the RT was mainly repaired by fibrocartilage and got matured gradually with more production of well-distributed collagen fibrils; while for joint debridement group, the RT was mainly repaired by fibrous and scar tissue. Conclusions: The post-operation repairing thickness and tissue composition of microfracture for OCD are superior to that of joint debridement. MR 3D-DESS and T_2-mapping can show the thickness and tissue composition of the RT after OCD treatments, provide effective evaluation of repairing conditions, and they are of great importance on the OCD post-op follow-up. (authors)

  6. Análises histológica e morfométrica do uso de membrana biossintética de celulose em trocleoplastia experimental de cães Histological and morphometric analysis for the use of a biosynthetic cellulose membrane in experimental trochleopasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana S. Iamaguti

    2008-04-01

    membrana de celulose acelerou o processo de reparação tecidual inicial da região da trocleoplastia, apresentando boa integração do tecido neoformado com a cartilagem adjacente.The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a locally made biosynthetic cellulose membrane after experimental trochleoplasty, in order to verify whether its use could support migration of chondrogenic cells. Twelve male and female adult healthy dogs and without claudication were used. All dogs were submitted to trochleoplasty in both pelvic limbs after sedation and epidural anesthesia. In the left hind limb, the biosynthetic cellulose membrane was fixed with simple suture using Polyglactin 910 6-0 after performing trochleoplasty (treated group; whereas in the right limb (control group only trochleoplasty was performed. The dogs were subdivided into 4 subgroups for postoperative evaluation at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days post-surgery. Biopsy was performed after exploratory arthrotomy for histopathologic and morfometric evaluation. At 30 and 60 days post-surgery, more condrocyte-like cells of immature aspect were observed in lesions treated with the cellulose membrane. At 90 days post-surgery the reparative tissue was characterized as mature fibrocartilage-like tissue without difference between the groups. In the control group there was a progressive increase of the number of cells until the end of the evaluation period. Otherwise, when compared to the initial period (15 days, there was an increase in the number of cells until 60 days, followed by a return the initial values at 90 days in the treated group. In comparison to controls, the number of cells was greater in the treated group from 15 to 60 days. Initially, the neoformed repair tissue was thicker in the treated group. From the results of this study, it was concluded that the cellulose membrane shortened the initial tissue repair process in the trochleoplasty area, showing good integration of the neoformed tissue with the adjacent cartilage.

  7. Direct MR Arthrography of the wrist in comparison with Arthroscopy: A prospective study on 125 patients; Direkte MR-Arthrographie des Handgelenks im Vergleich zur Arthroskopie: Eine prospektive Studie an 125 Patienten

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    Schmitt, R.; Christopoulos, G.; Coblenz, G.; Froehner, S. [Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie der Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Meier, R.; Lanz, U.; Krimmer, H. [Klinik fuer Handchirurgie GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Objective: In literature the diagnostic value of MRI for detecting lesions of the carpal ligaments and the TFCC is judged controversially. The aim of the following study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of direct MR arthrography for depicting and staging of intraarticular lesions of the wrist. Material and methods: One day before undergoing arthroscopy, 125 patients suffering from wrist pain were examined with direct MR arthrography in a prospective and blinded study. A mixture of contrast medium (iodine-containing contrast medium and gadopentetate in relation 200:1) was injected into both radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5T scanner: coronal T1-weighted SE, coronal fat-saturated T1-weighted SE, coronal T1-/T2*-DESS-3D, and sagittal T2*-weighted MEDIC. MRI results were compared with arthroscopic findings using statistical analysis (SEN=sensitivity, SPE=specificity, PPV=positive predictive value, NPV=negative predictive value, ACC=accuracy). Results: In comparison to arthroscopy as the accepted diagnostic gold standard, the following results were found for MR arthrography. Detection of TFCC lesions: SEN 97.1%, SPE 96.4%, PPV 97.1%, NPV 96.4%, ACC 96.8%. Detection of complete tears of the scapholunate ligament: SEN 91.7%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 99.1%, ACC 99.2%. Detection of partial tears: SEN 62.5%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 94.8%, ACC 95.2%. Detection of cartilage defects: SEN 84.2%, SPE 96.2%, PPV 80%, NPV 97.1%, ACC 94.4%. In total, only three lesions of the lunotriquetral ligament were present. Conclusion: Direct MR arthrographic imaging is well suited for detecting intraarticular lesions of the wrist. The presented diagnostic results of MR arthrography are superior to the results of unenhanced MRI reported in the literature. Direct MR arthrography as a reliable diagnostic tool is strongly recommended if lesions of the scapholunate ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage complex are suspected. In contrast, an