WorldWideScience

Sample records for fibroblast biology role

  1. Fibroblasts in fibrosis: novel roles and mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Thomas Kendall

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are the most common cell type of the connective tissues found throughout the body and the principal source of the extensive extracellular matrix (ECM characteristic of these tissues. They are also the central mediators of the pathological fibrotic accumulation of ECM and the cellular proliferation and differentiation that occurs in response to prolonged tissue injury and chronic inflammation. The transformation of the fibroblast cell lineage involves classical developmental signaling programs and includes a surprisingly diverse range of precursor cell types—most notably, myofibroblasts that are the apex of the fibrotic phenotype. Myofibroblasts display exaggerated ECM production; constitutively secrete and are hypersensitive to chemical signals such as cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors; and are endowed with a contractile apparatus allowing them to manipulate the ECM fibers physically to close open wounds. In addition to ECM production, fibroblasts have multiple concomitant biological roles, such as in wound healing, inflammation, and angiogenesis, which are each interwoven with the process of fibrosis. We now recognize many common fibroblast-related features across various physiological and pathological protracted processes. Indeed, a new appreciation has emerged for the role of noncancerous fibroblast interactions with tumors in cancer progression. Although the predominant current clinical treatments of fibrosis involve nonspecific immunosuppressive and anti-proliferative drugs, a variety of potential therapies under investigation specifically target fibroblast biology.

  2. Regulating Cancer Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT There is an urgent need to develop both new approaches to the treatment of prostate cancer. Analysis of human prostate...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0512 TITLE: Regulating Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrew...CONTRACT NUMBER Regulating Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0512 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  3. The biology and function of fibroblasts in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Raghu

    2016-08-23

    Among all cells, fibroblasts could be considered the cockroaches of the human body. They survive severe stress that is usually lethal to all other cells, and they are the only normal cell type that can be live-cultured from post-mortem and decaying tissue. Their resilient adaptation may reside in their intrinsic survival programmes and cellular plasticity. Cancer is associated with fibroblasts at all stages of disease progression, including metastasis, and they are a considerable component of the general host response to tissue damage caused by cancer cells. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) become synthetic machines that produce many different tumour components. CAFs have a role in creating extracellular matrix (ECM) structure and metabolic and immune reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment with an impact on adaptive resistance to chemotherapy. The pleiotropic actions of CAFs on tumour cells are probably reflective of them being a heterogeneous and plastic population with context-dependent influence on cancer.

  4. Fibroblasts in myocardial infarction: a role in inflammation and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Arti V.; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblasts do not only serve as matrix-producing reparative cells, but exhibit a wide range of functions in inflammatory and immune responses, angiogenesis and neoplasia. The adult mammalian myocardium contains abundant fibroblasts enmeshed within the interstitial and perivascular extracellular matrix. The current review manuscript discusses the dynamic phenotypic and functional alterations of cardiac fibroblasts following myocardial infarction. Extensive necrosis of cardiomyocytes in the infarcted heart triggers an intense inflammatory reaction. In the early stages of infarct healing, fibroblasts become pro-inflammatory cells, activating the inflammasome and producing cytokines, chemokines and proteases. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as Interleukin-1) delay myofibroblast transformation, until the wound is cleared from dead cells and matrix debris. Resolution of the inflammatory infiltrate is associated with fibroblast migration, proliferation, matrix protein synthesis and myofibroblast conversion. Growth factors and matricellular proteins play an important role in myofibroblast activation during the proliferative phase of healing. Formation of a mature cross-linked scar is associated with clearance of fibroblasts, as poorly-understood inhibitory signals restrain the fibrotic response. However, in the non-infarcted remodeling myocardium, local fibroblasts may remain activated in response to volume and pressure overload and may promote interstitial fibrosis. Considering their abundance, their crucial role in cardiac inflammation and repair, and their involvement in myocardial dysfunction and arrhythmogenesis, cardiac fibroblasts may be key therapeutic targets in cardiac remodeling. PMID:24321195

  5. Fibroblastic reticular cells and their role in viral hemorrhagic fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Keith E; Anderson, Arthur O; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2009-05-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by Ebola, Marburg and Lassa viruses often manifest as multiple organ dysfunction and hemorrhagic shock with high mortality. These viruses target numerous cell types, including monocytes and dendritic cells, which are primary early targets that mediate critical pathogenetic processes. This review focuses on fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), another prevalent infected cell type that is known as a key regulator of circulatory and immune functions. Viral infection of FRCs could have debilitating effects in secondary lymphoid organs and various other tissues. FRCs may also contribute to the spread of these deadly viruses throughout the body. Here, we review the salient features of these VHFs and the biology of FRCs, emphasizing the potential role of these cells in VHFs and the rapid deterioration of immune and hemovascular sytems that are characteristic of such acute infections.

  6. The Colorectal Cancer Microenvironment: Strategies for Studying the Role of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhome, Rahul; Mellone, Massimiliano; Emo, Katherine; Thomas, Gareth J; Sayan, A Emre; Mirnezami, Alex H

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a key public health concern and the second highest cause of cancer related death in Western society. A dynamic interaction exists between CRC cells and the surrounding tumor microenvironment, which can stimulate not only the development of CRC, but its progression and metastasis, as well as the development of resistance to therapy. In this chapter, we focus on the role of fibroblasts within the CRC tumor microenvironment and describe some of the key methods for their study, as well as the evaluation of dynamic interactions within this biological ecosystem.

  7. The Biological Behaviors of Rat Dermal Fibroblasts Can Be Inhibited by High Levels of MMP9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Neng Xue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To explore the effects of the high expression of MMP9 on biological behaviors of fibroblasts. Methods. High glucose and hyperhomocysteine were used to induce MMP9 expression in skin fibroblasts. Cell proliferation was detected by flow cytometry and cell viability by CCK-8. ELISA assay was used to detect collagen (hydroxyproline secretion. Scratch test was employed to evaluate horizontal migration of cells and transwell method to evaluate vertical migration of cells. Results. The mRNA and protein expressions of MMP9 and its protease activity were significantly higher in cells treated with high glucose and hyperhomocysteine than those in control group. At the same time, the S-phase cell ratio, proliferation index, cell viability, collagen (hydroxyproline secretion, horizontal migration rate, and the number of vertical migration cells decreased in high-glucose and hyperhomocysteine-treated group. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1, which inhibits the activity of MMP9, recovered the above biological behaviors. Conclusions. High expression of MMP9 in skin fibroblasts could be induced by cultureing in high glucose and hyperhomocysteine medium, which inhibited cell biological behaviors. Inhibitions could be reversed by TIMP1. The findings suggested that MMP9 deters the healing of diabetic foot ulcers by inhibiting the biological behaviors of fibroblasts.

  8. Role of Hepatic-Specific Transcription Factors and Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 during Induction of Fibroblasts to Hepatic Fate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Rastegar-Pouyani

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming using defined sets of transcription factors (TFs is a recent strategy for generating induced hepatocytes (iHeps from fibroblasts for use in regenerative medicine and drug development. Comprehensive studies detailing the regulatory role of TFs during this reprogramming process could help increase its efficiency. This study aimed to find the TFs with the greatest influences on the generation of iHeps from fibroblasts, and to further understand their roles in the regulation of the gene expression program. Here, we used systems biology approaches to analyze high quality expression data sets in combination with TF-binding sites data and protein-protein interactions data during the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts to iHeps. Our results revealed two main patterns for differentially expressed genes (DEGs: up-regulated genes were categorized as hepatic-specific pattern, and down-regulated genes were categorized as mesoderm- and fibroblast-specific pattern. Interestingly, hepatic-specific genes co-expressed and were regulated by hepatic-specific TFs, specifically Hnf4a and Foxa2. Conversely, the mesoderm- and fibroblast-specific pattern was mainly silenced by polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 members, including Suz12, Mtf2, Ezh2, and Jarid2. Independent analysis of both the gene and core regulatory network of DE-TFs showed significant roles for Hnf4a, Foxa2, and PRC2 members in the regulation of the gene expression program and in biological processes during the direct conversion process. Altogether, using systems biology approaches, we clarified the role of Hnf4a and Foxa2 as hepatic-specific TFs, and for the first time, introduced the PRC2 complex as the main regulator that favors the direct reprogramming process in cooperation with hepatic-specific factors.

  9. The role of fibroblast growth factor 21 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, John; Tang, Shudi; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Ong, Kwok Leung

    2017-02-01

    The metabolic properties of the endocrine fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) have been extensively studied in the past decade. Previous studies have demonstrated the lipid-lowering, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of FGF21. FGF21 is mainly secreted in the liver and adipose tissue in response to a range of physiological and pathological stimuli. In animal and in vitro studies, FGF21 has been shown to improve lipid profiles and inhibit key processes in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. It exerts its effects on the cardiovascular system via adiponectin dependent and independent mechanisms. However, the signalling pathways by which FGF21 exerts its effects on endothelial cells remains unknown and needs to be further investigated. The elevation of circulating FGF21 levels in cardiovascular disease has also raised questions as to whether FGF21 can be used as a biomarker to predict subclinical atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Recent findings from population studies must be validated in independent cohorts before FGF21 can be used as a biomarker in the clinical setting. The anti-atherosclerotic effects of FGF21 have been investigated in two recent clinical trials, where treatment with an FGF21 analog significantly improved the cardiometabolic profile in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. This review will evaluate recent advances that suggest there may be a role for FGF21 in atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced Biological Behavior of In Vitro Human Gingival Fibroblasts on Cold Plasma-Treated Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Miao; Yang, Yang; Liu, Xiao-Qiang; Liu, Ming-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Xin; Li, He-Ping; Tan, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma treatment of zirconia enhances its biocompatibility with human gingival fibroblasts. Materials and Methods The zirconia disks were divided into four groups and treated using helium atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier-discharge plasmas for 30, 60 or 90 s or left untreated. The surface morphology, wettability and chemical elements were analyzed. Fibroblasts density, morphology, morphometry and attachment-related genes expression were measured at different time points from 3 to 72 h. Results After plasma treatment, the surface morphology and roughness remained the same, while the contact angle decreased from 78.31° to 43.71°, and the surface C/O ratio decreased from 3.17 to 0.89. The surficial areas and perimeters of HGFs were increased two-fold in the treated groups at 3 h. Fibroblasts density increased on treated disks at all time points, especially the ones treated for 60 s. Attachment-related genes in the groups treated for 30 and 60 s were significantly higher at 3 and 24 h. Conclusion The helium atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma treatment enhances the biological behavior of fibroblasts on zirconia by increasing the expression of attachment-related genes within 24 h and promoting the cell density during longer culture times. Wettability of zirconia, an important physicochemical property, has a vital influence on the cell behaviors. PMID:26461253

  11. Stromal fibroblasts and the immune microenvironment: partners in mammary gland biology and pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Ashleigh; Anderson, Robin; Britt, Kara

    2014-07-01

    The microenvironment of a tumor has emerged recently as a critical contributor to the development of cancer. Within this environment, fibroblasts and immune cells are the cell lineages that seem to be active mediators of tumour development. The activated fibroblasts that are also present during wound healing and chronic inflammation have been studied extensively. Their activation leads to altered gene expression profiles that markedly increase growth factor and cytokine secretion, leading to major alterations in the immune cell microenvironment. To better understand normal tissue development, wound healing and the chronic inflammation that leads to cancer, we review here information available on the role of fibroblasts and immune cells in normal breast development and in cancer. We also discuss the immunogenicity of breast cancer compared to other cancers and the contribution of the immune microenvironment to the initiation, progression and metastasis of tumors. Also reviewed is the limited knowledge on the role of immune cells and fibroblasts in normal development and whether the risk of cancer increases when their control is not tightly regulated.

  12. Cultured fibroblasts from alveolar and gingival mucosae are biologically and biochemically different

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanz, J.; Banes, A.

    1986-01-01

    Tissues removed from the alveolar or gingival mucosa of 5 patients were separated into cell populations to assess the relative contributions each might make in wound healing intraorally. Growth curves and protein synthetic patterns of fibroblasts, free of epithelial cells, were obtained at pass 5. The morphologies of the two cell types were not grossly different. However, the AM cells (alveolar mucosa) had a generation time (gt) of 18.7 hrs. whereas the gt for KG cells (keratinized gingiva) was 49.6 hrs. Cells labeled in vitro with 35 S-methionine had distinct patterns of protein synthesis. The AM cells had more of the 275, 220, 92, 80, 50 and 46 kd bands on the autoradiogram of a 7.5% PAGE slab gel than did the KG cells. The KG cells contained more of the 165, 84, 68, 60, 54, 51, 43, 36, and 32a kd bands. In a wound healing situation, the AM cells may be the first fibroblasts to rapidly divide to fill a defect, whereas the KG cells may require a longer time period to divide. This is the first report of biochemical and biological differences in these two fibroblast populations from cultured, human tissues

  13. The role of STAT1 for crosstalk between fibroblasts and colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan eKaler

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signaling between tumor cells and the associated stroma has an important impact on cancer initiation and progression. The tumor microenvironment has a paradoxical role in tumor progression and fibroblasts, a major component of the tumor stroma, have been shown to either inhibit or promote cancer development. In this study we established that normal intestinal fibroblasts activate STAT1 signaling in colon cancer cells and, in contrast to cancer- associated fibroblasts, inhibit growth of tumor cells. Treatment of 18Co fibroblasts with the proinflammatory cytokine TNF interfered with their ability to trigger STAT1 signaling in cancer cells. Accordingly, intestinal myofibroblasts isolated from patients with Ulcerative colitis (UC or Crohn’s disease (CD, which are activated and produce high levels of TNF, failed to stimulate STAT1 signaling in tumor cells, demonstrating that activated myofibroblasts lose the ability to trigger growth-inhibitory STAT1 signaling in tumor cells. Finally, we confirmed that silencing of STAT1 in tumor cells alters the crosstalk between tumor cells and fibroblasts, suggesting STAT1 as a novel link between intestinal inflammation and colon cancer. We demonstrated that normal fibroblasts restrain the growth of carcinoma cells, at least in part, through the induction of STAT1 signaling in cancer cells. We showed that changes in the microenvironment, as they occur in inflammatory bowel disease, alter the crosstalk between carcinoma cells and fibroblasts, perturb the homeostasis of intestinal tissue and thereby contribute to tumor progression.

  14. Integrated gene and miRNA expression analysis of prostate cancer associated fibroblasts supports a prominent role for interleukin-6 in fibroblast activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doldi, Valentina; Callari, Maurizio; Giannoni, Elisa; D'Aiuto, Francesca; Maffezzini, Massimo; Valdagni, Riccardo; Chiarugi, Paola; Gandellini, Paolo; Zaffaroni, Nadia

    2015-10-13

    Tumor microenvironment coevolves with and simultaneously sustains cancer progression. In prostate carcinoma (PCa), cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) have been shown to fuel tumor development and metastasis by mutually interacting with tumor cells. Molecular mechanisms leading to activation of CAFs from tissue-resident fibroblasts, circulating bone marrow-derived fibroblast progenitors or mesenchymal stem cells are largely unknown. Through integrated gene and microRNA expression profiling, we showed that PCa-derived CAF transcriptome strictly resembles that of normal fibroblasts stimulated in vitro with interleukin-6 (IL6), thus proving evidence, for the first time, that the cytokine is able per se to induce most of the transcriptional changes characteristic of patient-derived CAFs. Comparison with publicly available datasets, however, suggested that prostate CAFs may be alternatively characterized by IL6 and TGFβ-related signatures, indicating that either signal, depending on the context, may concur to fibroblast activation. Our analyses also highlighted novel pathways potentially relevant for induction of a reactive stroma. In addition, we revealed a role for muscle-specific miR-133b as a soluble factor secreted by activated fibroblasts to support paracrine activation of non-activated fibroblasts or promote tumor progression.Overall, we provided insights into the molecular mechanisms driving fibroblast activation in PCa, thus contributing to identify novel hits for the development of therapeutic strategies targeting the crucial interplay between tumor cells and their microenvironment.

  15. The novel roles of stromal fibroblasts in metronomic chemotherapy: Focusing on cancer stemness and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ying Liao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metronomic chemotherapy involves the administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy at reduced doses administered at regular and frequent intervals. Low-dose metronomic (LDM chemotherapy represents an alternative to standard maximum tolerated dose (MTD chemotherapy as it is less toxic and offers additional beneficial biological effects; such effects include inhibition of tumor neovascularization and reduced recruitment of immune-suppressive cells. In desmoplastic cancers such as breast and pancreatic cancers, carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs in the tumor stroma constitute an important cellular target of systemic chemotherapy, and the treatment-modulated CAFs may deleteriously influence treatment efficacy. Herein, we reviewed the novel roles of CAFs in metronomic chemotherapy in desmoplastic cancers. We discuss the differential effects of MTD- and LDM-chemotherapy on the heterotypic interactions among CAFs and cells in the other cancer compartments, emphasizing the roles of cancer stem cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. The novel mechanistic roles of CAFs in cancer therapy provide an additional rationale for the clinical development of LDM chemotherapy.

  16. In vitro invasion and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in gingival fibroblasts: role of the capsule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irshad, M.; van der Reijden, W.A.; Crielaard, W.; Laine, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium involved in periodontitis and peri-implantitis that can invade and survive inside host cells in vitro. P. gingivalis can invade human gingival fibroblasts (GF), but no data are available about the role of P. gingivalis’ capsule in GF

  17. The role of HGF/MET and FGF/FGFR in fibroblast-derived growth stimulation and lapatinib-resistance of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shin; Morishima, Kazue; Ui, Takashi; Hoshino, Hiroko; Matsubara, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Hosoya, Yoshinori; Sata, Naohiro; Lefor, Alan K; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Niki, Toshiro

    2015-02-25

    Although advanced esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) is treated using a multidisciplinary approach, outcomes remain unsatisfactory. The microenvironment of cancer cells has recently been shown to strongly influence the biologic properties of malignancies. We explored the effect of supernatant from esophageal fibroblasts on the cell growth and chemo-resistance of ESCC cell lines. We used 22 ESCC cell lines, isolated primary human esophageal fibroblasts and immortalized fibroblasts. We first examined cell proliferation induced by fibroblast supernatant. The effect of supernatant was evaluated to determine whether paracrine signaling induced by fibroblasts can influence the proliferation of cancer cells. Next, we examined the effects of adding growth factors HGF, FGF1, FGF7, and FGF10, to the culture medium of cancer cells. These growth factors are assumed to be present in the culture supernatants of fibroblasts and may exert a paracrine effect on the proliferation of cancer cells. We also examined the intrinsic role of HGF/MET and FGFs/FGFR in ESCC proliferation. In addition, we examined the inhibitory effect of lapatinib on ESCC cell lines and studied whether the fibroblast supernatants affect the inhibitory effect of lapatinib on ESCC cell proliferation. Finally, we tested whether the FGFR inhibitor PD-173074 could eliminate the rescue effect against lapatinib that was induced by fibroblast supernatants. The addition of fibroblast supernatant induces cell proliferation in the majority of cell lines tested. The results of experiments to evaluate the effects of adding growth factors and kinase inhibitors suggests that the stimulating effect of fibroblasts was attributable in part to HGF/MET or FGF/FGFR. The results also indicate diversity in the degree of dependence on HGF/MET and FGF/FGFR among the cell lines. Though lapanitib at 1 μM inhibits cell proliferation by more than 50% in the majority of the ESCC cell lines, fibroblast supernatant can rescue the

  18. The role of cancer-associated fibroblast MRC-5 in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Song-Ming; Lu, Ai-Li; Zhang, Wu; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Hai-Yang; Zheng, Shu-Sen; Li, Qi-Yong

    2018-01-01

    Background: Our previous study showed that cancer-associated fibroblast MRC-5 promoted hepatocellular carcinoma progression by enhancing migration and invasion capability. However, few studies have explored the role of MRC-5 in pancreatic cancer (PC). In this study, we examined the exact role and associated mechanisms of MRC-5. Methods: The conditioned media for MRC-5 was used to culture PC cell lines SW1990 and PANC-1. Cell proliferation was compared based on colony formation assays of PC cells in normal media and of PC cells cultured with conditioned media of MRC-5. Cell migration and invasion were assayed by transwell chambers. The expression of EMT-related proteins and apoptosis-related proteins was evaluated using Western blot. And confocal microscopy was used to further detect the expression of EMT-related proteins. qRT-PCR was used to confirm the expression changes of related genes at the mRNA level. We also used flow cytometry to examine the cell cycle, apoptotic rate, and expression of CD3, CD4, CD14, CD25, CD45, CD61, CD90, TLR1, and TLR4. Results: MRC-5 repressed the colony formation ability of PC cells and significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion potential. MRC-5 induced S-phase cell cycle arrest but did not augment the apoptotic effects in PC cells. We hypothesized that the weakened malignant biological behavior of PC cells was correlated with MRC-5-induced altered expression of the cancer stem cell marker CD90; the immune-related cell surface molecules CD14, CD25, TLR4, and TLR1; and cell polarity complexes Par, Scribble, and Crumbs. Conclusion: MRC-5 limits the malignant activities of PC cells by suppressing cancer stem cell expansion, remolding epithelial polarity, and blocking the protumoral cascade reaction coupled to TLR4, TLR1, CD14, and CD25.

  19. The human gallbladder secretes fibroblast growth factor 19 into bile: Towards defining the role of fibroblast growth factor 19 in the enterobiliary tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweers, Serge J. L. B.; Booij, Klaske A. C.; Komuta, Mina; Roskams, Tania; Gouma, Dirk J.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Schaap, Frank G.

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) plays a crucial role in the negative feedback regulation of bile salt synthesis. In the postprandial state, activation of ileal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) by bile salts results in transcriptional induction of FGF19 and elevation of circulating FGF19 levels. An

  20. Biological effects of in vitro THz radiation exposure in human foetal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Amicis, Andrea; Sanctis, Stefania De; Cristofaro, Sara Di; Franchini, Valeria; Lista, Florigio; Regalbuto, Elisa; Giovenale, Emilio; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Nenzi, Paolo; Bei, Roberto; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Coluzzi, Elisa; Cicia, Cristina; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, terahertz (THz) radiation has been widely used in a variety of applications: medical, security, telecommunications and military areas. However, few data are available on the biological effects of this type of electromagnetic radiation and the reported results, using different genetic or cellular assays, are quite discordant. This multidisciplinary study focuses on potential genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, evaluated by several end-points, associated with THz radiation. For this purpose, in vitro exposure of human foetal fibroblasts to low frequency THz radiation (0.1-0.15THz) was performed using a Compact Free Electron Laser. We did not observe an induction of DNA damage evaluated by Comet assay, phosphorylation of H2AX histone or telomere length modulation. In addiction, no induction of apoptosis or changes in pro-survival signalling proteins were detected. Moreover, our results indicated an increase in the total number of micronuclei and centromere positive micronuclei induction evaluated by CREST analysis, indicating that THz radiation could induce aneugenic rather than clastogenic effects, probably leading to chromosome loss. Furthermore, an increase of actin polymerization observed by ultrastructural analysis after THz irradiation, supports the hypothesis that an abnormal assembly of spindle proteins could lead to the observed chromosomal malsegregation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Simulated studies on the biological effects of space radiation on quiescent human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Nan; Pei, Hailong; He, Jinpeng; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Liu, Cuihua; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Li, He; Hu, Wentao; Li, Yinghui; Wang, Jufang; Wang, Tieshan; Zhou, Guangming

    2013-10-01

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are severe risk to manned long-term outer space exploration. Studies on the biological effects of space HZE particles and the underlying mechanisms are essential to the accurate risk assessment and the development of efficient countermeasure. Since majority of the cells in human body stay quiescent (G0 phase), in this study, we established G0 cell and G1 cell models by releasing human normal embryonic lung fibroblast cells from contact inhibition and studied the radiation toxicity of various kinds of HZE particles. Results showed that all of the particles were dose-dependently lethal and G0 cells were more radioresistant than G1 cells. We also found that 53BP1 foci were induced in a LET- and fluence-dependent manner and fewer foci were induced in G0 cells than G1 cells, however, the decrease of foci in 24 h after irradiation was highly relevant to the type of particles. These results imply that even though health risk of space radiation is probably overestimated by the data obtained with exponentially growing cells, whose radiosensitivity is similar to G1 cells, the risk of space HZE particles is un-ignorable and accurate assessment and mechanistic studies should be deepened. The diverse abilities of G0 cells and G1 cells in repairing DNA damages induced by HZE particles emphasize the importance in studying the impact of HZE particles on DNA damage repair pathways.

  2. Gastrointestinal Fibroblasts Have Specialized, Diverse Transcriptional Phenotypes: A Comprehensive Gene Expression Analysis of Human Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Higuchi

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are the principal stromal cells that exist in whole organs and play vital roles in many biological processes. Although the functional diversity of fibroblasts has been estimated, a comprehensive analysis of fibroblasts from the whole body has not been performed and their transcriptional diversity has not been sufficiently explored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the transcriptional diversity of human fibroblasts within the whole body.Global gene expression analysis was performed on 63 human primary fibroblasts from 13 organs. Of these, 32 fibroblasts from gastrointestinal organs (gastrointestinal fibroblasts: GIFs were obtained from a pair of 2 anatomical sites: the submucosal layer (submucosal fibroblasts: SMFs and the subperitoneal layer (subperitoneal fibroblasts: SPFs. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we elucidated identifiable subgroups of fibroblasts and analyzed the transcriptional character of each subgroup.In unsupervised clustering, 2 major clusters that separate GIFs and non-GIFs were observed. Organ- and anatomical site-dependent clusters within GIFs were also observed. The signature genes that discriminated GIFs from non-GIFs, SMFs from SPFs, and the fibroblasts of one organ from another organ consisted of genes associated with transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling.GIFs are characteristic fibroblasts with specific gene expressions from transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling related genes. In addition, the anatomical site- and organ-dependent diversity of GIFs was also discovered. These features of GIFs contribute to their specific physiological function and homeostatic maintenance, and create a functional diversity of the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. The biological role of sulfatides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Suchański

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sulfatides (3-O-sulfogalactosylceramides, sulfated galactocerebrosides, SM4 are esters of sulfuric acid with galactosylceramides. These acidic glycosphingolipids, present at the external leaflet of the plasma membrane, are synthesized by a variety of mammalian cells. They are especially abundant in the myelin sheath of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. Studies using cerebroside galactosyltransferase-deficient mice revealed that sulfatides are responsible for proper structure and functioning of myelin. Large amounts of sulfatides are also found in the kidney, gastrointestinal tract, islets of Langerhans, and membranes of erythrocytes, thrombocytes and granulocytes. They are ligands for numerous proteins, but in most cases the biological role of such interactions is poorly understood. A notable exception is their binding by P- and L-selectins. Platelet sulfatides are major ligands for P-selectin, and this interaction is critical for the formation of stable platelet aggregates. Sulfatides also bind to chemokines, and seem to play a role in regulation of cytokine expression in human lymphocytes and monocytes. Aberrant metabolism of sulfatides, could cause several important human diseases. In this article, we describe the changes in sulfatide expression associated with such nervous disorders as metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease, and several types of cancer, e.g. colon cancer, kidney cancer, and ovarian cancer. We also discuss the involvement of sulfatides in cancer progression, diabetes and autoimmune and immune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. This acidic glycosphingolipids seem to play an important role in pathogenesis of infectious diseases, serving as receptors for binding various bacteria and viruses.

  4. Prognostic role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 in human solid tumors: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Xiong, Disheng; Xiao, Rui; Huang, Zhengjie

    2017-06-01

    In the past decades, the oncogenic role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 has been demonstrated in a number of cancer types. However, studies have reported contradictory findings concerning the correlation between fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 expression and prognosis in solid tumors. To address this discrepancy, we performed a meta-analysis with 18 published studies (2975 patients) retrieved from PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of science. Data were extracted and computed into odds ratios. The results showed that fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 overexpression was significantly associated with decreased 3-year overall survival (odds ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence interval: 1.30-2.85, p = 0.001) and 5-year overall survival (odds ratio = 1.62, 95% confidence interval: 1.07-2.44, p = 0.02) in patients with solid tumors. Subgroup analysis revealed that high fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 expression was also associated with poor prognosis of gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and esophageal cancer, but not correlated with pancreatic cancer. In conclusion, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 overexpression is correlated with decreased survival in most solid tumors, suggesting that the expression status of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 is a valuable prognostic biomarker and a novel therapeutic target in human solid tumors.

  5. Role of human pulmonary fibroblast-derived MCP-1 in cell activation and migration in experimental silicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueting; Fang, Shencun; Liu, Haijun; Wang, Xingang; Dai, Xiaoniu; Yin, Qing; Yun, Tianwei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yingming; Liao, Hong; Zhang, Wei; Yao, Honghong; Chao, Jie

    2015-10-15

    Silicosis is a systemic disease caused by inhaling silicon dioxide (SiO2). Phagocytosis of SiO2 in the lung initiates an inflammatory cascade that results in fibroblast proliferation and migration and subsequent fibrosis. Clinical evidence indicates that the activation of alveolar macrophages by SiO2 produces rapid and sustained inflammation that is characterized by the generation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), which induces fibrosis. Pulmonary fibroblast-derived MCP-1 may play a critical role in fibroblast proliferation and migration. Experiments using primary cultured adult human pulmonary fibroblasts (HPF-a) demonstrated the following results: 1) SiO2 treatment resulted in the rapid and sustained induction of MCP-1 as well as the elevation of the CC chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) protein levels; 2) pretreatment of HPF-a with RS-102895, a specific CCR2 inhibitor, abolished the SiO2-induced increase in cell activation and migration in both 2D and 3D culture systems; and 3) RNA interference targeting CCR2 prevented the SiO2-induced increase in cell migration. These data demonstrated that the up-regulation of pulmonary fibroblast-derived MCP-1 is involved in pulmonary fibroblast migration induced by SiO2. CCR2 was also up-regulated in response to SiO2, and this up-regulation facilitated the effect of MCP-1 on fibroblasts. Our study deciphered the link between fibroblast-derived MCP-1 and SiO2-induced cell migration. This finding provides novel insight into the potential of MCP-1 in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for silicosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Defining the Cardiac Fibroblast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Malina J.; Tallquist, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis remains an important health concern, but the study of fibroblast biology has been hindered by a lack of effective means for identifying and tracking fibroblasts. Recent advances in fibroblast-specific lineage tags and reporters have permitted a better understanding of these cells. After injury multiple cell types have been implicated as the source for extracellular matrix producing cells, but emerging studies suggest that resident cardiac fibroblasts contribute substantially to the remodeling process. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding cardiac fibroblast origin and identity. Our understanding of cardiac fibroblast biology and fibrosis is still developing and will expand profoundly in the next few years, with many of the recent findings regarding fibroblast gene expression and behavior laying down the groundwork for interpreting the purpose and utility of these cells before and after injury. PMID:27746422

  7. Establishment and biological characteristics of a Jingning chicken embryonic fibroblast bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bai

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Using tissue explantation and cryopreservation biotechniques, a Jingning chicken embryonic fibroblast bank was successfully established, which includes 43 embryo samples and a stock of 178 cryovials, each one containing 3.0×106 cells. Most of the cells were apparently fibroblasts in their morphology, and the population doubling time (PDT was about 48 h. The total chromosome number of a diploid cell was 78. According to karyotyping and G-banding, the diploid rate in the cell bank was 97.62±2.12%. The cells were tested for microbial contamination and found free of infections from bacteria, fungi, viruses and mycoplasms. There was no cross-contamination from other cell lines as revealed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and malate dehydrogenase (MDH isoenzyme polymorphisms. Six fluorescent proteins were transfected into the Jingning chicken embryonic fibroblasts, and the transfection efficiencies of these genes were between 10.1 and 41.9%. All the tests showed that the quality of the cell line conforms to the quality criteria of the ATCC (American type culture collection. This work succeeded not only in preserving the genetic resources of Jingning chicken, but it also established a new protocol to preserve endangered animal breeds.

  8. Application of Allogeneic Fibroblast Cells in Cellular Therapy of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zare

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Connective tissue cells include fibroblasts, chondrocytes, adipocyte, and osteocytes. These cells are specialized for the secretion of collagenous extracellular matrix and are responsible for the architectural framework of the human body. Evidence Acquisition Connective tissue cells play a central role in supporting as well as repairing tissues and organs. Fibroblast cell therapy could be used for the treatment of burn wounds, scars, diabetic foot ulcers, acne scars and skin aging. This review focused on biology of fibroblasts and their role in cell therapy of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB. Results Fibroblasts are known to play a pivotal role in skin structure and integrity, and dermal fibroblasts are believed to promote skin regeneration and rejuvenation via collagen production. Conclusions Fibroblasts can be used in transplantations to ameliorate an immune system response, in order to reduce antigen production. Human fibroblasts suppress ongoing mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs between lymphocyte cells from two individuals, and supernatant materials from fibroblast cultures suppress MLRs.

  9. Altered Expression of MicroRNA-203 in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts and Its Role in Fibroblast Activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanczyk, Joanna; Ospelt, Caroline; Karouzakis, Emmanuel; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Kolling, Christoph; Gay, Renate; Buckley, Christopher D.; Tak, Paul P.; Gay, Steffen; Kyburz, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Objective. MicroRNA (miRNA) are recognized as important regulators of a variety of fundamental biologic processes. Previously, we described increased expression of miR-155 and miR-146a in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and showed a repressive effect of miR-155 on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression

  10. Biological roles of fungal carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Javier; Carmen Limón, M

    2015-08-01

    Carotenoids are terpenoid pigments widespread in nature, produced by bacteria, fungi, algae and plants. They are also found in animals, which usually obtain them through the diet. Carotenoids in plants provide striking yellow, orange or red colors to fruits and flowers, and play important metabolic and physiological functions, especially relevant in photosynthesis. Their functions are less clear in non-photosynthetic microorganisms. Different fungi produce diverse carotenoids, but the mutants unable to produce them do not exhibit phenotypic alterations in the laboratory, apart of lack of pigmentation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the functional basis for carotenoid production in fungi. Different lines of evidence support a protective role of carotenoids against oxidative stress and exposure to visible light or UV irradiation. In addition, the carotenoids are intermediary products in the biosynthesis of physiologically active apocarotenoids or derived compounds. This is the case of retinal, obtained from the symmetrical oxidative cleavage of β-carotene. Retinal is the light-absorbing prosthetic group of the rhodopsins, membrane-bound photoreceptors present also in many fungal species. In Mucorales, β-carotene is an intermediary in the synthesis of trisporoids, apocarotenoid derivatives that include the sexual hormones the trisporic acids, and they are also presumably used in the synthesis of sporopollenin polymers. In conclusion, fungi have adapted their ability to produce carotenoids for different non-essential functions, related with stress tolerance or with the synthesis of physiologically active by-products.

  11. Upregulation of NOXA by 10-Hydroxycamptothecin plays a key role in inducing fibroblasts apoptosis and reducing epidural fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihang Dai

    2017-01-01

    the first to demonstrate that upregulation of NOXA by HCPT plays a key role in inducing fibroblast apoptosis and in reducing epidural fibrosis. These findings might provide a potential therapeutic target for preventing epidural fibrosis following laminectomy.

  12. Nuclear targeting of IGF-1 receptor in orbital fibroblasts from Graves' disease: apparent role of ADAM17.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Hoa

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R comprises two subunits, including a ligand binding domain on extra- cellular IGF-1Rα and a tyrosine phosphorylation site located on IGF-1Rβ. IGF-1R is over-expressed by orbital fibroblasts in the autoimmune syndrome, Graves' disease (GD. When activated by IGF-1 or GD-derived IgG (GD-IgG, these fibroblasts produce RANTES and IL-16, while those from healthy donors do not. We now report that IGF-1 and GD-IgG provoke IGF-1R accumulation in the cell nucleus of GD fibroblasts where it co-localizes with chromatin. Nuclear IGF-1R is detected with anti-IGF-1Rα-specific mAb and migrates to approximately 110 kDa, consistent with its identity as an IGF-1R fragment. Nuclear IGF-1R migrating as a 200 kDa protein and consistent with an intact receptor was undetectable when probed with either anti-IGF-1Rα or anti-IGF-1Rβ mAbs. Nuclear redistribution of IGF-1R is absent in control orbital fibroblasts. In GD fibroblasts, it can be abolished by an IGF-1R-blocking mAb, 1H7 and by physiological concentrations of glucocorticoids. When cell-surface IGF-1R is cross-linked with (125I IGF-1, (125I-IGF-1/IGF-1R complexes accumulate in the nuclei of GD fibroblasts. This requires active ADAM17, a membrane associated metalloproteinase, and the phosphorylation of IGF-1R. In contrast, virally encoded IGF-1Rα/GFP fusion protein localizes equivalently in nuclei in both control and GD fibroblasts. This result suggests that generation of IGF-1R fragments may limit the accumulation of nuclear IGF-1R. We thus identify a heretofore-unrecognized behavior of IGF-1R that appears limited to GD-derived fibroblasts. Nuclear IGF-1R may play a role in disease pathogenesis.

  13. Novel Biphasic Role of LipoxinA4 on Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Lung Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxing Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are important to host defence and immunity, can also as initiators of inflammation as well. As the endogenous “braking signal”, Lipoxins can regulate anti-inflammation and the resolution of inflammation. We investigated the effect of lipoxinA4 on the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated lung fibroblasts. We demonstrated that the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 protein was significantly increased and peaked initially at 6 hours, with a second increase, with maximal levels occurring 24 hours after lipopolysaccharide challenge. ProstaglandinE2 levels also peaked at 6 hours, and prostaglandinD2 levels were increased at both 6 and 24 hours. Exogenous lipoxinA4 inhibited the first peak of cyclooxygenase-2 expression as well as the production of prostaglandinE2 induced by lipopolysaccharide in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, exogenous lipoxinA4 increased the second peak of cyclooxygenase-2 expression as well as the production of prostaglandinD2 induced by lipopolysaccharide in a dose-dependent manner. LipoxinA4 receptor mRNA expression was markedly stimulated by lipopolysaccharide but inhibited by lipoxinA4. We present evidence for a novel biphasic role of lipoxinA4 on the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated lung fibroblasts, whereby LXA4 has an anti-inflammatory and proresolving activity in lung fibroblasts following LPS stimulation.

  14. Synthesis and biological activity of M6-P and M6-P analogs on fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Caroline; Barragan-Montero, Véronique; Garric, Xavier; Molès, Jean-Pierre; Montero, Jean-Louis

    2005-09-01

    A new synthetic route to obtain the carboxylate analog of mannose 6-phosphate (M6-P) is presented. The effects of the M6-P, the carboxylate and two other analogs (the phosphonate and the alpha,beta ethylenic carboxylate) on the proliferation of human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts as well as on the proliferation of a murine fibroblast cell line, 3T3-J2 are tested. We observed that M6-P is a potent inhibitor of proliferation of both fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Among its analogs, the phosphonate showed a similar effect on human dermal fibroblasts but not on keratinocytes.

  15. Podoplanin increases the migration of human fibroblasts and affects the endothelial cell network formation: A possible role for cancer-associated fibroblasts in breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Suchanski

    Full Text Available In our previous studies we showed that in breast cancer podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts correlated positively with tumor size, grade of malignancy, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion and poor patients' outcome. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to assess if podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts can affect malignancy-associated properties of breast cancer cells. Human fibroblastic cell lines (MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst overexpressing podoplanin and control fibroblasts were co-cultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells and the impact of podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts on migration and invasiveness of breast cancer cells were studied in vitro. Migratory and invasive properties of breast cancer cells were not affected by the presence of podoplanin on the surface of fibroblasts. However, ectopic expression of podoplanin highly increases the migration of MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst fibroblasts. The present study also revealed for the first time, that podoplanin expression affects the formation of pseudo tubes by endothelial cells. When human HSkMEC cells were co-cultured with podoplanin-rich fibroblasts the endothelial cell capillary-like network was characterized by significantly lower numbers of nodes and meshes than in co-cultures of endothelial cells with podoplanin-negative fibroblasts. The question remains as to how our experimental data can be correlated with previous clinical data showing an association between the presence of podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, we propose that expression of podoplanin by fibroblasts facilitates their movement into the tumor stroma, which creates a favorable microenvironment for tumor progression by increasing the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts, which produce numerous factors affecting proliferation, survival and invasion of cancer cells. In accordance with this, the present study revealed for the first

  16. Podoplanin increases the migration of human fibroblasts and affects the endothelial cell network formation: A possible role for cancer-associated fibroblasts in breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanski, Jaroslaw; Tejchman, Anna; Zacharski, Maciej; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Nowinska, Katarzyna; Rys, Janusz; Dziegiel, Piotr; Kieda, Claudine; Ugorski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies we showed that in breast cancer podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts correlated positively with tumor size, grade of malignancy, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion and poor patients' outcome. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to assess if podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts can affect malignancy-associated properties of breast cancer cells. Human fibroblastic cell lines (MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst) overexpressing podoplanin and control fibroblasts were co-cultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells and the impact of podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts on migration and invasiveness of breast cancer cells were studied in vitro. Migratory and invasive properties of breast cancer cells were not affected by the presence of podoplanin on the surface of fibroblasts. However, ectopic expression of podoplanin highly increases the migration of MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst fibroblasts. The present study also revealed for the first time, that podoplanin expression affects the formation of pseudo tubes by endothelial cells. When human HSkMEC cells were co-cultured with podoplanin-rich fibroblasts the endothelial cell capillary-like network was characterized by significantly lower numbers of nodes and meshes than in co-cultures of endothelial cells with podoplanin-negative fibroblasts. The question remains as to how our experimental data can be correlated with previous clinical data showing an association between the presence of podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, we propose that expression of podoplanin by fibroblasts facilitates their movement into the tumor stroma, which creates a favorable microenvironment for tumor progression by increasing the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts, which produce numerous factors affecting proliferation, survival and invasion of cancer cells. In accordance with this, the present study revealed for the first time, that such

  17. Role of DNA lesions and DNA repair in mutagenesis by carcinogens in diploid human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigated the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, and transforming activity of carcinogens and radiation in diploid human fibroblasts, using cells which differ in their DNA repair capacity. The results indicate that cell killing and induction of mutations are correlated with the number of specific lesions remaining unrepaired in the cells at a particular time posttreatment. DNA excision repair acts to eliminate potentially cytotoxic and mutagenic (and transforming) damage from DNA before these can be converted into permanent cellular effects. Normal human fibroblasts were derived from skin biopsies or circumcision material. Skin fibroblasts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients provided cells deficient in nucleotide excision repair of pyrimidine dimers or DNA adducts formed by bulky ring structures. Cytotoxicity was determined from loss of ability to form a colony. The genetic marker used was resistance to 6-thioguanine (TG). Transformation was measured by determining the frequency of anchorage-independent cells

  18. Roles of dental pulp fibroblasts in the recognition of bacterium-related factors and subsequent development of pulpitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Nakanishi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available As caries-related bacteria invade deeply into dentin and come into close proximity to the pulp, inflammatory cells (such as lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrate into the bacterium-invaded area and consequently pulpitis develops. Many types of cytokines and adhesion molecules are responsible for the initiation and progression of pulpitis. Dental pulp fibroblasts, a major cell type in the dental pulp, also have capacity to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and express adhesion molecules in response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, including lipopolysaccharide. The innate immune system senses microbial infection using pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD, for PAMPs. In this review, we summarize the roles of dental pulp fibroblasts in the recognition of invaded bacterium-related factors via TLR and NOD pathways, and the subsequent pulpal immune responses, leading to progressive pulpitis.

  19. Relative biological efficiency of intermediate energy neutrons and 60Co rays for induction of chromosomal aberrations in Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturelid, S.; Bergman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Intermediate energy neutrons are unique in that a considerable fraction of critical interactions and of dose absorbed is not associated with ionization but with atomic collision. It is still unknown to what extent the qualitative difference in primary damage after atomic collision compared to that of ionization and excitation becomes expressed at biological levels. Chromosomal aberrations were studied in Chinese hamster fibroblasts exposed for 5-8 hours at 22 degree C to intermediate energy neutrons, mean energy 8.5 keV, or to 60 Co-gamma rays. RBE at the 10 per cent aberration frequency level in S-phase were 2.2+-0.6 for total aberrations, 2.1+-0.6 for chromatid breaks and 1.8+-0.5 for exchanges. For each chromatid aberration observed after recovery, about 200 bondbreaking atomic collisions besides 3000 primary iniozations should have occured in DNA. However, the extent to which the aberration response is due to atomic collisions is not clear. (author)

  20. The Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 in Skin Carcinogenesis and Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marcel Oliver; Garman, Khalid Ammar; Lee, Yong Gu

    2018-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-binding protein 1 (FGFBP1, FGF-BP) is a secreted chaperone that mobilizes paracrine-acting FGFs, stored in the extracellular matrix, and presents them to their cognate receptors. FGFBP1 enhances FGF signaling including angiogenesis during cancer progression, and is upregu...

  1. Protective role of vitamin E preconditioning of human dermal fibroblasts against thermal stress in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Hira; Mehmood, Azra; Ali, Muhammad; Tasneem, Saba; Anjum, Muhammad Sohail; Tarar, Moazzam N; Khan, Shaheen N; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2017-09-01

    Oxidative microenvironment of burnt skin restricts the outcome of cell based therapies of thermal skin injuries. The aim of this study was to precondition human dermal fibroblasts with an antioxidant such as vitamin E to improve their survival and therapeutic abilities in heat induced oxidative in vitro environment. Fibroblasts were treated with 100μM vitamin E for 24h at 37°C followed by heat shock for 10min at 51°C in fresh serum free medium. Preconditioning with vitamin E reduced cell injury as demonstrated by decreased expression of annexin-V, cytochrome p450 (CYP450) mediated oxidative reactions, senescence and release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) accomplished by down-regulated expression of pro-apoptotic BAX gene. Vitamin E preconditioned cells exhibited remarkable improvement in cell viability, release of paracrine factors such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), stromal derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1α) and also showed significantly up-regulated levels of PCNA, VEGF, BCL-XL, FGF7, FGF23, FLNβ and Col7α genes presumably through activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt pathway. The results suggest that pretreatment of fibroblasts with vitamin E prior to transplantation in burnt skin speeds up the wound healing process by improving the antioxidant scavenging responses in oxidative environment of transplanted burn wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Role of Fibroblasts in Pancreatic Cancer: Extracellular Matrix Versus Paracrine Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa Bolm

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Desmoplasia is a characteristic feature and a suspected mechanism of tumor progression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. Main constituents of the stroma involve cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs and extracellular matrix (ECM. The aim of this study was to dissect the interaction of CAFs, ECM, and PDAC cells in both an in vitro setting and a large-scale clinical cohort study. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Patients operated for PDAC were identified from our prospectively maintained clinical database. A standard pathology protocol was applied for pancreatoduodenectomy specimens also assessing CAF activation as either CAF grade 0 or CAF grade +. Interaction between a spectrum of pancreatic cancer cell lines (PCCs and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (NIH 3T3 was assessed in a conditioned medium experimental setup. RESULTS: One hundred eleven patients operated for PDAC from 2001 to 2011 were identified. Univariate analysis disclosed CAF grade + (P = .030, positive M status (P 0.1 (P = .045 to impair overall survival. Independent prognostic factors were CAF grade (P = .050 and positive M status (P = .002. CAF grade correlated with N status (CC = 0.206, P = .030, LNR (CC = 0.187, P = .049, tumor size (CC = −0.275, P = .003, and M status (CC = 0.190, P = .045. In the in vitro setting, paracrine effects of pancreatic cancer cell resulted in morphological activation of fibroblasts and tumor cell differentiation–dependent increase of fibroblast growth. Paracrine effects of poorly differentiated PCCs led to an upregulation of Vimentin in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Paracrine effects of fibroblasts on their part promoted cancer cell motility in all PCCs. As the second stromal component, fibroblast-derived ECM resulted in significantly decreased proliferation depending on density and led to upregulation of ZEB1 in poorly differentiated PCCs. CONCLUSION: In PDAC patients, positive CAF grading was identified as a negative prognostic parameter

  3. Possible role of ginsenoside Rb1 in skin wound healing via regulating senescent skin dermal fibroblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingang; Kim, Sunchang

    2018-05-05

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by inducing irreversible cell growth arrest. Nevertheless, senescent cells is proposed as causal link with aging and aging-related pathologies. The physiological beneficial functions of senescent cells are still of paucity. Here we show that senescent human dermal fibroblast accelerates keratinocytes scratch wound healing and stimulates differentiation of fibroblast. Using oxidative stress (100 μM H 2 O 2 exposure for 1 h) induction, we successfully triggered fibroblast senescence and developed senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP). The induction of SASP was regulated by p38MAPK/MSK2/NF-κB pathway. Interestingly, inhibition of p38MAPK activation only partially suppressed SASP. However, SASP was significantly inhibited by SB747651A, a specific MSK inhibitor. Additionally, we demonstrate that SASP stimulates migration of keratinocytes and myofibroblast transition of fibroblast, through fold-increased secretion of growth factors, platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGF-AA) and AB (PDGF-AB), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and beta 2 (TGF-β2), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and D (VEGF-D), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and 3 (VEGFR3). Importantly, we also confirmed ginsenoside Rb1 promoted SASP-mediated healing process via p38MAPK/MSK2/NF-κB pathway. The results pointed to senescent fibroblast as a potential mechanism of wound healing control in human skin. Further, it provided a candidate targeted for wound therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chlorhexidine-induced apoptosis or necrosis in L929 fibroblasts: A role for endoplasmic reticulum stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Gisele; Cardoso, Cristina R.B.; Larson, Roy E.; Silva, Joao S.; Rossi, Marcos A.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorhexidine (CHX), widely used as antiseptic and therapeutic agent in medicine and dentistry, has a toxic effect both in vivo and in vitro. The intrinsic mechanism underlying CHX-induced cytotoxicity in eukaryotic cells is, however, still unknown. A recent study from our laboratory has suggested that CHX may induce death in cultured L929 fibroblasts via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This hypothesis was further tested by means of light and electron microscopy, quantification of apoptosis and necrosis by flow cytometry, fluorescence visualization of the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum, and evaluation of the expression of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein 78 (Grp78), a marker of activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cultured L929 fibroblasts. Our finding showing increased Grp 78 expression in CHX-treated cells and the results of flow cytometry, cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum fluorescence visualization, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy allowed us to suggest that CHX elicits accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, which causes ER overload, resulting in ER stress and cell death either by necrosis or apoptosis. It must be pointed out, however, that this does not necessarily mean that ER stress is the only way that CHX kills L929 fibroblasts, but rather that ER stress is an important target or indicator of cell death induced by this drug

  5. Expression and role of fibroblast activation protein-alpha in microinvasive breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xing

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS in breast cancer cases is challenging for pathologist due to a variety of in situ patterns and artefacts, which could be misinterpreted as stromal invasion. Microinvasion is detected by the presence of cytologically malignant cells outside the confines of the basement membrane and myoepithelium. When malignant cells invade the stroma, there is tissue remodeling induced by perturbed stromal-epithelial interactions. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs are main cells in the microenvironment of the remodeled tumor-host interface. They are characterized by the expression of the specific fibroblast activation protein-alpha (FAP-α, and differ from that of normal fibroblasts exhibiting an immunophenotype of CD34. We hypothesized that staining for FAP-α may be helpful in determining whether DCIS has microinvasion. Methods 349 excised breast specimens were immunostained for smooth muscle actin SMA, CD34, FAP-α, and Calponin. Study material was divided into 5 groups: group 1: normal mammary tissues of healthy women after plastic surgery; group 2: usual ductal hyperplasia (UDH; group 3: DCIS without microinvasion on H & E stain; group 4: DCIS with microinvasion on H & E stain (DCIS-MI, and group 5: invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC. A comparative evaluation of the four immunostains was conducted. Results Our results demonstrated that using FAP-α and Calponin adjunctively improved the sensitivity of pathological diagnosis of DCIS-MI by 11.29%, whereas the adjunctive use of FAP-α and Calponin improved the sensitivity of pathological diagnosis of DCIS by 13.6%. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that immunostaining with FAP-α and Calponin can serve as a novel marker for pathologically diagnosing whether DCIS has microinvasion.

  6. Key role of the kidney in the regulation of fibroblast growth factor 23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mace, Maria L; Gravesen, Eva; Hofman-Bang, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    was significantly increased in BNX rats. The rapid rise in FGF23 after BNX was independent of parathyroid hormone or FGF receptor signaling. No evidence of early stimulation of FGF23 gene expression in the bone was found. Furthermore, acute severe hyperphosphatemia or hypercalcemia had no impact on intact FGF23......High circulating levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) have been demonstrated in kidney failure, but mechanisms of this are not well understood. Here we examined the impact of the kidney on the early regulation of intact FGF23 in acute uremia as induced by bilateral or unilateral...

  7. Recognition of Candida albicans by gingival fibroblasts: The role of TLR2, TLR4/CD14, and MyD88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Claudia Ramos; Coelho, Ana Lúcia; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; Gasparoto, Thaís Helena; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Silva, João Santana; Santos, Carlos Ferreira; Cavassani, Karen Angélica; Hogaboam, Cory M; Campanelli, Ana Paula

    2017-11-08

    Recent evidence indicates that nonprofessional immune cells such as epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts also contribute to innate immunity via secretion of cytokines. Fibroblasts are the principal type of cell found in the periodontal connective tissues and they are involved in the immune response during periodontal disease. The role of fibroblasts in the recognition of pathogens via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has been established; however, few studies have been conducted concerning the involvement of innate immune receptors in the recognition of Candida albicans by gingival fibroblast. In the current study, we investigate the functional activity of TLR2, cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14), and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) molecules in the recognition of C. albicans by gingival fibroblast. First, we identified that gingival fibroblasts expressed TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4. Our results showed that TLR agonists had no effect on these receptors' expression by TLR2, MyD88, and CD14-deficient cells. Notably, C. albicans and a synthetic triacylated lipoprotein (Pam3CSK4) induced a remarkable increase of TLR3 expression on MyD88-deficient gingival fibroblasts. TLR4 expression levels were lower than TLR2 and TLR3 levels and remained unchanged after TLR agonist stimulation. Gingival fibroblasts presented morphological similarities; however, TLR2 deficiency on these cells leads to a lower proliferative response, whereas the deficiency on CD14 expression resulted in lower levels of type I collagen by these cells. In addition, the recognition of C. albicans by gingival fibroblasts had an effect on the secretion of cytokines and it was dependent on a specific recognition molecule. Specifically, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production after the recognition of C. albicans was dependent on MyD88, CD14, and TLR2 molecules, whereas the production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-13 was dependent on TLR2. These findings are the first to

  8. The role of cancer-associated fibroblasts, solid stress and other microenvironmental factors in tumor progression and therapy resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaishvili, Gvantsa; Simkova, Dana; Bouchalova, Katerina; Gachechiladze, Mariam; Narsia, Nato; Bouchal, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are not merely masses of neoplastic cells but complex tissues composed of cellular and noncellular elements. This review provides recent data on the main components of a dynamic system, such as carcinoma associated fibroblasts that change the extracellular matrix (ECM) topology, induce stemness and promote metastasis-initiating cells. Altered production and characteristics of collagen, hyaluronan and other ECM proteins induce increased matrix stiffness. Stiffness along with tumor growth-induced solid stress and increased interstitial fluid pressure contribute to tumor progression and therapy resistance. Second, the role of immune cells, cytokines and chemokines is outlined. We discuss other noncellular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment such as hypoxia and extracellular pH in relation to neoangiogenesis. Overall, full understanding of the events driving the interactions between tumor cells and their environment is of crucial importance in overcoming treatment resistance and improving patient outcome.

  9. Curcumin suppresses crosstalk between colon cancer stem cells and stromal fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment: potential role of EMT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Buhrmann

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Interaction of stromal and tumor cells plays a dynamic role in initiating and enhancing carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated the crosstalk between colorectal cancer (CRC cells with stromal fibroblasts and the anti-cancer effects of curcumin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU, especially on cancer stem cell (CSC survival in a 3D-co-culture model that mimics in vivo tumor microenvironment. METHODS: Colon carcinoma cells HCT116 and MRC-5 fibroblasts were co-cultured in a monolayer or high density tumor microenvironment model in vitro with/without curcumin and/or 5-FU. RESULTS: Monolayer tumor microenvironment co-cultures supported intensive crosstalk between cancer cells and fibroblasts and enhanced up-regulation of metastatic active adhesion molecules (β1-integrin, ICAM-1, transforming growth factor-β signaling molecules (TGF-β3, p-Smad2, proliferation associated proteins (cyclin D1, Ki-67 and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT factor (vimentin in HCT116 compared with tumor mono-cultures. High density tumor microenvironment co-cultures synergistically increased tumor-promoting factors (NF-κB, MMP-13, TGF-β3, favored CSC survival (characterized by up-regulation of CD133, CD44, ALDH1 and EMT-factors (increased vimentin and Slug, decreased E-cadherin in HCT116 compared with high density HCT116 mono-cultures. Interestingly, this synergistic crosstalk was even more pronounced in the presence of 5-FU, but dramatically decreased in the presence of curcumin, inducing biochemical changes to mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET, thereby sensitizing CSCs to 5-FU treatment. CONCLUSION: Enrichment of CSCs, remarkable activation of tumor-promoting factors and EMT in high density co-culture highlights that the crosstalk in the tumor microenvironment plays an essential role in tumor development and progression, and this interaction appears to be mediated at least in part by TGF-β and EMT. Modulation of this synergistic crosstalk by

  10. Key regulatory role of dermal fibroblasts in pigmentation as demonstrated using a reconstructed skin model: impact of photo-aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Duval

    Full Text Available To study cutaneous pigmentation in a physiological context, we have previously developed a functional pigmented reconstructed skin model composed of a melanocyte-containing epidermis grown on a dermal equivalent comprising living fibroblasts. The present studies, using the same model, aimed to demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts influence skin pigmentation up to the macroscopic level. The proof of principle was performed with pigmented skins differing only in the fibroblast component. First, the in vitro system was reconstructed with or without fibroblasts in order to test the global influence of the presence of this cell type. We then assessed the impact of the origin of the fibroblast strain on the degree of pigmentation using fetal versus adult fibroblasts. In both experiments, impressive variation in skin pigmentation at the macroscopic level was observed and confirmed by quantitative parameters related to skin color, melanin content and melanocyte numbers. These data confirmed the responsiveness of the model and demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts do indeed impact the degree of skin pigmentation. We then hypothesized that a physiological state associated with pigmentary alterations such as photo-aging could be linked to dermal fibroblasts modifications that accumulate over time. Pigmentation of skin reconstructed using young unexposed fibroblasts (n = 3 was compared to that of tissues containing natural photo-aged fibroblasts (n = 3 which express a senescent phenotype. A stimulation of pigmentation in the presence of the natural photo-aged fibroblasts was revealed by a significant increase in the skin color (decrease in Luminance and an increase in both epidermal melanin content and melanogenic gene expression, thus confirming our hypothesis. Altogether, these data demonstrate that the level of pigmentation of the skin model is influenced by dermal fibroblasts and that natural photo-aged fibroblasts can contribute to the

  11. Bringing RNA into View: RNA and Its Roles in Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, John F.; Ellington, Andrew; Friedman, B. Ellen; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Noller, Harry F.; Pasquale, Stephen M.; Storey, Richard D.; Uhlenbeck, Olke C.; Weiner, Alan M.

    This guide presents a module for college students on ribonucleic acid (RNA) and its role in biology. The module aims to integrate the latest research and its findings into college-level biology and provide an opportunity for students to understand biological processes. Four activities are presented: (1) "RNA Structure: Tapes to Shapes"; (2) "RNA…

  12. The role of histamine in the regulation of the viability, proliferation and transforming growth factor β1 secretion of rat wound fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolak, Monika; Bojanowska, Ewa; Staszewska, Teresa; Ciosek, Joanna; Juszczak, Marlena; Drobnik, Jacek

    2017-04-01

    Inflammation mediators play a regulatory role in repair processes. The study will examine the influence of histamine on wound fibroblast metabolic activity, viability, proliferation, and TGFβ1 secretion. The study also will identify the histamine receptor involved in regulation of the tested repair processes. Fibroblasts were obtained from the granulation tissue of wounds or intact dermis of rats. The MTT and BrdU assays were used to examine the effect of histamine (10 -8 M-10 -4 M) on the viability and metabolic activity of fibroblasts, and on their proliferative capacity. The influence of histamine receptor antagonists (i.e., ketotifen, ranitidine, ciproxifan and JNJ7777120) and agonists (2-pyridylethlamine dihydrochloride, amthamine dihydrobromide) was also investigated. The TGFβ1 and histamine receptors H1 were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Histamine significantly increased granulation tissue fibroblast viability and metabolic activity at 10 -8 and 10 -6 M but did not change their proliferative activity. Only the blockade of the H1 receptor removed this effect of histamine. H1 receptor agonist (2-pyridylethlamine dihydrochloride) increased cell viability, thereby mimicking histamine action. Both Histamine (10 -4 M) and 2-pyridylethlamine dihydrochloride increased TGFβ1 concentration in cell culture medium. However, ketotifen blocked histamine-induced augmentation of TGFβ1. H1 receptor expression on wound fibroblasts was confirmed. The regulatory influence of histamine on wound fibroblast function (viability/metabolic activity or secretion of TGFβ1) is dependent on H1 receptor stimulation. Contrary to wound fibroblasts, these cells express a very low level of H1 receptors when isolated from intact dermis and histamine is unable to modify their metabolic activity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  13. Structural biology response of a collagen hydrogel synthetic extracellular matrix with embedded human fibroblast: computational and experimental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Sara; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Doblaré, Manuel; Ochoa, Ignacio; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    Adherent cells exert contractile forces which play an important role in the spatial organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Due to these forces, the substrate experiments a volume reduction leading to a characteristic shape. ECM contraction is a key process in many biological processes such as embryogenesis, morphogenesis and wound healing. However, little is known about the specific parameters that control this process. With this aim, we present a 3D computational model able to predict the contraction process of a hydrogel matrix due to cell-substrate mechanical interaction. It considers cell-generated forces, substrate deformation, ECM density, cellular migration and proliferation. The model also predicts the cellular spatial distribution and concentration needed to reproduce the contraction process and confirms the minimum value of cellular concentration necessary to initiate the process observed experimentally. The obtained continuum formulation has been implemented in a finite element framework. In parallel, in vitro experiments have been performed to obtain the main model parameters and to validate it. The results demonstrate that cellular forces, migration and proliferation are acting simultaneously to display the ECM contraction.

  14. Role of biologics in intractable urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooke A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Andrew Cooke,1 Adeeb Bulkhi,1,2 Thomas B Casale1 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Allergy and Immunology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Chronic urticaria (CU is a common condition faced by many clinicians. CU has been estimated to affect approximately 0.5%–1% of the population, with nearly 20% of sufferers remaining symptomatic 20 years after onset. Antihistamines are the first-line therapy for CU. Unfortunately, nearly half of these patients will fail this first-line therapy and require other medication, including immune response modifiers or biologics. Recent advances in our understanding of urticarial disorders have led to more targeted therapeutic options for CU and other urticarial diseases. The specific biologic agents most investigated for antihistamine-refractory CU are omalizumab, rituximab, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG. Of these, the anti-IgE monoclonal antibody omalizumab is the best studied, and has recently been approved for the management of CU. Other agents, such as interleukin-1 inhibitors, have proved beneficial for Schnitzler syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS, diseases associated with urticaria. This review summarizes the relevant data regarding the efficacy of biologics in antihistamine-refractory CU. Keywords: chronic urticaria, omalizumab, intravenous immunoglobulin, anakinra, canakinumab

  15. Increased fibroblast functionality on CNN2-loaded titania nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei HB

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hongbo Wei*, Shuyi Wu*, Zhihong Feng, Wei Zhou, Yan Dong, Guofeng Wu, Shizhu Bai, Yimin Zhao Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Infection and epithelial downgrowth are major problems associated with maxillofacial percutaneous implants. These complications are mainly due to the improper closure of the implant–skin interface. Therefore, designing a percutaneous implant that better promotes the formation of a stable soft tissue biologic seal around percutaneous sites is highly desirable. Additionally, the fibroblast has been proven to play an important role in the formation of biologic seals. In this study, titania nanotubes were filled with 11.2 kDa C-terminal CCN2 (connective tissue growth factor fragment, which could exert full CCN2 activity to increase the biological functionality of fibroblasts. This drug delivery system was fabricated on a titanium implant surface. CCN2 was loaded into anodized titania nanotubes using a simplified lyophilization method and the loading efficiency was approximately 80%. Then, the release kinetics of CCN2 from these nanotubes was investigated. Furthermore, the influence of CCN2-loaded titania nanotubes on fibroblast functionality was examined. The results revealed increased fibroblast adhesion at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 24 hours, increased fibroblast viability over the course of 5 days, as well as enhanced actin cytoskeleton organization on CCN2-loaded titania nanotubes surfaces compared to uncoated, unmodified counterparts. Therefore, the results from this in vitro study demonstrate that CCN2-loaded titania nanotubes have the ability to increase fibroblast functionality and should be further studied as a method of promoting the formation of a stable soft tissue biologic seal around percutaneous sites.Keywords: anodization, titania nanotubes, adhesion, connective

  16. Biological role of lectins: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kiran Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins comprise a stracturally vary diverse class of proteins charecterized by their ability to selectively bind carbohydrate moieties of the glycoproteins of the cell surface. Lectins may be derived from plants, microbial or animal sources and may be soluble or membrane bound. Lectins is a tetramer made up of four nearly identical subunits. In human, lectins have been reported to cause food poisoning, hemolytic anemia, jaundice, digestive distress, protein and carbohydrate malabsorption and type I allergies. The present review focuses on the classification, structures, biological significance and application of lectins.

  17. Expression of podoplanin in stromal fibroblasts plays a pivotal role in the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Kazuyoshi; Kono, Hiroshi; Nakata, Yuuki; Akazawa, Yoshihiro; Wakana, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Hisataka; Fujii, Hideki

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the role of podoplanin (PDPN) expression in invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas (IDCP) in humans. Tumor samples were obtained from 95 patients with IDCP. Immunohistochemical staining was done to evaluate the expression of PDPN in cancer tissues. PDPN was detected predominantly in stromal fibroblasts, stained with α-smooth muscle actin. The cutoff value of PDPN-positive areas was calculated according to a histogram. There was no significant difference in clinicopathologic factors between patients with high vs. those with low PDPN expression. The high PDPN group showed significantly poorer disease-free and disease-specific survival rates than the low PDPN group. Among patients from the high PDPN group, those with lymph node metastases and those with a tumor larger than 20 cm in diameter had significantly poorer prognoses than similar patients from the low PDPN group. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis indicated that a high expression of PDPN was an independent risk factor for disease-specific survival. PDPN expression in cancer-related fibrotic tissues is associated with a poor prognosis, especially in patients with large tumors or lymph node metastases.

  18. A Functional Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1 in the Suppression of Influenza A Virus Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus causes annual epidemics and occasional pandemics in humans. Here, we investigated four members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR family; FGFR1 to 4, and examined their expression patterns in human lung epithelial cells A549 with influenza A virus infection. We identified a functional role of FGFR1 in influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8 and A/Anhui/01/2005 (H5N1 virus replication. Our results showed that FGFR1 silencing by siRNA interference promoted influenza A/PR8 and H5N1 virus replication in A549 cells, while lentivirus-mediated exogenous FGFR1 expression significantly suppressed influenza A virus replication; however, FGFR4 did not have the same effects. Moreover, FGFR1 phosphorylation levels were downregulated in A549 cells by influenza A virus infection, while the repression of FGFR1 kinase using PD173074, a potent and selective FGFR1 inhibitor, could enhance virus replication. Furthermore, we found that FGFR1 inhibits influenza virus internalization, but not binding, during viral entry. These results suggested that FGFR1 specifically antagonizes influenza A virus replication, probably by blocking viral entry.

  19. Chemical Composition of Moringa oleifera Ethyl Acetate Fraction and Its Biological Activity in Diabetic Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothai, Sivapragasam; Muniandy, Katyakyini; Zarin, Mazni Abu; Sean, Tan Woan; Kumar, S. Suresh; Munusamy, Murugan A.; Fakurazi, Sharida; Arulselvan, Palanisamy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Moringa oleifera (MO), commonly known as the drumstick tree, is used in folklore medicine for the treatment of skin disease. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of MO leaves for in vitro antibacterial, antioxidant, and wound healing activities and conduct gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Materials and Methods: Antibacterial activity was evaluated against six Gram-positive bacteria and 10 Gram-negative bacteria by disc diffusion method. Free radical scavenging activity was assessed by 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical hydrogen peroxide scavenging and total phenolic content (TPC). Wound healing efficiency was studied using cell viability, proliferation, and scratch assays in diabetic human dermal fibroblast (HDF-D) cells. Results: The EtOAc fraction showed moderate activity against all bacterial strains tested, and the maximum inhibition zone was observed against Streptococcus pyogenes (30 mm in diameter). The fraction showed higher sensitivity to Gram-positive strains than Gram-negative strains. In the quantitative analysis of antioxidant content, the EtOAc fraction was found to have a TPC of 65.81 ± 0.01. The DPPH scavenging activity and the hydrogen peroxide assay were correlated with the TPC value, with IC50 values of 18.21 ± 0.06 and 59.22 ± 0.04, respectively. The wound healing experiment revealed a significant enhancement of cell proliferation and migration of HDF-D cells. GC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of 17 bioactive constituents that may be the principal factors in the significant antibacterial, antioxidant, and wound healing activity. Conclusion: The EtOAc fraction of MO leaves possesses remarkable wound healing properties, which can be attributed to the antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the fraction. SUMMARY Moringa oleifera (MO) leaf ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction possesses antibacterial activities toward Gram-positive bacteria such as

  20. Chemical Composition of Moringa oleifera Ethyl Acetate Fraction and Its Biological Activity in Diabetic Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothai, Sivapragasam; Muniandy, Katyakyini; Zarin, Mazni Abu; Sean, Tan Woan; Kumar, S Suresh; Munusamy, Murugan A; Fakurazi, Sharida; Arulselvan, Palanisamy

    2017-10-01

    Moringa oleifera (MO), commonly known as the drumstick tree, is used in folklore medicine for the treatment of skin disease. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of MO leaves for in vitro antibacterial, antioxidant, and wound healing activities and conduct gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Antibacterial activity was evaluated against six Gram-positive bacteria and 10 Gram-negative bacteria by disc diffusion method. Free radical scavenging activity was assessed by 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical hydrogen peroxide scavenging and total phenolic content (TPC). Wound healing efficiency was studied using cell viability, proliferation, and scratch assays in diabetic human dermal fibroblast (HDF-D) cells. The EtOAc fraction showed moderate activity against all bacterial strains tested, and the maximum inhibition zone was observed against Streptococcus pyogenes (30 mm in diameter). The fraction showed higher sensitivity to Gram-positive strains than Gram-negative strains. In the quantitative analysis of antioxidant content, the EtOAc fraction was found to have a TPC of 65.81 ± 0.01. The DPPH scavenging activity and the hydrogen peroxide assay were correlated with the TPC value, with IC 50 values of 18.21 ± 0.06 and 59.22 ± 0.04, respectively. The wound healing experiment revealed a significant enhancement of cell proliferation and migration of HDF-D cells. GC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of 17 bioactive constituents that may be the principal factors in the significant antibacterial, antioxidant, and wound healing activity. The EtOAc fraction of MO leaves possesses remarkable wound healing properties, which can be attributed to the antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the fraction. Moringa oleifera (MO) leaf ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction possesses antibacterial activities toward Gram-positive bacteria such as Streptococcus pyogenes , Streptococcus faecalis , Bacillus subtilis

  1. The Biological Role of Nestin(+-Cells in Physiological and Pathological Cardiovascular Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelino Calderone

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The intermediate filament protein nestin was identified in diverse populations of cells implicated in cardiovascular remodeling. Cardiac resident neural progenitor/stem cells constitutively express nestin and following an ischemic insult migrate to the infarct region and participate in angiogenesis and neurogenesis. A modest number of normal adult ventricular fibroblasts express nestin and the intermediate filament protein is upregulated during the progression of reparative and reactive fibrosis. Nestin depletion attenuates cell cycle re-entry suggesting that increased expression of the intermediate filament protein in ventricular fibroblasts may represent an activated phenotype accelerating the biological impact during fibrosis. Nestin immunoreactivity is absent in normal adult rodent ventricular cardiomyocytes. Following ischemic damage, the intermediate filament protein is induced in a modest population of pre-existing adult ventricular cardiomyocytes bordering the peri-infarct/infarct region and nestin(+-ventricular cardiomyocytes were identified in the infarcted human heart. The appearance of nestin(+-ventricular cardiomyocytes post-myocardial infarction (MI recapitulates an embryonic phenotype and depletion of the intermediate filament protein inhibits cell cycle re-entry. Recruitment of the serine/threonine kinase p38 MAPK secondary to an overt inflammatory response after an ischemic insult may represent a seminal event limiting the appearance of nestin(+-ventricular cardiomyocytes and concomitantly suppressing cell cycle re-entry. Endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs express nestin and upregulation of the intermediate filament protein may directly contribute to vascular remodeling. This review will highlight the biological role of nestin(+-cells during physiological and pathological remodeling of the heart and vasculature and discuss the phenotypic advantage attributed to the intermediate filament protein.

  2. Hormetic effects of noncoplanar PCB exposed to human lung fibroblast cells (HELF) and possible role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Khan, Kiran Yasmin; Hu, Jinxing; Naveedullah; Su, Xiaomei; Abbas, Ghulam; Yu, Chunna; Shen, Chaofeng

    2015-12-01

    Hormesis, a biphasic dose-response phenomenon, which is characterized by stimulation of an end point at a low-dose and inhibition at a high-dose. In the present study we used human lungs fibroblast (HELF) cells as a test model to evaluate the role of oxidative stress (OS) in hormetic effects of non coplanar PCB 101. Results from 3-(4,5-dime-thylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazo-lium bromide (MTT) assay indicated that PCB101 at lower concentrations (10(-5) to 10(-1) μg mL(-1) ) stimulated HELF cell proliferation and inhibited at high concentrations (1, 5, 10, and 20 μg mL(-1) ) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) (except 48 h) showed a significant increase at higher concentrations of PCB 101 than those at the lower concentrations with the passage of time. Antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) exhibited decreasing trends in dose and time dependent manner. Lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant increase (P PCB 101-treated HELF cells compared with controls, suggesting that OS plays a key role in PCB 101-induced toxicity. Comet assay indicated a significant increase in genotoxicity at higher concentrations of PCB 101 exposure compared to lower concentrations. Overall, we found that HELF cell proliferation was higher at low ROS level and vice versa, which revealed activation of cell signaling-mediated hormetic mechanisms. The results suggested that PCB 101 has hormetic effects to HELF cells and these were associated with oxidative stress. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Characterization and biological role of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Wójtowicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV form a heterogeneous population of mostly spherical membrane structures released by almost all cells, including tumour cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Their size varies from 30 nm to 1 μm, and size is one of the main criteria of the selection of two categories of EV: small (30-100 nm, more homogeneous exosomes and larger fragments (0.1-1 μm called membrane microvesicles or ectosomes. The presence of EV has already been detected in many human body fluids: blood, urine, saliva, semen and amniotic fluid. Formation of EV is tightly controlled, and their function and biochemical composition depend on the cell type they originate from. EV are the “vehicles” of bioactive molecules, such as proteins, mRNA and microRNA, and may play an important role in intercellular communication and modulation of e.g. immune system cell activity. In addition, on the surface of tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV, called oncosomes, several markers specific for cancer cells were identified, which indicates a role of TMV in tumour growth and cancer development. On the other hand, TMV may be an important source of tumour-associated antigens (TAA which can be potentially useful as biomarkers with prognostic value, as well as in development of new forms of targeted immunotherapy of cancer.

  4. The biological activities of (1,3)-(1,6)-{beta}-d-glucan and porous electrospun PLGA membranes containing {beta}-glucan in human dermal fibroblasts and adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Yeon I; Park, Bong Joo; Kim, Hye-Lee; Lee, Mi Hee; Kim, Jungsung; Park, Jong-Chul [Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Young-Il [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Paik Institute for Clinical Research, Inje University, 633-165 Gae-dong, Busan-jin-gu, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Koo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Inje University, Kimhae 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Tsubaki, Kazufumi [R and D division, Asahi Denka Co. Ltd, 7-2-35 Higashi-ogu, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo 116-8554 (Japan); Han, Dong-Wook, E-mail: parkjc@yuhs.a [Department of Nanomedical Engineering, College of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Pusan National University, geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the possible roles of (1,3)-(1,6)-{beta}-d-glucan ({beta}-glucan) and porous electrospun poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) membranes containing {beta}-glucan for skin wound healing, especially their effect on adult human dermal fibroblast (aHDF) and adipose tissue-derived stem cell (ADSC) activation, proliferation, migration, collagen gel contraction and biological safety tests of the prepared membrane. This study demonstrated that {beta}-glucan and porous PLGA membranes containing {beta}-glucan have enhanced the cellular responses, proliferation and migration, of aHDFs and ADSCs and the result of a collagen gel contraction assay also revealed that collagen gels contract strongly after 4 h post-gelation incubation with {beta}-glucan. Furthermore, we confirmed that porous PLGA membranes containing {beta}-glucan are biologically safe for wound healing study. These results indicate that the porous PLGA membranes containing {beta}-glucan interacted favorably with the membrane and the topical administration of {beta}-glucan was useful in promoting wound healing. Therefore, our study suggests that {beta}-glucan and porous PLGA membranes containing {beta}-glucan may be useful as a material for enhancing wound healing.

  5. Fibroblastic rheumatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Ranjan Parida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblastic rheumatism (FR is a rare dermoarthopathy reported from different parts of the world since 1980. Although the exact cause is unknown, few reports implicate infection may be a triggering event. Patients usually present with multiple skin nodules and polyarthropathy with progressive skin contractures. Laboratory parameters including acute phase reactants are usually normal. The confirmatory diagnosis is based on histopathologic study of skin nodules, which demonstrate fibroblastic proliferation, thickened collagen fibers, dermal fibrosis, and decreased number of elastic fibers. Immunoreactivity for b-catenin, smooth muscle actin, and the monoclonal antibody HHF35 show myofibroblastic differentiation. Treatments with oral prednisolone and other disease-modifying drugs such as methotrexate, infliximab, and interferon have been tried with variable success. In general, skin lesions respond more aptly than joint symptoms indicating that skin fibroblast is more amenable to treatment than synovial fibroblasts. Awareness regarding this orphan disease among clinicians and pathologists will help in more reporting of such cases and finding out optimal treatment regimen.

  6. Fibroblast-Specific Genetic Manipulation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase In Vivo Reveals Its Central Regulatory Role in Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molkentin, Jeffery D; Bugg, Darrian; Ghearing, Natasha; Dorn, Lisa E; Kim, Peter; Sargent, Michelle A; Gunaje, Jagadambika; Otsu, Kinya; Davis, Jennifer

    2017-08-08

    In the heart, acute injury induces a fibrotic healing response that generates collagen-rich scarring that is at first protective but if inappropriately sustained can worsen heart disease. The fibrotic process is initiated by cytokines, neuroendocrine effectors, and mechanical strain that promote resident fibroblast differentiation into contractile and extracellular matrix-producing myofibroblasts. The mitogen-activated protein kinase p38α ( Mapk14 gene) is known to influence the cardiac injury response, but its direct role in orchestrating programmed fibroblast differentiation and fibrosis in vivo is unknown. A conditional Mapk14 allele was used to delete the p38α encoding gene specifically in cardiac fibroblasts or myofibroblasts with 2 different tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase-expressing gene-targeted mouse lines. Mice were subjected to ischemic injury or chronic neurohumoral stimulation and monitored for survival, cardiac function, and fibrotic remodeling. Antithetically, mice with fibroblast-specific transgenic overexpression of activated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 6, a direct inducer of p38, were generated to investigate whether this pathway can directly drive myofibroblast formation and the cardiac fibrotic response. In mice, loss of Mapk14 blocked cardiac fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts and ensuing fibrosis in response to ischemic injury or chronic neurohumoral stimulation. A similar inhibition of myofibroblast formation and healing was also observed in a dermal wounding model with deletion of Mapk14 . Transgenic mice with fibroblast-specific activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 6-p38 developed interstitial and perivascular fibrosis in the heart, lung, and kidney as a result of enhanced myofibroblast numbers. Mechanistic experiments show that p38 transduces cytokine and mechanical signals into myofibroblast differentiation through the transcription factor serum response factor and the signaling effector

  7. Bone mineralization is regulated by signaling cross talk between molecular factors of local and systemic origin: the role of fibroblast growth factor 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir-Koren, Rony; Livshits, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Body phosphate homeostasis is regulated by a hormonal counter-balanced intestine-bone-kidney axis. The major systemic hormones involved in this axis are parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D, and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). FGF23, produced almost exclusively by the osteocytes, is a phosphaturic hormone that plays a major role in regulation of the bone remodeling process. Remodeling composite components, bone mineralization and resorption cycles create a continuous influx-efflux loop of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) through the skeleton. This "bone Pi loop," which is formed, is controlled by local and systemic factors according to phosphate homeostasis demands. Although FGF23 systemic actions in the kidney, and for the production of PTH and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D are well established, its direct involvement in bone metabolism is currently poorly understood. This review presents the latest available evidence suggesting two aspects of FGF23 bone local activity: (a) Regulation of FGF23 production by both local and systemic factors. The suggested local factors include extracellular levels of Pi and pyrophosphate (PPi), (the Pi/PPi ratio), and another osteocyte-derived protein, sclerostin. In addition, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D, synthesized locally by bone cells, may contribute to regulation of FGF23 production. The systemic control is achieved via PTH and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D endocrine functions. (b) FGF23 acts as a local agent, directly affecting bone mineralization. We support the assumption that under balanced physiological conditions, sclerostin, by para- autocrine signaling, upregulates FGF23 production by the osteocyte. FGF23, in turn, acts as a mineralization inhibitor, by stimulating the generation of the major mineralization antagonist-PPi. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. The Role and Potential Therapeutic Implications of the Fibroblast Growth Factors in Energy Balance and Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaguirre, Maitane; Gil, María J; Monreal, Ignacio; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Frühbeck, Gema; Catalán, Victoria

    2017-06-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic diseases have reached epidemic proportions worldwide, reducing life expectancy and quality of life. Several drugs have been tested to treat these diseases but many of them have damaging side effects. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop more effective therapies. Recently, endocrine fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) have become attractive targets in the treatment of metabolic diseases. This review summarizes their most important functions as well as FGF-based therapies for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recent studies demonstrate that circulating levels of FGF19 are reduced in obesity. In fact, exogenous FGF19 administration is associated with a reduction in food intake as well as with improvements in glycaemia. In contrast, FGF21 levels are elevated in subjects with abdominal obesity, insulin resistance and T2D, probably representing a compensatory response. Additionally, elevated levels of circulating FGF23 in individuals with obesity and T2D are reported in most clinical studies. Finally, increased FGF1 levels in obese patients associated with adipogenesis have been described. FGFs constitute important molecules in the treatment of metabolic diseases due to their beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. Among all members, FGF19 and FGF21 have demonstrated the ability to improve glucose, lipid and energy homeostasis, along with FGF1, which was recently discovered to have beneficial effects on metabolic homeostasis. Additionally, FGF23 may also play a role in insulin resistance or energy homeostasis beyond mineral metabolism control. These results highlight the relevant use of FGFs as potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of metabolic diseases. In this regard, notable progress has been made in the development of FGF-based therapies and different approaches are being tested in different clinical trials. However, further studies are needed to determine their potential therapeutic

  9. Role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in inflammation and migration of fibroblast-like synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongying; Zeng, Shan; Huang, Mingcheng; Xu, Hanshi; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan

    2017-04-01

    To probe the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) in regulating inflammation, cell proliferation, migration and invasion of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). FLSs were separated from synovial tissues (STs) from patients with RA and osteoarthritis (OA). An inhibitor of PRMT5 (EPZ015666) and short interference RNA (siRNA) against PRMT5 were used to inhibit PRMT5 expression. The standard of protein was measured by Western blot or immunofluorescence. The excretion and genetic expression of inflammatory factors were, respectively, estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Migration and invasion in vitro were detected by Boyden chamber assay. FLSs proliferation was detected by BrdU incorporation. Increased PRMT5 was discovered in STs and FLSs from patients with RA. In RA FLSs, the level of PRMT5 was up-regulated by stimulation with IL-1β and TNF-α. Inhibition of PRMT5 by EPZ015666 and siRNA-mediated knockdown reduced IL-6 and IL-8 production, and proliferation of RA FLSs. In addition, inhibition of PRMT5 decreased in vitro migration and invasion of RA FLSs. Furthermore, EPZ015666 restrained the phosphorylation of IκB kinaseβ and IκBα, as well as nucleus transsituation of p65 as well as AKT in FLSs. PRMT5 regulated the production of inflammatory factors, cell proliferation, migration and invasion of RA FLS, which was mediated by the NF-κB and AKT pathways. Our data suggested that targeting PRMT5 to prevent synovial inflammation and destruction might be a promising therapy for RA. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  10. Role of cytogenetic techniques in biological dosimetry of absorbed radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    In most of the radiation accidents, physical dosimetric information is rarely available. Further, most of the accidental exposures are non-uniform involving either partial body or localized exposure to significant doses. In such situations, physical dosimetry does not provide reliable dose estimate. It has now been realized that biological dosimetric techniques can play an important role in the assessment of absorbed dose. In recent years, a number of biological indicators of radiation have been identified. These include the kinetics of onset and persistence of prodromal syndromes (radiation sickness), cytogenetic changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes, hematological changes, biochemical indicators, ESR spectroscopy of biological samples, induction of gene mutations in red blood cells, cytogenetic and physiological changes in skin and neurophysiological changes. In general, dosimetric information is derived by a combination of several different methods, as they have potential to serve as prognostic indicators. The role of cytogenetic techniques in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) as biological indicators of absorbed radiation is reviewed here

  11. Fibronectin has a dual role in locomotion and anchorage of primary chick fibroblasts and can promote entry into the division cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Rees, D A; Green, M R

    1982-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN), which is already known to be a natural factor for fibroblast spreading on substrata, has now been shown to be essential for two distinct types of adhesion with different biological functions in chick heart fibroblasts, namely adhesion directed toward locomotion and toward statio...... for stationary anchorage can be dramatically enhanced by addition of cell-derived FN at an appropriate stage, and this promotes entry into the growth cycle. New macromolecular synthesis in addition to FN is necessary for focal adhesion development but not for locomotion....... stationary anchorage for growth. Manipulation of culture conditions and the use of antisera of differing specificities has demonstrated that both exogenous and cell-derived FN are important in each process. The organization of the fibronectin-containing matrix differs between the two states. Immunoelectron...... microscopy with a colloidal gold marker reveals the presence of small membrane-associated plaques of fibronectin in motile cells with associated submembranous specialization. A fibrillar matrix containing fibronectin is dominant in nonmotile, growing fibroblasts. The development of focal adhesions...

  12. A Role for SHIP in Stem Cell Biology and Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Inositol phospholipid signaling pathways have begun to emerge as important players in stem cell biology and bone marrow transplantation [1–4]. The SH2-containing Inositol Phosphatase (SHIP) is among the enzymes that can modify endogenous mammalian phosphoinositides. SHIP encodes an isoform specific to pluripotent stem (PS) cells [5,6] plays a role in hematopoietic stem (HS) cell biology [7,8] and allogeneic bone marrow (BM) transplantation [1,2,9,10]. Here I discuss our current understanding ...

  13. Comparative study on cytotoxicity effect of biological and commercial synthesized nanosilver on human gastric carcinoma and normal lung fibroblast cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Rashmezad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biosynthesis of nanoparticles has attracted the attention of the scientific community in nanotechnology and biotechnology due to their extensive application in the area of material sciences and medicine. Nowadays, despite a various application of nanomaterial’s, there is a little information about their impact on human health. In this study, we investigated the comparative study on cytotoxicity effect of biological and commercial synthesized nanosilver on human gastric carcinoma (AGS and normal lung fibroblast (MRC-5 cell lines. Methods: The current experimental study was carried out in Islamic Azad University, East Tehran Branch, from April to November 2014. The biological synthesis of nanosilver was obtained from Eucalyptus plant extract as a reducing agent. Further to more analysis, morphological study on size and shape of developed biological nanosilver was characterized by performing scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. AGS and MCR-5 cell lines were treated with various concentration of nanosilver for 24, 48 and 72 hours. Finally, the cell viability was evaluated by using MTT assay. Results: The results show that the nanosilver exerts a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on viability of cells. At 100µg/mL of commercial and biological synthesized nanosilver, the viability of AGS was reduced to 7.47±0.002% (P=0.002 and 3.65±0.01% (P=0.003 after 72 hours, respectively. In addition, the viability of MRC-5 at the same condition was reduced to 10.27±0.19% (P=0.001 and 9.16±1.53% (P=0.002, respectively. Conclusion: Based on a thorough literature surveys, the present study is the first research about biosynthesis of nanosilver using Eucalyptus plant extract. This eco-friendly and cost effective method can be used for large scale production of silver nanoparticle. In addition, based on the current obtained data, commercial and biological synthesized nanosilver can more inhibitory effect on cancer cells compared

  14. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases-1 and -2 in Interleukin-13–Suppressed Elastin in Airway Fibroblasts in Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, David; Church, Tony D.; Francisco, Dave; Heck, Karissa; Sigmon, R. Wesley; Ghio, Michael; Murillo, Anays; Firszt, Rafael; Lugogo, Njira L.; Que, Loretta; Sunday, Mary E.; Kraft, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Elastin synthesis and degradation in the airway and lung parenchyma contribute to airway mechanics, including airway patency and elastic recoil. IL-13 mediates many features of asthma pathobiology, including airway remodeling, but the effects of IL-13 on elastin architecture in the airway wall are not known. We hypothesized that IL-13 modulates elastin expression in airway fibroblasts from subjects with allergic asthma. Twenty-five subjects with mild asthma (FEV1, 89 ± 3% predicted) and 30 normal control subjects (FEV1, 102 ± 2% predicted) underwent bronchoscopy with endobronchial biopsy. Elastic fibers were visualized in airway biopsy specimens using Weigert’s resorcin-fuchsin elastic stain. Airway fibroblasts were exposed to IL-13; a pan-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (GM6001); specific inhibitors to MMP-1, -2, -3, and -8; and combinations of IL-13 with MMP inhibitors in separate conditions in serum-free media for 48 hours. Elastin (ELN) expression as well as MMP secretion and activity were quantified. Results of this study show that elastic fiber staining of airway biopsy tissue was significantly associated with methacholine PC20 (i.e., the provocative concentration of methacholine resulting in a 20% fall in FEV1 levels) in patients with asthma. IL-13 significantly suppressed ELN expression in asthmatic airway fibroblasts as compared with normal control fibroblasts. The effect of IL-13 on ELN expression was significantly correlated with postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC in patients with asthma. MMP inhibition significantly stimulated ELN expression in patients with asthma as compared with normal control subjects. Specific inhibition of MMP-1 and MMP-2, but not MMP-3 or MMP-8, reversed the IL-13–induced suppression of ELN expression. In asthma, MMP-1 and MMP-2 mediate IL-13–induced suppression of ELN expression in airway fibroblasts. PMID:26074138

  15. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases-1 and -2 in Interleukin-13-Suppressed Elastin in Airway Fibroblasts in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jennifer L; Slade, David; Church, Tony D; Francisco, Dave; Heck, Karissa; Sigmon, R Wesley; Ghio, Michael; Murillo, Anays; Firszt, Rafael; Lugogo, Njira L; Que, Loretta; Sunday, Mary E; Kraft, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Elastin synthesis and degradation in the airway and lung parenchyma contribute to airway mechanics, including airway patency and elastic recoil. IL-13 mediates many features of asthma pathobiology, including airway remodeling, but the effects of IL-13 on elastin architecture in the airway wall are not known. We hypothesized that IL-13 modulates elastin expression in airway fibroblasts from subjects with allergic asthma. Twenty-five subjects with mild asthma (FEV1, 89 ± 3% predicted) and 30 normal control subjects (FEV1, 102 ± 2% predicted) underwent bronchoscopy with endobronchial biopsy. Elastic fibers were visualized in airway biopsy specimens using Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin elastic stain. Airway fibroblasts were exposed to IL-13; a pan-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (GM6001); specific inhibitors to MMP-1, -2, -3, and -8; and combinations of IL-13 with MMP inhibitors in separate conditions in serum-free media for 48 hours. Elastin (ELN) expression as well as MMP secretion and activity were quantified. Results of this study show that elastic fiber staining of airway biopsy tissue was significantly associated with methacholine PC20 (i.e., the provocative concentration of methacholine resulting in a 20% fall in FEV1 levels) in patients with asthma. IL-13 significantly suppressed ELN expression in asthmatic airway fibroblasts as compared with normal control fibroblasts. The effect of IL-13 on ELN expression was significantly correlated with postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC in patients with asthma. MMP inhibition significantly stimulated ELN expression in patients with asthma as compared with normal control subjects. Specific inhibition of MMP-1 and MMP-2, but not MMP-3 or MMP-8, reversed the IL-13-induced suppression of ELN expression. In asthma, MMP-1 and MMP-2 mediate IL-13-induced suppression of ELN expression in airway fibroblasts.

  16. Brain disorders and the biological role of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Camilla N; Downey, Laura E; Warren, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Despite its evident universality and high social value, the ultimate biological role of music and its connection to brain disorders remain poorly understood. Recent findings from basic neuroscience have shed fresh light on these old problems. New insights provided by clinical neuroscience concerning the effects of brain disorders promise to be particularly valuable in uncovering the underlying cognitive and neural architecture of music and for assessing candidate accounts of the biological role of music. Here we advance a new model of the biological role of music in human evolution and the link to brain disorders, drawing on diverse lines of evidence derived from comparative ethology, cognitive neuropsychology and neuroimaging studies in the normal and the disordered brain. We propose that music evolved from the call signals of our hominid ancestors as a means mentally to rehearse and predict potentially costly, affectively laden social routines in surrogate, coded, low-cost form: essentially, a mechanism for transforming emotional mental states efficiently and adaptively into social signals. This biological role of music has its legacy today in the disordered processing of music and mental states that characterizes certain developmental and acquired clinical syndromes of brain network disintegration. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Circulating immune complexes – reviewing the biological roles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Circulating immune complexes – reviewing the biological roles in human immune function and exercise. ... studies that have investigated CIC's following exercise and proposes that a comprehensive understanding and interpretation of immune system responses to exercise should take these complexes into consideration.

  18. Fibroblast activation protein regulates tumor-associated fibroblasts and epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Dongmei; Ma, Li; Wang, Fangyuan

    2012-08-01

    The fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a cell surface serine protease which has emerged as a specific marker of tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs). FAP has been shown to have both in vitro dipeptidyl peptidase and collagenase activity. However, the biological function of FAP in the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. In this study, we first show that TAFs isolated from ovarian cancer samples have the characteristics of stem cells. To explore the functional role of FAP, the protein was silenced by siRNA lentiviral vector transfection. FAP silencing inhibited the growth of TAFs in vitro, accompanied with cell cycle arrest at the G2 and S phase in TAFs. FAP silencing also reduced the stem cell marker gene expression in TAFs. SKOV3 cells do not express FAP. Although FAP-silenced SKOV3 cells induced ovarian tumors, the rate of tumor growth was significantly decreased, as shown in the xenograft mouse model. TAF phenotypes in the xenograft tumor tissues were further assayed by immunohistochemistry. The expression of TAF markers, including fibroblast-specific protein, FAP, smooth muscle actin, desmin, vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor was decreased in the tumor stroma induced by FAP-silenced SKOV3 cells. In conclusion, FAP is an important regulator of the microenvironment in tumor formation and targeting FAP is a potential therapeutic strategy to combat ovarian cancer.

  19. Role of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in the metabolism of phosphorus and calcium immediately after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Fructuoso, A I; Maestro, M L; Calvo, N; De La Orden, V; Pérez Flores, I; Vidaurreta, M; Valero, R; Fernández-Pérez, C; Barrientos, A

    2012-11-01

    Persistence of inappropriately high serum levels of fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), a recently discovered phosphaturic hormone, has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of posttransplant hypophosphatemia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate FGF23 in the early posttransplant period and study the complex associations between FGF23, parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25(OH)(2) vitamin D, and phosphate in transplant patients. We performed a cross-sectional observational study of 42 adult kidney recipients in the early posttransplant period (urine samples were collected during a routine follow-up outpatient visit. Serum creatinine, calcium, phosphate, magnesium and urinary creatinine, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate were measured using standard assays. We also studied concentrations of 25 hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)(2) vitamin D, intact PTH, and circulating FGF23. Median values for the different parameters studied were as follows: 9.9 ± 0.6 mg/dL, phosphatemia 3.3 ± 0.7 mg/dL, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; 41.1 ± 14.0 mL/min, phosphate reabsorption rate 68.4% ± 10.7%, PTH 94.5 ng/L (53.8-199.5), calcitriol 33.0 pg/mL (24.0-44.1), calcidiol 27.3 ng/mL (17.0-38.0), FGF23 139 pg/mL (88-221), and calciuria 62.5 mg/d (40.3-101.3). The variables significantly associated with serum FGF23 levels were phosphate reabsorption rate (r = .493; P = .001), calcitriol (r = .399; P = .009), eGFR (r = .557; P phosphorus wasting in the early posttransplant period. All treatments that can lead to increased serum phosphate levels (eg, oral medication or calcitriol) should be carefully evaluated, since increased phosphatemia could further stimulate secretion of FGF23 and prolong high phosphorus loss. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiac fibroblasts contribute to myocardial dysfunction in mice with sepsis: the role of NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Zhang

    Full Text Available Myocardial contractile dysfunction in sepsis is associated with the increased morbidity and mortality. Although the underlying mechanisms of the cardiac depression have not been fully elucidated, an exaggerated inflammatory response is believed to be responsible. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome is an intracellular platform that is involved in the maturation and release of interleukin (IL-1β. The aim of the present study is to evaluate whether sepsis activates NLRP3 inflammasome/caspase-1/IL-1β pathway in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs and whether this cytokine can subsequently impact the function of cardiomyocytes (cardiac fibroblast-myocyte cross-talk. We show that treatment of CFs with lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces upregulation of NLRP3, activation of caspase-1, as well as the maturation (activation and release of IL-1β. In addition, the genetic (small interfering ribonucleic acid [siRNA] and pharmacological (glyburide inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome in CFs can block this signaling pathway. Furthermore, the inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome in cardiac fibroblasts ameliorated the ability of LPS-challenged CFs to impact cardiomyocyte function as assessed by intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP responses in cardiomyocytes. Salient features of this the NLP3 inflammasome/ caspase-1 pathway were confirmed in in vivo models of endotoxemia/sepsis. We found that inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome attenuated myocardial dysfunction in mice with LPS and increased the survival rate in mice with feces-induced peritonitis. Our results indicate that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in cardiac fibroblasts is pivotal in the induction of myocardial dysfunction in sepsis.

  1. Resistance to protein adsorption and adhesion of fibroblasts on nanocrystalline diamond films: the role of topography and boron doping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alcaide, M.; Papaioannou, S.; Taylor, Andrew; Fekete, Ladislav; Gurevich, L.; Zachar, V.; Pennisi, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 5 (2016), s. 90-1-12 ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409 Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : protein adsorption * fibroblasts adhesion * nanocrystalline diamond * boron doping * topography Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.325, year: 2016

  2. Disrupted cell cycle arrest and reduced proliferation in corneal fibroblasts from GCD2 patients: A potential role for altered autophagy flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung-il; Dadakhujaev, Shorafidinkhuja; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Ahn, So-yeon; Kim, Tae-im [Department of Ophthalmology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Corneal Dystrophy Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung Kweon, E-mail: eungkkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Ophthalmology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Corneal Dystrophy Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Plus Project for Medical Science and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Reduced cell proliferation in granular corneal dystrophy type 2. • Abnormal cell cycle arrest by defective autophagy. • Decreased Cyclin A1, B1, and D1 in Atg7 gene knockout cells. • Increase in p16 and p27 expressions were observed in Atg7 gene knockout cells. - Abstract: This study investigates the role of impaired proliferation, altered cell cycle arrest, and defective autophagy flux of corneal fibroblasts in granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2) pathogenesis. The proliferation rates of homozygous (HO) GCD2 corneal fibroblasts at 72 h, 96 h, and 120 h were significantly lower (1.102 ± 0.027, 1.397 ± 0.039, and 1.527 ± 0.056, respectively) than those observed for the wild-type (WT) controls (1.441 ± 0.029, 1.758 ± 0.043, and 2.003 ± 0.046, respectively). Flow cytometry indicated a decreased G{sub 1} cell cycle progression and the accumulation of cells in the S and G{sub 2}/M phases in GCD2 cells. These accumulations were associated with decreased levels of Cyclin A1, B1, and E1, and increased expression of p16 and p27. p21 and p53 expression was also significantly lower in GCD2 cells compared to the WT. Interestingly, treatment with the autophagy flux inhibitor, bafilomycin A{sub 1}, resulted in similarly decreased Cyclin A1, B1, D1, and p53 expression in WT fibroblasts. Furthermore, similar findings, including a decrease in Cyclin A1, B1, and D1 and an increase in p16 and p27 expression were observed in autophagy-related 7 (Atg7; known to be essential for autophagy) gene knockout cells. These data provide new insight concerning the role of autophagy in cell cycle arrest and cellular proliferation, uncovering a number of novel therapeutic possibilities for GCD2 treatment.

  3. The role of epigenetics in the biology of multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimopoulos, K; Gimsing, P; Grønbæk, K

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have highlighted the biological complexity of multiple myeloma (MM) that arises as a result of several disrupted cancer pathways. Apart from the central role of genetic abnormalities, epigenetic aberrations have also been shown to be important players in the development of MM......, and a lot of research during the past decades has focused on the ways DNA methylation, histone modifications and noncoding RNAs contribute to the pathobiology of MM. This has led to, apart from better understanding of the disease biology, the development of epigenetic drugs, such as histone deacetylase...... inhibitors that are already used in clinical trials in MM with promising results. This review will present the role of epigenetic abnormalities in MM and how these can affect specific pathways, and focus on the potential of novel 'epidrugs' as future treatment modalities for MM....

  4. Suppression of cholesterol synthesis in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by her own low density lipoprotein density fraction. A possible role of apolipoprotein E

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havekes, L.; Vermeer, B.J.; Wit, E. de

    1980-01-01

    The suppression of cellular cholesterol synthesis by low density lipoprotein (LDL) from a normal and from a homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic subject was measured on normal fibroblasts and on fibroblasts derived from the same homozygous familial hypercholesterolemic patient. On normal

  5. Lack of specificity of fibroblast-specific protein 1 in cardiac remodeling and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Christia, Panagiota; Saxena, Amit; Su, Ya; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the role of fibroblasts in pathologic conditions is hampered by the absence of specific markers. Fibroblast-specific protein (FSP)1 has been suggested as a fibroblast-specific marker in normal and fibrotic tissues; FSP1 reporter mice and FSP1-Cre-driven gene deletion are considered reliable strategies to investigate fibroblast biology. Because fibroblasts are abundant in normal and injured mammalian hearts, we studied the identity of FSP1(+) cells in the infarcted and remodeling myocardium using mice with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression driven by the FSP1 promoter. Neonatal and adult mouse hearts had low numbers of FSP1(+) cells. Myocardial infarction induced marked infiltration with FSP1-expressing cells that peaked after 72 h of reperfusion. Using flow cytometry, we identified 50% of FSP1(+) cells as hematopoietic cells; many endothelial cells were also FSP1(+). Increased infiltration with FSP1(+) cells was also noted in the pressure-overloaded myocardium. Although some FSP1(+) cells had fibroblast morphology, >30% were identified as hematopoietic cells, endothelial cells, or vascular smooth muscle cells. In contrast, periostin did not stain leukocytes or vascular cells but labeled spindle-shaped interstitial cells and, as a typical matricellular protein, was deposited in the matrix. CD11b(+) myeloid cells sorted from the infarcted heart had higher FSP1 expression than corresponding CD11b-negative cells, highlighting the predominant expression by hematopoietic cells. FSP1 is not a specific marker for fibroblasts in cardiac remodeling and fibrosis.

  6. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenperä, Pertteli, E-mail: pertteli.salmenpera@helsinki.fi [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Karhemo, Piia-Riitta [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Räsänen, Kati [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Laakkonen, Pirjo [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Vaheri, Antti [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland)

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts acquire a sustained quiescence when grown as multicellular spheroids. • This quiescence is associated with drastic change in gene expression. • Fibroblasts spheroids secrete various inflammation-linked cytokines and chemokines. • Fibroblasts spheroids reduced growth of RT3 SCC cells in xenograft model.

  7. The Role of c-SKI in Regulation of TGFβ-Induced Human Cardiac Fibroblast Proliferation and ECM Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Guo, Liping; Shen, Difei; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Jiaping; Han, Suxia; He, Wen

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is characterized by over-deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and over-proliferation of cardiac fibroblast, and contributes to both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in many cardiac pathophysiologic conditions. Transforming growth factor β 1 (TGFβ1) is as an essential inducing factor of cardiac fibrosis. C-Ski protein has been identified as an inhibitory regulator of TGFβ signaling. In the present study, we revealed the repressive effect of c-Ski on TGFβ1-induced human cardiac fibroblast (HCFB) proliferation and ECM protein increase (Collagen I and α-SMA). Moreover, miR-155 and miR-17 could inhibit SKI mRNA expression by direct binding to the 3'UTR of SKI, so as to reduce c-Ski protein level. Either miR-155 inhibition or miR-17 inhibition could reverse TGFβ1-induced HCFB proliferation and ECM protein increase. Taken together, we provided a potential therapy to treat cardiac fibrosis by inhibiting miR-155/miR-17 so as to restore the repressive effect of c-Ski on TGFβ1 signaling. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1911-1920, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Opposing roles of C/EBPbeta and AP-1 in the control of fibroblast proliferation and growth arrest-specific gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagliardi, Mark; Maynard, Scott; Miyake, Tetsuaki

    2003-01-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) express several growth arrest-specific (GAS) gene products in G0. In contact-inhibited cells, the expression of the most abundant of these proteins, the p20K lipocalin, is activated at the transcriptional level by C/EBPbeta. In this report, we describe the role of C....../EBPbeta in CEF proliferation. We show that the expression of a dominant negative mutant of C/EBPbeta (designated Delta184-C/EBPbeta) completely inhibited p20K expression at confluence and stimulated the proliferation of CEF without inducing transformation. Mouse embryo fibroblasts nullizygous for C/EBPbeta had...... in the levels of AP-1 proteins. Therefore, C/EBPbeta is a negative regulator of AP-1 expression and activity in CEF. The expression of cyclin D1 and cell proliferation were stimulated by the dominant negative mutant of C/EBPbeta but not in the presence of TAM67, a dominant negative mutant of c-Jun and AP-1. CEF...

  9. Comparison of the biological effectiveness of 45 MeV C-ions and γ-rays in inducing early and late effects in normal human primary fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratini, E.; Balduzzi, M.; Antonelli, F.; Sorrentino, E.; Esposito, G.; Cuttone, G.; Romano, F.; Dini, V.; Simone, G.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Tabocchini, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    Investigation of the mechanisms underlying the biological effects induced by densely ionizing radiation has relevant implications in both radiation protection and therapy. In particular, the possible advantages of hadrontherapy with respect to conventional radiotherapy in terms of high conformal tumor treatment and sparing of healthy tissues are well known. Further improvements are limited by lack of radiobiological knowledge, particularly about the specific cellular response to the damage induced by particles of potential interest for tumor treatment. This study compares early and late effects induced in AG01522 normal human primary fibroblasts by γ-rays and C-ions having E ˜ 45 MeV/u at the cell entrance, corresponding to LET (in water) ˜ 49 keV/μm. Different end points have been investigated, namely: cell killing and lethal mutation, evaluated as early and delayed reproductive cell death, respectively; chromosome damage, as measured by micronuclei induction (MN); DNA damage, in terms of DSB induction and repair, as measured by the H2AX phosphorylation/dephosphorylation kinetics. Linear dose-response relationships were found for cell killing and induction of lethal mutations, with RBEs of about 1.3 and 1.6 respectively, indicating that the presence of genomic instability is greater in the progeny of C-ions irradiated cells. H2AX phosphorylation/dephosphorylation kinetics have shown a maximum foci number at 30 min after irradiation, higher for γ-rays than for C-ions. However, in the first 12 h the fraction of residual γ-H2AX foci was higher for C-ions irradiated cells, indicating a lower removal rate, possibly related to multiple/more complex damage along the particle track, with respect to the sparse lesions produced by γ-rays. MN induction, observed after 72 h from irradiation, was also greater for C-ions. Overall, these data indicate a more severe DNA damage induced by 45 MeV/u C-ions with respect to γ-rays, likely responsible of an increased cellular

  10. Context Dependence of Students' Views about the Role of Equations in Understanding Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Jessica; Elby, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Students' epistemological views about biology--their ideas about what "counts" as learning and understanding biology--play a role in how they approach their courses and respond to reforms. As introductory biology courses incorporate more physics and quantitative reasoning, student attitudes about the role of equations in biology become…

  11. Investigating the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinases in the proliferation of Werner syndrome fibroblasts using diaminopyridine inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Terence

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroblasts derived from the progeroid Werner syndrome show reduced replicative lifespan and a "stressed" morphology, both alleviated using the MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. However, interpretation of these data is problematical because although SB203580 has the stress-activated kinases p38 and JNK1/2 as its preferred targets, it does show relatively low overall kinase selectivity. Several lines of data support a role for both p38 and JNK1/2 activation in the control of cellular proliferation and also the pathology of diseases of ageing, including type II diabetes, diseases to which Werner Syndrome individuals are prone, thus making the use of JNK inhibitors attractive as possible therapeutics. We have thus tested the effects of the widely used JNK inhibitor SP600125 on the proliferation and morphology of WS cells. In addition we synthesised and tested two recently described aminopyridine based inhibitors. SP600125 treatment resulted in the cessation of proliferation of WS cells and resulted in a senescent-like cellular phenotype that does not appear to be related to the inhibition of JNK1/2. In contrast, use of the more selective aminopyridine CMPD 6o at concentrations that fully inhibit JNK1/2 had a positive effect on cellular proliferation of immortalised WS cells, but no effect on the replicative lifespan of primary WS fibroblasts. In addition, CMPD 6o corrected the stressed WS cellular morphology. The aminopyridine CMPD 6r, however, had little effect on WS cells. CMDP 6o was also found to be a weak inhibitor of MK2, which may partially explain its effects on WS cells, since MK2 is known to be involved in regulating cellular morphology via HSP27 phosphorylation, and is thought to play a role in cell cycle arrest. These data suggest that total JNK1/2 activity does not play a substantial role in the proliferation control in WS cells.

  12. STAT6: its role in interleukin 4-mediated biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, K; Kishimoto, T; Akira, S

    1997-05-01

    Interleukin (IL) 4 is known to be a cytokine which plays a central role in the regulation of immune response. Studies on cytokine signal transduction have clarified the mechanism by which IL4 exerts its functions. Two cytoplasmic proteins, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 6 and IL4-induced phosphotyrosine substrate/insulin receptor substrate 2 (4PS/IRS2), are activated in IL4 signal transduction. Recent studies from STAT6-deficient mice have revealed the essential role of STAT6 in IL4-mediated biological actions. In addition, STAT6 has also been demonstrated to be important for the functions mediated by IL13, which is related to IL4. IL4 and IL13 have been shown to induce the production of IgE, which is a major mediator in an allergic response. These findings indicate that STAT6 activation is involved in IL4- and IL13-mediated disorders such as allergy.

  13. Role of diatoms in the biological carbon pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treguer, P. J.; Lasbleiz, M.

    2016-12-01

    Diatoms are major players in the biological carbon pump. However, are their role correctly represented in biogeochemical models? 1-The classic view of the biological carbon pump considers that diatoms as efficient transporters of labile organic carbon to the mesopelagic layer but not to the CO2 sequestration layer. However, this view is challenged by qualitative and quantitative data related to the functioning of the biological carbon pump, both for the modern and the paleo-ocean. They show that massive and rapid pulsed export of organic carbon to the CO2 sequestration layer occurs when unfavorable conditions for diatoms to grow up prevail either in the surface or in the subsurface deep chlorophyll maximum. 2-In most plankton functional type (PFT) models diatoms are usually represent as a single FTP. However, recent studies related to naturally iron-fertilized systems show that (1) the responses of the cellular content of diatoms to iron availability are very variable from one species of diatoms to another, and that (2) the diatom community composition directly impacts the particulate organic carbon export efficiency. Implications of these two issues for marine biogeochemistry and ecosystem modeling will be discussed.

  14. Vanadium in Biosphere and Its Role in Biological Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Deepika; Mani, Veena; Pal, Ravi Prakash

    2018-03-09

    Ultra-trace elements or occasionally beneficial elements (OBE) are the new categories of minerals including vanadium (V). The importance of V is attributed due to its multifaceted biological roles, i.e., glucose and lipid metabolism as an insulin-mimetic, antilipemic and a potent stress alleviating agent in diabetes when vanadium is administered at lower doses. It competes with iron for transferrin (binding site for transportation) and with lactoferrin as it is secreted in milk also. The intracellular enzyme protein tyrosine phosphatase, causing the dephosphorylation at beta subunit of the insulin receptor, is inhibited by vanadium, thus facilitating the uptake of glucose inside the cell but only in the presence of insulin. Vanadium could be useful as a potential immune-stimulating agent and also as an antiinflammatory therapeutic metallodrug targeting various diseases. Physiological state and dose of vanadium compounds hold importance in causing toxicity also. Research has been carried out mostly on laboratory animals but evidence for vanadium importance as a therapeutic agent are available in humans and large animals also. This review examines the potential biochemical and molecular role, possible kinetics and distribution, essentiality, immunity, and toxicity-related study of vanadium in a biological system.

  15. The role of genetics in students' understandings of biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Mary Frances

    2001-10-01

    An important element of an education is an understanding of biology. Science education researchers have shown that both high school and college biology students finish their biology instruction with a poor understanding of evolution, an important unifying concept of the discipline. The goal of this study is to examine the role of genetics in students understanding of evolution. Eight introductory college biology students' understandings of evolutionary biology and their use of genetics concepts as they addressed problems in evolution were examined. Data collected included students' classwork and individual student interviews. Data analysis began with an examination of each students understanding of evolution concepts. The framework for this analysis was based on Mayr's (1982) description of Darwin's five theories: evolution as such, common descent, natural selection, gradualism, and multiplication of species. The descriptions of students' understandings of evolution are followed by an account of how students used genetics concepts to support their explanations of evolutionary processes. The data from this study illustrate how students used transmission genetics, molecular biology and population genetics to support their understandings of evolution. The students in this study constructed syntheses of genetics and evolution concepts that they employed to solve problems. These syntheses fell into three categories: productive, semi-productive and obstructive. Students who achieved a productive synthesis of genetics and evolution concepts also held appropriate understandings of common descent, natural selection, gradualism, and speciation. Students who constructed either a semi-productive or obstructive synthesis of genetics and evolution did not benefit in the same way. Productive synthesis students benefited from their syntheses of genetics and evolution concepts in three ways. They were able to construct complete problem solutions for evolutionary problems, to

  16. The poison center role in biological and chemical terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzelok, E P; Allswede, M P; Mrvos, R

    2000-10-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) terrorism countermeasures are a major priority with municipalities, healthcare providers, and the federal government. Significant resources are being invested to enhance civilian domestic preparedness by conducting education at every response level in anticipation of a NBC terroristic incident. The key to a successful response, in addition to education, is integration of efforts as well as thorough communication and understanding the role that each agency would play in an actual or impending NBC incident. In anticipation of a NBC event, a regional counter-terrorism task force was established to identify resources, establish responsibilities and coordinate the response to NBC terrorism. Members of the task force included first responders, hazmat, law enforcement (local, regional, national), government officials, the health department, and the regional poison information center. Response protocols were developed and education was conducted, culminating in all members of the response task force becoming certified NBC instructors. The poison center participated actively in 3 incidents of suspected biologic and chemical terrorism: an alleged anthrax-contaminated letter sent to a women's health clinic; a possible sarin gas release in a high school: and a potential anthrax/ebola contamination incident at an international airport. All incidents were determined hoaxes. The regional response plan establishes the poison information center as a common repository for all cases in a biological or chemical incident. The poison center is one of several critical components of a regional counterterrorism response force. It can conduct active and passive toxicosurveillance and identify sentinel events. To be responsive, the poison center staff must be knowledgeable about biological and chemical agents. The development of basic protocols and a standardized staff education program is essential. The use of the RaPiD-T (R-recognition, P

  17. Myocardial fibroblast-matrix interactions and potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Edie C; Bradshaw, Amy D; Zile, Michael R; Spinale, Francis G

    2014-05-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic structure, adapting to physiological and pathological stresses placed on the myocardium. Deposition and organization of the matrix fall under the purview of cardiac fibroblasts. While often overlooked compared to myocytes, fibroblasts play a critical role in maintaining ECM homeostasis under normal conditions and in response to pathological stimuli assume an activated, myofibroblast phenotype associated with excessive collagen accumulation contributing to impaired cardiac function. Complete appreciation of fibroblast function is hampered by the lack of fibroblast-specific reagents and the heterogeneity of fibroblast precursors. This is further complicated by our ability to dissect the role of myofibroblasts versus fibroblasts in myocardial in remodeling. This review highlights critical points in the regulation of collagen deposition by fibroblasts, the current panel of molecular tools used to identify fibroblasts and the role of fibroblast-matrix interactions in fibroblast function and differentiation into the myofibroblast phenotype. The clinical potential of exploiting differences between fibroblasts and myofibroblasts and using them to target specific fibroblast populations is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Myocyte-Fibroblast Signalling in Myocardium." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inactivation of Wolbachia Reveals Its Biological Roles in Whitefly Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xia; Li, Shao-Jian; Ahmed, Muhammad Z.; De Barro, Paul J.; Ren, Shun-Xiang; Qiu, Bao-Li

    2012-01-01

    Background The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is cryptic species complex composed of numerous species. Individual species from the complex harbor a diversity of bacterial endosymbionts including Wolbachia. However, while Wolbachia is known to have a number of different roles, its role in B. tabaci is unclear. Here, the antibiotic rifampicin is used to selectively eliminate Wolbachia from B. tabaci so as to enable its roles in whitefly development and reproduction to be explored. The indirect effects of Wolbachia elimination on the biology of Encarsia bimaculata, a dominant parasitoid of B. tabaci in South China, were also investigated. Methodology/Principal Finding qRT-PCR and FISH were used to show that after 48 h exposure to 1.0 mg/ml rifampicin, Wolbachia was completely inactivated from B. tabaci Mediterranean (MED) without any significant impact on either the primary symbiont, Portiera aleyrodidarum or any of the other secondary endosymbionts present. For B. tabaci MED, Wolbachia was shown to be associated with decreased juvenile development time, increased likelihood that nymphs completed development, increased adult life span and increased percentage of female progeny. Inactivation was associated with a significant decrease in the body size of the 4th instar which leads us to speculate as to whether Wolbachia may have a nutrient supplementation role. The reduction in nymph body size has consequences for its parasitoid, E. bimaculata. The elimination of Wolbachia lead to a marked increase in the proportion of parasitoid eggs that completed their development, but the reduced size of the whitefly host was also associated with a significant reduction in the size of the emerging parasitoid adult and this was in turn associated with a marked reduction in adult parasitoid longevity. Conclusions/Significance Wolbachia increases the fitness of the whitefly host and provides some protection against parasitization. These observations add to our understanding of the roles

  19. The Role of Src in Mammary Epithelial Tumorigenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kusdra, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    ...) and its effects in the transformation of fibroblast cells. While these studies have gained insight into several aspects of Src signaling and biology, the role of endogenous c-Src in mammary epithelial cells remains unclear...

  20. The toxicity of aromatic nitrocompounds to bovine leukemia virus-transformed fibroblasts: the role of single-electron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cènas, N; Nemeikaitè, A; Dickancaitè, E; Anusevicius, Z; Nivinskas, H; Bironaitè, D

    1995-08-31

    Bovine leukemia virus-transformed lamb embryo fibroblasts (line FLK) possess activity of DT-diaphorase of ca. 260 U/mg protein and similar levels of other NADP(H)-oxidizing enzymes: NADH:oxidase, 359 U/mg; NADPH:oxidase, 43 U/mg; NADH:cytochrome-c reductase, 141 U/mg; NADPH:cytochrome-c reductase, 43 U/mg. In general, the toxicity of aromatic nitrocompounds towards FLK cells increases on increase of single-electron reduction potentials (E1(1)) of nitrocompounds or the log of their reduction rate constants by single-electron-transferring enzymes, microsomal NADPH:cytochrome P-450 reductase (EC 1.6.2.4) and mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone reductase (EC 1.6.99.3). No correlation between the toxicity and reduction rate of nitrocompounds by rat liver DT-diaphorase (EC 1.6.99.2) was observed. The toxicity is not significantly affected by dicumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase. Nitrocompounds examined were poor substrates for DT-diaphorase, being 10(4) times less active than menadione. Their poor reactivity is most probably determined by their preferential binding to a NADPH binding site, but not to menadione binding site of diaphorase. These data indicate that at comparable activities of DT-diaphorase and single-electron-transferring NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in the cell, the toxicity of nitrocompounds will be determined mainly by their single-electron reduction reactions.

  1. The Role of AMPK in Neuromuscular Biology and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, Athan G; Ng, Sean Y; Manta, Alexander; Ljubicic, Vladimir

    2018-03-20

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a primary regulator of cellular metabolism. Recent studies have revealed that AMPK also mediates the maintenance and plasticity of α-motoneurons, the neuromuscular junction, and skeletal muscle. Furthermore, AMPK stimulation by either genetic, pharmacological, or physiological approaches elicits beneficial phenotypic remodeling in neuromuscular disorders (NMDs). Here, we review the role of AMPK as a governor of neuromuscular biology, and present evidence for AMPK as an effective molecular target for therapeutic pursuit in the context of the most prevalent NMDs, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, and myotonic dystrophy type 1. This information may be useful for engineering AMPK-targeted pharmacological- or lifestyle-based strategies to treat disorders of the neuromuscular system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Roles of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD+ in Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmiro Poltronieri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available NAD+ has emerged as a crucial element in both bioenergetic and signaling pathways since it acts as a key regulator of cellular and organism homeostasis. NAD+ is a coenzyme in redox reactions, a donor of adenosine diphosphate-ribose (ADPr moieties in ADP-ribosylation reactions, a substrate for sirtuins, a group of histone deacetylase enzymes that use NAD+ to remove acetyl groups from proteins; NAD+ is also a precursor of cyclic ADP-ribose, a second messenger in Ca++ release and signaling, and of diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A and oligoadenylates (oligo2′-5′A, two immune response activating compounds. In the biological systems considered in this review, NAD+ is mostly consumed in ADP-ribose (ADPr transfer reactions. In this review the roles of these chemical products are discussed in biological systems, such as in animals, plants, fungi and bacteria. In the review, two types of ADP-ribosylating enzymes are introduced as well as the pathways to restore the NAD+ pools in these systems.

  3. Temporal activation of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors in human gingival fibroblasts infected with the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis: potential role of bacterial proteases in host signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehara Tadamichi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is the foremost oral pathogen of adult periodontitis in humans. However, the mechanisms of bacterial invasion and the resultant destruction of the gingival tissue remain largely undefined. Results We report host-P. gingivalis interactions in primary human gingival fibroblast (HGF cells. Quantitative immunostaining revealed the need for a high multiplicity of infection for optimal infection. Early in infection (2–12 h, P. gingivalis activated the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappa B, partly via the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. This was accompanied by the induction of cellular anti-apoptotic genes, including Bfl-1, Boo, Bcl-XL, Bcl2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Survivin. Late in infection (24–36 h the anti-apoptotic genes largely shut down and the pro-apoptotic genes, including Nip3, Hrk, Bak, Bik, Bok, Bax, Bad, Bim and Moap-1, were activated. Apoptosis was characterized by nuclear DNA degradation and activation of caspases-3, -6, -7 and -9 via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Use of inhibitors revealed an anti-apoptotic function of NF-kappa B and PI3 kinase in P. gingivalis-infected HGF cells. Use of a triple protease mutant P. gingivalis lacking three major gingipains (rgpA rgpB kgp suggested a role of some or all these proteases in myriad aspects of bacteria-gingival interaction. Conclusion The pathology of the gingival fibroblast in P. gingivalis infection is affected by a temporal shift from cellular survival response to apoptosis, regulated by a number of anti- and pro-apoptotic molecules. The gingipain group of proteases affects bacteria-host interactions and may directly promote apoptosis by intracellular proteolytic activation of caspase-3.

  4. Temporal activation of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors in human gingival fibroblasts infected with the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis: potential role of bacterial proteases in host signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urnowey, Sonya; Ansai, Toshihiro; Bitko, Vira; Nakayama, Koji; Takehara, Tadamichi; Barik, Sailen

    2006-03-08

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is the foremost oral pathogen of adult periodontitis in humans. However, the mechanisms of bacterial invasion and the resultant destruction of the gingival tissue remain largely undefined. We report host-P. gingivalis interactions in primary human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells. Quantitative immunostaining revealed the need for a high multiplicity of infection for optimal infection. Early in infection (2-12 h), P. gingivalis activated the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappa B, partly via the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. This was accompanied by the induction of cellular anti-apoptotic genes, including Bfl-1, Boo, Bcl-XL, Bcl2, Mcl-1, Bcl-w and Survivin. Late in infection (24-36 h) the anti-apoptotic genes largely shut down and the pro-apoptotic genes, including Nip3, Hrk, Bak, Bik, Bok, Bax, Bad, Bim and Moap-1, were activated. Apoptosis was characterized by nuclear DNA degradation and activation of caspases-3, -6, -7 and -9 via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Use of inhibitors revealed an anti-apoptotic function of NF-kappa B and PI3 kinase in P. gingivalis-infected HGF cells. Use of a triple protease mutant P. gingivalis lacking three major gingipains (rgpA rgpB kgp) suggested a role of some or all these proteases in myriad aspects of bacteria-gingival interaction. The pathology of the gingival fibroblast in P. gingivalis infection is affected by a temporal shift from cellular survival response to apoptosis, regulated by a number of anti- and pro-apoptotic molecules. The gingipain group of proteases affects bacteria-host interactions and may directly promote apoptosis by intracellular proteolytic activation of caspase-3.

  5. Role of surface modification in zinc oxide nanoparticles and its toxicity assessment toward human dermal fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohankandhasamy Ramasamy,1 Minakshi Das,1 Seong Soo A An,1 Dong Kee Yi2 1Division of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Seongnam, 2Department of Chemistry, Myongji University, Yongin, South Korea Abstract: The wide-scale applications of zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles (NPs in ­photocatalysts, gas sensors, and cosmetics may cause toxicity to humans and environments. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to reduce the toxicity of ZnO NPs by coating them with a silica (SiO2 layer, which could be used in human applications, such as cosmetic preparations. The sol–gel method was used to synthesize core ZnO with SiO2-shelled NPs (SiO2/ZnO NPs with varying degrees of coating. Diverse studies were performed to analyze the toxicity of NPs against cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To ensure the decreased toxicity of the produced SiO2/ZnO NPs, cytotoxicity in membrane damage and/or intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS were assessed by employing 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, lactate dehydrogenase, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin, and lipid peroxide estimations. The cores of ZnO NPs exhibited cytotoxicity over time, regardless of shell thickness. Nevertheless, the thicker SiO2/ZnO NPs revealed reduced enzyme leakage, decreased peroxide production, and less oxidative stress than their bare ZnO NPs or thinner SiO2/ZnO NPs. Therefore, thicker SiO2/ZnO NPs moderated the toxicity of ZnO NPs by restricting free radical formation and the release of zinc ions, and decreasing surface contact with cells. Keywords: zinc oxide, silica coating, photostability, human dermal fibroblast, membrane damage, oxidative stress

  6. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Vladimir I.; Ivanchina, Natalia V.; Krasokhin, Vladimir B.; Makarieva, Tatyana N.; Stonik, Valentin A.

    2012-01-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed. PMID:23015769

  7. Impact of anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles on mutagenic and genotoxic response in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells (V-79): The role of cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Abhishek Kumar; Senapati, Violet Aileen; Singh, Divya; Dubey, Kavita; Maurya, Renuka; Pandey, Alok Kumar

    2017-07-01

    The unique physico-chemical properties of nano crystalline anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 NPs) render them with different biological and chemical activities. Hence, it is widely used in industrial and consumer applications. Previous studies have shown the genotoxicity of TiO 2 NPs. However, there is a paucity of data regarding mutagenicity of these NPs. In the present study, the cellular uptake, sub-cellular localization, cytotoxicity and short term DNA interaction of TiO 2 NPs (1-100 μgmL -1 ) of diameter ranging from 12 to 25 nm on mammalian lung fibroblast cells (V-79) has been studied. The flow cytometric analysis and electron micrographs of V-79 monolayer showed the internalization of TiO 2 NPs in the cytoplasm with the confirmation of elemental composition through SEM/EDX analysis. TEM analysis also showed TiO 2 NPs induced ultra-structural changes such as swollen mitochondria and nuclear membrane disruption in V-79 cells. TiO 2 NPs generated free radicals, which induced indirect mutagenic and genotoxic responses. Apart from measuring the genotoxicity by Comet assay, the mutagenic potential of TiO 2 NPs in V-79 cells was evaluated by mammalian HGPRT gene forward mutation assay, showing a 2.98- fold increase in 6TG R HGPRT mutant frequency (*p disposal of NPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression and potential role of fibroblast growth factor 2 and its receptors in human embryonic stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Petr; Dvořáková, D.; Košková, S.; Vidinská, M.; Najvirtová, M.; Krekáč, D.; Hampl, Aleš

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 8 (2005), s. 1200-1211 ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA301/03/1122; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0434; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : growth factor * human embryonic stem cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.094, year: 2005

  9. Expression levels of novel cytokine IL-32 in periodontitis and its role in the suppression of IL-8 production by human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Ouhara

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:IL-32 was recently found to be elevated in the tissue of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by polymicrobial infections that result in soft tissue destruction and alveolar bone loss. Although IL-32 is also thought to be associated with periodontal disease, its expression and possible role in periodontal tissue remain unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the expression patterns of IL-32 in healthy and periodontally diseased gingival tissue. The expression of IL-32 in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF as well as effects of autocrine IL-32 on IL-8 production from HGF were also examined.Methods:Periodontal tissue was collected from both healthy volunteers and periodontitis patients, and immunofluorescent staining was performed in order to determine the production of IL-32. Using real-time PCR and ELISA, mRNA expression and protein production of IL-32 in HGF, stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, were also investigated.Results:Contrary to our expectation, the production of IL-32 in the periodontitis patients was significantly lower than in the healthy volunteers. According to immunofluorescent microscopy, positive staining for IL-32 was detected in prickle and basal cell layers in the epithelium as well as fibroblastic cells in connective tissue. Addition of fixed Pg in vitro was found to suppress the otherwise constitutive expression of IL-32 mRNA and protein in HGF. However, recombinant IL-32 in vitro inhibited the expression of IL-8 mRNA by HGF stimulated with Pg. Interestingly, anti-IL-32 neutralizing antibody upregulated the IL-8 mRNA expression in non-stimulated HGF, indicating that constitutive expression of IL-32 in HGF suppressed IL-8 mRNA expression in the absence of bacterial stimulation.Conclusion:These results indicate that IL-32 is constitutively produced by HGF which can be suppressed by Pg and may play a role in the downregulation

  10. Eosinophils: multifaceted biological properties and roles in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Hirohito

    2011-07-01

    Eosinophils are leukocytes resident in mucosal tissues. During T-helper 2 (Th2)-type inflammation, eosinophils are recruited from bone marrow and blood to the sites of immune response. While eosinophils have been considered end-stage cells involved in host protection against parasite infection and immunopathology in hypersensitivity disease, recent studies changed this perspective. Eosinophils are now considered multifunctional leukocytes involved in tissue homeostasis, modulation of adaptive immune responses, and innate immunity to certain microbes. Eosinophils are capable of producing immunoregulatory cytokines and are actively involved in regulation of Th2-type immune responses. However, such new information does not preclude earlier observations showing that eosinophils, in particular human eosinophils, are also effector cells with proinflammatory and destructive capabilities. Eosinophils with activation phenotypes are observed in biological specimens from patients with disease, and deposition of eosinophil products is readily seen in the affected tissues from these patients. Therefore, it would be reasonable to consider the eosinophil a multifaceted leukocyte that contributes to various physiological and pathological processes depending on their location and activation status. This review summarizes the emerging concept of the multifaceted immunobiology of eosinophils and discusses the roles of eosinophils in health and disease and the challenges and perspectives in the field. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Role of Transforming Growth Factor β in Uterine Fibroid Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciebiera, Michał; Włodarczyk, Marta; Wrzosek, Małgorzata; Męczekalski, Błażej; Nowicka, Grażyna; Łukaszuk, Krzysztof; Ciebiera, Magdalena; Słabuszewska-Jóźwiak, Aneta; Jakiel, Grzegorz

    2017-11-17

    Uterine fibroids (UFs) are benign tumors of the female genital tract made of the smooth muscle of the uterus. UF growth depends mostly on the influence of the steroid hormones and selected growth factors. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-βs) is a polypeptide that consists of three isoforms: TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and TGF-β3. At present, TGF-β is considered to be one of the key factors in the pathophysiology of UFs. It plays a major role in cellular migration within the tumor, stimulates tumor growth, and enhances tumor metabolism. As a consequence of various dependencies, the synthesis and release of TGF-β in a UF tumor is increased, which results in excessive extracellular matrix production and storage. High concentrations or overexpression of TGF-β mediators may be responsible for clinically symptomatic UFs. The aim of this review was to check the available evidence for the influence of the TGF-β family on UF biology. We conducted their search in PubMed of the National Library of Medicine with the use of the following selected keywords: "uterine fibroid", "leiomyoma", and "transforming growth factor β". After reviewing the titles and abstracts, more than 115 full articles were evaluated. We focused on the TGF-β-related molecular aspects and their influence on the most common symptoms that are associated with UFs. Also, we described how the available data might implicate the current medical management of UFs.

  12. Roles of radiation chemistry in development and research of radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Rui

    2009-01-01

    Radiation chemistry acts as a bridge connecting radiation physics with radiation biology in spatial and temporal insight. The theory, model, and methodology coming from radiation chemistry play an important role in the research and development of radiation biology. The chemical changes induced by ionizing radiation are involved not only in early event of biological effects caused by ionizing radiation but in function radiation biology, such as DNA damage and repair, sensitive modification, metabolism and function of active oxygen and so on. Following the research development of radiation biology, systems radiation biology, accurate quality and quantity of radiation biology effects need more methods and perfect tools from radiation chemistry. (authors)

  13. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmenperä, Pertteli; Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Räsänen, Kati; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Vaheri, Antti

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling plays a key role in transformation induced by the TMPRSS2/ERG fusion gene and decreased PTEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Longjiang; Wang, Jianghua; Karatas, Omer Faruk; Feng, Shu; Zhang, Yiqun; Creighton, Chad J; Ittmann, Michael

    2018-03-06

    Prostate cancer is the most common visceral malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in US men. Correlative studies in human prostate cancers reveal a frequent association of the TMPRSS2/ERG (TE) fusion gene with loss of PTEN and studies in mouse models reveal that ERG expression and PTEN loss synergistically promote prostate cancer progression. To determine the mechanism by which ERG overexpression and PTEN loss leads to transformation, we overexpressed the TE fusion gene and knocked down PTEN in an immortalized but non-transformed prostate epithelial cell line. We show that ERG overexpression in combination with PTEN loss can transform these immortalized but non-tumorigenic cells, while either alteration alone was not sufficient to fully transform these cells. Expression microarray analysis revealed extensive changes in gene expression in cells expressing the TE fusion with loss of PTEN. Among these gene expression changes was increased expression of multiple FGF ligands and receptors. We show that activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling plays a key role in transformation induced by TE fusion gene expression in association with PTEN loss. In addition, in vitro and in silico analysis reveals PTEN loss is associated with widespread increases in FGF ligands and receptors in prostate cancer. Inhibitors of FGF receptor signaling are currently entering the clinic and our results suggests that FGF receptor signaling is a therapeutic target in cancers with TE fusion gene expression and PTEN loss.

  15. Interactions between sub-10-nm iron and cerium oxide nanoparticles and 3T3 fibroblasts: the role of the coating and aggregation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safi, M; Sarrouj, H; Berret, J-F; Sandre, O; Mignet, N

    2010-01-01

    Recent nanotoxicity studies revealed that the physico-chemical characteristics of engineered nanomaterials play an important role in the interactions with living cells. Here, we report on the toxicity and uptake of cerium and iron oxide sub-10-nm nanoparticles by NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Coating strategies include low-molecular weight ligands (citric acid) and polymers (poly(acrylic acid), M W = 2000 g mol -1 ). Electrostatically adsorbed on the surfaces, the organic moieties provide a negatively charged coating in physiological conditions. We find that most particles were biocompatible, as exposed cells remained 100% viable relative to controls. Only the bare and the citrate-coated nanoceria exhibit a slight decrease in mitochondrial activity at very high cerium concentrations (>1 g l -1 ). We also observe that the citrate-coated particles are internalized/adsorbed by the cells in large amounts, typically 250 pg/cell after 24 h incubation for iron oxide. In contrast, the polymer-coated particles are taken up at much lower rates (<30 pg/cell). The strong uptake shown by the citrated particles is related to the destabilization of the dispersions in the cell culture medium and their sedimentation down to the cell membranes. In conclusion, we show that the uptake of nanomaterials by living cells depends on the coating of the particles and on its ability to preserve the colloidal nature of the dispersions.

  16. Interactions between sub-10-nm iron and cerium oxide nanoparticles and 3T3 fibroblasts: the role of the coating and aggregation state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safi, M; Sarrouj, H; Berret, J-F [Matiere et Systemes Complexes, UMR 7057 CNRS, Universite Denis Diderot Paris VII, Batiment Condorcet, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris (France); Sandre, O [UPMC Universite Paris VI-Laboratoire de Physico-chimie des Electrolytes, Colloides et Sciences Analytiques, UMR 7195 UPMC Universite Paris 6/CNRS/ESPCI Paristech, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mignet, N, E-mail: jean-francois.berret@univ-paris-diderot.fr [CNRS UMR 8151, Faculte de Pharmacie, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75270 Paris (France)

    2010-04-09

    Recent nanotoxicity studies revealed that the physico-chemical characteristics of engineered nanomaterials play an important role in the interactions with living cells. Here, we report on the toxicity and uptake of cerium and iron oxide sub-10-nm nanoparticles by NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Coating strategies include low-molecular weight ligands (citric acid) and polymers (poly(acrylic acid), M{sub W} = 2000 g mol{sup -1}). Electrostatically adsorbed on the surfaces, the organic moieties provide a negatively charged coating in physiological conditions. We find that most particles were biocompatible, as exposed cells remained 100% viable relative to controls. Only the bare and the citrate-coated nanoceria exhibit a slight decrease in mitochondrial activity at very high cerium concentrations (>1 g l{sup -1}). We also observe that the citrate-coated particles are internalized/adsorbed by the cells in large amounts, typically 250 pg/cell after 24 h incubation for iron oxide. In contrast, the polymer-coated particles are taken up at much lower rates (<30 pg/cell). The strong uptake shown by the citrated particles is related to the destabilization of the dispersions in the cell culture medium and their sedimentation down to the cell membranes. In conclusion, we show that the uptake of nanomaterials by living cells depends on the coating of the particles and on its ability to preserve the colloidal nature of the dispersions.

  17. Immunotherapy of tumor with vaccine based on basic fibroblast growth factor-activated fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuying; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Yuwei; Yang, Hengxiu; Tong, Aiping; Zhao, Chengjian; Shi, Huashan; Li, Yang; Wang, Zhenlin; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-02-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts play a key role in tumor progression. It is conceivable that the breaking of immune tolerance of "self-antigens" associated with tumor cells and tumor stromal is an attractive approach for tumor immunotherapy. To test this concept, we used basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to activate normal fibroblasts and used these activated fibroblasts as one vaccine against tumor. Normal fibroblasts were treated with bFGF; their expressions of a-SMA and FAP were assessed by Western blot. We immunized mice with bFGF-activated fibroblasts. Auto-antibodies were assessed by flow cytometric and Western blot analysis. The deposition of auto-antibodies within the tumor tissues was assessed. The inhibition of proliferation of tumor cells and fibroblasts by purified immunoglobulins was investigated. The anti-tumor effects of purified immunoglobulins and lymphocytes of immunized mice were assessed. The bFGF-activated fibroblasts were effective in affording protection from tumor onset, growth, and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. The immunized sera exhibited positive staining for fibroblasts and tumor cells in FCAS and Western blot analysis. The purified immunoglobulins of immunized serum could inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells and fibroblasts in vitro and had the anti-tumor activity in vivo. There was the deposition of auto-antibodies within the tumor tissues. Adoptive transfer of lymphocytes of immunized mice revealed that cellular immune response is also involved. The anti-tumor activity could be abrogated by the depletion of CD4(+), CD8(+) T lymphocytes and NK cells. In summary, bFGF-activated fibroblasts could induce an autoimmune response which was simultaneously against both cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumor cells in a cross-reaction.

  18. Protective role of Nrf2 against mechanical-stretch-induced apoptosis in mouse fibroblasts: a potential therapeutic target of mechanical-trauma-induced stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiannan; Li, Bingshu; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Linlin; Tang, Jianming; Hong, Li

    2018-01-10

    We investigated the protective effect and underlying molecular mechanism of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) against mechanical-stretch-induced apoptosis in mouse fibroblasts. Normal cells, Nrf2 silencing cells, and Nrf2 overexpressing cells were respectively divided into two groups-nonintervention and cyclic mechanical strain (CMS)-subjected to CMS of 5333 μ (1.0 Hz for 4 h), six groups in total (control, CMS, shNfe212, shNfe212 + CMS, LV-shNfe212, and LV-shNfe212 + CMS). After treatment, cell apoptosis; cell-cycle distribution; expressions of Nrf2, Bax, Bcl-2, Cyt-C, caspase-3, caspase-9, cleaved-caspase-3, and cleaved-caspase-9; mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm); reactive oxygen species (ROS); and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured. Thirty virgin female C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups: control (without intervention) and vaginal distension (VD) groups, which underwent VD for 1 h with an 8-mm dilator (0.3 ml saline). Leak-point pressure (LPP) was tested on day 7 after VD; Nrf2 expression, apoptosis, and MDA levels were then measured in urethra and anterior vaginal wall. Mechanical stretch decreased Nrf2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions. Overexpression of Nrf2 alleviated mechanical-stretch-induced cell apoptosis; S-phase arrest of cell cycle; up-regulation of Bax, cytochrome C (Cyt-C), ROS, MDA, ratio of cleaved-caspase-3/caspase-3 and cleaved-caspase-9/caspase-9; and exacerbated the decrease of Bcl2 and ΔΨm in L929 cells. On the contrary, silencing of Nrf2 showed opposite effects. Besides, VD reduced LPP levels and Nrf2 expression and increased cell apoptosis and MDA generation in the urethra and anterior vaginal wall. Nrf2 exhibits a protective role against mechanical-stretch -induced apoptosis on mouse fibroblasts, which might indicate a potential therapeutic target of mechanical-trauma-induced stress urinary incontinence (SUI).

  19. Roles of soil biological interations in enhancing food security | Bruns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In developed countries, continuous monocropping, high-disturbance tillage, and ready access to synthetic inputs have allowed farmers and researchers to obtain high crop yields with little regard for soil biology. An unrecognized “opportunity cost” associated with large-scale agriculture is the depletion of soil biological ...

  20. Mécano-Stimulation™ of the skin improves sagging score and induces beneficial functional modification of the fibroblasts: clinical, biological, and histological evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humbert P

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Philippe Humbert,1,2 Ferial Fanian,1,2 Thomas Lihoreau,1,2 Adeline Jeudy,1,2 Ahmed Elkhyat,1,2 Sophie Robin,3 Carol Courderot-Masuyer,3 Hélène Tauzin,3 Christine Lafforgue,1,2,4 Marek Haftek5 1Research and Studies Center on the Integument (CERT, Department of Dermatology, Clinical Investigation Center (CIC 1431, Besançon University Hospital; 2INSERM UMR1098, FED4234 IBCT, University of Franche-Comté, Besançon, France; 3SARL BIOEXIGENCE, Besançon, France; 4Dermopharmacology and Cosmetology Unit, University of Paris Sud, France; 5University of Lyon 1, EA4169, Experimental, clinical and therapeutic aspects of the skin barrier function, INSERM US7 – CNRS UMS3453, Lyon, France Background: Loss of mechanical tension appears to be the major factor underlying decreased collagen synthesis in aged skin. Numerous in vitro studies have shown the impact of mechanical forces on fibroblasts through mechanotransduction, which consists of the conversion of mechanical signals to biochemical responses. Such responses are characterized by the modulation of gene expression coding not only for extracellular matrix components (collagens, elastin, etc. but also for degradation enzymes (matrix metalloproteinases [MMPs] and their inhibitors (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases [TIMPs]. A new device providing a mechanical stimulation of the cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue has been used in a simple, blinded, controlled, and randomized study. Materials and methods: Thirty subjects (aged between 35 years and 50 years, with clinical signs of skin sagging, were randomly assigned to have a treatment on hemiface. After a total of 24 sessions with Mécano-Stimulation™, biopsies were performed on the treated side and control area for in vitro analysis (dosage of hyaluronic acid, elastin, type I collagen, MMP9; equivalent dermis retraction; GlaSbox®; n=10 and electron microscopy (n=10. Furthermore, before and after the treatment, clinical evaluations and self

  1. Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitor (17-AAG) Induces Apoptosis and Decreases Cell Migration/Motility of Keloid Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, In Sik; Lee, Mi Hee; Rah, Dong Kyun; Lew, Dae Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul; Lee, Won Jai

    2015-07-01

    The regulation of apoptosis, proliferation, and migration of fibroblasts is altered in keloids. The 90-kDa heat shock protein (heat shock protein 90) is known to play a key role in such regulation. Therefore, the authors investigated whether the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 in keloid fibroblasts could induce apoptosis and attenuate keloid fibroblast proliferation and migration. The authors evaluated heat shock protein 90 expression in keloid tissues with immunohistochemistry. The authors used cell viability [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assays and annexin V/propidium iodide staining for apoptosis, a wound healing model and cell tracking system to assess cell migration, and Akt Western blotting analysis in keloid fibroblasts after inhibition of heat shock protein 90 with 17-allylaminodemethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG). The expression of heat shock protein 90 in keloid tissues was significantly increased compared with normal tissues. The 17-AAG-treated keloid fibroblasts showed significantly decreased proliferation, promotion of apoptosis, and decreased expression of Akt. Furthermore, a dose-dependent decrease in cell migration was noted after 17-AAG treatment of keloid fibroblasts. The 17-AAG-treated keloid fibroblasts had less directionality to the wound center and migrated a shorter distance. The authors confirmed that the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 in keloid fibroblasts could promote apoptosis and attenuate proliferation and migration of keloid fibroblasts. Therefore, the authors think that the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 is a key factor in the regulation of biological processes in keloids. With further preclinical study, the authors will be able to apply these results clinically for keloid treatment.

  2. A systems biology-based approach to deciphering the etiology of steatosis employing patient-derived dermal fibroblasts and iPS cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna eJozefczuk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD comprises a broad spectrum of disease states ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. As a result of increases in the prevalences of obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia, the number of people with hepatic steatosis continues to increase. Differences in susceptibility to steatohepatitis and its progression to cirrhosis have been attributed to a complex interplay of genetic and external factors all addressing the intracellular network. Increase in sugar or refined carbohydrate consumption results in an increase of insulin and insulin resistance that can lead to the accumulation of fat in the liver. Here we demonstrate how a multidisciplinary approach encompassing cellular reprogramming, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, modeling, network reconstruction and data management can be employed to unveil the mechanisms underlying the progression of steatosis. Proteomics revealed reduced AKT/mTOR signaling in fibroblasts derived from steatosis patients and further establishes that the insulin-resistant phenotype is present not only in insulin-metabolizing central organs, e.g. the liver, but is also manifested in skin fibroblasts. Transcriptome data enabled the generation of a regulatory network based on the transcription factor SREBF1, linked to a metabolic network of glycerolipid and fatty acid biosynthesis including the downstream transcriptional targets of SREBF1 which include LIPIN1 (LPIN and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR. Glutathione metabolism was among the pathways enriched in steatosis patients in comparison to healthy controls. By using a model of the glutathione pathway we predict a significant increase in the flux through glutathione synthesis as both gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione synthetase have an increased flux. We anticipate that a larger sample of patients and matching controls will confirm our preliminary findings presented

  3. The key role of miR-21-regulated SOD2 in the medium-mediated bystander responses in human fibroblasts induced by α-irradiated keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Wenqian; Yin, Xiaoming; Wang, Longxiao; Wang, Jingdong; Zhu, Wei; Cao, Jianping [School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Medical College of Soochow University/Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, 199 Renai Road, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province 215123 (China); Yang, Hongying, E-mail: yanghongying@suda.edu.cn [School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Medical College of Soochow University/Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, 199 Renai Road, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province 215123 (China); Institute of Radiotherapy & Oncology, Soochow University (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • After co-culture with α-irradiated HaCaT cells, WS1 cells displayed oxidative stress and DNA damage. • Increased miR-21 expression in bystander cells was critical to the occurrence of RIBEs. • SOD2 of bystander cells played an important role in bystander responses. • miR-21 mediated bystander effects through its regulation on SOD2. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is well accepted in the radiation research field by now, but the underlying molecular mechanisms for better understanding this phenomenon caused by intercellular communication and intracellular signal transduction are still incomplete. Although our previous study has demonstrated an important role of miR-21 of unirradiated bystander cells in RIBEs, the direct evidence for the hypothesis that RIBE is epigenetically regulated is still limited and how miR-21 mediates RIBEs is unknown. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been demonstrated to be involved in RIBEs, however, the roles of anti-oxidative stress system of cells in RIBEs are unclear. Using transwell insert co-culture system, we investigated medium-mediated bystander responses in WS1 human fibroblasts after co-culture with HaCaT keratinocytes traversed by α-particles. Results showed that the ROS levels in unirradiated bystander WS1 cells were significantly elevated after 30 min of co-culture, and 53BP1 foci, a surrogate marker of DNA damage, were obviously induced after 3 h of co-culture. This indicates the occurrence of oxidative stress and DNA damage in bystander WS1 cells after co-culture with irradiated keratinocytes. Furthermore, the expression of miR-21 was increased in bystander WS1 cells, downregulation of miR-21 eliminated the bystander responses, overexpression of miR-21 alone could induce bystander-like oxidative stress and DNA damage in WS1 cells. These data indicate an important mediating role of miR-21 in RIBEs. In addition, MnSOD or SOD2 in WS1 cells was involved in the bystander effects

  4. The key role of miR-21-regulated SOD2 in the medium-mediated bystander responses in human fibroblasts induced by α-irradiated keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Wenqian; Yin, Xiaoming; Wang, Longxiao; Wang, Jingdong; Zhu, Wei; Cao, Jianping; Yang, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • After co-culture with α-irradiated HaCaT cells, WS1 cells displayed oxidative stress and DNA damage. • Increased miR-21 expression in bystander cells was critical to the occurrence of RIBEs. • SOD2 of bystander cells played an important role in bystander responses. • miR-21 mediated bystander effects through its regulation on SOD2. - Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is well accepted in the radiation research field by now, but the underlying molecular mechanisms for better understanding this phenomenon caused by intercellular communication and intracellular signal transduction are still incomplete. Although our previous study has demonstrated an important role of miR-21 of unirradiated bystander cells in RIBEs, the direct evidence for the hypothesis that RIBE is epigenetically regulated is still limited and how miR-21 mediates RIBEs is unknown. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been demonstrated to be involved in RIBEs, however, the roles of anti-oxidative stress system of cells in RIBEs are unclear. Using transwell insert co-culture system, we investigated medium-mediated bystander responses in WS1 human fibroblasts after co-culture with HaCaT keratinocytes traversed by α-particles. Results showed that the ROS levels in unirradiated bystander WS1 cells were significantly elevated after 30 min of co-culture, and 53BP1 foci, a surrogate marker of DNA damage, were obviously induced after 3 h of co-culture. This indicates the occurrence of oxidative stress and DNA damage in bystander WS1 cells after co-culture with irradiated keratinocytes. Furthermore, the expression of miR-21 was increased in bystander WS1 cells, downregulation of miR-21 eliminated the bystander responses, overexpression of miR-21 alone could induce bystander-like oxidative stress and DNA damage in WS1 cells. These data indicate an important mediating role of miR-21 in RIBEs. In addition, MnSOD or SOD2 in WS1 cells was involved in the bystander effects

  5. Estrogen modulates the influence of cardiac inflammatory cells on function of cardiac fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLarty JL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer L McLarty,1 Jianping Li,2 Scott P Levick,3 Joseph S Janicki2 1Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; 3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Cardiovascular Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA Background: Inflammatory cells play a major role in the pathology of heart failure by stimulating cardiac fibroblasts to regulate the extracellular matrix in an adverse way. In view of the fact that inflammatory cells have estrogen receptors, we hypothesized that estrogen provides cardioprotection by decreasing the ability of cardiac inflammatory cells to influence fibroblast function. Methods: Male rats were assigned to either an untreated or estrogen-treated group. In the treated group, estrogen was delivered for 2 weeks via a subcutaneous implanted pellet containing 17β-estradiol. A mixed population of cardiac inflammatory cells, including T-lymphocytes (about 70%, macrophages (about 12%, and mast cells (about 12%, was isolated from each rat and cultured in a Boyden chamber with cardiac fibroblasts from untreated adult male rats for 24 hours. To examine if tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α produced by inflammatory cells represents a mechanism contributing to the stimulatory effects of inflammatory cells on cardiac fibroblasts, inflammatory cells from the untreated group were incubated with cardiac fibroblasts in a Boyden chamber system for 24 hours in the presence of a TNF-α -neutralizing antibody. Cardiac fibroblasts were also incubated with 5 ng/mL of TNF-α for 24 hours. Fibroblast proliferation, collagen synthesis, matrix metalloproteinase activity, β1 integrin protein levels, and the ability of fibroblasts to contract collagen gels were determined in all groups and statistically compared via one-way analysis of variance. Results: Inflammatory cells from the

  6. Divergent fibroblast growth factor signaling pathways in lung fibroblast subsets: where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Camp, Jordi; Morty, Rory E

    2015-10-15

    Lung fibroblasts play a key role in postnatal lung development, namely, the formation of the alveolar gas exchange units, through the process of secondary septation. Although evidence initially highlighted roles for fibroblasts in the production and remodeling of the lung extracellular matrix, more recent studies have described the presence of different fibroblast subsets in the developing lung. These subsets include myofibroblasts and lipofibroblasts and their precursors. These cells are believed to play different roles in alveologenesis and are localized to different regions of the developing septa. The precise roles played by these different fibroblast subsets remain unclear. Understanding the signaling pathways that control the discrete functions of these fibroblast subsets would help to clarify the roles and the regulation of lung fibroblasts during lung development. Here, we critically evaluate a recent report that described divergent fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways in two different subsets of lung fibroblasts that express different levels of green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α promoter. The GFP expression was used as a surrogate for lipofibroblasts (GFP(low)) and myofibroblasts (GFP(high)). It was suggested that Fgf10/Fgf1 and Fgf18/Fgfr3 autocrine pathways may be operative in GFP(low) and GFP(high) cells, respectively, and that these pathways might regulate the proliferation and migration of different fibroblast subsets during alveologenesis. These observations lay important groundwork for the further exploration of FGF function during normal lung development, as well as in aberrant lung development associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Dietary Manipulations That Induce Ketosis Activate the HPA Axis in Male Rats and Mice: A Potential Role for Fibroblast Growth Factor-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Karen K; Packard, Amy E B; Larson, Karlton R; Stout, Jayna; Fourman, Sarah M; Thompson, Abigail M K; Ludwick, Kristen; Habegger, Kirk M; Stemmer, Kerstin; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Tschöp, Matthias H; Seeley, Randy J; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M

    2018-01-01

    In response to an acute threat to homeostasis or well-being, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis is engaged. A major outcome of this HPA axis activation is the mobilization of stored energy, to fuel an appropriate behavioral and/or physiological response to the perceived threat. Importantly, the extent of HPA axis activity is thought to be modulated by an individual's nutritional environment. In this study, we report that nutritional manipulations signaling a relative depletion of dietary carbohydrates, thereby inducing nutritional ketosis, acutely and chronically activate the HPA axis. Male rats and mice maintained on a low-carbohydrate high-fat ketogenic diet (KD) exhibited canonical markers of chronic stress, including increased basal and stress-evoked plasma corticosterone, increased adrenal sensitivity to adrenocorticotropin hormone, increased stress-evoked c-Fos immunolabeling in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and thymic atrophy, an indicator of chronic glucocorticoid exposure. Moreover, acutely feeding medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) to rapidly induce ketosis among chow-fed male rats and mice also acutely increased HPA axis activity. Lastly, and consistent with a growing literature that characterizes the hepatokine fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) as both a marker of the ketotic state and as a key metabolic stress hormone, the HPA response to both KD and MCTs was significantly blunted among mice lacking FGF21. We conclude that dietary manipulations that induce ketosis lead to increased HPA axis tone, and that the hepatokine FGF21 may play an important role to facilitate this effect. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  8. Role of Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Measurement in Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease Among Chinese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi Ho; Woo, Yu Cho; Chow, Wing Sun; Cheung, Chloe Yu Yan; Fong, Carol Ho Yi; Yuen, Michele Mae Ann; Xu, Aimin; Tse, Hung Fat; Lam, Karen Siu Ling

    2017-06-06

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has demonstrated beneficial effects on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. In cross-sectional studies, an association of raised circulating FGF21 levels with coronary heart disease (CHD) was found in some but not all studies. Here we investigated prospectively whether baseline serum FGF21 levels could predict incident CHD in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and no known cardiovascular diseases. Baseline serum FGF21 levels were measured in 3528 Chinese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus recruited from the Hong Kong West Diabetes Registry. The role of baseline serum FGF21 levels in predicting incident CHD over a median follow-up of 3.8 years was analyzed using Cox regression analysis. Among 3528 recruited subjects without known cardiovascular diseases, 147 (4.2%) developed CHD over a mean follow-up of 4 years. Baseline serum log-transformed FGF21 levels were significantly higher in those who had incident CHD than those who did not (222.7 pg/mL [92.8-438.4] versus 151.1 pg/mL [75.6-274.6]; P 206.22 pg/mL derived from our study, independently predicted incident CHD (hazard ratio, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.10-2.19; P =0.013) and significantly improved net reclassification index and integrated discrimination improvement after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. We have demonstrated, for the first time, that serum FGF21 level is an independent predictor of incident CHD and might be usefully utilized as a biomarker for identifying type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects with raised CHD risk, for primary prevention. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. Biological monitoring of lotic ecosystems: the role of diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bere

    Full Text Available Increasing anthropogenic influence on lotic environments as a result of civilisation has captured public interest because of the consequent problems associated with deterioration of water quality. Various biological monitoring methods that provide a direct measure of ecological integrity by using the response of biota to environmental changes have been developed to monitor the ecological status of lotic environments. Diatoms have been used extensively in this regard and this review attempts to summarise the basic concepts associated with biological monitoring using benthic diatoms. Where possible, examples from work carried out in Brazil are used.

  10. Biological monitoring of lotic ecosystems: the role of diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bere, T; Tundisi, J G

    2010-08-01

    Increasing anthropogenic influence on lotic environments as a result of civilisation has captured public interest because of the consequent problems associated with deterioration of water quality. Various biological monitoring methods that provide a direct measure of ecological integrity by using the response of biota to environmental changes have been developed to monitor the ecological status of lotic environments. Diatoms have been used extensively in this regard and this review attempts to summarise the basic concepts associated with biological monitoring using benthic diatoms. Where possible, examples from work carried out in Brazil are used.

  11. Polysaccharies of higher fungi: Biological role, structure and antioxidative activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozarski, M.S.; Klaus, A.; Niksic, M.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.; Vrvic, M.M.; Jakovljevic, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    The fungal polysaccharides attract a lot of attention due to their multiple challenging bio-logical properties, such as: anti-tumor, anti-viral, anticomplementary, anticoagulant, hypo-lipidemic, immunomodulatory and immune-stimulatory activities, which all together make them suitable for application

  12. A dancer with rheumatoid arthritis: a role for biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, H A; Bergstrom, A

    2013-04-01

    A case study is presented in which a student dancer who developed rheumatoid arthritis during her degree course was able to complete her course with meticulous treatment including the use of biologics. She describes her own reactions to the disease occurring at this crucial phase in her career.

  13. Evidence for a Role of Executive Functions in Learning Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Sinéad M.; Booth, Josephine N.; Campbell, Lorna Elise; Blythe, Richard A.; Wheate, Nial J.; Delibegovic, Mirela

    2014-01-01

    Research examining cognition and science learning has focused on working memory, but evidence implicates a broader set of executive functions. The current study examined executive functions and learning of biology in young adolescents. Fifty-six participants, aged 12-13?years, completed tasks of working memory (Spatial Working Memory), inhibition…

  14. Sex Roles: Their Relationship to Cultural and Biological Determinants. [Draft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This paper examines relevant research in comparative sociology, social anthropology with primitive societies, the behavior of primates, the hormonal control of social behavior, and contemporary social psychology. The reciprocal influence of social and biological factors on human societies is discussed. Moreover, the effect of attitudes on social…

  15. The role of depressed metabolism in space biology: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, J.

    1973-01-01

    Organization and research activities of the entire NASA Space Biology Program are outlined. Various technical approaches are reported to study depressed metabolism particularly in the situation of 100% oxygen and reduced ambient pressures. These include hibernation and hypothermia, thermal regulation, and diluent gases.

  16. The role of analytical sciences in medical systems biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J. van der; Stroobant, P.; Heijden, R. van der

    2004-01-01

    Medical systems biology has generated widespread interest because of its bold conception and exciting potential, but the field is still in its infancy. Although there has been tremendous progress achieved recently in generating, integrating and analysing data in the medical and pharmaceutical field,

  17. The emerging role of telomere biology in cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huzen, Jardi; de Boer, Rudolf A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van der Harst, Pim

    2010-01-01

    A striking variability exists in the susceptibility, age of onset and pace of progression of cardiovascular diseases. This is inadequately explained by the presence or absence of conventional risk factors. Differences in biological aging might provide an additional component of the observed

  18. Healthy aging and disease : role for telomere biology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Haidong; Belcher, Matthew; van der Harst, Pim

    Aging is a biological process that affects most cells, organisms and species. Human aging is associated with increased susceptibility to a variety of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, neurological diseases and cancer. Despite the remarkable progress made during the

  19. Alteration of Skin Properties with Autologous Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh L. Thangapazham

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dermal fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells found between the skin epidermis and subcutaneous tissue. They are primarily responsible for synthesizing collagen and glycosaminoglycans; components of extracellular matrix supporting the structural integrity of the skin. Dermal fibroblasts play a pivotal role in cutaneous wound healing and skin repair. Preclinical studies suggest wider applications of dermal fibroblasts ranging from skin based indications to non-skin tissue regeneration in tendon repair. One clinical application for autologous dermal fibroblasts has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA while others are in preclinical development or various stages of regulatory approval. In this context, we outline the role of fibroblasts in wound healing and discuss recent advances and the current development pipeline for cellular therapies using autologous dermal fibroblasts. The microanatomic and phenotypic differences of fibroblasts occupying particular locations within the skin are reviewed, emphasizing the therapeutic relevance of attributes exhibited by subpopulations of fibroblasts. Special focus is provided to fibroblast characteristics that define regional differences in skin, including the thick and hairless skin of the palms and soles as compared to hair-bearing skin. This regional specificity and functional identity of fibroblasts provides another platform for developing regional skin applications such as the induction of hair follicles in bald scalp or alteration of the phenotype of stump skin in amputees to better support their prosthetic devices.

  20. Cardiac fibroblast transcriptome analyses support a role for interferogenic, profibrotic, and inflammatory genes in anti-SSA/Ro-associated congenital heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Robert M; Markham, Androo J; Jackson, Tanisha; Rasmussen, Sara E; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Buyon, Jill P

    2017-09-01

    The signature lesion of SSA/Ro autoantibody-associated congenital heart block (CHB) is fibrosis and a macrophage infiltrate, supporting an experimental focus on cues influencing the fibroblast component. The transcriptomes of human fetal cardiac fibroblasts were analyzed using two complementary approaches. Cardiac injury conditions were simulated in vitro by incubating human fetal cardiac fibroblasts with supernatants from macrophages transfected with the SSA/Ro-associated noncoding Y ssRNA. The top 10 upregulated transcripts in the stimulated fibroblasts reflected a type I interferon (IFN) response [e.g., IFN-induced protein 44-like (IFI44L), of MX dynamin-like GTPase (MX)1, MX2, and radical S -adenosyl methionine domain containing 2 (Rsad2)]. Within the fibrotic pathway, transcript levels of endothelin-1 (EDN1), phosphodiesterase (PDE)4D, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)2, and CXCL3 were upregulated, while others, including adenomedullin, RAP guanine nucleotide exchange factor 3 (RAPGEF3), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)1, TIMP3, and dual specificity phosphatase 1, were downregulated. Agnostic Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery analysis revealed a significant increase in inflammatory genes, including complement C3A receptor 1 (C3AR1), F2R-like thrombin/trypsin receptor 3, and neutrophil cytosolic factor 2. In addition, stimulated fibroblasts expressed high levels of phospho-MADS box transcription enhancer factor 2 [a substrate of MAPK5 (ERK5)], which was inhibited by BIX-02189, a specific inhibitor of ERK5. Translation to human disease leveraged an unprecedented opportunity to interrogate the transcriptome of fibroblasts freshly isolated and cell sorted without stimulation from a fetal heart with CHB and a matched healthy heart. Consistent with the in vitro data, five IFN response genes were among the top 10 most highly expressed transcripts in CHB fibroblasts. In addition, the expression of matrix-related genes

  1. Redefining the role of syndecans in C. elegans biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopal, Sandeep; Couchman, John; Pocock, Roger

    2016-01-01

    in the activation of several downstream signaling pathways. We identified a previously unappreciated role of syndecans in cytosolic calcium regulation in mammals that is conserved in C. elegans. We concluded that calcium regulation is the basic, evolutionarily conserved role for syndecans, which enables them...

  2. Fibroblast activation protein alpha expression identifies activated fibroblasts after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmanns, Jochen; Hoffmann, Daniel; Habbaba, Yasmin; Schmitto, Jan D; Sedding, Daniel; Fraccarollo, Daniela; Galuppo, Paolo; Bauersachs, Johann

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast activation protein α (FAP) is a membrane-bound serine protease expressed by activated fibroblasts during wound healing in the skin. Expression of FAP after myocardial infarction (MI) and potential effects on cardiac wound healing are largely unknown. MI was induced in rats and FAP expression was analyzed at 3, 7 and 28 days post-MI by microarray, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. In human hearts after MI, a FAP(+) fibroblast population was identified, and characterized by immunohistochemistry for prolyl-4-hydroxylase β, α-smooth muscle actin, Thy-1 and vimentin. Signaling pathways leading to FAP expression were studied in human cardiac fibroblasts by Western blot and ELISA using TGFβ1, TGF-beta type I-receptor (TGFbR1)-inhibitor SB431542 or the MAPK-inhibitor U0126 as well as siRNA targeting SMAD2 and SMAD3. Finally, fibroblasts were assayed for FAP-dependent migration (modified Boyden-chamber), proliferation (BrdU-assay) and gelatinolytic activity by gelatin zymography. In rats, FAP expression was increased after MI especially in the peri-infarct area peaking at 7 days post-MI. Co-localization analysis identified the majority of FAP(+) cells as activated proto-myofibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Concordantly, FAP(+) fibroblasts were abundant in ischemic tissue of human hearts after MI, but not in healthy control hearts. In vitro, FAP was induced by TGFβ1 via the canonical SMAD2/SMAD3 pathway. Depletion of FAP in fibroblasts reduced migratory capacity, while proliferation was not affected. Gelatin zymography revealed gelatinase activity by fibroblast-derived FAP. In this study, we show for the first time the expression of FAP in activated fibroblasts after MI and its activation by TGFβ1. Effects of FAP on fibroblast migration and gelatinolytic activity indicate a potential role in cardiac wound healing and remodeling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interleukin-6 production by human liver (myo)fibroblasts in culture. Evidence for a regulatory role of LPS, IL-1 beta and TNF alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiggelman, A. M.; Boers, W.; Linthorst, C.; Brand, H. S.; Sala, M.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin-6 is a major trigger for the synthesis of acute phase proteins by liver parenchymal cells. Acute phase proteins may contribute to the regulation of liver fibrosis by inhibition of proteases (e.g. collagenase) and by binding of cytokines. Since liver (myo)fibroblasts play an important

  4. Different proliferative capacity of lung fibroblasts obtained from control subjects and patients with emphysema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhoek, JA; Postma, DS; Chong, LL; Vos, JTWM; Kauffman, HF; Timens, W; van Straaten, JFM

    2003-01-01

    To characterize the possible role of a dysregulated proliferative capacity of pulmonary fibroblasts in insufficient tissue repair in lungs from patients with pulmonary emphysema, the authors undertook in vitro proliferative studies with pulmonary fibroblasts obtained from lung tissue of patients

  5. Expression of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway and Its Regulatory Role in Type I Collagen with TGF-β1 in Scleral Fibroblasts from an Experimentally Induced Myopia Guinea Pig Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To investigate Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway expression and its regulation of type I collagen by TGF-β1 in scleral fibroblasts from form-deprivation myopia (FDM guinea pig model. Methods. Wnt isoforms were examined using genome microarrays. Scleral fibroblasts from FDM group and self-control (SC group were cultured. Wnt isoforms, β-catenin, TGF-β1, and type I collagen expression levels were examined in the two groups with or without DKK-1 or TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody. Results. For genome microarrays, the expression of Wnt3 in FDM group was significantly greater as confirmed in retinal and scleral tissue. The expression of Wnt3 and β-catenin significantly increased in FDM group and decreased significantly with DKK-1. TGF-β1 expression level decreased significantly in FDM group and increased significantly with DKK-1. Along with morphological misalignment inside and outside cells, the amount of type I collagen decreased in FDM group. Furthermore, type I collagen increased and became regular in DKK-1 intervention group, whereas it decreased and rearranged more disorder in TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody intervention group. Conclusions. The activation of Wnt3/β-catenin signaling pathway was demonstrated in primary scleral fibroblasts in FDM. This pathway further reduced the expression of type I collagen by TGF-β1, which ultimately played a role in scleral remodeling during myopia development.

  6. Biological Mechanisms Underlying the Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Formation of Skin Wrinkling and Sagging II: Over-Expression of Neprilysin Plays an Essential Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genji Imokawa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies strongly indicated that the up-regulated activity of skin fibroblast-derived elastase plays a pivotal role in wrinkling and/or sagging of the skin via the impairment of elastic fiber configuration and the subsequent loss of skin elasticity. Fortunately, we succeeded in identifying human skin fibroblast-derived elastase as a previously known enzyme, neprilysin or neutral endopeptidase (NEP. We have also characterized epithelial-mesenchymal paracrine cytokine interactions between UVB-exposed-keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts and found that interleukin-1α and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulatory factor (GM-CSF are intrinsic cytokines secreted by UVB-exposed keratinocytes that stimulate the expression of neprilysin by fibroblasts. On the other hand, direct UVA exposure of human fibroblasts significantly stimulates the secretion of IL-6 and also elicits a significant increase in the gene expression of matrix metallo-protease(MMP-1 as well as neprilysin (to a lesser extent, which is followed by distinct increases in their protein and enzymatic activity levels. Direct UVA exposure of human keratinocytes also stimulates the secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF but not of IL-1 and endothelin-1. These findings suggest that GM-CSF secreted by UVA-exposed keratinocytes as well as IL-6 secreted by UVA-exposed dermal fibroblasts play important and additional roles in UVA-induced sagging and wrinkling by up-regulation of neprilysin and MMP-1, respectively, in dermal fibroblasts.

  7. Biological Motion Preference in Humans at Birth: Role of Dynamic and Configural Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, Lara; Regolin, Lucia; Simion, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses the hypothesis that detection of biological motion is an intrinsic capacity of the visual system guided by a non-species-specific predisposition for the pattern of vertebrate movement and investigates the role of global vs. local information in biological motion detection. Two-day-old babies exposed to a biological…

  8. Lipid polymorphism and the functional roles of lipids in biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cullis, P.R.; Kruijff, B. de

    1979-01-01

    The reasons for the great variety of lipids found in biological membranes, and the relations between lipid composition and membrane function pose major unsolved problems in membrane biology. Perhaps the only major functional role of lipids which may be regarded as firmly established involves the

  9. The role of antioxidant-protein interactions in biological membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGillivray, Duncan J; Singh, Rachna; Melton, Laurence D.; Worcester, David L.; Gilbert, Elliot P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Oxidative damage of cellular membranes has been linked to a variety of disease pathologies, including cardiac disease, Alzheimer's and complications due to diabetes. The oxidation of unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid chains found in cellular membranes leads to significant alteration in membrane physical properties, including lipid orientation and membrane permeability, which ultimately affect biological function. Polyphenols are naturally occurring phytochemicals present in a number of fruit and vegetables that are of interest for their anti-oxidative powers. These polyphenols inhibit lipid oxidation in cellular membrane surfaces, although the mechanism of this inhibition is not entirely clear. Moreover, the polyphenols have significant binding affinity for proteins, which can lead to the formation of soluble and insoluble protein-polyphenol complexes Significantly, in the presence of casein proteins the oxidation inhibition the polyphenols in the membrane is significantly enhanced (as assessed by Lipid Peroxidation Inhibition Capacity assays). Thus the antioxidant pathway appears to involve these protein/polyphenol complexes, as well as direct antioxidant action by the polyphenol. Here we discuss neutron and x-ray scattering results from phospholipid membranes, looking at the positioning of two examples of polyphenolic antioxidants in phospholipid membranes, quercetin and phloretin, the antioxidants' impact on the membrane organisation, and the interaction between antioxidant and extra-membranous protein. This information sheds light on the mechanism of antioxidant protection in these systems, which may be used to understand biological responses to oxidative stress.

  10. The role of biological clock in glucose homeostasis 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Chrościcki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the biological clock is based on a rhythmic expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes. As a result of their transcripto-translational associations, endogenous rhythms in the synthesis of key proteins of various physiological and metabolic processes are created. The major timekeeping mechanism for these rhythms exists in the central nervous system. The master circadian clock, localized in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, regulates multiple metabolic pathways, while feeding behavior and metabolite availability can in turn regulate the circadian clock. It is also suggested that in the brain there is a food entrainable oscillator (FEO or oscillators, resulting in activation of both food anticipatory activity and hormone secretion that control digestion processes. Moreover, most cells and tissues express autonomous clocks. Maintenance of the glucose homeostasis is particularly important for the proper function of the body, as this sugar is the main source of energy for the brain, retina, erythrocytes and skeletal muscles. Thus, glucose production and utilization are synchronized in time. The hypothalamic excited orexin neurons control energy balance of organism and modulate the glucose production and utilization. Deficiency of orexin action results in narcolepsy and weight gain, whereas glucose and amino acids can affect activity of the orexin cells. Large-scale genetic studies in rodents and humans provide evidence for the involvement of disrupted clock gene expression rhythms in the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In general, the current lifestyle of the developed modern societies disturbs the action of biological clock. 

  11. New biological and clinical roles for the n-6 and n-3 fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.

    1994-01-01

    Four new findings of the biochemistry and biology of the essential n-6 and n-3 fatty acids have recently been demonstrated. These findings will augment current knowledge as to the role of the essential fatty acids in human health.......Four new findings of the biochemistry and biology of the essential n-6 and n-3 fatty acids have recently been demonstrated. These findings will augment current knowledge as to the role of the essential fatty acids in human health....

  12. The role of P2X receptors in bone biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N R; Syberg, S; Ellegaard, M

    2015-01-01

    come from studies on murine knockout models and from pharmacologic studies on cells and animals. More recently, the role of P2X receptors in human bone diseases has been documented. Loss-of-functions polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptorare associated with bone loss and increased fracture risk. Very...

  13. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone and its versatile roles in biological ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, the role of PQQ has also been shown as a bio-control agent for plant fungal pathogens, an inducer for proteins kinases involved in cellular differentiation of mammalian cells and as a redox sensor leading to development of biosensor. Recent reviews published on PQQ and enzymes requiring this cofactor have ...

  14. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone and its versatile roles in biological ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-05

    Apr 5, 2012 ... growth and protection of living cells under stress. Recently, the role of PQQ has also ... growth and differentiation in mammalian system, as a nutrient and vitamin in stress tolerance, in crop productivity through increasing the ...... noline in plant growth promotion: A novel discovery. World. App. Sci. J. 8 57–61.

  15. The role of material in homogeneities in biological growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grillo A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of the material in homogeneities that are generated by an isotropic growth on the source of mass acting within a growing living tissue. In order to do that, we need to study the interaction between these material in homogeneities and the chemical agents dissolved within the tissue. For this purpose, we use some ideas and methods from Condensed Matter Physics (e.g., the Path Integral technique employed in modeling Brownian processes and apply them to the Continuum Mechanics description of volumetric Growth. We believe that this approach may provide new physical insight into the interactions between the macroscopic dynamics of living systems and the evolution of the subsystems which activate biological processes.

  16. The role of biological fertility in predicting family size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joffe, M; Key, J; Best, N

    2009-01-01

    rather than a decrease in couple fertility. METHODS: Using four high-quality European datasets, we took the reported time to pregnancy (TTP) as the predictor variable; births reported as following contraceptive failure were an additional category. The outcome variable was final or near-final family size......BACKGROUND: It is plausible that a couple's ability to achieve the desired number of children is limited by biological fertility, especially if childbearing is postponed. Family size has declined and semen quality may have deteriorated in much of Europe, although studies have found an increase....... Potential confounders were maternal age when unprotected sex began prior to the first birth, and maternal smoking. Desired family size was available in only one of the datasets. RESULTS: Couples with a TTP of at least 12 months tended to have smaller families, with odds ratios for the risk of not having...

  17. The role of mixotrophic protists in the biological carbon pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Aditee; Flynn, K.J.; Burkholder, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The traditional view of the planktonic food web describes consumption of inorganic nutrients by photoautotrophic phytoplankton, which in turn supports zooplankton and ultimately higher trophic levels. Pathways centred on bacteria provide mechanisms for nutrient recycling. This structure lies...... at the foundation of most models used to explore biogeochemical cycling, functioning of the biological pump, and the impact of climate change on these processes. We suggest an alternative new paradigm, which sees the bulk of the base of this food web supported by protist plankton communities that are mixotrophic...... – combining phototrophy and phagotrophy within a single cell. The photoautotrophic eukaryotic plankton and their heterotrophic microzooplankton grazers dominate only during the developmental phases of ecosystems (e.g. spring bloom in temperate systems). With their flexible nutrition, mixotrophic protists...

  18. Role of Molecular Biology in Cancer Treatment: A Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Aman; Qamar, Hafiza Yasara; Ali, Qurban; Naeem, Hafsa; Riaz, Mariam; Amin, Saima; Kanwal, Naila; Ali, Fawad; Sabar, Muhammad Farooq; Nasir, Idrees Ahmad

    2017-11-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease and mainly arises due to a number of reasons include activation of onco-genes, malfunction of tumor suppressor genes or mutagenesis due to external factors. This article was written from the data collected from PubMed, Nature, Science Direct, Springer and Elsevier groups of journals. Oncogenes are deregulated form of normal proto-oncogenes required for cell division, differentiation and regulation. The conversion of proto-oncogene to oncogene is caused due to translocation, rearrangement of chromosomes or mutation in gene due to addition, deletion, duplication or viral infection. These oncogenes are targeted by drugs or RNAi system to prevent proliferation of cancerous cells. There have been developed different techniques of molecular biology used to diagnose and treat cancer, including retroviral therapy, silencing of oncogenes and mutations in tumor suppressor genes. Among all the techniques used, RNAi, zinc finger nucleases and CRISPR hold a brighter future towards creating a Cancer Free World.

  19. Role of biological factors in etiopathogenesis of borderline personality disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Rabe-Jabłońska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Emotionally labile personality of borderline type (borderline personality occurs in 1-2% of individuals from general population; 75% of this group are women. Similarly to most of the other mental disorders, the borderline personality results from a combination of biological, social and psychological factors. The subject of this study is a survey of the current knowledge on biological factors of borderline personality. Most researchers are of the opinion that these personality disorders are determined genetically, with such inherited temperamental traits as: dysregulation, impulsivity, and hypersensitivity. Perhaps hereditary is also a defect within the serotonergic system, endogenous opioid system and/or dopaminergic system related to the reward system. Many researchers have recently perceived the dysfunction of endogenous opioid system as an integral component of borderline personality. There is now a lot of evidence showing that this dysfunction as well as that of the reward system may account for most of the borderline personality symptoms which constitute an involuntary attempt of stimulating the inefficient systems. This is how e.g. the presence of reckless sexual behaviours, unstable interpersonal relationships and inability to delay the reward in borderline personality is accounted for. Such observations may in the future constitute an important indication for seeking a more effective pharmacotherapy for patients with borderline personality. It is possible that in some patients the described dysfunctions may be alleviated with time. This is implied by the results of comprehensive prospective studies which show a significant regression of symptoms and improvement in functioning of most patients with borderline personality after at least several years.

  20. The Biology of Eosinophils and Their Role in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire N. McBrien

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This review will describe the structure and function of the eosinophil. The roles of several relevant cell surface molecules and receptors will be discussed. We will also explore the systemic and local processes triggering eosinophil differentiation, maturation, and migration to the lungs in asthma, as well as the cytokine-mediated pathways that result in eosinophil activation and degranulation, i.e., the release of multiple pro-inflammatory substances from eosinophil-specific granules, including cationic proteins, cytokines, chemokines growth factors, and enzymes. We will discuss the current understanding of the roles that eosinophils play in key asthma processes such as airway hyperresponsiveness, mucus hypersecretion, and airway remodeling, in addition to the evidence relating to eosinophil–pathogen interactions within the lungs.

  1. The role of P2X receptors in bone biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N R; Syberg, S; Ellegaard, M

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a highly dynamic organ, being constantly modeled and remodeled in order to adapt to the changing need throughout life. Bone turnover involves the coordinated actions of bone formation and bone degradation. Over the past decade great effort has been put into the examination of how P2X...... receptors regulate bone metabolism and especially for the P2X7 receptor an impressive amount of evidence has now documented its expression in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes as well as important functional roles in proliferation, differentiation, and function of the cells of bone. Key evidence has...... come from studies on murine knockout models and from pharmacologic studies on cells and animals. More recently, the role of P2X receptors in human bone diseases has been documented. Loss-of-functions polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptorare associated with bone loss and increased fracture risk. Very...

  2. The role of extracellular vesicles in malaria biology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Natalia Guimaraes; Cheng, Lesley; Eriksson, Emily M

    2017-06-09

    In the past decade, research on the functions of extracellular vesicles in malaria has expanded dramatically. Investigations into the various vesicle types, from both host and parasite origin, has revealed important roles for extracellular vesicles in disease pathogenesis and susceptibility, as well as cell-cell communication and immune responses. Here, work relating to extracellular vesicles in malaria is reviewed, and the areas that remain unknown and require further investigations are highlighted.

  3. The role of ionizing radiation in biological control of agricultural pests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.

    2011-01-01

    Although the commercial biological control industry is growing, it still represents only a small portion of the international market of pest control sales (about 3%). This low ratio is due to several factors including high cost of production of biological control agents and technical and regulatory difficulties that complicate the shipping procedures and create trade barriers. This article summarizes the role of ionizing radiation in supporting the use of biological control agents in insect pest control and concentrates on its role in the production, transport, distribution, and release of parasites and predators and the advantages that ionizing radiation can offer, in comparison with traditional techniques. (author)

  4. Context dependence of students' views about the role of equations in understanding biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Jessica; Elby, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    Students' epistemological views about biology--their ideas about what "counts" as learning and understanding biology--play a role in how they approach their courses and respond to reforms. As introductory biology courses incorporate more physics and quantitative reasoning, student attitudes about the role of equations in biology become especially relevant. However, as documented in research in physics education, students' epistemologies are not always stable and fixed entities; they can be dynamic and context-dependent. In this paper, we examine an interview with an introductory student in which she discusses the use of equations in her reformed biology course. In one part of the interview, she expresses what sounds like an entrenched negative stance toward the role equations can play in understanding biology. However, later in the interview, when discussing a different biology topic, she takes a more positive stance toward the value of equations. These results highlight how a given student can have diverse ways of thinking about the value of bringing physics and math into biology. By highlighting how attitudes can shift in response to different tasks, instructional environments, and contextual cues, we emphasize the need to attend to these factors, rather than treating students' beliefs as fixed and stable.

  5. Biological messiness vs. biological genius: Mechanistic aspects and roles of protein promiscuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, William M

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to the traditional biological paradigms focused on 'specificity', recent research and theoretical efforts have focused on functional 'promiscuity' exhibited by proteins and enzymes in many biological settings, including enzymatic detoxication, steroid biochemistry, signal transduction and immune responses. In addition, divergent evolutionary processes are apparently facilitated by random mutations that yield promiscuous enzyme intermediates. The intermediates, in turn, provide opportunities for further evolution to optimize new functions from existing protein scaffolds. In some cases, promiscuity may simply represent the inherent plasticity of proteins resulting from their polymeric nature with distributed conformational ensembles. Enzymes or proteins that bind or metabolize noncognate substrates create 'messiness' or noise in the systems they contribute to. With our increasing awareness of the frequency of these promiscuous behaviors it becomes interesting and important to understand the molecular bases for promiscuous behavior and to distinguish between evolutionarily selected promiscuity and evolutionarily tolerated messiness. This review provides an overview of current understanding of these aspects of protein biochemistry and enzymology. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Biological messiness vs. biological genius: Mechanistic aspects and roles of protein promiscuity✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, William M.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the traditional biological paradigms focused on ‘specificity’, recent research and theoretical efforts have focused on functional ‘promiscuity’ exhibited by proteins and enzymes in many biological settings, including enzymatic detoxication, steroid biochemistry, signal transduction and immune responses. In addition, divergent evolutionary processes are apparently facilitated by random mutations that yield promiscuous enzyme intermediates. The intermediates, in turn, provide opportunities for further evolution to optimize new functions from existing protein scaffolds. In some cases, promiscuity may simply represent the inherent plasticity of proteins resulting from their polymeric nature with distributed conformational ensembles. Enzymes or proteins that bind or metabolize noncognate substrates create ‘messiness’ or noise in the systems they contribute to. With our increasing awareness of the frequency of these promiscuous behaviors it becomes interesting and important to understand the molecular bases for promiscuous behavior and to distinguish between evolutionarily selected promiscuity and evolutionarily tolerated messiness. This review provides an overview of current understanding of these aspects of protein biochemistry and enzymology. PMID:25218442

  7. The role of P2X receptors in bone biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, N R; Syberg, S; Ellegaard, M

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a highly dynamic organ, being constantly modeled and remodeled in order to adapt to the changing need throughout life. Bone turnover involves the coordinated actions of bone formation and bone degradation. Over the past decade great effort has been put into the examination of how P2X receptors regulate bone metabolism and especially for the P2X7 receptor an impressive amount of evidence has now documented its expression in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes as well as important functional roles in proliferation, differentiation, and function of the cells of bone. Key evidence has come from studies on murine knockout models and from pharmacologic studies on cells and animals. More recently, the role of P2X receptors in human bone diseases has been documented. Loss-of-functions polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptorare associated with bone loss and increased fracture risk. Very recently a report from a genetic study in multiple myeloma demonstrated that decreased P2X7 receptor function was associated with increased risk of developing multiple myeloma. In contrast, the risk of developing myeloma bone disease and subsequent vertebral fractures was increased in subjects carrying P2X7 receptor gain-of-function alleles as compared to subjects only carrying loss-of-function or normal functioning alleles. It is evident that P2X receptors are important in regulating bone turnover and maintaining bone mass, and thereby holding great potential as novel drug targets for treatment of bone diseases. However, further research is needed before we fully understand the roles and effects of P2X receptors in bone.

  8. Fibulins and Their Role in Cardiovascular Biology and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cangemi, Claudia; Hansen, Maria Lyck; Argraves, William Scott

    2014-01-01

    Fibulins are a group of extracellular matrix proteins of which many are present in high amounts in the cardiovascular system. They share common biochemical properties and are often found in relation to basement membranes or elastic fibers. Observations in humans with specific mutations in fibulin...... genes, together with results from genetically engineered mice and data from human cardiovascular tissue suggest that the fibulin family of proteins play important functional roles in the cardiovascular system. Moreover, fibulin-1 circulates in high concentrations in plasma and may function...

  9. Revelation of fibroblast protein commonalities and differences and their possible roles in wound healing and tumourigenesis using co-culture models of cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jarkovská, Karla; Dvořánková, B.; Halada, Petr; Kodet, O.; Szabo, P.; Gadher, S. J.; Motlík, Jan; Kovářová, Hana; Smetana, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 7 (2014), s. 203-218 ISSN 0248-4900 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : cancer -associated fibroblasts * contractile proteins * myofibroblasts * tissue injury * tumourigeneses Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.506, year: 2014

  10. Helium generated cold plasma finely regulates activation of human fibroblast-like primary cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Brun

    Full Text Available Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and

  11. The role of viral persistence in flavivirus biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlera, Luwanika; Melik, Wessam; Bloom, Marshall E.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, vector-borne flaviviruses are persistently cycled between either the tick or mosquito vector and small mammals such as rodents, skunks, and swine. These viruses account for considerable human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Increasing and substantial evidence of viral persistence in humans, which includes the isolation of RNA by RT-PCR and infectious virus by culture, continues to be reported. Viral persistence can also be established in vitro in various human, animal, arachnid and insect cell lines in culture. Although some research has focused on the potential roles of defective virus particles, evasion of the immune response through the manipulation of autophagy and/or apoptosis, the precise mechanism of flavivirus persistence is still not well understood. We propose additional research for further understanding of how viral persistence is established in different systems. Avenues for additional studies include determining if the multifunctional flavivirus protein NS5 has a role in viral persistence, the development of relevant animal models of viral persistence as well as investigating the host responses that allow vector borne flavivirus replication without detrimental effects on infected cells. Such studies might shed more light on the viral-host relationships, and could be used to unravel the mechanisms for establishment of persistence. PMID:24737600

  12. Role of microProteins in controlling diverse biological pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolde, Ulla Margrit

    a synthetic microProtein approach, we demonstrate that microProteins are able to regulate multi-domain proteins belonging to different protein classes. Furthermore, these results revealed that microProteins may provide a useful tool for post-translational regulation due to their role in protein regulation....... orthologous microProteins, miP1a and miP1b were identified using a computational analysis. MiP1a and miP1b are small B-Box containing proteins that interact with and negatively regulate CONSTANS (CO), a major regulator of flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana. They are known to be the first micro...... T (FT) expression. In agreement with the late flowering of overexpression plants, loss-of-function mutants of both miP1a and miP1b, generated using CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering, showed also a slightly early flowering phenotype. In a forward genetic screen using transgenic plants overexpressing mi...

  13. The chalcone butein from Rhus verniciflua Stokes inhibits clonogenic growth of human breast cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Jenny

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Butein (3,4,2',4'-tetrahydroxychalone, a plant polyphenol, is a major biologically active component of the stems of Rhus verniciflua Stokes. It has long been used as a food additive in Korea and as an herbal medicine throughout Asia. Recently, butein has been shown to suppress the functions of fibroblasts. Because fibroblasts are believed to play an important role in promoting the growth of breast cancer cells, we investigated the ability of butein to inhibit the clonogenic growth of small numbers of breast cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts in vitro. Methods We first measured the clonogenic growth of small numbers of the UACC-812 human breast cancer cell line co-cultured on monolayers of serum-activated, human fibroblasts in the presence of butein (2 μg/mL or various other modulators of fibroblast function (troglitazone-1 μg/mL; GW9662-1 μM; meloxican-1 μM; and 3,4 dehydroproline-10 μg/mL. In a subsequent experiment, we measured the dose-response effect on the clonogenic growth of UACC-812 breast cancer cells by pre-incubating the fibroblasts with varying concentrations of butein (10 μg/ml-1.25 μg/mL. Finally, we measured the clonogenic growth of primary breast cancer cells obtained from 5 clinical specimens with normal fibroblasts and with fibroblasts that had been pre-treated with a fixed dose of butein (2.5 μg/mL. Results Of the five modulators of fibroblast function that we tested, butein was by far the most potent inhibitor of clonogenic growth of UACC-812 breast cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. Pre-treatment of fibroblasts with concentrations of butein as low as 2.5 μg/mL nearly abolished subsequent clonogenic growth of UACC-812 breast cancer cells co-cultured with the fibroblasts. A similar dose of butein had no effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured in the absence of fibroblasts. Significantly, clonogenic growth of the primary breast cancer cells was also

  14. Periodontal Dressing-containing Green Tea Epigallocathechin gallate Increases Fibroblasts Number in Gingival Artifical Wound Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardisa U. Pradita

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Green tea leaf (Camellia sinensis is one of herbal plants that is used for traditional medicine. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG in green tea is the most potential polyphenol component and has the strongest biological activity. It is known that EGCG has potential effect on wound healing. Objective: This study aimed to determine the effect of adding green tea EGCG into periodontal dressing on the number of fibroblasts after gingival artificial wound in animal model. Methods: Gingival artifical wound model was performed using 2mm punch biopsy on 24 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus. The animals were divided into two groups. Periodontal dressing with EGCG and without EGCG was applied to the experimental and control group, respectively. Decapitation period was scheduled at day 3, 5, and 7 after treatment. Histological analysis to count the number of fibroblasts was performed. Results: Number of fibroblasts was significantly increased in time over the experimental group treated with EGCG periodontal dressing compared to control (p<0.05. Conclusion: EGCG periodontal dressing could increase the number of fibroblast, therefore having role in wound healing after periodontal surgery in animal model.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i3.197

  15. Investigation on the role of IGF-1 signal transduction in the biological radiation responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee; Park, Hae Ran; Oh, Soo Jin; Cho, Eun Hee; Eom, Hyun Soo; Ju, Eun Jin

    2009-05-01

    Effects of γ-irradiation on the IGF-1 related gene expressions and activations in various cell lines - Various expression patterns of IGF-1 and IGF-1R following γ-irradiation were observed according to the cell lines - The increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in Balb/3T3 and NIH/3T3 cells - Among the IGF-1 downstream signaling molecules, the phosphorylated ERK5 were not changed by γ-irradiation in all three examined cell lines, whereas the phosphorylated p65 were increased by γ -irradiation in all cell lines. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in γ-irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells - In MEF cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules were decreased and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by γ-irradiation - The experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 signaling is involved but not essential in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence and that p38 MAP kinase play a important role in this cellular radiation response. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in γ-irradiated mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell - In NIH/3T3 cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by γ -irradiation. - However, the experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 and p38 signaling do not play a crucial role in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence in NIH/3T3 cells. Effects of γ-irradiation on the expressions and activations on the genes related to the IGF-1 signaling in mouse tissues - In γ-irradiated mice, the increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in the lung and kidney at 2 months after irradiation, and in all the tissues examined (lung, liver and kidney) at 6 months after irradiation. - In the lung of γ-irradiated mice at 6 months after irradiation, the increases of IGF-1R, phosphorylated FOXO3a, p65, p38, p21 were observed. - The patterns of altered expressions showed significant

  16. Inhibition of fibroblast growth by Notch1 signaling is mediated by induction of Wnt11-dependent WISP-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Jun Liu

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are an integral component of stroma and important source of growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM. They play a prominent role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and in wound healing and tumor growth. Notch signaling regulates biological function in a variety of cells. To elucidate the physiological function of Notch signaling in fibroblasts, we ablated Notch1 in mouse (Notch1(Flox/Flox embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. Notch1-deficient (Notch1(-/- MEFs displayed faster growth and motility rate compared to Notch1(Flox/Flox MEFs. Such phenotypic changes, however, were reversible by reconstitution of Notch1 activation via overexpression of the intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD1 in Notch1-deficient MEFs. In contrast, constitutive activation of Notch1 signaling by introducing NICD1 into primary human dermal fibroblasts (FF2441, which caused pan-Notch activation, inhibited cell growth and motility, whereas cellular inhibition was relievable when the Notch activation was countered with dominant-negative mutant of Master-mind like 1 (DN-MAML-1. Functionally, "Notch-activated" stromal fibroblasts could inhibit tumor cell growth/invasion. Moreover, Notch activation induced expression of Wnt-induced secreted proteins-1 (WISP-1/CCN4 in FF2441 cells while deletion of Notch1 in MEFs resulted in an opposite effect. Notably, WISP-1 suppressed fibroblast proliferation, and was responsible for mediating Notch1's inhibitory effect since siRNA-mediated blockade of WISP-1 expression could relieve cell growth inhibition. Notch1-induced WISP-1 expression appeared to be Wnt11-dependent, but Wnt1-independent. Blockade of Wnt11 expression resulted in decreased WISP-1 expression and liberated Notch-induced cell growth inhibition. These findings indicated that inhibition of fibroblast proliferation by Notch pathway activation is mediated, at least in part, through regulating Wnt1-independent, but Wnt11-dependent WISP-1 expression.

  17. Increased expression of fibroblast activation protein-alpha in keloid fibroblasts: implications for development of a novel treatment option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienus, Kirstin; Bayat, Ardeshir; Gilmore, Brendan F; Seifert, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    Keloid scars are common benign fibroproliferative reticular dermal lesions with unknown etiology and ill-defined management with high rate of recurrence post surgery. The progression of keloids is characterized by increased deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, invasion into the surrounding healthy skin and inflammation. Fibroblasts are considered to be the key cellular mediators of fibrogenesis in keloid scars. Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP-α) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) are proteases located at the plasma membrane promoting cell invasiveness and tumor growth and have been previously associated with keloid scars. Therefore, in this study we analyzed in further detail the expression of FAP-α in keloid fibroblasts compared to control skin fibroblasts. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained from punch-biopsies from the active margin of four keloids and four control skin samples. Flow cytometry was used to analyze FAP-α expression and the CytoSelect 24-Well Collagen I Cell Invasion Assay was applied to study fibroblast invasion. Secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins was investigated by multiplexed particle-based flow cytometric assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found an increased expression of FAP-α in keloid fibroblasts compared to control skin fibroblasts (p fibroblasts (p fibroblast growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor, (c) on the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8) or monocyte chemotactic protein-1. These results suggest a potential role for FAP-α and DPPIV in the invasive behavior of keloids. FAP-α and DPPIV may increase the invasive capacity of keloid fibroblasts rather than by modulating inflammation or ECM production. Since FAP-α expression is restricted to reactive fibroblasts in wound healing and normal adult tissues are generally FAP-α negative, inhibiting FAP-α/DPPIV activity may be a novel treatment option to prevent keloid progression.

  18. Rho A and the Rho kinase pathway regulate fibroblast contraction: Enhanced contraction in constitutively active Rho A fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobe, Koji, E-mail: kojinobe@pharm.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Nobe, Hiromi [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Physical Therapy, Bunkyo-Gakuin University (Japan); Yoshida, Hiroko [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Kolodney, Michael S. [Dermatology Division, Department of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Paul, Richard J. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Honda, Kazuo [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Mechanisms of fibroblast cell contraction in collagen matrix. {yields} Assessed an isometric force development using 3D-reconstituted-fibroblast fiber. {yields} Constitutively active Rho A induced the over-contraction of fibroblast cells. {yields} Rho A and Rho kinase pathway has a central role in fibroblast cell contraction. -- Abstract: Fibroblast cells play a central role in the proliferation phase of wound healing processes, contributing to force development. The intracellular signaling pathways regulating this non-muscle contraction are only partially understood. To study the relations between Rho A and contractile responses, constitutively active Rho A (CA-Rho A) fibroblast cells were reconstituted into fibers and the effects of calf serum (CS) on isometric force were studied. CS-induced force in CA-Rho A fibroblast fibers was twice as large as that in wild type (NIH 3T3) fibroblast fibers. During this response, the translocation of Rho A from the cytosol to the membrane was detected by Rho A activity assays and Western blot analysis. Pre-treatment with a Rho specific inhibitor (C3-exoenzyme) suppressed translocation as well as contraction. These results indicate that Rho A activation is essential for fibroblast contraction. The Rho kinase inhibitor ( (Y27632)) inhibited both NIH 3T3 and CA-Rho A fibroblast fiber contractions. Activation of Rho A is thus directly coupled with Rho kinase activity. We conclude that the translocation of Rho A from the cytosol to the membrane and the Rho kinase pathway can regulate wound healing processes mediated by fibroblast contraction.

  19. Fibroblast α11β1 Integrin Regulates Tensional Homeostasis in Fibroblast/A549 Carcinoma Heterospheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ning; Karlsen, Tine V.; Reed, Rolf K.; Kusche-Gullberg, Marion; Gullberg, Donald

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that fibroblast expression of α11β1 integrin stimulates A549 carcinoma cell growth in a xenograft tumor model. To understand the molecular mechanisms whereby a collagen receptor on fibroblast can regulate tumor growth we have used a 3D heterospheroid system composed of A549 tumor cells and fibroblasts without (α11+/+) or with a deletion (α11-/-) in integrin α11 gene. Our data show that α11-/-/A549 spheroids are larger than α11+/+/A549 spheroids, and that A549 cell number, cell migration and cell invasion in a collagen I gel are decreased in α11-/-/A549 spheroids. Gene expression profiling of differentially expressed genes in fibroblast/A549 spheroids identified CXCL5 as one molecule down-regulated in A549 cells in the absence of α11 on the fibroblasts. Blocking CXCL5 function with the CXCR2 inhibitor SB225002 reduced cell proliferation and cell migration of A549 cells within spheroids, demonstrating that the fibroblast integrin α11β1 in a 3D heterospheroid context affects carcinoma cell growth and invasion by stimulating autocrine secretion of CXCL5. We furthermore suggest that fibroblast α11β1 in fibroblast/A549 spheroids regulates interstitial fluid pressure by compacting the collagen matrix, in turn implying a role for stromal collagen receptors in regulating tensional hemostasis in tumors. In summary, blocking stromal α11β1 integrin function might thus be a stroma-targeted therapeutic strategy to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy. PMID:25076207

  20. Normal skin and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts differentially regulate collagen and fibronectin expression as well as mitochondrial membrane potential in response to basic fibroblast growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Bian, Hui-Ning; Lai, Wen; Chen, Hua-De; Zhao, Ke-Seng

    2011-05-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) regulates skin wound healing; however, the underlying mechanism remains to be defined. In the present study, we determined the effects of bFGF on the regulation of cell growth as well as collagen and fibronectin expression in fibroblasts from normal human skin and from hypertrophic scars. We then explored the involvement of mitochondria in mediating bFGF-induced effects on the fibroblasts. We isolated and cultivated normal and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts from tissue biopsies of patients who underwent plastic surgery for repairing hypertrophic scars. The fibroblasts were then treated with different concentrations of bFGF (ranging from 0.1 to 1000 ng/mL). The growth of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts became slower with selective inhibition of type I collagen production after exposure to bFGF. However, type III collagen expression was affected in both normal and hypertrophic scar fibroblasts. Moreover, fibronectin expression in the normal fibroblasts was up-regulated after bFGF treatment. bFGF (1000 ng/mL) also induced mitochondrial depolarization in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (P fibroblasts (P fibroblasts following treatment with bFGF (P fibroblasts of the normal skin and hypertrophic scars, indicating that bFGF may play a role in the early phase of skin wound healing and post-burn scar formation.

  1. Biological Activity of Mesoporous Dendrimer-Coated Titanium Dioxide: Insight on the Role of the Surface-Interface Composition and the Framework Crystallinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowska, Katarzyna; Rybczyńska, Aneta; Mosiolek, Joanna; Durdyn, Joanna; Szewczyk, Eligia M; Katir, Nadia; Brahmi, Younes; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bousmina, Mosto; Bryszewska, Maria; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2015-09-16

    Hitherto, the field of nanomedicine has been overwhelmingly dominated by the use of mesoporous organosilicas compared to their metal oxide congeners. Despite their remarkable reactivity, titanium oxide-based materials have been seldom evaluated and little knowledge has been gained with respect to their "structure-biological activity" relationship. Herein, a fruitful association of phosphorus dendrimers (both "ammonium-terminated" and "phosphonate-terminated") and titanium dioxide has been performed by means of the sol-gel process, resulting in mesoporous dendrimer-coated nanosized crystalline titanium dioxide. A similar organo-coating has been reproduced using single branch-mimicking dendrimers that allow isolation of an amorphous titanium dioxide. The impact of these materials on red blood cells was evaluated by studying cell hemolysis. Next, their cytotoxicity toward B14 Chinese fibroblasts and their antimicrobial activity were also investigated. Based on their variants (cationic versus anionic terminal groups and amorphous versus crystalline titanium dioxide phase), better understanding of the role of the surface-interface composition and the nature of the framework has been gained. No noticeable discrimination was observed for amorphous and crystalline material. In contrast, hemolysis and cytotoxicity were found to be sensitive to the nature of the interface composition, with the ammonium-terminated dendrimer-coated titanium dioxide being the most hemolytic and cytotoxic material. This surface-functionalization opens the door for creating a new synergistic machineries mechanism at the cellular level and seems promising for tailoring the biological activity of nanosized organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

  2. Using Analogy Role-Play Activity in an Undergraduate Biology Classroom to Show Central Dogma Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Masaharu; Kurabayashi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    For the study of biology in an undergraduate classroom, a classroom exercise was developed: an analogy role-play to learn mechanisms of gene transcription and protein translation (central dogma). To develop the central dogma role-play exercise, we made DNA and mRNA using paper sheets, tRNA using a wire dress hanger, and amino acids using Lego®…

  3. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS in the Biological Activities of Metallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdal Dayem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs possess unique physical and chemical properties that make them appropriate for various applications. The structural alteration of metallic NPs leads to different biological functions, specifically resulting in different potentials for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The amount of ROS produced by metallic NPs correlates with particle size, shape, surface area, and chemistry. ROS possess multiple functions in cellular biology, with ROS generation a key factor in metallic NP-induced toxicity, as well as modulation of cellular signaling involved in cell death, proliferation, and differentiation. In this review, we briefly explained NP classes and their biomedical applications and describe the sources and roles of ROS in NP-related biological functions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we also described the roles of metal NP-induced ROS generation in stem cell biology. Although the roles of ROS in metallic NP-related biological functions requires further investigation, modulation and characterization of metallic NP-induced ROS production are promising in the application of metallic NPs in the areas of regenerative medicine and medical devices.

  4. Intradermal adipocytes mediate fibroblast recruitment during skin wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Barbara A.; Horsley, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Acute wound healing in the skin involves the communication of multiple cell types to coordinate keratinocyte and fibroblast proliferation and migration for epidermal and dermal repair. Many studies have focused on the interplay between hematopoietic cells, keratinocytes and fibroblasts during skin wound healing, yet the possible roles for other cell types within the skin, such as intradermal adipocytes, have not been investigated during this process. Here, we identify that adipocyte lineage cells are activated and function during acute skin wound healing. We find that adipocyte precursor cells proliferate and mature adipocytes repopulate skin wounds following inflammation and in parallel with fibroblast migration. Functional analysis of mice with defects in adipogenesis demonstrates that adipocytes are necessary for fibroblast recruitment and dermal reconstruction. These data implicate adipocytes as a key component of the intercellular communication that mediates fibroblast function during skin wound healing. PMID:23482487

  5. Investigating the role of retinal Müller cells with approaches in genetics and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Suhua; Zhu, Meili; Ash, John D; Wang, Yunchang; Le, Yun-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Müller cells are major macroglia and play many essential roles as a supporting cell in the retina. As Müller cells only constitute a small portion of retinal cells, investigating the role of Müller glia in retinal biology and diseases is particularly challenging. To overcome this problem, we first generated a Cre/lox-based conditional gene targeting system that permits the genetic manipulation and functional dissection of gene of interests in Müller cells. To investigate diabetes-induced alteration of Müller cells, we recently adopted methods to analyze Müller cells survival/death in vitro and in vivo. We also used normal and genetically altered primary cell cultures to reveal the mechanistic insights for Müller cells in biological and disease processes. In this article, we will discuss the applications and limitations of these methodologies, which may be useful for research in retinal Müller cell biology and pathophysiology.

  6. Quantitative analysis of chromatin accessibility in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Baowen; Yu, Juan; Chang, Luyuan; Lei, Jiafan; Wen, Zengqi; Liu, Cuifang; Mao, Guankun; Wang, Kehui; Shen, Jie; Xu, Xueqing

    2017-11-04

    Genomic DNA of eukaryotic cells is hierarchically packaged into chromatin by histones. The dynamic organization of chromatin fibers plays a critical role in the regulation of gene transcription and other DNA-associated biological processes. Recently, numerous approaches have been developed to map the chromatin organization by characterizing chromatin accessibilities in genome-wide. However, reliable methods to quantitatively map chromatin accessibility are not well-established, especially not on a genome-wide scale. Here, we developed a modified MNase-seq for mouse embryonic fibroblasts, wherein chromatin was partially digested at multiple digestion times using micrococcal nuclease (MNase), allowing quantitative analysis of local yet genome-wide chromatin compaction. Our results provide strong evidence that the chromatin accessibility at promoter regions are positively correlated with gene activity. In conclusion, our assay is an ideal tool for the quantitative study of gene regulation in the perspective of chromatin accessibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems in the Biology and Virulence of Protozoan Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, proteasomes perform crucial roles in many cellular pathways by degrading proteins to enforce quality control and regulate many cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, cell death, immune responses, metabolism, protein-quality control, and development. The catalytic heart of these complexes, the 20S proteasome, is highly conserved in bacteria, yeast, and humans. However, until a few years ago, the role of proteasomes in parasite biology was completely unknown. Here, we summarize findings about the role of proteasomes in protozoan parasites biology and virulence. Several reports have confirmed the role of proteasomes in parasite biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, and encystation. Proliferation and cell differentiation are key steps in host colonization. Considering the importance of proteasomes in both processes in many different parasites such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, and Entamoeba, parasite proteasomes might serve as virulence factors. Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is also a viable parasitic therapeutic target. Research in recent years has shown that the proteasome is a valid drug target for sleeping sickness and malaria. Then, proteasomes are a key organelle in parasite biology and virulence and appear to be an attractive new chemotherapeutic target.

  8. IL-13 promotes collagen accumulation in Crohn's disease fibrosis by down-regulation of fibroblast MMP synthesis: a role for innate lymphoid cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Bailey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibrosis is a serious consequence of Crohn's disease (CD, often necessitating surgical resection. We examined the hypothesis that IL-13 may promote collagen accumulation within the CD muscle microenvironment. METHODS: Factors potentially modulating collagen deposition were examined in intestinal tissue samples from fibrotic (f CD and compared with cancer control (C, ulcerative colitis (UC and uninvolved (u CD. Mechanisms attributable to IL-13 were analysed using cell lines derived from uninvolved muscle tissue and tissue explants. RESULTS: In fCD muscle extracts, collagen synthesis was significantly increased compared to other groups, but MMP-2 was not co-ordinately increased. IL-13 transcripts were highest in fCD muscle compared to muscle from other groups. IL-13 receptor (R α1 was expressed by intestinal muscle smooth muscle, nerve and KIR(+ cells. Fibroblasts from intestinal muscle expressed Rα1, phosphorylated STAT6 in response to IL-13, and subsequently down-regulated MMP-2 and TNF-α-induced MMP-1 and MMP-9 synthesis. Cells with the phenotype KIR(+CD45(+CD56(+/-CD3(- were significantly increased in fCD muscle compared to all other groups, expressed Rα1 and membrane IL-13, and transcribed high levels of IL-13. In explanted CD muscle, these cells did not phosphorylate STAT6 in response to exogenous IL-13. CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate that in fibrotic intestinal muscle of Crohn's patients, the IL-13 pathway is stimulated, involving a novel population of infiltrating IL-13Rα1(+, KIR(+ innate lymphoid cells, producing IL-13 which inhibits fibroblast MMP synthesis. Consequently, matrix degradation is down-regulated and this leads to excessive collagen deposition.

  9. Differential Effects of Planktonic and Biofilm MRSA on Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Kelly R.; James, Garth A.; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E.; Stewart, Philip S.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria colonizing chronic wounds often exist as biofilms, yet their role in chronic wound pathogenesis remains unclear. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms induce apoptosis in dermal keratinocytes, and given that chronic wound biofilms also colonize dermal tissue, it is important to investigate the effects of bacterial biofilms on dermal fibroblasts. The effects of a predominant wound pathogen, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, on normal, human, dermal fibroblasts were examined in vitro. Cell culture medium was conditioned with equivalent numbers of either planktonic or biofilm methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and then fed to fibroblast cultures. Fibroblast response was evaluated using scratch, viability, and apoptosis assays. The results suggested that fibroblasts experience the same fate when exposed to the soluble products of either planktonic or biofilm methicillin-resistant S. aureus, namely limited migration followed by death. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that fibroblast production of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases were differentially affected by planktonic and biofilm-conditioned medium. Planktonic-conditioned medium induced more interleukin-6, interleukin-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1, heparin-bound epidermal growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-1, and metalloproteinase-3 production in fibroblasts than the biofilm-conditioned medium. Biofilm-conditioned medium induced more tumor-necrosis factor-α production in fibroblasts compared to planktonic-conditioned medium, and suppressed metalloproteinase-3 production compared to controls. PMID:22332802

  10. The requirement for fibroblasts in angiogenesis: fibroblast-derived matrix proteins are essential for endothelial cell lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Andrew C; Nakatsu, Martin N; Chou, Wayne; Gershon, Paul D; Hughes, Christopher C W

    2011-10-01

    A role for fibroblasts in physiological and pathological angiogenesis is now well recognized; however, the precise mechanisms underlying their action have not been determined. Using an in vitro angiogenesis model in combination with a candidate gene approach, column chromatography, and mass spectrometry, we identify two classes of fibroblast-derived factors--one that supports vessel sprouting but not lumen formation, and one that promotes lumen formation. In the absence of fibroblasts a combination of angiopoietin-1, angiogenin, hepatocyte growth factor, transforming growth factor-α, and tumor necrosis factor drives robust endothelial cell (EC) sprouting; however, lumens fail to form. Subsequent addition of fibroblast-conditioned medium restores lumenogenesis. Using small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown, we show that five genes expressed in fibroblasts--collagen I, procollagen C endopeptidase enhancer 1, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, transforming growth factor-β-induced protein ig-h3, and insulin growth factor-binding protein 7--are necessary for lumen formation. Moreover, lumen formation can be rescued by addition of purified protein to knockdown cultures. Finally, using rheology, we demonstrate that the presence of these matricellular proteins results in significantly stiffer gels, which correlates with enhanced lumen formation. These findings highlight the critical role that fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix components play in EC lumen formation and provide potential insight into the role of fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment.

  11. Quantifying the roles of random motility and directed motility using advection-diffusion theory for a 3T3 fibroblast cell migration assay stimulated with an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Matthew J; Lo, Kai-Yin; Sun, Yung-Shin

    2017-03-17

    Directed cell migration can be driven by a range of external stimuli, such as spatial gradients of: chemical signals (chemotaxis); adhesion sites (haptotaxis); or temperature (thermotaxis). Continuum models of cell migration typically include a diffusion term to capture the undirected component of cell motility and an advection term to capture the directed component of cell motility. However, there is no consensus in the literature about the form that the advection term takes. Some theoretical studies suggest that the advection term ought to include receptor saturation effects. However, others adopt a much simpler constant coefficient. One of the limitations of including receptor saturation effects is that it introduces several additional unknown parameters into the model. Therefore, a relevant research question is to investigate whether directed cell migration is best described by a simple constant tactic coefficient or a more complicated model incorporating saturation effects. We study directed cell migration using an experimental device in which the directed component of the cell motility is driven by a spatial gradient of electric potential, which is known as electrotaxis. The electric field (EF) is proportional to the spatial gradient of the electric potential. The spatial variation of electric potential across the experimental device varies in such a way that there are several subregions on the device in which the EF takes on different values that are approximately constant within those subregions. We use cell trajectory data to quantify the motion of 3T3 fibroblast cells at different locations on the device to examine how different values of the EF influences cell motility. The undirected (random) motility of the cells is quantified in terms of the cell diffusivity, D, and the directed motility is quantified in terms of a cell drift velocity, v. Estimates D and v are obtained under a range of four different EF conditions, which correspond to normal

  12. Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I am particularly happy that the Academy is bringing out this document by Professor M S. Valiathan on Ayurvedic Biology. It is an effort to place before the scientific community, especially that of India, the unique scientific opportunities that arise out of viewing Ayurveda from the perspective of contemporary science, its tools ...

  13. Role of the crystalline form of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Rutile, and not anatase, induces toxic effects in Balb/3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uboldi, Chiara; Urbán, Patricia; Gilliland, Douglas; Bajak, Edyta; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Ponti, Jessica; Rossi, François

    2016-03-01

    The wide use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) in industrial applications requires the investigation of their effects on human health. In this context, we investigated the effects of nanosized and bulk titania in two different crystalline forms (anatase and rutile) in vitro. By colony forming efficiency assay, a dose-dependent reduction of the clonogenic activity of Balb/3T3 mouse fibroblasts was detected in the presence of rutile, but not in the case of anatase NPs. Similarly, the cell transformation assay and the micronucleus test showed that rutile TiO2 NPs were able to induce type-III foci formation in Balb/3T3 cells and appeared to be slightly genotoxic, whereas anatase TiO2 NPs did not induce any significant neoplastic or genotoxic effect. Additionally, we investigated the interaction of TiO2 NPs with Balb/3T3 cells and quantified the in vitro uptake of titania using mass spectrometry. Results showed that the internalization was independent of the crystalline form of TiO2 NPs but size-dependent, as nano-titania were taken up more than their respective bulk materials. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the cytotoxic, neoplastic and genotoxic effects triggered in Balb/3T3 cells by TiO2 NPs depend on the crystalline form of the nanomaterial, whereas the internalization is regulated by the particle size. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel conserved phosphotyrosine motif in the Drosophila fibroblast growth factor signaling adaptor Dof with a redundant role in signal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszar, Agnes; Vogelsang, Elisabeth; Beug, Hartmut; Leptin, Maria

    2010-04-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signals through adaptors constitutively associated with the receptor. In Drosophila melanogaster, the FGFR-specific adaptor protein Downstream-of-FGFR (Dof) becomes phosphorylated upon receptor activation at several tyrosine residues, one of which recruits Corkscrew (Csw), the Drosophila homolog of SHP2, which provides a molecular link to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. However, the Csw pathway is not the only link from Dof to MAPK. In this study, we identify a novel phosphotyrosine motif present in four copies in Dof and also found in other insect and vertebrate signaling molecules. We show that these motifs are phosphorylated and contribute to FGF signal transduction. They constitute one of three sets of phosphotyrosines that act redundantly in signal transmission: (i) a Csw binding site, (ii) four consensus Grb2 recognition sites, and (iii) four novel tyrosine motifs. We show that Src64B binds to Dof and that Src kinases contribute to FGFR-dependent MAPK activation. Phosphorylation of the novel tyrosine motifs is required for the interaction of Dof with Src64B. Thus, Src64B recruitment to Dof through the novel phosphosites can provide a new link to MAPK activation and other cellular responses. This may give a molecular explanation for the involvement of Src kinases in FGF-dependent developmental events.

  15. The diverse and expanding role of mass spectrometry in structural and molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lössl, Philip; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Heck, Albert Jr

    2016-12-15

    The emergence of proteomics has led to major technological advances in mass spectrometry (MS). These advancements not only benefitted MS-based high-throughput proteomics but also increased the impact of mass spectrometry on the field of structural and molecular biology. Here, we review how state-of-the-art MS methods, including native MS, top-down protein sequencing, cross-linking-MS, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange-MS, nowadays enable the characterization of biomolecular structures, functions, and interactions. In particular, we focus on the role of mass spectrometry in integrated structural and molecular biology investigations of biological macromolecular complexes and cellular machineries, highlighting work on CRISPR-Cas systems and eukaryotic transcription complexes. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  16. As the twig is bent: the biology and socialization of gender roles in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, M B; Brabeck, M M; Nuttall, R L

    1995-03-01

    The present study supports the view that biological predisposition interacts with perceived parental influences to affect cross-gender role identity. Geschwind and colleagues have identified two patterns of brain organization (anomalous and standard dominance) assessed through individual and familial handedness. Anomalous dominant women who perceived their parents as definitely giving them permission for cross-gender behavior demonstrated high masculine/low feminine characteristics on the Bem Sex Role Inventory. The cross-gender role identity in this group differed significantly from the traditional gender role identity found in all other groups of females (including anomalous dominant women whose parents were perceived as less permissive and the women with standard dominance reporting both styles of parenting.

  17. The Role of Biologically Active Ingredients from Natural Drug Treatments for Arrhythmias in Different Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jie; Hu, Dan; Song, Xiaoli; Han, Tao; Gao, Yonghong; Xing, Yanwei

    2017-01-01

    Arrhythmia is a disease that is caused by abnormal electrical activity in the heart rate or rhythm. It is the major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although several antiarrhythmic drugs have been used in clinic for decades, their application is often limited by their adverse effects. As a result, natural drugs, which have fewer side effects, are now being used to treat arrhythmias. We searched for all articles on the role of biologically active ingredients from natural drug t...

  18. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: the role of biological particles in cloud physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of a series of papers on the sources, distribution and potential impact of biological particles in the atmosphere, this paper introduces and summarizes the potential role of biological particles in atmospheric clouds. Biological particles like bacteria or pollen may be active as both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN and thereby can contribute to the initial cloud formation stages and the development of precipitation through giant CCN and IN processes. The paper gives an introduction to aerosol-cloud processes involving CCN and IN in general and provides a short summary of previous laboratory, field and modelling work which investigated the CCN and IN activity of bacterial cells and pollen. Recent measurements of atmospheric ice nuclei with a continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC and of the heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of bacterial cells are also briefly discussed. As a main result of this overview paper we conclude that a proper assessment of the impact of biological particles on tropospheric clouds needs new laboratory, field and modelling work on the abundance of biological particles in the atmosphere and their CCN and heterogeneous IN properties.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in development and skeletal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teven, Chad M; Farina, Evan M; Rivas, Jane; Reid, Russell R

    2014-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) and their receptors serve many functions in both the developing and adult organism. Humans contain 18 FGF ligands and four FGF receptors (FGFR). FGF ligands are polypeptide growth factors that regulate several developmental processes including cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration, morphogenesis, and patterning. FGF-FGFR signaling is also critical to the developing axial and craniofacial skeleton. In particular, the signaling cascade has been implicated in intramembranous ossification of cranial bones as well as cranial suture homeostasis. In the adult, FGFs and FGFRs are crucial for tissue repair. FGF signaling generally follows one of three transduction pathways: RAS/MAP kinase, PI3/AKT, or PLCγ. Each pathway likely regulates specific cellular behaviors. Inappropriate expression of FGF and improper activation of FGFRs are associated with various pathologic conditions, unregulated cell growth, and tumorigenesis. Additionally, aberrant signaling has been implicated in many skeletal abnormalities including achondroplasia and craniosynostosis. The biology and mechanisms of the FGF family have been the subject of significant research over the past 30 years. Recently, work has focused on the therapeutic targeting and potential of FGF ligands and their associated receptors. The majority of FGF-related therapy is aimed at age-related disorders. Increased understanding of FGF signaling and biology may reveal additional therapeutic roles, both in utero and postnatally. This review discusses the role of FGF signaling in general physiologic and pathologic embryogenesis and further explores it within the context of skeletal development.

  20. Chemical Biology of Hydropersulfides and Related Species: Possible Roles in Cellular Protection and Redox Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Lucía; Bianco, Christopher L; Toscano, John P; Lin, Joseph; Akaike, Takaaki; Fukuto, Jon M

    2017-10-01

    For >20 years, physiological signaling associated with the endogenous generation of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) has been of significant interest. Despite its presumed importance, the biochemical mechanisms associated with its actions have not been elucidated. Recent Advances: Recently it has been found that H 2 S-related or derived species are highly prevalent in mammalian systems and that these species may be responsible for some, if not the majority, of the biological actions attributed to H 2 S. One of the most prevalent and intriguing species are hydropersulfides (RSSH), which can be present at significant levels. Indeed, it appears that H 2 S and RSSH are intimately linked in biological systems and likely to be mutually inclusive. The fact that H 2 S and polysulfides such as RSSH are present simultaneously means that the biological actions previously assigned to H 2 S can be instead because of the presence of RSSH (or other polysulfides). Thus, it remains possible that hydropersulfides are the biological effectors, and H 2 S serves, to a certain extent, as a marker for persulfides and polysulfides. Addressing this possibility will to a large extent be based on the chemistry of these species. Currently, it is known that persulfides possess unique and novel chemical properties that may explain their biological prevalence. However, significantly more work will be required to establish the possible physiological roles of these species. Moreover, an understanding of the regulation of their biosynthesis and degradation will become important topics in piecing together their biology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  1. Teleology and its constitutive role for biology as the science of organized systems in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toepfer, Georg

    2012-03-01

    'Nothing in biology makes sense, except in the light of teleology'. This could be the first sentence in a textbook about the methodology of biology. The fundamental concepts in biology, e.g. 'organism' and 'ecosystem', are only intelligible given a teleological framework. Since early modern times, teleology has often been considered methodologically unscientific. With the acceptance of evolutionary theory, one popular strategy for accommodating teleological reasoning was to explain it by reference to selection in the past: functions were reconstructed as 'selected effects'. But the theory of evolution obviously presupposes the existence of organisms as organized and regulated, i.e. functional systems. Therefore, evolutionary theory cannot provide the foundation for teleology. The underlying reason for the central methodological role of teleology in biology is not its potential to offer particular forms of (evolutionary) explanations for the presence of parts, but rather an ontological one: organisms and other basic biological entities do not exist as physical bodies do, as amounts of matter with a definite form. Rather, they are dynamic systems in stable equilibrium; despite changes of their matter and form (in metabolism and metamorphosis) they maintain their identity. What remains constant in these kinds of systems is their 'organization', i.e. the causal pattern of interdependence of parts with certain effects of each part being relevant for the working of the system. Teleological analysis consists in the identification of these system-relevant effects and at the same time of the system as a whole. Therefore, the identity of biological systems cannot be specified without teleological reasoning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Critical Role for Cysteine 57 in the Biological Functions of Selenium Binding Protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Qi; Ansong, Emmanuel; Diamond, Alan M; Yang, Wancai

    2015-11-18

    The concentration of selenium-binding protein1 (SBP1) is often lower in tumors than in the corresponding tissue and lower levels have been associated with poor clinical outcomes. SBP1 binds tightly selenium although what role selenium plays in its biological functions remains unknown. Previous studies indicated that cysteine 57 is the most likely candidate amino acid for selenium binding. In order to investigate the role of cysteine 57 in SBP1, this amino acid was altered to a glycine and the mutated protein was expressed in human cancer cells. The SBP1 half-life, as well as the cellular response to selenite cytotoxicity, was altered by this change. The ectopic expression of SBP1(GLY) also caused mitochondrial damage in HCT116 cells. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine 57 is a critical determinant of SBP1 function and may play a significant role in mitochondrial function.

  3. A brief history of fish osmoregulation: the central role of the Mt. Desert Island Biological Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H Evans

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mt. Desert Island Biological Laboratory has played a central role in the study of fish osmoregulation for the past 80 years. In particular, scientists at the MDIBL have made significant discoveries in the basic pattern of fish osmoregulation, the function of aglomerular kidneys and proximal tubular secretion, the roles of NaCl cotransporters in intestinal uptake and gill and rectal gland secretion, the role of the shark rectal gland in osmoregulation, the mechanisms of salt secretion by the teleost fish gill epithelium, and the evolution of the ionic uptake mechanisms in fish gills. This short review presents the history of these discoveries and their relationships to the study of epithelial transport in general.

  4. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide promotes profibrotic activation of intestinal fibroblasts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, J P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibroblasts play a critical role in intestinal wound healing. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a cell wall component of commensal gut bacteria. The effects of LPS on intestinal fibroblast activation were characterized. METHODS: Expression of the LPS receptor, toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, was assessed in cultured primary human intestinal fibroblasts using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Fibroblasts were treated with LPS and\\/or transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1. Nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) pathway activation was assessed by inhibitory kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and NFkappaB promoter activity. Fibroblast contractility was measured using a fibroblast-populated collagen lattice. Smad-7, a negative regulator of TGF-beta1 signalling, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression were assessed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The NFkappaB pathway was inhibited by IkappaBalpha transfection. RESULTS: TLR-4 was present on the surface of intestinal fibroblasts. LPS treatment of fibroblasts induced IkappaBalpha degradation, enhanced NFkappaB promoter activity and increased collagen contraction. Pretreatment with LPS (before TGF-beta1) significantly increased CTGF production relative to treatment with TGF-beta1 alone. LPS reduced whereas TGF-beta1 increased smad-7 expression. Transfection with an IkappaBalpha plasmid enhanced basal smad-7 expression. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fibroblasts express TLR-4 and respond to LPS by activating NFkappaB and inducing collagen contraction. LPS acts in concert with TGF-beta1 to induce CTGF. LPS reduces the expression of the TGF-beta1 inhibitor, smad-7.

  5. Effects of Panax ginseng extract on human dermal fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geum-Young; Park, Kang-Gyun; Namgoong, Sik; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Current studies of Panax ginseng (or Korean ginseng) have demonstrated that it has various biological effects, including angiogenesis, immunostimulation, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, we hypothesised that P. ginseng may also play an important role in wound healing. However, few studies have been conducted on the wound-healing effects of P. ginseng. Thus, the purpose of this in vitro pilot study was to determine the effects of P. ginseng on the activities of fibroblasts, which are key wound-healing cells. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were treated with one of six concentrations of P. ginseng: 0, 1, 10 and 100 ng/ml and 1 and 10 µg/ml. Cell proliferation was determined 3 days post-treatment using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, and collagen synthesis was evaluated by the collagen type I carboxy-terminal propeptide method. Cell proliferation levels and collagen synthesis were compared among the groups. The 10 ng/ml to 1 µg/ml P. ginseng treatments significantly increased cell proliferation, and the 1 ng/ml to 1 µg/ml concentrations significantly increased collagen synthesis. The maximum effects for both parameters were observed at 10 ng/ml. P. ginseng stimulated human dermal fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis at an optimal concentration of 10 ng/ml. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Cellular metabolic rates from primary dermal fibroblast cells isolated from birds of different body masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Williams, Joseph B

    2014-10-01

    The rate of metabolism is the speed at which organisms use energy, an integration of energy transformations within the body; it governs biological processes that influence rates of growth and reproduction. Progress at understanding functional linkages between whole organism metabolic rate and underlying mechanisms that influence its magnitude has been slow despite the central role this issue plays in evolutionary and physiological ecology. Previous studies that have attempted to relate how cellular processes translate into whole-organism physiology have done so over a range of body masses of subjects. However, the data still remains controversial when observing metabolic rates at the cellular level. To bridge the gap between these ideas, we examined cellular metabolic rate of primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from 49 species of birds representing a 32,000-fold range in body masses to test the hypothesis that metabolic rate of cultured cells scales with body size. We used a Seahorse XF-96 Extracellular flux analyzer to measure cellular respiration in fibroblasts. Additionally, we measured fibroblast size and mitochondrial content. We found no significant correlation between cellular metabolic rate, cell size, or mitochondrial content and body mass. Additionally, there was a significant relationship between cellular basal metabolic rate and proton leak in these cells. We conclude that metabolic rate of cells isolated in culture does not scale with body mass, but cellular metabolic rate is correlated to growth rate in birds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA damage markers in dermal fibroblasts in vitro reflect chronological donor age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaijer, Mariëtte E C; Croco, Eleonora; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2016-01-01

    and presence of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, numbers of 53BP1 foci, telomere-associated foci (TAF) and micronuclei were measured in cultured dermal fibroblasts obtained from three age groups of donors (mean age 22, 63 and 90 years). Fibroblasts were cultured without a stressor and with 0.6 μM rotenone...... markers and long-lived family membership or cardiovascular disease. Results were comparable when fibroblasts were stressed in vitro with rotenone. In conclusion, we found that DNA damage foci of cultured fibroblasts are significantly associated with the chronological age, but not biological age...

  8. Role of Muramyl Dipeptide in Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Biological Activity and Osteoclast Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Kitaura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is an endotoxin and bacterial cell wall component that is capable of inducing inflammation and immunological activity. Muramyl dipeptide (MDP, the minimal essential structural unit responsible for the immunological activity of peptidoglycans, is another inflammation-inducing molecule that is ubiquitously expressed by bacteria. Several studies have shown that inflammation-related biological activities were synergistically induced by interactions between LPS and MDP. MDP synergistically enhances production of proinflammatory cytokines that are induced by LPS exposure. Injection of MDP induces lethal shock in mice challenged with LPS. LPS also induces osteoclast formation and pathological bone resorption; MDP enhances LPS induction of both processes. Furthermore, MDP enhances the LPS-induced receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL expression and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 expression both in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, MDP enhances LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling in stromal cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that MDP plays an important role in LPS-induced biological activities. This review discusses the role of MDP in LPS-mediated biological activities, primarily in relation to osteoclastogenesis.

  9. Deletion of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuates cardiac hypertrophy via down-regulation of cardiac fibroblasts-derived fibroblast growth factor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huanji; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Yu; Huang, Feifei; Zhu, Xinhong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Mong-Heng; Tang, Wanchun; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2014-05-01

    Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2) has been shown to play a protective role in cardiac hypertrophy, but the mechanism is not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that deletion of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuates cardiac hypertrophy via down-regulation of cardiac fibroblasts-derived fibroblast growth factor-2. Prospective, controlled, and randomized animal study. University laboratory. Male wild-type C57BL/6 mice and Ephx2 (-/-) mice. Male wild-type or Ephx2 (-/-) mice were subjected to transverse aorta constriction surgery. Four weeks after transverse aorta constriction, Ephx2 (-/-) mice did not develop significant cardiac hypertrophy as that of wild-type mice, indicated by no changes in the ratio of heart weight/body weight and ventricular wall thickness after transverse aorta constriction. Cardiac fibroblast growth factor-2 increased in wild-type-transverse aorta constriction group but this did not change in Ephx2 (-/-)-transverse aorta constriction group, and the serum level of fibroblast growth factor-2 did not change in both groups. In vitro, cardiac fibroblasts were stimulated by angiotensin II to analyze the expression of fibroblast growth factor-2. The effect of increased fibroblast growth factor-2 from cardiac fibroblasts induced by angiotensin II was attenuated by soluble epoxide hydrolase deletion. ERK1/2, p38, and AKT kinase were involved in fibroblast growth factor-2 expression regulated by angiotensin II, and soluble epoxide hydrolase deletion lowered the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 not p38 or AKT to mediate fibroblast growth factor-2 expression. In addition, soluble epoxide hydrolase deletion did not attenuate cardiomyocytes hypertrophy induced by exogenous fibroblast growth factor-2. Our present data demonstrated that deletion of soluble epoxide hydrolase prevented cardiac hypertrophy not only directly to cardiomyocytes but also to cardiac fibroblasts by reducing expression of fibroblast growth factor-2.

  10. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Rui [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Lotze, Michael T., E-mail: lotzemt@upcm.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Zeh III, Herbert J., E-mail: zehh@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts.

  11. Oxidative Stress and Adipocyte Biology: Focus on the Role of AGEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Boyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a major health problem that is usually associated with obesity, together with hyperglycemia and increased advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs formation. Elevated AGEs elicit severe downstream consequences via their binding to receptors of AGEs (RAGE. This includes oxidative stress and oxidative modifications of biological compounds together with heightened inflammation. For example, albumin (major circulating protein undergoes increased glycoxidation with diabetes and may represent an important biomarker for monitoring diabetic pathophysiology. Despite the central role of adipose tissue in many physiologic/pathologic processes, recognition of the effects of greater AGEs formation in this tissue is quite recent within the obesity/diabetes context. This review provides a brief background of AGEs formation and adipose tissue biology and thereafter discusses the impact of AGEs-adipocyte interactions in pathology progression. Novel data are included showing how AGEs (especially glycated albumin may be involved in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage in adipocytes and its potential links to diabetes progression.

  12. The Role of Synthetic Biology in the Design of Microbial Cell Factories for Biofuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Verónica Leticia; Rodríguez, Analía; Cristóbal, Héctor Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Insecurity in the supply of fossil fuels, volatile fuel prices, and major concerns regarding climate change have sparked renewed interest in the production of fuels from renewable resources. Because of this, the use of biodiesel has grown dramatically during the last few years and is expected to increase even further in the future. Biodiesel production through the use of microbial systems has marked a turning point in the field of biofuels since it is emerging as an attractive alternative to conventional technology. Recent progress in synthetic biology has accelerated the ability to analyze, construct, and/or redesign microbial metabolic pathways with unprecedented precision, in order to permit biofuel production that is amenable to industrial applications. The review presented here focuses specifically on the role of synthetic biology in the design of microbial cell factories for efficient production of biodiesel. PMID:22028591

  13. Role of nuclear analytical probe techniques in biological trace element research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Pounds, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Many biomedical experiments require the qualitative and quantitative localization of trace elements with high sensitivity and good spatial resolution. The feasibility of measuring the chemical form of the elements, the time course of trace elements metabolism, and of conducting experiments in living biological systems are also important requirements for biological trace element research. Nuclear analytical techniques that employ ion or photon beams have grown in importance in the past decade and have led to several new experimental approaches. Some of the important features of these methods are reviewed here along with their role in trace element research, and examples of their use are given to illustrate potential for new research directions. It is emphasized that the effective application of these methods necessitates a closely integrated multidisciplinary scientific team. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. The Role of Synthetic Biology in the Design of Microbial Cell Factories for Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Leticia Colin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Insecurity in the supply of fossil fuels, volatile fuel prices, and major concerns regarding climate change have sparked renewed interest in the production of fuels from renewable resources. Because of this, the use of biodiesel has grown dramatically during the last few years and is expected to increase even further in the future. Biodiesel production through the use of microbial systems has marked a turning point in the field of biofuels since it is emerging as an attractive alternative to conventional technology. Recent progress in synthetic biology has accelerated the ability to analyze, construct, and/or redesign microbial metabolic pathways with unprecedented precision, in order to permit biofuel production that is amenable to industrial applications. The review presented here focuses specifically on the role of synthetic biology in the design of microbial cell factories for efficient production of biodiesel.

  15. Biological role of gravity: Hypotheses and results of experiments on ``Cosmos'' biosatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpatov, Alexey M.; Antipov, Vsevolod V.; Tairbekov, Murad G.

    In order to reveal the biological significance of gravity, microgravity effects have been studied at the cellular, organism and population levels. The following questions arise. Do any gravity - dependent processes exist in a cell? Is cell adaptation to weightlessness possible; if so, what role may cytoskeleton, the genetic apparatus play in it? What are the consequences of the lack of convection in weightlessness for the performance of morphogenesis? Do the integral characteristics of living beings change in weightlessness? Is there any change in ``biological capacity'' of space, its resistance to expansion of life? What are the direction and intensity of microgravity action as a factor of natural selection, the driving force of evolution? These problems are discussed from a theoretical point of view, and in the light of results obtained in experiments flown aboard biosatellites ``Cosmos''.

  16. Controlled induction of focal adhesion disassembly and migration in primary fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunlevy, J R; Couchman, J R

    1993-01-01

    with HCM; conversely, removal of HCM promoted reformation of focal adhesions within 12-24 h. HCM-stimulated fibroblasts which lacked focal adhesions concomitantly lacked F-actin stress fibers and focal concentrations of vinculin and talin. Therefore, fibroblast migration can be readily controlled in an on......Fibroblast migration is an integral component of biological processes such as wound healing and embryogenesis. Previous experiments examining fibroblast locomotion from tissue explants have shown that migrating fibroblasts lack, or contain only transient, focal adhesions (focal contacts). Focal...... adhesions are specialized regions of tight cell-matrix interaction, assembled by a complex process of transmembrane signalling. Although the explant model has been used for studying several aspects of fibroblast locomotion, it is limited by the lack of control over migration, and only a small percentage...

  17. The role of metal ions in biological oxidation--the past and the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleczkowski, M; Garncarz, M

    2012-01-01

    Two theories, one based on the metabolism of inorganic substances, the other on metabolism of organic substances, have played an important role in the explanation of the origin of life. They demonstrate that the original environment of life on Earth was seawater containing micronutrients with structural, metabolic and catalytic activity. It is assumed that the first primitive organisms lived around 3.8 billion years ago and it was also then that the first catalytic reaction involving metal ions occurred. Biological oxidation leading to oxidative stress and cell damage in animals represents one of these types of reactions which are responsible for many animal diseases. The role of prooxidative and antioxidative actions of transition metal ions as well as their neuropathological consequences have therefore been the topic for many research projects. There is hope that metal chelates and antioxidants might prove to be a modern mode of therapy for i.e. neurogenerative diseases. The aim of this review is to show the evolution of scientific knowledge on metal ions, their biological oxidation, and an overview of their role in physiology and in pathological processes.

  18. Basic fibroblast growth factor activates β-catenin/RhoA signaling in pulmonary fibroblasts with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhengxing; Li, Bo; Zhou, Xun; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is featured by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Trigger of the β-catenin/RhoA pathway has been involved in aberrant ECM deposition in several diseases. We investigated WNT signaling activation in primary pulmonary fibroblasts of rats with and without COPD and the function of WNT signaling in pulmonary fibroblast. We evaluated the expression of WNT signaling and the role of β-catenin, using MRC-5 fibroblasts and primary lung fibroblasts of rats with and without COPD. Lung fibroblasts highly expressed mRNA of genes associated with WNT signaling. Treatment of MRC-5 fibroblasts using basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a composition of the mucus in COPD patients, enhanced β-catenin, Wnt5a and RhoA expression. The expression in β-catenin, Wnt5a and RhoA induced by bFGF was higher in fibroblasts of rats with COPD than without COPD, whereas the basal expression was similar. bFGF also activated transcriptionally active and increased total β-catenin protein expression. Moreover, bFGF enhanced the expression of α-sm-actin and fibronectin, which was abrogated by β-catenin, Wnt5a and RhoA-specific adenovirus siRNA. The induction of active β-catenin and then fibronectin turnover in response to bFGF were markedly increased in pulmonary fibroblasts from rat with COPD. β-Catenin/RhoA pathway results in ECM deposition in lung fibroblasts and myofibroblasts differentiation. β-catenin/RhoA signaling induced by bFGF is promoted in lung fibroblasts from rats with COPD. The study indicated a crucial role of the WNT signaling in mediating fibroblast morphology and function in COPD.

  19. The role of adalimumab in rheumatic and autoimmune disorders: comparison with other biologic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimold AM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Andreas M ReimoldDallas Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Rheumatic Diseases Division, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: Adalimumab (ADA is a biologic medication that dampens inflammatory pathways by binding to the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved ADA as a medication for use in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This year marks 10 years of clinical experience with ADA. Long-term extension studies of some of the initial clinical trials, as well as data from large patient registries, are demonstrating ongoing benefit for responders. Potential side effects such as increased risk of infection, lymphoma, congestive heart failure, and demyelination continue to be examined, as the available data are not unanimous in showing an increase in incidence. In balancing both the advantages and the disadvantages of using ADA, the drug's overall effectiveness and its availability for use in patients with hepatic or renal comorbidities are weighed against the high cost. ADA is expected to have a leading role in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions for years to come. Future studies will need to address the optimal sequence of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics to use, combinations of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics, and head-to-head comparisons of biologics in clinical trials. For those who go into clinical remission on an anti-tumor necrosis factor medication, unanswered questions remain about identifying the patients who can maintain the remission off all drugs, or at least off injected medication. Given the cost of biologic drugs, even studies that increase the interval between drug doses in well-controlled patients could provide financial benefits.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, Humira®, tumor

  20. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Andrew R.; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/beta-catenin and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR...

  1. Instability restricts signaling of multiple fibroblast growth factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchtová, Marcela; Chaloupková, R.; Zakrzewska, M.; Veselá, I.; Celá, Petra; Barathová, J.; Gudernová, I.; Zajíčková, R.; Trantírek, L.; Martin, J.; Kostas, M.; Otlewski, J.; Damborský, J.; Kozubík, Alois; Wiedlocha, A.; Krejčí, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 12 (2015), s. 2445-2459 ISSN 1420-682X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31540S; GA ČR GBP302/12/G157 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : fibroblast growth factor * FGF * unstable Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 5.694, year: 2015

  2. Activation of the NLRP3/caspase-1 inflammasome in human dental pulp tissue and human dental pulp fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenkai; Lv, Haipeng; Wang, Haijing; Wang, Diya; Sun, Shukai; Jia, Qian; Wang, Peina; Song, Bing; Ni, Longxing

    2015-08-01

    The NLRP3/caspase-1 inflammasome pathway plays an important role in cellular immune defence against bacterial infection; however, its function in human dental pulp tissue and human dental pulp fibroblasts remains poorly understood. We demonstrate that NLRP3 protein expression occurs to a greater extent in pulp tissue with irreversible pulpitis than in normal pulp tissue and in tissue with reversible pulpitis. Caspase-1 is present in its active (cleaved) form only in pulp tissue with irreversible pulpitis. NLRP3 and caspase-1 are expressed in the odontoblast layers in normal human dental pulp tissue, whereas in inflamed pulp tissue, the odontoblast layers are disrupted and dental pulp cells are positive for NLRP3 and caspase-1. Additionally, we investigate the role of the NLRP3/caspase-1 inflammasome pathway in human dental pulp fibroblasts and show that ATP activates the P2X7 receptor on the cell membrane triggering K(+) efflux and inducing the gradual recruitment of the membrane pore pannexin-1. Extracellular lipopolysaccharide is able to penetrate the cytosol and activate NLRP3. Furthermore, the low intracellular K(+) concentration in the cytosol triggers reactive oxygen species generation, which also induces the NLRP3 inflammasome. Thus, the NLRP3/caspase-1 pathway has a biological role in the innate immune response mounted by human dental pulp fibroblasts.

  3. Do field-free electromagnetic potentials play a role in biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, A; Vincze, G; Andocs, G; Szasz, O

    2009-01-01

    All bio-systems are imperfect dielectrics. Their general properties however cannot be described by conventional simple electrodynamics; the system is more complex. A central question in our present paper is centered on a controversial debate of the possible effect of the zero fields (only potentials exist). We show that the identical use of the "field-free," "curl-free," and "force-free" terminologies is incorrect, there have definitely different meanings. It is shown that the effective electro-dynamical parameters that describe and modify living systems are the potentials and not the fields. We discuss how the potentials have a role in biological processes even in field-free cases.

  4. The role of biology in planetary evolution: cyanobacterial primary production in low?oxygen Proterozoic oceans

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Trinity L.; Bryant, Donald A.; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the role of biology in planetary evolution remains an outstanding challenge to geobiologists. Progress towards unravelling this puzzle for Earth is hindered by the scarcity of well?preserved rocks from the Archean (4.0 to 2.5?Gyr ago) and Proterozoic (2.5 to 0.5?Gyr ago) Eons. In addition, the microscopic life that dominated Earth's biota for most of its history left a poor fossil record, consisting primarily of lithified microbial mats, rare microbial body fossils and m...

  5. The Mediating Role of Physical Self-Concept on Relations between Biological Maturity Status and Physical Activity in Adolescent Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Sean P.; Standage, Martyn; Loney, Tom; Gammon, Catherine; Neville, Helen; Sherar, Lauren B.; Malina, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the mediating role of physical self-concept on relations between biological maturity status and self-reported physical activity in adolescent British females. Biological maturity status, physical self-concept and physical activity were assessed in 407 female British year 7-9 pupils (M age = 13.2 years, SD = 1.0).…

  6. An expanded role for microbial physiology in metabolic engineering and functional genomics: moving towards systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2002-01-01

    . With the progress in molecular biology it has become possible to optimize industrial fermentations through introduction of directed genetic modification - an approach referred to as metabolic engineering. Furthermore, as a consequence of large sequencing programs the complete genomic sequence has become available...... for an increasing number of microorganisms. This has resulted in substantial research efforts in assigning function to all identified open reading frames - referred to as functional genomics. In both metabolic engineering and functional genomics there is a trend towards application of a macroscopic view on cell......Microbial physiology has traditionally played a very important role in both fundamental research and in industrial applications of microorganisms. The classical approach in microbial physiology has been to analyze the role of individual components (genes or proteins) in the overall cell function...

  7. Dendritic cells and skin sensitization: Biological roles and uses in hazard identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Cindy A.; Kimber, Ian; Basketter, David A.; Pallardy, Marc; Gildea, Lucy A.; Gerberick, G. Frank

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances have been made in our understanding of the roles played by cutaneous dendritic cells (DCs) in the induction of contact allergy. A number of associated changes in epidermal Langerhans cell phenotype and function required for effective skin sensitization are providing the foundations for the development of cellular assays (using DC and DC-like cells) for skin sensitization hazard identification. These alternative approaches to the identification and characterization of skin sensitizing chemicals were the focus of a Workshop entitled 'Dendritic Cells and Skin Sensitization: Biological Roles and Uses in Hazard Identification' that was given at the annual Society of Toxicology meeting held March 6-9, 2006 in San Diego, California. This paper reports information that was presented during the Workshop

  8. The integrative role of cryo electron microscopy in molecular and cellular structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Igor; Myasnikov, Alexander G; Andronov, Leonid; Natchiar, S Kundhavai; Khatter, Heena; Beinsteiner, Brice; Ménétret, Jean-François; Hazemann, Isabelle; Mohideen, Kareem; Tazibt, Karima; Tabaroni, Rachel; Kratzat, Hanna; Djabeur, Nadia; Bruxelles, Tatiana; Raivoniaina, Finaritra; Pompeo, Lorenza di; Torchy, Morgan; Billas, Isabelle; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Klaholz, Bruno P

    2017-02-01

    After gradually moving away from preparation methods prone to artefacts such as plastic embedding and negative staining for cell sections and single particles, the field of cryo electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is now heading off at unprecedented speed towards high-resolution analysis of biological objects of various sizes. This 'revolution in resolution' is happening largely thanks to new developments of new-generation cameras used for recording the images in the cryo electron microscope which have much increased sensitivity being based on complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices. Combined with advanced image processing and 3D reconstruction, the cryo-EM analysis of nucleoprotein complexes can provide unprecedented insights at molecular and atomic levels and address regulatory mechanisms in the cell. These advances reinforce the integrative role of cryo-EM in synergy with other methods such as X-ray crystallography, fluorescence imaging or focussed-ion beam milling as exemplified here by some recent studies from our laboratory on ribosomes, viruses, chromatin and nuclear receptors. Such multi-scale and multi-resolution approaches allow integrating molecular and cellular levels when applied to purified or in situ macromolecular complexes, thus illustrating the trend of the field towards cellular structural biology. © 2016 The Authors. Biology of the Cell published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA on behalf of Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France.

  9. The Role of Molecular Biology in the Biomonitoring of Human Exposure to Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balam Muñoz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to different substances in an occupational environment is of utmost concern to global agencies such as the World Health Organization and the International Labour Organization. Interest in improving work health conditions, particularly of those employees exposed to noxious chemicals, has increased considerably and has stimulated the search for new, more specific and selective tests. Recently, the field of molecular biology has been indicated as an alternative technique for monitoring personnel while evaluating work-related pathologies. Originally, occupational exposure to environmental toxicants was assessed using biochemical techniques to determine the presence of higher concentrations of toxic compounds in blood, urine, or other fluids or tissues; results were used to evaluate potential health risk. However, this approach only estimates the presence of a noxious chemical and its effects, but does not prevent or diminish the risk. Molecular biology methods have become very useful in occupational medicine to provide more accurate and opportune diagnostics. In this review, we discuss the role of the following common techniques: (1 Use of cell cultures; (2 evaluation of gene expression; (3 the “omic” sciences (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics and (4 bioinformatics. We suggest that molecular biology has many applications in occupational health where the data can be applied to general environmental conditions.

  10. The role of molecular biology in the biomonitoring of human exposure to chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Balam; Albores, Arnulfo

    2010-11-12

    Exposure to different substances in an occupational environment is of utmost concern to global agencies such as the World Health Organization and the International Labour Organization. Interest in improving work health conditions, particularly of those employees exposed to noxious chemicals, has increased considerably and has stimulated the search for new, more specific and selective tests. Recently, the field of molecular biology has been indicated as an alternative technique for monitoring personnel while evaluating work-related pathologies. Originally, occupational exposure to environmental toxicants was assessed using biochemical techniques to determine the presence of higher concentrations of toxic compounds in blood, urine, or other fluids or tissues; results were used to evaluate potential health risk. However, this approach only estimates the presence of a noxious chemical and its effects, but does not prevent or diminish the risk. Molecular biology methods have become very useful in occupational medicine to provide more accurate and opportune diagnostics. In this review, we discuss the role of the following common techniques: (1) Use of cell cultures; (2) evaluation of gene expression; (3) the "omic" sciences (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) and (4) bioinformatics. We suggest that molecular biology has many applications in occupational health where the data can be applied to general environmental conditions.

  11. Role of arginine and its methylated derivatives in cancer biology and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyihák Erno

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both L-arginine supplementation and deprivation influence cell proliferation. The effect of high doses on tumours is determined by the optical configuration: L-arginine is stimulatory, D-arginine inhibitory. Arginine-rich hexapeptides inhibited tumour growth. Deprivation of L-arginine from cell cultures enhanced apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic action of NO synthase inhibitors, like NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, is manifested through inhibition of the arginase pathway. NG-hydroxymethyl-L-arginines caused apoptosis in cell cultures and inhibited the growth of various transplantable mouse tumours. These diverse biological activities become manifest through formaldehyde (HCHO because guanidine group of L-arginine in free and bound form can react rapidly with endogenous HCHO, forming NG-hydroxymethylated derivatives. L-arginine is a HCHO capturer, carrier and donor molecule in biological systems. The role of formaldehyde generated during metabolism of NG-methylated and hydroxymethylated arginines in cell proliferation and death can be shown. The supposedly anti-apoptotic homozygous Arg 72-p53 genotype may increase susceptibility of some cancers. The diverse biological effects of L-arginine and its methylated derivatives call for further careful studies on their possible application in chemoprevention and cancer therapy.

  12. Functional and molecular characterization of the role of CTCF in human embryonic stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Sri Kripa; Witcher, Michael; Berggren, Travis W; Emerson, Beverly M

    2012-01-01

    The CCCTC-binding factor CTCF is the only known vertebrate insulator protein and has been shown to regulate important developmental processes such as imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and genomic architecture. In this study, we examined the role of CTCF in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) biology. We demonstrate that CTCF associates with several important pluripotency genes, including NANOG, SOX2, cMYC and LIN28 and is critical for hESC proliferation. CTCF depletion impacts expression of pluripotency genes and accelerates loss of pluripotency upon BMP4 induced differentiation, but does not result in spontaneous differentiation. We find that CTCF associates with the distal ends and internal sites of the co-regulated 160 kb NANOG-DPPA3-GDF3 locus. Each of these sites can function as a CTCF-dependent enhancer-blocking insulator in heterologous assays. In hESCs, CTCF exists in multisubunit protein complexes and can be poly(ADP)ribosylated. Known CTCF cofactors, such as Cohesin, differentially co-localize in the vicinity of specific CTCF binding sites within the NANOG locus. Importantly, the association of some cofactors and protein PARlation selectively changes upon differentiation although CTCF binding remains constant. Understanding how unique cofactors may impart specialized functions to CTCF at specific genomic locations will further illuminate its role in stem cell biology.

  13. Functional and molecular characterization of the role of CTCF in human embryonic stem cell biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Kripa Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available The CCCTC-binding factor CTCF is the only known vertebrate insulator protein and has been shown to regulate important developmental processes such as imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and genomic architecture. In this study, we examined the role of CTCF in human embryonic stem cell (hESC biology. We demonstrate that CTCF associates with several important pluripotency genes, including NANOG, SOX2, cMYC and LIN28 and is critical for hESC proliferation. CTCF depletion impacts expression of pluripotency genes and accelerates loss of pluripotency upon BMP4 induced differentiation, but does not result in spontaneous differentiation. We find that CTCF associates with the distal ends and internal sites of the co-regulated 160 kb NANOG-DPPA3-GDF3 locus. Each of these sites can function as a CTCF-dependent enhancer-blocking insulator in heterologous assays. In hESCs, CTCF exists in multisubunit protein complexes and can be poly(ADPribosylated. Known CTCF cofactors, such as Cohesin, differentially co-localize in the vicinity of specific CTCF binding sites within the NANOG locus. Importantly, the association of some cofactors and protein PARlation selectively changes upon differentiation although CTCF binding remains constant. Understanding how unique cofactors may impart specialized functions to CTCF at specific genomic locations will further illuminate its role in stem cell biology.

  14. Clinical Significance and Biological Role of HuR in Head and Neck Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Levidou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hu-antigen R (HuR is a posttranscriptional regulator of several target mRNAs, implicated in carcinogenesis. This review aims to present the current evidence regarding the biological role and potential clinical significance of HuR in head and neck carcinomas. Methods. The existing literature concerning HuR expression and function in head and neck carcinomas is critically presented and summarised. Results. HuR is expressed in the majority of the examined samples, showing higher cytoplasmic levels in malignant or premalignant cases. Moreover, HuR modulates several genes implicated in biological processes important for malignant transformation, growth, and invasiveness. HuR seems to be an adverse prognosticator in patients with OSCCs, whereas a correlation with a more aggressive phenotype is reported in several types of carcinomas. Conclusions. A consistent role of HuR in the carcinogenesis and progression of head and neck carcinomas is suggested; nevertheless, further studies are warranted to expand the present information.

  15. Cellular and Developmental Biology of TRPM7 Channel-Kinase: Implicated Roles in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson S. Yee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 7 (TRPM7 is a ubiquitously expressed cation-permeable ion channel with intrinsic kinase activity that plays important roles in various physiological functions. Biochemical and electrophysiological studies, in combination with molecular analyses of TRPM7, have generated insights into its functions as a cellular sensor and transducer of physicochemical stimuli. Accumulating evidence indicates that TRPM7 channel-kinase is essential for cellular processes, such as proliferation, survival, differentiation, growth, and migration. Experimental studies in model organisms, such as zebrafish, mouse, and frog, have begun to elucidate the pleiotropic roles of TRPM7 during embryonic development from gastrulation to organogenesis. Aberrant expression and/or activity of the TRPM7 channel-kinase have been implicated in human diseases including a variety of cancer. Studying the functional roles of TRPM7 and the underlying mechanisms in normal cells and developmental processes is expected to help understand how TRPM7 channel-kinase contributes to pathogenesis, such as malignant neoplasia. On the other hand, studies of TRPM7 in diseases, particularly cancer, will help shed new light in the normal functions of TRPM7 under physiological conditions. In this article, we will provide an updated review of the structural features and biological functions of TRPM7, present a summary of current knowledge of its roles in development and cancer, and discuss the potential of TRPM7 as a clinical biomarker and therapeutic target in malignant diseases.

  16. The role of mathematical models in understanding pattern formation in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umulis, David M; Othmer, Hans G

    2015-05-01

    In a Wall Street Journal article published on April 5, 2013, E. O. Wilson attempted to make the case that biologists do not really need to learn any mathematics-whenever they run into difficulty with numerical issues, they can find a technician (aka mathematician) to help them out of their difficulty. He formalizes this in Wilsons Principle No. 1: "It is far easier for scientists to acquire needed collaboration from mathematicians and statisticians than it is for mathematicians and statisticians to find scientists able to make use of their equations." This reflects a complete misunderstanding of the role of mathematics in all sciences throughout history. To Wilson, mathematics is mere number crunching, but as Galileo said long ago, "The laws of Nature are written in the language of mathematics[Formula: see text] the symbols are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without whose help it is impossible to comprehend a single word." Mathematics has moved beyond the geometry-based model of Galileo's time, and in a rebuttal to Wilson, E. Frenkel has pointed out the role of mathematics in synthesizing the general principles in science (Both point and counter-point are available in Wilson and Frenkel in Notices Am Math Soc 60(7):837-838, 2013). We will take this a step further and show how mathematics has been used to make new and experimentally verified discoveries in developmental biology and how mathematics is essential for understanding a problem that has puzzled experimentalists for decades-that of how organisms can scale in size. Mathematical analysis alone cannot "solve" these problems since the validation lies at the molecular level, but conversely, a growing number of questions in biology cannot be solved without mathematical analysis and modeling. Herein, we discuss a few examples of the productive intercourse between mathematics and biology.

  17. Cellular response to ionizing radiations: a study of the roles of physics and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWyngaert, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    A study of the complementary roles of physics and biology in determining the response of cellular systems to ionizing radiations has been conducted. Upon exposure to radiation, a cell responds in a binary (yes/no) manner in terms of its proliferative ability (survival). The relationship between the survival probability and absorbed dose may then be examined in terms of relevant physical and biological parameters. The approach to these studies was to vary the physics and biology independently and observe separately their influences upon the measured effect. Unique to these studies was the use of heterogeneous tumor systems. These are solid tumors found to consist of genetically related but identifiably distinct populations of cells. The two heterogeneous systems studied, a murine system consisting of four subpopulations and a human tumor system with two subpopulations, were exposed to graded doses of 14 MeV neutrons or x-rays and their effectiveness in inducing cell lethality compared. A further examination of the radiation effect involved a study at the chemical level, measuring the ability of oxygen to potentiate the damage produced by photon irradiation. To summarize, the physics, biology and the environment have all been varied, and the systematics of the responses studied. The data were analyzed within the formalisms of the dual theory of radiation action, the repair-misrepair model, and the repair saturation model of cell killing. The change in survival curve shape and the increased effectiveness in cell killing for higher Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiations (neutrons vs. x-rays) are discussed in relation to explanations in terms of either physical or biochemical processes

  18. Preparing Biology Graduate Teaching Assistants for Their Roles as Instructors: An Assessment of Institutional Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussler, Elisabeth E; Read, Quentin; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Miller, Kristen; Ferzli, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The inconsistency of professional development (PD) in teaching for graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) is a widespread problem in higher education. Although GTAs serve an important role in retention of undergraduate science majors and in promotion of scientific literacy in nonmajors, they often lack preparation and ongoing support for teaching. Given the recent national focus on instructional quality in introductory courses, our goal was to use an online survey to identify current practices of teaching PD for biology GTAs and compare these results with the last national survey on this topic. In responses from 71 participant institutions, 96% reported some mandatory teaching preparation for biology GTAs; however, 52% of these programs required 10 or fewer hours per year. Respondents wanted to change their programs to include more pedagogical information and teaching observations with feedback to their GTAs. Programmatic self-ratings of satisfaction with GTA PD were positively correlated with the number of topics discussed during PD. Although more schools are requiring GTA PD for teaching compared with the last national survey, the lack of program breadth at many schools warrants a national conversation with regard to recent calls for improving undergraduate instruction. © 2015 E. E. Schussler et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. Insects as test systems for assessing the potential role of microgravity in biological development and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernós, I.; Carratalá, M.; González-Jurado, J.; Valverde, J. R.; Calleja, M.; Domingo, A.; Vinós, J.; Cervera, M.; Marco, R.

    account in the planning and evaluation of experiments designed to test the potential role of microgravity on biological development and evolution.

  20. A role of intracellular mono-ADP-ribosylation in cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Emanuele S; Fabrizio, Gaia; Di Girolamo, Maria

    2013-08-01

    During the development, progression and dissemination of neoplastic lesions, cancer cells can hijack normal pathways and mechanisms. This includes the control of the function of cellular proteins through reversible post-translational modifications, such as ADP-ribosylation, phosphorylation, and acetylation. In the case of mono-ADP-ribosylation and poly-ADP-ribosylation, the addition of one or several units of ADP-ribose to target proteins occurs via two families of enzymes that can generate ADP-ribosylated proteins: the diphtheria toxin-like ADP-ribosyltransferase (ARTD) family, comprising 17 different proteins that are either poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases or mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases or inactive enzymes; and the clostridial toxin-like ADP-ribosyltransferase family, with four human members, two of which are active mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, and two of which are enzymatically inactive. In line with a central role for poly-ADP-ribose polymerase 1 in response to DNA damage, specific inhibitors of this enzyme have been developed as anticancer therapeutics and evaluated in several clinical trials. Recently, in combination with the discovery of a large number of enzymes that can catalyse mono-ADP-ribosylation, the role of this modification has been linked to human diseases, such as inflammation, diabetes, neurodegeneration, and cancer, thus revealing the need for the development of specific ARTD inhibitors. This will provide a better understanding of the roles of these enzymes in human physiology and pathology, so that they can be targeted in the future to generate new and efficacious drugs. This review summarizes our present knowledge of the ARTD enzymes that are involved in mono-ADP-ribosylation reactions and that have roles in cancer biology. In particular, the well-documented role of macro-containing ARTD8 in lymphoma and the putative role of ARTD15 in cancer are discussed. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  1. Persistent stromal fibroblast activation is present in chronic tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Stephanie G; Buckley, Christopher D; Al-Mossawi, Mohammad Hussein; Hedley, Robert; Martinez, Fernando O; Wheway, Kim; Watkins, Bridget; Carr, Andrew J

    2017-01-25

    Growing evidence supports a key role for inflammation in the onset and progression of tendinopathy. However, the effect of the inflammatory infiltrate on tendon cells is poorly understood. We investigated stromal fibroblast activation signatures in tissues and cells from patients with tendinopathy. Diseased tendons were collected from well-phenotyped patient cohorts with supraspinatus tendinopathy before and after sub-acromial decompression treatment. Healthy tendons were collected from patients undergoing shoulder stabilisation or anterior cruciate ligament repair. Stromal fibroblast activation markers including podoplanin (PDPN), CD106 (VCAM-1) and CD248 were investigated by immunostaining, flow cytometry and RT-qPCR. PDPN, CD248 and CD106 were increased in diseased compared to healthy tendon tissues. This stromal fibroblast activation signature persisted in tendon biopsies in patients at 2-4 years post treatment. PDPN, CD248 and CD106 were increased in diseased compared to healthy tendon cells. IL-1β treatment induced PDPN and CD106 but not CD248. IL-1β treatment induced NF-κB target genes in healthy cells, which gradually declined following replacement with cytokine-free medium, whilst PDPN and CD106 remained above pre-stimulated levels. IL-1β-treated diseased cells had more profound induction of PDPN and CD106 and sustained expression of IL6 and IL8 mRNA compared to IL-1β-treated healthy cells. We conclude that stromal fibroblast activation markers are increased and persist in diseased compared to healthy tendon tissues and cells. Diseased tendon cells have distinct stromal fibroblast populations. IL-1β treatment induced persistent stromal fibroblast activation which was more profound in diseased cells. Persistent stromal fibroblast activation may be implicated in the development of chronic inflammation and recurrent tendinopathy. Targeting this stromal fibroblast activation signature is a potential therapeutic strategy.

  2. The role of cytokines in cervical ripening: correlations between the concentrations of cytokines and hyaluronic acid in cervical mucus and the induction of hyaluronic acid production by inflammatory cytokines by human cervical fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, M; Hirano, H; Tsubaki, H; Kodama, H; Tanaka, T

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of our study was (1) to explain the relationship between levels of inflammatory cytokines and levels of hyaluronic acid in cervical mucus of pregnant women and (2) to investigate whether cytokines promote hyaluronic acid production by human cervical fibroblasts in vitro. The concentration of hyaluronic acid, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-8 were measured in cervical mucus of pregnant women, and hyaluronic acid production by cytokine-treated (interleukin-1beta and interleukin-8) cultured fibroblasts was measured. Hyaluronic acid concentrations in the mucus of pregnant women with threatened premature labor were higher than in mucus of normal pregnant women (P hyaluronic acid concentrations and interleukin-1beta (P = .018) and interleukin-8 (P = .003) concentrations in cervical mucus. Cytokines (especially interleukin-8) stimulated hyaluronic acid production by cultured cervical fibroblasts. Cytokines induce hyaluronic acid production by human cervical fibroblasts, which may promote cervical ripening.

  3. A FTIR imaging characterization of fibroblasts stimulated by various breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar

    Full Text Available It is well known that the microenvironment plays a major role in breast cancer progression. Yet, the mechanism explaining the transition from normal fibroblasts to cancer-stimulated fibroblasts remains to be elucidated. Here we report a FTIR imaging study of the effects of three different breast cancer cell lines on normal fibroblasts in culture. Fibroblast activation process was monitored by FTIR imaging and spectra compared by multivariate statistical analyses. Principal component analysis evidenced that the fibroblasts stimulated by these cancer cell lines grouped together and remained distinctly separated from normal fibroblasts indicating a modified different chemical composition in the cancer-stimulated fibroblasts. Similar changes in fibroblasts were induced by the various breast cancer cell lines belonging to different sub-types. Most significant changes were observed in the region of 2950 and 1230 cm(-1, possibly related to changes in lipids and in the 1230 cm(-1 area assigned to phosphate vibrations (nucleotides. Interestingly, the cancer-cell induced changes in the fibroblasts also occurred when there was no possible direct contact between the two cell lines in the co-culture. When contact was possible, the spectral changes were similar, suggesting that soluble factors but not direct cell-cell interactions were responsible for fibroblast activation. Overall, the results indicate that IR imaging could be used in the future for analyzing the microenvironment of breast tumors.

  4. Fibroblast activation in cancer: when seed fertilizes soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzet, Sanya-Eduarda; Gaggioli, Cedric

    2016-09-01

    In solid cancers, activated fibroblasts acquire the capacity to provide fertile soil for tumor progression. Specifically, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) establish a strong relationship with cancer cells. This provides advantages to both cell types: whereas cancer cells initiate and sustain CAF activation, CAFs support cancer cell growth, motility and invasion. This results in tumor progression, metastasis and chemoresistance. Numerous studies have detailed the mechanisms involved in fibroblast activation and cancer progression, some of which are reviewed in this article. Cancer cells and CAFs are "partners in crime", and their interaction is supported by inflammation. An understanding of the enemy, the cancer cell population and its "allies" should provide novel opportunities for targeted-drug development. Graphical Abstract Molecular mechanism of fibroblast activation. a Normal fibroblasts are the most common cell type in the extracellular matrix and are responsible for the synthesis of collagens and fibrilar proteins. Under normal conditions, fibroblasts maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to proper cell communication and function. Fibroblasts can be activated by a diverse set of factors secreted from cancer or immune cells. Not only growth factors such as TGF-β, PDGF, HGF and FGF but also interleukins, metalloproteinases and reactive oxygen species can promote activation. Likewise, transcriptional factors such as NF-κB and HSF-1 play an important role, as do the gene family of metalloproteinase inhibitors, Timp and the NF-κB subunit, p62. Interestingly, fibroblasts themselves can stimulate cancer cells to support activation further. b Once activated, fibroblasts undergo a phenotype switch and become cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) expressing various markers such as α-SMA, FSP1, vimentin and periostatin. c Recently, the LIF/GP130/IL6-R pathway has been identified as a signaling cascade involved in fibroblast activation. Upon LIF stimulation

  5. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is robustly induced by ethanol and has a protective role in ethanol associated liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna N. Desai

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Acute or binge ethanol consumption significantly increases circulating FGF21 levels in both humans and mice. However, FGF21 does not play a role in acute ethanol clearance. In contrast, chronic ethanol consumption in the absence of FGF21 is associated with significant liver pathology alone or in combination with excess mortality, depending on the type of diet consumed with ethanol. This suggests that FGF21 protects against long term ethanol induced hepatic damage and may attenuate progression of alcoholic liver disease. Further study is required to assess the therapeutic potential of FGF21 in the treatment of alcoholic liver disease.

  6. Roles of extracellular polymeric substances in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is known to mainly rely on the ability of phosphorus-accumulating organisms to take up, transform and store excess amount of phosphorus (P) inside the cells. However, recent studies have revealed considerable accumulation of P also in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of sludge, implying a non-negligible role of EPS in P removal by EBPR sludge. However, the contribution of EPS to P uptake and the forms of accumulated extracellular P vary substantially in different studies, and the underlying mechanism of P transformation and transportation in EPS remains poorly understood. This review provides a new recognition into the P removal process in EBPR system by incorporating the role of EPS. It overviews on the characteristics of P accumulation in EPS, explores the mechanism of P transformation and transportation in EBPR sludge and EPS, summarizes the main influential factors for the P-accumulation properties of EPS, and discusses the remaining knowledge gaps and needed future efforts that may lead to better understanding and use of such an EPS role for maximizing P recovery from wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A two-dimensional model of the colonic crypt accounting for the role of the basement membrane and pericryptal fibroblast sheath.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara-Jane Dunn

    Full Text Available The role of the basement membrane is vital in maintaining the integrity and structure of an epithelial layer, acting as both a mechanical support and forming the physical interface between epithelial cells and the surrounding connective tissue. The function of this membrane is explored here in the context of the epithelial monolayer that lines the colonic crypt, test-tube shaped invaginations that punctuate the lining of the intestine and coordinate a regular turnover of cells to replenish the epithelial layer every few days. To investigate the consequence of genetic mutations that perturb the system dynamics and can lead to colorectal cancer, it must be possible to track the emerging tissue level changes that arise in the crypt. To that end, a theoretical crypt model with a realistic, deformable geometry is required. A new discrete crypt model is presented, which focuses on the interaction between cell- and tissue-level behaviour, while incorporating key subcellular components. The model contains a novel description of the role of the surrounding tissue and musculature, based upon experimental observations of the tissue structure of the crypt, which are also reported. A two-dimensional (2D cross-sectional geometry is considered, and the shape of the crypt is allowed to evolve and deform. Simulation results reveal how the shape of the crypt may contribute mechanically to the asymmetric division events typically associated with the stem cells at the base. The model predicts that epithelial cell migration may arise due to feedback between cell loss at the crypt collar and density-dependent cell division, an hypothesis which can be investigated in a wet lab. This work forms the basis for investigation of the deformation of the crypt structure that can occur due to proliferation of cells exhibiting mutant phenotypes, experiments that would not be possible in vivo or in vitro.

  8. Role of soil biology and soil functions in relation to land use intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, Giulia; Wall, David; Bacher, Matthias; Emmet-Booth, Jeremy; Graça, Jessica; Marongiu, Irene; Creamer, Rachel

    2017-04-01

    The delivery of the ecosystem's functions is predominantly controlled by soil biology. The biology found in a gram of soil contains more than ten thousand individual species of bacteria and fungi (Torsvik et al., 1990). Understanding the role and the requirements of these organisms is essential for the protection and the sustainable use of soils. Soil biology represents the engine of all the processes occurring in the soil and it supports the ecosystem services such as: 1) nutrient mineralisation 2) plant production 3) water purification and regulation and 4) carbon cycling and storage. During the last years land management type and intensity have been identified as major drivers for microbial performance in soil. For this reason land management needs to be appropriately studied to understand the role of soil biology within this complex interplay of functions. We aimed to study whether and how land management drives soil biological processes and related functions. To reach this objective we built a land use intensity index (LUI) able to quantify the impact of the common farming practices carried out in Irish grassland soils. The LUI is derived from a detailed farmer questionnaire on grassland management practices at 38 farms distributed in the five major agro-climatic regions of Ireland defined by Holden and Brereton (2004). Soils were classified based on their drainage status according to the Irish Soil Information System by Creamer et al. (2014). This detailed questionnaire is then summarised into 3 management intensity components: (i) intensity of Fertilisation (Fi), (ii) frequency of Mowing (Mi) and (iii) intensity of Livestock Grazing (Gi). Sites were sampled to assess the impact of land management intensity on microbial community structure and enzyme behaviour in relation to nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon cycling. Preliminary results for enzymes linked to C and N cycles showed higher activity in relation to low grazing pressure (low Gi). Enzymes linked to P

  9. The cell biology of cross-presentation and the role of dendritic cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Lee; Zhan, Yifan; Villadangos, Jose A; Lew, Andrew M

    2008-01-01

    The cell biology of cross-presentation is reviewed regarding exogenous antigen uptake, antigen degradation and entry into the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway. Whereas cross-presentation is not associated with enhanced phagocytic ability, certain receptors may favour uptake for cross-presentation for example mannose receptor for soluble glycoproteins. Perhaps, the defining property of the cross-presenting cell is some specialization in host machinery for handling and transport of antigen across organelles. Both cytosolic and vacuolar pathways are discussed. Which dendritic cell (DC) subset is the cross-presenting cell is explored. Cross-presentation is found within the CD8(+) subset resident in lymphoid organs. The role of other DC subsets (especially the migratory CD8(-) DC) and the route of antigen delivery are also discussed. Further consideration is given to antigen transfer between DC subsets and differential presentation to naive vs memory T cells.

  10. The role of genomics in the identification, prediction, and prevention of biological threats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Florian Fricke

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In all likelihood, it is only a matter of time before our public health system will face a major biological threat, whether intentionally dispersed or originating from a known or newly emerging infectious disease. It is necessary not only to increase our reactive "biodefense," but also to be proactive and increase our preparedness. To achieve this goal, it is essential that the scientific and public health communities fully embrace the genomic revolution, and that novel bioinformatic and computing tools necessary to make great strides in our understanding of these novel and emerging threats be developed. Genomics has graduated from a specialized field of science to a research tool that soon will be routine in research laboratories and clinical settings. Because the technology is becoming more affordable, genomics can and should be used proactively to build our preparedness and responsiveness to biological threats. All pieces, including major continued funding, advances in next-generation sequencing technologies, bioinformatics infrastructures, and open access to data and metadata, are being set in place for genomics to play a central role in our public health system.

  11. Preparing Biology Graduate Teaching Assistants for Their Roles as Instructors: An Assessment of Institutional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussler, Elisabeth E.; Read, Quentin; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Miller, Kristen; Ferzli, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The inconsistency of professional development (PD) in teaching for graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) is a widespread problem in higher education. Although GTAs serve an important role in retention of undergraduate science majors and in promotion of scientific literacy in nonmajors, they often lack preparation and ongoing support for teaching. Given the recent national focus on instructional quality in introductory courses, our goal was to use an online survey to identify current practices of teaching PD for biology GTAs and compare these results with the last national survey on this topic. In responses from 71 participant institutions, 96% reported some mandatory teaching preparation for biology GTAs; however, 52% of these programs required 10 or fewer hours per year. Respondents wanted to change their programs to include more pedagogical information and teaching observations with feedback to their GTAs. Programmatic self-ratings of satisfaction with GTA PD were positively correlated with the number of topics discussed during PD. Although more schools are requiring GTA PD for teaching compared with the last national survey, the lack of program breadth at many schools warrants a national conversation with regard to recent calls for improving undergraduate instruction. PMID:26231562

  12. A hydra with many heads: protein and polypeptide toxins from hydra and their biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Daniel; Zlotkin, Eliahu

    2009-12-15

    Hydra have been classical model organisms for over 250 years, yet little is known about the toxins they produce, and how they utilize these toxins to catch prey, protect themselves from predators and fulfill other biological roles necessary for survival. Unlike typical venomous organisms the hydra allomonal system is complex and "holistic", produced by various stinging cells (in the hunting tentacles and body ectoderm) as well as by non-nematocystic tissue. Toxic proteins also fulfill novel, non-allomonal roles in hydra. This review described the toxins produced by hydra within the context of their biology and natural history. Hydra nematocyst venom contains a high-molecular weight (>100 kDa) hemolytic and paralytic protein and a protein of approximately 30 kDa which induces a long-lasting flaccid paralysis. No low-molecular weight toxicity is observed, suggesting the lack of "classical" 4-7 kDa neurotoxins. The occurrence of a potent phospholipase activity in the venom is supported by the detection of several venom-like phospholipase A2 genes expressed by hydra. Hydra also produce toxins which are not part of the nematocyst venom. In the green hydra, Hydralysins, a novel family of Pore-Forming Proteins, are secreted into the gastrovascular cavity during feeding, probably helping in disintegration of the prey. Other putative non-nematocystic "toxins" may be involved in immunity, development or regulation of behavior. As the first venomous organism for which modern molecular tools are available, hydra provide a useful model to answer many outstanding questions on the way venomous organisms utilize their toxins to survive.

  13. ESL students learning biology: The role of language and social interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipal, Kamini

    This study explored three aspects related to ESL students in a mainstream grade 11 biology classroom: (1) the nature of students' participation in classroom activities, (2) the factors that enhanced or constrained ESL students' engagement in social interactions, and (3) the role of language in the learning of science. Ten ESL students were observed over an eight-month period in this biology classroom. Data were collected using qualitative research methods such as participant observation, audio-recordings of lessons, field notes, semi-structured interviews, short lesson recall interviews and students' written work. The study was framed within sociocultural perspectives, particularly the social constructivist perspectives of Vygotsky (1962, 1978) and Wertsch (1991). Data were analysed with respect to the three research aspects. Firstly, the findings showed that ESL students' preferred and exhibited a variety of participation practices that ranged from personal-individual to socio-interactive in nature. Both personal-individual and socio-interactive practices appeared to support science and language learning. Secondly, the findings indicated that ESL students' engagement in classroom social interactions was most likely influenced by the complex interactions between a number of competing factors at the individual, interpersonal and community/cultural levels (Rogoff, Radziszewska, & Masiello, 1995). In this study, six factors that appeared to enhance or constrain ESL students' engagement in classroom social interactions were identified. These factors were socio-cultural factors, prior classroom practice, teaching practices, affective factors, English language proficiency, and participation in the research project. Thirdly, the findings indicated that language played a significant mediational role in ESL students' learning of science. The data revealed that the learning of science terms and concepts can be explained by a functional model of language that includes: (1

  14. The role of podoplanin in the biology of differentiated thyroid cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Rudzińska

    Full Text Available Podoplanin (PDPN, a mucin-type transmembrane glycoprotein specific to the lymphatic system is expressed in a variety of human cancers, and is regarded as a factor promoting tumor progression. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular role of PDPN in the biology of thyroid cancer cells. PDPN expression was evaluated in primary thyroid carcinomas and thyroid carcinoma cell lines by RT-qPCR, Western blotting, IF and IHC. To examine the role of podoplanin in determining a cell's malignant potential (cellular migration, invasion, proliferation, adhesion, motility, apoptosis, a thyroid cancer cell line with silenced PDPN expression was used. We observed that PDPN was solely expressed in the cancer cells of 40% of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC tissues. Moreover, PDPN mRNA and protein were highly expressed in PTC-derived TPC1 and BcPAP cell lines but were not detected in follicular thyroid cancer derived cell lines. PDPN knock-down significantly decreased cellular invasion, and modestly reduced cell migration, while proliferation and adhesion were not affected. Our results demonstrate that PDPN mediates the invasive properties of cells derived from papillary thyroid carcinomas, suggesting that podoplanin might promote PTC progression.

  15. The critical role of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide on physico-chemical, technological and biological properties of NLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, C; Campisi, A; Manno, D; Serra, A; Spatuzza, M; Musumeci, T; Bonfanti, R; Puglisi, G

    2014-09-01

    Exploiting the experimental factorial design and the potentiality of Turbiscan AG Station, we developed and characterized unmodified and DDAB-coated NLC prepared by a low energy organic solvent free phase inversion temperature technique. A 22 full factorial experimental design was developed in order to study the effects of two independent variables (DDAB and ferulic acid) and their interaction on mean particle size and zeta potential values. The factorial planning was validated by ANOVA analysis; the correspondence between the predicted values of size and zeta and those measured experimentally confirmed the validity of the design and the equation applied for its resolution. The DDAB-coated NLC were significantly affected in their physico-chemical properties by the presence of DDAB, as showed by the results of the experimental design. The coated NLC showed higher physical stability with no particles aggregation compared to the unmodified NLC, as demonstrated by Turbiscan(®) AGS measurements. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Cryo-TEM images allowed us to assert that DDAB plays a critical role in increasing the lipids structural order with a consequent enhancement of the NLC physical stability. Furthermore, the results of the in vitro biological studies allow the revisiting of the role of DDAB to the benefit of glioblastoma treatment, due to its efficacy in increasing the NLC uptake and reducing the viability of human glioblastoma cancer cells (U87MG). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of the SIBLING, Bone Sialoprotein in skeletal biology - Contribution of mouse experimental genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouleftour, Wafa; Juignet, Laura; Bouet, Guenaelle; Granito, Renata Neves; Vanden-Bossche, Arnaud; Laroche, Norbert; Aubin, Jane E; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Vico, Laurence; Malaval, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Bone Sialoprotein (BSP) is a member of the "Small Integrin-Binding Ligand N-linked Glycoproteins" (SIBLING) extracellular matrix protein family of mineralized tissues. BSP has been less studied than other SIBLING proteins such as Osteopontin (OPN), which is coexpressed with it in several skeletal cell types. Here we review the contribution of genetically engineered mice (BSP gene knockout and overexpression) to the understanding of the role of BSP in the bone organ. The studies made so far highlight the role of BSP in skeletal mineralization, as well as its importance for proper osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and activity, most prominently in primary/repair bone. The absence of BSP also affects the local environment of the bone tissue, in particular hematopoiesis and vascularization. Interestingly, lack of BSP induces an overexpression of OPN, and the cognate protein could be responsible for some aspects of the BSP gene knockout skeletal phenotype, while replacing BSP for some of its functions. Such interplay between the partly overlapping functions of SIBLING proteins, as well as the network of cross-regulations in which they are involved should now be the focus of further work. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of epicardial-derived cardiac interstitial cells: differentiation and mobilization of heart fibroblast progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Ruiz-Villalba

    Full Text Available The non-muscular cells that populate the space found between cardiomyocyte fibers are known as 'cardiac interstitial cells' (CICs. CICs are heterogeneous in nature and include different cardiac progenitor/stem cells, cardiac fibroblasts and other cell types. Upon heart damage CICs soon respond by initiating a reparative response that transforms with time into extensive fibrosis and heart failure. Despite the biomedical relevance of CICs, controversy remains on the ontogenetic relationship existing between the different cell kinds homing at the cardiac interstitium, as well as on the molecular signals that regulate their differentiation, maturation, mutual interaction and role in adult cardiac homeostasis and disease. Our work focuses on the analysis of epicardial-derived cells, the first cell type that colonizes the cardiac interstitium. We present here a characterization and an experimental analysis of the differentiation potential and mobilization properties of a new cell line derived from mouse embryonic epicardium (EPIC. Our results indicate that these cells express some markers associated with cardiovascular stemness and retain part of the multipotent properties of embryonic epicardial derivatives, spontaneously differentiating into smooth muscle, and fibroblast/myofibroblast-like cells. Epicardium-derived cells are also shown to initiate a characteristic response to different growth factors, to display a characteristic proteolytic expression profile and to degrade biological matrices in 3D in vitro assays. Taken together, these data indicate that EPICs are relevant to the analysis of epicardial-derived CICs, and are a god model for the research on cardiac fibroblasts and the role these cells play in ventricular remodeling in both ischemic or non/ischemic myocardial disease.

  18. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts: Perspectives in Cancer Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakash, Jai

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between cancer cells and stromal cells is increasingly recognized as a main driver of tumor progression and metastasis. This Forum article highlights the role of cancer-associated stromal fibroblasts (CAFs) in tumorigenesis and discusses the potential for developing specific stromal

  19. Correlation of astrocyte elevated gene‑1, basic‑fibroblast growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-03

    . Hu G, Wei Y, Kang Y. The multifaceted role of MTDH/AEG‑1 in cancer progression. Clin Cancer Res 2009;15:5615‑20. 10. Dow JK, deVere White RW. Fibroblast growth factor 2: Its structure and property, paracrine function ...

  20. Endogenous Semaphorin-7A Impedes Human Lung Fibroblast Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esnault, Stephane; Torr, Elizabeth E; Bernau, Ksenija; Johansson, Mats W; Kelly, Elizabeth A; Sandbo, Nathan; Jarjour, Nizar N

    2017-01-01

    Semaphorin-7A is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, initially characterized as an axon guidance protein. Semaphorin-7A also contributes to immune cell regulation and may be an essential pro-fibrotic factor when expressed by non-fibroblast cell types (exogenous). In mouse models, semaphorin-7A was shown to be important for TGF-ß1-induced pulmonary fibrosis characterized by myofibroblast accumulation and extracellular matrix deposition, but the cell-specific role of semaphorin-7A was not examined in fibroblasts. The purpose of this study is to determine semaphorin-7A expression by fibroblasts and to investigate the function of endogenously expressed semaphorin-7A in primary human lung fibroblasts (HLF). Herein, we show that non-fibrotic HLF expressed high levels of cell surface semaphorin-7A with little dependence on the percentage of serum or recombinant TGF-ß1. Semaphorin-7A siRNA strongly decreased semaphorin-7A mRNA expression and reduced cell surface semaphorin-7A. Reduction of semaphorin-7A induced increased proliferation and migration of non-fibrotic HLF. Also, independent of the presence of TGF-ß1, the decline of semaphorin-7A by siRNA was associated with increased α-smooth muscle actin production and gene expression of periostin, fibronectin, laminin, and serum response factor (SRF), indicating differentiation into a myofibroblast. Conversely, overexpression of semaphorin-7A in the NIH3T3 fibroblast cell line reduced the production of pro-fibrotic markers. The inverse association between semaphorin-7A and pro-fibrotic fibroblast markers was further analyzed using HLF from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n = 6) and non-fibrotic (n = 7) lungs. Using these 13 fibroblast lines, we observed that semaphorin-7A and periostin expression were inversely correlated. In conclusion, our study indicates that endogenous semaphorin-7A in HLF plays a role in maintaining fibroblast homeostasis by preventing up-regulation of pro-fibrotic genes. Therefore

  1. Curcumin-induced fibroblast apoptosis and in vitro wound contraction are regulated by antioxidants and heme oxygenase: implications for scar formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharstuhl, A.; Mutsaers, H.A.M.; Pennings, S.W.C.; Szarek, W.A.; Russel, F.G.M.; Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblast apoptosis plays a crucial role in normal and pathological scar formation and therefore we studied whether the putative apoptosis-inducing factor curcumin affects fibroblast apoptosis and may function as a novel therapeutic. We show that 25-microM curcumin causes fibroblast apoptosis and

  2. Multiple functions of gingival and mucoperiosteal fibroblasts in oral wound healing and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquet, Matthias; Katsaros, Christos; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-06-01

    Fibroblasts are cells of mesenchymal origin. They are responsible for the production of most extracellular matrix in connective tissues and are essential for wound healing and repair. In recent years, it has become clear that fibroblasts from different tissues have various distinct traits. Moreover, wounds in the oral cavity heal under very special environmental conditions compared with skin wounds. Here, we reviewed the current literature on the various interconnected functions of gingival and mucoperiosteal fibroblasts during the repair of oral wounds. The MEDLINE database was searched with the following terms: (gingival OR mucoperiosteal) AND fibroblast AND (wound healing OR repair). The data gathered were used to compare oral fibroblasts with fibroblasts from other tissues in terms of their regulation and function during wound healing. Specifically, we sought answers to the following questions: (i) what is the role of oral fibroblasts in the inflammatory response in acute wounds; (ii) how do growth factors control the function of oral fibroblasts during wound healing; (iii) how do oral fibroblasts produce, remodel and interact with extracellular matrix in healing wounds; (iv) how do oral fibroblasts respond to mechanical stress; and (v) how does aging affect the fetal-like responses and functions of oral fibroblasts? The current state of research indicates that oral fibroblasts possess unique characteristics and tightly controlled specific functions in wound healing and repair. This information is essential for developing new strategies to control the intraoral wound-healing processes of the individual patient. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    -rich environment differentially alters gene expression in these cells. In addition, Ingenuity pathway analysis of the specific biological pathways that differentiate DC-derived cells from carpal tunnel-derived cells has identified the potential involvement of microRNAs in this fibroproliferative disorder. Conclusions These data show that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected palmar fascia in DC patients are highly similar, and differ significantly from the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release. PMID:22559715

  4. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Latha

    2012-05-01

    a collagen-rich environment differentially alters gene expression in these cells. In addition, Ingenuity pathway analysis of the specific biological pathways that differentiate DC-derived cells from carpal tunnel-derived cells has identified the potential involvement of microRNAs in this fibroproliferative disorder. Conclusions These data show that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected palmar fascia in DC patients are highly similar, and differ significantly from the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release.

  5. The Role of Biological Soil Crusts in Nitrogen Cycling and Soil Deflation in West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, R. C.; Governali, F. C.; Spickard, A. M.; Virginia, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Although shrub expansion has been observed across the Arctic in moist tundra habitat, shrubs may be prevented from expanding in arid Arctic regions due to low soil moisture or soil erosion. This may be the case in Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland, where katabatic winds off the Greenland Ice Sheet have eroded distinct patches of mixed shrub tundra, resulting in nearly barren low productivity areas dominated by biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and graminoids. The future trajectory of these bare patches - persisting in a low biomass state or returning to a shrub-dominated state - depends on the role of the biocrust as either a long-term landscape cover limiting revegetation or as a successional facilitator. Prior to this study, little was known about the physical and ecological development of West Greenland biocrusts and how they may influence future vegetation dynamics. We found that biocrusts took 230 ± 48 years to fully develop, and that later stages of biocrust development were related to increased thickness and penetration resistance and decreased soil moisture, factors limiting shrub seedling establishment. The nitrogen (N) fixing lichen Stereocaulon sp. was found throughout the study region at all stages of biocrust development. Natural 15N abundance suggests that Stereocaulon sp. obtains about half of its N from biological fixation, and that some biologically-fixed N is incorporated into the underlying soils over time. Although soil N and C concentrations increased slightly with biocrust development, their levels under the most developed biocrusts remained low compared to the surrounding shrub and graminoid tundra. Our results suggest that deflation patches, triggered by long-term variations in climate, may remain in a low-productivity ecosystem state for hundreds to thousands of years, if precipitation and temperature regimes do not dramatically alter the vegetation potential of the region. However, if future climate change in the Arctic favors greater

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase content and activity in low-platelet, low-leukocyte and high-platelet, high-leukocyte platelet rich plasma (PRP) and the biologic response to PRP by human ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifer, Matthew A; Maerz, Tristan; Baker, Kevin C; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    Recent work has shown the presence of catabolic cytokines in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), but little is known about endogenous catabolic proteases such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Hypothesis/ To quantify MMP content in 2 commercially available PRP preparation systems: Arthrex Double Syringe System autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) and Biomet GPS (GPS). The hypothesis was that MMPs are actively secreted from PRP immediately after preparation. Controlled laboratory study. PRP was prepared using either ACP (low platelet, low leukocyte) or GPS (high platelet, high leukocyte). MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 concentrations were measured using multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for up to 6 days in 2 donors, and MMP activity was measured in 3 donors using kinetic activity kits able to detect the enzymatic cleavage of a fluorogenic peptide. Human ligament fibroblasts were cultured and exposed to both ACP and GPS from 1 donor each. MMP-2, -3, and -9 concentrations were assayed in culture media at 24 and 48 hours after exposure. GPS exhibited higher total MMP-2, -3, and -9 concentrations for up to 144 hours of release, while ACP had higher platelet-normalized MMP-2 and MMP-3 concentrations. GPS had significantly higher total and endogenous MMP-2 activity (P = .004 and .014, respectively), MMP-3 activity (P = .020 and .015, respectively), and MMP-9 activity (P = .004 and .002, respectively) compared with ACP. Once normalized to platelet count, differences in MMP activity were not significant between ACP and GPS. Compared with controls, cells stimulated with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and treated with ACP showed significantly higher fold changes of MMP-2 (P = .001) and MMP-3 (P = .003) concentrations at 24 hours than did cells treated with GPS. Total MMP-9 content was higher in the media of GPS-treated, IL-1β-stimulated cells compared with ACP-treated cells (P = .001). At 48 hours, IL-1β-stimulated cells treated with GPS exhibited higher fold changes of MMP-2

  7. Case report 511: Fibroblastic rheumatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, R.J.; Martel, W.; Headington, J.T.; Kaufman, R.A.; Cincinnati Univ., OH

    1989-01-01

    We report a ten-year-old child with the newly described entity of fibroblastic rheumatism. This child developed rapid, progressive, symmetrical polyarthritis, similar to the radiographic appearance of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, except for the rapidity of progression. The polyarthritis was preceded by the development of skin nodules with characteristic histological changes. (orig./GDG)

  8. The large universal Pantoea plasmid LPP-1 plays a major role in biological and ecological diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Maayer Pieter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pantoea spp. are frequently isolated from a wide range of ecological niches and have various biological roles, as plant epi- or endophytes, biocontrol agents, plant-growth promoters or as pathogens of both plant and animal hosts. This suggests that members of this genus have undergone extensive genotypic diversification. One means by which this occurs among bacteria is through the acquisition and maintenance of plasmids. Here, we have analyzed and compared the sequences of a large plasmid common to all sequenced Pantoea spp. Results and discussion The Large PantoeaPlasmids (LPP-1 of twenty strains encompassing seven different Pantoea species, including pathogens and endo-/epiphytes of a wide range of plant hosts as well as insect-associated strains, were compared. The LPP-1 plasmid sequences range in size from ~281 to 794 kb and carry between 238 and 750 protein coding sequences (CDS. A core set of 46 proteins, encompassing 2.2% of the total pan-plasmid (2,095 CDS, conserved among all LPP-1 plasmid sequences, includes those required for thiamine and pigment biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that these plasmids have arisen from an ancestral plasmid, which has undergone extensive diversification. Analysis of the proteins encoded on LPP-1 also showed that these plasmids contribute to a wide range of Pantoea phenotypes, including the transport and catabolism of various substrates, inorganic ion assimilation, resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals, colonization and persistence in the host and environment, pathogenesis and antibiosis. Conclusions LPP-1 is universal to all Pantoea spp. whose genomes have been sequenced to date and is derived from an ancestral plasmid. LPP-1 encodes a large array of proteins that have played a major role in the adaptation of the different Pantoea spp. to their various ecological niches and their specialization as pathogens, biocontrol agents or benign saprophytes found in many diverse

  9. The role of biology in planetary evolution: cyanobacterial primary production in low‐oxygen Proterozoic oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Donald A.; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Understanding the role of biology in planetary evolution remains an outstanding challenge to geobiologists. Progress towards unravelling this puzzle for Earth is hindered by the scarcity of well‐preserved rocks from the Archean (4.0 to 2.5 Gyr ago) and Proterozoic (2.5 to 0.5 Gyr ago) Eons. In addition, the microscopic life that dominated Earth's biota for most of its history left a poor fossil record, consisting primarily of lithified microbial mats, rare microbial body fossils and membrane‐derived hydrocarbon molecules that are still challenging to interpret. However, it is clear from the sulfur isotope record and other geochemical proxies that the production of oxygen or oxidizing power radically changed Earth's surface and atmosphere during the Proterozoic Eon, pushing it away from the more reducing conditions prevalent during the Archean. In addition to ancient rocks, our reconstruction of Earth's redox evolution is informed by our knowledge of biogeochemical cycles catalysed by extant biota. The emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis in ancient cyanobacteria represents one of the most impressive microbial innovations in Earth's history, and oxygenic photosynthesis is the largest source of O 2 in the atmosphere today. Thus the study of microbial metabolisms and evolution provides an important link between extant biota and the clues from the geologic record. Here, we consider the physiology of cyanobacteria (the only microorganisms capable of oxygenic photosynthesis), their co‐occurrence with anoxygenic phototrophs in a variety of environments and their persistence in low‐oxygen environments, including in water columns as well as mats, throughout much of Earth's history. We examine insights gained from both the rock record and cyanobacteria presently living in early Earth analogue ecosystems and synthesize current knowledge of these ancient microbial mediators in planetary redox evolution. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that anoxygenic

  10. The emerging role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in redox biology and some implications for plasma applications to medicine and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David B.

    2012-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the closely related reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are often generated in applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas intended for biomedical purposes. These species are also central players in what is sometimes referred to as ‘redox’ or oxidation-reduction biology. Oxidation-reduction biochemistry is fundamental to all of aerobic biology. ROS and RNS are perhaps best known as disease-associated agents, implicated in diabetes, cancer, heart and lung disease, autoimmune disease and a host of other maladies including ageing and various infectious diseases. These species are also known to play active roles in the immune systems of both animals and plants and are key signalling molecules, among many other important roles. Indeed, the latest research has shown that ROS/RNS play a much more complex and nuanced role in health and ageing than previously thought. Some of the most potentially profound therapeutic roles played by ROS and RNS in various medical interventions have emerged only in the last several years. Recent research suggests that ROS/RNS are significant and perhaps even central actors in the actions of antimicrobial and anti-parasite drugs, cancer therapies, wound healing therapies and therapies involving the cardiovascular system. Understanding the ways ROS/RNS act in established therapies may help guide future efforts in exploiting novel plasma medical therapies. The importance of ROS and RNS to plant biology has been relatively little appreciated in the plasma biomedicine community, but these species are just as important in plants. It appears that there are opportunities for useful applications of plasmas in this area as well.

  11. The emerging role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in redox biology and some implications for plasma applications to medicine and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, David B

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the closely related reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are often generated in applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas intended for biomedical purposes. These species are also central players in what is sometimes referred to as ‘redox’ or oxidation-reduction biology. Oxidation-reduction biochemistry is fundamental to all of aerobic biology. ROS and RNS are perhaps best known as disease-associated agents, implicated in diabetes, cancer, heart and lung disease, autoimmune disease and a host of other maladies including ageing and various infectious diseases. These species are also known to play active roles in the immune systems of both animals and plants and are key signalling molecules, among many other important roles. Indeed, the latest research has shown that ROS/RNS play a much more complex and nuanced role in health and ageing than previously thought. Some of the most potentially profound therapeutic roles played by ROS and RNS in various medical interventions have emerged only in the last several years. Recent research suggests that ROS/RNS are significant and perhaps even central actors in the actions of antimicrobial and anti-parasite drugs, cancer therapies, wound healing therapies and therapies involving the cardiovascular system. Understanding the ways ROS/RNS act in established therapies may help guide future efforts in exploiting novel plasma medical therapies. The importance of ROS and RNS to plant biology has been relatively little appreciated in the plasma biomedicine community, but these species are just as important in plants. It appears that there are opportunities for useful applications of plasmas in this area as well. (topical review)

  12. The role of adaptive trans-generational plasticity in biological invasions of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Andrew R; Brown, Cynthia S; Espeland, Erin K; McKay, John K; Meimberg, Harald; Rice, Kevin J

    2010-03-01

    High-impact biological invasions often involve establishment and spread in disturbed, high-resource patches followed by establishment and spread in biotically or abiotically stressful areas. Evolutionary change may be required for the second phase of invasion (establishment and spread in stressful areas) to occur. When species have low genetic diversity and short selection history, within-generation phenotypic plasticity is often cited as the mechanism through which spread across multiple habitat types can occur. We show that trans-generational plasticity (TGP) can result in pre-adapted progeny that exhibit traits associated with increased fitness both in high-resource patches and in stressful conditions. In the invasive sedge, Cyperus esculentus, maternal plants growing in nutrient-poor patches can place disproportional number of propagules into nutrient-rich patches. Using the invasive annual grass, Aegilops triuncialis, we show that maternal response to soil conditions can confer greater stress tolerance in seedlings in the form of greater photosynthetic efficiency. We also show TGP for a phenological shift in a low resource environment that results in greater stress tolerance in progeny. These lines of evidence suggest that the maternal environment can have profound effects on offspring success and that TGP may play a significant role in some plant invasions.

  13. Fungal inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes: classification, properties, possible biological roles, and perspectives for practical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaevsky, Y E; Popova, V V; Semenova, T A; Beliakova, G A; Belozersky, M A

    2014-06-01

    Peptidase inhibitors are ubiquitous regulatory proteins controlling catalytic activity of proteolytic enzymes. Interest in these proteins increased substantially after it became clear that they can be used for therapy of various important diseases including cancer, malaria, and autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review we summarize available data on peptidase inhibitors from fungi, emphasizing their properties, biological role, and possible practical applications of these proteins in the future. A number of fungal peptidase inhibitors with unique structure and specificity of action have no sequence homology with other classes of peptidase inhibitors, thus representing new and specific candidates for therapeutic use. The main classifications of inhibitors in current use are considered. Available data on structure, mechanisms and conditions of action, and diversity of functions of peptidase inhibitors of fungi are analyzed. It is mentioned that on one side the unique properties of some inhibitors can be used for selective inhibition of peptidases responsible for initiation and development of pathogenic processes. On the other side, general inhibitory activity of other inhibitors towards peptidases of various catalytic classes might be able to provide efficient defense of transgenic plants against insect pests by overcoming compensatory synthesis of new peptidases by these pests in response to introduction of a fungal inhibitor. Together, the data analyzed in this review reveal that fungal inhibitors extend the spectrum of known peptidase inhibitors potentially suitable for use in medicine and agriculture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium: biological role of interferon tau in endometrial function and conceptus elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorniak, P; Bazer, F W; Spencer, T E

    2013-04-01

    This review integrates established and new information on the biological role of ovarian progesterone (P4) and interferon tau as well as conceptus- and endometrial-derived factors, PG and cortisol, in endometrial function and conceptus elongation during the periimplantation period of pregnancy in ruminants. Interferon tau is the maternal recognition of pregnancy signal that inhibits production of luteolytic pulses of PGF2α by the endometrium to maintain corpora lutea and their production of P4, the unequivocal hormone of pregnancy. Conceptus-endometrial interactions in ruminants are complex and involve carefully orchestrated temporal and spatial alterations in endometrial gene expression during pregnancy. Available results from studies in sheep support the idea that the individual, interactive, and coordinated actions of P4, interferon tau, PG, and cortisol regulate expression of elongation- and implantation-related genes in the endometrial epithelia and that P4 and PG are essential regulators of conceptus elongation. The outcome of these gene expression changes is alterations in endometrial secretions that govern conceptus elongation via effects on trophectoderm proliferation, migration, attachment, and adhesion. An increased knowledge of conceptus-endometrial interactions during early pregnancy in ruminants is necessary to understand and elucidate the causes of recurrent pregnancy loss and to provide a basis for new strategies to improve pregnancy outcome and reproductive efficiency.

  15. The Role of Biologically Active Ingredients from Natural Drug Treatments for Arrhythmias in Different Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Hu, Dan; Song, Xiaoli; Han, Tao; Gao, Yonghong; Xing, Yanwei

    2017-01-01

    Arrhythmia is a disease that is caused by abnormal electrical activity in the heart rate or rhythm. It is the major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although several antiarrhythmic drugs have been used in clinic for decades, their application is often limited by their adverse effects. As a result, natural drugs, which have fewer side effects, are now being used to treat arrhythmias. We searched for all articles on the role of biologically active ingredients from natural drug treatments for arrhythmias in different mechanisms in PubMed. This study reviews 19 natural drug therapies, with 18 active ingredient therapies, such as alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, quinones, and terpenes, and two kinds of traditional Chinese medicine compound (Wenxin-Keli and Shensongyangxin), all of which have been studied and reported as having antiarrhythmic effects. The primary focus is the proposed antiarrhythmic mechanism of each natural drug agent. Conclusion . We stress persistent vigilance on the part of the provider in discussing the use of natural drug agents to provide a solid theoretical foundation for further research on antiarrhythmia drugs.

  16. Biological roles and potential applications of immune cell-derived extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chuan; Seeger, Robert C; Fabbri, Muller; Wang, Larry; Wayne, Alan S; Jong, Ambrose Y

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) deliver bioactive macromolecules (i.e. proteins, lipids and nucleic acids) for intercellular communication in multicellular organisms. EVs are secreted by all cell types including immune cells. Immune cell-derived EVs modulate diverse aspects of the immune system to either enhance or suppress immune activities. The extensive effects of immune cell-derived EVs have become the focus of great interest for various nano-biomedical applications, ranging from the medical use of nanoplatform-based diagnostic agents to the development of therapeutic interventions as well as vaccine applications, and thus may be ideal for 'immune-theranostic'. Here, we review the latest advances concerning the biological roles of immune cell-derived EVs in innate and acquired immunity. The intercellular communication amongst immune cells through their EVs is highlighted, showing that all immune cell-derived EVs have their unique function(s) in immunity through intricate interaction(s). Natural-killer (NK) cell-derived EVs, for example, contain potent cytotoxic proteins and induce apoptosis to targeted cancer cells. On the other hand, cancer cell-derived EVs bearing NK ligands may evade immune surveillance and responses. Finally, we discuss possible medical uses for the immune cell-derived EVs as a tool for immune-theranostic: as diagnostic biomarkers, for use in therapeutic interventions and for vaccination.

  17. Insights into the key roles of proteoglycans in breast cancer biology and translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Neill, Thomas; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Hubo, Mario; Frey, Helena; Gopal, Sandeep; Gomes, Angélica; Afratis, Nikos; Lim, Hooi Ching; Couchman, John R; Filmus, Jorge; Sanderson, Ralph D; Schaefer, Liliana; Iozzo, Renato V; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2015-04-01

    Proteoglycans control numerous normal and pathological processes, among which are morphogenesis, tissue repair, inflammation, vascularization and cancer metastasis. During tumor development and growth, proteoglycan expression is markedly modified in the tumor microenvironment. Altered expression of proteoglycans on tumor and stromal cell membranes affects cancer cell signaling, growth and survival, cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. Despite the high complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the rapid evolution in our knowledge that proteoglycans are among the key players in the breast tumor microenvironment suggests their potential as pharmacological targets in this type of cancer. It has been recently suggested that pharmacological treatment may target proteoglycan metabolism, their utilization as targets for immunotherapy or their direct use as therapeutic agents. The diversity inherent in the proteoglycans that will be presented herein provides the potential for multiple layers of regulation of breast tumor behavior. This review summarizes recent developments concerning the biology of selected proteoglycans in breast cancer, and presents potential targeted therapeutic approaches based on their novel key roles in breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ecology and functional roles of biological soil crusts in semi-arid ecosystems of Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Fernando T.; Bowker, Matthew A.; Cantón, Yolanda; Castillo-Monroy, Andrea P.; Cortina, Jordi; Escolar, Cristina; Escudero, Adrián; Lázaro, Roberto; Martínez, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs), composed of lichens, cyanobacteria, mosses, liverworts and microorganisms, are key biotic components of arid and semi-arid ecosystems worldwide. Despite they are widespread in Spain, these organisms have been historically understudied in this country. This trend is beginning to change as a recent wave of research has been identifying BSCs as a model ecological system. Many studies and research projects carried out in Spain have explored the role of BSCs on water, carbon and nitrogen fluxes, the interactions between BSCs and vascular plants, their dynamics after disturbances, and their response to global change, among other topics. In this article we review the growing body of research on BSCs available from semi-arid areas of Spain, highlighting its importance for increasing our knowledge on this group of organisms. We also discuss how it is breaking new ground in emerging research areas on the ecology of BSCs, and how it can be use to guide management and restoration efforts. Finally, we provide directions for future research on the ecology of BSCs in Spain and abroad. PMID:25908884

  19. Cancer stem cells: a systems biology view of their role in prognosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertins, Susan D

    2014-04-01

    Evidence has accumulated that characterizes highly tumorigenic cancer cells residing in heterogeneous populations. The accepted term for such a subpopulation is cancer stem cells (CSCs). While many questions still remain about their precise role in the origin, progression, and drug resistance of tumors, it is clear they exist. In this review, a current understanding of the nature of CSC, their potential usefulness in prognosis, and the need to target them will be discussed. In particular, separate studies now suggest that the CSC is plastic in its phenotype, toggling between tumorigenic and nontumorigenic states depending on both intrinsic and extrinsic conditions. Because of this, a static view of gene and protein levels defined by correlations may not be sufficient to either predict disease progression or aid in the discovery and development of drugs to molecular targets leading to cures. Quantitative dynamic modeling, a bottom up systems biology approach whereby signal transduction pathways are described by differential equations, may offer a novel means to overcome the challenges of oncology today. In conclusion, the complexity of CSCs can be captured in mathematical models that may be useful for selecting molecular targets, defining drug action, and predicting sensitivity or resistance pathways for improved patient outcomes.

  20. Probing the roles of SUMOylation in cancer cell biology by using a selective SAE inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xingyue; Riceberg, Jessica; Soucy, Teresa; Koenig, Erik; Minissale, James; Gallery, Melissa; Bernard, Hugues; Yang, Xiaofeng; Liao, Hua; Rabino, Claudia; Shah, Pooja; Xega, Kristina; Yan, Zhong-Hua; Sintchak, Mike; Bradley, John; Xu, He; Duffey, Matt; England, Dylan; Mizutani, Hirotake; Hu, Zhigen; Guo, Jianping; Chau, Ryan; Dick, Lawrence R; Brownell, James E; Newcomb, John; Langston, Steve; Lightcap, Eric S; Bence, Neil; Pulukuri, Sai M

    2017-11-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) family proteins regulate target-protein functions by post-translational modification. However, a potent and selective inhibitor targeting the SUMO pathway has been lacking. Here we describe ML-792, a mechanism-based SUMO-activating enzyme (SAE) inhibitor with nanomolar potency in cellular assays. ML-792 selectively blocks SAE enzyme activity and total SUMOylation, thus decreasing cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, we found that induction of the MYC oncogene increased the ML-792-mediated viability effect in cancer cells, thus indicating a potential application of SAE inhibitors in treating MYC-amplified tumors. Using ML-792, we further explored the critical roles of SUMOylation in mitotic progression and chromosome segregation. Furthermore, expression of an SAE catalytic-subunit (UBA2) S95N M97T mutant rescued SUMOylation loss and the mitotic defect induced by ML-792, thus confirming the selectivity of ML-792. As a potent and selective SAE inhibitor, ML-792 provides rapid loss of endogenously SUMOylated proteins, thereby facilitating novel insights into SUMO biology.

  1. S100A4 expression is increased in stricture fibroblasts from patients with fibrostenosing Crohn's disease and promotes intestinal fibroblast migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Michael F; Docherty, Neil G; Burke, John P; O'Connell, P Ronan

    2010-08-01

    Fibroblasts represent the key cell type in fibrostenosing Crohn's disease (FCD) pathogenesis. S100A4 is an EF-hand calcium-binding protein family member, implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and as a marker of activated T lymphocytes and fibroblasts in chronic tissue remodeling. The aim of this study was to examine the expression profile of S100A4 in the resected ileum of patients with FCD. Mucosa, seromuscular explants, and transmural biopsies were harvested from diseased and proximal, macroscopically normal margins of ileocecal resections from patients with FCD. Samples were processed for histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting, and transmission electron microscopy. Primary explant cultures of seromuscular fibroblasts were exposed to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 (1 ng/ml), and S100A4 expression and scratch wound-healing activity were assessed at 24 h. CCD-18Co fibroblasts were transfected with S100A4 small interfering RNA, treated with TGF-beta1 (1 ng/ml) for 30 min or 24 h, and then assessed for S100A4 and Smad3 expression and scratch wound-healing activity. S100A4 expression was increased in stricture mucosa, in the lamina propria, and in CD3-positive intraepithelial CD3-positive T lymphocytes. Fibroblastic S100A4 staining was observed in seromuscular scar tissue. Stricture fibroblast explant culture showed significant upregulation of S100A4 expression. TGF-beta1 increased S100A4 expression in cultured ileal fibroblasts. In CCD-18Co fibroblasts, S100A4 small interfering RNA inhibited scratch wound healing and modestly inhibited Smad3 activation. S100A4 expression is increased in fibroblasts, as well as immune cells, in Crohn's disease stricture and induced by TGF-beta1. Results from knockdown experiments indicate a potential role for S100A4 in mediating intestinal fibroblast migration.

  2. Entrainment of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Fibroblasts by Temperature Cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2013), e77010 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP305/10/P244; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian rhythms * temperature * entrainment * SHR * fibroblasts * phase response curve Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  3. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in embryonic and cancer stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Petr; Dvořáková, D.; Hampl, Aleš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 580, - (2006), s. 2869-2874 ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA ČR GA301/03/1122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Fibroblast growth factor 2 * Embryonic stem cell * Hematopoietic progenitor cell Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.372, year: 2006

  4. The role of fire in managing for biological diversity on native rangelands of the Northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn Hull Sieg

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for using fire to manage for biological diversity on native rangelands in the Northern Great Plains incorporates an understanding of its past frequency, timing and intensity. Historically, lightning and humans were the major fire setters, and the role of fire varied both in space and time. A burning regime that includes fires at various intervals, seasons...

  5. The potential roles of biological soil crusts in dryland hydrologic cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, J.

    2006-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are the dominant living cover in many drylands of the world. They possess many features that can influence different aspects of local hydrologic cycles, including soil porosity, absorptivity, roughness, aggregate stability, texture, pore formation, and water retention. The influence of biological soil crusts on these factors depends on their internal and external structure, which varies with climate, soil, and disturbance history. This paper presents the different types of biological soil crusts, discusses how crust type likely influences various aspects of the hydrologic cycle, and reviews what is known and not known about the influence of biological crusts on sediment production and water infiltration versus runoff in various drylands around the world. Most studies examining the effect of biological soil crusts on local hydrology are done by comparing undisturbed sites with those recently disturbed by the researchers. Unfortunately, this greatly complicates interpretation of the results. Applied disturbances alter many soil features such as soil texture, roughness, aggregate stability, physical crusting, porosity, and bulk density in ways that would not necessarily be the same if crusts were not naturally present. Combined, these studies show little agreement on how biological crusts affect water infiltration or runoff. However, when studies are separated by biological crust type and utilize naturally occurring differences among these types, results indicate that biological crusts in hyperarid regions reduce infiltration and increase runoff, have mixed effects in and regions, and increase infiltration and reduce runoff in semiarid cool and cold drylands. However, more studies are needed before broad generalizations can be made on how biological crusts affect infiltration and runoff. We especially need studies that control for sub-surface soil features such as bulk density, micro- and macropores, and biological crust structure. Unlike

  6. Annexin A1 is elevated in patients with COPD and affects lung fibroblast function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai TW

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tianwen Lai,1,* Yanyu Li,1,* Zongjiong Mai,2 Xiaoxia Wen,1 Yingying Lv,1 Zhanqing Xie,3 Quanchao Lv,1 Min Chen,1 Dong Wu,1 Bin Wu1 1Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2Department of Oncology, 3Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Fibrosis in peripheral airways is responsible for airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Annexin A1 modulates several key biological events during inflammation. However, little is known about its role in airway fibrosis in COPD. We investigated whether levels of Annexin A1 were upregulated in patients with COPD, and whether it promoted airway fibrosis.Methods: We quantified serum Annexin A1 levels in never-smokers (n=12, smokers without COPD (n=11, and smokers with COPD (n=22. Correlations between Annexin A1 expression and clinical indicators (eg, lung function were assessed. In vitro, human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE and Annexin A1 expression was assessed. Primary human lung fibroblasts were isolated from patients with COPD and effects of Annexin A1 on fibrotic deposition of lung fibroblasts were evaluated.Results: Serum Annexin A1 was significantly higher in patients with Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD guidelines stage III or IV than in those with GOLD stages I or II (12.8±0.8 ng/mL versus 9.8±0.7 ng/mL; p=0.016. Annexin A1 expression was negatively associated with airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in one second % predicted; r=−0.72, p<0.001. In vitro, Annexin A1 was significantly increased in CSE-exposed HBE cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Annexin A1 promoted lung fibroblasts proliferation, migration, differentiation, and collagen deposition via the ERK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways

  7. Functions and Mechanisms of Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Arno J. Müller

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular signalling via growth factors plays an important role in controlling cell differentiation and cell movements during the development of multicellular animals. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF signalling induces changes in cellular behaviour allowing cells in the embryo to move, to survive, to divide or to differentiate. Several examples argue that FGF signalling is used in multi-step morphogenetic processes to achieve and maintain a transitional state of the cells required for the control of cell fate. In the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster, FGF signalling via the receptor tyrosine kinases Heartless (Htl and Breathless (Btl is particularly well studied. These FGF receptors affect gene expression, cell shape and cell–cell interactions during mesoderm layer formation, caudal visceral muscle (CVM formation, tracheal morphogenesis and glia differentiation. Here, we will address the current knowledge of the biological functions of FGF signalling in the fly on the tissue, at a cellular and molecular level.

  8. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio

    2007-01-01

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation

  9. Intracellular pH in increased after transformation of Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ober, S.S.; Pardee, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    These studies reveal that a series of tumorigenic Chinese hamster embryo fibroblast (CHEF) cell lines maintain an internal pH (pH/sub i/) that is 0.12 +/- 0.04 pH unit above that of the nontumorigenic CHEF/18 parental line. pH measurements were made with [ 14 C]-benzoic acid. This increase of pH/sub i/ in the tumorigenic CHEF cells is not due to autocrine growth factor production or to the persistent activation of pathways previously shown to modulate Na + /H + -antiporter activity present in the CHEF/18 line. These findings suggest that the defect in pH/sub i/ regulation in the tumorigenic CHEF/18 derivatives lies in the Na + /H + antiporter itself. Further studies to determine the biological significance of an increased pH/sub i/ show that the external pH (pH 0 )-dependence curve for initiation of DNA synthesis in the tumorigenic CHEF lines is shifted by approximately 0.2 pH unit toward acidic values relative to that of the nontumorigenic CHEF/18 parent. These data show a critical role for pH/sub i/ in the regulation of DNA synthesis in Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts and demonstrate that aberrations in pH/sub i/ can contribute to the acquisition of altered growth properties

  10. Human diploid fibroblasts have receptors for the globular domain of C1Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordin, S.; Page, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors showed that mass cultures of fibroblasts grown from gingival explants in DB medium with 10% human serum are enriched in a phenotype that binds C1q with an affinity much higher than the rest of the population. Because of potential biologic importance of C1q receptors, the authors studied whether the interaction between C1q and this phenotype was mediated by the globular or collagenous domains of the molecule. Globular fragments were prepared by digesting C1q with collagenase, and collagenous fragments obtained after pepsin treatment. C1q binding on cells in suspension was determined by reaction with 125 I-C1q as reported. Competition experiments were performed under conditions in which intact 125 I-C1q binding saturated all available receptors. The results showed that collagenous fragments inhibited 20% of the 125 I-C1q binding to high affinity receptors, whereas inhibition by globular fragments was 70%. Unlabeled intact C1q and collagen type 1 were used as controls, and inhibited 92% and 17% of C1q binding, respectively. These studies show that C1q interacts with the fibroblast phenotype expressing high affinity receptors through its globular domain. The authors suggest that at sites of trauma, native C1 may bind to the surface of these cells via the globular domain of C1q, and that this unique phenotype may play an important role in tissue repair

  11. Epigenetic and phenotypic profile of fibroblasts derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle J Hewitt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS cells offer a novel source of patient-specific cells for regenerative medicine. However, the biological potential of iPS-derived cells and their similarities to cells differentiated from human embryonic stem (hES cells remain unclear. We derived fibroblast-like cells from two hiPS cell lines and show that their phenotypic properties and patterns of DNA methylation were similar to that of mature fibroblasts and to fibroblasts derived from hES cells. iPS-derived fibroblasts (iPDK and their hES-derived counterparts (EDK showed similar cell morphology throughout differentiation, and patterns of gene expression and cell surface markers were characteristic of mature fibroblasts. Array-based methylation analysis was performed for EDK, iPDK and their parental hES and iPS cell lines, and hierarchical clustering revealed that EDK and iPDK had closely-related methylation profiles. DNA methylation analysis of promoter regions associated with extracellular matrix (ECM-production (COL1A1 by iPS- and hESC-derived fibroblasts and fibroblast lineage commitment (PDGFRβ, revealed promoter demethylation linked to their expression, and patterns of transcription and methylation of genes related to the functional properties of mature stromal cells were seen in both hiPS- and hES-derived fibroblasts. iPDK cells also showed functional properties analogous to those of hES-derived and mature fibroblasts, as seen by their capacity to direct the morphogenesis of engineered human skin equivalents. Characterization of the functional behavior of ES- and iPS-derived fibroblasts in engineered 3D tissues demonstrates the utility of this tissue platform to predict the capacity of iPS-derived cells before their therapeutic application.

  12. Cancer-associated fibroblasts secrete FGF-1 to promote ovarian proliferation, migration, and invasion through the activation of FGF-1/FGFR4 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanzhen; Fan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qing; Shi, Xiaoyu; Xu, Guangwei; Zou, Cuimin

    2017-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, due to its high propensity for metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts, as the dominant component of tumor microenvironment, are crucial for tumor progression. However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of ovarian cancer cells by cancer-associated fibroblasts remain little known. Here, we first isolated cancer-associated fibroblasts from patients' ovarian tissues and found that cancer-associated fibroblasts promoted SKOV3 cells' proliferation, migration, and invasion. Fibroblast growth factor-1 was identified as a highly increased factor in cancer-associated fibroblasts compared with normal fibroblasts by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (~4.6-fold, p fibroblast growth factor-1 in cancer-associated fibroblasts either naturally or through gene recombination led to phosphorylation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 in SKOV3 cells, which is followed by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-associated gene Snail1 and MMP3 expression. Moreover, treatment of SKOV3 cell with fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor PD173074 terminated cellular proliferation, migration, and invasion, reduced the phosphorylation level of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, and suppressed the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway. In addition, the expression level of Snail1 and MMP3 was reduced, while the expression level of E-cadherin increased. These observations suggest a crucial role for cancer-associated fibroblasts and fibroblast growth factor-1/fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 signaling in the progression of ovarian cancer. Therefore, this fibroblast growth factor-1/fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 axis may become a potential target for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  13. The role of biology in planetary evolution: cyanobacterial primary production in low-oxygen Proterozoic oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Bryant, Donald A; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the role of biology in planetary evolution remains an outstanding challenge to geobiologists. Progress towards unravelling this puzzle for Earth is hindered by the scarcity of well-preserved rocks from the Archean (4.0 to 2.5 Gyr ago) and Proterozoic (2.5 to 0.5 Gyr ago) Eons. In addition, the microscopic life that dominated Earth's biota for most of its history left a poor fossil record, consisting primarily of lithified microbial mats, rare microbial body fossils and membrane-derived hydrocarbon molecules that are still challenging to interpret. However, it is clear from the sulfur isotope record and other geochemical proxies that the production of oxygen or oxidizing power radically changed Earth's surface and atmosphere during the Proterozoic Eon, pushing it away from the more reducing conditions prevalent during the Archean. In addition to ancient rocks, our reconstruction of Earth's redox evolution is informed by our knowledge of biogeochemical cycles catalysed by extant biota. The emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis in ancient cyanobacteria represents one of the most impressive microbial innovations in Earth's history, and oxygenic photosynthesis is the largest source of O2 in the atmosphere today. Thus the study of microbial metabolisms and evolution provides an important link between extant biota and the clues from the geologic record. Here, we consider the physiology of cyanobacteria (the only microorganisms capable of oxygenic photosynthesis), their co-occurrence with anoxygenic phototrophs in a variety of environments and their persistence in low-oxygen environments, including in water columns as well as mats, throughout much of Earth's history. We examine insights gained from both the rock record and cyanobacteria presently living in early Earth analogue ecosystems and synthesize current knowledge of these ancient microbial mediators in planetary redox evolution. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that anoxygenic photosynthesis

  14. The role of Src kinase in the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Ruqaiyyah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoeba species are the causative agents of fatal granulomatous encephalitis in humans. Haematogenous spread is thought to be a primary step, followed by blood–brain barrier penetration, in the transmission of Acanthmaoeba into the central nervous system, but the associated molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the role of Src, a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase in the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba. Methods Amoebistatic and amoebicidal assays were performed by incubating amoeba in the presence of Src kinase-selective inhibitor, PP2 (4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl-7-(t-butylpyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine and its inactive analog, PP3 (4-amino-7-phenylpyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine. Using this inhibitor, the role of Src kinase in A. castellanii interactions with Escherichia coli was determined. Zymographic assays were performed to study effects of Src kinase on extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. The human brain microvascular endothelial cells were used to determine the effects of Src kinase on A. castellanii adhesion to and cytotoxicity of host cells. Results Inhibition of Src kinase using a specific inhibitor, PP2 (4-amino-5-(4 chlorophenyl-7-(t-butylpyrazolo [3,4-d] pyrimidine but not its inactive analog, PP3 (4-amino-7-phenylpyrazolo[3,4-d] pyrimidine, had detrimental effects on the growth of A. castellanii (keratitis isolate, belonging to the T4 genotype. Interestingly, inhibition of Src kinase hampered the phagocytic ability of A. castellanii, as measured by the uptake of non-invasive bacteria, but, on the contrary, invasion by pathogenic bacteria was enhanced. Zymographic assays revealed that inhibition of Src kinases reduced extracellular protease activities of A. castellanii. Src kinase inhibition had no significant effect on A. castellanii binding to and cytotoxicity of primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood–brain barrier

  15. The role of Src kinase in the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Iqbal, Junaid; Maugueret, Marie-Josée; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-06-07

    Acanthamoeba species are the causative agents of fatal granulomatous encephalitis in humans. Haematogenous spread is thought to be a primary step, followed by blood-brain barrier penetration, in the transmission of Acanthmaoeba into the central nervous system, but the associated molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the role of Src, a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase in the biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba. Amoebistatic and amoebicidal assays were performed by incubating amoeba in the presence of Src kinase-selective inhibitor, PP2 (4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine) and its inactive analog, PP3 (4-amino-7-phenylpyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine). Using this inhibitor, the role of Src kinase in A. castellanii interactions with Escherichia coli was determined. Zymographic assays were performed to study effects of Src kinase on extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. The human brain microvascular endothelial cells were used to determine the effects of Src kinase on A. castellanii adhesion to and cytotoxicity of host cells. Inhibition of Src kinase using a specific inhibitor, PP2 (4-amino-5-(4 chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo [3,4-d] pyrimidine) but not its inactive analog, PP3 (4-amino-7-phenylpyrazolo[3,4-d] pyrimidine), had detrimental effects on the growth of A. castellanii (keratitis isolate, belonging to the T4 genotype). Interestingly, inhibition of Src kinase hampered the phagocytic ability of A. castellanii, as measured by the uptake of non-invasive bacteria, but, on the contrary, invasion by pathogenic bacteria was enhanced. Zymographic assays revealed that inhibition of Src kinases reduced extracellular protease activities of A. castellanii. Src kinase inhibition had no significant effect on A. castellanii binding to and cytotoxicity of primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier. For the first time, these findings demonstrated that Src

  16. Ecohydrological role of biological soil crusts across a gradient in levels of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Kristen M.; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Duniway, Michael C.; Bradford, John B.; Reed, Sasha C.; Belnap, Jayne

    2017-01-01

    Though biological soil crusts (biocrusts) form abundant covers in arid and semiarid regions, their competing effects on soil hydrologic conditions are rarely accounted for in models. This study presents the modification of a soil water balance model to account for the presence of biocrusts at different levels of development (LOD) and their impact on one-dimensional hydrologic processes during warm and cold seasons. The model is developed, tested, and applied to study the hydrologic controls of biocrusts in context of a long-term manipulative experiment equipped with meteorological and soil moisture measurements in a Colorado Plateau ecosystem near Moab, Utah. The climate manipulation treatments resulted in distinct biocrust communities, and model performance with respect to soil moisture was assessed in experimental plots with varying LOD as quantified through a field-based roughness index (RI). Model calibration and testing yielded excellent comparisons to observations and smooth variations of biocrust parameters with RI approximated through simple regressions. The model was then used to quantify how LOD affects soil infiltration, evapotranspiration, and runoff under calibrated conditions and in simulation experiments with gradual modifications in biocrust porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Simulation results show that highly developed biocrusts modulate soil moisture nonlinearly with LOD by altering soil infiltration and buffering against evapotranspiration losses, with small impacts on runoff. The nonlinear and threshold variations of the soil water balance in the presence of biocrusts of varying LOD helps explain conflicting outcomes of various field studies and sheds light on the ecohydrological role of biocrusts in arid and semiarid ecosystems.

  17. Desensitization of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis fibroblasts to Alternaria alternata extract-mediated necrotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jintaek; Kim, Kyutae; Yhee, Ji Young; O'Grady, Scott M; Nho, Richard S

    2016-11-01

    Alternaria alternata is an allergenic fungus and known to cause an upper respiratory tract infection and asthma in humans with compromised immunity. Although A. alternata's effect on airway epithelial cells has previously been examined, the potential role of A. alternata on lung fibroblast viability is not understood. Since lung fibroblasts derived from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) display a distinct phenotype that is resistant to stress and cell death inducing conditions, the investigation of the role of Alternaria on pathological IPF fibroblasts provides a better understanding of the fibrotic process induced by an allergenic fungus. Therefore, we examined cell viability of control and IPF fibroblasts (n = 8 each) in response to A. alternata extract. Control fibroblast cell death was increased while IPF fibroblasts were resistant when exposed to 50-100 μg/mL of A. alternata extract. However, there was no significant difference in kinetics or magnitude of Ca 2+ responses from control lung and IPF fibroblasts. In contrast, unlike control fibroblasts, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels remained low when IPF cells were treated with A. alternata extracts as a function of time. Caspase 3/7 and TUNEL assay revealed that enhanced cell death caused by A. alternata extract was likely due to necrosis, and 7-AAD assay and the use of sodium pyruvate for ATP generation further supported our findings that IPF fibroblasts become resistant to A. alternata extract-induced necrotic cell death. Our results suggest that exposure to A. alternata potentially worsens the fibrotic process by promoting normal lung fibroblast cell death in patients with IPF. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  18. Myocyte-Fibroblast Communication in Cardiac Fibrosis and Arrhythmias: Mechanisms and Model Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellman, Jason; Zhang, Jing; Sheikh, Farah

    2016-01-01

    Development of cardiac fibrosis and arrhythmias is controlled by the activity of and communication between cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts in the heart. Myocyte-fibroblast interactions occur via both direct and indirect means including paracrine mediators, extracellular matrix interactions, electrical modulators, mechanical junctions, and membrane nanotubes. In the diseased heart, cardiomyocyte and fibroblast ratios and activity, and thus myocyte-fibroblast interactions, change and are thought to contribute to the course of disease including development of fibrosis and arrhythmogenic activity. Fibroblasts have a developing role in modulating cardiomyocyte electrical and hypertrophic activity, however gaps in knowledge regarding these interactions still exist. Research in this field has necessitated the development of unique approaches to isolate and control myocyte-fibroblast interactions. Numerous methods for 2D and 3D co-culture systems have been developed, while a growing part of this field is in the use of better tools for in vivo systems including cardiomyocyte and fibroblast specific Cre mouse lines for cell type specific genetic ablation. This review will focus on (i) mechanisms of myocyte-fibroblast communication and their effects on disease features such as cardiac fibrosis and arrhythmias as well as (ii) methods being used and currently developed in this field. PMID:26996756

  19. Disease and region-related cardiac fibroblast potassium current variations and potential functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Tung; Qi, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Hai; Naud, Patrice; Dawson, Kristin; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Harada, Masahide; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Nattel, Stanley

    2014-06-01

    Fibroblasts, which play an important role in cardiac function/dysfunction, including arrhythmogenesis, have voltage-dependent (Kv) currents of unknown importance. Here, we assessed the differential expression of Kv currents between atrial and ventricular fibroblasts from control dogs and dogs with an atrial arrhythmogenic substrate caused by congestive heart failure (CHF). Left atrial (LA) and ventricular (LV) fibroblasts were freshly isolated from control and CHF dogs (2-week ventricular tachypacing, 240 bpm). Kv currents were measured with whole-cell voltage-clamp, mRNA by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and fibroblast proliferation by (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Robust voltage-dependent tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive K(+) currents (IC50 ∼1 mM) were recorded. The morphologies and TEA responses of LA and LV fibroblast Kv currents were similar. LV fibroblast Kv-current densities were significantly greater than LA, and Kv-current densities were significantly less in CHF than control. The mRNA expression of Kv-channel subunits Kv1.5 and Kv4.3 was less in LA vs. LV fibroblasts and was down-regulated in CHF, consistent with K(+)-current recordings. Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-channel subunit (KCa1.1) mRNA and currents were less expressed in LV vs. LA fibroblasts. Inhibiting LA fibroblast K(+) current with 1 mmol/L of TEA or KCa1.1 current with paxilline increased proliferation. Fibroblast Kv-current expression is smaller in CHF vs. control, as well as LA vs. LV. KCa1.1 current is greater in LA vs. LV. Suppressing Kv current with TEA enhances fibroblast proliferation, suggesting that Kv current might act to check fibroblast proliferation and that reduced Kv current in CHF may contribute to fibrosis. Fibroblast Kv-current remodelling may play a role in the atrial fibrillation (AF) substrate; modulating fibroblast K(+) channels may present a novel strategy to prevent fibrosis and AF. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights

  20. AGE AND MULTIPLICATION OF FIBROBLASTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, A; Ebeling, A H

    1921-11-30

    Pure cultures of fibroblasts displayed marked differences in their activity in the plasma of young, middle aged, and old chickens. The rate of cell multiplication varied in inverse ratio to the age of the animal from which the plasma was taken. There was a definite relation between the age of the animal and the amount of new tissue produced in its plasma in a given time (Text-figs. 1 to 10). The chart obtained by plotting the rate of cell proliferation in ordinates, and the age of the animal in abscissae, showed that the rate of growth decreased more quickly than the age increased (Text-fig. 12). The decrease in the rate of growth was 50 per cent during the first 3 years of life, while in the following 6 years it was only 30 per cent. When the duration of the life of the cultures in the four plasmas was compared, a curve was obtained which showed about the same characteristics (Text-fig. 11). The duration of life of the fibroblasts in vitro varied in inverse ratio to the age of the animal, and decreased more quickly than the age increased. As the differences in the amount of new tissue produced in the plasma of young, middle aged, and old chickens were large, the growth of a pure culture of fibroblasts could be employed as a reagent for detecting certain changes occurring in the plasma under the influence of age. But the method possesses the necessary accuracy only when it is used as has already been described, and by technicians thoroughly trained in the details of its application. A comparative study of the growth of fibroblasts in media containing no serum, and serum under low and high concentrations, was made in order to ascertain whether the decreasing rate of cell multiplication was due to the loss of an accelerating factor, or to the increase See PDF for Structure of an inhibiting one. In high and low concentrations of the serum of young animals, no difference in the rate of multiplication of fibroblasts was observed. This showed that the serum of an

  1. Serum platelet-derived growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christine Vestergaard; Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Olsen, Dorte Aalund

    2012-01-01

    New biological markers with predictive or prognostic value are highly warranted in the treatment of ovarian cancer. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) system and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system are important components in tumor growth and angiogenesis.......New biological markers with predictive or prognostic value are highly warranted in the treatment of ovarian cancer. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) system and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system are important components in tumor growth and angiogenesis....

  2. Unconventional transport routes of soluble and membrane proteins and their role in developmental biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pompa, A.; De Marchis, F.; Pallotta, M. T.; Benitez-Alfonso, Y.; Jones, A.; Schipper, K.; Moreau, K.; Žárský, Viktor; Di Sansebastiano, G. P.; Bellucci, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 703. E-ISSN 1422-0067 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Autophagy * Exosomes * Intercellular channels * Leaderless proteins * Protein secretion * Trafficking mechanisms * Unconventional secretion Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology OBOR OECD: Developmental biology Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  3. Role of biology in the air–sea carbon flux in the Bay of Bengal and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A physical-biological-chemical model (PBCM)is used for investigating the seasonal cycle of air –sea carbon flux and for assessing the effect of the biological processes on seasonal time scale in the Arabian Sea (AS)and Bay of Bengal (BoB),where the surface waters are subjected to contrasting physical conditions.

  4. Role of biology in the air–sea carbon flux in the Bay of Bengal and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A physical-biological-chemical model (PBCM) is used for investigating the seasonal cycle of air–sea carbon flux and for assessing the effect of the biological processes on seasonal time scale in the Arabian Sea (AS) and Bay of Bengal (BoB), where the surface waters are subjected to contrasting physical conditions.

  5. Parenting Practices of Resident Fathers: The Role of Marital and Biological Ties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Lawrence M.; Carlson, Marcia J.; Bzostek, Sharon H.; Osborne, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2,098) to examine differences in the parenting practices of four types of resident fathers, defined by their biological relationship to a focal child and their marital status with regard to the focal child's mother. Regression results suggest that biological fathers and…

  6. Role of biology in the air–sea carbon flux in the Bay of Bengal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A physical-biological-chemical model (PBCM)is used for investigating the seasonal cycle of air –sea carbon flux and for assessing the effect of the biological processes on seasonal time scale in the Arabian Sea (AS)and Bay of Bengal (BoB),where the surface waters are subjected to contrasting physical conditions.

  7. The role of Ikaros transcriptional factor in normal hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis: biological and clinical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Vshivkoo

    2015-01-01

    , are the most significant features. These mutations of IKZF1 gene and Ikaros aberrant expression play a key role in the lymphoid transformation, tumor progression, and may cause development of leukemic cells chemoresistance. Therefore, IKZF1 aberrations should be taken into account as a valuable prognostic marker for risk groups stratification, poor outcome and low survival rare. This review compiles currently available data regarding the frequency and variants of the IKZF1 (Ikaros aberrations, and the use of them in diagnostics of all types of leukemia and minimal residual disease detection. Although Ikaros has already applied in clinical studies, a growing number of questions  still remain unanswered. Molecular biology of IKZF1 expression and splicing regulation is not well understood. Clinical value of point mutations and subclonal deletion in IKZF1 locus should be elucidated. Prognostic significance of intragenic deletions and aberrant splicing is necessary to clarify for different groups of ALL patients, in connection with other genetic markers and therapy protocol. More detailed clinical analysis required for proving IKZF1 impact on probability of relapse, improving patients, risk stratification and application of minimal residual disease.

  8. Actin dynamics in mouse fibroblasts in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moes, Maarten J. A.; Bijvelt, Jose J.; Boonstra, Johannes

    2007-09-01

    After stimulating with the growth factor PDGF, cells exhibit abundant membrane ruffling and other morphological changes under normal gravity conditions. These morphological changes are largely determined by the actin microfilament system. Now these actin dynamics were studied under microgravity conditions in mouse fibroblasts during the DELTA mission. The aim of the present study was to describe the actin morphology in detail, to establish the effect of PDGF on actin morphology and to study the role of several actin-interacting proteins involved in introduced actin dynamics in microgravity. Identical experiments were conducted at 1G on earth as a reference. No results in microgravity were obtained due to a combination of malfunctioning hardware and unfulfilled temperature requirements.

  9. Fibroblast activation protein-α, a stromal cell surface protease, shapes key features of cancer associated fibroblasts through proteome and degradome alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczorowska, M M; Tholen, S; Bucher, F; Lutz, L; Kizhakkedathu, J N; De Wever, O; Wellner, U F; Biniossek, M L; Stahl, A; Lassmann, S; Schilling, O

    2016-01-01

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) constitute an abundant stromal component of most solid tumors. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) α is a cell surface protease that is expressed by CAFs. We corroborate this expression profile by immunohistochemical analysis of colorectal cancer specimens. To better understand the tumor-contextual role of FAPα, we investigate how FAPα shapes functional and proteomic features of CAFs using loss- and gain-of function cellular model systems. FAPα activity has a strong impact on the secreted CAF proteome ("secretome"), including reduced levels of anti-angiogenic factors, elevated levels of transforming growth factor (TGF) β, and an impact on matrix processing enzymes. Functionally, FAPα mildly induces sprout formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Moreover, loss of FAPα leads to a more epithelial cellular phenotype and this effect was rescued by exogenous application of TGFβ. In collagen contraction assays, FAPα induced a more contractile cellular phenotype. To characterize the proteolytic profile of FAPα, we investigated its specificity with proteome-derived peptide libraries and corroborated its preference for cleavage carboxy-terminal to proline residues. By "terminal amine labeling of substrates" (TAILS) we explored FAPα-dependent cleavage events. Although FAPα acts predominantly as an amino-dipeptidase, putative FAPα cleavage sites in collagens are present throughout the entire protein length. In contrast, putative FAPα cleavage sites in non-collagenous proteins cluster at the amino-terminus. The degradomic study highlights cell-contextual proteolysis by FAPα with distinct positional profiles. Generally, our findings link FAPα to key aspects of CAF biology and attribute an important role in tumor-stroma interaction to FAPα. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Apoptosis-Like Cell Death Induction and Aberrant Fibroblast Properties in Human Incisional Hernia Fascia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Ramon; Quiles, Maria T.; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Lopez-Cano, Manuel; Huguet, Pere; Ramon-y-Cajal, Santiago; Reventos, Jaume; Armengol, Manel; Arbos, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Incisional hernia often occurs following laparotomy and can be a source of serious problems. Although there is evidence that a biological cause may underlie its development, the mechanistic link between the local tissue microenvironment and tissue rupture is lacking. In this study, we used matched tissue-based and in vitro primary cell culture systems to examine the possible involvement of fascia fibroblasts in incisional hernia pathogenesis. Fascia biopsies were collected at surgery from incisional hernia patients and non-incisional hernia controls. Tissue samples were analyzed by histology and immunoblotting methods. Fascia primary fibroblast cultures were assessed at morphological, ultrastructural, and functional levels. We document tissue and fibroblast loss coupled to caspase-3 activation and induction of apoptosis-like cell-death mechanisms in incisional hernia fascia. Alterations in cytoskeleton organization and solubility were also observed. Incisional hernia fibroblasts showed a consistent phenotype throughout early passages in vitro, which was characterized by significantly enhanced cell proliferation and migration, reduced adhesion, and altered cytoskeleton properties, as compared to non-incisional hernia fibroblasts. Moreover, incisional hernia fibroblasts displayed morphological and ultrastructural alterations compatible with autophagic processes or lysosomal dysfunction, together with enhanced sensitivity to proapoptotic challenges. Overall, these data suggest an ongoing complex interplay of cell death induction, aberrant fibroblast function, and tissue loss in incisional hernia fascia, which may significantly contribute to altered matrix maintenance and tissue rupture in vivo. PMID:21641387

  11. The role of mechanics in biological and bio-inspired systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Paul; Sinko, Robert; LeDuc, Philip R; Keten, Sinan

    2015-07-06

    Natural systems frequently exploit intricate multiscale and multiphasic structures to achieve functionalities beyond those of man-made systems. Although understanding the chemical make-up of these systems is essential, the passive and active mechanics within biological systems are crucial when considering the many natural systems that achieve advanced properties, such as high strength-to-weight ratios and stimuli-responsive adaptability. Discovering how and why biological systems attain these desirable mechanical functionalities often reveals principles that inform new synthetic designs based on biological systems. Such approaches have traditionally found success in medical applications, and are now informing breakthroughs in diverse frontiers of science and engineering.

  12. Effect of eosinophils activated with Alternaria on the production of extracellular matrix from nasal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung-Heon; Ye, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Sung-Yong; Kim, Yee-Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Eosinophils and fibroblasts are known to play major roles in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps. Fungi are commonly found in nasal secretion and are associated with airway inflammation. To investigate whether activated eosinophils by airborne fungi can influence the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) from nasal fibroblasts. Inferior turbinate and nasal polyp fibroblasts were stimulated with Alternaria or Aspergillus, respectively, for 24 hours and ECM messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were measured. Eosinophils isolated from healthy volunteers were stimulated with Alternaria or Aspergillus for 4 hours then superoxide, eosinophil peroxidase, and transforming growth factor β1 were measured. Then activated eosinophils were cocultured with nasal fibroblasts for 24 hours, and ECM mRNA expressions were measured. Alternaria strongly enhanced ECM mRNA expression and protein production from nasal fibroblasts. Alternaria also induced the production of superoxide, eosinophil peroxidase, and transforming growth factor β1 from eosinophils, and activated eosinophils enhanced ECM mRNA expression when they were cocultured without the Transwell insert system. Eosinophils activated with Alternaria enhanced ECM mRNA expression from nasal polyp fibroblasts. Alternaria plays an important role in tissue fibrosis in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps by directly or indirectly influencing the production of ECM from nasal fibroblasts. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian’an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna AE; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A; Nyholt, Dale R; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E Warwick; De Jong, Pim A; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex SF; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.; Groves, Christopher J; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K; Hillege, Hans L; Hlatky, Mark A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Åsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L; McKenzie, Colin A; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Morken, Mario A; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Nöthen, Markus M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor VA; Vermeulen, Sita H; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gejman, Pablo V; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W; Hall, Alistair S; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hindorff, Lucia A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John JP; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela AF; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Andrew D; Morris, Andrew P; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, DC; Rice, Treva K; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter EH; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Chambers, John C; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooper, Richard S; de Bakker, Paul IW; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin NA; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Inês; Fox, Caroline S; North, Kari E; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; McCarthy, Mark I; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J; Price, Alkes L.; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth JF; Weedon, Michael N; Ingelsson, Erik; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Chasman, Daniel I; Goddard, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explain one-fifth of heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ~2,000, ~3,700 and ~9,500 SNPs explained ~21%, ~24% and ~29% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured the majority (60%) of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423 loci enriched for genes, pathways, and tissue-types known to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/beta-catenin, and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR, osteoglycin and binding of hyaluronic acid. Our results indicate a genetic architecture for human height that is characterized by a very large but finite number (thousands) of causal variants. PMID:25282103

  14. Functional profiles reveal unique ecological roles of various biological soil crust organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M.A.; Mau, R.L.; Maestre, F.T.; Escolar, C.; Castillo-Monroy, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    1. At the heart of the body of research on biodiversity effects on ecosystem function is the debate over whether different species tend to be functionally singular or redundant. When we consider ecosystem multi-function, the provision of multiple ecosystem functions simultaneously, we may find that seemingly redundant species may in fact play unique roles in ecosystems. 2. Over the last few decades, the significance of biological soil crusts (BSCs) as ecological boundaries and ecosystem engineers, and their multi-functional nature, has become increasingly well documented. We compiled 'functional profiles' of the organisms in this understudied community, to determine whether functional singularity emerges when multiple ecosystem functions are considered. 3. In two data sets, one representing multiple sites around the semi-arid regions of Spain (regional scale), and another from a single site in central Spain (local scale), we examined correlations between the abundance or frequency of BSC species in a community, and multiple surrogates of ecosystem functioning. There was a wide array of apparent effects of species on specific functions. 4. Notably, in gypsiferous soils and at regional scale, we found that indicators of carbon (C) and phosphorus cycling were apparently suppressed and promoted by the lichens Diploschistes diacapsis and Squamarina lentigera, respectively. The moss Pleurochaete squarrosa appears to promote C cycling in calcareous soils at this spatial scale. At the local scale in gypsiferous soils, D. diacapsis positively correlated with carbon cycling, but negatively with nitrogen cycling, whereas numerous lichens exhibited the opposite profile. 5. We found a high degree of functional singularity, i.e. that species were highly individualistic in their effects on multiple functions. Many functional attributes were not easily predictable from existing functional grouping systems based primarily on morphology. 6. Our results suggest that maintaining

  15. miR-29a-3p attenuates hypoxic pulmonary hypertension by inhibiting pulmonary adventitial fibroblast activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying; Dong, Hai-Ying; Zhang, Bo; Feng, Zhao; Liu, Yi; Gao, Yu-Qi; Dong, Ming-Qing; Li, Zhi-Chao

    2015-02-01

    Activation of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts plays a key role in the pulmonary vascular remodeling in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Previous studies showed that miRNAs participated in the regulation of fibroblast activation. This study explored the role of miR-29 in the activation of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts and the therapeutic potential in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. We found that hypoxia-induced pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts activation was accompanied with a drastic decrease of miR-29a-3p expression. Knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α or Smad3 reversed the hypoxia-induced decrease of miR-29-3p in cultured pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts. In vitro, miR-29a-3p mimic inhibited the hypoxia-induced proliferation, migration, and secretion of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts, suppressed the hypoxia-induced expression of α-smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix collagen in pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts; however, miR-29a-3p inhibitor mimicked the effect of hypoxia on the activation of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts. Further studies revealed that preventative or therapeutic administration of miR-29a-3p significantly decreased pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricle hypertrophy index and ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension rats. These findings suggest that miR-29a-3p regulates the activation and phenotype of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts in hypoxia and has preventative and therapeutic potential in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Current perspectives and challenges in understanding the role of nitrite as an integral player in nitric oxide biology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitturi, Dario A; Patel, Rakesh P

    2011-08-15

    Beyond an inert oxidation product of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, current thinking posits a key role for nitrite as a mediator of NO signaling, especially during hypoxia. This concept has been discussed in the context of nitrite serving a role as an endogenous modulator of NO homeostasis, but also from a novel clinical perspective whereby nitrite therapy may replenish NO signaling and prevent ischemic tissue injury. Indeed, the relatively rapid translation of studies delineating mechanisms of action to ongoing and planned clinical trials has been critical in fuelling interest in nitrite biology, and several excellent reviews have been written on this topic. In this article we limit our discussions to current concepts and what we feel are questions that remain unanswered within the paradigm of nitrite being a mediator of NO biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding the Biological Roles of Pectins in Plants through Physiological and Functional Characterizations of Plant and Fungal Mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranne, Maria

    polysaccharides and consist of backbones rich in galacturonic acids, which are decorated with a range of functional groups including acetyl esters and arabinan sidechains. Although much effort has been made to uncover biological functions of pectins in plants and remarkable progresses have taken place, many...... aspects remain elusive. Studies described in this thesis aimed at gaining new insights into the biological roles of pectin acetylation and arabinosylation in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The thesis consists of four chapters: physiological characterization of cell wall mutants affected in cell......-degrading enzyme secreted by B. cinerea during infection of plants (Chapter 5). The results described resulted in valuable new knowledge regarding the role of pectin acetylation and arabinosylation in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana documented in three published research papers, one manuscript and one...

  18. Autotaxin: Its Role in Biology of Melanoma Cells and as a Pharmacological Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Jankowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autotaxin (ATX is an extracellular lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD released from normal cells and cancer cells. Activity of ATX is detected in various biological fluids. The lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is the main product of ATX. LPA acting through specific G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-LPA6 affects immunological response, normal development, and malignant tumors' formation and progression. In this review, the impact of autotoxin on biology of melanoma cells and potential treatment is discussed.

  19. On Beyond Star Trek, the Role of Synthetic Biology in Nasa's Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    The time has come to for NASA to exploit the nascent field of synthetic biology in pursuit of its mission, including aeronautics, earth science, astrobiology and notably, human exploration. Conversely, NASA advances the fundamental technology of synthetic biology as no one else can because of its unique expertise in the origin of life and life in extreme environments, including the potential for alternate life forms. This enables unique, creative "game changing" advances. NASA's requirement for minimizing upmass in flight will also drive the field toward miniaturization and automation. These drivers will greatly increase the utility of synthetic biology solutions for military, health in remote areas and commercial purposes. To this end, we have begun a program at NASA to explore the use of synthetic biology in NASA's missions, particularly space exploration. As part of this program, we began hosting an iGEM team of undergraduates drawn from Brown and Stanford Universities to conduct synthetic biology research at NASA Ames Research Center. The 2011 team (http://2011.igem.org/Team:Brown-Stanford) produced an award-winning project on using synthetic biology as a basis for a human Mars settlement and the 2012 team has expanded the use of synthetic biology to estimate the potential for life in the clouds of other planets (http://2012.igem.org/Team:Stanford-Brown; http://www.calacademy.org/sciencetoday/igem-competition/). More recent projects from the Stanford-Brown team have expanded our ideas of how synthetic biology can aid NASA's missions from "Synthetic BioCommunication" (http://2013.igem.org/Team:Stanford-Brown) to a "Biodegradable UAS (drone)" in collaboration with Spelman College (http://2014.igem.org/Team:StanfordBrownSpelman#SBS%20iGEM) and most recently, "Self-Folding Origami" (http://2015.igem.org/Team:Stanford-Brown), the winner of the 2015 award for Manufacturing.

  20. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  1. BIOLOGICAL ROLE AND TOXIC INFLUENCE OF MOLYBDENUM IN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS (A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І. Hrytsyniak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The consequence of human impact of the ecosystems of water bodies are as a rule the input of xenobiotics of various natures or the excess of the natural level of biogenic trace elements that ultimately leads to negative changes in the structure of aquatic biota communities, disturbances of vital activity processes of some flora and fauna species. The consequences of these processes are presented as a reduction in the productivity of water bodies, impoverishment of their species variety, and subsequently as an unsuitability of water bodies for fisheries related activities. Study, analysis and generalization of information concerning the pathways of toxicants input into water bodies, their behavior in hydroecosystems, possible effects on aquatic organisms of different trophic levels have an important theoretical and practical value. Behavioral, physiological, biochemical, cytological, histological and genetic reactions can serve as a basis for the adoption of necessary measures aimed at improving the ecological state of water bodies or preventing and avoiding potential hazards to aquatic populations. The aim of this work is an analysis and synthesis of the available literature data about the role of a relatively poorly studied trace element molybdenum in hydroecosystems, its biological importance and toxic effect for aquatic organisms. Findings. The data containing in the article were obtained based on reviewing existing publications of domestic and foreign authors. In particular, they describe hydrochemical properties of molybdenum and its compounds, possible sources of input into water bodies, pathways of element migration. A brief description of the identification and control methods for the element content in aquatic environment is presented. Biophilic properties of molybdenum for aquatic flora and fauna as well as the impact on their productive parameters are described. The data regarding the bioaccumulation potential of molybdenum

  2. Fibroblast inward-rectifier potassium current upregulation in profibrillatory atrial remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Hai; Ordog, Balazs; Luo, Xiaobin; Naud, Patrice; Sun, Yiguo; Wu, Chia-Tung; Dawson, Kristin; Tadevosyan, Artavazd; Chen, Yu; Harada, Masahide; Dobrev, Dobromir; Nattel, Stanley

    2015-02-27

    Fibroblasts are involved in cardiac arrhythmogenesis and contribute to the atrial fibrillation substrate in congestive heart failure (CHF) by generating tissue fibrosis. Fibroblasts display robust ion currents, but their functional importance is poorly understood. To characterize atrial fibroblast inward-rectifier K(+) current (IK1) remodeling in CHF and its effects on fibroblast properties. Freshly isolated left atrial fibroblasts were obtained from controls and dogs with CHF (ventricular tachypacing). Patch clamp was used to record resting membrane potential (RMP) and IK1. RMP was significantly increased by CHF (from -43.2±0.8 mV, control, to -55.5±0.9 mV). CHF upregulated IK1 (eg, at -90 mV from -1.1±0.2 to -2.7±0.5 pA/pF) and increased the expression of KCNJ2 mRNA (by 52%) and protein (by 80%). Ba(2+) (300 μmol/L) decreased the RMP and suppressed the RMP difference between controls and dogs with CHF. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (Fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester) and fibroblast proliferation (flow cytometry) were enhanced by CHF. Lentivirus-mediated overexpression of KCNJ2 enhanced IK1 and hyperpolarized fibroblasts. Functional KCNJ2 suppression by lentivirus-mediated expression of a dominant negative KCNJ2 construct suppressed IK1 and depolarized RMP. Overexpression of KCNJ2 increased Ca(2+) entry and fibroblast proliferation, whereas the dominant negative KCNJ2 construct had opposite effects. Fibroblast hyperpolarization to mimic CHF effects on RMP enhanced the Ca(2+) entry. MicroRNA-26a, which targets KCNJ2, was downregulated in CHF fibroblasts. Knockdown of endogenous microRNA-26 to mimic CHF effects unregulated IK1. CHF upregulates fibroblast KCNJ2 expression and currents, thereby hyperpolarizing RMP, increasing Ca(2+) entry, and enhancing atrial fibroblast proliferation. These effects are likely mediated by microRNA-26a downregulation. Remodeling-induced fibroblast KCNJ2 expression changes may play a role in atrial fibrillation promoting fibroblast

  3. Effects of chlorhexidine, essential oils and herbal medicines (Salvia, Chamomile, Calendula) on human fibroblast in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaniak, Paulina; Szkaradkiewicz, Anna; Jankun, Jerzy; Kotwicka, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Antiseptic rinses have been successfully used in inflammatory states of the gums and oral cavity mucosa. Antibacterial effects of chlorhexidine, essential oils and some herbs are well documented. Reaction of host tissue to these substances has much poorer documentation. The aim of the study was to analyse the influence of chlorhexidine (CHX), essential oil (EO: thymol, 0.064%; eucalyptol, 0.092%; methyl salicylate, 0.060%; menthol, 0.042%) mouth rinses and salvia, chamomile and calendula brews on fibroblast biology in vitro. The human fibroblast CCD16 line cells were cultured in incubation media which contained the examined substances. After 24 and 48 hours, the cell morphology, relative growth and apoptosis were evaluated. Exposure of fibroblasts to CHX, EO or salvia caused various changes in cell morphology. Cells cultured for 48 hours with CHX revealed a noticeably elongated shape of while cells cultured in high EO concentration or with salvia were considerably smaller and contracted with fewer projections. Chlorhexidine, EO and salvia reduced the fibroblast proliferation rate and stimulated cell death. Both reactions to EO were dose dependent. Cells exposure to chamomile or calendula brews did not change morphology or proliferation of fibroblasts. The results of this in vitro study showed that in contrast to chamomile and calendula, the brews of EO, CHX or salvia had a negative influence on fibroblast biology. PMID:27536196

  4. The Living Scar – Cardiac Fibroblasts and the Injured Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Norris, Russell A; Kohl, Peter; Markwald, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac scars, often perceived as “dead” tissue, are very much alive, with heterocellular activity ensuring the maintenance of structural and mechanical integrity following heart injury. To form a scar, non-myocytes such as fibroblasts, proliferate and are recruited from intra- and extra-cardiac sources. Fibroblasts perform important autocrine and paracrine signalling functions. They also establish mechanical and, as is increasingly evident, electrical junctions with other cells. While fibroblasts were previously thought to act simply as electrical insulators, they may be electrically connected among themselves and, under certain circumstances, to other cells, including cardiomyocytes. A better understanding of these interactions will help target scar structure and function and facilitate the development of novel therapies aimed at modifying scar properties for patient benefit. This review explores available insight and recent concepts on fibroblast integration in the heart, and highlights potential avenues for harnessing their roles to optimise scar function following heart injury such as infarction, and therapeutic interventions such as ablation. PMID:26776094

  5. System-Wide Analysis Reveals a Complex Network of Tumor-Fibroblast Interactions Involved in Tumorigenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Megha; Li, Jinyu; Egeblad, Mikala; Powers, R. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Many fibroblast-secreted proteins promote tumorigenicity, and several factors secreted by cancer cells have in turn been proposed to induce these proteins. It is not clear whether there are single dominant pathways underlying these interactions or whether they involve multiple pathways acting in parallel. Here, we identified 42 fibroblast-secreted factors induced by breast cancer cells using comparative genomic analysis. To determine what fraction was active in promoting tumorigenicity, we chose five representative fibroblast-secreted factors for in vivo analysis. We found that the majority (three out of five) played equally major roles in promoting tumorigenicity, and intriguingly, each one had distinct effects on the tumor microenvironment. Specifically, fibroblast-secreted amphiregulin promoted breast cancer cell survival, whereas the chemokine CCL7 stimulated tumor cell proliferation while CCL2 promoted innate immune cell infiltration and angiogenesis. The other two factors tested had minor (CCL8) or minimally (STC1) significant effects on the ability of fibroblasts to promote tumor growth. The importance of parallel interactions between fibroblasts and cancer cells was tested by simultaneously targeting fibroblast-secreted amphiregulin and the CCL7 receptor on cancer cells, and this was significantly more efficacious than blocking either pathway alone. We further explored the concept of parallel interactions by testing the extent to which induction of critical fibroblast-secreted proteins could be achieved by single, previously identified, factors produced by breast cancer cells. We found that although single factors could induce a subset of genes, even combinations of factors failed to induce the full repertoire of functionally important fibroblast-secreted proteins. Together, these results delineate a complex network of tumor-fibroblast interactions that act in parallel to promote tumorigenicity and suggest that effective anti-stromal therapeutic strategies

  6. Identification of a transitional fibroblast function in very early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filer, Andrew; Ward, Lewis S C; Kemble, Samuel; Davies, Christopher S; Munir, Hafsa; Rogers, Rebekah; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher Dominic; Nash, Gerard B; McGettrick, Helen M

    2017-12-01

    Synovial fibroblasts actively regulate the inflammatory infiltrate by communicating with neighbouring endothelial cells (EC). Surprisingly, little is known about how the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) alters these immunomodulatory properties. We examined the effects of phase of RA and disease outcome (resolving vs persistence) on fibroblast crosstalk with EC and regulation of lymphocyte recruitment. Fibroblasts were isolated from patients without synovitis, with resolving arthritis, very early RA (VeRA; symptom ≤12 weeks) and established RA undergoing joint replacement (JRep) surgery. Endothelial-fibroblast cocultures were formed on opposite sides of porous filters. Lymphocyte adhesion from flow, secretion of soluble mediators and interleukin 6 (IL-6) signalling were assessed. Fibroblasts from non-inflamed and resolving arthritis were immunosuppressive, inhibiting lymphocyte recruitment to cytokine-treated endothelium. This effect was lost very early in the development of RA, such that fibroblasts no longer suppressed recruitment. Changes in IL-6 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β 1 ) signalling appeared critical for the loss of the immunosuppressive phenotype. In the absence of exogenous cytokines, JRep, but not VeRA, fibroblasts activated endothelium to support lymphocyte. In RA, fibroblasts undergo two distinct changes in function: first a loss of immunosuppressive responses early in disease development, followed by the later acquisition of a stimulatory phenotype. Fibroblasts exhibit a transitional functional phenotype during the first 3 months of symptoms that contributes to the accumulation of persistent infiltrates. Finally, the role of IL-6 and TGF-β 1 changes from immunosuppressive in resolving arthritis to stimulatory very early in the development of RA. Early interventions targeting 'pathogenic' fibroblasts may be required in order to restore protective regulatory processes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless

  7. Emdogain-regulated gene expression in palatal fibroblasts requires TGF-βRI kinase signaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Stähli, Alexandra Beatrice; Bosshardt, Dieter; Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide microarrays have suggested that Emdogain regulates TGF-β target genes in gingival and palatal fibroblasts. However, definitive support for this contention and the extent to which TGF-β signaling contributes to the effects of Emdogain has remained elusive. We therefore studied the role of the TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI) kinase to mediate the effect of Emdogain on palatal fibroblasts. Palatal fibroblasts were exposed to Emdogain with and without the inhibitor for TGF-βRI kinase, SB43...

  8. LXA{sub 4} actions direct fibroblast function and wound closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Bruno S. [Department of Applied Oral Sciences, Center for Periodontology, The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Microbiology Branch, US Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, TX (United States); Kantarci, Alpdogan; Zarrough, Ahmed; Hasturk, Hatice [Department of Applied Oral Sciences, Center for Periodontology, The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Leung, Kai P., E-mail: kai.p.leung.civ@mail.mil [Microbiology Branch, US Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, TX (United States); Van Dyke, Thomas E., E-mail: tvandyke@forsyth.org [Department of Applied Oral Sciences, Center for Periodontology, The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-09-04

    Timely resolution of inflammation is crucial for normal wound healing. Resolution of inflammation is an active biological process regulated by specialized lipid mediators including the lipoxins and resolvins. Failure of resolution activity has a major negative impact on wound healing in chronic inflammatory diseases that is manifest as excess fibrosis and scarring. Lipoxins, including Lipoxin A{sub 4} (LXA{sub 4}), have known anti-fibrotic and anti-scarring properties. The goal of this study was to elucidate the impact of LXA{sub 4} on fibroblast function. Mouse fibroblasts (3T3 Mus musculus Swiss) were cultured for 72 h in the presence of TGF-β1, to induce fibroblast activation. The impact of exogenous TGF-β1 (1 ng/mL) on LXA{sub 4} receptor expression (ALX/FPR2) was determined by flow cytometry. Fibroblast proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling and migration in a “scratch” assay wound model. Expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen types I and III were measured by Western blot. We observed that TGF-β1 up-regulates LXA{sub 4} receptor expression, enhances fibroblast proliferation, migration and scratch wound closure. α-SMA levels and Collagen type I and III deposition were also enhanced. LXA{sub 4} slowed fibroblast migration and scratch wound closure at early time points (24 h), but wound closure was equal to TGF-β1 alone at 48 and 72 h. LXA{sub 4} tended to slow fibroblast proliferation at both concentrations, but had no impact on α-SMA or collagen production by TGF-β1 stimulated fibroblasts. The generalizability of the actions of resolution molecules was examined in experiments repeated with resolvin D2 (RvD2) as the agonist. The activity of RvD2 mimicked the actions of LXA{sub 4} in all assays, through an as yet unidentified receptor. The results suggest that mediators of resolution of inflammation enhance wound healing and limit fibrosis in part by modulating fibroblast function. - Highlights: • TGF

  9. Human skeletal muscle fibroblasts stimulate in vitro myogenesis and in vivo muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Abigail L; Magnan, Mélanie; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Kjaer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Accumulation of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix is an unfavourable characteristic of many muscle diseases, muscle injury and sarcopenia. The extent of cross-talk between fibroblasts, as the source of matrix protein, and satellite cells in humans is unknown. We studied this in human muscle biopsies and cell-culture studies. We observed a strong stimulation of myogenesis by human fibroblasts in cell culture. In biopsies collected 30 days after a muscle injury protocol, fibroblast number increased to four times control levels, where fibroblasts were found to be preferentially located immediately surrounding regenerating muscle fibres. These novel findings indicate an important role for fibroblasts in supporting the regeneration of muscle fibres, potentially through direct stimulation of satellite cell differentiation and fusion, and contribute to understanding of cell-cell cross-talk during physiological and pathological muscle remodelling. Accumulation of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix is an unfavourable characteristic of many muscle diseases, muscle injury and sarcopenia. In addition to the indispensable role satellite cells play in muscle regeneration, there is emerging evidence in rodents for a regulatory influence on fibroblast activity. However, the influence of fibroblasts on satellite cells and muscle regeneration in humans is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate this in vitro and during in vivo regeneration in humans. Following a muscle injury protocol in young healthy men (n = 7), the number of fibroblasts (TCF7L2+), satellite cells (Pax7+), differentiating myogenic cells (myogenin+) and regenerating fibres (neonatal/embryonic myosin+) was determined from biopsy cross-sections. Fibroblasts and myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) were also isolated from human skeletal muscle (n = 4) and co-cultured using different cell ratios, with the two cell populations either in direct contact with each other or separated by a permeable

  10. The role of evolutionary biology in research and control of liver flukes in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaubard, Pierre; Sripa, Banchob; Mallory, Frank F; Wilcox, Bruce A

    2016-09-01

    Stimulated largely by the availability of new technology, biomedical research at the molecular-level and chemical-based control approaches arguably dominate the field of infectious diseases. Along with this, the proximate view of disease etiology predominates to the exclusion of the ultimate, evolutionary biology-based, causation perspective. Yet, historically and up to today, research in evolutionary biology has provided much of the foundation for understanding the mechanisms underlying disease transmission dynamics, virulence, and the design of effective integrated control strategies. Here we review the state of knowledge regarding the biology of Asian liver Fluke-host relationship, parasitology, phylodynamics, drug-based interventions and liver Fluke-related cancer etiology from an evolutionary biology perspective. We consider how evolutionary principles, mechanisms and research methods could help refine our understanding of clinical disease associated with infection by Liver Flukes as well as their transmission dynamics. We identify a series of questions for an evolutionary biology research agenda for the liver Fluke that should contribute to an increased understanding of liver Fluke-associated diseases. Finally, we describe an integrative evolutionary medicine approach to liver Fluke prevention and control highlighting the need to better contextualize interventions within a broader human health and sustainable development framework. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The role and future of in-vitro isotopic techniques in molecular biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dar, L.; Khan, B.K.

    2004-01-01

    In this review we discuss isotopic in-vitro molecular biology techniques, and their advantages and applications. Isotopic methods have helped to shape molecular biology since its early days. Despite the availability of non-isotopic alternatives, isotopic methods continue to be used in molecular biology due to certain advantages, especially related to sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. Numerous techniques involving the use of isotopes help in the characterization of genes, including the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or mutations. Other isotopic molecular methods are utilized to study the phenotypic expression of gene sequences and their mutation. Emerging branches of molecular biology like functional genomics and proteomics are extremely important for exploiting the rapidly growing data derived from whole genomic sequencing of human and microbial genomes. Recent molecular biology applications like the high-throughput array techniques are relevant in the context of both structural and functional genomics. In proteomics, stable isotope based technology has found applications in the analysis of protein structure and interactions. (author)

  12. SIRT-1 regulates TGF-β-induced dermal fibroblast migration via modulation of Cyr61 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eun-Jeong; Park, Eun-Jung; Yu, Hyeran; Huh, Jung-Sik; Kim, Jinseok; Cho, Moonjae

    2018-05-01

    SIRT1 is a NAD-dependent protein deacetylase that participates in cellular regulation. The increased migration of fibroblasts is an important phenotype in fibroblast activation. The role of SIRT1 in cell migration remains controversial as to whether SIRT1 acts as an activator or suppressor of cell migration. Therefore, we have established the role of SIRT1 in the migration of human dermal fibroblasts and explored targets of SIRT1 during dermal fibroblast migration. SIRT1 and Cyr61 were expressed in human dermal fibroblasts and the stimulation with TGF-β further induced their expression. Treatment with resveratrol (RSV), a SIRT1 agonist, or overexpression of SIRT1 also promoted the expression Cyr61 in human dermal fibroblasts, whereas the inhibition of SIRT1 activity by nicotinamide or knockdown of SIRT1 decreased the level of Cyr61, as well as TGF-β or RSV-induced Cyr61 expression. Blocking of ERK signaling by PD98509 reduced the expression of Cyr61 induced by TGF-β or RSV. TGF-β, RSV, or SIRT1 overexpression enhanced β-catenin as well as Cyr61 expression. This stimulation was reduced by the Wnt inhibitor XAV939. RSV increased migration and nicotinamide attenuated RSV-induced migration of human dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, SIRT1 overexpression promoted cell migration, whereas blocking Cyr61 attenuated SIRT1-stimulated migration of human dermal fibroblasts. SIRT1 increased cell migration by stimulating Cyr61 expression and the ERK and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. SIRT1-induced Cyr61 activity is very important for human dermal fibroblasts migration.

  13. EB1 is required for primary cilia assembly in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Jacob M; Schneider, Linda; Christensen, Søren T

    2007-01-01

    EB1 is a small microtubule (MT)-binding protein that associates preferentially with MT plus ends and plays a role in regulating MT dynamics. EB1 also targets other MT-associated proteins to the plus end and thereby regulates interactions of MTs with the cell cortex, mitotic kinetochores, and diff...... that localization of EB1 at the centriole/basal body is required for primary cilia assembly in fibroblasts....

  14. The role of socioscientific issues in biology teaching – from the perspective of teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Sofie; Nielsen, Jan Alexis

    2017-01-01

    documented that a range of challenges hinders the uptake of socioscientific issues. In this study we investigated the interpretation and implementation of socioscientific issues among Danish biology teachers – who teach in a curriculum that, on paper, is permeated by socioscientific issues. We conducted five...... harbour a content-centred interpretation of socioscientific issues which manifests itself in at least three separate ways. First, the teachers generally use socioscientific issues as a means to an end of teaching factual biological content. Second, the teachers had a clear emphasis on mastery of factual...... content in their assessment practices. Third, the teachers tended to reduce socioscientific issues (e.g. should we allow GMOs) to specific biological contents (DNA) in a way that does not seem to allow students to engage with the real socioscientific issue. Our findings are particularly significant...

  15. The emerging role of systems biology for engineering protein production in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chih-Chung; Chiang, Austin Wt; Shamie, Isaac; Samoudi, Mojtaba; Gutierrez, Jahir M; Lewis, Nathan E

    2017-12-06

    To meet the ever-growing demand for effective, safe, and affordable protein therapeutics, decades of intense efforts have aimed to maximize the quantity and quality of recombinant proteins produced in CHO cells. Bioprocessing innovations and cell engineering efforts have improved product titer; however, uncharacterized cellular processes and gene regulatory mechanisms still hinder cell growth, specific productivity, and protein quality. Herein, we summarize recent advances in systems biology and data-driven approaches aiming to unravel how molecular pathways, cellular processes, and extrinsic factors (e.g. media supplementation) influence recombinant protein production. In particular, as the available omics data for CHO cells continue to grow, predictive models and screens will be increasingly used to unravel the biological drivers of protein production, which can be used with emerging genome editing technologies to rationally engineer cells to further control the quantity, quality and affordability of many biologic drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A role for biological optimization within the current treatment planning paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: Biological optimization using complication probability models in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning has tremendous potential for reducing radiation-induced toxicity. Nevertheless, biological optimization is almost never clinically utilized, probably because of clinician confidence in, and familiarity with, physical dose-volume constraints. The method proposed here incorporates biological optimization after dose-volume constrained optimization so as to improve the dose distribution without detrimentally affecting the important reductions achieved by dose-volume optimization (DVO). Methods: Following DVO, the clinician/planner first identifies ''fixed points'' on the target and organ-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume histograms. These points represent important DVO plan qualities that are not to be violated within a specified tolerance. Biological optimization then maximally reduces a biological metric (illustrated with equivalent uniform dose (EUD) in this work) while keeping the fixed dose-volume points within tolerance limits, as follows. Incremental fluence adjustments are computed and applied to incrementally reduce the OAR EUDs while approximately maintaining the fixed points. This process of incremental fluence adjustment is iterated until the fixed points exceed tolerance. At this juncture, remedial fluence adjustments are computed and iteratively applied to bring the fixed points back within tolerance, without increasing OAR EUDs. This process of EUD reduction followed by fixed-point correction is repeated until no further EUD reduction is possible. The method is demonstrated in the context of a prostate cancer case and olfactory neuroblastoma case. The efficacy of EUD reduction after DVO is evaluated by comparison to an optimizer with purely biological (EUD) OAR objectives. Results: For both cases, EUD reduction after DVO additionally reduced doses, especially high doses, to normal organs. For the prostate case, bladder

  17. Integrating biological motion: the role of grouping in the perception of point-light actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin Poljac

    Full Text Available The human visual system is highly sensitive to biological motion and manages to organize even a highly reduced point-light stimulus into a vivid percept of human action. The current study investigated to what extent the origin of this saliency of point-light displays is related to its intrinsic Gestalt qualities. In particular, we studied whether biological motion perception is facilitated when the elements can be grouped according to good continuation and similarity as Gestalt principles of perceptual organization. We found that both grouping principles enhanced biological motion perception but their effects differed when stimuli were inverted. These results provide evidence that Gestalt principles of good continuity and similarity also apply to more complex and dynamic meaningful stimuli.

  18. Fathering and adolescents' psychological adjustment: the role of fathers' involvement, residence and biology status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouri, E

    2008-03-01

    Studies on fathering and child mental health are now increasingly looking for specificity in children's psychological adjustment, indicating whether the impact of fathering is diagnostically specific or non-specific. Data from 435 fathers of secondary school-aged children in Britain were used to explore the association between resident biological fathers', non-resident biological fathers' and stepfathers' involvement and children's total difficulties, prosocial behaviour, emotional symptoms, conduct problems, hyperactivity and peer problems (all measured with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) in adolescence. After controlling for child-, father- and family-related factors, fathers' involvement was negatively associated with children's total difficulties and hyperactivity, was positively associated with children's prosocial behaviour, and was unrelated with children's emotional symptoms, conduct problems and peer problems. There was no non-resident biological father effect. Compared with resident biological fathers, stepfathers reported more total difficulties, conduct problems and hyperactivity in their children even after adjusting for involvement. Whether this reflects stepfathers' low tolerance levels or biological fathers' complacency, as sociobiologists would argue, or whether this is due to pre-existing predispositions of children in families which separate and restructure, to the effects of these multiple family changes or to the high exposure of children in restructured families to parental risk factors, is, given the data available and the study design, unclear. However, this study showed that, compared with their peers in biological father families, adolescents in stepfather families are perceived to be at higher risk of behaviour problems, and that father involvement is related to specific aspects of child adjustment.

  19. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Li,D.X.; Deng,T.Z.; Lv,J.; Ke,J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts t...

  20. Biological knowledge management: the emerging role of the Semantic Web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antezana, Erick; Kuiper, Martin; Mironov, Vladimir

    2009-07-01

    New knowledge is produced at a continuously increasing speed, and the list of papers, databases and other knowledge sources that a researcher in the life sciences needs to cope with is actually turning into a problem rather than an asset. The adequate management of knowledge is therefore becoming fundamentally important for life scientists, especially if they work with approaches that thoroughly depend on knowledge integration, such as systems biology. Several initiatives to organize biological knowledge sources into a readily exploitable resourceome are presently being carried out. Ontologies and Semantic Web technologies revolutionize these efforts. Here, we review the benefits, trends, current possibilities, and the potential this holds for the biosciences.

  1. The role of informatics in the coordinated management of biological resources collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Paolo; Kracht, Manfred; Manniello, Maria Assunta; Stegehuis, Gerrit; Fritze, Dagmar

    2005-01-01

    The term 'biological resources' is applied to the living biological material collected, held and catalogued in culture collections: bacterial and fungal cultures; animal, human and plant cells; viruses; and isolated genetic material. A wealth of information on these materials has been accumulated in culture collections, and most of this information is accessible. Digitalisation of data has reached a high level; however, information is still dispersed. Individual and coordinated approaches have been initiated to improve accessibility of biological resource centres, their holdings and related information through the Internet. These approaches cover subjects such as standardisation of data handling and data accessibility, and standardisation and quality control of laboratory procedures. This article reviews some of the most important initiatives implemented so far, as well as the most recent achievements. It also discusses the possible improvements that could be achieved by adopting new communication standards and technologies, such as web services, in view of a deeper and more fruitful integration of biological resources information in the bioinformatics network environment.

  2. Role of biologics targeting type 2 airway inflammation in asthma : What have we learned so far?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parulekar, Amit D.; Diamant, Zuzana; Hanania, Nicola A.

    Purpose of reviewSevere asthma is a heterogeneous syndrome that can be classified into distinct phenotypes and endotypes. In the type 2 (T2)-high endotype, multiple cytokines are produced that lead to eosinophilic inflammation. These cytokines and their receptors are targets for biologic therapies

  3. Jan Lever: Challenging the Role of Typological Thinking in Reformational Views of Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, Harry; Flipse, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    This essay analyzes the view of evolution of Jan Lever (1922–2010), founder of the biology department at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, and compares his view with those of J.H. Diemer and H. Dooyeweerd. Together with Dooyeweerd, Lever wrote a series of chapters on the species concept in

  4. Role of biological soil crusts in desert hydrology and geomorphology: Implications for military training operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven D. Warren

    2014-01-01

    Biological soil crusts, composed of soil surfaces stabilized by a consortium of cyanobacteria, algae, fungi, lichens, and/or bryophytes, are common in most deserts and perform functions of primary productivity, nitrogen fixation, nutrient cycling, water redistribution, and soil stabilization. The crusts are highly susceptible to disturbance. The degree of perturbation...

  5. Integrating Biological Motion: The Role of Grouping in the Perception of Point-Light Actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poljac, E.; Verfaillie, K.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    The human visual system is highly sensitive to biological motion and manages to organize even a highly reduced point-light stimulus into a vivid percept of human action. The current study investigated to what extent the origin of this saliency of point-light displays is related to its intrinsic

  6. A Brief History of the Study of Fish Osmoregulation: The Central Role of the Mt. Desert Island Biological Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The Mt. Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) has played a central role in the study of fish osmoregulation for the past 80 years. In particular, scientists at the MDIBL have made significant discoveries in the basic pattern of fish osmoregulation, the function of aglomerular kidneys and proximal tubular secretion, the roles of NaCl cotransporters in intestinal uptake and gill and rectal gland secretion, the role of the shark rectal gland in osmoregulation, the mechanisms of salt secretion by the teleost fish gill epithelium, and the evolution of the ionic uptake mechanisms in fish gills. This short review presents the history of these discoveries and their relationships to the study of epithelial transport in general. PMID:21423356

  7. Histamine induces human lung fibroblast-mediated collagen gel contraction via histamine H1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masafumi; Saito, Akira; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Mikami, Yu; Sakamoto, Makiko; Jo, Taisuke; Nakajima, Jun; Takizawa, Hajime; Nagase, Takahide; Kohyama, Tadashi

    2014-06-01

    Airway remodeling is implicated in irreversible airflow limitation of refractory asthma, which includes increased smooth muscle mass and subepithelial fibrosis. Activated fibroblasts acquire contractile phenotype to participate in tissue contraction and structural alteration of extracellular matrices. Histamine is a potent mediator of allergic inflammation, substantially involved in asthmatic pathophysiology. We hypothesized that histamine might play a role in airway remodeling, and investigated its effect on fibroblast-mediated collagen gel contraction. Fibroblast-mediated collagen gel contraction was studied. Histamine's regulation of collagen gel contraction was characterized by using specific histamine-receptor antagonists, an IP3 receptor antagonist and a PKC inhibitor. Histamine induced contraction of collagen gels embedded with human lung fibroblasts, in a time-dependent manner, and at the concentration more than 10(-6) M, both in four primary cultured adult lung fibroblasts and three fetal lung fibroblast cell lines. This effect was attenuated by H1 receptor antagonist, whereas those for H2 to H4 receptors failed to show an inhibitory effect. Furthermore, IP3 receptor-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization was implicated in histamine's action on collagen gel contraction. Our results suggest that histamine is involved in airway remodeling through its action on lung fibroblasts, and antihistamine drugs, especially H1 receptor antagonists, might be potentially beneficial for a subset of asthmatic patients.

  8. The Cardiac Fibroblast: Functional and Electrophysiological Considerations in Healthy and Diseased Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Carolina; Benamer, Najate; Morley, Gregory E.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis occurs in a number of cardiovascular diseases associated with a high incidence of arrhythmias. A critical event in the development of fibrosis is the transformation of fibroblasts into an active phenotype or myofibroblast. This transformation results in functional changes including increased proliferation and changes in the release of signaling molecules and extracellular matrix deposition. Traditionally fibroblasts have been considered to affect cardiac electrophysiology indirectly by physically isolating myocytes and creating conduction barriers. There is now increasing evidence that cardiac fibroblasts may play a direct role in modulating the electrophysiological substrate in diseased hearts. The purpose of this review is to summarize the functional changes associated with fibroblast activation, the membrane currents that have been identified in adult cardiac fibroblasts and describe recent studies of fibroblast-myocyte electrical interactions with emphasis on the changes that occur with cardiac injury. Further analysis of fibroblast membrane electrophysiology and their interactions with myocytes will lead to a more complete understanding of the arrhythmic substrate. These studies have the potential to generate new therapeutic approaches for the prevention of arrhythmias associated with cardiac fibrosis. PMID:21242811

  9. Synthetic Biology between Self-Regulation and Public Discourse: Ethical Issues and the Many Roles of the Ethicist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Gardar

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the roles of ethicists in the governance of synthetic biology. I am particularly concerned with the idea of self-regulation of bioscience and its relationship to public discourse about ethical issues in bioscience. I will look at the role of philosophical ethicists at different levels and loci, from the "embedded ethicist" in the laboratory or research project, to ethicists' impact on policy and public discourse. In a democratic society, the development of governance frameworks for emerging technologies, such as synthetic biology, needs to be guided by a well-informed public discourse. In the case of synthetic biology, the public discourse has to go further than merely considering technical issues of biosafety and biosecurity, or risk management, to consider more philosophical issues concerning the meaning and value of "life" between the natural and the synthetic. I argue that ethicists have moral expertise to bring to the public arena, which consists not only in guiding the debate but also in evaluating arguments and moral positions and making normative judgments. When ethicists make normative claims or moral judgments, they must be transparent about their theoretical positions and basic moral standpoints.

  10. Cellular dysfunction in the diabetic fibroblast: impairment in migration, vascular endothelial growth factor production, and response to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Oren Z; Galiano, Robert D; Armour, Mary; Levine, Jamie P; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2003-01-01

    Although it is known that systemic diseases such as diabetes result in impaired wound healing, the mechanism for this impairment is not understood. Because fibroblasts are essential for wound repair, we compared the in vitro behavior of fibroblasts cultured from diabetic, leptin receptor-deficient (db/db) mice with wild-type fibroblasts from mice of the same genetic background in processes important during tissue repair. Adult diabetic mouse fibroblast migration exhibited a 75% reduction in migration compared to normal fibroblasts (P under basal or hypoxic conditions, confirming that the results from db/db fibroblasts in mature mice resulted from the diabetic state and were not because of alterations in the leptin-leptin receptor axis. Markers of cellular viability including proliferation and senescence were not significantly different between diabetic and wild-type fibroblasts. We conclude that, in vitro, diabetic fibroblasts show selective impairments in discrete cellular processes critical for tissue repair including cellular migration, VEGF production, and the response to hypoxia. The VEGF abnormalities developed concurrently with the onset of hyperglycemia and were not seen in normoglycemic, leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice. These observations support a role for fibroblast dysfunction in the impaired wound healing observed in human diabetics, and also suggest a mechanism for the poor clinical outcomes that occur after ischemic injury in diabetic patients.

  11. The effect of keratinocytes on the biomechanical characteristics and pore microstructure of tissue engineered skin using deep dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkey, Mathew; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2014-12-01

    Fibrosis affects most organs, it results in replacement of normal parenchymal tissue with collagen-rich extracellular matrix, which compromises tissue architecture and ultimately causes loss of function of the affected organ. Biochemical pathways that contribute to fibrosis have been extensively studied, but the role of biomechanical signaling in fibrosis is not clearly understood. In this study, we assessed the effect keratinocytes have on the biomechanical characteristics and pore microstructure of tissue engineered skin made with superficial or deep dermal fibroblasts in order to determine any biomaterial-mediated anti-fibrotic influences on tissue engineered skin. Tissue engineered skin with deep dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes were found to be less stiff and contracted and had reduced number of myofibroblasts and lower expression of matrix crosslinking factors compared to matrices with deep fibroblasts alone. However, there were no such differences between tissue engineered skin with superficial fibroblasts and keratinocytes and matrices with superficial fibroblasts alone. Also, tissue engineered skin with deep fibroblasts and keratinocytes had smaller pores compared to those with superficial fibroblasts and keratinocytes; pore size of tissue engineered skin with deep fibroblasts and keratinocytes were not different from those matrices with deep fibroblasts alone. A better understanding of biomechanical characteristics and pore microstructure of tissue engineered skin may prove beneficial in promoting normal wound healing over pathologic healing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coxsackievirus B3 induces the formation of autophagosomes in cardiac fibroblasts both in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Xia, E-mail: zhai_xia_cool@126.com [Department of Microbiology and Wu Lien-Teh Institute, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Qin, Ying, E-mail: qinyinggaofeng@163.com [Department of Microbiology and Wu Lien-Teh Institute, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Chen, Yang, E-mail: cy_hmu@126.com [Department of Microbiology and Wu Lien-Teh Institute, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Lin, Lexun, E-mail: linlexun@163.com [Department of Microbiology and Wu Lien-Teh Institute, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Wang, Tianying, E-mail: wangty0929@163.com [Department of Microbiology and Wu Lien-Teh Institute, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhong, Xiaoyan, E-mail: littlerock712@163.com [Department of Microbiology and Wu Lien-Teh Institute, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Wu, Xiaoyu, E-mail: xiaoyu_wu2006@163.com [Department of Cardiology, The First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 23 Youzheng Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen, Sijia, E-mail: chensj0802@163.com [Department of Microbiology and Wu Lien-Teh Institute, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: jing070822@163.com [Center of Electron Microscopy, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Wang, Yan, E-mail: wangyan@hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology and Wu Lien-Teh Institute, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhang, Fengmin, E-mail: fengminzhang@ems.hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology and Wu Lien-Teh Institute, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhao, Wenran, E-mail: zhaowenran2002@aliyun.com [Department of Cell Biology, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); and others

    2016-12-10

    Coxsackievirus group B (CVB) is one of the common pathogens that cause myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Evidence has shown that CVB replication in cardiomyocytes is responsible for the damage and loss of cardiac muscle and the dysfunction of the heart. However, it remains largely undefined how CVB would directly impact cardiac fibroblasts, the most abundant cells in human heart. In this study, cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from Balb/c mice and infected with CVB type 3 (CVB3). Increased double-membraned, autophagosome-like vesicles in the CVB3-infected cardiac fibroblasts were observed with electron microscope. Punctate distribution of LC3 and increased level of LC3-II were also detected in the infected cardiac fibroblasts. Furthermore, we observed that the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α, was increased in the CVB3-infected cardiac fibroblasts, while suppressed autophagy by 3-MA and Atg7-siRNA inhibited cytokine expression. Consistent with the in vitro findings, increased formation of autophagosomes was observed in the cardiac fibroblasts of Balb/c mice infected with CVB3. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that cardiac fibroblasts respond to CVB3 infection with the formation of autophagosomes and the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that the autophagic response of cardiac fibroblasts may play a role in the pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by CVB3 infection. - Highlights: • CVB3 replication induced autophagosome assembly in primary cardiac fibroblasts. • Both IL-6 and TNF-α in cardiac fibroblasts infected by CVB3 were increased. • IL-6 and TNF-α were reduced in cardiac fibroblasts when autophagy was inhibited. • Autophagosome assembly in cardiac fibroblasts of CVB-infected mice was increased.

  13. ERK5 regulates basic fibroblast growth factor-induced type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor expression and cell proliferation in lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung-Hwa; Hwang, Ae-Rang; Nam, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Suji; Choi, Hyoung Chul; Lim, Jae Hyang; Woo, Chang-Hoon

    2015-08-15

    bFGF is a potent mitogen of cells associated with fibrosis. Although ERK5 has been reported to play roles in the development of fibrosis, its roles in regulating bFGF-induced fibrotic responses are not understood, especially in lung fibroblasts. The authors investigated the role of ERK5 in bFGF induction of cell proliferation and in induction of PAI-1, a critical regulator of the pathological features of fibrosis, in lung fibroblasts. The role played by ERK5 in bFGF-induced PAI-1 expression was elucidated by perturbing the ERK5 signaling pathway using a specific chemical inhibitor and siRNA of ERK5. The effects of ERK5 signal perturbation on PAI-1 expression were measured at multiple levels by Q-PCR, immunoblotting, ELISA, and reporter gene analysis. The role of MEF2 in bFGF-induced activation of PAI-1 promoter activity via ERK5 was measured using a biotin-labeled DNA pull-down assay, and the effects of ERK5 on the mitogenic effects of bFGF were assessed using a MTT assay. In both primary human lung fibroblast and lung fibroblast cell lines, inhibition of ERK5 blocked bFGF-induced PAI-1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels and inhibited bFGF-induced PAI-1 promoter activity induction by bFGF. Upon stimulation with bFGF, MEF2 directly bound to the consensus sequence of the MEF2 binding site in the PAI-1 promoter. In addition, bFGF-induced PAI-1 up-regulation was inhibited by MEF2 siRNA, and bFGF-induced fibroblast proliferation was blocked by inhibiting ERK5. This study reveals a novel role for the ERK5-MEF2 cascade, linking bFGF-induced PAI-1 expression and subsequent mitogenic processes in lung fibroblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of vitamin A in type 2 diabetes mellitus biology: effects of intervention therapy in a deficient state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sarah; Naseem, Imrana

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes has emerged as the biggest pandemic of our times, growing parallel to obesity. Insulin treatment regimens have been unable to completely inhibit protein glycation, which is responsible for the development of increased oxidative stress in diabetic tissues. Coupled with recent evidences that highlight the role of reactive oxygen species in the onset and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the antioxidants have taken prime focus as a possible intervention strategy. Studies have established a role of antioxidant vitamins C and E in improving patient condition in the past. Vitamin A, in addition to its role as an antioxidant, boasts a pleiotropic role in cell regulation through its action on gene regulation, maintenance of epithelial cell integrity, and resistance to infection. Studies have also ascribed a role to vitamin A in up-regulating the antioxidant enzyme functions in the body. Additionally, a link has been found between diabetes and deficient vitamin A levels indicating vitamin A supplementation may have a role in T2DM biology. This review therefore focuses on the vitamin A intervention in T2DM patients having deficient in vitamin A. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Basic fibroblast growth factor stimulates the proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts via the ERK1/2 and JNK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, T; Jinnin, M; Muchemwa, F C; Fukushima, S; Kogushi-Nishi, H; Moriya, C; Igata, T; Fujisawa, A; Johno, T; Ihn, H

    2010-04-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FGF-2) has been described as a multipotent cytokine that regulates cell growth as well as differentiation, matrix composition, chemotaxis, cell adhesion and migration in numerous cell types. It is known that bFGF stimulates proliferation of cultured fibroblasts. However, the detailed mechanism of fibroblast proliferation induced by bFGF in vitro still remains to be elucidated. Objectives We investigated the precise effects of bFGF on fibroblast proliferation and the signalling pathways responsible for bFGF-induced proliferation in cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). HDFs were cultured with bFGF in the presence or absence of specific inhibitors against MAPK signalling pathways including ERK, JNK and p38. The number of cells was counted and immunoblotting findings were examined for the activation of ERK1/2 and JNK. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of ERK1, ERK2 and JNK1 were proven by the transfection of siRNA. bFGF increased the number of HDFs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The bFGF-induced proliferation was suppressed by the MEK inhibitors PD98059 and U0126, and the JNK inhibitor SP600125. bFGF increased the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and JNK1. Treatment with ERK1, ERK2 or JNK1 siRNA significantly inhibited bFGF-induced proliferation. This study indicates that ERK1/2 and JNK pathways play an important role in the bFGF-mediated effect in HDFs. This study also suggests that controlling ERK1/2 and/or JNK signalling may therefore be a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of chronic and untreatable skin ulcers.

  16. The "Century of Biology" and the Evolving Role of Medicinal Chemists in Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doller, Dario

    2017-01-18

    Society expects that the wave of contemporary new discoveries in biological sciences will soon lead to novel treatments for human diseases, including many devastating brain disorders. Historically, medicinal chemists have contributed to drug discovery teams in ways that synergize with those from their partner sciences, and help transform new knowledge into the ultimate tangible asset: a new drug. The optimal balance of resources and the right strategy to minimize the risk of late clinical failure may differ for different therapeutic indications. Recent progress in the oncology and neuroscience therapeutic areas is compared and contrasted, in particular looking at the biological target space and functional attributes of recently FDA-approved drugs and those in the late clinical pipeline. Medicinal chemists are poised to have major influence in neuroscience drug research, and examples of areas of potential impact are presented, together with a discussion of the soft skills they bring to their project teams and why they have been so impactful.

  17. [THE ROLE OF BIOLOGICAL MEMBRANES IN DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF SALMONELLA AND ACUTE ALCOHOL GASTROENTERITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, V K; Makarov, P V

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of Salmonella infection and alcohol on biological membranes from the content of serum phospholipid fraction known to be a component ofenterocyte membranes. Any change of membrane phospholipid content leads to a change of their blood level. The study included 50 patients with acute alcohol gastroenteritis, 50 ones with salmonella gastroenteritis, and 50 healthy subjects. Both salmonellosis and alcohol caused differently directed changes in biological membranes. The mechanism of diarrhea in patients with salmonella and acute alcohol gastroenteritis is different. Diarrhea associated with alcohol gastroenteritis is due to enhanced viscosity of biomembranes that decreases in salmonella gastroenteritis. It suggests different approaches to the treatment of these conditions. The membrane destruction coefficient below 2 is an additional proof of alcoholic etiology of gastroenteritis whereas its value above 3 confirms the involvement of salmonellosis in pathogenesis of gastroenteritis.

  18. The role of adaptive trans-generational plasticity in biological invasions of plants

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, Andrew R; Brown, Cynthia S; Espeland, Erin K; McKay, John K; Meimberg, Harald; Rice, Kevin J

    2010-01-01

    High-impact biological invasions often involve establishment and spread in disturbed, high-resource patches followed by establishment and spread in biotically or abiotically stressful areas. Evolutionary change may be required for the second phase of invasion (establishment and spread in stressful areas) to occur. When species have low genetic diversity and short selection history, within-generation phenotypic plasticity is often cited as the mechanism through which spread across multiple hab...

  19. Disentangling the role of environmental and human pressures on biological invasions across Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pyšek, Petr; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Wild, Jan; Hejda, Martin; Pergl, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 27 (2010), s. 12157-12162 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E09053 Grant - others:ALARM(XE) GOCE-CT-2003-506675; European Comission(XE) SSPI-CT-2003-511202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : biological invasions * Europe * economy Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 9.771, year: 2010

  20. The Role of Oxygen Radicals in Biology and Medicine 7-11 February 1983, Ventura, California,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-11

    thiolate catalytic site of the correspon- ding isomerases . Measurement of and antioxidant protection from in vivo lipid peroxidation. Al Tappel Measurements...Hassan and Carmella S. Moody. Departments Of Food Science and Micro- .. biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27650. Paraquat augmented...Na and glucose - 6-P (G6P) as markers lyse when exposed to the xanthine/xanthine oxidase/iron system. In the absence of EDTA, marker release

  1. The Biology of Bioavailability: The Role of Functional Ecology in Exposure Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-30

    were assessed using polyethylene devices (PEDs) and provided a reasonable indicator of organism exposure but did not account for organisms with...predicting bioavailability, but could not account for divergent animal behavior between species and substrate types. ERDC/EL TR-17-2 3 1.4 Benefits...sediment horizon containing most of the biological activity (application of this ambiguous concept has proven to be very difficult to accomplish, in

  2. The Role of Low and High Spatial Frequencies in Exogenous Attention to Biologically Salient Stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Carretié, Luis; Ríos, Marcos; Periáñez, José A.; Kessel, Dominique; Álvarez-Linera, Juan

    2012-01-01

    PLOS: Creative Commons Attribution License Exogenous attention can be understood as an adaptive tool that permits the detection and processing of biologically salient events even when the individual is engaged in a resource-consuming task. Indirect data suggest that the spatial frequency of stimulation may be a crucial element in this process. Behavioral and neural data (both functional and structural) were analyzed for 36 participants engaged in a digit categorization task in which dis...

  3. The role of cell hydration in realization of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2015-09-01

    The weak knowledge on the nature of cellular and molecular mechanisms of biological effects of NIR such as static magnetic field, infrasound frequency of mechanical vibration, extremely low frequency of electromagnetic fields and microwave serves as a main barrier for adequate dosimetry from the point of Public Health. The difficulty lies in the fact that the biological effects of NIR depend not only on their thermodynamic characteristics but also on their frequency and intensity "windows", chemical and physical composition of the surrounding medium, as well as on the initial metabolic state of the organism. Therefore, only biomarker can be used for adequate estimation of biological effect of NIR on organisms. Because of the absence of such biomarker(s), organizations having the mission to monitor hazardous effects of NIR traditionally base their instruction on thermodynamic characteristics of NIR. Based on the high sensitivity to NIR of both aqua medium structure and cell hydration, it is suggested that cell bathing medium is one of the primary targets and cell hydration is a biomarker for NIR effects on cells and organisms. The purpose of this article is to present a short review of literature and our own experimental data on the effects of NIR on plants' seeds germination, microbe growth and development, snail neurons and heart muscle, rat's brain and heart tissues.

  4. The pleiotropic roles of ADAM9 in the biology of solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oria, Victor O; Lopatta, Paul; Schilling, Oliver

    2018-03-17

    A disintegrin and a metalloprotease (ADAM) 9 is a metzincin cell-surface protease involved in several biological processes such as myogenesis, fertilization, cell migration, inflammatory response, proliferation, and cell-cell interactions. ADAM9 has been found over-expressed in several solid tumors entities such as glioma, melanoma, prostate cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, gastric, breast, lung, and liver cancers. Immunohistochemical analyses highlight ADAM9 expression by actual cancer cells and associate its abundant presence with clinicopathological features such as shortened overall survival, poor tumor grade, de-differentiation, therapy resistance, and metastasis formation. In each of these tumors, ADAM9 may contribute to tumor biology via proteolytic or non-proteolytic mechanisms. For example, in liver cancer, ADAM9 has been found to shed MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A, contributing towards the evasion of tumor immunity. ADAM9 may also contribute to tumor biology in non-proteolytic ways probably through interaction with different integrins. For example, in melanoma, the interaction between ADAM9 and β1 integrins facilitates tumor stroma cross talks, which then promotes invasion and metastasis via the activation of MMP1 and MMP2. In breast cancer, the interaction between β1 integrins on endothelial cells and ADAM9 on tumor cells facilitate tumor cell extravasation and invasion to distant sites. This review summarizes the present knowledge on ADAM9 in solid cancers, and the different mechanisms which it employ to drive tumor progression.

  5. The Role of Field Classes in Education of Prospective Teachers in Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fleszar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Field classes are indispensable in education of biology and environment protection students, as they allow a future teacher to carry out teaching material bringing together theory and practice through activity. In the framework of Biology Didactics classes the biology students of the Faculty of Natural Sciences at the University of Szczecin participate actively in the works on didactic nature trail in the Arkoñski Woods prepared by Dr. Ewa Fleszar. During the work on didactic natural path the students make themselves acquainted with: field class objectives; field class tasks; field class programmes, e.g. concerning phenology; flora and fauna species. Writing synopsis of field classes for selected lesson units at different teaching levels they acquire sound knowledge based on the ecological contents. Contacts with nature as well as gaining the experience during field classes allow them to obtain competences for working in the field and to understand the objectives of carrying out such classes. Field classes have an effect on developing interests of participants in the subject, and affect the improvement of teaching performance. Visit to the field forms ecological awareness, which leads to obtaining an ecological culture.

  6. Fetal Programming of Body Composition, Obesity, and Metabolic Function: The Role of Intrauterine Stress and Stress Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Entringer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological, clinical, physiological, cellular, and molecular evidence suggests that the origins of obesity and metabolic dysfunction can be traced back to intrauterine life and supports an important role for maternal nutrition prior to and during gestation in fetal programming. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms is an area of interest and intense investigation. In this perspectives paper we propose that in addition to maternal nutrition-related processes it may be important to concurrently consider the potential role of intrauterine stress and stress biology. We frame our arguments in the larger context of an evolutionary-developmental perspective that supports roles for both nutrition and stress as key environmental conditions driving natural selection and developmental plasticity. We suggest that intrauterine stress exposure may interact with the nutritional milieu, and that stress biology may represent an underlying mechanism mediating the effects of diverse intrauterine perturbations, including but not limited to maternal nutritional insults (undernutrition and overnutrition, on brain and peripheral targets of programming of body composition, energy balance homeostasis, and metabolic function. We discuss putative maternal-placental-fetal endocrine and immune/inflammatory candidate mechanisms that may underlie the long-term effects of intrauterine stress. We conclude with a commentary of the implications for future research and clinical practice.

  7. Enhanced Keratinocyte Proliferation and Migration in Co-culture with Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenxiang; Wang, Ying; Farhangfar, Farhang; Zimmer, Monica; Zhang, Yongxin

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is primarily controlled by the proliferation and migration of keratinocytes and fibroblasts as well as the complex interactions between these two cell types. To investigate the interactions between keratinocytes and fibroblasts and the effects of direct cell-to-cell contact on the proliferation and migration of keratinocytes, keratinocytes and fibroblasts were stained with different fluorescence dyes and co-cultured with or without transwells. During the early stage (first 5 days) of the culture, the keratinocytes in contact with fibroblasts proliferated significantly faster than those not in contact with fibroblasts, but in the late stage (11th to 15th day), keratinocyte growth slowed down in all cultures unless EGF was added. In addition, keratinocyte migration was enhanced in co-cultures with fibroblasts in direct contact, but not in the transwells. Furthermore, the effects of the fibroblasts on keratinocyte migration and growth at early culture stage correlated with heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), IL-1α and TGF-β1 levels in the cultures where the cells were grown in direct contact. These effects were inhibited by anti-HB-EGF, anti-IL-1α and anti-TGF-β1 antibodies and anti-HB-EGF showed the greatest inhibition. Co-culture of keratinocytes and IL-1α and TGF-β1 siRNA-transfected fibroblasts exhibited a significant reduction in HB-EGF production and keratinocyte proliferation. These results suggest that contact with fibroblasts stimulates the migration and proliferation of keratinocytes during wound healing, and that HB-EGF plays a central role in this process and can be up-regulated by IL-1α and TGF-β1, which also regulate keratinocyte proliferation differently during the early and late stage. PMID:22911722

  8. Fucosyltransferase 1 mediates angiogenesis, cell adhesion and rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue fibroblast proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported that sialyl Lewisy, synthesized by fucosyltransferases, is involved in angiogenesis. Fucosyltransferase 1 (fut1) is an α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase responsible for synthesis of the H blood group and Lewisy antigens. However, the angiogenic involvement of fut 1 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue (RA ST) has not been clearly defined. Methods Assay of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA was performed by enzyme-linked lectin assay. Fut1 expression was determined in RA ST samples by immunohistological staining. We performed angiogenic Matrigel assays using a co-culture system of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) and fut1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. To determine if fut1 played a role in leukocyte retention and cell proliferation in the RA synovium, myeloid THP-1 cell adhesion assays and fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblast proliferation assays were performed. Results Total α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA ST were significantly higher compared to normal (NL) ST. Fut1 expression on RA ST lining cells positively correlated with ST inflammation. HMVECs from a co-culture system with fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts exhibited decreased endothelial cell tube formation compared to control siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. Fut1 siRNA also inhibited myeloid THP-1 adhesion to RA synovial fibroblasts and RA synovial fibroblast proliferation. Conclusions These data show that α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins are upregulated in RA ST compared to NL ST. We also show that fut1 in RA synovial fibroblasts is important in angiogenesis, leukocyte-synovial fibroblast adhesion, and synovial fibroblast proliferation, all key processes in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24467809

  9. Imatinib Mesylate Causes Genome-wide Transcriptional Changes in Systemic Sclerosis Fibroblasts in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchcliff, Monique; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Ishida, Wataru; Fang, Feng; Lee, Jungwha; Jafari, Nadereh; Wilkes, Mark; Bhattacharyya, Swati; Leof, Edward; Varga, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a heterogeneous multifactorial disease dominated by progressive skin and internal organ fibrosis that is driven in part by Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β). An important downstream target of TGF-β is the Abelson (c-Abl) tyrosine kinase, and its inhibition by imatinib mesylate (Gleevec)attenuates fibrosis in mice. Here we examined the effect of c-Abl activation and blockade in explanted healthy control and SSc fibroblasts. Methods Skin biopsies and explanted fibroblasts from healthy subjects and patients with SSc were studied. Changes in genome-wide expression patterns in imatinib-treated control and SSc fibroblasts were analyzed by DNA microarray. Results Treatment of control fibroblasts with TGF-β resulted in activation of c-Abl and stimulation of fibrotic gene expression that was prevented by imatinib. Moreover, imatinib reduced basal collagen gene expression in SSc but not control fibroblasts. No significant differences in tissue levels of c-Abl and phospho-c-Abl were detected between SSc and control skin biopsies. In vitroimatinib induced dramatic changes in the expression of genes involved in fibrosis, cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and lipid and cholesterol metabolism. Remarkably, of the 587-imatinib-responsive genes, 91% showed significant change in SSc fibroblasts, but only 12% in control fibroblasts. Conclusion c-Abl plays a key role in fibrotic responses. Imatinib treatment results in dramatic changes in gene expression in SSc fibroblasts but has only modest effects in control fibroblasts. These data provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the antifibrotic effect of imatinib in SSc. PMID:22691216

  10. Effect of periodontal dressings on human gingiva fibroblasts in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eber, R.M.; Shuler, C.F.; Buchanan, W.; Beck, F.M.; Horton, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity studies of periodontal dressings have not generally produced a result consistent with in vivo observations. These prior in vitro studies have not used human intraoral cell lines. We tested the effects of two eugenol containing and two non-eugenol periodontal dressings on cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) (ATCC No. 1292). Replicate HGF cultures grown in microtiter plates were exposed to stock, 1:4 and 1:16 dilutions of extracts made from each of the four periodontal dressings. The HGF cultures were pulse labelled with tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Incorporations of the labelled thymidine were measured using liquid scintillation counting and expressed as counts per minute. The results showed that undiluted extracts from all four periodontal dressings totally inhibited 3HTdR uptake (P less than 0.05). The 1:4 dilution of eugenol dressings inhibited 3HTdR uptake significantly more than non-eugenol dressings (P less than 0.05). Interestingly, at 72 hours the 1:16 dilution of the non-eugenol dressings caused significantly increased 3HTdR uptake which was not observed with the eugenol dressings. The present results suggest that the use of a human fibroblastic cell line for testing the effects of periodontal dressings may provide information about the relative biological effects of these dressings. Using this cell line, we have found that eugenol dressings inhibit fibroblast proliferation to a greater extent than non-eugenol dressings

  11. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Vera J M; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T; Atkins, Annette R; Evans, Ronald M; Jonker, Johan W; Downes, Michael Robert

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  12. The in vitro photosensitivity of systemic lupus erythematosus skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamansky, G B; Minka, D F; Deal, C L; Hendricks, K

    1985-03-01

    To investigate the role of DNA damage in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we studied the ability of skin fibroblasts derived from SLE patients to recover from ultraviolet (UV) light radiation of varying wavelengths. Four of five SLE cell strains were more sensitive to UV-C (254 nm), sun lamp, and UV-A (320 to 400 nm) light than were normal cells. SLE cellular recovery was most sensitive to broad spectrum, long wavelength light. This hypersensitivity did not appear to result from the UV light activation of a clastogenic factor. Experiments which examined the DNA repair capacity of irradiated cells indicated that SLE fibroblasts may be able to excise certain DNA lesions as well as normal cells. The mechanisms responsible for the hypersensitivity of SLE cells remain under investigation.

  13. Gene expression profiling reveals novel TGFβ targets in adult lung fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearson Jeremy D

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ, a multifunctional cytokine, plays a crucial role in the accumulation of extracellular matrix components in lung fibrosis, where lung fibroblasts are considered to play a major role. Even though the effects of TGFβ on the gene expression of several proteins have been investigated in several lung fibroblast cell lines, the global pattern of response to this cytokine in adult lung fibroblasts is still unknown. Methods We used Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays U95v2, containing approximately 12,000 human genes, to study the transcriptional profile in response to a four hour treatment with TGFβ in control lung fibroblasts and in fibroblasts from patients with idiopathic and scleroderma-associated pulmonary fibrosis. A combination of the Affymetrix change algorithm (Microarray Suite 5 and of analysis of variance models was used to identify TGFβ-regulated genes. Additional criteria were an average up- or down- regulation of at least two fold. Results Exposure of fibroblasts to TGFβ had a profound impact on gene expression, resulting in regulation of 129 transcripts. We focused on genes not previously found to be regulated by TGFβ in lung fibroblasts or other cell types, including nuclear co-repressor 2, SMAD specific E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2 (SMURF2, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1, and confirmed the microarray results by real time-PCR. Western Blotting confirmed induction at the protein level of AGTR1, the most highly induced gene in both control and fibrotic lung fibroblasts among genes encoding for signal transduction molecules. Upregulation of AGTR1 occurred through the MKK1/MKK2 signalling pathway. Immunohistochemical staining showed AGTR1 expression by lung fibroblasts in fibroblastic foci within biopsies of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Conclusions This study identifies several novel TGFβ targets in lung fibroblasts, and confirms

  14. Fibroblast growth factor-1 improves cardiac functional recovery and enhances cell survival after ischemia and reperfusion: a fibroblast growth factor receptor, protein kinase C, and tyrosine kinase-dependent mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, Meindert; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; de Windt, Leon J.; Willems, Jodil; Dassen, Willem R. M.; Heeneman, Sylvia; Zimmermann, Rene; van Bilsen, Marc; Doevendans, Pieter A.

    2004-01-01

    We sought to investigate the role of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-1 during acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. The FGFs display cardioprotective effects during ischemia and reperfusion. We investigated FGF-1-induced cardioprotection during ischemia and reperfusion and the intracellular

  15. A cell culture model using rat coronary artery adventitial fibroblasts to measure collagen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meszaros Gary

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a rat cell model for studying collagen type I production in coronary artery adventitial fibroblasts. Increased deposition of adventitial collagen type I leads to stiffening of the blood vessel, increased blood pressure, arteriosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Although the source and mechanism of collagen deposition is yet unknown, the adventitia appears to play a significant role. To demonstrate the application of our cell model, cultured adventitial fibroblasts were treated with sex hormones and the effect on collagen production measured. Methods Hearts (10–12 weeks were harvested and the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD was isolated and removed. Tissue explants were cultured and cells (passages 2–4 were confirmed as fibroblasts using immunohistochemistry. Optimal conditions were determined for cell tissue harvest, timing, proliferation and culture conditions. Fibroblasts were exposed to 10-7 M testosterone or 10-7 M estrogen for 24 hours and either immunostained for collagen type I or subjected to ELISA. Results Results showed increased collagen staining in fibroblasts treated with testosterone compared to control and decreased staining with estrogen. ELISA results showed that testosterone increased collagen I by 20% whereas estrogen decreased collagen I by 15%. Conclusion Data demonstrates the usefulness of our cell model in studying the specific role of the adventitia apart from other blood vessel tissue in rat coronary arteries. Results suggest opposite effects of testosterone and estrogen on collagen synthesis in the rat coronary artery adventitial fibroblasts.

  16. Fibroblast adhesion and activation onto micro-machined titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillem-Marti, J; Delgado, L; Godoy-Gallardo, M; Pegueroles, M; Herrero, M; Gil, F J

    2013-07-01

    Surface modifications performed at the neck of dental implants, in the manner of micro-grooved surfaces, can reduce fibrous tissue encapsulation and prevent bacterial colonization, thereby improving fibrointegration and the formation of a biological seal. However, the applied procedures are technically complex and/or time consuming methods. The aim of this study was to analyse the fibroblast behaviour on modified titanium surfaces obtained, applying a simple and low-cost method. An array of titanium surfaces was obtained using a commercial computerized numerical control lathe, modifying the feed rate and the cutting depth. To elucidate the potential ability of the generated surfaces to activate connective tissue cells, a thorough gene (by real time - qPCR) and protein (by western blot or zymography) expression and cellular response characterization (cell morphology, cell adhesion and cell activation by secreting extracellular matrix (ECM) components and their enzyme regulators) was performed. Micro-grooved surfaces have statistically significant differences in the groove's width (approximately 10, 50 and 100 μm) depending on the applied advancing fixed speed. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images showed that fibroblasts oriented along the generated grooves, but they were only entirely accommodated on the wider grooves (≥50 μm). Micro-grooved surfaces exhibited an earlier cell attachment and activation, as seen by collagen Iα1 and fibronectin deposition and activation of ECM remodelling enzymes, compared with the other surfaces. However, fibroblasts could remain in an activated state on narrower surfaces (micro-grooved surfaces could improve implant integration at the gingival site with respect to polished surfaces. Micro-grooved surfaces enhance early fibroblast adhesion and activation, which could be critical for the formation of a biological seal and finally promote tissue integration. Surfaces with wider grooves (≥50 μm) seem to be more

  17. [Construction of chicken embryo fibroblasts cDNA expression library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Gao, Yu-long; Gao, Hong-lei; Wang, Xiao-mei; Xu, Xiu-hong

    2007-06-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) is a primary cellular material to research the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Constructing the cDNA expression library of CEF is the foundation to research cell tropism and find cell receptors of IBDV from CEF. In order to achieve that purpose, a high-quality cDNA expression library of CEF was constructed by Gateway technology, which could avoid using the restriction enzyme for cloning to solve technical limitation of roution method. The mRNA was extracted from chicken embryonic fibroblast. Moreover, single-strand cDNA and double-strand cDNA were synthesized by using biotin-conjugated Oligo (dT) primer in turn. The double-strand cDNA was ligated Adapter and then purified by the cDNA Size Fractionation Columns. After BP recombination reaction, a cDNA entry library was constructed with a titer of 1 x 10(6) cfu/mL, total clones of 1.2 x 10(7) cfu and an average insertion size of about 2243 bp. After LR recombination reaction, the cDNA entry library was transformed into expression library which took on a titer of 5 x 10(5) cfu/mL, total clones of 5.5 x 10(6) cfu and an average insertion size of about 2411bp. The results indicate that the constructed cDNA expression library performs a remarkable high value in both recombination rate and library coverage. As a result, the cDNA expression library, with its good quality, may facilitate to identify the receptors associated with the resistance against IBDV in chicken embryonic fibroblast and to cast new light on the mechanism of cellular tropism. Moreover, it may also provide data of chicken embryonic fibroblast in transcription level and may be helpful to study its biological functions.

  18. A comparison of the role of beamwidth in biological and engineered sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Bryan Donald; Mueller, Rolf

    2017-11-13

    Sonar is an important sensory modality for engineers as well as in nature. In engineering, sonar is the dominating modality for underwater sensing. In nature, biosonar is likely to have been a central factor behind the unprecedented evolutionary success of bats, a highly diverse group that accounts for over 20% of all mammal species. However, it remains unclear to what extent engineered and biosonar follow similar design and operational principles. In the current work, the key sonar design characteristic of beamwidth is examined in technical and biosonar. To this end, beamwidth data has been obtained for 23 engineered sonar systems and from numerical beampattern predictions for 151 emission and reception elements (noseleaves and ears) representing bat biosonar. Beamwidth data from these sources is compared to the beamwidth of a planar ellipsoidal transducer as a reference. The results show that engineered and biological both obey the basic physical limit on beamwidth as a function of the ratio of aperture size and wavelength. However, beyond that, the beamwidth data revealed very different behaviors between the engineered and the biological sonar systems. Whereas the beamwidths of the technical sonar systems were very close to the planar transducer limit, the biological samples showed a very wide scatter away from this limit. This scatter was as large, if not wider, than what was seen in a small reference data set obtained with random aluminum cones. A possible interpretation of these differences in the variability could be that whereas sonar engineers try to minimize beamwidth subject to constraints on device size, the evolutionary optimization of bat biosonar beampatterns has been directed at other factors that have left beamwidth as a byproduct. Alternatively, the biosonar systems may require beamwidth values that are larger than the physical limit and differ between species and their sensory ecological niches. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. The role of biological weathering in periglacial areas: a study of weathering rinds in south Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Samuel

    2002-09-01

    The importance of biogeochemical processes in the morphogenic system of periglacial environments has been underestimated for decades. Weathering rind studies help to characterise and quantify biogeochemical weathering over time. Experiments using fungi strains isolated from basaltic boulders allow one to decipher biological weathering. A historical approach using heterochronous moraines provides the opportunity to follow the life of weathering rinds and helps to build a chronology of dominant processes of weathering during the first century of exposure. It appears that exfoliation of weathering rinds, commonly observed on boulders, is the result of a combination of both biogeochemical and physical processes.

  20. The role of the molecular biology laboratory in the management of chronic hepatitis B and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Karayiannis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular biology techniques are routinely used nowadays to diagnose and evaluate antiviral treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV infections. Current tools at our disposal include tests that quantify the amount of circulating virus in the blood, techniques that can analyse genomic sequences to determine viral genotypes or subtypes, or determine amino-acid substitutions that may confer resistance to existing antiviral drugs. What is more, continuously evolving serological tests for the detection of viral antigens or their corresponding antibodies, have made diagnosis of disease as sensitive as possible. The present review will concentrate primarily on molecular diagnostics.

  1. Enhanced expression of fibroblast growth factors and receptor FGFR-1 during vascular remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Kranenburg (Andor); W.I. de Boer (Pim); J.H.J.M. van Krieken (Han); W.J. Mooi (Wolter); J.E. Walters (Jane); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan); P.J. Sterk (Peter); H.S. Sharma (Hari)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractImportant characteristics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) include airway and vascular remodeling, the molecular mechanisms of which are poorly understood. We assessed the role of fibroblast growth factors (FGF) in pulmonary vascular remodeling by

  2. Role of Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor and Sequencing Batch Reactor in Biological Degradation of Formaldehyde Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays formaldehyde is used as raw material in many industries. It has also disinfection applications in some public places. Due to its toxicity for microorganisms, chemical or anaerobic biological methods are applied for treating wastewater containing formaldehyde.In this research, formaldehyde removal efficiencies of aerobic biological treatment systems including moving bed biofilm (MMBR and sequencing batch reactors (SBR were investigated. During all experiments, the efficiency of SBR was more than MBBR, but the difference was not significant statistically. According to the results, the best efficiencies were obtained for influent formaldehyde COD of 200 mg/L in MBBR and SBR which were 93% and 99.4%, respectively. The systems were also capable to treat higher formaldehyde concentrations (up to 2500 mg/L with lower removal efficiency. The reaction kinetics followed the Stover-Kincannon second order model. The gram-positive and gram-negative bacillus and coccus as well as the gram-positive binary bacillus were found to be the most dominant species. The results of 13C-NMR analysis have shown that formaldehyde and urea were converted into N-{[(aminocarbonyl amino] methyl}urea and the residual formaldehyde was polymerized at room temperature.

  3. How old do you feel? The role of age discrimination and biological aging in subjective age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Stephan

    Full Text Available Subjective age, or how young or old individuals experience themselves to be relative to their chronological age, is a crucial construct in gerontology. Subjective age is a significant predictor of important health outcomes, but little is known about the criteria by which individuals' subjectively evaluate their age. To identify psychosocial and biomedical factors linked to the subjective evaluation of age, this study examined whether perceived age discrimination and markers of biological aging are associated with subjective age. Participants were 4776 adults (Mage = 68 from the 2008 and 2010 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS who completed measures of subjective age, age discrimination, demographic variables, self-rated health and depression, and had physical health measures, including peak expiratory flow, grip strength, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Telomere length was available for a subset of participants in the 2008 wave (n = 2214. Regression analysis indicated that perceived age discrimination, lower peak expiratory flow, lower grip strength, and higher waist circumference were associated with an older subjective age, controlling for sociodemographic factors, self-rated health, and depression. In contrast, blood pressure and telomere length were not related to subjective age. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that how old a person feels depends in part on psychosocial and biomedical factors, including the experiences of ageism and perceptible indices of fitness and biological age.

  4. The role of ontologies in biological and biomedical research: a functional perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-04-10

    Ontologies are widely used in biological and biomedical research. Their success lies in their combination of four main features present in almost all ontologies: provision of standard identifiers for classes and relations that represent the phenomena within a domain; provision of a vocabulary for a domain; provision of metadata that describes the intended meaning of the classes and relations in ontologies; and the provision of machine-readable axioms and definitions that enable computational access to some aspects of the meaning of classes and relations. While each of these features enables applications that facilitate data integration, data access and analysis, a great potential lies in the possibility of combining these four features to support integrative analysis and interpretation of multimodal data. Here, we provide a functional perspective on ontologies in biology and biomedicine, focusing on what ontologies can do and describing how they can be used in support of integrative research. We also outline perspectives for using ontologies in data-driven science, in particular their application in structured data mining and machine learning applications.

  5. The Role of Stochastic Models in Interpreting the Origins of Biological Chirality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Lente

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent stochastic modeling efforts in the theoretical research aimed at interpreting the origins of biological chirality. Stochastic kinetic models, especially those based on the continuous time discrete state approach, have great potential in modeling absolute asymmetric reactions, experimental examples of which have been reported in the past decade. An overview of the relevant mathematical background is given and several examples are presented to show how the significant numerical problems characteristic of the use of stochastic models can be overcome by non-trivial, but elementary algebra. In these stochastic models, a particulate view of matter is used rather than the concentration-based view of traditional chemical kinetics using continuous functions to describe the properties system. This has the advantage of giving adequate description of single-molecule events, which were probably important in the origin of biological chirality. The presented models can interpret and predict the random distribution of enantiomeric excess among repetitive experiments, which is the most striking feature of absolute asymmetric reactions. It is argued that the use of the stochastic kinetic approach should be much more widespread in the relevant literature.

  6. The role of fractional calculus in modeling biological phenomena: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, C.; Lopes, A.; Copot, D.; Machado, J. A. T.; Bates, J. H. T.

    2017-10-01

    This review provides the latest developments and trends in the application of fractional calculus (FC) in biomedicine and biology. Nature has often showed to follow rather simple rules that lead to the emergence of complex phenomena as a result. Of these, the paper addresses the properties in respiratory lung tissue, whose natural solutions arise from the midst of FC in the form of non-integer differ-integral solutions and non-integer parametric models. Diffusion of substances in human body, e.g. drug diffusion, is also a phenomena well known to be captured with such mathematical models. FC has been employed in neuroscience to characterize the generation of action potentials and spiking patters but also in characterizing bio-systems (e.g. vegetable tissues). Despite the natural complexity, biological systems belong as well to this class of systems, where FC has offered parsimonious yet accurate models. This review paper is a collection of results and literature reports who are essential to any versed engineer with multidisciplinary applications and bio-medical in particular.

  7. Low-Molecular-Weight Metabolites from Diatoms: Structures, Biological Roles and Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonik, Valentin; Stonik, Inna

    2015-06-09

    Diatoms are abundant and important biological components of the marine environment that biosynthesize diverse natural products. These microalgae are rich in various lipids, carotenoids, sterols and isoprenoids, some of them containing toxins and other metabolites. Several groups of diatom natural products have attracted great interest due to their potential practical application as energy sources (biofuel), valuable food constituents, and prospective materials for nanotechnology. In addition, hydrocarbons, which are used in climate reconstruction, polyamines which participate in biomineralization, new apoptotic agents against tumor cells, attractants and deterrents that regulate the biochemical communications between marine species in seawaters have also been isolated from diatoms. However, chemical studies on these microalgae are complicated by difficulties, connected with obtaining their biomass, and the influence of nutrients and contaminators in their environment as well as by seasonal and climatic factors on the biosynthesis of the corresponding natural products. Overall, the number of chemically studied diatoms is lower than that of other algae, but further studies, particularly those connected with improvements in the isolation and structure elucidation technique as well as the genomics of diatoms, promise both to increase the number of studied species with isolated biologically active natural products and to provide a clearer perception of their biosynthesis.

  8. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) promotes lung fibroblast proliferation, survival and differentiation to myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Cao, Jian; Pulkoski-Gross, Ashleigh; Zucker, Stanley; Foda, Hussein D

    2016-02-17

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressively fatal disease. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) is a glycosylated transmembrane protein that induces the expression of some matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) in neighboring stromal cells through direct epithelial-stromal interactions. EMMPRIN is highly expressed in type II alveolar epithelial cells at the edges of the fibrotic areas in IPF lung sections. However, the exact role of EMMPRIN in IPF is unknown. To determine if EMMPRIN contributes to lung fibroblast proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, and differentiation to myofibroblasts, normal Human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) transiently transfected with either EMMPRIN/GFP or GFP were treated with TGF- β1 from 0 to 10 ng/ml for 48 h and examined for cell proliferation (thymidine incorporation), apoptosis (FACS analysis and Cell Death Detection ELISA assay), cell migration (Modified Boyden chamber) and differentiation to myofibroblasts using Western blot for α-smooth actin of cell lysates. The effect of EMMPRIN inhibition on NHLF proliferation, apoptosis, migration and differentiation to myofibroblasts after TGF- β1 treatment was examined using EMMPRIN blocking antibody. We examined the mechanism by which EMMPRIN induces its effects on fibroblasts by studying the β-catenin/canonical Wnt signaling pathway using Wnt luciferase reporter assays and Western blot for total and phosphorylated β-catenin. Human lung fibroblasts overexpressing EMMPRIN had a significant increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to control fibroblasts. Furthermore, EMMPRIN promoted lung fibroblasts resistance to apoptosis. Lung fibroblasts overexpressing EMMPRIN showed a significantly increased expression of α- smooth muscle actin, a marker of differentiation to myofibroblasts compared to control cells. TGF-β1 increased the expression of EMMPRIN in lung fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. Attenuation of EMMPRIN expression with the use of an

  9. The roles of loosely-bound and tightly-bound extracellular polymer substances in enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiangyu; Tang, Ran; Fang, Zhendong; Xie, Chaoxin; Li, Yongqin; Xian, Guang

    2017-12-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have be founded to participate in the process of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), but the exact role of EPS in EBPR process is unclear. In this work, the roles of loosely-bound EPS (LB-EPS), tightly-bound EPS (TB-EPS) and microbial cell in EBPR were explored, taking the activated sludge from 4 lab-scale A/O-SBR reactors with different temperatures and organic substrates as objects. It was founded that the P of EBPR activated sludge was mainly stored in TB-EPS, but the P of non-EBPR activated sludge was primarily located in microbial cell. The P release and uptake of EBPR activated sludge was attributed to the combined action of TB-EPS and microbial cell. Furthermore, TB-EPS played an more important role than microbial cell in EBPR process. With the analysis of 31 P NMR spectroscopy, both polyP and orthoP were the main phosphorus species of TB-EPS in EBPR sludge, but only orthoP was the main phosphorus species of LB-EPS and microbial cell. During the anaerobic-aerobic cycle, the roles of LB-EPS, TB-EPS and microbial cell in transfer and transformation of P in EBPR sludge were obviously different. LB-EPS transported and retained orthoP, and microbial cell directly anaerobically released or aerobically absorbed orthoP. Importantly, TB-EPS not only transported and retained orthoP, but also participated in biological phosphorus accumulation. The EBPR performance of sludge was closely related with the polyp in TB-EPS, which might be synthesized and decomposed by extracellular enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Heterodimerization of wild-type and mutant fibroblast growth factor receptors in cell-derived vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, Kalina; Del Piccolo, Nuala; Sarabipour, Sarvenaz

    The activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is controlled through their lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane. RTKs are believed to form both homodimers and heterodimers, and the different dimers are believed to play unique roles in cell signaling. However, RTK heterodimers remain poorly characterized, as compared to homodimers, due to limitations in current experimental methods. Here, we develop a Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based methodology to assess the thermodynamics of hetero-interactions in the plasma membrane. To demonstrate the utility of the methodology, we use it to study the hetero-interactions between three Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors - FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGFR3 - in the absence of ligand. Our results show that all possible FGFR heterodimers form, suggesting that the biological roles of FGFR heterodimers may be as significant as the homodimer roles. We further investigate the effect of two pathogenic point mutations in FGFR3 (A391E and G380R) on heterodimerization. We show that each of these mutations stabilize most of the heterodimers, with the largest effects observed for FGFR3 wild-type/mutant heterodimers. We thus demonstrate that the methodology presented here can yield new knowledge about RTK interactions and can further our understanding of signal transduction across the plasma membrane..

  11. L-Lactate Protects Skin Fibroblasts against Aging-Associated Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Mitohormesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelenka, Jaroslav; Dvořák, Aleš; Alán, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2015, č. 2015 (2015), ID351698 ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP305/12/P388 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondria * reactive oxygen species * lactate * fibroblasts Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.492, year: 2015

  12. Alpha-tocopheryl succinate inhibits malignant mesothelioma by disrupting the fibroblast growth factor autocrine loop

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stapelberg, M.; Gellert, N.; Swettenham, E.; Tomasetti, M.; Witting, P. K.; Procopio, A.; Neužil, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 280, č. 27 (2005), s. 25369-25376 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : alpha-tocopheryl succinate * malignant mesothelioma * fibroblast growth factor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2005

  13. Rationale behind targeting fibroblast activation protein-expressing carcinoma-associated fibroblasts as a novel chemotherapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennen, W Nathaniel; Isaacs, John T; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2012-02-01

    The tumor microenvironment has emerged as a novel chemotherapeutic strategy in the treatment of cancer. This is most clearly exemplified by the antiangiogenesis class of compounds. Therapeutic strategies that target fibroblasts within the tumor stroma offer another treatment option. However, despite promising data obtained in preclinical models, such strategies have not been widely used in the clinical setting, largely due to a lack of effective treatments that specifically target this population of cells. The identification of fibroblast activation protein α (FAP) as a target selectively expressed on fibroblasts within the tumor stroma or on carcinoma-associated fibroblasts led to intensive efforts to exploit this novel cellular target for clinical benefit. FAP is a membrane-bound serine protease of the prolyl oligopeptidase family with unique post-prolyl endopeptidase activity. Until recently, the majority of FAP-based therapeutic approaches focused on the development of small-molecule inhibitors of enzymatic activity. Evidence suggests, however, that FAP's pathophysiological role in carcinogenesis may be highly contextual, depending on both the exact nature of the tumor microenvironment present and the cancer type in question to determine its tumor-promoting or tumor-suppressing phenotype. As an alternative strategy, we are taking advantage of FAP's restricted expression and unique substrate preferences to develop a FAP-activated prodrug to target the activation of a cytotoxic compound within the tumor stroma. Of note, this strategy would be effective independently of FAP's role in tumor progression because its therapeutic benefit would rely on FAP's localization and activity within the tumor microenvironment rather than strictly on inhibition of its function.

  14. Functional biology and ecological role of krill in Northern marine ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersted, Mette Dalgaard

    ) and by production of fast sinking carbon-rich faecal pellets. Hence, the large schools of krill greatly influence the pelagic food web and the flux of organic matter in the sea. However, knowledge of the distribution and feeding biology in krill from northern areas is scarce, although of importance to get a better...... understanding of the marine ecosystems and food webs. This thesis aimed to gain more knowledge of krill in northern hemisphere and to study their trophic position and grazing impact in a sub-Arctic fjord. The project investigated i) species and population composition of krill in the area of Godthåbsfjord, SW...... assumed to be the main grazers in marine ecosystems. This suggests that krill could be and are - in the case of Godthåbsfjord - important grazers that deserve more attention in future monitoring and research programs...

  15. Using phosphine ligands with a biological role to modulate reactivity in novel platinum complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri, Marcelo; Alvarez-Valdés, Amparo; Navas, Francisco; Perles, Josefina; Sánchez-Pérez, Isabel; Quiroga, A. G.

    2018-02-01

    Three platinum complexes with cis and trans configuration cis-[Pt(TCEP)2Cl2], cis-[Pt(tmTCEP)2Cl2] and trans-[Pt(TCEP)2Cl2], where TCEP is tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, have been synthesized and fully characterized by usual techniques including single-crystal X-ray diffraction for trans-[Pt(TCEP)2Cl2] and cis-[Pt(tmTCEP)2Cl2]. Here, we also report on an esterification process of TCEP, which takes place in the presence of alcohols, leading to a platinum complex coordinated to an ester tmTCEP (2-methoxycarbonylethyl phosphine) ligand. The stability in solution of the three compounds and their interaction with biological models such as DNA (pBR322 and calf thymus DNA) and proteins (lysozyme and RNase) have also been studied.

  16. Role of Pullulan in preparation of ceria nanoparticles and investigation of their biological activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, Mohammad Bagher; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Pasdar, Alireza; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Riahi-Zanjani, Bamdad; Darroudi, Majid

    2018-04-01

    Throughout this work, a facile, environmental-friendly, and "green" method is delineated for preparing ceria nanoparticles (CNPs), which utilizes nontoxic and renewable degraded polysaccharide polymer including pullulan as a natural matrix. Pullulan behaves as a suitable stabilizing (capping) agent for CNPs that are effectively formed at various high temperatures, while they are structurally analyzed through different techniques such as TGA/DTG, XRD, FESEM, and FTIR instruments. This procedure was found to be comparable to the ones that were acquired from conventional preparation methods that employ hazardous materials, which confirms this approach to be an exquisite alternative in preparing CNPs through the benefit of bioorganic materials. The in vitro cytotoxicity studies on Neuro2A cells have mentioned nontoxic particles in a range of concentrations (0.97-125 μg/ml) and thus, we reckon that the prepared particular CNPs will have persistent utilization in various fields of biology and medicine.

  17. Insights into the key roles of proteoglycans in breast cancer biology and translational medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Skandalis, Spyros S.; Neill, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    of proteoglycans on tumor and stromal cell membranes affects cancer cell signaling, growth and survival, cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. Despite the high complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the rapid evolution in our knowledge that proteoglycans are among the key players in the breast tumor...... in the proteoglycans that will be presented herein provides the potential for multiple layers of regulation of breast tumor behavior. This review summarizes recent developments concerning the biology of selected proteoglycans in breast cancer, and presents potential targeted therapeutic approaches based on their novel......Proteoglycans control numerous normal and pathological processes, among which are morphogenesis, tissue repair, inflammation, vascularization and cancer metastasis. During tumor development and growth, proteoglycan expression is markedly modified in the tumor microenvironment. Altered expression...

  18. The role of energy in the emergence of biology from chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibrova, Daria V; Chudetsky, Michail Y; Galperin, Michael Y; Koonin, Eugene V; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y

    2012-10-01

    Any scenario of the transition from chemistry to biology should include an "energy module" because life can exist only when supported by energy flow(s). We addressed the problem of primordial energetics by combining physico-chemical considerations with phylogenomic analysis. We propose that the first replicators could use abiotically formed, exceptionally photostable activated cyclic nucleotides both as building blocks and as the main energy source. Nucleoside triphosphates could replace cyclic nucleotides as the principal energy-rich compounds at the stage of the first cells, presumably because the metal chelates of nucleoside triphosphates penetrated membranes much better than the respective metal complexes of nucleoside monophosphates. The ability to exploit natural energy flows for biogenic production of energy-rich molecules could evolve only gradually, after the emergence of sophisticated enzymes and ion-tight membranes. We argue that, in the course of evolution, sodium-dependent membrane energetics preceded the proton-based energetics which evolved independently in bacteria and archaea.

  19. Flexible mechanisms: the diverse roles of biological springs in vertebrate movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J; Azizi, Emanuel

    2011-02-01

    The muscles that power vertebrate locomotion are associated with springy tissues, both within muscle and in connective tissue elements such as tendons. These springs share in common the same simple action: they stretch and store elastic strain energy when force is applied to them and recoil to release energy when force decays. Although this elastic action is simple, it serves a diverse set of functions, including metabolic energy conservation, amplification of muscle power output, attenuation of muscle power input, and rapid mechanical feedback that may aid in stability. In recent years, our understanding of the mechanisms and importance of biological springs in locomotion has advanced significantly, and it has been demonstrated that elastic mechanisms are essential for the effective function of the muscle motors that power movement. Here, we review some recent advances in our understanding of elastic mechanisms, with an emphasis on two proposed organizing principles. First, we review the evidence that the various functions of biological springs allow the locomotor system to operate beyond the bounds of intrinsic muscle properties, including metabolic and mechanical characteristics, as well as motor control processes. Second, we propose that an energy-based framework is useful for interpreting the diverse functions of series-elastic springs. In this framework, the direction and timing of the flow of energy between the body, the elastic element and the contracting muscle determine the function served by the elastic mechanism (e.g. energy conservation vs power amplification). We also review recent work demonstrating that structures such as tendons remodel more actively and behave more dynamically than previously assumed.

  20. Volatile compounds of raspberry fruit: from analytical methods to biological role and sensory impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Gasperi, Flavia

    2015-01-30

    Volatile compounds play a key role in the formation of the well-recognized and widely appreciated raspberry aroma. Studies on the isolation and identification of volatile compounds in raspberry fruit (Rubus idaeus L.) are reviewed with a focus on aroma-related compounds. A table is drawn up containing a comprehensive list of the volatile compounds identified so far in raspberry along with main references and quantitative data where available. Two additional tables report the glycosidic bond and enantiomeric distributions of the volatile compounds investigated up to now in raspberry fruit. Studies on the development and evolution of volatile compounds during fruit formation, ripening and senescence, and genetic and environmental influences are also reviewed. Recent investigations showing the potential role of raspberry volatile compounds in cultivar differentiation and fruit resistance to mold disease are reported as well. Finally a summary of research done so far and our vision for future research lines are reported.

  1. The role of microbial-produced extracellular polymeric matrix in the formation and survival of biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Federico; Adessi, Alessandra; De Philippis, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are complex communities commonly constituting organo-mineral layers in arid and semiarid environment having a major influence on these ecosystems (Belnap and Lange, 2001). They have high tolerance towards a-biotic stresses and fluctuations in moisture, illumination, salinity and nutrients. The plasticity exhibited by BSCs is hugely contributed by the presence of the extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM) that is synthesized by crustal organisms, notably cyanobacteria and microalgae. This polysaccharidic net plays key roles in biofilm relations with the surrounding constrained environment. Notably, EPM concurs in coping with water scarcity, freezing and salt stress; increases biolayers stability against erosion, and is involved in nutrient provision (Rossi and De Philippis, 2015). We conducted several investigations in a research area located in the Inner Mongolian desert (Inner Mongolia, China) where BSCs were induced over different sites through inoculation-based techniques performed in different years. Our studies were aimed at determining the role of EPM in BSC development and survival in such a hyper-arid system. This presentation will report the results concerning the role of EPM in water capture from non-rainfall sources, water maintenance at the topsoil, and in water infiltrability, the latter being a factor with important ecological implications. In additions we investigated the role of the matrix as a source of carbon for the crustal heterotrophs. Furthermore, EPM was extracted with methods optimized in our lab, aiming at removing tightly bound fractions and loosely bound fractions from BSCs having different ages. The fractions were analyzed in terms of monosaccharidic composition, and molecular weight (MW) distribution. We show how the relative amounts of uronic acids increase in the EPM with the age of the crusts, implying advantages for the community-water relations. In addition, we observed significant differences in MW

  2. Phosphorylation of CREB, a cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein, contributes partially to lysophosphatidic acid-induced fibroblast cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Yong-Jun; Sun, Yuanjie; Kim, Nam-Ho; Huh, Sung-Oh

    2009-01-01

    Lysophospholipids regulate a wide array of biological processes including cell survival and proliferation. In our previous studies, we found that in addition to SRE, CRE is required for maximal c-fos promoter activation triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). c-fos is an early indicator of various cells into the cell cycle after mitogenic stimulation. However, role of CREB activation in LPA-stimulated proliferation has not been elucidated yet. Here, we investigate how LPA induces proliferation in Rat-2 fibroblast cell via CREB activation. We found that total cell number and BrdU-positive cells were increased by LPA. Moreover, levels of c-fos mRNA and cyclin D1 protein were increased via LPA-induced CREB phosphorylation. Furthermore, LPA-induced Rat-2 cell proliferation was decreased markedly by ERK inhibitor (U0126) and partially by MSK inhibitor (H89). Taken together, these results suggest that CREB activation could partially up-regulate accumulation of cyclin D1 protein level and proliferation of LPA-stimulated Rat-2 fibroblast cells.

  3. Understanding Biological Roles of Venoms Among the Caenophidia: The Importance of Rear-Fanged Snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackessy, Stephen P; Saviola, Anthony J

    2016-11-01

    Snake venoms represent an adaptive trophic response to the challenges confronting a limbless predator for overcoming combative prey, and this chemical means of subduing prey shows several dominant phenotypes. Many front-fanged snakes, particularly vipers, feed on various vertebrate and invertebrate prey species, and some of their venom components (e.g., metalloproteinases, cobratoxin) appear to have been selected for "broad-brush" incapacitation of different prey taxa. Using proteomic and genomic techniques, the compositional diversity of front-fanged snakes is becoming well characterized; however, this is not the case for most rear-fanged colubroid snakes. Because these species consume a high diversity of prey, and because venoms are primarily a trophic adaptation, important clues for understanding specific selective pressures favoring venom component composition will be found among rear-fanged snake venoms. Rear-fanged snakes typically (but not always) produce venoms with lower complexity than front-fanged snakes, and there are even fewer dominant (and, arguably, biologically most relevant) venom protein families. We have demonstrated taxon-specific toxic effects, where lizards and birds show high susceptibility while mammals are largely unaffected, for both Old World and New World rear-fanged snakes, strongly indicating a causal link between toxin evolution and prey preference. New data are presented on myotoxin a, showing that the extremely rapid paralysis induced by this rattlesnake toxin is specific for rodents, and that myotoxin a is ineffectual against lizards. Relatively few rear-fanged snake venoms have been characterized, and basic natural history data are largely lacking, but directed sampling of specialized species indicates that novel compounds are likely among these specialists, particularly among those species feeding on invertebrate prey such as scorpions and centipedes. Because many of the more than 2200 species of colubroid snakes are rear

  4. The role of automated feedback in training and retaining biological recorders for citizen science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, René; Sharma, Nirwan; Mellish, Chris; Robinson, Annie; Siddharthan, Advaith

    2016-06-01

    correct identification without explanation. The value of NLG feedback in the live program, captured through questionnaires and evaluation of the online photo-based training tool, likewise showed that the automated generation of informative feedback fostered learning and volunteer engagement and thus paves the way for productive and long-lived citizen science projects. © 2016 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Differences in motility pattern between human buccal fibroblasts and periodontal and skin fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepekhin, Eugene; Grøn, Birgitte; Berezin, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    -assisted microscope work-station. For evaluation of cell morphology, cell contours were recognized semiautomatically and used for determination of cell area, cell spreading and number and length of processes. We found that the cellular displacement of the buccal fibroblasts was only approximately 50% of the cellular...... and motility pattern amongst the three fibroblast types could not be explained by differences in secretion of extracellular matrix components and are therefore believed to reflect phenotypic differences amongst fibroblast subpopulations....

  6. Interfacial water molecules at biological membranes: Structural features and role for lateral proton diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Zhang, Chao; Weichselbaum, Ewald; Knyazev, Denis G; Pohl, Peter; Carloni, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Proton transport at water/membrane interfaces plays a fundamental role for a myriad of bioenergetic processes. Here we have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of proton transfer along two phosphatidylcholine bilayers. As found in previous theoretical studies, the excess proton is preferably located at the water/membrane interface. Further, our simulations indicate that it interacts not only with phosphate head groups, but also with water molecules at the interfaces. Interfacial water molecules turn out to be oriented relative to the lipid bilayers, consistently with experimental evidence. Hence, the specific water-proton interaction may help explain the proton mobility experimentally observed at the membrane interface.

  7. Developmental biology informs cancer: the emerging role of the hedgehog signaling pathway in upper gastrointestinal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Keping; Abbruzzese, James L

    2003-10-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays many roles in invertebrate and vertebrate development. For example, specific inhibition of sonic Hh expression is critical during early stages of pancreas organogenesis, but an active Hh pathway appears to be required for maintenance of adult endocrine functions. Mutational inactivation of the Hh pathway has been demonstrated in human malignancies of the skin, cerebellum, and skeletal muscle. Now, two papers implicate aberrant Hh signaling in human upper gastrointestinal cancers including those developing from the esophagus, stomach, biliary tract, and pancreas.

  8. CO2 Permeability of Biological Membranes and Role of CO2 Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endeward, Volker; Arias-Hidalgo, Mariela; Al-Samir, Samer; Gros, Gerolf

    2017-01-01

    We summarize here, mainly for mammalian systems, the present knowledge of (a) the membrane CO2 permeabilities in various tissues; (b) the physiological significance of the value of the CO2 permeability; (c) the mechanisms by which membrane CO2 permeability is modulated; (d) the role of the intracellular diffusivity of CO2 for the quantitative significance of cell membrane CO2 permeability; (e) the available evidence for the existence of CO2 channels in mammalian and artificial systems, with a brief view on CO2 channels in fishes and plants; and, (f) the possible significance of CO2 channels in mammalian systems. PMID:29064458

  9. Matrix stiffness and oxigen tension modulate epigenetic conversion of mouse dermal fibroblasts into insulin producing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Zenobi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, cells are surrounded by a three-dimensional (3-D organization of supporting matrix, neighboring cells and a gradient of chemical and mechanical signals (Antoni, et al., 2015. However, the present understanding of many biological processes is mainly based on two-dimensional (2-D systems that typically provides a static environment. In the present study, we tested two different 3-D culture systems and apply them to the epigenetic conversion of mouse dermal fibroblasts into insulin producing-cells (Pennarossa, et al., 2013; Brevini, et al., 2015, combining also the use of two oxygen tensions. In particular, cells were differentiated using the Polytetrafluoroethylene micro-bioreactor (PTFE and the Polyacrylamide (PAA gels with different stiffness (1 kPa; 4 kPa, maintained either in the standard 20% or in the more physiological 5% oxygen tensions. Standard differentiation performed on plastic substrates was assessed as a control. Cell morphology (Fig.1A, insulin expression and release were analyzed to evaluate the role of both stiffness and oxygen tension in the process. The results obtained showed that 1 kPa PAA gel and PTFE system induced a significantly higher insulin expression and release than plastic and 4 kPa PAA gel, especially in low oxygen condition (Fig.1B. Furthermore, comparing the efficiency of the two systems tested, 1 kPa PAA gel ensured a higher insulin transcription than PTFE (Fig.1C. Recent studies show the direct influence of substrates on lineage commitment and cell differentiation (Engler, et al., 2006; Evans, et al., 2009. The evidence here presented confirm that the use of an appropriate stiffness (similar to the pancreatic tissue, combined with a physiological oxygen tension, promote β-cell differentiation, with beneficial effects on cell functional activity and insulin release. The present results highlight the importance of 3-D cell rearrangement and oxigen tension to promote in vitro epigenetic conversion of

  10. Evidence for the involvement of fibroblast growth factor 10 in lipofibroblast formation during embryonic lung development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Alam, Denise; El Agha, Elie; Sakurai, Reiko; Kheirollahi, Vahid; Moiseenko, Alena; Danopoulos, Soula; Shrestha, Amit; Schmoldt, Carole; Quantius, Jennifer; Herold, Susanne; Chao, Cho-Ming; Tiozzo, Caterina; De Langhe, Stijn; Plikus, Maksim V; Thornton, Matthew; Grubbs, Brendan; Minoo, Parviz; Rehan, Virender K; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-12-01

    Lipid-containing alveolar interstitial fibroblasts (lipofibroblasts) are increasingly recognized as an important component of the epithelial stem cell niche in the rodent lung. Although lipofibroblasts were initially believed merely to assist type 2 alveolar epithelial cells in surfactant production during neonatal life, recent evidence suggests that these cells are indispensable for survival and growth of epithelial stem cells during adulthood. Despite increasing interest in lipofibroblast biology, little is known about their cellular origin or the molecular pathways controlling their formation during embryonic development. Here, we show that a population of lipid-droplet-containing stromal cells emerges in the developing mouse lung between E15.5 and E16.5. This is accompanied by significant upregulation, in the lung mesenchyme, of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (master switch of lipogenesis), adipose differentiation-related protein (marker of mature lipofibroblasts) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (previously shown to identify a subpopulation of lipofibroblast progenitors). We also demonstrate that although only a subpopulation of total embryonic lipofibroblasts derives from Fgf10(+) progenitor cells, in vivo knockdown of Fgfr2b ligand activity and reduction in Fgf10 expression lead to global reduction in the expression levels of lipofibroblast markers at E18.5. Constitutive Fgfr1b knockouts and mutants with conditional partial inactivation of Fgfr2b in the lung mesenchyme reveal the involvement of both receptors in lipofibroblast formation and suggest a possible compensation between the two receptors. We also provide data from human fetal lungs to demonstrate the relevance of our discoveries to humans. Our results reveal an essential role for Fgf10 signaling in the formation of lipofibroblasts during late lung development. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Effects of biomaterial-derived fibroblast conditioned medium on the α-amylase expression of parotid gland acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ya-Shuan; Young, Tai-Horng; Lou, Pei-Jen

    2015-11-01

    present study represents the first description of the role of NT-4 in the expression of α-amylase of PGACs and the role of PVDF in the reprogramming fibroblasts into neural progenitor-like cells, indicating that PVDF could promote the expression of α-amylase by PGACs via the NT-4 produced by fibroblasts. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Distinct signaling roles of ceramide species in yeast revealed through systematic perturbation and systems biology analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montefusco, David J; Chen, Lujia; Matmati, Nabil; Lu, Songjian; Newcomb, Benjamin; Cooper, Gregory F; Hannun, Yusuf A; Lu, Xinghua

    2013-10-29

    Ceramide, the central molecule of sphingolipid metabolism, is an important bioactive molecule that participates in various cellular regulatory events and that has been implicated in disease. Deciphering ceramide signaling is challenging because multiple ceramide species exist, and many of them may have distinct functions. We applied systems biology and molecular approaches to perturb ceramide metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and inferred causal relationships between ceramide species and their potential targets by combining lipidomic, genomic, and transcriptomic analyses. We found that during heat stress, distinct metabolic mechanisms controlled the abundance of different groups of ceramide species and provided experimental support for the importance of the dihydroceramidase Ydc1 in mediating the decrease in dihydroceramides during heat stress. Additionally, distinct groups of ceramide species, with different N-acyl chains and hydroxylations, regulated different sets of functionally related genes, indicating that the structural complexity of these lipids produces functional diversity. The transcriptional modules that we identified provide a resource to begin to dissect the specific functions of ceramides.

  13. Disentangling the role of environmental and human pressures on biological invasions across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysek, Petr; Jarosík, Vojtech; Hulme, Philip E; Kühn, Ingolf; Wild, Jan; Arianoutsou, Margarita; Bacher, Sven; Chiron, Francois; Didziulis, Viktoras; Essl, Franz; Genovesi, Piero; Gherardi, Francesca; Hejda, Martin; Kark, Salit; Lambdon, Philip W; Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Pergl, Jan; Poboljsaj, Katja; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Roques, Alain; Roy, David B; Shirley, Susan; Solarz, Wojciech; Vilà, Montserrat; Winter, Marten

    2010-07-06

    The accelerating rates of international trade, travel, and transport in the latter half of the twentieth century have led to the progressive mixing of biota from across the world and the number of species introduced to new regions continues to increase. The importance of biogeographic, climatic, economic, and demographic factors as drivers of this trend is increasingly being realized but as yet there is no consensus regarding their relative importance. Whereas little may be done to mitigate the effects of geography and climate on invasions, a wider range of options may exist to moderate the impacts of economic and demographic drivers. Here we use the most recent data available from Europe to partition between macroecological, economic, and demographic variables the variation in alien species richness of bryophytes, fungi, vascular plants, terrestrial insects, aquatic invertebrates, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Only national wealth and human population density were statistically significant predictors in the majority of models when analyzed jointly with climate, geography, and land cover. The economic and demographic variables reflect the intensity of human activities and integrate the effect of factors that directly determine the outcome of invasion such as propagule pressure, pathways of introduction, eutrophication, and the intensity of anthropogenic disturbance. The strong influence of economic and demographic variables on the levels of invasion by alien species demonstrates that future solutions to the problem of biological invasions at a national scale lie in mitigating the negative environmental consequences of human activities that generate wealth and by promoting more sustainable population growth.

  14. Role of cell deformability in the two-dimensional melting of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Wei; Ciamarra, Massimo Pica

    2018-04-01

    The size and shape of a large variety of polymeric particles, including biological cells, star polymers, dendrimes, and microgels, depend on the applied stresses as the particles are extremely soft. In high-density suspensions these particles deform as stressed by their neighbors, which implies that the interparticle interaction becomes of many-body type. Investigating a two-dimensional model of cell tissue, where the single particle shear modulus is related to the cell adhesion strength, here we show that the particle deformability affects the melting scenario. On increasing the temperature, stiff particles undergo a first-order solid/liquid transition, while soft ones undergo a continuous solid/hexatic transition followed by a discontinuous hexatic/liquid transition. At zero temperature the melting transition driven by the decrease of the adhesion strength occurs through two continuous transitions as in the Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson, and Young scenario. Thus, there is a range of adhesion strength values where the hexatic phase is stable at zero temperature, which suggests that the intermediate phase of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition could be hexatic type.

  15. Examining the Role of Leadership in an Undergraduate Biology Institutional Reform Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Rebecca L.; Jardeleza, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education reform continues to be a national priority. We studied a reform process in undergraduate biology at a research-intensive university to explore what leadership issues arose in implementation of the initiative when characterized with a descriptive case study method. The data were drawn from transcripts of meetings that occurred over the first 2 years of the reform process. Two literature-based models of change were used as lenses through which to view the data. We find that easing the burden of an undergraduate education reform initiative on faculty through articulating clear outcomes, developing shared vision across stakeholders on how to achieve those outcomes, providing appropriate reward systems, and ensuring faculty have ample opportunity to influence the initiative all appear to increase the success of reform. The two literature-based models were assessed, and an extended model of change is presented that moves from change in STEM instructional strategies to STEM organizational change strategies. These lessons may be transferable to other institutions engaging in education reform. PMID:27856545

  16. Understanding the Role of Biology in the Global Environment: NASA'S Mission to Planet Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, William F.

    1996-01-01

    NASA has long used the unique perspective of space as a means of expanding our understanding of how the Earth's environment functions. In particular, the linkages between land, air, water, and life-the elements of the Earth system-are a focus for NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. This approach, called Earth system science, blends together fields like meteorology, biology, oceanography, and atmospheric science. Mission to Planet Earth uses observations from satellites, aircraft, balloons, and ground researchers as the basis for analysis of the elements of the Earth system, the interactions between those elements, and possible changes over the coming years and decades. This information is helping scientists improve our understanding of how natural processes affect us and how we might be affecting them. Such studies will yield improved weather forecasts, tools for managing agriculture and forests, information for fishermen and local planners, and, eventually, an enhanced ability to predict how the climate will change in the future. NASA has designed Mission to Planet Earth to focus on five primary themes: Land Cover and Land Use Change; Seasonal to Interannual Climate Prediction; Natural Hazards; Long-Term Climate Variability; and Atmosphere Ozone.

  17. The biological role of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, A; Tikkanen, R; Kirfel, G; Herzog, V

    2002-02-01

    Proteolytic processing of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) results in the generation of at least two distinct classes of biologically relevant peptides: (1) the amyloid beta peptides which are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and (2) the soluble N-terminal ectodomain (sAPP) which exhibits a protective but as yet ill-defined effect on neurons and epithelial cells. In this report we present an overview on the functions of sAPP as an epithelial growth factor. This function involves specific binding of sAPP to membrane rafts and results in signal transduction and various physiological effects in epithelial cells as different as keratinocytes and thyrocytes. At nanomolar concentrations sAPP induces a two to fourfold increase in the rate of cell proliferation and cell migration. Specific inhibition of APP expression by antisense techniques results in decreased sAPP release and in reduced proliferative and motogenic activities. Proliferation and migration are known to be part of complex processes such as wound healing which, therefore, might be facilitated by the growth factor function of sAPP.

  18. Identification of colonic fibroblast secretomes reveals secretory factors regulating colon cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Xu, Xiao-En; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Qian; Qiao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-10-14

    Stromal microenvironment influences tumor cell proliferation and migration. Fibroblasts represent the most abundant stromal constituents. Here, we established two pairs of normal fibroblast (NF) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) cultures from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues and the normal counterparts. The NFs and CAFs were stained positive for typical fibroblast markers and inhibited colon cancer (CC) cell proliferation in in vitro cocultures and in xenograft mouse models. The fibroblast conditioned media were analyzed using LC-MS and 227 proteins were identified at a false discovery rate of 1.3%, including 131 putative secretory and 20 plasma membrane proteins. These proteins were enriched for functional categories of extracellular matrix, adhesion, cell motion, inflammatory response, redox homeostasis and peptidase inhibitor. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, transgelin, follistatin-related protein 1 (FSTL1) and decorin was abundant in the fibroblast secretome as confirmed by Western blot. Silencing of FSTL1 and transgelin in colonic fibroblast cell line CCD-18Co induced an accelerated proliferation of CC cells in cocultures. Exogenous FSTL1 attenuates CC cell proliferation in a negative fashion. FSTL1 was upregulated in CC patient plasma and cancerous tissues but had no implication in prognosis. Our results provided novel insights into the molecular signatures and modulatory role of CC associated fibroblasts. In this study, a label-free LC-MS was performed to analyze the secretomes of two paired primary fibroblasts, which were isolated from fresh surgical specimen of colorectal adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal colonic tissues and exhibited negative modulatory activity for colon cancer cell growth in in vitro cocultures and in vivo xenograph mouse models. Follistatin-related protein 1 was further revealed to be one of the stroma-derived factors of potential suppression role for colon cancer cell proliferation. Our results provide novel

  19. Inhibition of normal human lung fibroblast growth by beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, N M; Gary, R K; Marrone, B L; Lehnert, B E

    2001-03-07

    Inhalation of particulate beryllium (Be) and its compounds causes chronic Be disease (CBD) in a relatively small subset ( approximately 1-6%) of exposed individuals. Hallmarks of this pulmonary disease include increases in several cell types, including lung fibroblasts, that contribute to the fibrotic component of the disorder. In this regard, enhancements in cell proliferation appear to play a fundamental role in CBD development and progression. Paradoxically, however, some existing evidence suggests that Be actually has antiproliferative effects. In order to gain further information about the effects of Be on cell growth, we: (1) assessed cell proliferation and cell cycle effects of low concentrations of Be in normal human diploid fibroblasts, and (2) investigated the molecular pathway(s) by which the cell cycle disturbing effects of Be may be mediated. Treatment of human lung and skin fibroblasts with Be added in the soluble form of BeSO(4) (0.1-100 microM) caused inhibitions of their growth in culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Such growth inhibition was found to persist, even after cells were further cultured in Be(2+)-free medium. Flow cytometric analyses of cellular DNA labeled with the DNA-binding fluorochrome DAPI revealed that Be causes a G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest. Western blot analyses indicated that the Be-induced G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest involves elevations in TP53 (p53) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21(Waf-1,Cip1)). That Be at low concentrations inhibits the growth of normal human fibroblasts suggests the possibility of the existence of abnormal cell cycle inhibitory responses to Be in individuals who are sensitive to the metal and ultimately develop CBD.

  20. Characterization of Lung Fibroblasts More than Two Decades after Mustard Gas Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzad Jahromi, Gila; Ghanei, Mostafa; Hosseini, Seyed Kazem; Shamsaei, Alireza; Gholipourmalekabadi, Mazaher; Koochaki, Ameneh; Karkuki Osguei, Nushin; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In patients with short-term exposure to the sulfur mustard gas, the delayed cellular effects on lungs have not been well understood yet. The lung pathology shows a dominant feature consistent with obliterative bronchiolitis, in which fibroblasts play a central role. This study aims to characterize alterations to lung fibroblasts, at the cellular level, in patients with delayed respiratory complications after short-term exposure to the sulfur mustard gas. Fibroblasts were isolated from the transbronchial biopsies of patients with documented history of exposure to single high-dose sulfur mustard during 1985-7 and compared with the fibroblasts of control subjects. Compared with controls, patients' fibroblasts were thinner and shorter, and showed a higher population doubling level, migration capacity and number of filopodia. Sulfur mustard decreased the in vitro viability of fibroblasts and increased their sensitivity to induction of apoptosis, but did not change the rate of spontaneous apoptosis. In addition, higher expression of alpha smooth muscle actin showed that the lung's microenvironment in these patients is permissive for myofibroblastic differentiation. These findings suggest that in patients under the study, the delayed pulmonary complications of sulfur mustard should be considered as a unique pathology, which might need a specific management by manipulation of cellular components.

  1. Characterization of Lung Fibroblasts More than Two Decades after Mustard Gas Exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gila Pirzad Jahromi

    Full Text Available In patients with short-term exposure to the sulfur mustard gas, the delayed cellular effects on lungs have not been well understood yet. The lung pathology shows a dominant feature consistent with obliterative bronchiolitis, in which fibroblasts play a central role. This study aims to characterize alterations to lung fibroblasts, at the cellular level, in patients with delayed respiratory complications after short-term exposure to the sulfur mustard gas.Fibroblasts were isolated from the transbronchial biopsies of patients with documented history of exposure to single high-dose sulfur mustard during 1985-7 and compared with the fibroblasts of control subjects.Compared with controls, patients' fibroblasts were thinner and shorter, and showed a higher population doubling level, migration capacity and number of filopodia. Sulfur mustard decreased the in vitro viability of fibroblasts and increased their sensitivity to induction of apoptosis, but did not change the rate of spontaneous apoptosis. In addition, higher expression of alpha smooth muscle actin showed that the lung's microenvironment in these patients is permissive for myofibroblastic differentiation.These findings suggest that in patients under the study, the delayed pulmonary complications of sulfur mustard should be considered as a unique pathology, which might need a specific management by manipulation of cellular components.

  2. Cellular Mechanics of Primary Human Cervical Fibroblasts: Influence of Progesterone and a Pro-inflammatory Cytokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vasudha; Barnhouse, Victoria; Ackerman, William E; Summerfield, Taryn L; Powell, Heather M; Leight, Jennifer L; Kniss, Douglas A; Ghadiali, Samir N

    2018-01-01

    The leading cause of neonatal mortality, pre-term birth, is often caused by pre-mature ripening/opening of the uterine cervix. Although cervical fibroblasts play an important role in modulating the cervix's extracellular matrix (ECM) and mechanical properties, it is not known how hormones, i.e., progesterone, and pro-inflammatory insults alter fibroblast mechanics, fibroblast-ECM interactions and the resulting changes in tissue mechanics. Here we investigate how progesterone and a pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, alter the biomechanical properties of human cervical fibroblasts and the fibroblast-ECM interactions that govern tissue-scale mechanics. Primary human fibroblasts were isolated from non-pregnant cervix and treated with estrogen/progesterone, IL-1β or both. The resulting changes in ECM gene expression, matrix remodeling, traction force generation, cell-ECM adhesion and tissue contractility were monitored. Results indicate that IL-1β induces a significant reduction in traction force and ECM adhesion independent of pre-treatment with progesterone. These cell level effects altered tissue-scale mechanics where IL-1β inhibited the contraction of a collagen gel over 6 days. Interestingly, progesterone treatment alone did not modulate traction forces or gel contraction but did result in a dramatic increase in cell-ECM adhesion. Therefore, the protective effect of progesterone may be due to altered adhesion dynamics as opposed to altered ECM remodeling.

  3. GRP78 is required for cell proliferation and protection from apoptosis in chicken embryo fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, M; Choi, H; Lee, S I; Kim, J S; Park, M; Kim, K; Lee, S; Byun, S J

    2016-05-01

    Chicken serum has been suggested as a supplement to promote chicken cell proliferation and development. However, the molecular mechanisms by which chicken serum stimulates chicken cell proliferation remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the effects of chicken serum supplementation on chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) and DF-1 cell proliferation. We also sought to elucidate the molecular pathways involved in mediating the effects of chicken serum on fibroblasts and DF-1 cells by overexpression of chicken 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (chGRP78), which is important for cell growth and the prevention of apoptosis. Our data demonstrated that the addition of 5% chicken serum significantly enhanced fibroblast proliferation. Moreover, knockdown of chGRP78 using siRNA decreased fibroblast proliferation and increased apoptosis. Based on these results, we suggest that the chGRP78-mediated signaling pathway plays a critical role in chicken serum-stimulated fibroblast survival and anti-apoptosis. Therefore, our findings have important implications for the maintenance of chicken fibroblast cells through the inhibition of apoptosis and may lead to the development of new treatments for avian disease. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. Fibroblast proliferation alters cardiac excitation conduction and contraction: a computational study*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, He-qing; Xia, Ling; Shou, Guo-fa; Zang, Yun-liang; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of cardiac fibroblast proliferation on cardiac electric excitation conduction and mechanical contraction were investigated using a proposed integrated myocardial-fibroblastic electromechanical model. At the cellular level, models of the human ventricular myocyte and fibroblast were modified to incorporate a model of cardiac mechanical contraction and cooperativity mechanisms. Cellular electromechanical coupling was realized with a calcium buffer. At the tissue level, electrical excitation conduction was coupled to an elastic mechanics model in which the finite difference method (FDM) was used to solve electrical excitation equations, and the finite element method (FEM) was used to solve mechanics equations. The electromechanical properties of the proposed integrated model were investigated in one or two dimensions under normal and ischemic pathological conditions. Fibroblast proliferation slowed wave propagation, induced a conduction block, decreased strains in the fibroblast proliferous tissue, and increased dispersions in depolarization, repolarization, and action potential duration (APD). It also distorted the wave-front, leading to the initiation and maintenance of re-entry, and resulted in a sustained contraction in the proliferous areas. This study demonstrated the important role that fibroblast proliferation plays in modulating cardiac electromechanical behaviour and which should be considered in planning future heart-modeling studies. PMID:24599687

  5. Fibroblast cultures in duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionasescu, V.; Lara-Braud, C.; Zellweger, H.; Ionasescu, R.; Burmeister, L.

    1977-01-01

    Primary skin fibroblast cultures were grown from forearm pinch skin biopsies obtained from 24 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and ten normal controls matched for sex and age. The first subcultures were grown for 7 days and incubated with L-( 3 H)-proline for 24 hours. Intracellular collagen incoption was significantly decreased (2.2 X) and extracellular collagen incorporation significantly increased (1.8 X) in fibroblast cultures from patients with DMD by both collagenase assay and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The synthesis of noncollagen proteins showed low values from the DMD fibroblast cultures. The alterations in synthesis and secretion of collagen and noncollagen proteins were characteristic only for the log phase of DMD fibroblasts. (author)

  6. Differences in motility pattern between human buccal fibroblasts and periodontal and skin fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepekhin, Eugene; Grøn, Birgitte; Berezin, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    Migration of fibroblasts from surrounding normal tissue into the wound bed is an important requirement for successful wound healing. This study investigated the motility pattern of buccal, periodontal and skin fibroblasts to determine whether differences in the wound healing efficiency at these s......Migration of fibroblasts from surrounding normal tissue into the wound bed is an important requirement for successful wound healing. This study investigated the motility pattern of buccal, periodontal and skin fibroblasts to determine whether differences in the wound healing efficiency...

  7. Oxidoreductases and cellulases in lichens: possible roles in lichen biology and soil organic matter turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Richard P; Zavarzina, Anna G; Liers, Christiane

    2013-06-01

    Lichens are symbiotic associations of a fungus (usually an Ascomycete) with green algae and/or a cyanobacterium. They dominate on 8 % of the world's land surface, mainly in Arctic and Antarctic regions, tundra, high mountain elevations and as components of dryland crusts. In many ecosystems, lichens are the pioneers on the bare rock or soil following disturbance, presumably because of their tolerance to desiccation and high temperature. Lichens have long been recognized as agents of mineral weathering and fine-earth stabilization. Being dominant biomass producers in extreme environments they contribute to primary accumulation of soil organic matter. However, biochemical role of lichens in soil processes is unknown. Our recent research has demonstrated that Peltigeralean lichens contain redox enzymes which in free-living fungi participate in lignocellulose degradation and humification. Thus lichen enzymes may catalyse formation and degradation of soil organic matter, particularly in high-stress communities dominated by lower plants. In the present review we synthesize recently published data on lichen phenol oxidases, peroxidases, and cellulases and discuss their possible roles in lichen physiology and soil organic matter transformations. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the protective and curative role of curcumin and venoruton against biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloyl methane) and venoruton [O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides] are powerful antioxidants and are important in protecting the cells from damage. The present study aims to evaluate the role of curcumin alone and curcumin with venoruton on radiation-induced changes in male rats exposed to a dose of 5 Gy gamma irradiation. Experimental analyses were performed 1, 7 and 14 days post-irradiation in all animal groups. Exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in decrease in glutathione content and SOD, G6PD and CPK activities and increase in lactate dehydrogenase and GOT activities and creatinine level. The results obtained showed that treatment of rats with olive oil pre and post-irradiation has significantly minimized radiation-induced changes. Curcumin dissolved in olive oil pre and post-irradiation significantly improved the radiation-induced changes while administration of venoruton with curcumin in olive oil provided a better amelioration. It could be concluded that, curcumin in olive oil plus venoruton showed an obvious protective and curative role against the hazards of gamma radiation in male rats

  9. Guided extracellular matrix formation from fibroblast cells cultured on bio-inspired configurable multiscale substrata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Gyu Bae

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering complex extracellular matrix (ECM is an important challenge for cell and tissue engineering applications as well as for understanding fundamental cell biology. We developed the methodology for fabrication of precisely controllable multiscale hierarchical structures using capillary force lithography in combination with original wrinkling technique for the generation of well-defined native ECM-like platforms by culturing fibroblast cells on the multiscale substrata [1]. This paper provides information on detailed characteristics of polyethylene glycol-diacrylate multiscale substrata. In addition, a possible model for guided extracellular matrix formation from fibroblast cells cultured on bio-inspired configurable multiscale substrata is proposed.

  10. Enhancing the role of veterinary vaccines reducing zoonotic diseases of humans: Linking systems biology with vaccine development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Leslie G.; Khare, Sangeeta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Lewin, Harris A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Turse, Joshua E.; Wylie, Dennis C.; Bai, Yu; Drake, Kenneth L.

    2011-09-22

    The aim of research on infectious diseases is their prevention, and brucellosis and salmonellosis as such are classic examples of worldwide zoonoses for application of a systems biology approach for enhanced rational vaccine development. When used optimally, vaccines prevent disease manifestations, reduce transmission of disease, decrease the need for pharmaceutical intervention, and improve the health and welfare of animals, as well as indirectly protecting against zoonotic diseases of people. Advances in the last decade or so using comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology with immunology, pathogenesis and vaccine formulation and delivery are expected to enable enhanced approaches to vaccine development. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the role of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced rational design of vaccines. Systems biology is bringing a new, more robust approach to veterinary vaccine design based upon a deeper understanding of the host pathogen interactions and its impact on the host's molecular network of the immune system. A computational systems biology method was utilized to create interactome models of the host responses to Brucella melitensis (BMEL), Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (STM), and a Salmonella mutant (isogenic *sipA, sopABDE2) and linked to the basis for rational development of vaccines for brucellosis and salmonellosis as reviewed by Adams et al. and Ficht et al. [1,2]. A bovine ligated ileal loop biological model was established to capture the host gene expression response at multiple time points post infection. New methods based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) machine learning were employed to conduct a comparative pathogenicity analysis of 219 signaling and metabolic pathways and 1620 gene ontology (GO) categories that defined the host

  11. Coupling of cytoskeleton functions for fibroblast locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Lenn, M; Rees, D A

    1985-01-01

    Using a chick cell phenotype specialised for locomotion with morphometric measurements made possible by modern instrumentation technology, we have reinvestigated motile functions in fibroblast locomotion. Quantitative analysis of rapid fluctuations in cell form and organelle distribution during l...... function of microtubules to direct the flow towards multiple foci on the leading edge, and so determine cell polarity. Such a mechanism of locomotion for fibroblasts has many features consistent with evidence for other cell types, especially amoebae and leukocytes....

  12. The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism in the propagation of ionizing radiation-induced biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai

    Coordinated interactions of specific molecular and biochemical processes are likely involved in the cellular responses to stresses induced by different ionizing radiations with distinctive linear energy transfer (LET) properties. Here, we investigated the roles and mechanisms of gap junction intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism in modulating cell killing and repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) in confluent AG1522 human fibroblasts exposed to 1 GeV protons (LET˜0.2 keV/μm), 137Cs γ rays (LET˜0.9 keV/μm), 241Am α particles (LET˜122 keV/μm) or 1 GeV/u iron ions (LET˜151 keV/μm) at doses by which all cells in the exposed cultures are irradiated. As expected, α-particles and iron ions were more effective than protons and γ rays at inducing cell killing. Holding γ- or proton-irradiated cells in the confluent state for several hours after irradiation promoted increased survival and decreased chromosomal damage. However, maintaining α-particle or iron ion-irradiated cells in the confluent state for various times prior to subculture resulted in increased rather than decreased lethality, and was associated with. persistent DNA damage and increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Inhibiting gap junction communication with 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid or by knockdown of connexin43, a constitutive protein of junctional channels in these cells, protected against the toxic effects expressed in these cells during confluent holding. Up-regulation of antioxidant defense by ectopic over-expression of glutathione peroxidase, protected against cell killing by α-particles when cells were analyzed shortly after exposure. However, it did not attenuate the decrease in survival during confluent holding. Together, these findings indicate that the damaging effect of α particles results in oxidative stress, and the toxic effects in the hours following irradiation are amplified by intercellular communication, but the communicated molecule(s) is

  13. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and biological rhythms: The discovery of TSH's unexpected role using animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are important for development, growth, and metabolism. It is also clear that the synthesis and secretion of TH are regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Animal models have helped advance our understanding of the roles and regulatory mechanisms of TH. The animals' bodies develop through coordinated timing of cell division and differentiation. Studies of frog metamorphosis led to the discovery of TH and their role in development. However, to adapt to rhythmic environmental changes, animals also developed various endocrine rhythms. Studies of rodents clarified the neural and molecular mechanisms underlying the circadian regulation of the HPT axis. Moreover, birds have a sophisticated seasonal adaptation mechanism, and recent studies of quail revealed unexpected roles for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and TH in the seasonal regulation of reproduction. Interestingly, this mechanism is conserved in mammals. Thus, we review how animal studies have shaped our general understanding of the HPT axis in relation to biological rhythms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiple Roles of the Y Chromosome in the Biology of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Piergentili

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The X and Y chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster were the first examples of chromosomes associated with genetic information. Thanks to the serendipitous discovery of a male with white eyes in 1910, T.H. Morgan was able to associate the X chromosome of the fruit fly with a phenotypic character (the eye color for the first time. A few years later, his student, C.B. Bridges, demonstrated that X0 males, although phenotypically normal, are completely sterile. This means that the X chromosome, like the autosomes, harbors genes that control several phenotypic traits, while the Y chromosome is important for male fertility only. Notwithstanding its long history – almost 100 years in terms of genetic studies – most of the features of the Y chromosome are still a mystery. This is due to the intrinsic nature of this genetic element, namely, (1 its molecular composition (mainly transposable elements and satellite DNA, (2 its genetic inertia (lack of recombination due to its heterochromatic nature, (3 the absence of homology with the X (with the only exception of the nucleolar organizer, (4 the lack of visible phenotypes when it is missing (indeed, except for their sterility, X0 flies are normal males, and (5 its low density as for protein-coding sequences (to date, only 13 genes out of approximately 14,000 have been mapped on this chromosome in D. melanogaster, i.e., ~0.1% of the total. Nonetheless, a more accurate analysis reveals that this chromosome can influence several complex phenotypes: (1 it has a role in the fertility of both sexes and viability of males when over-represented; (2 it can unbalance the intracellular nucleotide pool; (3 it can interfere with the gene expression either by recruiting proteins involved in chromatin remodeling (PEV or, to a higher extent, by influencing the expression of up to 1,000 different genes, probably by changing the availability of transcription factors; (4 it plays a major role (up to 50% in the resistance

  15. Multiple roles of the Y chromosome in the biology of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piergentili, Roberto

    2010-09-01

    The X and Y chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster were the first examples of chromosomes associated with genetic information. Thanks to the serendipitous discovery of a male with white eyes in 1910, T.H. Morgan was able to associate the X chromosome of the fruit fly with a phenotypic character (the eye color) for the first time. A few years later, his student, C.B. Bridges, demonstrated that X0 males, although phenotypically normal, are completely sterile. This means that the X chromosome, like the autosomes, harbors genes that control several phenotypic traits, while the Y chromosome is important for male fertility only. Notwithstanding its long history--almost 100 years in terms of genetic studies--most of the features of the Y chromosome are still a mystery. This is due to the intrinsic nature of this genetic element, namely, (1) its molecular composition (mainly transposable elements and satellite DNA), (2) its genetic inertia (lack of recombination due to its heterochromatic nature), (3) the absence of homology with the X (with the only exception of the nucleolar organizer), (4) the lack of visible phenotypes when it is missing (indeed, except for their sterility, X0 flies are normal males), and (5) its low density as for protein-coding sequences (to date, only 13 genes out of approximately 14,000 have been mapped on this chromosome in D. melanogaster, i.e., ~0.1% of the total). Nonetheless, a more accurate analysis reveals that this chromosome can influence several complex phenotypes: (1) it has a role in the fertility of both sexes and viability of males when over-represented; (2) it can unbalance the intracellular nucleotide pool; (3) it can interfere with the gene expression either by recruiting proteins involved in chromatin remodeling (PEV) or, to a higher extent, by influencing the expression of up to 1,000 different genes, probably by changing the availability of transcription factors; (4) it plays a major role (up to 50%) in the resistance to heat

  16. A paradigm shift towards low-nitrifying production systems: the role of biological nitrification inhibition (BNI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, G. V.; Sahrawat, K. L.; Nakahara, K.; Rao, I. M.; Ishitani, M.; Hash, C. T.; Kishii, M.; Bonnett, D. G.; Berry, W. L.; Lata, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Agriculture is the single largest geo-engineering initiative that humans have initiated on planet Earth, largely through the introduction of unprecedented amounts of reactive nitrogen (N) into ecosystems. A major portion of this reactive N applied as fertilizer leaks into the environment in massive amounts, with cascading negative effects on ecosystem health and function. Natural ecosystems utilize many of the multiple pathways in the N cycle to regulate N flow. In contrast, the massive amounts of N currently applied to agricultural systems cycle primarily through the nitrification pathway, a single inefficient route that channels much of this reactive N into the environment. This is largely due to the rapid nitrifying soil environment of present-day agricultural systems. Scope In this Viewpoint paper, the importance of regulating nitrification as a strategy to minimize N leakage and to improve N-use efficiency (NUE) in agricultural systems is highlighted. The ability to suppress soil nitrification by the release of nitrification inhibitors from plant roots is termed ‘biological nitrification inhibition’ (BNI), an active plant-mediated natural function that can limit the amount of N cycling via the nitrification pathway. The development of a bioassay using luminescent Nitrosomonas to quantify nitrification inhibitory activity from roots has facilitated the characterization of BNI function. Release of BNIs from roots is a tightly regulated physiological process, with extensive genetic variability found in selected crops and pasture grasses. Here, the current status of understanding of the BNI function is reviewed using Brachiaria forage grasses, wheat and sorghum to illustrate how BNI function can be utilized for achieving low-nitrifying agricultural systems. A fundamental shift towards ammonium (NH4+)-dominated agricultural systems could be achieved by using crops and pastures with high BNI capacities. When viewed from an agricultural and

  17. The role of non-rainfall water on physiological activation in desert biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiaoli; Peng, Chengrong; Li, Hua; Li, Shuangshuang; Huang, Shun; Hu, Yao; Zhang, Jinli; Li, Dunhai

    2018-01-01

    Non-rainfall water (NRW, e.g. fog and dew), in addition to rainfall and snowfall, are considered important water inputs to drylands. At the same time, biological soil crusts (BSCs) are important components of drylands. However, little information is available regarding the effect of NRW inputs on BSC activation. In this study, the effects of NRW on physiological activation in three BSC successional stages, including the cyanobacteria crust stage (Crust-C), moss colonization stage (Crust-CM), and moss crust stage (Crust-M), were studied in situ. Results suggest NRW inputs hydrated and activated physiological activity (Fv/Fm, carbon exchange, and nitrogen fixation) in BSCs but led to a negative carbon balance and low rates of nitrogen fixation in BSCs. One effective NRW event could hydrate BSCs for 7 h. Following simulated rainfall, the physiological activities recovered within 3 h, and net carbon gain occurred until 3 h after hydration, whereas NRW-induced physiological recovery processes were slower and exhibited lower activities, leading to a negative carbon balance. There were significant positive correlations between NRW amounts and the recovered values of Fv/Fm in all the three BSC stages (p < .001). The thresholds for Fv/Fm activation decreased with BSC succession, and the annual effective NRW events increased with BSC succession, with values of 29.8, 89.2, and 110.7 in Crust-C, Crust-CM and Crust-M, respectively. The results suggest that moss crust and moss-cyanobacteria crust use NRW to prolong metabolic activity and reduce drought stress more efficiently than cyanobacteria crusts. Therefore, these results suggest that BSCs utilize NRW to sustain life while growth and biomass accumulation require precipitation (rainfall) events over a certain threshold.

  18. Extracellular Vesicles in Glioblastoma: Role in Biological Processes and in Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Ilaria; Di Francesco, Marianna; Dolo, Vincenza

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and malignant form of primary brain cancer; it is characterized by one of the highest mortality among human cancers. Maximal and aggressive surgical resection is the first approach treatment even if not usually definitive, being the tumor characterized by a high proliferative rate and extensive invasion. Early diagnosis, associated to careful monitoring, is pivotal in glioblastoma treatment; Magnetic Resonance Imaging is used for monitoring purpose, but it's not sensitive enough to detect very small tumors; a valid alternative could be a repeated biopsy, but it is associated to a significant morbidity: less invasive options for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring are unfailingly researched. A careful search was performed on PubMed, mainly considering papers in the last 10 years. In recent years it has begun to take hold the knowledge that glioblastoma cells secrete extracellular vesicles (microvesicles and exosomes), which mirror the molecular features of parental cells and are able to escape from tumor microenvironment, reaching cerebrospinal fluid and systemic blood circulation. Such information led to consider the possibility to use extracellular vesicles in biological fluids as markers of glioblastoma pathology and to use them as a more feasible "liquid-biopsy" to gain diagnostic information, follow the disease progression and the response to clinical treatment, just through a blood test or cerebrospinal fluid collection. The most interesting extracellular vesiclesassociated molecules studied as glioblastoma markers are taken into account, as well as approaches aiming to use extracellular vesicles as cell-free vaccines or vehicle of therapeutic molecules. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Distribution and biological role of the oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) in Xanthomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Elisa E; Tavares, Milene B; Suzuki, Celso F; Pimenta, Daniel C; Angeli, Claudia B; de Oliveira, Julio C F; Ferro, Maria I T; Ferreira, Luis C S; Ferreira, Rita C C

    2010-04-01

    In this study we investigated the prevalence of the oppA gene, encoding the oligopeptide binding protein (OppA) of the major bacterial oligopeptide uptake system (Opp), in different species of the genus Xanthomonas. The oppA gene was detected in two Xanthomonas axonopodis strains among eight tested Xanthomonas species. The generation of an isogenic oppA-knockout derivative of the Xac 306 strain, showed that the OppA protein neither plays a relevant role in oligopeptide uptake nor contributes to the infectivity and multiplication of the bacterial strain in leaves of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia). Taken together these results suggest that the oppA gene has a recent evolutionary history in the genus and does not contribute in the physiology or pathogenesis of X. axonopodis.

  20. Distribution and biological role of the oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA in Xanthomonas species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa E. Oshiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the prevalence of the oppA gene, encoding the oligopeptide binding protein (OppA of the major bacterial oligopeptide uptake system (Opp, in different species of the genus Xanthomonas. The oppA gene was detected in two Xanthomonas axonopodis strains among eight tested Xanthomonas species. The generation of an isogenic oppA-knockout derivative of the Xac 306 strain, showed that the OppA protein neither plays a relevant role in oligopeptide uptake nor contributes to the infectivity and multiplication of the bacterial strain in leaves of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis and Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia. Taken together these results suggest that the oppA gene has a recent evolutionary history in the genus and does not contribute in the physiology or pathogenesis of X. axonopodis.

  1. Seeing the World Topsy-Turvy: The Primary Role of Kinematics in Biological Motion Inversion Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-Anne Fitzgerald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical inversion of whole or partial human body representations typically has catastrophic consequences on the observer's ability to perform visual processing tasks. Explanations usually focus on the effects of inversion on the visual system's ability to exploit configural or structural relationships, but more recently have also implicated motion or kinematic cue processing. Here, we systematically tested the role of both on perceptions of sex from upright and inverted point-light walkers. Our data suggest that inversion results in systematic degradations of the processing of kinematic cues. Specifically and intriguingly, they reveal sex-based kinematic differences: Kinematics characteristic of females generally are resistant to inversion effects, while those of males drive systematic sex misperceptions. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  2. Role of nitrification in the biodegradation of selected artificial sweetening agents in biological wastewater treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, N H; Nguyen, V T; Urase, T; Ngo, H H

    2014-06-01

    The biodegradation of the six artificial sweetening agents including acesulfame (ACE), aspartame (ASP), cyclamate (CYC), neohesperidindihydrochalcone (NHDC), saccharin (SAC), and sucralose (SUC) by nitrifying activated sludge was first examined. Experimental results showed that ASP and NHDC were the most easily degradable compounds even in the control tests. CYC and SAC were efficiently biodegraded by the nitrifying activated sludge, whereas ACE and SUC were poorly removed. However, the biodegradation efficiencies of the ASs were increased with the increase in initial ammonium concentrations in the bioreactors. The association between nitrification and co-metabolic degradation was investigated and a linear relationship between nitrification rate and co-metabolic biodegradation rate was observed for the target artificial sweeteners (ASs). The contribution of heterotrophic microorganisms and autotrophic ammonia oxidizers in biodegradation of the ASs was elucidated, of which autotrophic ammonia oxidizers played an important role in the biodegradation of the ASs, particularly with regards to ACE and SUC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Does Toll-like receptor 3 play a biological role in virus infections?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, Kurt H.; Richardson-Burns, Sarah; Alexopoulou, Lena; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) family functions to recognize conserved microbial and viral structures with the purpose of activating signal pathways to instigate immune responses against infections by these organisms. For example, in vitro studies reveal that the TLR3 ligand is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a product of viral infections. From this observation, it has been proposed that TLR3 is likely an important first signal for virus infections. We approached this issue by investigating the role of TLR3 in four different infectious viral models (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), and reovirus) and in TLR3 genetically deficient ( -/- ) mice. Our results indicate that TLR3 is not universally required for the generation of effective antiviral responses because the absence of TLR3 does not alter either viral pathogenesis or impair host's generation of adaptive antiviral responses to these viruses

  4. Regulating Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    enhances protein synthesis, the levels of important transcription factors, long non-coding RNAs, and tyrosine kinases associated with signal transduction as...enhance PCa growth, thus mimicking a CAF-like phenotype. The addition of kinase inhibitory drugs that have entered Phase I clinical trials reverses ...100 kDa) device using an Allegra® X-15R centrifuge at 3,500 g at 4°C. The concentrate was then recovered with a reverse spin at 1,000 g for 2

  5. Soluble α-klotho and its relation to kidney function and fibroblast growth factor-23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Liu, Ying; Pedersen, Lise

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Relations between fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), soluble α-klotho (s-α-klotho), and kidney function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are still unclear. Especially the role of s-α-klotho requires further study. OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were to analyze the relation of s-α-klotho to......CONTEXT: Relations between fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), soluble α-klotho (s-α-klotho), and kidney function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are still unclear. Especially the role of s-α-klotho requires further study. OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were to analyze the relation of s...

  6. Systems biology approach to study the role of miRNA in promoter targeting during megakaryopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Itishri; Hebalkar, Rucha; Kar, Sonika; Ts, SreeVidya; Gutti, Usha; Gutti, Ravi Kumar

    2018-05-15

    The distinct process of megakaryopoiesis requires occurrence of endomitosis for polyploidization of the megakaryocytes. Although, Cyclins, CDKs and have been described to regulate endomitosis, the exact mechanism still remains an enigma. miRNA which were otherwise known as post transcriptional gene silencers are now emerging with various non-canonical functions including gene regulation at pre-transcriptional level by miRNA binding at promoter region. Out of the many processes they regulate, miRNA have been manifested to play a role in megakaryocyte differentiation. In this study an attempt has been made to identify miRNA that could regulate cell cycle genes (Cyclins and CDKs) by targeting their promoters, during megakaryopoiesis. A new computational algorithm was implemented using Perl programming to identify putative targets of miRNA in CDK and Cyclin promoters. Perl script was also used to check nuclear localizing miRNA based on the presence of a consensus sequence. Real-time PCR was performed to analyze the expression of miRNA and their predicted targets in Dami vs. PMA treated Dami cells. Putative targets of miRNAs with longest, high complementarity matches in CDK/Cyclin promoters were obtained. We identified two significant miRNA, miR-1273g-3p and miR-619-5p with longest seed sequence matches. We further identified three main targets (CDK10, CDK11, Cyclin F) through which these two miRNA could regulate cell cycle during megakaryopoiesis. Our results reinforce the role of promoting targeting miRNA in regulation of cell cycle through certain CDK/Cyclins to support the process of endomitosis during megakaryopoiesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The common properties and the heterogeneity of dermal fibroblast subpopulations.

    OpenAIRE

    Makarchuk O.I.

    2007-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are a dynamic and diverse population of cells whose functions in skin in many respects remain unknown. Normal adult human skin contains at least three distinct subpopulations of fibroblasts, which occupy unique niches in the dermis. Fibroblasts from each of these niches exhibit distinctive differences when cultured separately. Specific differences in fibroblast histophysiology are evident in papillary dermal fibroblasts, which reside in the superficial dermis, and reticular...

  8. Lung fibroblasts from patients with emphysema show markers of senescence in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The loss of alveolar walls is a hallmark of emphysema. As fibroblasts play an important role in the maintenance of alveolar structure, a change in fibroblast phenotype could be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. In a previous study we found a reduced in vitro proliferation rate and number of population doublings of parenchymal lung fibroblasts from patients with emphysema and we hypothesized that these findings could be related to a premature cellular aging of these cells. In this study, we therefore compared cellular senescence markers and expression of respective genes between lung fibroblasts from patients with emphysema and control patients without COPD. Methods Primary lung fibroblasts were obtained from 13 patients with moderate to severe lung emphysema (E and 15 controls (C undergoing surgery for lung tumor resection or volume reduction (n = 2. Fibroblasts (8E/9C were stained for senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal. In independent cultures, DNA from lung fibroblasts (7E/8C was assessed for mean telomere length. Two exploratory 12 k cDNA microarrays were used to assess gene expression in pooled fibroblasts (3E/3C. Subsequently, expression of selected genes was evaluated by quantitative PCR (qPCR in fibroblasts of individual patients (10E/9C and protein concentration was analyzed in the cell culture supernatant. Results The median (quartiles percentage of fibroblasts positive for SA-β-Gal was 4.4 (3.2;4.7 % in controls and 16.0 (10.0;24.8 % in emphysema (p = 0.001, while telomere length was not different. Among the candidates for differentially expressed genes in the array (factor ≥ 3, 15 were upregulated and 121 downregulated in emphysema. qPCR confirmed the upregulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-rP1 (p = 0.029, p = 0.0002, while expression of IGFBP-5, -rP2 (CTGF, -rP4 (Cyr61, FOSL1, LOXL2, OAZ1 and CDK4 was not different between groups. In line with the

  9. Impact of Antibodies and Strain Polymorphisms on Cytomegalovirus Entry and Spread in Fibroblasts and Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaohong; Freed, Daniel C; Wang, Dai; Qiu, Ping; Li, Fengsheng; Fu, Tong-Ming; Kauvar, Lawrence M; McVoy, Michael A

    2017-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) entry into fibroblasts differs from entry into epithelial cells. CMV also spreads cell to cell and can induce syncytia. To gain insights into these processes, 27 antibodies targeting epitopes in CMV virion glycoprotein complexes, including glycoprotein B (gB), gH/gL, and the pentamer, were evaluated for their effects on viral entry and spread. No antibodies inhibited CMV spread in fibroblasts, including those with potent neutralizing activity against fibroblast entry, while all antibodies that neutralized epithelial cell entry also inhibited spread in epithelial cells and a correlation existed between the potencies of these two activities. This suggests that exposure of virions to the cell culture medium is obligatory during spread in epithelial cells but not in fibroblasts. In fibroblasts, the formation of syncytiumlike structures was impaired not only by antibodies to gB or gH/gL but also by antibodies to the pentamer, suggesting a potential role for the pentamer in promoting fibroblast fusion. Four antibodies reacted with linear epitopes near the N terminus of gH, exhibited strain specificity, and neutralized both epithelial cell and fibroblast entry. Five other antibodies recognized conformational epitopes in gH/gL and neutralized both fibroblast and epithelial cell entry. That these antibodies were strain specific for neutralizing fibroblast but not epithelial cell entry suggests that polymorphisms external to certain gH/gL epitopes may influence antibody neutralization during fibroblast but not epithelial cell entry. These findings may have implications for elucidating the mechanisms of CMV entry, spread, and antibody evasion and may assist in determining which antibodies may be most efficacious following active immunization or passive administration. IMPORTANCE Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a significant cause of birth defects among newborns infected in utero and morbidity and mortality in transplant and AIDS patients. Monoclonal antibodies

  10. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eNies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases, and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed.In this review we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease, and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions.

  11. Hemolysin of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli: structure, transport, biological activity and putative role in virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielaszewska, Martina; Aldick, Thomas; Bauwens, Andreas; Karch, Helge

    2014-07-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) cause diarrhea, bloody diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a thrombotic microangiopathy affecting the renal glomeruli, the intestine, and the brain. The pathogenesis of EHEC-mediated diseases is incompletely understood. In addition to Shiga toxins, the major virulence factors of EHEC, the contribution of EHEC hemolysin (EHEC-Hly), also designated EHEC toxin (Ehx), which is a member of the RTX (repeats-in-toxin) family, is increasingly recognized. The toxin and its activation and secretion machinery are encoded by the EHEC-hlyCABD operon, in which EHEC-hlyA is the structural gene for EHEC-Hly and the EHEC-hlyC product mediates post-translational activation of EHEC-Hly; the EHEC-hlyB- and EHEC-hlyD-encoded proteins form, together with genetically unlinked TolC, the type I secretion system that transports EHEC-Hly out of the bacterial cell. EHEC-Hly exists in two biologically active forms: as a free EHEC-Hly, and an EHEC-Hly associated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that are released by EHEC during growth. The OMV-associated form results from a rapid binding of free EHEC-Hly to OMVs upon its extracellular secretion. The OMV association stabilizes EHEC-Hly and thus substantially prolongs its hemolytic activity compared to the free toxin. The two EHEC-Hly forms differ by their mechanism of toxicity toward human intestinal epithelial and microvascular endothelial cells, which are the major targets during EHEC infection. The free EHEC-Hly lyses human microvascular endothelial cells, presumably by pore formation in the cell membrane. In contrast, the OMV-associated EHEC-Hly does not lyse any of these cell types, but after its cellular internalization via OMVs it targets mitochondria and triggers caspase-9-mediated apoptosis. The proinflammatory potential of EHEC-Hly, in particular its ability to elicit secretion of interleukin-1β from human monocytes/macrophages, might be an additional mechanism of its putative

  12. The Glutamate Dehydrogenase Pathway and Its Roles in Cell and Tissue Biology in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Plaitakis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH is a hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia while reducing NAD(P+ to NAD(PH. It is found in all living organisms serving both catabolic and anabolic reactions. In mammalian tissues, oxidative deamination of glutamate via GDH generates α-ketoglutarate, which is metabolized by the Krebs cycle, leading to the synthesis of ATP. In addition, the GDH pathway is linked to diverse cellular processes, including ammonia metabolism, acid-base equilibrium, redox homeostasis (via formation of fumarate, lipid biosynthesis (via oxidative generation of citrate, and lactate production. While most mammals possess a single GDH1 protein (hGDH1 in the human that is highly expressed in the liver, humans and other primates have acquired, via duplication, an hGDH2 isoenzyme with distinct functional properties and tissue expression profile. The novel hGDH2 underwent rapid evolutionary adaptation, acquiring unique properties that enable enhanced enzyme function under conditions inhibitory to its ancestor hGDH1. These are thought to provide a biological advantage to humans with hGDH2 evolution occurring concomitantly with human brain development. hGDH2 is co-expressed with hGDH1 in human brain, kidney, testis and steroidogenic organs, but not in the liver. In human cerebral cortex, hGDH1 and hGDH2 are expressed in astrocytes, the cells responsible for removing and metabolizing transmitter glutamate, and for supplying neurons with glutamine and lactate. In human testis, hGDH2 (but not hGDH1 is densely expressed in the Sertoli cells, known to provide the spermatids with lactate and other nutrients. In steroid producing cells, hGDH1/2 is thought to generate reducing equivalents (NADPH in the mitochondria for the biosynthesis of steroidal hormones. Lastly, up-regulation of hGDH1/2 expression occurs in cancer, permitting neoplastic cells to utilize glutamine/glutamate for their growth

  13. New Insights Into the Mechanisms and Biological Roles of D-Amino Acids in Complex Eco-Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliashkevich, Alena; Alvarez, Laura; Cava, Felipe

    2018-01-01

    In the environment bacteria share their habitat with a great diversity of organisms, from microbes to humans, animals and plants. In these complex communities, the production of extracellular effectors is a common strategy to control the biodiversity by interfering with the growth and/or viability of nearby microbes. One of such effectors relies on the production and release of extracellular D-amino acids which regulate diverse cellular processes such as cell wall biogenesis, biofilm integrity, and spore germination. Non-canonical D-amino acids are mainly produced by broad spectrum racemases (Bsr). Bsr’s promiscuity allows it to generate high concentrations of D-amino acids in environments with variable compositions of L-amino acids. However, it was not clear until recent whether these molecules exhibit divergent functions. Here we review the distinctive biological roles of D-amino acids, their mechanisms of action and their modulatory properties of the biodiversity of complex eco-systems. PMID:29681896

  14. Role of casein kinase 1A1 in the biology and targeted therapy of del(5q) MDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Rebekka K.; Ademà, Vera; Heckl, Dirk; Järås, Marcus; Mallo, Mar; Lord, Allegra M.; Chu, Lisa P.; McConkey, Marie E.; Kramann, Rafael; Mullally, Ann; Bejar, Rafael; Solé, Francesc; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Casein kinase 1A1 gene (CSNK1A1) is a putative tumor suppressor gene located in the common deleted region for del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We generated a murine model with conditional inactivation of Csnk1a1 and found that Csnk1a1 haploinsufficiency induces hematopoietic stem cell expansion and a competitive repopulation advantage whereas homozygous deletion induces hematopoietic stem cell failure. Based on this finding, we found that heterozygous inactivation of Csnk1a1 sensitizes cells to a CSNK1 inhibitor relative to cells with two intact alleles. In addition, we identified recurrent somatic mutations in CSNK1A1 on the non-deleted allele of patients with del(5q) MDS. These studies demonstrate that CSNK1A1 plays a central role in the biology of del(5q) MDS and is a promising therapeutic target. PMID:25242043

  15. A novel theory: biological processes mostly involve two types of mediators, namely general and specific mediators Endogenous small radicals such as superoxide and nitric oxide may play a role of general mediator in biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jian

    2005-01-01

    A great number of papers have shown that free radicals as well as bioactive molecules can play a role of mediator in a wide spectrum of biological processes, but the biological actions and chemical reactivity of the free radicals are quite different from that of the bioactive molecules, and that a wide variety of bioactive molecules can be easily modified by free radicals due to having functional groups sensitive to redox, and the significance of the interaction between the free radicals and the bioactive molecules in biological processes has been confirmed by the results of some in vitro and in vivo studies. Based on these evidence, this article presented a novel theory about the mediators of biological processes. The essentials of the theory are: (a) mediators of biological processes can be classified into general and specific mediators; the general mediators include two types of free radicals, namely superoxide and nitric oxide; the specific mediators include a wide variety of bioactive molecules, such as specific enzymes, transcription factors, cytokines and eicosanoids; (b) a general mediator can modify almost any class of the biomolecules, and thus play a role of mediator in nearly every biological process via diverse mechanisms; a specific mediator always acts selectively on certain classes of the biomolecules, and may play a role of mediator in different biological processes via a same mechanism; (c) biological processes are mostly controlled by networks of their mediators, so the free radicals can regulate the last consequence of a biological process by modifying some types of the bioactive molecules, or in cooperation with these bioactive molecules; the biological actions of superoxide and nitric oxide may be synergistic or antagonistic. According to this theory, keeping the integrity of these networks and the balance between the free radicals and the bioactive molecules as well as the balance between the free radicals and the free radical scavengers

  16. The critical role of the Poison Center in the recognition, mitigation and management of biological and chemical terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzelok, E P

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) terrorism counter measures are a major priority with healthcare providers, municipalities, states and the federal government. Significant resources are being invested to enhance civilian domestic preparedness through training in anticipation of a NBC terroristic incident. The key to a successful response, in addition to education, is integration of efforts as well as thorough communication and understanding the role that each agency would play in an actual or impending NBC incident. In anticipation of a NBC event, a regional counter-terrorism task force was established in southwestern Pennsylvania to identify resources, establish responsibilities and coordinate the response to NBC terrorism. Members of the task force include first responders, hazmat, law enforcement (local, regional, national), government officials, health departments, the statewide emergency management agency and the regional poison information center. The poison center is one of several critical components of a regional counter-terrorism response force. It can conduct active and passive toxicosurveillance and identify sentinel events. To be responsive, the poison center staff must be knowledgeable about biological and chemical agents. The development of basic protocols and a standardized staff education program is essential. The use of the RaPID-T (R-recognition, P-protection, D-detection, T-triage/treatment) course can provide basic staff education for responding to this important but rare consultation to the poison center.

  17. Phos-tag SDS-PAGE resolves agonist- and isoform-specific activation patterns for PKD2 and PKD3 in cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Weihua; Steinberg, Susan F

    2016-10-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) consists of a family of three structurally related enzymes that are co-expressed in the heart and have important roles in many biological responses. PKD1 is activated by pro-hypertrophic stimuli and has been implicated in adverse cardiac remodeling. Efforts to define the cardiac actions of PKD2 and PKD3 have been less successful at least in part because conventional methods provide a general screen for PKD activation but are poorly suited to resolve activation patterns for PKD2 or PKD3. This study uses Phos-tag SDS-PAGE, a method that exaggerates phosphorylation-dependent mobility shifts, to overcome this technical limitation. Phos-tag SDS-PAGE resolves PKD1 as distinct molecular species (indicative of pools of enzyme with distinct phosphorylation profiles) in unstimulated cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes; as a result, attempts to track PKD1 mobility shifts that result from agonist activation were only moderately successful. In contrast, PKD2 and PKD3 are recovered from resting cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes as single molecular species; both enzymes display robust mobility shifts in Phos-tag SDS-PAGE in response to treatment with sphingosine-1-phosphate, thrombin, PDGF, or H 2 O 2 . Studies with GF109203X implicate protein kinase C activity in the stimulus-dependent pathways that activate PKD2/PKD3 in both cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes. Studies with C3 toxin identify a novel role for Rho in the sphingosine-1-phosphate and thrombin receptor-dependent pathways that lead to the phosphorylation of PKD2/3 and the downstream substrate CREB in cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, Phos-tag SDS-PAGE provides a general screen for stimulus-specific changes in PKD2 and PKD3 phosphorylation and exposes a novel role for these enzymes in specific stress-dependent pathways that influence cardiac remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. MiR-155-5p promotes fibroblast cell proliferation and inhibits FOXO signaling pathway in vulvar lichen sclerosis by targeting FOXO3 and CDKN1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lina; Zhao, Yi; Huo, Xiaoxi; Wu, Xin

    2018-05-05

    Vulvar lichen sclerosis (VLS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder. Evidence is accumulating that microRNAs (miRNAs) exert crucial roles in initiation and development of a wide range of human diseases. MiR-155-5p has been frequently reported to be implicated in the tumorigenesis and progression of multiple types of cancers, however, its biological role in VLS remains unclear. This study aimed to explore the role of miR-155-5p in VLS and clarify the potential molecular mechanisms involved. In the present study, miR-155-5p was observed to be significantly upregulated in VLS tissues. Functional studies showed that miR-155-5p facilitated cell proliferation, accelerated cell cycle progression and inhibited forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling pathway in fibroblast cells. Mechanical studies demonstrated that miR-155-5p exerted its promoting effects on fibroblast cell proliferation via targeting both forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B). Besides, Pearson's correlation analysis revealed that miR-155-5p expression was negatively correlated with the mRNA expression of FOXO3 and CDKN1B in VLS tissues. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-155-5p promotes fibroblast cell proliferation and inhibits FOXO signaling pathway by negative modulation of both FOXO3 and CDKN1B in VLS, and that miR-155-5p may be used to be a potential therapeutic target for VLS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Diversification and coevolution in brood pollination mutualisms: Windows into the role of biotic interactions in generating biological diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembry, David H; Althoff, David M

    2016-10-01

    Brood pollination mutualisms-interactions in which specialized insects are both the pollinators (as adults) and seed predators (as larvae) of their host plants-have been influential study systems for coevolutionary biology. These mutualisms include those between figs and fig wasps, yuccas and yucca moths, leafflowers and leafflower moths, globeflowers and globeflower flies, Silene plants and Hadena and Perizoma moths, saxifrages and Greya moths, and senita cacti and senita moths. The high reciprocal diversity and species-specificity of some of these mutualisms have been cited as evidence that coevolution between plants and pollinators drives their mutual diversification. However, the mechanisms by which these mutualisms diversify have received less attention. In this paper, we review key hypotheses about how these mutualisms diversify and what role coevolution between plants and pollinators may play in this process. We find that most species-rich brood pollination mutualisms show significant phylogenetic congruence at high taxonomic scales, but there is limited evidence for the processes of both cospeciation and duplication, and there are no unambiguous examples known of strict-sense contemporaneous cospeciation. Allopatric speciation appears important across multiple systems, particularly in the insects. Host-shifts appear to be common, and widespread host-shifts by pollinators may displace other pollinator lineages. There is relatively little evidence for a "coevolution through cospeciation" model or that coevolution promotes speciation in these systems. Although we have made great progress in understanding the mechanisms by which brood pollination mutualisms diversify, many opportunities remain to use these intriguing symbioses to understand the role of biotic interactions in generating biological diversity. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  20. Biologic role of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule overexpression in breast cancer cell lines and clinical tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sibyll; Müller, Volkmar; Köhler, Nadine; Wikman, Harriet; Krenkel, Sylke; Streichert, Thomas; Schweizer, Michaela; Riethdorf, Sabine; Assmann, Volker; Ihnen, Maike; Beck, Katrin; Issa, Rana; Jänicke, Fritz; Pantel, Klaus; Milde-Langosch, Karin

    2011-09-01

    The activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is overexpressed in many mammary tumors, but controversial results about its role and prognostic impact in breast cancer have been reported. Therefore, we evaluated the biologic effects of ALCAM expression in two breast cancer cell lines and a larger cohort of mammary carcinomas. By stable transfections, MCF7 cells with ALCAM overexpression and MDA-MB231 cells with reduced ALCAM levels were generated and analyzed in functional assays and cDNA microarrays. In addition, an immunohistochemical study on 347 patients with breast cancer with long-term follow-up and analysis of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) was performed. In both cell lines, high ALCAM expression was associated with reduced cell motility. In addition, ALCAM silencing in MDA-MB231 cells resulted in lower invasive potential, whereas high ALCAM expression was associated with increased apoptosis in both cell lines. Among genes which were differentially expressed in clones with altered ALCAM expression, there was an overlap of 15 genes between both cell lines, among them cathepsin D, keratin 7, gelsolin, and ets2 whose deregulation was validated by western blot analysis. In MDA-MB231 cells, we observed a correlation with VEGF expression which was validated by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). Our IHC results on primary breast carcinomas showed that ALCAM expression was associated with an estrogen receptor-positive phenotype. In addition, strong ALCAM immunostaining correlated with nodal involvement and the presence of tumor cells in bone marrow. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, strong ALCAM expression in ductal carcinomas correlated with shorter recurrence-free intervals (P=0.048) and overall survival (OAS, P=0.003). Our results indicate that the biologic role of ALCAM in breast cancer is complex, but overexpression might be relevant for outcome in ductal carcinomas.

  1. The Role of microRNAs in the Biology of Rare Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Taruscio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Rare diseases (RD are characterized by low prevalence and affect not more than five individuals per 10,000 in the European population; they are a large and heterogeneous group of disorders including more than 7,000 conditions and often involve all organs and tissues, with several clinical subtypes within the same disease. Very often information concerning either diagnosis and/or prognosis on many RD is insufficient. microRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by either degrading or blocking translation of messenger RNA targets. Recently, microRNA expression patterns of body fluids underscored their potential as noninvasive biomarkers for various diseases. The role of microRNAs as potential biomarkers has become particularly attractive. The identification of disease-related microRNAs is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of diseases at the molecular level, and is critical for designing specific molecular tools for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Computational analysis of microRNA-disease associations is an important complementary means for prioritizing microRNAs for further experimental examination. In this article, we explored the added value of miRs as biomarkers in a selected panel of RD hitting different tissues/systems at different life stages, but sharing the need of better biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.

  2. Biology and Role of Aedes albopictus (Skuse 1894 as Vector of Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Boesri

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Behavior of the mosquito Aedes albopictus is generally res ting outside the home with the brood in a natural or artificial containers protected from sunlight. Human biting activity between the hours of9:00 to 11:00 and between the hours of 17:00 to 18:00 inside and outside the home. The period of rest after sucking the blood 4-5 days and is ready to lie. Habitat or the environment that most coveted of th is mosquito is a forest or gar­den with temperatures of 24-30 0 C. eggs hatch after 4-5 days with a temperature of 24-30 0 C, the eggs usually form elus ters of 49-60 eggs Larvae and pupae usually found in contain­ers, pieces of bambo containing water. The period of the larvae to adults between 20-25 days. The spread of Ae albopictus mosquitoes from Africa, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Thai­land, Malaysia, Vietnam, Papua New Guinea, northern Australia, and Indonesia. Role in disease transmission is a secondary vector or as the primary vector of dengue hemorrhagic fever. On viral diseases that attack the nerves like encephalistis Japanese, Western or East­ern encephalistis, and Chikuguya has been demonstrated by laboratories, as well as on ani­mal diseases caused by Dirofilaria immitis agent, Plasmodium lophurae, P. gallinaceum, and P. fallax.

  3. Toxicology and the biological role of methanol and ethanol: Current view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    Alcohol variants such as ethanol and methanol are simple organic compounds widely used in foods, pharmaceuticals, chemical synthesis, etc. Both are becoming an emerging health problem; abuse of ethanol containing beverages can lead to disparate health problems and methanol is highly toxic and unfit for consumption. This review summarizes the basic knowledge about ethanol and methanol toxicity, the effect mechanism on the body, the current care of poisoned individuals and the implication of alcohols in the development of diseases. Alcohol related dementia, stroke, metabolic syndrome and hepatitis are discussed as well. Besides ethanol, methanol toxicity and its biodegradation pathways are addressed. The impact of ethanol and methanol on the body is shown as case reports, along with a discussion on the possible implication of alcohol in Alzheimer's disease and antidotal therapy for methanol poisoning. The role of ethanol in cancer and degenerative disorders seems to be underestimated given the current knowledge. Treatment in case of poisoning is another issue that remains unresolved even though effective protocols and drugs exist.

  4. Overview on the Role of Advance Genomics in Conservation Biology of Endangered Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliman Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent era, due to tremendous advancement in industrialization, pollution and other anthropogenic activities have created a serious scenario for biota survival. It has been reported that present biota is entering a “sixth” mass extinction, because of chronic exposure to anthropogenic activities. Various ex situ and in situ measures have been adopted for conservation of threatened and endangered plants and animal species; however, these have been limited due to various discrepancies associated with them. Current advancement in molecular technologies, especially, genomics, is playing a very crucial role in biodiversity conservation. Advance genomics helps in identifying the segments of genome responsible for adaptation. It can also improve our understanding about microevolution through a better understanding of selection, mutation, assertive matting, and recombination. Advance genomics helps in identifying genes that are essential for fitness and ultimately for developing modern and fast monitoring tools for endangered biodiversity. This review article focuses on the applications of advanced genomics mainly demographic, adaptive genetic variations, inbreeding, hybridization and introgression, and disease susceptibilities, in the conservation of threatened biota. In short, it provides the fundamentals for novice readers and advancement in genomics for the experts working for the conservation of endangered plant and animal species.

  5. Macrophage biology plays a central role during ionizing radiation-elicited tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuji Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is one of the major therapeutic modalities for most solid tumors. The anti-tumor effect of radiation therapy consists of the direct tumor cell killing, as well as the modulation of tumor microenvironment and the activation of immune response against tumors. Radiation therapy has been shown to promote immunogenic cells death, activate dendritic cells and enhance tumor antigen presentation and anti-tumor T cell activation. Radiation therapy also programs innate immune cells such as macrophages that leads to either radiosensitization or radioresistance, according to different tumors and different radiation regimen studied. The mechanisms underlying radiation-induced macrophage activation remain largely elusive. Various molecular players such as NF-κB, MAPKs, p53, reactive oxygen species, inflammasomes have been involved in these processes. The skewing to a pro-inflammatory phenotype thus results in the activation of anti-tumor immune response and enhanced radiotherapy effect. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of radiation-induced macrophage activation and its role in tumor response to radiation therapy is crucial for the development of new therapeutic strategies to enhance radiation therapy efficacy.

  6. The role of neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL) as biological constituent linking depression and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouweleeuw, L; Naudé, P J W; Rots, M; DeJongste, M J L; Eisel, U L M; Schoemaker, R G

    2015-05-01

    Depression is more common in patients with cardiovascular disease than in the general population. Conversely, depression is a risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease. Comorbidity of these two pathologies worsens prognosis. Several mechanisms have been indicated in the link between cardiovascular disease and depression, including inflammation. Systemic inflammation can have long-lasting effects on the central nervous system, which could be associated with depression. NGAL is an inflammatory marker and elevated plasma levels are associated with both cardiovascular disease and depression. While patients with depression show elevated NGAL levels, in patients with comorbid heart failure, NGAL levels are significantly higher and associated with depression scores. Systemic inflammation evokes NGAL expression in the brain. This is considered a proinflammatory effect as it is involved in microglia activation and reactive astrocytosis. Animal studies support a direct link between NGAL and depression/anxiety associated behavior. In this review we focus on the role of NGAL in linking depression and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Overview on the Role of Advance Genomics in Conservation Biology of Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Suliman; Nabi, Ghulam; Ullah, Muhammad Wajid; Yousaf, Muhammad; Manan, Sehrish; Siddique, Rabeea; Hou, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    In the recent era, due to tremendous advancement in industrialization, pollution and other anthropogenic activities have created a serious scenario for biota survival. It has been reported that present biota is entering a "sixth" mass extinction, because of chronic exposure to anthropogenic activities. Various ex situ and in situ measures have been adopted for conservation of threatened and endangered plants and animal species; however, these have been limited due to various discrepancies associated with them. Current advancement in molecular technologies, especially, genomics, is playing a very crucial role in biodiversity conservation. Advance genomics helps in identifying the segments of genome responsible for adaptation. It can also improve our understanding about microevolution through a better understanding of selection, mutation, assertive matting, and recombination. Advance genomics helps in identifying genes that are essential for fitness and ultimately for developing modern and fast monitoring tools for endangered biodiversity. This review article focuses on the applications of advanced genomics mainly demographic, adaptive genetic variations, inbreeding, hybridization and introgression, and disease susceptibilities, in the conservation of threatened biota. In short, it provides the fundamentals for novice readers and advancement in genomics for the experts working for the conservation of endangered plant and animal species.

  8. The Signaling Role of CD40 Ligand in Platelet Biology and in Platelet Component Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Pozzetto, Bruno; Richard, Yolande; Cognasse, Fabrice; Laradi, Sandrine; Garraud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a transmembrane molecule of crucial interest in cell signaling in innate and adaptive immunity. It is expressed by a variety of cells, but mainly by activated T-lymphocytes and platelets. CD40L may be cleaved into a soluble form (sCD40L) that has a cytokine-like activity. Both forms bind to several receptors, including CD40. This interaction is necessary for the antigen specific immune response. Furthermore, CD40L and sCD40L are involved in inflammation and a panoply of immune related and vascular pathologies. Soluble CD40L is primarily produced by platelets after activation, degranulation and cleavage, which may present a problem for transfusion. Soluble CD40L is involved in adverse transfusion events including transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Although platelet storage designed for transfusion occurs in sterile conditions, platelets are activated and release sCD40L without known agonists. Recently, proteomic studies identified signaling pathways activated in platelet concentrates. Soluble CD40L is a good candidate for platelet activation in an auto-amplification loop. In this review, we describe the immunomodulatory role of CD40L in physiological and pathological conditions. We will focus on the main signaling pathways activated by CD40L after binding to its different receptors. PMID:25479079

  9. Sphingomyelin in High-Density Lipoproteins: Structural Role and Biological Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Osada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available High-density lipoprotein (HDL levels are an inverse risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and sphingomyelin (SM is the second most abundant phospholipid component and the major sphingolipid in HDL. Considering the marked presence of SM, the present review has focused on the current knowledge about this phospholipid by addressing its variable distribution among HDL lipoparticles, how they acquire this phospholipid, and the important role that SM plays in regulating their fluidity and cholesterol efflux from different cells. In addition, plasma enzymes involved in HDL metabolism such as lecithin–cholesterol acyltransferase or phospholipid transfer protein are inhibited by HDL SM content. Likewise, HDL SM levels are influenced by dietary maneuvers (source of protein or fat, drugs (statins or diuretics and modified in diseases such as diabetes, renal failure or Niemann–Pick disease. Furthermore, increased levels of HDL SM have been shown to be an inverse risk factor for coronary heart disease. The complexity of SM species, described using new lipidomic methodologies, and their distribution in different HDL particles under many experimental conditions are promising avenues for further research in the future.

  10. Protease-activated receptors and their biological role - focused on skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Florian; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-12-01

    For several years, protease-activated receptors (PARs) are targets of science regarding to various diseases and platelet aggregation. In the past, a number of publications related to PARs have been published, which refer to a variety of aspects. An important point of view is the inflammation of the skin, which has not been reported in detail yet. This review will provide an overview of the current knowledge on PARs, and in particular, on